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Sample records for large tourette family

  1. Broad scan linkage analysis in a large Tourette family pedigree

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    Peiffer, A.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wetering, B.J.M. van der [Univ. Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01

    Attempts to find a gene causing Tourette syndrome (TS) using linkage analysis have been unsuccessful even though as much as 65% of the autosomal genetic map has been excluded by the pooled results from several laboratories collaborating worldwide. One reason for this failure may be the misclassification of affection status of marry-in spouses. Specifically, we have found that six unrelated spouses in our Utah TS pedigree suffer from TS, obsessive-compulsive disorder or chronic motor tics. In light of these findings we decided to conduct a complete genomic scan from this Utah kindred with polymorphic markers in three related sibships in which there was no assortative mating. A linkage study assuming autosomal dominant inheritance was done using tetranucleotide repeat markers developed at the University of Utah. We selected markers that were less than 300 bp in size and that gave a heterozygosity of over 70% upon analysis in 4 CEPH families. Results to date with 95 markers run at an interval of 30 cM (covering 61% of the genome) show no evidence of linkage. We intend to extend the coverage to 100% of the genome. Pending completion of this scan, failure to provide evidence of linkage in our TS pedigree might then be attributed to phenotypic misclassification or erroneous assumptions regarding the genetic model of transmission.

  2. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  3. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  4. The Genetic Etiology of Tourette Syndrome: Large-Scale Collaborative Efforts on the Precipice of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Mathews, Carol A.; State, Matthew; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Paschou, Peristera

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. It has a complex etiology with multiple genes likely interacting with environmental factors to lead to the onset of symptoms. The genetic basis of the disorder remains elusive. However, multiple resources and large-scale projects are coming together, launching a new era in the field and bringing us on the verge of discovery. The large-scale efforts outlined in this report are complementary and represent a range of different approaches to the study of disorders with complex inheritance. The Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics (TSAICG) has focused on large families, parent-proband trios and cases for large case-control designs such as genomewide association studies (GWAS), copy number variation (CNV) scans, and exome/genome sequencing. TIC Genetics targets rare, large effect size mutations in simplex trios, and multigenerational families. The European Multicentre Tics in Children Study (EMTICS) seeks to elucidate gene-environment interactions including the involvement of infection and immune mechanisms in TS etiology. Finally, TS-EUROTRAIN, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network, aims to act as a platform to unify large-scale projects in the field and to educate the next generation of experts. Importantly, these complementary large-scale efforts are joining forces to uncover the full range of genetic variation and environmental risk factors for TS, holding great promise for identifying definitive TS susceptibility genes and shedding light into the complex pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:27536211

  5. The genetic etiology of Tourette Syndrome: Large-scale collaborative efforts on the precipice of discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianthi Georgitsi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. It has a complex etiology with multiple genes likely interacting with environmental factors to lead to the onset of symptoms. The genetic basis of the disorder remains elusive;however, multiple resources and large-scale projects are coming together, launching a new era in the field and bringing us on the verge of discovery. The large-scale efforts outlined in this report, are complementary and represent a range of different approaches to the study of disorders with complex inheritance. The Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics (TSAICG has focused on large families, parent-proband trios and cases for large case-control designs such as genomewide association studies (GWAS, copy number variation (CNV scans and exome/genome sequencing. TIC Genetics targets rare, large effect size mutations in simplex trios and multigenerational families. The European Multicentre Tics in Children Study (EMTICS seeks to elucidate gene-environment interactions including the involvement of infection and immune mechanisms in TS etiology. Finally, TS-EUROTRAIN, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network, aims to act as a platform to unify large-scale projects in the field and to educate the next generation of experts. Importantly, these complementary large-scale efforts are joining forces to uncover the full range of genetic variation and environmental risk factors for TS, holding great promise for indentifying definitive TS susceptibility genes and shedding light into the complex pathophysiology of this disorder.

  6. The Impact of Tourette's Syndrome in the School and the Family: Perspectives from Three Stakeholder Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Navarro, Jesús; Cubo, Esther; Almazán, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the perceptions of Spanish health professionals, children with Tourette's Syndrome (TS) and their parents about social, school and family problems related to the disorder. A qualitative research methodology was used involving Focus Groups (FGs) made up of children with TS (× 2 FGs), parents/caregivers of persons with TS (× 2…

  7. GDNF gene is associated with tourette syndrome in a family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Heiman, Gary A; Mir, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10(-4) ). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. GDNF Gene Is Associated With Tourette Syndrome in a Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. Methods We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). Results The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10−4). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. Conclusions As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. PMID:26096985

  9. Course of Tourette Syndrome and Comorbidities in a Large Prospective Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Camilla; Mol Debes, Nanette; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics and frequent comorbidities. Although tics often improve during adolescence, recent studies suggest that comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder...... (ADHD) tend to persist. This large prospective follow-up study describes the clinical course of tics and comorbidities during adolescence and the prevalence of coexisting psychopathologies. Method: The clinical cohort was recruited at the Danish National Tourette Clinic, and data were collected...... at baseline (n = 314, age range 5–19 years) and at follow-up 6 years later (n = 227) to establish the persistence and severity of tics and comorbidities. During follow-up, the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) was used to diagnose coexisting psychopathologies. Repeated measures of severity scores...

  10. Support of positive association in family-based genetic analysis between COL27A1 and Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiguo; Yu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Quanchen; Cui, Jiajia; Yi, Mingji; Zhang, Xinhua; Ge, Yinlin; Ma, Xu

    2015-08-03

    Recently, a genome-wide association study has indicated associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Collagen Type XXVII Alpha 1 gene (COL27A1) and Tourette syndrome in several ethnic populations. To clarify the global relevance of the previously identified SNPs in the development of Tourette syndrome, the associations between polymorphisms in COL27A1 and Tourette syndrome were assessed in Chinese trios. PCR-directed sequencing was used to evaluate the genetic contributions of three SNPs in COL27A1(rs4979356, rs4979357 and rs7868992) using haplotype relative risk (HRR) and transmission disequilibrium tests (TDT) with a total of 260 Tourette syndrome trios. The family-based association was significant between Tourette syndrome and rs4979356 (TDT: χ2 = 4.804, P = 0.033; HRR = 1.75, P = 0.002; HHRR = 1.32, P = 0.027), and transmission disequilibrium was suspected for rs4979357 (TDT: χ2 = 3.969, P = 0.053; HRR = 1.84, P = 0.001; HHRR = 1.29, P = 0.044). No statistically significant allele transfer was found for rs7868992 (TDT: χ2 = 2.177, P = 0.158). Although the TDT results did not remain significant after applying the conservative Bonferroni correction (p = 0.005), the significant positive HRR analysis confirmed the possibility of showing transmission disequilibrium, which provides evidence for an involvement of COL27A1in the development of TS. However, these results need to be verified with larger datasets from different populations.

  11. Course of Tourette Syndrome and Comorbidities in a Large Prospective Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Camilla; Mol Debes, Nanette; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Lange, Theis; Skov, Liselotte

    2017-04-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics and frequent comorbidities. Although tics often improve during adolescence, recent studies suggest that comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to persist. This large prospective follow-up study describes the clinical course of tics and comorbidities during adolescence and the prevalence of coexisting psychopathologies. The clinical cohort was recruited at the Danish National Tourette Clinic, and data were collected at baseline (n = 314, age range 5-19 years) and at follow-up 6 years later (n = 227) to establish the persistence and severity of tics and comorbidities. During follow-up, the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) was used to diagnose coexisting psychopathologies. Repeated measures of severity scores were modeled using mixed effects models. Tic severity declined yearly (0.8 points, CI: 0.58-1.01, on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale [YGTSS]) during adolescence; 17.7% of participants above age 16 years had no tics, whereas 59.5% had minimal or mild tics, and 22.8% had moderate or severe tics. Similarly, significant yearly declines in severity of both OCD (0.24, CI: 0.09-0.39, on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Adults [Y-BOCS] and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Children [CY-BOCS]) and ADHD (0.42, CI: 0.32-0.52, DSM-IV) were recorded. At follow-up, 63.0% of participants had comorbidities or coexistent psychopathologies, whereas 37.0% had pure TS. Severity of tics, OCD, and ADHD were significantly associated with age and declined during adolescence. However, considerable comorbidities and coexisting psychopathologies persist throughout adolescence and require monitoring by clinicians. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Familial Risks of Tourette Syndrome and Chronic Tic Disorders. A Population-Based Cohort Study.

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    Mataix-Cols, David; Isomura, Kayoko; Pérez-Vigil, Ana; Chang, Zheng; Rück, Christian; Larsson, K Johan; Leckman, James F; Serlachius, Eva; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Tic disorders, including Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic tic disorders (CTDs), are assumed to be strongly familial and heritable. Although gene-searching efforts are well under way, precise estimates of familial risk and heritability are lacking. Previous controlled family studies were small and typically conducted within specialist clinics, resulting in potential ascertainment biases. They were also underpowered to disentangle genetic from environmental factors that contribute to the observed familiality. Twin studies have been either very small or based on parent-reported tics in population-based (nonclinical) twin samples. To provide unbiased estimates of familial risk and heritability of tic disorders at the population level. In this population cohort, multigenerational family study, we used a validated algorithm to identify 4826 individuals diagnosed as having TS or CTDs (76.2% male) in the Swedish National Patient Register from January 1, 1969, through December 31, 2009. We studied risks for TS or CTDs in all biological relatives of probands compared with relatives of unaffected individuals (matched on a 1:10 ratio) from the general population. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the heritability of tic disorders. The risk for tic disorders among relatives of probands with tic disorders increased proportionally to the degree of genetic relatedness. The risks for first-degree relatives (odds ratio [OR], 18.69; 95% CI, 14.53-24.05) were significantly higher than for second-degree relatives (OR, 4.58; 95% CI, 3.22-6.52) and third-degree relatives (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 2.08-4.51). First-degree relatives at similar genetic distances (eg, parents, siblings, and offspring) had similar risks for tic disorders despite different degrees of shared environment. The risks for full siblings (50% genetic similarity; OR, 17.68; 95% CI, 12.90-24.23) were significantly higher than those for maternal half siblings (25% genetic similarity; OR, 4.41; 95

  13. Tardive or Atypical Tourette's Disorder in a Population with Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Beverly; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1995-01-01

    In a population of 425 individuals with Down's syndrome, 5 persons (1.2%) were identified as having Tourette's disorder. The lack of interrelationship between Down's syndrome and Tourette's disorder argues against an atypical Tourette's disorder. Diagnoses of tardive Tourette's disorder were based on absence of family history of Tourette's, late…

  14. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of a large clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hansen, Adam; Skov, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    in activation in brain regions between the children with Tourette syndrome (divided according to the presence of comorbidity) and healthy controls after correction for the confounders age, sex, and intelligence. Activation in the cingulated gyrus, temporal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus was correlated...... significantly with obsessive-compulsive disorder score. The authors did not find significant correlations between activation patterns and age, sex, duration of disease, intelligence, severity of tics, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) score.......There is evidence that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical pathways are involved in the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome. During the performance of neuropsychological tests in subjects with Tourette syndrome there are suggestions for increased activity in the sensimotor cortex, supplementary motor...

  15. Association of AADAC Deletion and Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome in a Large European Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Riff Jensen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic influence where copy number variations are suggested to play a role in disease pathogenesis. In a previous small-scale copy number variation study of a GTS cohort (n = 111), recurrent exon...

  16. Microduplication of 15q13.3 and Xq21.31 in a family with tourette syndrome and comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Linea; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder. Although it is widely accepted that genetic factors play a significant role in TS pathogenesis the etiology of this disorder is largely unknown. Identification of rare copy number variations (CNVs) as susceptibility factors...... in several neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism and schizophrenia, suggests involvement of these rare structural changes also in TS etiology. In a male patient with TS, ADHD, and OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) we identified two microduplications (at...

  17. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  18. Predictive factors for familiality in a Danish clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    have examined a large Danish clinical cohort of children with TS (N=307). Validated diagnostic instruments were used to assess the presence of co-morbidities in the children with TS. A three-generation pedigree was drawn for all the probands and through reports from the family, a family history...

  19. Predictive factors for familiality in a Danish clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic, neurobiological disease, characterized by the presence of motor and vocal tics and it is often accompanied by associated symptoms. The two best-known co-morbidities are Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD...... and the frequency of affected relatives was noted. The rates of tics, symptoms of OCD, and ADHD among relatives are similar to the rates found in other countries and are higher than in the general population. Although the role of sex in determining the phenotype has to be examined more thoroughly, we found...... that male relatives were more likely to have tics and female relatives were more likely to have symptoms of OCD. When comparing the relatives to male patients with relatives to female patients, there were no differences in the rates of symptoms, apart from symptoms of ADHD that were more frequent in second...

  20. Tourette Association of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... outcomes Find a Doctor Find information for Select Audience Parents Adults with Tourette Kids Teens Educators Professionals ... About Tourette Tourette Association of America Welcomes NFL Marketing Executive Julie Haddon to Its Board of Directors ...

  1. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarif......Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet......, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene...... discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA...

  2. CNV analysis in Tourette syndrome implicates large genomic rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Nag

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic component. However, the genetic architecture of TS remains uncertain. Copy number variation (CNV has been shown to contribute to the genetic make-up of several neurodevelopmental conditions, including schizophrenia and autism. Here we describe CNV calls using SNP chip genotype data from an initial sample of 210 TS cases and 285 controls ascertained in two Latin American populations. After extensive quality control, we found that cases (N = 179 have a significant excess (P = 0.006 of large CNV (>500 kb calls compared to controls (N = 234. Amongst 24 large CNVs seen only in the cases, we observed four duplications of the COL8A1 gene region. We also found two cases with ∼400 kb deletions involving NRXN1, a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including TS. Follow-up using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (and including 53 more TS cases validated the CNV calls and identified additional patients with rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1, but none in controls. Examination of available parents indicates that two out of three NRXN1 deletions detected in the TS cases are de-novo mutations. Our results are consistent with the proposal that rare CNVs play a role in TS aetiology and suggest a possible role for rearrangements in the COL8A1 and NRXN1 gene regions.

  3. CNV analysis in Tourette syndrome implicates large genomic rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Abhishek; Bochukova, Elena G; Kremeyer, Barbara; Campbell, Desmond D; Muller, Heike; Valencia-Duarte, Ana V; Cardona, Julio; Rivas, Isabel C; Mesa, Sandra C; Cuartas, Mauricio; Garcia, Jharley; Bedoya, Gabriel; Cornejo, William; Herrera, Luis D; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Reus, Victor I; Lowe, Thomas L; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Mathews, Carol A; McGrath, Lauren M; Yu, Dongmei; Cook, Ed; Wang, Kai; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Pauls, David L; Freimer, Nelson B; Plagnol, Vincent; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic component. However, the genetic architecture of TS remains uncertain. Copy number variation (CNV) has been shown to contribute to the genetic make-up of several neurodevelopmental conditions, including schizophrenia and autism. Here we describe CNV calls using SNP chip genotype data from an initial sample of 210 TS cases and 285 controls ascertained in two Latin American populations. After extensive quality control, we found that cases (N = 179) have a significant excess (P = 0.006) of large CNV (>500 kb) calls compared to controls (N = 234). Amongst 24 large CNVs seen only in the cases, we observed four duplications of the COL8A1 gene region. We also found two cases with ∼400 kb deletions involving NRXN1, a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including TS. Follow-up using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (and including 53 more TS cases) validated the CNV calls and identified additional patients with rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1, but none in controls. Examination of available parents indicates that two out of three NRXN1 deletions detected in the TS cases are de-novo mutations. Our results are consistent with the proposal that rare CNVs play a role in TS aetiology and suggest a possible role for rearrangements in the COL8A1 and NRXN1 gene regions.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Vocal Tic Disorder Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome GTS TD Tourette Disorder Tourette's Disease TS Related ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome Health Topic: Tourette Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  5. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Nausea and Vomiting Home Diseases and Conditions Tics and Tourette Syndrome Condition Tics and Tourette Syndrome Share Print Table of Contents1. ... little or no control over. These are called tics. Several different tics can happen at the same ...

  6. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and disruptive behavior disorders: prevalence, associations, and explanation of the relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary M; Cavanna, Andrea E; Eapen, Valsamma

    2015-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and conduct disorder (CD) are both heterogeneous childhood onset conditions, and although patients with CD have been described in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome cohorts, little is known about the etiology of CD in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome or of the interrelationships. A cohort of 578 consecutive patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome was assessed using standard assessment protocols. A total of 13.5% of participants had only Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, whereas the rest had associated comorbidities and psychopathology. CD occurred in 14.5% of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome probands. These findings suggest that CD is not an integral part of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome but rather that CD in the context of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is related to the presence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as, and importantly, a family history of aggressive and violent behavior and forensic encounters.

  7. Genetic Susceptibility and Neurotransmitters in Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Martino, D; Cavanna, AE

    2013-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to

  8. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  9. Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work on Tourette Syndrome Tourette Association information on bullying What it’s like to have Tourette – Mary tells her story What children wish people knew about Tourette Syndrome CDC Children’s Mental Health StopBullying.gov Features Media Sign up for Features ...

  10. Tourette Syndrome and the School Nurse. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ort, Sharon I.; And Others

    Information on Tourette Syndrome (TS), as well as transient and chronic tic disorders, is provided in this pamphlet for the school nurse, who can support and educate the child, family, and other school personnel. Information is included on genetic factors and behaviors that may be connected to TS: obsessive-compulsive symptoms, hyperactivity,…

  11. The relationship between tics, OC, ADHD and autism symptoms: A cross- disorder symptom analysis in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome patients and family-members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-van Dijk, Hilde M; Schoot, Rens van de; Rijkeboer, Marleen M; Mathews, Carol A; Cath, Daniëlle C

    2016-03-30

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS) is a disorder in which obsessive-compulsive (OC), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and autism symptoms occur in up to 60% of patients, suggesting shared etiology. We explored the phenotypic structure of tic, OC, ADHD, and autism symptoms as measured by the YGTSS,Y-BOCS,CAARS and AQ, in 225 GTS patients and 371 family members. First, Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA) were performed on the symptom structure of each separate symptom scale. Second, the symptom dimensions derived from each scale were combined in one model, and correlations between them were calculated. Using the correlation matrix, Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) were performed on the symptom dimensions across the scales. EFA revealed a five factor structure: tic/aggression/symmetry; OC symptoms/compulsive tics/ numbers and patterns; ADHD symptoms; autism symptoms; and hoarding/inattention symptoms. The results are partly in line with the traditional categorical boundaries of the symptom scales used, and partly reveal a symptom structure that cuts through the diagnostic categories. This phenotypic structure might more closely reflect underlying etiologies than a structure that classically describes GTS patients according to absence or presence of comorbid OCD, ADHD and autism, and might inform both future genetic and treatment studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults Teachers Speech-Language Pathologists Physicians Employers Tweet Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome Parents of Preschoolers Parents of ... to 3 people in 1000. Just as in stuttering, TS is more common in males than females ( ...

  13. Tourette syndrome and learning disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klug Marilyn G

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tourette Syndrome (TS is a neurodevelopmental disorder of childhood. Learning disabilities are frequently comorbid with TS. Using the largest sample of TS patients ever reported, we sought to identify differences between subjects with TS only and subjects with TS and a comorbid learning disability. Methods We used the Tourette Syndrome International Consortium database (TIC to compare subjects with comorbid Tourette Syndrome and learning disabilities (TS + LD to subjects who did not have a comorbid learning disability (TS - LD. The TIC database contained 5,500 subjects. We had usable data on 5,450 subjects. Results We found 1,235 subjects with TS + LD. Significant differences between the TS + LD group and the TS - LD group were found for gender (.001, age onset (.030, age first seen (.001, age at diagnosis (.001, prenatal problems (.001, sibling or other family member with tics (.024, two or more affected family members (.009, and severe tics (.046. We used logistic modeling to identify the optimal prediction model of group membership. This resulted in a five variable model with the epidemiologic performance characteristics of accuracy 65.2% (model correctly classified 4,406 of 5,450 subjects, sensitivity 66.1%, and specificity 62.2%. Conclusion Subjects with TS have high prevalence rates of comorbid learning disabilities. We identified phenotype differences between the TS - LD group compared to TS + LD group. In the evaluation of subjects with TS, the presence of a learning disability should always be a consideration. ADHD may be an important comorbid condition in the diagnosis of LD or may also be a potential confounder. Further research on etiology, course and response to intervention for subjects with TS only and TS with learning disabilities is needed.

  14. A national profile of Tourette syndrome, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsko, Rebecca H; Holbrook, Joseph R; Visser, Susanna N; Mink, Jonathan W; Zinner, Samuel H; Ghandour, Reem M; Blumberg, Stephen J

    2014-06-01

    To provide recent estimates of the prevalence of Tourette syndrome among a nationally representative sample of US children and to describe the association of Tourette syndrome with indicators of health and functioning. Data on 65,540 US children aged 6 to 17 years from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health were analyzed. Parents reported whether a health care provider had ever told them their child had Tourette syndrome or other neurobehavioral or chronic health conditions and whether their child had current Tourette syndrome. Based on parents' report, 0.19% of US children had Tourette syndrome; the average age of diagnosis was 8.1 years. Children with Tourette syndrome, compared with those without, were more likely to have co-occurring neurobehavioral and other health conditions, meet criteria for designation as having a special health care need, receive mental health treatment, have unmet mental health care needs, and have parents with high parenting aggravation and parents who were contacted about school problems; they were less likely to receive effective care coordination or have a medical home. After controlling for co-occurring neurobehavioral conditions, the findings on parents being contacted about school problems and children having unmet mental health care needs were no longer significant. Tourette syndrome is characterized by co-occurring neurobehavioral and other health conditions, and poorer health, education, and family relationships. The findings support previous recommendations to consider co-occurring conditions in the diagnosis and treatment of Tourette syndrome. Future research may explore whether having a medical home improves outcomes among children with Tourette syndrome.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide aggravated DOI-induced Tourette syndrome: elaboration for recurrence of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongyan, Long; Zhenyang, Si; Chunyan, Wang; Qingqing, Pan

    2017-12-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by highest familial recurrence rate among neuropsychiatric diseases with complicated inheritance. Recurrence of Tourette syndrome was frequently observed in clinical. Unexpectedly, the mechanism of recurrence of Tourette syndrome was failure to elucidate. Here, we first shown that lipopolysaccharide(LPS) may played an important role in the recurrence of Tourette syndrome. The TS model in rats was induced by DOI (the selective 5-HT2A/2C agonist 1-(2, 5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl) -2- aminopropane). The rats were randomly divided into 4 groups:(1)Control;(2) Control + LPS; (2)TS; (3)TS + LPS. The results demonstrated that the LPS treatment significantly increased stereotypic score and autonomic activity. LPS treatment also significantly increased inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum and striatum. Also, highly expressed TLR4, MyD88, P-NF-κBp65, P-IκBα in TS rats were increased respectively by LPS treatment as indicted in western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry analysis. Thus, it was supposed that lipopolysaccharide(LPS) may played an important role in the recurrence of Tourette syndrome and its mechanism was related to TLR/NF-κB pathway.

  16. The relationship between tics, OC, ADHD and autism symptoms : A cross-disorder symptom analysis in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome patients and family-members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, H.M.; van de Schoot, A.G.J.; Rijkeboer, M.M.; Mathews, C.A.; Cath, D.C.

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS) is a disorder in which obsessive-compulsive (OC), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and autism symptoms occur in up to 60% of patients, suggesting shared etiology. We explored the phenotypic structure of tic, OC, ADHD, and autism symptoms as

  17. rs2043211 polymorphism in CARD8 is not associated with Tourette syndrome in a family-based association study in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Mingji; Shao, Xiaohui; Ma, Jianhua; Tian, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Shiguo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that postinfectious autoimmunity and immune deficiency played an important role in the pathogenesis of Tourette syndrome. CARD8 can suppress activity of NF-ΚB activated by inflammatory mediators. To study the association between the rs2043211 polymorphism in CARD8 and susceptibility to Tourette syndrome in Chinese Han population. We recruited 279 patients diagnosed with Tourette syndrome and their parents for the study. Genotyping for CARD8 rs2043211 single-nucleotide polymorphism was performed using predesigned TaqMan single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assay. The genetic contribution of this single-nucleotide polymorphism was evaluated using transmission disequilibrium test and haplotype relative risk and the haplotype-based haplotype relative risk. The results of the allelic and genotypic distribution of rs2043211 polymorphism in CARD8 showed that both the Tourette syndrome patients group and the parents group are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. No significant differences were observed in the mutant allele transmission (transmission disequilibrium test = 1.107, df = 1, p = 0.322). Results of haplotype relative risk analysis showed that no statistical significant difference was found in the genotypic frequency (AA/AT/TT) of Tourette syndrome patients passed from parents (haplotype relative risk = 1.152, χ(2 )= 0.494, p = 0.482, 95% CI = 0.777-1.708). Similarly, the analysis of haplotype-based haplotype relative risk was also not to support a statistically significant association in allelic frequency (A/T) of Tourette syndrome patients passed from parents (haplotype-based haplotype relative risk = 1.130, χ(2 )= 1.037, p = 0.308, 95% CI = 0.893-1.429). Our results suggest CARD8 might not play a role in the pathogenesis of Tourette syndrome in Chinese Han population. However, the results still need to be tested in a larger sample and different populations. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and

  18. Recognition and management of Tourette's syndrome and tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, M M; Kerbeshian, J; Burd, L

    1999-04-15

    Tic disorders and Tourette's syndrome are conditions that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Up to 20 percent of children have at least a transient tic disorder at some point. Once believed to be rare, Tourette's syndrome is now known to be a more common disorder that represents the most complex and severe manifestation of the spectrum of tic disorders. Tourette's syndrome is a chronic familial disorder with a fluctuating course; the long-term outcome is generally favorable. Although the exact underlying pathology has yet to be determined, evidence indicates a disorder localized to the frontal-subcortical neural pathways. Tourette's syndrome is commonly associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, behavior problems and learning disabilities. These comorbid conditions make the management of Tourette's syndrome more challenging. Management of Tourette's syndrome should include timely and accurate diagnosis, education, and behavior or pharmacologic interventions. Use of neuroleptic medications and dopamine D2 antagonist drugs can be effective but may be associated with significant side effects.

  19. ADHD & Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of methylphenidate (MPH and clonidine (CLON, alone and in combination, in 136 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and chronic tic disorder, was evaluated in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, and reported by the Tourette Syndrome Study Group from the University of Rochester, NY.

  20. Tourette--and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, Blanche R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome, a little-known disorder of the central nervous system whose symptoms include involuntary movements, such as facial tics, and the production of involuntary sounds, such as grunts and obscenities. Suggests ways teachers can help a child afflicted with this disorder. (SJL)

  1. Tourette Syndrome: Classroom Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Amrita; Gartin, Barbara C.; Murdick, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurobiological disorder characterized by various involuntary motor movements and vocal tics. Symptoms of TS emerge between the ages of 3 to 8 years old, are most severe when an individual reaches puberty, and decrease by the time a person is 20 years old. Additionally, persons with TS may have secondary disabilities of…

  2. Kids' Quest: Tourette

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about to help with your Quest. Step 6: Learn about movies and books that can give you information. Step ... to Steps Movies and Books Here are some movies and books about kids with Tourette syndrome. Children’s Mental Health Disorders – A Journey for Parents and ...

  3. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome: objectives and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A; State, Matthew W; Tischfield, Jay A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Heiman, Gary A

    2015-02-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarified fully. There is now mounting evidence that the genetic risks for TS include both common and rare variants and may involve complex multigenic inheritance or, in rare cases, a single major gene. Based on recent progress in many other common disorders with apparently similar genetic architectures, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA) are part of a sharing repository located within the National Institute for Mental Health Center for Collaborative Genomics Research on Mental Disorders, USA, and will be made available to the broad scientific community. This resource will ultimately facilitate better understanding of the pathophysiology of TS and related disorders and the development of novel therapies. Here, we describe the objectives and methods of the TIC Genetics study as a reference for future studies from our group and to facilitate collaboration between genetics consortia in the field of TS.

  4. Tourette Syndrome: Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Tourette Syndrome is a disorder characterized by tics. It typically begins in childhood and often improves in adult life. Tics are best described as voluntary movements made automatically so that volition is not ordinarily appreciated. There is frequently an urge, sometimes in the form of a specific sensory feeling (sensory tic), that precedes the tic. Patients say that they make the tic in order to reduce the urge, although shortly after the tic, the urge recurs. The sensory feeling may arise due to defective sensory habituation. Since tics relieve the urge, this can be considered rewarding, and repetition of this behavior may perpetuate the tic as a habit. Tourette Syndrome affects boys more than girls and is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Although Tourette Syndrome often appears to be autosomal recessive in inheritance, it has been difficult to find any abnormal genes. There is a loss of inhibition in these patients and recent studies show abnormalities in brain GABA. Certainly there is also an abnormality in dopamine function and dopamine blocking agents are effective therapy. In severe drug-refractory patients, deep brain stimulation can be effective. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Life events and Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Tamar; Shmuel-Baruch, Sharona; Horesh, Netta; Apter, Alan

    2013-07-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric developmental disorder characterized by the presence of multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics. Although TS is primarily biological in origin, stress-diatheses interactions most probably play a role in the course of the illness. The precise influence of the environment on this basically biological disorder is difficult to ascertain, particularly when TS is complicated by comorbidities. Among the many questions that remain unresolved are the differential impact of positive and negative events and specific subtypes of events, and the importance of major crucial events relative to minor daily ones to tic severity. To examine the relationships between life events, tic severity and comorbid disorders in Tourette Syndrome (TS), including OCD, ADHD, anxiety, depression and rage attacks. Life events were classified by quantity, quality (positive or negative) and classification types of events (family, friends etc.). Sixty patients aged 7-17 years with Tourette syndrome or a chronic tic disorder were recruited from Psychological Medicine Clinic in Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel. Yale Global Tic Severity Scale; Children's Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale; Life Experiences Survey; Brief Adolescent Life Events Scale; Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders; Child Depression Inventory/Beck Depression Inventory; ADHD Rating Scale IV; Overt Aggression Scale. Regarding tics and minor life events, there was a weak but significant correlation between severity of motor tics and the quantity of negative events. No significant correlation was found between tic severity and quantity of positive events. Analysis of the BALES categories yielded a significant direct correlation between severity of vocal tics and quantity of negative events involving friends. Regarding comorbidities and minor life events, highly significant correlations were found with depression and anxiety. Regarding tics and major life

  6. Genome-wide association study of Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharf, J. M.; Yu, D.; Mathews, C. A.; Neale, B. M.; Stewart, S. E.; Fagerness, J. A.; Evans, P.; Gamazon, E.; Edlund, C. K.; Service, S. K.; Tikhomirov, A.; Osiecki, L.; Illmann, C.; Pluzhnikov, A.; Konkashbaev, A.; Davis, L. K.; Han, B.; Crane, J.; Moorjani, P.; Crenshaw, A. T.; Parkin, M. A.; Reus, V. I.; Lowe, T. L.; Rangel-Lugo, M.; Chouinard, S.; Dion, Y.; Girard, S.; Cath, D. C.; Smit, J. H.; King, R. A.; Fernandez, T. V.; Leckman, J. F.; Kidd, K. K.; Kidd, J. R.; Pakstis, A. J.; State, M. W.; Herrera, L. D.; Romero, R.; Fournier, E.; Sandor, P.; Barr, C. L.; Phan, N.; Gross-Tsur, V.; Benarroch, F.; Pollak, Y.; Budman, C. L.; Bruun, R. D.; Erenberg, G.; Naarden, A. L.; Hoekstra, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association

  7. La Tourette's Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fernando Oviedo Lugo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder in which tic symptoms emerge prior to age of 18 and have, at least, a minimum duration of 12 months. This disorder produces distress and impairs normal functioning; it has a well-known chronic-waxing and waning course. TS has several comorbid conditions like obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, and learning disorders, among others. This article will review the epidemiologic, etiologic and phenomenological concepts of the disease and its therapeutic perspectives.

  8. Tics and Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Zoey A; Coffey, Barbara J

    2014-09-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Although many youth experience attenuation or even remission of tics in adolescence and young adulthood, some individuals experience persistent tics, which can be debilitating or disabling. Most patients also have 1 or more psychiatric comorbid disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment is multimodal, including both pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral treatment, and requires disentanglement of tics and the comorbid symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aripiprazole for the Treatment of Tourette's Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Padala, Prasad R.; Qadri, S. Faiz; Madaan, Vishal

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Tourette's disorder is a neuropsychiatric syndrome that manifests with motor and vocal tics, including coprolalia. This article presents a report of successful treatment of these tics with aripiprazole in 2 consecutive patients with Tourette's disorder.

  10. Gesinsterapie en die opvoedkundig-sielkundige hulpverlening aan kinders met Tourette-sindroom

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Ed. (Educational Psychology) The purpose of this study was to determine if family therapy has potential in handling the behaviour problems of children with Tourette syndrome. This study was approached within a system theoretical framework and from an educational psychological perspective. The study was presented as follows: Chapter 1: Conceptualization, formulation of the problem and objectives. Chapter 2: A literature study regarding the spectrum of Tourette syndrome. Chapter 3: A liter...

  11. Tourette: por dentro da síndrome Tourette: within the syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Isabel V. Loureiro

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Tourette (ST é uma patologia de comprometimento psicossocial que acarreta alterações significativas na vida dos seus portadores e respectivos familiares. Este artigo aborda diversos aspectos relacionados a esta doença, incluindo etiologia, epidemiologia, aspectos neurobiológicos, quadro clínico, diagnóstico, patologias associadas e tratamento (clássico e alternativo. Neste trabalho, ainda comparamos a ST com outras doenças, envolvendo tiques e mencionamos as associações de apoio aos pacientes portadores de ST, que auxiliam no tratamento e na socialização do paciente afetado.Tourette syndrome is a disorder associated with a variety of psycho- and social problems, which affects not only the patients but also their family life. The aim of this work is to review aspects involving etiology, epidemiology, neurobiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, and treatment (classic and alternative. We also compare the Tourette syndrome with others diseases involving tics and cite the organizations that help the patients and contribute to their treatment and socialization.

  12. No evidence for a major gene effect of the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor gene in the susceptibility to Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome in five Canadian families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, C.L.; Wigg, K.G.; Tsui, Lap-Chee [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-05-31

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by both motor and vocal tics affecting approximately 1/10,000 females and 1/2000 males. Because of the success of neuroleptics and other agents interacting with the dopaminergic system in the suppression of tics, a defect in the dopamine system has been hypothesized in the etiology of TS. In this paper we test the hypothesis that the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor (DRD44) is linked to the genetic susceptibility to TS in five families. We tested three polymorphisms in the DRD4 gene and a polymorphism in the closely linked locus, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). We found no evidence for linkage of DRD4 or TH to TS using an autosomal dominant model with reduced penetrance or using non-parametric methods. The presence of a mutation that results in a truncated non-functional D{sub 4} receptor protein was also tested for, but was not observed in these families. 36 refs., 1 tab.

  13. 'Living with tics': self-experience of adolescents with Tourette syndrome during peer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Yin; Mu, Pei-Fan; Wang, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Huei-Shyong

    2016-02-01

    To describe the essence of the self-experience of adolescents with Tourette syndrome in the context of peer interaction. Tourette syndrome has an adverse impact on adolescents' physical, psychological and interpersonal interactions. Peers provide adolescents with social interactions that are crucial to the formation of self-identity. Studies exploring the self-experience of adolescents with Tourette syndrome in the context of peer relationships are lacking. A qualitative, phenomenological research design was used. A total of 12 adolescents with Tourette syndrome from the Taiwan Tourette Family Association were selected by purposive sampling. Data were collected using open-ended questions in one-on-one in-depth interviews that lasted 60-90 minutes. Giorgi's phenomenological methods were applied to analyse the data obtained. Four criteria were employed to evaluate methodological rigour. The findings showed that the self-experience of adolescents with Tourette syndrome during peer interaction reflected their lived experiences of peer identity, social identity and self-identity. Themes included: (1) the inexplicable onset of tics during encounters with other people, (2) sources inspiring the courage for self-acceptance and (3) strategies of self-protection in response to changes in situation. The self-experience of peer interaction among adolescents with Tourette syndrome is a dynamic and interactive process characterised by the symbolic meanings conferred on the tics by the interacting adolescents. The adolescents with Tourette syndrome obtain self-identity through peer responses and recognition, while the tolerance, respect and support of parents and teachers spark the adolescents' courage for self-acceptance. Healthcare providers who assist adolescents with Tourette syndrome must understand that tics occur in the context of peer interaction and how this affects the adolescents' relationships with their peers in various life situations. Furthermore, healthcare

  14. Neutrino bi-large mixings and family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Masako; Obara, Midori

    2004-01-01

    After a brief review of quark-lepton relations in grand unified theories (GUT), we show that the Pati-Salam relation with only one type of Higgs field configuration with ''four zero symmetric texture'' can reproduce two large neutrino mixings as well as observed mass differences. This is quite in contrast to the case of SU(5) where bi-large mixings essentially come from the charged lepton sector with non-symmetric charged lepton mass matrix. (author)

  15. The portrayal of Tourette Syndrome in film and television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder-Sprackman, Samantha; Sutherland, Stephanie; Doja, Asif

    2014-03-01

    To determine the representation of Tourette Syndrome (TS) in fictional movies and television programs by investigating recurrent themes and depictions. Television and film can be a source of information and misinformation about medical disorders. Tourette Syndrome has received attention in the popular media, but no studies have been done on the accuracy of the depiction of the disorder. International internet movie databases were searched using the terms "Tourette's", "Tourette's Syndrome", and "tics" to generate all movies, shorts, and television programs featuring a character or scene with TS or a person imitating TS. Using a grounded theory approach, we identified the types of characters, tics, and co-morbidities depicted as well as the overall representation of TS. Thirty-seven television programs and films were reviewed dating from 1976 to 2010. Fictional movies and television shows gave overall misrepresentations of TS. Coprolalia was overrepresented as a tic manifestation, characters were depicted having autism spectrum disorder symptoms rather than TS, and physicians were portrayed as unsympathetic and only focusing on medical therapies. School and family relationships were frequently depicted as being negatively impacted by TS, leading to poor quality of life. Film and television are easily accessible resources for patients and the public that may influence their beliefs about TS. Physicians should be aware that TS is often inaccurately represented in television programs and film and acknowledge misrepresentations in order to counsel patients accordingly.

  16. Action inhibition in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos; Kühn, Simone; Kahl, Ursula; Schunke, Odette; Feldheim, Jan; Gerloff, Christian; Roessner, Veit; Bäumer, Tobias; Thomalla, Götz; Haggard, Patrick; Münchau, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics. Tic generation is often linked to dysfunction of inhibitory brain networks. Some previous behavioral studies found deficiencies in inhibitory motor control in Tourette syndrome, but others suggested normal or even better-than-normal performance. Furthermore, neural correlates of action inhibition in these patients are poorly understood. We performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging during a stop-signal reaction-time task in 14 uncomplicated adult Tourette patients and 15 healthy controls. In patients, we correlated activations in stop-signal reaction-time task with their individual motor tic frequency. Task performance was similar in both groups. Activation of dorsal premotor cortex was stronger in the StopSuccess than in the Go condition in healthy controls. This pattern was reversed in Tourette patients. A significant positive correlation was present between motor tic frequency and activations in the supplementary motor area during StopSuccess versus Go in patients. Inhibitory brain networks differ between healthy controls and Tourette patients. In the latter the supplementary motor area is probably a key relay of inhibitory processes mediating both suppression of tics and inhibition of voluntary action. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Little Brother Joins the Large Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    On the night of 15 December 2006, the fourth and last-to-be-installed VLTI Auxiliary Telescope (AT4) obtained its 'First Light'. The first images demonstrate that AT4 will be able to deliver the excellent image quality already delivered by the first three ATs. It will soon join its siblings to perform routinely interferometric measurements. ESO PR Photo 51a/06 ESO PR Photo 51a/06 VLT Auxiliary Telescope The VLT is composed of four 8.2-m Unit Telescope (Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun). They have been progressively put into service together with a vast suite of the most advanced astronomical instruments and are operated every night in the year. Contrary to other large astronomical telescopes, the VLT was designed from the beginning with the use of interferometry as a major goal. The VLT Interferometer (VLTI) combines starlight captured by two or three 8.2- VLT Unit Telescopes, dramatically increasing the spatial resolution and showing fine details of a large variety of celestial objects. ESO PR Photo 51b/06 ESO PR Photo 51b/06 One AT Under the Sky However, most of the time the large telescopes are used for other research purposes. They are therefore only available for interferometric observations during a limited number of nights every year. Thus, in order to exploit the VLTI each night and to achieve the full potential of this unique setup, some other (smaller), dedicated telescopes were included into the overall VLT concept. These telescopes, known as the VLTI Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs), are mounted on tracks and can be placed at precisely defined "parking" observing positions on the observatory platform. From these positions, their light beams are fed into the same common focal point via a complex system of reflecting mirrors mounted in an underground system of tunnels. The Auxiliary Telescopes are real technological jewels. They are placed in ultra-compact enclosures, complete with all necessary electronics, an air conditioning system and cooling liquid for

  18. Síndrome de Tourette

    OpenAIRE

    Maniega López, Raisa

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: El ST o Síndrome de Tourette descubierto por el doctor Gilles Tourette en el año 1885, se caracteriza por la presencia de varios tics motores y sónicos además de fallos en la fluencia del habla. Este síndrome tiene un componente hereditario y las descompensaciones de dopamina parecen tener algo que ver con su aparición. Además del ST los enfermos pueden padecer otras formas de la enfermedad como el trastorno de tic crónico o transitorio. Esta enfermedad también se asocia con otr...

  19. Randomized trial of behavior therapy for adults with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Peterson, Alan L; Piacentini, John; Woods, Douglas W; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sukhodolsky, Denis G; Chang, Susanna; Liu, Haibei; Dziura, James; Walkup, John T; Scahill, Lawrence

    2012-08-01

    Tics in Tourette syndrome begin in childhood, peak in early adolescence, and often decrease by early adulthood. However, some adult patients continue to have impairing tics. Medications for tics are often effective but can cause adverse effects. Behavior therapy may offer an alternative but has not been examined in a large-scale controlled trial in adults. To test the efficacy of a comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics in adults with Tourette syndrome of at least moderate severity. A randomized controlled trial with posttreatment evaluations at 3 and 6 months for positive responders. Three outpatient research clinics. Patients (N = 122; 78 males; age range, 16-69 years) with Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorder were recruited between December 27, 2005, and May 21, 2009. Patients received 8 sessions of comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics or 8 sessions of supportive treatment for 10 weeks. Patients with a positive response were given 3 monthly booster sessions. Total tic score on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale rated by a clinician masked to treatment assignment. Behavior therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean (SD) decrease on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (24.0 [6.47] to 17.8 [7.32]) from baseline to end point compared with the control treatment (21.8 [6.59] to 19.3 [7.40]) (P Tourette syndrome. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00231985.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of child self-rating using the Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloes, Kelly Isaacs; Barfell, Kara S Francis; Horn, Paul S; Wu, Steve W; Jacobson, Sarah E; Hart, Kathleen J; Gilbert, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate and compare how children with Tourette syndrome and parents rate tic and non-tic behavioral related impairment in home, school, and social domains; to compare these with clinician tic ratings; and to identify factors that may predict greater impairment. In a sample of 85 Tourette syndrome and 92 healthy control families, the Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale, designed for parent-report and which includes 37 items rated for tic and non-tic impairment, was administered to parents and, with the referent modified, to children ages 9 to 17 years. Tic severity was rated using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS). Analyses utilized descriptive and multivariate statistics. Tourette syndrome children's and parents' impairment ratings were higher than HC (ptic impairment ratings correlated with YGTSS (r=0.36 to 0.37; ptic and all 37 non-tic impairment items. For 29 items, children self-rated impairment higher for tics than non-tics. Diagnoses of attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder had larger effects on parent impairment ratings. The Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale appears informative for child self-rating in Tourette syndrome. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Treatment of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlan, Roger M

    2014-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) consists of chronic motor and phonic tics and characteristically begins in childhood. The tics can be disabling and commonly associated behavioral comorbities such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), can also cause problems in daily functioning. The underlying etiology and neurobiology of TS remain unknown although genetic factors appear to be important, cortical control of basal ganglia motor function appears to be disturbed and neurochemical abnormalities, particularly involving dopamine neurotransmission, are likely present. The treatment of TS involves appropriate education and support. Tics can be treated with habit reversal cognitive behavioral therapy, medications (most commonly alpha agonists and antipsychotics), local intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin and some severe, refractory cases have responded to deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS). It is important to appropriately diagnose and treat comorbid behavioral disorders that are disrupting function. OCD can be treated with cognitive behavioral therapy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and atypical antipsychotics. DBS has become a treatment option for patients with disabling OCD despite other therapies. ADHD is treated with appropriate classroom accommodations, behavioral therapy, alpha agonists, atomoxetine or methylphenidate-containing stimulant drugs.

  2. Tourette disorder and other tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Thomas V; State, Matthew W; Pittenger, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Tourette disorder is a developmental neuropsychiatric condition characterized by vocal and motor tics that can range in severity from mild to disabling. It represents one end of a spectrum of tic disorders and is estimated to affect 0.5-0.7% of the population. Accumulated evidence supports a substantial genetic contribution to disease risk, but the identification of genetic variants that confer risk has been challenging. Positive findings in candidate gene association studies have not replicated, and genomewide association studies have not generated signals of genomewide significance, in large part because of inadequate sample sizes. Rare mutations in several genes have been identified, but their causality is difficult to establish. As in other complex neuropsychiatric disorders, it is likely that Tourette disorder risk involves a combination of common, low-effect and rare, larger-effect variants in multiple genes acting together with environmental factors. With the ongoing collection of larger patient cohorts and the emergence of affordable high-throughput genomewide sequencing, progress is expected to accelerate in coming years. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Therapeutic management of tics in Tourette's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, R; Welter, M L; Mallet, L

    2007-03-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterised by both involuntary movements, tics, and psychiatric symptoms, attentional deficit disorder, hyperactivity, obsessive compulsive symptoms..., and can be the cause of major disability. Over the past 30 years, several types of treatment have been proposed for the treatment of tics in Tourette's Syndrome, ranging from psychotherapeutic approaches to neurosurgery. The education of the patient and his entourage is fundamental and must be offered to all patients. Psychotherapy does not directly improve the tics but contributes to a better adjustment of both patient and carers to his disability. The decision to start a course of drug therapy depends largely on the impact of the patient's tics on his personal life. Drug treatment relies on neuromodulators acting on a variety of neural systems and whose efficacy has been rarely demonstrated. The literature shows that the latest generation of dopaminergic antagonists have the highest benefit/risk ratio. Recently, deep brain stimulation, by modulating neuronal activity in structures involved in the pathophysiology of the disease, has become a promising therapeutical approach, producing a marked decrease in the severity of tics over that obtained with other treatments.

  4. Neurobiological Substrates of Tourette's Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.; Smith, Megan E.; Larabi, Daouia; Hampson, Michelle

    Objective: This article reviews the available scientific literature concerning the neurobiological substrates of Tourette's disorder (TD). Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies using relevant search terms. Results:

  5. Tourette Syndrome in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder believed to be genetic. The most visible symptom is the presence of tics. These involuntary movements or sounds can range from simple (sniffing, throat clearing, blinking) to complex (words or phrases, hopping, body contortions). They may be frequent for a few weeks, then fade away almost…

  6. Tourette's Syndrome: Characteristics and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestia, Kelly

    2003-01-01

    This article overviews the characteristics of children and youth with Tourette syndrome and provides suggestions that can be used in the school setting for addressing academic concerns, social-emotional concerns, and physical concerns. Teachers are urged to break down assignments, allow computer use to complete work, and give preferential seating.…

  7. Tourette Syndrome research highlights 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Cheryl A; Black, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    About 200 journal articles reported research on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders in 2014. Here we briefly summarize a few of the reports that seemed most important or interesting, ranging from animal models to human studies. Readers can comment on our choices or provide their own favorites using the tools on the online article. PMID:26512319

  8. Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome—A Case Report from Guyana in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Eapen

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of the Gilles de la Tourette syndrome from Guyana in South America is presented. The patient had a positive family history as well as coprolalia, echolalia, and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. The family history and cross-cultural similarity emphasise the biological factors in the aetiology of the syndrome.

  9. Tourette Syndrome: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Novotny

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this mini-review is to provide the latest information on epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS. The authors conducted a literature search of available sources describing the issue of tic disorders with special focus on TS and made a comparison and evaluation of relevant findings. The results of this mini-review indicate that TS is a complex disorder, which has a significant impact on the quality of life of both the patients and his/her family. Therefore, early and proper diagnosis and treatment are necessary in order to reduce or even eliminate both symptoms and social burden of the patient. This requires a multidisciplinary management approach in order to meet the patients’ special needs. Future research should focus on neuroimaging, new neurotransmitter targets, in functional neurosurgery, as well as the effect of non-pharmacological psychotherapies for these people.

  10. Deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won; Pouratian, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a movement disorder characterized by repetitive stereotyped motor and phonic movements with varying degrees of psychiatric comorbidity. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a novel therapeutic intervention for patients with refractory Tourette syndrome. Since 1999, more than 100 patients have undergone DBS at various targets within the corticostriatothalamocortical network thought to be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome. Future multicenter clinical trials and the use of a centralized online database to compare the results are necessary to determine the efficacy of DBS for Tourette syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Brazilian cohort of patients with Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, F; Veado, C C; de Oliveira, J T

    1996-01-01

    The clinical features of 32 patients (24 males) with Tourette's syndrome in Brazil were studied. The mean age at onset was 7.1 years, tics being the first symptom in 71% and hyperactivity in 29%. Blinking, grimacing, and shoulder elevation were the most common motor tics and sniffing, throat clearing, and grunting noises, the most frequent vocal tics. Coprolalia was present in 28%, echolalia in 16%, palilalia in 9%, and copropraxia in 25% of patients. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder was diagnosed in 63%, and obsessive compulsive behaviour in 44% of patients. In 84% of patients there was a family history of tics whereas attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive behaviour were respectively present in relatives of 19% and 53% of the patients studied. These data suggest that Tourette's syndrome in Brazil is not clinically different from other countries, supporting the notion that genetic factors play the most important part in its aetiology. PMID:8708658

  12. Sleep disorders in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debabrata; Rajan, Prashant V; Das, Deepanjana; Datta, Priya; Rothner, A David; Erenberg, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, nature, and impact of sleep disorders in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome and to raise awareness about their possible inclusion as a Tourette syndrome comorbidity. Using a prospective questionnaire, we interviewed 123 patients of age ≤21 years with a confirmed diagnosis of Tourette syndrome. Each completed questionnaire was then reviewed in accordance with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, criteria for categorization to a form of sleep disorder. Of the 123 patients with Tourette syndrome, 75 (61%) had comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and 48 (39%) had Tourette without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The sleep problems observed included problems in the nature of sleep, abnormal behaviors during sleep, and impact of sleep disturbances on quality of life. Within these cohorts, 31 (65%) of the 48 Tourette-only patients and 48 (64%) of the 75 Tourette + attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients could fit into some form of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, coded sleep disorders. Of the 48 Tourette + attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients with sleep disorders, 36 (75%) had insomnia signs, which could be explained by the co-occurrence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and high stimulant use. However, 10 (32%) of the 31 Tourette-only patients with sleep disorders had insomnia irrespective of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or medication use. Sleep problems are common in children with Tourette syndrome irrespective of comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, justifying their inclusion as a comorbidity of Tourette syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. "Dude, you don't have Tourette's:" Tourette's syndrome, beyond the tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, Naomi A

    2002-01-01

    While coprolalia is the most well-known symptom of Tourette's syndrome (TS), it affects only a minority of persons with the condition. TS is a chronic neurobiological condition consisting of vocal and motor tics. Many children with TS have associated obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), both of which can interfere with school, peer, and family functioning more than the tics themselves. The article distinguishes TS from other tic disorders and reviews literature on epidemiology, etiology, clinical course, and diagnostic and treatment issues. The article discusses the role of primary care pediatric and advanced practice nurses in the diagnosis and management of TS and details helpful interventions in the arenas of personal, family, and educational support, as well as symptom management and indications for medications. The author also suggests areas for future nursing research.

  14. Tic disorders and Tourette's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic categories of tic disorders include both transient and chronic tic disorders and Tourette's disorder. Changes for this group of disorders proposed for the forthcoming DSM-5 system include: (1) The term "stereotyped" will be eliminated in the definition of tics and the new definition...... will be applied consistently across all entities of tic disorders; (2) the diagnosis "Transient Tic Disorder" will change its name to "Provisional Tic Disorder"; (3) introduction of two new categories in individuals whose tics are triggered by illicit drugs or by a medical condition; (4) specification of chronic...... tic disorders into those with motor tics or with vocal tics only; (5) specification of the absence of a period longer than 3 months without tics will disappear for Tourette's Disorder. This overview discusses a number of implications resulting from these diagnostic modifications of the diagnostic...

  15. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Cheryl A.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS. PMID:27429744

  16. Imitation inhibition in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Moczydlowski, Agnes; Jonas, Melanie; Boelmans, Kai; Bäumer, Tobias; Brass, Marcel; Münchau, Alexander

    2017-08-12

    Echopraxia, that is, the open and automatic imitation of other peoples' actions, is common in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, and also those with frontal lobe lesions. While systematic reaction time tasks have confirmed increased automatic imitation in the latter two groups, adult patients with Tourette syndrome appear to compensate for automatic imitation tendencies by an overall slowing in response times. However, whether children with Tourette syndrome are already able to inhibit automatic imitation tendencies has not been investigated. Fifteen children with Tourette syndrome and 15 healthy children (aged 7-12 years) performed an imitation inhibition paradigm. Participants were asked to respond to an auditory cue by lifting their index finger or their little finger. Participants were simultaneously presented with either compatible or incompatible visual stimuli. Overall responses in children with Tourette syndrome were slower than in healthy children. Although responses were faster in compatible than in incompatible trials in both groups, this 'interference effect' was smaller in children with Tourette syndrome. Children with Tourette syndrome have a smaller interference effect than healthy children, indicating an enhanced ability to behaviourally control automatic imitation tendencies at the cost of reacting slower. The results suggest that children with Tourette syndrome already employ different or additional inhibition strategies compared to healthy children. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Brain Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Tourette's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Timothy J.; Drost, Dick J.; Pavlosky, William; Neufeld, Richard W.J.; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; McKinlay, B. Duncan; Williamson, Peter C.; Nicolson, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Although abnormalities of neural circuits involving the cortex, striatum, and thalamus are hypothesized to underlie Tourette's disorder, the neuronal abnormalities within components of these circuits are unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the cellular neurochemistry within these circuits in Tourette's disorder using…

  18. An Educator's Guide to Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronheim, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome is described in terms of causes, treatment, associated disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, learning disabilities), and classroom management (dealing with tics, writing problems, language problems, and attention problems). Common teacher questions concerning Tourette Syndrome are…

  19. Phenotype Development in Adolescents With Tourette Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Camilla; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by frequent comorbidities and a wide spectrum of phenotype presentations. This study aimed to describe the development of phenotypes in TS and tic-related impairment in a large longitudinal study of 226 children and adolescents...... followed up after 6 years. The participants were clinically examined to assess tic severity and impairment, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The development in phenotypes changed toward less comorbidity with 40% TS-only (no OCD or ADHD) (TS without...... OCD or ADHD) at baseline and 55% at follow-up.Tic-related impairment was expected to improve with an age-related tic decline, but surprisingly the impairment score did not reflect the tic decline. Sex, vocal and motor tics, and OCD and ADHD severity were highly significantly correlated...

  20. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  1. Tics and Tourette: a clinical, pathophysiological and etiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Russell C

    2017-12-01

    Describe developments in the etiological understanding of Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is a complex heterogenous clinical syndrome, which is not a unitary entity. Pathophysiological models describe gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic-associated disinhibition of cortico-basal ganglia motor, sensory and limbic loops. MRI studies support basal ganglia volume loss, with additional white matter and cerebellar changes. Tourette syndrome cause likely involves multiple vulnerability genes and environmental factors. Only recently have some vulnerability gene findings been replicated, including histidine decarboxylase and neurexin 1, yet these rare variants only explain a small proportion of patients. Planned large genetic studies will improve genetic understanding. The role of inflammation as a contributor to disease expression is now supported by large epidemiological studies showing an association with maternal autoimmunity and childhood infection. Investigation of blood cytokines, blood mRNA and brain mRNA expression support the role of a persistent immune activation, and there are similarities with the immune literature of autistic spectrum disorder. Current treatment is symptomatic, although there is a better appreciation of factors that influence treatment response. At present, therapeutics is focused on symptom-based treatments, yet with improved etiological understanding, we will move toward disease-modifying therapies in the future.

  2. Tourette's Syndrome and the School Experience: A Qualitative Study of Children's and Parents' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Rebekah; Russell, Cherry

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on research exploring the school experiences of 26 children (aged between 8 and 15.5 years) diagnosed with Tourette's Syndrome. The research adopted a qualitative methodology, and is reported here from the perspective of both the parents and the children themselves. Three different groups of families emerged: those who were…

  3. Tic symptom dimensions and their heritabilities in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Marcel J; Delucchi, Kevin L; Mathews, Carol M; Cath, Danielle C

    2015-06-01

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is both genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Gene-finding strategies have had limited success, possibly because of symptom heterogeneity. This study aimed at specifically investigating heritabilities of tic symptom factors in a relatively large sample of TS patients and family members. Lifetime tic symptom data were collected in 494 diagnosed individuals in two cohorts of TS patients from the USA (n=273) and the Netherlands (n=221), and in 351 Dutch family members. Item-level factor analysis, using a tetrachoric correlation matrix in SAS (v9.2), was carried out on 23 tic symptoms from the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale. Three factors were identified explaining 49% of the total variance: factor 1, complex vocal tics and obscene behaviour; factor 2, body tics; and factor 3, head/neck tics. Using Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routine, moderate heritabilities were found for factor 1 (h2r=0.21) and factor 3 (h2r=0.25). Lower heritability was found for overall tic severity (h2r=0.19). Bivariate analyses indicated no genetic associations between tic factors. These findings suggest that (i) three tic factors can be discerned with a distinct underlying genetic architecture and that (ii) considering the low tic heritabilities found, only focusing on the narrow-sense TS phenotype and leaving out comorbidities that are part of the broader sense tic phenotype may lead to missing heritability. Although these findings need replication in larger independent samples, they might have consequences for future genetic studies in TS.

  4. New Sequences with Low Correlation and Large Family Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanxin

    In direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) communication systems and direct-sequence ultra wideband (DS-UWB) radios, sequences with low correlation and large family size are important for reducing multiple access interference (MAI) and accepting more active users, respectively. In this paper, a new collection of families of sequences of length pn-1, which includes three constructions, is proposed. The maximum number of cyclically distinct families without GMW sequences in each construction is φ(pn-1)/n·φ(pm-1)/m, where p is a prime number, n is an even number, and n=2m, and these sequences can be binary or polyphase depending upon choice of the parameter p. In Construction I, there are pn distinct sequences within each family and the new sequences have at most d+2 nontrivial periodic correlation {-pm-1, -1, pm-1, 2pm-1,…,dpm-1}. In Construction II, the new sequences have large family size p2n and possibly take the nontrivial correlation values in {-pm-1, -1, pm-1, 2pm-1,…,(3d-4)pm-1}. In Construction III, the new sequences possess the largest family size p(d-1)n and have at most 2d correlation levels {-pm-1, -1,pm-1, 2pm-1,…,(2d-2)pm-1}. Three constructions are near-optimal with respect to the Welch bound because the values of their Welch-Ratios are moderate, WR_??_d, WR_??_3d-4 and WR_??_2d-2, respectively. Each family in Constructions I, II and III contains a GMW sequence. In addition, Helleseth sequences and Niho sequences are special cases in Constructions I and III, and their restriction conditions to the integers m and n, pm≠2 (mod 3) and n≅0 (mod 4), respectively, are removed in our sequences. Our sequences in Construction III include the sequences with Niho type decimation 3·2m-2, too. Finally, some open questions are pointed out and an example that illustrates the performance of these sequences is given.

  5. Genetic susceptibility and neurotransmitters in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A; Hoekstra, Pieter J

    2013-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to more complex models including additive and multifactorial inheritance and likely interaction with genetic factors. While the exact cellular and molecular base of TS is as yet elusive, neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies have pointed to the involvement of cortico-striato-thalamocortical circuits and abnormalities in dopamine, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin neurotransmitter systems, with the most consistent evidence being available for involvement of dopamine-related abnormalities, that is, a reduction in tonic extracellular dopamine levels along with hyperresponsive spike-dependent dopamine release, following stimulation. Genetic and gene expression findings are very much supportive of involvement of these neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, intriguingly, genetic work on a two-generation pedigree has opened new research pointing to a role for histamine, a so far rather neglected neurotransmitter, with the potential of the development of new treatment options. Future studies should be aimed at directly linking neurotransmitter-related genetic and gene expression findings to imaging studies (imaging genetics), which enables a better understanding of the pathways and mechanisms through which the dynamic interplay of genes, brain, and environment shapes the TS phenotype. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Recognition and management of Tourette syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kuo-Yu; Wang, Huei-Shyong; See, Lai-Chu

    2009-10-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic tic disorder that occurs in childhood. Children with TS may have multiple tic incidents during a day, even many times per minute. Such sudden, rapid and short utterings or movements may influence sufferers' ability to perform daily activities and present barriers to normal interaction with others. Anger, depression and low self-esteem are commonly seen in many children with TS. Awareness of TS is not great in Taiwan, and so many pediatric patients fail to obtain an early diagnosis and / or are mistreated or punished due to disorder-related behaviors. Such results in elevated physical, psychological and social stresses for sufferers. In this paper, we briefly introduce TS symptoms, diagnosis, classification, prognosis, co-morbidity, related psycho-social stresses, and common treatments. In order to facilitate the effective management of TS, we provide suggestion for patient families and schools as well as recommendations on how to interact effectively with others. We hope this article is helpful for healthcare workers, patients, families and schools to improve the recognition and management of TS.

  7. The relationship between tics, OC, ADHD and autism symptoms: A cross-disorder symptom analysis in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome patients and their family members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-van Dijk, Hilde M.; van de Schoot, Rens; Rijkeboer, Marleen M.; Mathews, Carol A; Cath, Dainelle C

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette’s syndrome (GTS) is a disorder in which co-morbid obsessive-compulsive (OC), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and autism symptoms occur in up to 60% of patients, suggesting shared etiology. We aimed to explore the phenotypic structure underlying GTS, taking tic, OC, ADHD, and autism symptoms into account as measured by various symptom scales (YGTSS, Y-BOCS, CAARS and AQ) in 225 GTS patients and 371 family members. First, Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA) were performed on the symptom structure of each separate symptom scale. Second, the symptom dimensions derived from each scale were combined in one model, and correlations between them were calculated. Using the correlation matrix, Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) were performed on the symptom dimensions across the scales. EFA revealed a five factor structure: tic/aggression/symmetry; OC symptoms/compulsive tics/numbers and patterns; ADHD symptoms; autism symptoms; and hoarding/inattention symptoms. The symptom factors found in this study are partly in line with the traditional categorical boundaries of the symptom scales used, and partly reveal a symptom structure that cuts through the diagnostic categories. This phenotypic structure might more closely reflect underlying etiologies than a structure that classically describes GTS patients according to absence or presence of comorbid OCD, ADHD and autism, and might inform both future genetic and treatment studies. PMID:26826899

  8. Treatment of tics and tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Harvey S

    2010-11-01

    Tics come in a variety of types and frequencies; have a waxing and waning course; are exacerbated by stress, anxiety, and fatigue; and often resolve or improve in the teenage or early adult years. Tourette syndrome requires the presence of chronic, fluctuating motor and phonic tics. In addition to tics, individuals with Tourette syndrome often have a variety of comorbid conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and anxiety, episodic outbursts, and academic difficulties. These conditions often are a greater source of difficulty than the tics themselves. All patients with tics should be evaluated to assure proper diagnosis and to identify any associated psychopathology or academic difficulty. The treatment of tics begins with education of the patient and family, including discussions about the fundamentals of tics: their characteristics, etiology, outcomes, and available treatments. Therapy should be individualized based on the extent of impairment, available support, ability to cope, and the presence of other problems. Indications for the treatment of tics include psychosocial problems (loss of self-esteem, comments from peers, excessive worries about tics, diminished participation in activities), functional difficulties, classroom disruption, and physical discomfort. A variety of behavioral approaches can be used. Recent studies have emphasized the value of comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT). Because habit reversal is the major component of CBIT, a cooperative patient, the presence of a premonitory urge, and a committed family are essential ingredients for success. If tic-suppressing medication is required, a two-tier approach and monotherapy are recommended. First-tier medications, notably the α-adrenergic agonists, are recommended for individuals with milder tics, especially persons with both tics and ADHD. Second-tier medications include various typical and atypical

  9. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez, B; Munduate, X; Miguel, U San

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  10. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  11. Educational Considerations for Children with Tourette's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin; Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    1992-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Tourette's Syndrome, an inherited neurological disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics. Considered are prevalence of the syndrome, common characteristics, instructional strategies, and the critical role of the teacher. (Author/DB)

  12. Progress in research on Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Kevin J.; Jankovic, Joseph; Hershey, Tamara; McNaught, Kevin St. P.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Walkup, John

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable neuropsychiatric disorder commonly complicated by obsessions and compulsions, but defined by frequent unwanted movements (motor tics) and vocalizations (phonic tics) that develop in childhood or adolescence. In recent years, research on TS has progressed rapidly on several fronts. Inspired by the Fifth International Scientific Symposium on Tourette Syndrome, the articles in this special issue review advances in the phenomenology, epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and treatment of TS. PMID:25436182

  13. Familial Interstitial Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Large Family with Atypical Clinical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranji Chibbar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A large kindred of familial pulmonary fibrosis is reported. Six members from the first two generations of this particular kindred were described more than 40 years previously; six more individuals from the third and fourth generations have also been evaluated. The proband, now 23 years of age, has mild disease; the other 11 documented affected family members all died from their disease at an average age of 37 years (range 25 to 50 years. The pathology was that of usual interstitial pneumonia, as is typical in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the initial radiographic pattern in many of these individuals was upper lobe and nodular and, along with the young age, was atypical for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Several genetic abnormalities have been associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis. The present study examined the genes coding for surfactant protein-C, ATP-binding cassette protein A3 and telomerase, and found no abnormalities.

  14. Health care needs of children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsko, Rebecca H; Danielson, Melissa; King, Michael; Visser, Susanna N; Scahill, Lawrence; Perou, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    To document the impact of Tourette syndrome on the health care needs of children and access to health care among youth with Tourette syndrome, parent-reported data from the 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health were analyzed. Children with Tourette syndrome had more co-occurring mental disorders than children with asthma or children without Tourette syndrome or asthma and had health care needs that were equal to or greater than children with asthma (no Tourette syndrome) or children with neither asthma nor Tourette syndrome. Health care needs were greatest among children with Tourette syndrome and co-occurring mental disorders, and these children were least likely to receive effective care coordination. Addressing co-occurring conditions may improve the health and well-being of children with Tourette syndrome. Strategies such as integration of behavioral health and primary care may be needed to improve care coordination.

  15. The Symptomatology and Diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Arthur; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The symptomatology of 34 patients with Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome was described in detail. The purpose was to clarify the diagnostic criteria for Tourette's syndrome by describing the type, variety, and frequency of symptoms in this illness. (Author)

  16. Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders: A Decade of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, James E.; Scahill, Lawrence; Lombroso, Paul J.; King, Robert A.; Leckman, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This is a review of progress made in the understanding of Tourette syndrome (TS) during the past decade including models of pathogenesis, state-of-the-art assessment techniques, and treatment. Method: Computerized literature searches were conducted under the key words "Tourette syndrome," "Tourette disorder," and "tics." Only references…

  17. Further Psychometric Examination of the Tourette's Disorder Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Grabill, Kristen M.; Geffken, Gary R.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2007-01-01

    The Tourette's Disorder Scales (Shytle et al., 2003) are parent- (Tourette's Disorder Scales-Parent Rated; TODS-PR) and clinician-rated (Tourette's Disorder Scales-Clinician Rated; TODS-CR) measures that assess tics, obsessions, compulsions, inattention, hyperactivity, aggression, and emotional disturbances among children with tics. Although the…

  18. Copy number variation in obsessive-compulsive disorder and tourette syndrome : a cross-disorder study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, Lauren M; Yu, Dongmei; Marshall, Christian; Davis, Lea K; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Li, Bingbin; Cappi, Carolina; Gerber, Gloria; Wolf, Aaron; Schroeder, Frederick A; Osiecki, Lisa; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Kirby, Andrew; Illmann, Cornelia; Haddad, Stephen; Gallagher, Patience; Fagerness, Jesen A; Barr, Cathy L; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Black, Donald W; Bloch, Michael H; Bruun, Ruth D; Budman, Cathy L; Camarena, Beatriz; Cath, Danielle C; Cavallini, Maria C; Chouinard, Sylvain; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Delorme, Richard; Denys, D.; Derks, Eske M; Dion, Yves; Rosário, Maria C; Eapen, Valsama; Evans, Patrick; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas V; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Grabe, Hans J; Grados, Marco A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Heiman, Gary A; Hemmings, Sian M J; Herrera, Luis D; Hounie, Ana G; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L; King, Robert A; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F; Lennertz, Leonhard; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L; Lyon, Gholson J; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; McCracken, James T; McMahon, William; Murphy, Dennis L; Naarden, Allan L; Neale, Benjamin M; Nurmi, Erika; Pakstis, Andrew J; Pato, Michele T; Pato, Carlos N; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Reus, Victor I; Richter, Margaret A; Riddle, Mark; Robertson, Mary M; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sampaio, Aline S; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S; Smit, Jan H; Stein, Dan J; Tischfield, Jay A; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C; Nicolini, Humberto; Oostra, Ben A; Moessner, Rainald; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Heutink, Peter; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson; Petryshen, Tracey; Posthuma, Danielle; Jenike, Michael A; Cox, Nancy J; Hanna, Gregory L; Brentani, Helena; Scherer, Stephen W; Arnold, Paul D; Stewart, S Evelyn; Mathews, Carol A; Knowles, James A; Cook, Edwin H; Pauls, David L; Wang, Kai; Scharf, Jeremiah M

    OBJECTIVE: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) are heritable neurodevelopmental disorders with a partially shared genetic etiology. This study represents the first genome-wide investigation of large (>500 kb), rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in OCD and the largest

  19. Copy number variation in obsessive-compulsive disorder and tourette syndrome: a cross-disorder study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Yu, Dongmei; Marshall, Christian; Davis, Lea K.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Li, Bingbin; Cappi, Carolina; Gerber, Gloria; Wolf, Aaron; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Osiecki, Lisa; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Kirby, Andrew; Illmann, Cornelia; Haddad, Stephen; Gallagher, Patience; Fagerness, Jesen A.; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Black, Donald W.; Bloch, Michael H.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Derks, Eske M.; Dion, Yves; Rosário, Maria C.; Eapen, Valsama; Evans, Patrick; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Herrera, Luis D.; Hounie, Ana G.; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Lyon, Gholson J.; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; McCracken, James T.; McMahon, William; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Nurmi, Erika; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark; Robertson, Mary M.; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-Vanderweele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Nicolini, Humberto; Oostra, Ben A.; Moessner, Rainald; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Heutink, Peter; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson; Petryshen, Tracey; Posthuma, Danielle; Jenike, Michael A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Hanna, Gregory L.; Brentani, Helena; Scherer, Stephen W.; Arnold, Paul D.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Mathews, Carol A.; Knowles, James A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Pauls, David L.; Wang, Kai; Scharf, Jeremiah M.

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) are heritable neurodevelopmental disorders with a partially shared genetic etiology. This study represents the first genome-wide investigation of large (>500 kb), rare ( <1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in OCD and the largest genome-wide

  20. Copy number variation in obsessive-compulsive disorder and tourette syndrome: A cross-disorder study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. McGrath; D. Yu (D.); C.R. Marshall (Christian); L.K. Davis (Lea); B. Thiruvahindrapuram (Bhooma); B. Li (Bingbin); C. Cappi (Carolina); G. Gerber (Gloria); A. de Wolf (Anneke); F.A. Schroeder (Frederick); L. Osiecki (Lisa); C. O'Dushlaine (Colm); A. Kirby (Andrew); C. Illmann (Cornelia); S. Haddad (Stephen); P. Gallagher (Patience); J. Fagerness (Jesen); C.L. Barr (Cathy); L. Bellodi (Laura); F. Benarroch (Fortu); O.J. Bienvenu (Oscar); D.W. Black (Donald); J. Bloch (Jocelyne); R.D. Bruun (Ruth); C.L. Budman (Cathy); B. Camarena (Beatriz); D. Cath (Daniëlle); M.C. Cavallini (Maria); S. Chouinard; V. Coric (Vladimir); C. Cullen; R. Delorme (Richard); D.A.J.P. Denys (Damiaan); E.M. Derks (Eske); Y. Dion (Yves); M.C. Rosário (Maria); C.E. Eapen (Chundamannil Eapen); P. Evans; P. Falkai (Peter); T.V. Fernandez (Thomas); H. Garrido (Helena); D. Geller (Daniel); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); M. Grados (Marco); B.D. Greenberg (Benjamin); V. Gross-Tsur (Varda); E. Grünblatt (Edna); M.L. Heiman (Mark); S.M.J. Hemmings (Sian); L.D. Herrera (Luis); A.G. Hounie (Ana); J. Jankovic (Joseph); J.L. Kennedy; R.A. King; R. Kurlan; N. Lanzagorta (Nuria); M. Leboyer (Marion); J.F. Leckman; L. Lennertz (Leonhard); C. Lochner (Christine); T.L. Lowe (Thomas); H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); W. Maier (Wolfgang); J.T. McCracken (James); W.M. McMahon (William); D.L. Murphy (Dennis); A.L. Naarden (Allan); E. Nurmi (Erika); A.J. Pakstis; C. Pato (Carlos); C. Pato (Carlos); J. Piacentini (John); C. Pittenger (Christopher); M.N. Pollak (Michael); V.I. Reus (Victor); M.A. Richter (Margaret); M. Riddle (Mark); M.M. Robertson; D. Rosenberg (David); G.A. Rouleau; S. Ruhrmann (Stephan); A.S. Sampaio (Aline); J. Samuels (Jonathan); P. Sandor (Paul); B. Sheppard (Brooke); H.S. Singer (Harvey); J.H. Smit (Jan); D.J. Stein (Dan); J.A. Tischfield (Jay); H. Vallada (Homero); J. Veenstra-Vanderweele (Jeremy); S. Walitza (Susanne); Y. Wang (Ying); A. Wendland (Annika); Y.Y. Shugart; E.C. Miguel (Euripedes); H. Nicolini (Humberto); B.A. Oostra (Ben); R. Moessner (Rainald); M. Wagner (Michael); A. Ruiz-Linares (Andres); P. Heutink (Peter); G. Nestadt (Gerald); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); T.L. Petryshen (Tracey); D. Posthuma (Danielle); M.A. Jenike (Michael); N.J. Cox (Nancy); G.L. Hanna (Gregory); H. Brentani (Helena); S.W. Scherer (Stephen); P.D. Arnold (Paul); S.E. Stewart; C. Mathews; J.A. Knowles (James A); E.H. Cook (Edwin); D.L. Pauls (David); K. Wang (Kai); J.M. Scharf; B.M. Neale (Benjamin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) are heritable neurodevelopmental disorders with a partially shared genetic etiology. This study represents the first genome-wide investigation of large (>500 kb), rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in OCD and

  1. Copy number variation in obsessive-compulsive disorder and tourette syndrome: a cross-disorder study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, L.M.; Yu, D.; Marshall, C.; Davis, L.K.; Thiruvahindrapuram, B.; Li, B.; Cappi, C.; Gerber, G.; Wolf, A.; Schroeder, F.A.; Osiecki, L.; O'Dushlaine, C.; Kirby, A.; Illmann, C.; Haddad, S.; Gallagher, P.; Fagerness, J.A.; Barr, C.L.; Bellodi, L.; Benarroch, F.; Bienvenu, O.J.; Black, D. W.; Bloch, M.H.; Bruun, R.D.; Budman, C.L.; Camarena, B.; Cath, D.C.; Cavallini, M.C.; Chouinard, S.; Coric, V.; Cullen, B.; Delorme, R.; Denys, D.; Derks, E.M.; Dion, Y.; Rosário, M.C.; Eapen, V.; Evans, P.; Falkai, P.; Fernandez, T.V.; Garrido, H.; Geller, D.; Grabe, H.J.; Grados, M.A.; Greenberg, B.D.; Gross-Tsur, V.; Grünblatt, E.; Heiman, G.A.; Hemmings, S.M.; Herrera, L.D.; Hounie, A.G.; Jankovic, J.; Kennedy, J.L.; King, R.A.; Kurlan, R.; Lanzagorta, N.; Leboyer, M.; Leckman, J.F.; Lennertz, L.; Lochner, C.; Lowe, T.L.; Lyon, G.J.; Macciardi, F.; Maier, W.; McCracken, J.T.; McMahon, W.; Murphy, D.L.; Naarden, A.L.; Neale, B. M.; Nurmi, E.; Pakstis, A.J.; Pato, M. T.; Piacentini, J.; Pittenger, C.; Pollak, Y.; Reus, V.I.; Richter, M.A.; Riddle, M.; Robertson, M.M.; Rosenberg, D.; Rouleau, G.A.; Ruhrmann, S.; Sampaio, A.S.; Samuels, J.; Sandor, P.; Sheppard, B.; Singer, H.S.; Smit, J.H.; Stein, D.J.; Tischfield, J.A.; Vallada, H.; Veenstra-Vanderweele, J.; Walitza, S.; Wang, Y.; Wendland, J.R.; Shugart, Y.Y.; Miguel, E.C.; Nicolini, H.; Oostra, B.A.; Moessner, R.; Wagner, M.; Ruiz-Linares, A.; Heutink, P.; Nestadt, G.; Freimer, N.; Petryshen, T.; Posthuma, D.; Jenike, M.A.; Cox, N.J.; Hanna, G.L.; Brentani, H.; Scherer, S.W.; Arnold, P.D.; Stewart, S.E.; Mathews, C.A.; Knowles, J.A.; Cook, E.H.; Pauls, D.L.; Wang, K.; Scharf, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) are heritable neurodevelopmental disorders with a partially shared genetic etiology. This study represents the first genome-wide investigation of large (>500 kb), rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in OCD and the largest

  2. Abnormal CT scan in a patient with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaer, M.; Boris, P.; Gadegaard Hansen, L.

    1986-07-01

    In a 28-year-old woman, who presented multiple muscular and vocal tics, typical of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, CT scans revealed a large porencephalic cyst in the right hemisphere involving the right basal ganglia, as well as contrast enhancement in the region of the left basal ganglia.

  3. Abnormal CT scan in a patient with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjaer, M.; Boris, P.; Gadegaard Hansen, L.

    1986-01-01

    In a 28-year-old woman, who presented multiple muscular and vocal tics, typical of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, CT scans revealed a large porencephalic cyst in the right hemisphere involving the right basal ganglia, as well as contrast enhancement in the region of the left basal ganglia. (orig.)

  4. Perceived Social Support and Caregiver Strain in Caregivers of Children with Tourette's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeder, Chrystal Edge; Remer, Rory

    2007-01-01

    The research on Tourette's disorder (TD), a neuropsychological disorder consisting of motor and phonic tics, has largely focused on individuals with TD and not on the caregivers of children with TD. We investigated the effects of several variables on caregiver strain of caregivers of children with TD, including perceived social support, caregiver…

  5. Tourette's syndrome in famous musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique F. Camargo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourette's syndrome (TS is defined as a disorder characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal tic that have lasted for not less than one year. It is a relatively complex neurobehavioral disorder, in which patients may present with coexistent attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder or other behavioral comorbidities. The musical genius Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791 and the rock star Kurt Cobain (1967-1994 may both have suffered from TS, and some contemporary musicians have had their clinical condition confirmed as TS. Our hypothetical diagnosis of TS in Mozart and Cobain is based on the presence of tics and psychiatric comorbidities. In contemporary musicians, such as Michael Wolff, Nick Van Bloss and James Durbin, TS has often only been diagnosed after a considerable delay. This delay in diagnosis and the controversies surrounding the clinical case of Mozart show how difficult a confirmatory diagnosis of this complex disease is.

  6. Three Cases of Palatal Tics and Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Renata; Cath, Danielle; Pavone, Piero; Tijssen, Marina; Robertson, Mary M

    2015-08-01

    Five patients with palatal tics and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome have been previously reported. Little is known about the characteristics of palatal tics given that there are so few reports. On one hand, palatal tics may be rare. Alternatively, they may be less well recognized than repetitive eye blinking or sniffing, which are both obvious and, therefore, more often reported. We describe 3 patients with palatal tics and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We also review the 5 patients reported in the literature and explore whether there are characteristic features among this group of 8 cases. The 8 patients had the following features: (1) Personal history of other multiple motor/vocal tics, (2) the presence of typical Gilles de la Tourette syndrome comorbidities, (3) positive family history of tics and/or Gilles de la Tourette syndrome comorbidities, (4) the presence of audible "ear clicks," (5) younger age at onset (2 years). We suggest that palatal tics are underreported. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. The Perceptions and Views on Family Interaction and Relationships of Middle Children from Large Families: An Informal Mini Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elena C. Thomas

    In Adler's Theory of Individual Psychology the significance of birth order position in the family constellation depends on the interpretation given to it by the child, which in turn influences his character. This study surveyed the perceptions of middle children in large families. Subjects (N=13) were middle children in families of more than five…

  8. Public perception of Tourette syndrome on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fat, Mary Jane Lim; Sell, Erick; Barrowman, Nick; Doja, Asif

    2012-08-01

    We sought to determine public perception surrounding Tourette syndrome through viewers' responses to videos on YouTube. The top 20 videos on YouTube for search terms Tourette's, Tourette's syndrome, Tourette syndrome and tics were selected. The portrayal of Tourette syndrome was assessed as positive, negative, or neutral. Top 10 comments for each video were graded as "sympathetic," "neutral," or "derogatory." A total of 14 970 hits were obtained and 41 videos were retained, with an average of 590 113 views (1369 to 13 747 069) and 1761 comments (0 to 35 241). Twenty-two percent of videos retained portrayed Tourette syndrome negatively, 20% were neutral and 59% positive. Negative portrayals were significantly associated with more views (Spearman correlation rho = -.46, P =.003) and comments (Spearman correlation rho = -.47, P = .002). Although excellent examples of Tourette syndrome are available on YouTube, the popularity of negative portrayals may reinforce existing stigma in society.

  9. Genetic and phenotypic overlap of specific obsessive-compulsive and attention-deficit/hyperactive subtypes with Tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirschtritt, M. E.; Darrow, S. M.; Illmann, C.; Osiecki, L.; Grados, M.; Sandor, P.; Dion, Y.; King, R. A.; Pauls, D.; Budman, C. L.; Cath, D. C.; Greenberg, E.; Lyon, G. J.; Yu, D.; McGrath, L. M.; McMahon, W. M.; Lee, P. C.; Delucchi, K. L.; Scharf, J. M.; Mathews, C. A.

    Background. The unique phenotypic and genetic aspects of obsessive-compulsive (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS) are not well characterized. Here, we examine symptom patterns and heritability of OCD and ADHD in TS families. Method.

  10. Linkage studies on Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: What is the strategy of choice?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heutink, P.; Wetering, J.M. van de; Oostra, B.A. [Erasmus Univ. Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    For a linkage study it is important to ascertain family material that is sufficiently informative. The statistical power of linkage sample can be determined via computer simulation. For complex traits uncertain parameters such as incomplete penetrance, frequency of phenocopies, gene frequency and variable expression have to be taken into account. One can either include only the most severe phenotype in the analysis or apply multiple linkage tests for a gradually broadened disease phenotype. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by multiple, intermittent motor and vocal tics. Segregation analyses suggests that GTS and milder phenotypes are caused by a single dominant gene. We report here the results of an extensive simulation study on a large set of families. We compared the effectiveness of linkage tests with only the GTS phenotype versus multiple tests that included various milder phenotypes and different gene frequencies. The scenario of multiple tests yielded superior power. Our results show that computer simulation can indicate the strategy of choice in linkage studies of multiple, complex phenotypes. 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. l-Histidine Decarboxylase and Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Stillman, Althea A.; Ghosh, Ananda K.; Bilguvar, Kaya; O'Roak, Brian J.; Mason, Christopher E.; Abbott, Thomas; Gupta, Abha; King, Robert A.; Pauls, David L.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Singer, Harvey S.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Morgan, Thomas M.; Loring, Erin; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Fernandez, Thomas; Sanders, Stephan; Louvi, Angeliki; Cho, Judy H.; Mane, Shrikant; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Biederer, Thomas; Lifton, Richard P.; Gunel, Murat; State, Matthew W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Tourette's syndrome is a common developmental neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Despite a strong genetic contribution, inheritance is complex, and risk alleles have proven difficult to identify. Here, we describe an analysis of linkage in a two-generation pedigree leading to the identification of a rare functional mutation in the HDC gene encoding l-histidine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in histamine biosynthesis. Our findings, together with previously published data from model systems, point to a role for histaminergic neurotransmission in the mechanism and modulation of Tourette's syndrome and tics. PMID:20445167

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility in Large Family and Founder Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); M. Wagner (Marcus)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBased on arguments about long-term orientation and corporate reputation, we argue that family and founder firms differ from other firms with regard to corporate social responsibility. Using Bayesian analysis, we then show that family and founder ownership are associated with a lower

  13. Study Rate of Major Depression in Children and Adolescents with Tourette\\'s Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Amiri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tourette disorder composed of history of multiple motor tics and at least a vocal tic during a period of such disorder. Many reports have investigated in co– morbid major depressive disorder, and studies signify such importance of early diagnosis and treatment. So diagnosis of major depressive disorder when it is comorbid with Tourette disorder considered to be important in our society as well. Materials & Methods: 30 cases of Tourette disorder who refferred to a child psychiatry center were studied during a period of one year in a descriptive. Cross sectional study. At the same time” 30 cases matched by age and sex were chosen as our control group from Tehran public schools. There were 25 boys and 5 girls in each group “with age rang of 8 to 18 years. A semistructural questionnaire of kiddy Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia was used to investigate the presence of major depressive disorder in both groups. Statistical tests including MC- Nemar exact test were used for statistical analysis. Results: 23/3% of Tourette group patients were diagnosed as major depressive while 3.3% of the control group was diagnosed as major depressive disorder” . Conclusion: As given the high association rate for Tourette disorder and major depressive disorder. It is suggested to investigate all cases of Tourette disorder for possible major depressive disorder.

  14. Clinical course of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H; Leckman, James F

    2009-12-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics lasting at least a year in duration. Children with TS often experience comorbid conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit disorder. The goal of this article was to review the long-term clinical course of tics and comorbid conditions in children with TS. We conducted a traditional literature search to locate relevant articles regarding long-term outcome and prognosis in TS and tic disorders. Tics typically have an onset between the ages of 4 and 6 years and reach their worst-ever severity between the ages of 10 and 12 years. On average, tic severity declines during adolescence. By early adulthood, roughly three-quarters of children with TS will have greatly diminished tic symptoms and over one-third will be tic free. Comorbid conditions, such as OCD and other anxiety and depressive disorders, are more common during the adolescence and early adulthood of individuals with TS than in the general population. Although tics are the sine qua non of TS, they are often not the most enduring or impairing symptoms in children with TS. Measures used to enhance self-esteem, such as encouraging strong friendships and the exploration of interests, are crucial to ensuring positive adulthood outcome in TS.

  15. The First World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders: Controversies and Hot Topics in Etiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A.; Stern, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    The first World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders was held in London, June 2016 by the Tourette Association of America, Tourettes Action (UK), and the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome. Presentations arising from large-scale collaborative projects were an important component of the scientific programme. This article focuses on areas raised in the hot topics session and two moderated debates, which covered emerging research in etiology and treatment. The hot topics ranged across genetics, arguably including the first confirmed Tourette Syndrome (TS) susceptibility gene NRXN1, neurocognition, and neurophysiology, including the possibility of a neurocognitive endophenotype for TS and the use of depth and cortical surface electrodes to investigate the neurophysiology of tics on the background of the evolving field of deep brain stimulation (DBS), to novel treatment approaches such as dental orthotics and an online behavioral intervention. The debates aired controversies in treatment; pharmacotherapy vs. behavioral treatment and the place of medical cannabinoids. These sessions demonstrate the vibrancy of a field that has considerably expanded in the last decade, the significant progress that has been made, and the direction that some of the most fruitful next phases of research will take. PMID:27375411

  16. Tourette syndrome and comorbid ADHD: causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Malhany, N; Gulisano, M; Rizzo, R; Curatolo, P

    2015-03-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common comorbid condition in patients with Tourette syndrome (TS). The co-occurrence of ADHD and TS is in most cases associated with a higher social and psychopathological impairment. Comorbidity between Tourette and ADHD appears to have a complex and partially known pathogenesis in which genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors can be implicated. Genetic studies have revealed an involvement of dopaminergic, catecholaminergic, and GABAergic genes that modulated the activity of neurotransmitters. Furthermore, there are a lot of networks implicated in the development of ADHD and TS, involving cortical and striatal areas and basal ganglia. Although a large number of studies tried to find a common pathogenesis, the complex pathways responsible are not clear. The genes implicated in both disorders are currently unidentified, but it is probable that epigenetic factors associated with neural modifications can represent a substrate for the development of the diseases. In this paper, recent advances in neurobiology of ADHD and TS are reviewed, providing a basis for understanding the complex common pathogenesis underlying the frequent co-occurrence of the two conditions and the therapeutic choices.

  17. Tourette's disease with impulse control disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, Rajnish; Sidhu, Balwant Singh

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of Tourette's disease (TD) with impulse control disorder which is rare;these type of patients are prone to rage attack and explosive outbursts in the childhood and adolescence which can be detrimental. Hence, a case is reported to understand the phenomenology of its co-morbidity in TD.

  18. Motor Tics, Tourette Syndrome, and Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerer, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Complex motor tics associated with vocal tics indicate a high likelihood of Tourette syndrome; children with this syndrome may also have learning disabilities and attentional disorders. Individuals may be treated with stimulant drugs which may precipitate or exacerbate tics. Pharmacotherapy is available for management of tics and attentional…

  19. Enlargement of thalamic nuclei in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Ann M; Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: The basal ganglia and thalamus together connect in parallel closed-loop circuits with the cortex. Previous imaging studies have shown modifications of the basal ganglia and cortical targets in individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS), but less is known regarding the role of the thalamus...

  20. Time Processing in Children with Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Martino, Davide; Spata, Felice; Defazio, Giovanni; Giacche, Roberta; Martino, Vito; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Anna Maria; Silvestri, Paola Rosaria; Cardona, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by dysfunctional connectivity between prefrontal cortex and sub-cortical structures, and altered meso-cortical and/or meso-striatal dopamine release. Since time processing is also regulated by fronto-striatal circuits and modulated by dopaminergic transmission, we hypothesized that time…

  1. Tourette Syndrome: Information for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurobehavioral disorder that consists of simple and complex tics. This disorder can significantly affect a child's self-esteem and academic success. Although some believe that only adults are affected, this disorder occurs most frequently in early childhood and symptoms decrease with age. Diagnosis of this disorder can…

  2. Tic or Compulsion? It's Tourettic OCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansueto, Charles; Keuler, David

    2005-01-01

    A subgroup of individuals suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) frequently present to treatment with an atypical yet distinguishable array of symptoms akin to both Tourettes disorder (TD) and OCD. These individuals often receive standard treatments for OCD (or less likely, TD) that fail to address the blended features of their…

  3. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, P; Limburg, P; Kallenberg, C; Minderaa, R; Battistin, L

    2004-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of both multiple motor and vocal tics. While its pathogenesis at a molecular and cellular level remains unknown, recent research findings point to the possible involvement of autoimmunity in at least a

  4. Tourette Syndrome: A Training Day for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Uttom; Christie, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a Tourette syndrome training day for teachers facilitated by members of the Tic Disorders Clinic at Great Ormond Street Hospital in England. The day provided a mix of information giving and discussion of current practice. Outcomes of the day are related to professional knowledge and experience. (Contains references.) (CR)

  5. Tourette Syndrome: A Review and Educational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Anne M.; Shea, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome, a condition characterized by involuntary muscular and verbal tics, is defined, its course described, incidence noted (possibly 1.6 percent of the population), etiology considered (from viewpoints of psychogenic and organic theories), treatment (primarily pharmaceutical therapy) discussed, and educational approaches examined.…

  6. Association analysis of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in Tourette`s syndrome using the haplotype relative risk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Propping, P. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Comings et al. have recently reported a highly significant association between Tourette`s syndrome (TS) and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene (DRD2) locus. The A1 allele of the DRD2 Taq I RFLP was present in 45% of the Tourette patients compared with 25% of controls. We tried to replicate this finding by using the haplotype relative risk (HRR) method for association analysis. This method overcomes a major problem of conventional case-control studies, where undetected ethnic differences between patients and controls may result in a false-positive finding, by using parental alleles not inherited by the proband as control alleles. Sixty-one nuclear families encompassing an affected child and parents were typed for the DRD2 Taq I polymorphism. No significant differences in DRD2 A1 allele frequency were observed between TS probands, sub-populations of probands classified according to tic severity, or parental control alleles. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the DRD2 locus may act as a modifying gene in the expression of the disorder in TS probands. 40 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Large family of quantum weak coin-flipping protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochon, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Each classical public-coin protocol for coin flipping is naturally associated with a quantum protocol for weak coin flipping. The quantum protocol is obtained by replacing classical randomness with quantum entanglement and by adding a cheat detection test in the last round that verifies the integrity of this entanglement. The set of such protocols defines a family which contains the protocol with bias 0.192 previously found by the author, as well as protocols with bias as low as 1/6 described herein. The family is analyzed by identifying a set of optimal protocols for every number of messages. In the end, tight lower bounds for the bias are obtained which prove that 1/6 is optimal for all protocols within the family

  8. Suicide in Tourette's and Chronic Tic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Rydell, Mina; Runeson, Bo; Brander, Gustaf; Rück, Christian; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Mataix-Cols, David

    2017-07-15

    Persons with neuropsychiatric disorders are at increased risk of suicide, but there is little data concerning Tourette's and chronic tic disorders (TD/CTD). We aimed to quantify the risk of suicidal behavior in a large nationwide cohort of patients with TD/CTD, establish the contribution of psychiatric comorbidity to this risk, and identify predictors of suicide. Using a validated algorithm, we identified 7736 TD/CTD cases in the Swedish National Patient Register during a 44-year period (1969-2013). Using a matched case-cohort design, patients were compared with general population control subjects (1:10 ratio). Risk of suicidal behavior was estimated using conditional logistic regressions. Predictors of suicidal behavior in the TD/CTD cohort were studied using Cox regression models. In unadjusted models, TD/CTD patients, compared with control subjects, had an increased risk of both dying by suicide (odds ratio: 4.39; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.89-6.67) and attempting suicide (odds ratio: 3.86; 95% CI: 3.50-4.26). After adjusting for psychiatric comorbidities, the risk was reduced but remained substantial. Persistence of tics beyond young adulthood and a previous suicide attempt were the strongest predictors of death by suicide in TD/CTD patients (hazard ratio: 11.39; 95% CI: 3.71-35.02, and hazard ratio: 5.65; 95% CI: 2.21-14.42, respectively). TD/CTD are associated with substantial risk of suicide. Suicidal behavior should be monitored in these patients, particularly in those with persistent tics, history of suicide attempts, and psychiatric comorbidities. Preventive and intervention strategies aimed to reduce the suicidal risk in this group are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome Sharing Repository: methods and sample description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Robert A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tourette Syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic motor and phonic tics. Affected individuals and their family members are at an increased risk for other neuropsychiatric conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. While there is consistent evidence that genetic factors play a significant etiologic role, no replicable susceptibility alleles have thus far been identified. Description Here we discuss a sharing resource of clinical and genetic data, the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome Sharing Repository, whose goal is to provide clinical data, DNA, and lymphoblastoid cell lines to qualified researchers. Conclusion Opening access to the data and patient material to the widest possible research community will hasten the identification of causal genetic factors and facilitate better understanding and treatment of this often impairing disorder.

  10. A clinical study of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, A J; Robertson, M; Trimble, M R; Murray, N M

    1984-01-01

    The clinical features of 53 British-born patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome are described. The mean age at onset of body tics was seven years and for vocalisations 11 years. Coprolalia was present in 39%, copropraxia in 21%, echolalia in 46% and echopraxia in 21%. Complicated antics and mannerisms were also common, often involving the compulsive touching of objects or self-injurious behaviour. Forty-six per cent of cases had a family history of tics in a single close relative and in two individuals a further member of the family had Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Focal dystonia was present in four patients who had never received neuroleptics drugs and chorea was seen in two other untreated patients. In three patients acoustic startle consistently induced brief eye blink followed by a whole body jerk or jump. Rapid repetitive movements of the hands increased the frequency and severity of tics in 13 patients, but the performance of mental arithmetic under time pressure had a much more unpredictable effect. Electroencephalographic abnormalities occurred in eight (13%) but no definite CT brain scan abnormalities were detected. The incidence of left handedness did not differ from that in the general population and no evidence to suggest organic impairment was found on neuropsychological testing. This study provides no support for the notion that Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system but provides some evidence for heterogeneity. PMID:6582230

  11. Tourette's syndrome in a special education population: a pilot study involving a single school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlan, R; Whitmore, D; Irvine, C; McDermott, M P; Como, P G

    1994-04-01

    To determine whether children requiring special education represent a high-risk group for identifying Tourette's syndrome (TS), we performed direct examinations for the presence of tics in 35 special education and 35 regular classroom students from a single school district. Of the special education students, nine (26%) had definite or probable tics as compared with only two (6%) of the regular classroom students. About one-third of the students with tics currently meet diagnostic criteria for TS and probably more will do so in the future. About one-half of the subjects with tics have evidence of obsessive-compulsive behavior (OCB) or an attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). For three randomly selected students with definite tics, direct examinations of first-degree relatives revealed the presence of tics in all families. Subjects to the limitations of this pilot study, we conclude that TS and related tic disorders are commonly associated with the need for special education in this single school district. TS might also be an important contributor to school problems in the childhood population at large and may be a highly prevalent condition. In addition, we conclude that childhood tics are associated with OCB and ADHD, are genetically determined, and are part of the TS clinical spectrum.

  12. Gender diversity in top-management positions in large family and nonfamily businesses

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Rosemarie; Schlömer-Laufen, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    (Why) does the sex ratio in top-management positions in large family and nonfamily businesses differ? Using a unique data set and estimating (fractional) logit regressions we show that the female share in top-management positions in family businesses exceeds the one in nonfamily businesses. One reason is the selection mechanism social homophily from which females in family businesses benefit more because of a higher female share in the decision making body in family businesses. Another reason...

  13. Study of a large Anglo-Saxon family with beta-thalassaemia trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raik, E; Powell, E; Gordon, S

    1976-01-01

    Study of a large Anglo-Saxon family with beta-thalassaemia trait revealed evidence of consanguinity, moreover both branches of the family shared a Spanish ancestor. The manifestations of the disorder were varied in severity and yet the degree of severity appeared to breed true within any individual part of the family. Our explanation for the inheritance pattern observed in the family was to postulate the existence of two non-allelic genes influencing the rate of beta-chain synthesis.

  14. Quest for the elusive genetic basis of Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.I. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a fairly common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of chronic motor and vocal tics that typically have an onset in childhood. The tics usually wax and wane and can even be suppressed. The diagnostic criteria, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., include (i) the presence of motor and one or more vocal tics at some time during the illness, although not necessarily concurrently; (ii) occurrence of tics throughout a period of > 1 year, with no tic-free period of > 3 consecutive mo; (iii) marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning; (iv) onset at <18 years of age; and (v) lack of identifiable environmental causes or other contributing medical conditions. Family studies indicate that the tics are not necessarily disabling, but can vary greatly in severity, with the vast majority being mild. The breadth of phenotypic manifestations considered for diagnosis is a subject of debate and controversy, and, consequently, frequency estimates can range from 1/100 to 1/10,000. One school of thought restricts the diagnosis to that described by Gilles de la Tourette in 1885 and does not include any associated psychopathologies. An intermediate school considers only chronic motor and vocal tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) within the phenotypic spectrum. A third school of thought suggests that the phenotypic boundaries of TS are broad and include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, OCD, panic disorder, conduct disorder, depression, dyslexia, stuttering, mania, obesity, and alcoholism, in addition to motor and vocal tics. The phenotypic definition of TS continues to evolve and is an important consideration for genetic approaches to the dissection of the syndrome. 14 refs.

  15. Partial trisomy 16p in an adolescent with autistic disorder and Tourette`s syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebebrand, J.; Martin, M.; Remschmidt, H. [Philipps-Univ., Marburg (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    A partial trisomy 16p was identified in a 14-year-old male adolescent with autistic disorder. He additionally showed complex motor and vocal phenomena, including some simple tics which had first appeared in childhood. Whereas these simple tics were of subclinical significance, an additional diagnosis of Tourette`s syndrome (TS) appears justified. The case report illustrates the diagnostic difficulties in assessing psychiatric symptomatology associated with both disorders, especially complex motor and vocal phenomena. The cytogenetic finding is discussed critically in the light of other chromosome abnormalities reported in both TS and autistic disorder. Chromosome 16p should be considered as a candidate region especially for autistic disorder. 21 refs.

  16. De Novo Coding Variants Are Strongly Associated with Tourette Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willsey, A Jeremy; Fernandez, Thomas V; Yu, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) and de novo variant detection have proven a powerful approach to gene discovery in complex neurodevelopmental disorders. We have completed WES of 325 Tourette disorder trios from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics cohort and a replication sample of 186 ...

  17. Multispectral Brain Morphometry in Tourette Syndrome Persisting into Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganski, Bogdan; Martino, Davide; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Hutton, Chloe; Orth, Michael; Robertson, Mary M.; Critchley, Hugo D.; Frackowiak, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder with a high prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive-compulsive disorder co-morbidities. Structural changes have been found in frontal cortex and striatum in children and adolescents. A limited number of morphometric studies in Tourette syndrome persisting into…

  18. [Tourette syndrome--in the borderland between neurology and psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Henning; Elvén, Bo

    2014-09-23

    Tourette syndrome is a hereditary tic disorder. The symptoms consist of compulsory movements and vocalizations. Stress has an aggravating effect on tics. Unfortunately tics are easily mistaken for oppositional and defiant behavior. Tourette syndrome is most frequently seen with psychiatric comorbidity. Tics are best treated with low arousal techniques, which may be supplemented with pharmacotherapy.

  19. Neuropsychological Evaluation in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmon, David C.; Smerz, Jessica M.

    2005-01-01

    The neurobiological basis of Tourettes syndrome is reviewed for the purpose of presenting a clinically relevant account of the neuropsychology of the disorder for the clinician who is behaviorally oriented. The neuropathology and neuropsychological deficits typically found in Tourettes are reviewed, and a neuropsychological test battery is…

  20. Adolescent with tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Se-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Tourette syndrome consists of multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics. Psychopathology occurs in approximately 90% of Tourette syndrome patients, with attention-deficit/hyperactivity, mood, and obsessive-compulsive disorders being common. Additionally, Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder may be related in some individuals. However, it is unclear why bipolar disorder may be overrepresented in Tourette syndrome patients, and more research is needed. Herein, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy diagnosed with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder, whose symptoms improved with aripiprazole, atomoxetine, and valproate. The patient was diagnosed with Tourette syndrome at 8 years of age when he developed tics and experienced his first depressive episode. The patient had a poor response to a variety of antidepressants and anti-tic medications. A combination of valproate and aripiprazole stabilized both the patient's tics and mood symptoms. It is important to assess individuals with Tourette syndrome for other disorders, including bipolar disorder. The treatment of children and adolescents with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder is an important clinical issue.

  1. Psychological Aspects of Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Hildreth Youkilis; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Evaluated the psychopathological features that may underlie or accompany Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome. Univariate analyses indicated that Tourette subjects scored higher on the following scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory: Schizophrenia, Depression, Psychopathic Deviate, Psychasthenia and Hypochondriasis. The results…

  2. Functional neuroimaging in Tourette syndrome: recent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debes NM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanette Mol Debes, Marie Préel, Liselotte Skov Pediatric Department, Tourette Clinic, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, DenmarkAbstract: The most recent functional neuroimaging studies on Tourette syndrome (TS are reviewed in this paper. Although it can be difficult to compare functional neuroimaging studies due to differences in methods, differences in age of the included subjects, and differences in the extent to which the presence of comorbidity, medical treatment, and severity of tics are considered in the various studies; most studies show that the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit seems to be involved in the generation of tics. Changes in this circuit seem to be correlated with tic severity. Correlations have been found between the presence of tics and hypermetabolism in various brain regions. Abnormalities of GABAergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with TS have been suggested. During tic suppression, increased activity in the inferior frontal gyrus is seen. The premotor cortex might be involved in inhibition of motor control in subjects with TS. The right anterior insula is suggested to be a part of the urge–tic network. Several studies have shown altered motor network activations and sensorimotor gating deficits in subjects with TS. In future studies, inclusion of more well-defined subjects and further examination of premonitory urge and tic suppression is needed in order to increase the knowledge about the pathophysiology and treatment possibilities of TS. Keywords: functional neuroimaging, Tourette syndrome

  3. Altered interhemispheric connectivity in individuals with Tourette's disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The corpus callosum is the major commissure connecting the cerebral hemispheres. Prior evidence suggests involvement of the corpus callosum in the pathophysiology of Tourette's disorder. The authors assessed corpus callosum size and anatomical connectivity across the cerebral hemispheres...... in persons with Tourette's disorder. METHOD: The size of the corpus callosum was determined on the true midsagittal slices of reformatted, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans and compared across groups in a cross-sectional case-control study of 158 subjects with Tourette's disorder and 121...... healthy comparison subjects, ages 5-65 years. RESULTS: In the context of increasing midsagittal corpus callosum area from childhood to age 30 years, children with Tourette's disorder had smaller overall corpus callosum size, whereas adults with Tourette's disorder on average had larger corpus callosum...

  4. Are there distinct subtypes in Tourette syndrome? Pure-Tourette syndrome versus Tourette syndrome-plus, and simple versus complex tics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen V

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Valsamma Eapen,1,2 Mary M Robertson3,41School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Academic Unit of Child Psychiatry, South Western Sydney Local Health District, Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW, Australia; 3Neuropsychiatry, University College London, UK; 4St Georges Hospital and Medical School, London, UKAbstract: This study addressed several questions relating to the core features of Tourette syndrome (TS including in particular coprolalia (involuntary utterance of obscene words and copropraxia (involuntary and inappropriate rude gesturing. A cohort of 400 TS patients was investigated. We observed that coprolalia occurred in 39% of the full cohort of 400 patients and copropraxia occurred in 20% of the cohort. Those with coprolalia had significantly higher Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS and Diagnostic Confidence Index (DCI total scores and a significantly higher proportion also experienced copropraxia and echolalia. A subgroup of 222 TS patients with full comorbidity data available were also compared based on whether they had pure-TS (motor and vocal tics only or associated comorbidities and co-existent psychopathologies (TS-plus. Pure-TS and TS-plus groups were compared across a number of characteristics including TS severity, associated clinical features, and family history. In this subgroup, 13.5% had pure-TS, while the remainder had comorbidities and psychopathologies consistent with TS-plus. Thirty-nine percent of the TS-plus group displayed coprolalia, compared to (0% of the pure-TS group and the difference in proportions was statistically significant. The only other significant difference found between the two groups was that pure-TS was associated with no family history of obsessive compulsive disorder which is an interesting finding that may suggest that additional genes or environmental factors may be at play when TS is associated with comorbidities. Finally, differences between individuals

  5. Pimozide for tics in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Marras, Connie

    2009-04-15

    Neuroleptic drugs with potent D-2 receptor blocking properties have been the traditional treatment for tics caused by Tourette Syndrome. Pimozide is the most studied of these. Use of these medications is declining because of concerns about side effects, and new atypical neuroleptics are now available. The true benefit and risks associated with pimozide compared to other drugs is not known. To evaluate the efficacy and harms of pimozide in comparison to placebo or other medications in the treatment of tics in Tourette Syndrome. We cross-referenced pimozide and its proprietary names with Tourette Syndrome and its derivations, as MeSH headings and as text words, and searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950-April 2007), and EMBASE (1980-April 2007). Reference lists of relevant articles were reviewed for additional trials. All randomized, controlled, double blind studies comparing pimozide to placebo or other medications for the treatment of tics in Tourette Syndrome were considered for inclusion in this review. Both parallel group and crossover studies of children or adults, at any dose and for any duration, were included. Data was abstracted independently by two authors onto standardized forms and disagreements were resolved by discussion. Six randomized controlled trials were included (total 162 participants, age range 7 to 53 years). Pimozide was compared with: placebo and haloperidol (two trials), placebo (one trial), haloperidol (one trial), and risperidone (two trials). Methodological quality was rated 'fair' for all studies. Studies used different outcome measurement scales for assessing tic severity and adverse effects. Significant clinical heterogeneity made meta-analysis inappropriate. Pimozide was superior to placebo in three studies, though it caused more side effects than placebo in one of these. Pimozide was inferior to

  6. Tourette syndrome in a pedigree with a 7;18 translocation: Identification of a YAC spanning the translocation breakpoint at 18q22.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Comings, D.E. [City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of multiple, involuntary motor and vocal tics. Associated pathologies include attention deficit disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Extensive linkage analysis based on an autosomal dominant mode of transmission with reduced penetrance has failed to show linkage with polymorphic markers, suggesting either locus heterogeneity or a polygenic origin for Tourette syndrome. An individual diagnosed with Tourette syndrome has been described carrying a constitutional chromosome translocation. Other family members carrying the translocation exhibit features seen in Tourette syndrome including motor tics, vocal tics, and OCD. Since the disruption of specific genes by a chromosomal rearrangement can elicit a particular phenotype, we have undertaken the physical mapping of the 7;18 translocation such that genes mapping at the site of the breakpoint can be identified and evaluated for a possible involvement in Tourette syndrome. Using somatic cell hybrids retaining either the der(7) or the der(18), a more precise localization of the breakpoints on chromosomes 7 and 18 have been determined. Furthermore, physical mapping has identified two YAC clones that span the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 18 as determined by FISH. These YAC clones will be useful for the eventual identification of genes that map to chromosomes 7 and 18 at the site of the translocation. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  8. Study on superhigh energy γ-ray family events with large-scale Fe emulsion chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Jingru; Lu Suiling; Su Shi

    1990-01-01

    Using a large-scale iron emulsion chamber, a big γ-ray family event with observed energy ΣE r = 7631 TeV was obtained. This paper described the advantages of iron emulsion chamber for studying big families and the characteristics of the event observed, together with a comparison with the Monte-Carlo simulation results

  9. Clinical Polymorphism of Stargardt Disease in a Large Consanguineous Tunisian Family; Implications for Nosology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila El Matri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the polymorphic expression of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family with clinical intra- and interfamilial variation of the condition. Methods: Twelve subjects from two related families with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease were enrolled. A detailed clinical examination including visual acuity and visual field measurement, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography (ERG and color vision testing was performed for all subjects. Results: The youngest child from family A manifested typical Stargardt disease while her two brothers presented with Stargardt disease-fundus flavimaculatus (STGD-FFM and her two sisters demonstrated a peculiar phenotype overlapping Stargardt disease and cone-rod dystrophy; their phenotypic manifestation corresponded well with ERG groups I, II and III, respectively. This uncommon occurrence of an age-related decline in ERG amplitude and worsening of fundus changes is suggestive of a grading pattern in Stargardt disease. Their two cousins in family B, displayed the STGD-FFM phenotype. Despite clinically similar STGD-FFM patterns in both families, age of onset and progression of the phenotype in family B differed from family A. Conclusion: This is the first report on phenotypic variation of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family. Regarding phenotype and severity of visual symptoms, family A demonstrated Stargardt disease at various stages of progression. In addition, STGDFFM appeared to be an independent clinical entity in family B. These findings imply that further parameters are required to classify Stargardt′s disease.

  10. Tourette syndrome and comorbid conditions: a spectrum of different severities and complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Renata; Gulisano, Mariangela; Pellico, Alessandra; Calì, Paola Valeria; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    To investigate clinical correlates of Tourette syndrome and to identify the impact of comorbidities, we retrospectively recruited 92 young people affected by Tourette syndrome compared with 102 healthy controls. Neuropsychological assessment included: Youth Quality of Life-Research, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Children's Depression Inventory, and Conner's and Child Behavior Checklist; moreover, Tourette syndrome patients completed the Yale Global Tic Severity Rating Scale and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. Four clinical subgroups were identified: pure Tourette syndrome (49.8%), Tourette syndrome plus attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (22.2%), Tourette syndrome plus obsessive-compulsive disorder (21.5%), and Tourette syndrome plus ADHD plus obsessive-compulsive disorder (6.5%). Our findings suggested that emotional lability appeared in all Tourette syndrome subgroups, independently from comorbidities, representing a clinical feature of Tourette syndrome itself. Moreover, our data suggested that all 4 clinical subgroups had higher statistically significant behavioral problems compared with the healthy controls (P = .000), whereas affective and anxiety symptoms were overrepresented in Tourette syndrome plus comorbidities subgroups. Finally, Tourette syndrome patients had a lower quality of life compared with the healthy controls. These differences were statistically significant between the pure Tourette syndrome subgroups and Tourette syndrome plus comorbidities subgroups, as well as Tourette syndrome plus comorbidities subgroups and healthy controls. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. An Empirical Examination of Symptom Substitution Associated With Behavior Therapy for Tourette's Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Alan L; McGuire, Joseph F; Wilhelm, Sabine; Piacentini, John; Woods, Douglas W; Walkup, John T; Hatch, John P; Villarreal, Robert; Scahill, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Over the past six decades, behavior therapy has been a major contributor to the development of evidence-based psychotherapy treatments. However, a long-standing concern with behavior therapy among many nonbehavioral clinicians has been the potential risk for symptom substitution. Few studies have been conducted to evaluate symptom substitution in response to behavioral treatments, largely due to measurement and definitional challenges associated with treated psychiatric symptoms. Given the overt motor and vocal tics associated with Tourette's disorder, it presents an excellent opportunity to empirically evaluate the potential risk for symptom substitution associated with behavior therapy. The present study examined the possible presence of symptom substitution using four methods: (a) the onset of new tic symptoms, (b) the occurrence of adverse events, (c) change in tic medications, and (d) worsening of co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. Two hundred twenty-eight participants with Tourette's disorder or persistent motor or vocal tic disorders were randomly assigned to receive behavioral therapy or supportive therapy for tics. Both therapies consisted of eight sessions over 10 weeks. Results indicated that participants treated with behavior therapy were not more likely to have an onset of new tic symptoms, experience adverse events, increase tic medications, or have an exacerbation in co-occurring psychiatric symptoms relative to participants treated with supportive therapy. Further analysis suggested that the emergence of new tics was attributed with the normal waxing and waning nature of Tourette's disorder. Findings provide empirical support to counter the long-standing concern of symptom substitution in response to behavior therapy for individuals with Tourette's disorder. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Malaysia: where big is still better. For Malays, large families are part of the plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-03

    The benefits of various-sized families in Malaysia were discussed by several women and supplemented with official statements on family planning (FP). The Director of the National Population and Family Development, Dr. Raj Karim, advised that maternal health is jeopardized when women have more than five children. About 30% of reproductive age women in Malaysia have five or more children. A Federation of FP Associations spokesperson agreed that women should be advised of the dangers of bearing over five children, of the importance of spacing births two to four years apart, and of the ideal age of childbearing (21-39 years). The government lacks an official policy on family size. The government position is, however, compatible with Islamic teachings on spacing in order to protect the health of the mother and child. Islamic law does not permit sterilization or abortion. The "fatwas" of Islamic teaching may have been misconstrued by those not using any form of contraception. Dr. Karim, who has five children, reported that having a large family can be difficult for a woman with a job, a career, and a husband or when both parents work. Most Malays desire large families. The average Malay family size was 4.1 children in 1990; Malaysian Chinese have fertility of 2.3 children and Malaysian Indians have 2.6 children. People say that the benefits outweigh the hardships of a large family.

  13. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R; Groth, Camilla; Glenthøj, Birte; Rizzo, Renata; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Paschou, Peristera; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying environmental and genetic factors are largely unknown. IMMP2L (inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase, subunit 2) located on chromosome 7q31 is one of the genes suggested as a susceptibility factor in disease pathogenesis. Through screening of a Danish cohort comprising 188 unrelated Tourette syndrome patients for copy number variations, we identified seven patients with intragenic IMMP2L deletions (3.7%), and this frequency was significantly higher (P=0.0447) compared with a Danish control cohort (0.9%). Four of the seven deletions identified did not include any known exons of IMMP2L, but were within intron 3. These deletions were found to affect a shorter IMMP2L mRNA species with two alternative 5′-exons (one including the ATG start codon). We showed that both transcripts (long and short) were expressed in several brain regions, with a particularly high expression in cerebellum and hippocampus. The current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons. PMID:24549057

  14. THE DEVELOPMENT OF SERVICES IN THE FIELD OF SOCIAL WORK WITH LARGE FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Ібрагім

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of social services in the field of social work with large families is analyzed and their basic functions are defined in the article. The necessity of implementation of the system of guaranteed social and educational support to families depending on the type of large families, which would be provided by governmental and nongovernmental organizations, including public organizations are considered and analyzed. The statistical data on the number and proportion of large families in Ukraine in general and namely in Kharkiv region are provided. The principle of subsidiarity, which is the basis of the full development of the state and is based on the redistribution of responsibility for the formation of family welfare from the state to the family, and receipt of primary social and pedagogical support of public organizations in case you are unable to solve certain problems is disclosed. The article also presents practical experience in providing social and educational support by public organization Association of large families “AMMA”” in Kharkiv.

  15. The effect of Tourette syndrome on the education and social interactions of a school-age child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohm, Bonnie

    2006-06-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurological condition characterized by involuntary vocal or motor tics. Symptoms begin occurring before the age of 18 and are more common in boys than girls. Tics can change in severity and character from hour to hour or in stressful situations. Uncontrolled tics can cause self-esteem concerns, family stress, and academic difficulty. Medication and school services were employed to help the student achieve the goal of feeling more comfortable with peers and in the classroom.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of tics in Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by the chronic presence of multiple motor tics (e.g. eye blinking, shoulder shrugging, etc. and at least one vocal/phonic tic (e.g. grunting or sniffing. The clinical picture of patients with Tourette syndrome is often complicated by tic-related behavioural problems and associated psychopathology. The pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome is poorly understood, however converging evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests abnormalities within the fronto-striatal pathways. The pharmacological management of the tic symptoms focuses on the dopaminergic and noradrenergic pathways and aims to improve the health-related quality of life of patients.

  17. Tourette syndrome, co-morbidities and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Snedden, Corina; Črnčec, Rudi; Pick, Anna; Sachdev, Perminder

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is often associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and other co-morbidities, the presence of which can reduce health-related quality of life. The relationship between the number and type of co-morbidities and tic severity upon health-related quality of life has been insufficiently examined in Tourette syndrome populations and not at all in the Australian context. We hypothesised that an increased number of co-morbid diagnoses would be inversely related to health-related quality of life and that the presence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder in particular would negatively impact health-related quality of life. In all, 83 people with a previously established diagnosis of Tourette syndrome, who responded to a letter of invitation sent to the Tourette Syndrome Association of Australia past-member database, formed the study sample. Participants completed the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome-Quality of Life Scale and a short form of the National Hospital Interview Schedule to assess tics and related behaviours. Participants with pure-Tourette syndrome had significantly better health-related quality of life than those with Tourette syndrome and three or more co-morbid diagnoses. Few differences were observed between the pure-Tourette syndrome and Tourette syndrome and one or two co-morbid diagnoses groups. Analysis of the impact of individual co-morbid disorders and Tourette syndrome symptoms on health-related quality of life indicated that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder exerted a significant negative effect, as did the presence of complex tics, especially coprolalia and copropraxia. When these variables were examined in multiple regression analysis, number of co-morbidities and the presence of coprophenomena emerged as significant predictors of health-related quality of life. While tics are the defining feature of Tourette syndrome, it appears to be the

  18. Genome scan for linkage to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, C.L.; Livingston, J.; Williamson, R. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a familial, neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic, intermittent motor and vocal tics. In addition to tics, affected individuals frequently display symptoms such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive compulsive disorder. Genetic analyses of family data have suggested that susceptibility to the disorder is most likely due to a single genetic locus with a dominant mode of transmission and reduced penetrance. In the search for genetic linkage for TS, we have collected well-characterized pedigrees with multiple affected individuals on whom extensive diagnostic evaluations have been done. The first stage of our study is to scan the genome systematically using a panel of uniformly spaced (10 to 20 cM), highly polymorphic, microsatellite markers on 5 families segregating TS. To date, 290 markers have been typed and 3,660 non-overlapping cM of the genome have been excluded for possible linkage under the assumption of genetic homogeneity. Because of the possibility of locus heterogeneity overall summed exclusion is not considered tantamount to absolute exclusion of a disease locus in that region. The results from each family are carefully evaluated and a positive lod score in a single family is followed up by typing closely linked markers. Linkage to TS was examined by two-point analysis using the following genetic model: single autosomal dominant gene with gene frequency .003 and maximum penetrance of .99. An age-of-onset correction is included using a linear function increasing from age 2 years to 21 years. A small rate of phenocopies is also incorporated into the model. Only individuals with TS or CMT according to DSM III-R criteria were regarded as affected for the purposes of this summary. Additional markers are being tested to provide coverage at 5 cM intervals. Moreover, we are currently analyzing the data non-parametrically using the Affected-Pedigree-Member Method of linkage analysis.

  19. Behandling af Tourettes syndrom med aripiprazol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenstrøm, Anne Dorte; Sindø, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a motoric disorder characterised by multiple motor and vocal tics. The treatment for patients with moderate to severe TS includes antipsychotic medication. A case report is described in which a 20 year-old male had taken antipsychotic medication since the age of five......, due to TS. The initial treatment consisted of pimozide and risperidone, both of which had an unsatisfactorily efficacy on tics and side effects in the form of weight gain and sedation. The patient is now treated with aripiprazole and there is a marked reduction of tics and no side effects...

  20. Tourette syndrome: the self under siege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, James F; Bloch, Michael H; Scahill, Lawrence; King, Robert A

    2006-08-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics--rapid, repetitive, stereotyped movements or vocalizations. Tourette syndrome typically has a prepubertal onset, and boys are more commonly affected than girls. Symptoms usually begin with transient bouts of simple motor tics. By age 10 years, most children are aware of nearly irresistible somatosensory urges that precede the tics. These urges likely reflect a defect in sensorimotor gating because they intrude into the child's conscious awareness and become a source of distraction and distress. A momentary sense of relief typically follows the completion of a tic. Over the course of hours, tics occur in bouts, with a regular intertic interval. Tics increase during periods of emotional excitement and fatigue. Tics can become "complex" in nature and appear to be purposeful. Tics can be willfully suppressed for brief intervals and can be evoked by the mere mention of them. Tics typically diminish during periods of goal-directed behavior, especially those that involve both heightened attention and fine motor or vocal control, as occur in musical and athletic performances. Over the course of months, tics wax and wane. New tics appear, often in response to new sources of somatosensory irritation, such as the appearance of a persistent vocal tic (a cough) following a cold. Over the course of years, tic severity typically peaks between 8 and 12 years of age. By the end of the second decade of life, many individuals are virtually tic free. Less than 20% of cases continue to experience clinically impairing tics as adults. Tics rarely occur in isolation, and other coexisting conditions--such as behavioral disinhibition, hypersensitivity to a broad range of sensory stimuli, problems with visual motor integration, procedural learning difficulties, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anxiety, and emotional instability--are often a

  1. Advances in Tourette syndrome: diagnoses and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serajee, Fatema J; Mahbubul Huq, A H M

    2015-06-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal or phonic tic, and often one or more comorbid psychiatric disorders. Premonitory sensory urges before tic execution and desire for "just-right" perception are central features. The pathophysiology involves cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits and possibly dopaminergic system. TS is considered a genetic disorder but the genetics is complex and likely involves rare mutations, common variants, and environmental and epigenetic factors. Treatment is multimodal and includes education and reassurance, behavioral interventions, pharmacologic, and rarely, surgical interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enlargement of thalamic nuclei in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Ann M; Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: The basal ganglia and thalamus together connect in parallel closed-loop circuits with the cortex. Previous imaging studies have shown modifications of the basal ganglia and cortical targets in individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS), but less is known regarding the role of the thalamus......-subcortical circuits constitute an anatomical crossroad wherein enlargement of motor nuclei may represent activity-dependent hypertrophy within this component of cortical-subcortical motor circuits, or an adaptive response within a larger putative compensatory system that could thereby directly modulate activity...

  3. Is it a tic or Tourette's? Clues for differentiating simple from more complex tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidente, V G

    2000-10-01

    Tics are characterized by sterotyped, purposeless, and irregularly repetitive movements and usually can be classified as chronic motor or vocal tic disorders, transient tic disorders, or Tourette's syndrome. The latter is a complex disorder associated with multiple tics and often accompanied by other conditions, such as ADHD and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment can be difficult, and drug therapy should begin with agents least likely to cause problems for the patient. Education of the patient and family and support from the physician and other care providers are essential elements of effective management.

  4. Genetic predisposition increases the tic severity, rate of comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational difficulties in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition. Professionals need to be aware of genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome, as children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition have more severe symptoms than those children with Tourette syndrome who are without genetic predisposition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. A large pericardial effusion and bilateral pleural effusions as the initial manifestations of Familial Mediterranean Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Schembri, Emma Louise; Mifsud, Simon; Cassar Demarco, Daniela; Coleiro, Bernard; Mallia, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a condition characterized by recurrent febrile poly-serositis. Typical presentations of the disease include episodes of fever, abdominal pain and joint pains. Chest pain is a less common presentation. We report a case of FMF which presented with a large pericardial effusion and bilateral pleural effusions in a lady who had no positive family history and negative genetic testing.

  6. Altered interhemispheric connectivity in individuals with Tourette's disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The corpus callosum is the major commissure connecting the cerebral hemispheres. Prior evidence suggests involvement of the corpus callosum in the pathophysiology of Tourette's disorder. The authors assessed corpus callosum size and anatomical connectivity across the cerebral hemispheres...

  7. Involvement of astrocyte metabolic coupling in Tourette syndrome pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Christiaan; Goudriaan, Andrea; Smit, August B; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Verheijen, Mark H G; Posthuma, Danielle

    2015-11-01

    Tourette syndrome is a heritable neurodevelopmental disorder whose pathophysiology remains unknown. Recent genome-wide association studies suggest that it is a polygenic disorder influenced by many genes of small effect. We tested whether these genes cluster in cellular function by applying gene-set analysis using expert curated sets of brain-expressed genes in the current largest available Tourette syndrome genome-wide association data set, involving 1285 cases and 4964 controls. The gene sets included specific synaptic, astrocytic, oligodendrocyte and microglial functions. We report association of Tourette syndrome with a set of genes involved in astrocyte function, specifically in astrocyte carbohydrate metabolism. This association is driven primarily by a subset of 33 genes involved in glycolysis and glutamate metabolism through which astrocytes support synaptic function. Our results indicate for the first time that the process of astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling may be an important contributor to Tourette syndrome pathogenesis.

  8. Tourette syndrome, growth retardation, and platyspondyly: an entity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheper, Frederike Y.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2002-01-01

    A 14-year-old male is described with Tourette syndrome, platyspondyly, a marked delay in bone age, growth retardation that is more expressed in the limbs and talipes equinovarus. This appears to be a new entity

  9. Aberrant cortical associative plasticity associated with severe adult Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Ruiz-Rodríguez, María Adilia; Palomar, Francisco J; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas, Laura; Porcacchia, Paolo; Gómez-Crespo, Mercedes; Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Carrillo, Fátima; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Mir, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown altered cortical plasticity in adult patients with Tourette syndrome. However, the clinical significance of this finding remains elusive. Motor cortical plasticity was evaluated in 15 adult patients with severe Tourette syndrome and 16 healthy controls using the paired associative stimulation protocol by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Associations between paired associative stimulation-induced plasticity and relevant clinical variables, including cortical excitability, psychiatric comorbidities, drug treatment and tic severity, were assessed. Motor cortical plasticity was abnormally increased in patients with Tourette syndrome compared with healthy subjects. This abnormal plasticity was independently associated with tic severity. Patients with severe Tourette syndrome display abnormally increased cortical associative plasticity. This aberrant cortical plasticity was associated with tic severity, suggesting an underlying mechanism for tic pathophysiology. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Tic symptom dimensions and their heritabilities in Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Marcel J; Delucchi, Kevin L; Mathews, Carol M; Cath, Danielle C

    INTRODUCTION: Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is both genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Gene-finding strategies have had limited success, possibly because of symptom heterogeneity. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at specifically investigating heritabilities of tic symptom factors in

  11. [Tics and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijero-Merino, B; Gómez-Esteban, J C; Zarranz, J J

    2009-01-23

    Tourette syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by involuntary vocal and motor tics. It affects around 1 to 2% of school-age children and is the most common movement disorder in paediatric age. Tics are involuntary or semivoluntary, sudden, brief, intermittent, repetitive movements (motor tics) or sounds (phonic tics). It is often associated with psychiatric comorbidities, mainly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Given its diverse presentation, Tourette's syndrome can almost mimic many hyperkinetic disorders, making the diagnosis challenging at times. The etiology of this syndrome is thought to be related to basal ganglia dysfunction and many clues have been pursued, both genetic and environmental factors, but no compelling major contribution to the pathogenesis of the disease has yet emerged. Treatment can be behavioural, pharmacologic, or surgical, and is dictated by the most incapacitating symptoms. Alpha-2-adrenergic agonists are the first line of pharmacologic therapy, but dopamine-receptor-blocking drugs are required for multiple, complex tics. Dopamine-receptor-blocking drugs are associated with potential side effects. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment can substantially improve quality of life and psychosocial functioning in affected patients.

  12. Are there distinct subtypes in Tourette syndrome? Pure-Tourette syndrome versus Tourette syndrome-plus, and simple versus complex tics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Robertson, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    This study addressed several questions relating to the core features of Tourette syndrome (TS) including in particular coprolalia (involuntary utterance of obscene words) and copropraxia (involuntary and inappropriate rude gesturing). A cohort of 400 TS patients was investigated. We observed that coprolalia occurred in 39% of the full cohort of 400 patients and copropraxia occurred in 20% of the cohort. Those with coprolalia had significantly higher Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) and Diagnostic Confidence Index (DCI) total scores and a significantly higher proportion also experienced copropraxia and echolalia. A subgroup of 222 TS patients with full comorbidity data available were also compared based on whether they had pure-TS (motor and vocal tics only) or associated comorbidities and co-existent psychopathologies (TS-plus). Pure-TS and TS-plus groups were compared across a number of characteristics including TS severity, associated clinical features, and family history. In this subgroup, 13.5% had pure-TS, while the remainder had comorbidities and psychopathologies consistent with TS-plus. Thirty-nine percent of the TS-plus group displayed coprolalia, compared to (0%) of the pure-TS group and the difference in proportions was statistically significant. The only other significant difference found between the two groups was that pure-TS was associated with no family history of obsessive compulsive disorder which is an interesting finding that may suggest that additional genes or environmental factors may be at play when TS is associated with comorbidities. Finally, differences between individuals with simple versus complex vocal/motor tics were evaluated. Results indicated that individuals with complex motor/vocal tics were significantly more likely to report premonitory urges/sensations than individuals with simple tics and TS. The implications of these findings for the assessment and understanding of TS are discussed. PMID:26089672

  13. The Relation Between Attention and Tic Generation in Tourette Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Misirlisoy, E.; Brandt, V.; Ganos, C.; Tuebing, J.; Muenchau, A.; Haggard, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Many neuropsychiatric disorders involve abnormal attentional processing. Systematic investigations of how attention may affect tic frequency in Tourette syndrome are lacking. Method: Patients performed rhythmic finger movements, approximately once every 2 s. Each movement triggered a unique visual color stimulus. Patients were asked to monitor and remember their finger actions, the external colors caused by their actions, or their tics. Sixteen adult Tourette syndrome patients perf...

  14. Involvement of astrocyte metabolic coupling in Tourette syndrome pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, CA; de Leeuw, C; Goudriaan, A; Smit, AB; Yu, D; Scharf, J; Verheijen, MHG; Posthuma, D

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTourette syndrome is a heritable neurodevelopmental disorder whose pathophysiology remains unknown. Recent genome-wide association studies suggest that it is a polygenic disorder influenced by many genes of small effect. We tested whether these genes cluster in cellular function by applying gene-set analysis using expert curated sets of brain-expressed genes in the current largest available Tourette syndrome genome-wide association data set, involving 1285 cases and 4964 controls....

  15. Family-specific aggregation of lipid GWAS variants confers the susceptibility to familial hypercholesterolemia in a large Austrian family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikkola, Elina; Ko, Arthur; Alvarez, Marcus; Cantor, Rita M.; Garske, Kristina; Kim, Elliot; Gee, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Muxel, Reinhard; Matikainen, Niina; Söderlund, Sanni; Motazacker, Mahdi M.; Borén, Jan; Lamina, Claudia; Kronenberg, Florian; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Palotie, Aarno; Laakso, Markku; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Hypercholesterolemia confers susceptibility to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Both serum total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) exhibit a strong genetic component (heritability estimates 0.41-0.50). However, a large part of this heritability cannot be explained by the

  16. Ultra Large Gene Families: A Matter of Adaptation or Genomic Parasites?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp H. Schiffer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication is an important mechanism of molecular evolution. It offers a fast track to modification, diversification, redundancy or rescue of gene function. However, duplication may also be neutral or (slightly deleterious, and often ends in pseudo-geneisation. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic distribution of ultra large gene families on long and short evolutionary time scales. In particular, we focus on a family of NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR-genes, which we previously found in large numbers to occupy one chromosome arm of the zebrafish genome. We were interested to see whether such a tight clustering is characteristic for ultra large gene families. Our data reconfirm that most gene family inflations are lineage-specific, but we can only identify very few gene clusters. Based on our observations we hypothesise that, beyond a certain size threshold, ultra large gene families continue to proliferate in a mechanism we term “run-away evolution”. This process might ultimately lead to the failure of genomic integrity and drive species to extinction.

  17. Tourette syndrome in a longitudinal perspective. Clinical course of tics and comorbidities, coexisting psychopathologies, phenotypes and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Camilla

    2018-04-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by motor and vocal tics and frequent associated comorbidities. The developmental trajectory of tic shows tic-onset in the age of 4-6, peak in the age of 10-12 and decline during adolescence, although only few and small longitudinal studies form the basis of this evidence. Recent studies suggest that comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and coexisting psychopathologies tend to persist and become more dominant in adolescence. This large prospective follow-up study want to examine the clinical course of TS: tic and comorbidities during adolescence, the prevalence of coexisting psychopathologies, the tic-related impairment, development in phenotype expression and find predictors for the expected course of TS. 
Method: This study is examining a large clinical cohort recruited at the Danish National Tourette Clinic during the period 2005-2007 and 2011-2013. At baseline, 314 participants aged 5-19 years were included and at follow-up 6 years later 227 participated, aged 11-26. All participants were uniformly clinically examined at basis and follow-up with a clinical interview and validated measurements to assess comorbidities. The Yale Global Tic Severity Scale was used to asses tic severity and tic-related impairment. At follow-up a cross-sectional diagnostic evaluation was made with the Development and Well-Being Assessment to assess coexisting psychopathologies.
 Results: A significant decline in tic and the most frequent comorbidities OCD and ADHD was found although some variation existed and some subclinical and partial remissions persisted. Tic-related impairment was not reflected in the tic-decline as expected but influenced by several parameters. The phenotype expression was found to be dynamic but overall changed toward TS without comorbidities. Several predictors were found to predict the clinical course of TS in

  18. Neurobehavioral aspects, pathophysiology, and management of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprecher, David R; Schrock, Lauren; Himle, Michael

    2014-08-01

    This update summarizes progress in understanding Tourette syndrome clinical characteristics, etiology, and treatment over the past year. Premonitory sensory phenomena were found to have important impacts on Tourette syndrome quality of life. A rare genetic form of Tourette syndrome due to L-histidine-decarboxylase mutation, with similar features in human and rodent, has inspired new research on functional anatomy of Tourette syndrome. In response to new data, treatment guidelines have been revised to include behavioral therapy as first-line treatment. Novel dopamine receptor antagonists aripiprazole and ecopipam have shown potential efficacy - as well as tolerability concerns. Recent work has suggested efficacy and tolerability of topiramate and fluphenazine, but more rigorous studies are needed to further understand their role in Tourette syndrome management. Recent consensus guidelines explain when deep brain stimulation can be considered for severe refractory cases under a multidisciplinary team. More research is needed to identify better tolerated treatments for, to understand pathophysiology or functional anatomy of, and to predict or influence longitudinal outcome of Tourette syndrome.

  19. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  20. Toward a Multifactorial Conception of the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome and Persistent Chronic Tic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie, Marc E.; O?Connor, Kieron

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent giant leaps in understanding Gilles de la Tourette?s syndrome (now Tourette Disorder in the DSM 5), accurate multi-modal description, rigorous assessment procedures, and the improvement of evidence-based treatment currently pose a considerable challenge. In this context, the current special edition aims to elaborate three important dimensions in Tourette Disorder. Firstly, the effective characterization and etiological basis of the disorder are reviewed, since such characteriza...

  1. Novel skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor mutation in a large Brazilian family with malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, S; Nelson, T; Sudo, R T; Zapata-Sudo, G; Batti, M; Sambuughin, N

    2002-07-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes susceptible individuals to a potentially life-threatening crisis when exposed to commonly used anesthetics. Mutations in the skeletal muscle calcium release channel, ryanodine receptor (RYR1) are associated with MH in over 50% of affected families. Linkage analysis of the RYR1 gene region at 19q13 was performed in a large Brazilian family and a distinct disease co-segregating haplotype was revealed in the majority of members with diagnosis of MH. Subsequent sequencing of RYR1 mutational hot spots revealed a nucleotide substitution of C to T at position 7062, causing a novel amino acid change from Arg2355 to Cys associated with MH in the family. Haplotype analysis of the RYR1 gene area at 19q13 in the family with multiple MH members is an important tool in identification of genetic cause underlying this disease.

  2. Prenatal molecular diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) in a large cohort of Israeli families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenmann, Ada; Bejarano-Achache, Idit; Eli, Dalia; Maftsir, Genia; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Blumenfeld, Anat

    2009-10-01

    To present our accumulated data on prenatal molecular diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) in a large cohort of Israeli albino families. Albinism consists of variable phenotypes, but only families with predicted severely handicapped albino offspring, who declared their wish to terminate a pregnancy of such a fetus, are eligible for prenatal testing. Prenatal testing is not offered otherwise. Following detailed genetic investigation and counseling, molecular prenatal testing was performed using the combination of mutation screening, direct sequencing, and haplotype analysis. A total of 55 prenatal tests were performed in 37 families; in 26 families the propositus was the child, and in 11, a parent or a close relative. In 32 families tyrosinase (TYR) mutations were diagnosed. In 5 families a P gene mutation was detected. Twelve albino fetuses were diagnosed. Following further genetic counseling, all couples elected to terminate the pregnancy. Three additional pregnancies were terminated for other reasons. Families with increased risk for an albino child with severe visual handicap, seek premarital and prenatal genetic counseling and testing, for the prevention of affected offspring. Our combined methods of molecular genetic testing enable a nationwide approach for prevention of albinism. The same paradigm can be applied to other populations affected with albinism.

  3. The pathophysiology of echopraxia/echolalia: relevance to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos; Ogrzal, Timo; Schnitzler, Alfons; Münchau, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    Echopraxia and echolalia are subsets of imitative behavior. They are essential developmental elements in social learning. Their persistence or reemergence after a certain age, though, can be a sign of underlying brain dysfunction. Although echophenomena have been acknowledged as a typical sign in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) since its first description, their clinical significance and neural correlates are largely unknown. Here, we review the course of their scientific historical development and focus on their clinical phenomenology and differential diagnosis with a particular view to GTS. The neural basis of echophenomena will also be addressed. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: an investigation in a rare and large Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Weili; Li, Dezhong; Liu, Wanhong; He, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP), mainly associated with the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene, is generally an autosomal-dominant inherited peripheral neuropathy. The present large family including four generations provides an exciting opportunity to gain important insights into HNPP in China. A large 43-member family with ten members suspected to be affected by HNPP was studied. Neurologic examinations, electrophysiological and neuropathological studies and molecular genetic testing were used for these kindred. Clinically, the proband had limb hyposthenia and atrophy, and his mother showed declined tendon reflexes in the right lower limb. Electrophysiologically, sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities were generalized reduced. Sural nerve biopsy for the proband showed focal thickesning of the myelin sheaths. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that the PMP22 gene has a higher Ct value than reference gene in all suspected patients. These results indicated that the family is indeed a rare and large pedigree of HNPP caused by the deletion of PMP22 gene. Given that the suspected patient in the fourth generation is absent, this family is still worthy of further follow-up study. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Evaluating the feasibility of using candidate DNA barcodes in discriminating species of the large Asteraceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ting; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Zhu, Yingjie; Liu, Chang; Chen, Shilin

    2010-10-26

    Five DNA regions, namely, rbcL, matK, ITS, ITS2, and psbA-trnH, have been recommended as primary DNA barcodes for plants. Studies evaluating these regions for species identification in the large plant taxon, which includes a large number of closely related species, have rarely been reported. The feasibility of using the five proposed DNA regions was tested for discriminating plant species within Asteraceae, the largest family of flowering plants. Among these markers, ITS2 was the most useful in terms of universality, sequence variation, and identification capability in the Asteraceae family. The species discriminating power of ITS2 was also explored in a large pool of 3,490 Asteraceae sequences that represent 2,315 species belonging to 494 different genera. The result shows that ITS2 correctly identified 76.4% and 97.4% of plant samples at the species and genus levels, respectively. In addition, ITS2 displayed a variable ability to discriminate related species within different genera. ITS2 is the best DNA barcode for the Asteraceae family. This approach significantly broadens the application of DNA barcoding to resolve classification problems in the family Asteraceae at the genera and species levels.

  6. Evaluating the feasibility of using candidate DNA barcodes in discriminating species of the large Asteraceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Five DNA regions, namely, rbcL, matK, ITS, ITS2, and psbA-trnH, have been recommended as primary DNA barcodes for plants. Studies evaluating these regions for species identification in the large plant taxon, which includes a large number of closely related species, have rarely been reported. Results The feasibility of using the five proposed DNA regions was tested for discriminating plant species within Asteraceae, the largest family of flowering plants. Among these markers, ITS2 was the most useful in terms of universality, sequence variation, and identification capability in the Asteraceae family. The species discriminating power of ITS2 was also explored in a large pool of 3,490 Asteraceae sequences that represent 2,315 species belonging to 494 different genera. The result shows that ITS2 correctly identified 76.4% and 97.4% of plant samples at the species and genus levels, respectively. In addition, ITS2 displayed a variable ability to discriminate related species within different genera. Conclusions ITS2 is the best DNA barcode for the Asteraceae family. This approach significantly broadens the application of DNA barcoding to resolve classification problems in the family Asteraceae at the genera and species levels.

  7. Psychosocial outcome and psychiatric comorbidity in older adolescents with Tourette syndrome: controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorman, Daniel A; Thompson, Nancy; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with Tourette syndrome generally experience improvement of tics by age 18 years, but psychosocial and comorbidity outcomes at this age are unclear. AIMS: To compare psychosocial outcomes and lifetime comorbidity rates in older adolescents with Tourette syndrome and controls. We...... hypothesised a priori that individuals with Tourette syndrome would have lower Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) scores. METHOD: A total of 65 individuals with Tourette syndrome, identified in childhood, and 65 matched community controls without tic or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms were......, learning disorder and conduct disorder (Ptic severity. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically ascertained children with Tourette syndrome typically have impaired psychosocial functioning...

  8. Translocation breakpoint at 7q31 associated with tics: further evidence for IMMP2L as a candidate gene for Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag; Cooper-Charles, Lisa; McMullan, Dominic J; Walker, Judith M; Davison, Val; Morton, Jenny

    2011-06-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic basis. We identified a male patient with Tourette syndrome-like tics and an apparently balanced de novo translocation [46,XY,t(2;7)(p24.2;q31)]. Further analysis using array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) revealed a cryptic deletion at 7q31.1-7q31.2. Breakpoints disrupting this region have been reported in one isolated and one familial case of Tourette syndrome. In our case, IMMP2L, a gene coding for a human homologue of the yeast inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase subunit 2, was disrupted by the breakpoint on 7q31.1, with deletion of exons 1-3 of the gene. The IMMP2L gene has previously been proposed as a candidate gene for Tourette syndrome, and our case provides further evidence of its possible role in the pathogenesis. The deleted region (7q31.1-7q31.2) of 7.2 Mb of genomic DNA also encompasses numerous genes, including FOXP2, associated with verbal dyspraxia, and the CFTR gene.

  9. Tourette syndrome and excitatory substances: is there a connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Li-Ping; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Li-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Bo; Lu, Jin-Fang; Liu, Qun; Wang, Hang-Yan

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between excitatory substances by testing the urine in children with Tourette syndrome (TS). We performed a control study involving 44 patients with TS and 44 normal children by investigating the children's daily eating habits. We used the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer from Agilent. Substances for detection included 197 excitatory substances prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and other substances with similar chemical structures or biological functions for urine samples. Forty-four patients who did not take any drugs in the past 2 weeks enrolled in the study. The positive rate in the experiment group was three cases, while it was negative in the control group. The level of 1-testosterone increased in one extremely severe TS patient who ate large amounts of puffed food and drank an average of 350 ml of cola per day. Cathine and other substances with similar chemical constitution or similar biological effects increased in one severe TS patient who ate bags of instant noodles daily, according to the high score of the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale. An increase in ephedrine type, testosterone, and stimulants may be related to the pathogenesis of TS. Unhealthy food possibly causes TS. The relationship between excitatory substances and TS needs to be explored with the goal of providing more information on diagnosing and treating TS.

  10. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E; Robertson, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person's experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted.

  11. Premonitory urges for tics in adult patients with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Eleanor; Seri, Stefano; Stern, Jeremy S; Robertson, Mary M; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) often report characteristic sensory experiences, also called premonitory urges (PUs), which precede tic expression and have high diagnostic relevance. This study investigated the usefulness of a scale developed and validated in children and adolescents-the Premonitory Urge for Tics Scale (PUTS, Woods et al., 2005 [13])-for the assessment of PUs in adult patients with TS. Standard statistical methods were applied to test the psychometric properties of the PUTS in 102 adult TS outpatients recruited from two specialist clinics in the United Kingdom. The PUTS showed good acceptability and endorsement rates, with evenly distributed scores and low floor and ceiling effects. Item-total correlations were moderate to strong; PUTS total scores were significantly correlated with quantitative measures of TS severity. The PUTS showed excellent internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.85) and Spearman's correlations demonstrated satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity. Although originally devised to assess urges to tic in young patients with TS, the PUTS demonstrated good psychometric properties in a large sample of adults recruited at specialist TS clinics. This instrument is therefore recommended for use across the life span as a valid and reliable self-report measure of sensory experiences accompanying tic expression. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The roles of segmental and tandem gene duplication in the evolution of large gene families in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumgarten Andrew

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most genes in Arabidopsis thaliana are members of gene families. How do the members of gene families arise, and how are gene family copy numbers maintained? Some gene families may evolve primarily through tandem duplication and high rates of birth and death in clusters, and others through infrequent polyploidy or large-scale segmental duplications and subsequent losses. Results Our approach to understanding the mechanisms of gene family evolution was to construct phylogenies for 50 large gene families in Arabidopsis thaliana, identify large internal segmental duplications in Arabidopsis, map gene duplications onto the segmental duplications, and use this information to identify which nodes in each phylogeny arose due to segmental or tandem duplication. Examples of six gene families exemplifying characteristic modes are described. Distributions of gene family sizes and patterns of duplication by genomic distance are also described in order to characterize patterns of local duplication and copy number for large gene families. Both gene family size and duplication by distance closely follow power-law distributions. Conclusions Combining information about genomic segmental duplications, gene family phylogenies, and gene positions provides a method to evaluate contributions of tandem duplication and segmental genome duplication in the generation and maintenance of gene families. These differences appear to correspond meaningfully to differences in functional roles of the members of the gene families.

  13. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A

    2007-01-01

    adulthood, asthma is frequently associated also with quantitative measures of atopy. Genome wide quantitative multipoint linkage analysis was conducted for serum IgE levels and percentage of positive skin prick test (SPT(per)) using three large groups of families originally ascertained for asthma....... In this report, 438 and 429 asthma families were informative for linkage using IgE and SPT(per) which represents 690 independent families. Suggestive linkage (LOD >/= 2) was found on chromosomes 1, 3, and 8q with maximum LODs of 2.34 (IgE), 2.03 (SPT(per)), and 2.25 (IgE) near markers D1S1653, D3S2322-D3S1764...... represents one of the biggest genome scans so far reported for asthma related phenotypes. This study also demonstrates the utility of increased sample sizes and quantitative phenotypes in linkage analysis of complex disorders....

  14. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early...... adulthood, asthma is frequently associated also with quantitative measures of atopy. Genome wide quantitative multipoint linkage analysis was conducted for serum IgE levels and percentage of positive skin prick test (SPT(per)) using three large groups of families originally ascertained for asthma....... In this report, 438 and 429 asthma families were informative for linkage using IgE and SPT(per) which represents 690 independent families. Suggestive linkage (LOD >/= 2) was found on chromosomes 1, 3, and 8q with maximum LODs of 2.34 (IgE), 2.03 (SPT(per)), and 2.25 (IgE) near markers D1S1653, D3S2322-D3S1764...

  15. Levetiracetam as an alternative therapy for Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Martínez-Granero

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available MA Martínez-Granero, A García-Pérez, F MontañesDepartment of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Tourette syndrome is a common childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic tics and frequent comorbid conditions such as attention deficit disorder. Most currently used tic-suppressing drugs are frequently associated with serious adverse events. Thus, alternative therapeutic agents with more favorable side-effect profiles are being evaluated. New hypotheses and recent studies involving GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome suppose a reason for the evaluation of GABAergic drugs. Levetiracetam is a drug with an atypical GABAergic mechanism of action that might be expected to improve tics. Although trials performed to evaluate the efficacy of levetiracetam in the treatment of Tourette syndrome have provided conflicting results, it may be useful in some patients. The established safe profile of levetiracetam makes this drug an alternative for treatment if intolerance to currently used drugs appears, but additional evaluation with larger and longer duration controlled studies are necessary to assess the real efficacy in patients with Tourette syndrome.Keywords: Tourette syndrome, levetiracetam, tics, children, adolescents, GABA

  16. Prenatal Maternal Smoking and Tourette Syndrome: A Nationwide Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivonen, Susanna; Chudal, Roshan; Joelsson, Petteri; Ekblad, Mikael; Suominen, Auli; Brown, Alan S; Gissler, Mika; Voutilainen, Arja; Sourander, Andre

    2016-02-01

    This is the first nationwide register-based study to examine the relationship between prenatal maternal smoking and Tourette syndrome. A total of 767 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. Each case was matched to four controls. Information on maternal smoking during pregnancy was obtained from the Finnish Medical Birth Register. Conditional logistic regression models were used for statistical analyses. Prenatal maternal smoking was associated with Tourette syndrome when comorbid with ADHD (OR 4.0, 95 % CI 1.2-13.5, p = 0.027 for exposure during first trimester, OR 1.7, 95 % CI, 1.05-2.7, p = 0.031 for exposure for the whole pregnancy). There was no association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and Tourette syndrome without comorbid ADHD (OR 0.5, 95 % CI 0.2-1.3, p = 0.166, OR 0.9, 95 % CI 0.7-1.3, p = 0.567). Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the association between prenatal maternal smoking and Tourette syndrome with comorbid ADHD.

  17. [Tics and Tourette syndrome in literature, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Carrillo, Jesús M

    2013-08-01

    Different neurological diseases have often been portrayed in literature, cinema and television. Tics and Tourette syndrome, for example, are commonly represented from different perspectives, which are sometimes very realistic but in some cases are used for more dramatic purposes or to make a character look ridiculous. One of the main effects of these inadequate views is to further stigmatise those who suffer these movement disorders. To review the way tics and Tourette syndrome have been portrayed in certain literary works, films and television. Tics are rapid, stereotypic, involuntary, recurring, non-purposeful movements of the skeletal and pharyngeal-laryngeal muscles. In Gilles de la Tourette syndrome a number of tics are associated to involuntary vocalisations (echolalia, coprolalia). They begin in childhood and are usually associated to obsessive-compulsive behaviours. These disorders have appeared in literature in works such as Little Dorrit, Angel Guerra, La torre de los siete jorobados or Motherless Brooklyn. Film-makers have also shown an interest in tics and Tourette syndrome and they have been portrayed in films such as Young and Innocent, The Tic Code or Matchstick Men. Likewise, a number of television series also contain characters with these disorders, including Shameless, Ally McBeal, Quincy, M.E. or L.A. Law. Tics and Tourette syndrome have frequently been portrayed in literature, cinema and television, sometimes in a very realistic manner. In other cases, however, the way they are dealt with has only helped to create false beliefs and stereotyped images of the disorders.

  18. Clinical and linkage study of a large family with simple ectopia lentis linked to FBN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, M.J.; Roberts, J.; Partington, M.W. [Newcastle and Northern New South Wales Genetics Service (Australia); Colley, P.W. [John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Hollway, G.E.; Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C. [Adelaide Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)

    1994-10-15

    Simple ectopia lentis (EL) was studied in a large family, by clinical examination and analysis of linkage to markers in the region of FBN1, the gene for fibrillin which causes Marfan syndrome on chromosome 15. No patient had clinical or echocardiographic evidence of Marfan syndrome, although there was a trend towards relatively longer measurements of height; lower segment; arm span; middle finger, hand, and foot length in the affected members of the family, compared with unaffected sibs of the same sex. Analysis of linkage to intragenic FBN1 markers was inconclusive because they were relatively uninformative. Construction of a multipoint background map from the CEPH reference families identified microsatellite markers linked closely to FBN1 which could demonstrate linkage of EL in this family to the FBN1 region. LINKMAP analysis detected a multipoint lod score of 5.68 at D15S119, a marker approximately 6 cM distal to FBN1, and a multipoint lod score of 5.04 at FBN1. The EL gene in this family is likely to be allelic to Marfan syndrome, and molecular characterization of the FBN1 mutation should now be possible. 25 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A family of conjugate gradient methods for large-scale nonlinear equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexiang Feng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we present a family of conjugate gradient projection methods for solving large-scale nonlinear equations. At each iteration, it needs low storage and the subproblem can be easily solved. Compared with the existing solution methods for solving the problem, its global convergence is established without the restriction of the Lipschitz continuity on the underlying mapping. Preliminary numerical results are reported to show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  20. A family of conjugate gradient methods for large-scale nonlinear equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dexiang; Sun, Min; Wang, Xueyong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a family of conjugate gradient projection methods for solving large-scale nonlinear equations. At each iteration, it needs low storage and the subproblem can be easily solved. Compared with the existing solution methods for solving the problem, its global convergence is established without the restriction of the Lipschitz continuity on the underlying mapping. Preliminary numerical results are reported to show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  1. Behavior therapy for children with Tourette disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, John; Woods, Douglas W; Scahill, Lawrence; Wilhelm, Sabine; Peterson, Alan L; Chang, Susanna; Ginsburg, Golda S; Deckersbach, Thilo; Dziura, James; Levi-Pearl, Sue; Walkup, John T

    2010-05-19

    Tourette disorder is a chronic and typically impairing childhood-onset neurologic condition. Antipsychotic medications, the first-line treatments for moderate to severe tics, are often associated with adverse effects. Behavioral interventions, although promising, have not been evaluated in large-scale controlled trials. To determine the efficacy of a comprehensive behavioral intervention for reducing tic severity in children and adolescents. Randomized, observer-blind, controlled trial of 126 children recruited from December 2004 through May 2007 and aged 9 through 17 years, with impairing Tourette or chronic tic disorder as a primary diagnosis, randomly assigned to 8 sessions during 10 weeks of behavior therapy (n = 61) or a control treatment consisting of supportive therapy and education (n = 65). Responders received 3 monthly booster treatment sessions and were reassessed at 3 and 6 months following treatment. Comprehensive behavioral intervention. Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (range 0-50, score >15 indicating clinically significant tics) and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale (range 1 [very much improved] to 8 [very much worse]). Behavioral intervention led to a significantly greater decrease on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (24.7 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 23.1-26.3] to 17.1 [95% CI, 15.1-19.1]) from baseline to end point compared with the control treatment (24.6 [95% CI, 23.2-26.0] to 21.1 [95% CI, 19.2-23.0]) (P tic worsening was reported by 4% of children (5/126). Treatment gains were durable, with 87% of available responders to behavior therapy exhibiting continued benefit 6 months following treatment. A comprehensive behavioral intervention, compared with supportive therapy and education, resulted in greater improvement in symptom severity among children with Tourette and chronic tic disorder. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00218777.

  2. A personal 35 year perspective on Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: assessment, investigations, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    After having examined the definition, clinical phenomenology, comorbidity, psychopathology, and phenotypes in the first paper of this Series, here I discuss the assessment, including neuropsychology, and the effects of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome with studies showing that the quality of life of patients with Tourette's syndrome is reduced and that there is a substantial burden on the family. In this paper, I review my local and collaborative studies investigating causal factors (including genetic vulnerability, prenatal and perinatal difficulties, and neuro-immunological factors). I also present my studies on neuro-imaging, electro-encephalograms, and other special investigations, which are helpful in their own right or to exclude other conditions. Finally, I also review our studies on treatment including medications, transcranial magnetic stimulation, biofeedback, target-specific botulinum toxin injections, biofeedback and, in severe refractory adults, psychosurgery and deep brain stimulation. This Review summarises and highlights selected main findings from my clinic (initially The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery Queen Square and University College London, UK, and, subsequently, at St George's Hospital, London, UK), and several collaborations since 1980. As in Part 1 of this Series, I address the main controversies in the fields and the research of other groups, and I make suggestions for future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Tics and Tourette syndrome: diagnosis, course and treatment principles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Giré, Pauline

    2008-02-01

    The term "Tourette syndrome" designates the combination of tics with other symptoms. Gilles de la Tourette disease is one of its most frequent causes. It combines motor and vocal tics, with no identifiable cause, with self-mutilation and variable psychiatric comorbidity that may include obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders, mood and personality disorders, and a syndrome of hyperactivity with attention disorders. The prevalence of Tourette syndrome is estimated at 0.1-1% of the general population. The condition begins during childhood and develops in a succession of periods of relative aggravation and remission of the tics. Most patients show improvement at the end of adolescence, but symptoms can persist into adulthood in approximately one third of patients. The cause of Gilles de la Tourette disease is unknown, but the role of genetic susceptibility has been suggested together with dysfunctions of the dopaminergic system and of neuron networks in associative and limbic areas of the basal ganglia and the prefrontal cortex. Treatment of Tourette syndrome and severe tics is often difficult and requires a multidisciplinary approach (neurologist, psychiatrist, psychologist and social workers). In mild forms, information and psychological management are usually recommended. Drug treatments--including neuroleptics--are essential in the moderate to severe forms of the disease. Psychiatric comorbidities, when present, often justify specific treatment. For the most severe forms of Gilles de la Tourette disease, preliminary results of treatment by deep brain stimulation of the associative and limb areas of the thalamus or pallidum have produced real hope of treatment, but nonetheless require confirmation.

  4. Multispectral brain morphometry in Tourette syndrome persisting into adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Davide; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Hutton, Chloe; Orth, Michael; Robertson, Mary M.; Critchley, Hugo D.; Frackowiak, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder with a high prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive-compulsive disorder co-morbidities. Structural changes have been found in frontal cortex and striatum in children and adolescents. A limited number of morphometric studies in Tourette syndrome persisting into adulthood suggest ongoing structural alterations affecting frontostriatal circuits. Using cortical thickness estimation and voxel-based analysis of T1- and diffusion-weighted structural magnetic resonance images, we examined 40 adults with Tourette syndrome in comparison with 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients with Tourette syndrome showed relative grey matter volume reduction in orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices bilaterally. Cortical thinning extended into the limbic mesial temporal lobe. The grey matter changes were modulated additionally by the presence of co-morbidities and symptom severity. Prefrontal cortical thickness reduction correlated negatively with tic severity, while volume increase in primary somatosensory cortex depended on the intensity of premonitory sensations. Orbitofrontal cortex volume changes were further associated with abnormal water diffusivity within grey matter. White matter analysis revealed changes in fibre coherence in patients with Tourette syndrome within anterior parts of the corpus callosum. The severity of motor tics and premonitory urges had an impact on the integrity of tracts corresponding to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections. Our results provide empirical support for a patho-aetiological model of Tourette syndrome based on developmental abnormalities, with perturbation of compensatory systems marking persistence of symptoms into adulthood. We interpret the symptom severity related grey matter volume increase in distinct functional brain areas as evidence of ongoing structural plasticity. The convergence of

  5. Linkage disequilibrium between an allele at the dopamine D4 receptor locus and Tourette syndrome, by the transmission-disequilibrium test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grice, D.E.; Gelernter, J. [Veterans Administration Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Leckman, J.F.; Pauls, D.L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Dopaminergic abnormalities are implicated in the pathogenesis of Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic multiple tics. We used the transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) method to test for linkage disequilibrium between a specific allele (the seven-repeat allele (DRD4*7R) of the exon 3 VNTR polymorphic site) at the D4 dopamine receptor locus (DRD4) and expression of chronic multiple tics and TS. This particular allele had been shown in functional studies to have different binding properties compared with the other common alleles in this DRD4 polymorphic system. We studied 64 family trios (consisting of an affected person and two parents, at least one heterozygous for DRD4*7R), including 12 nuclear family trios and 52 trios from four large TS kindreds. The DRD4*7R allele was transmitted significantly more frequently than expected ({chi}{sup 2}{sub TDT} ranging from 8.47 [P < .004] to 10.80 [P = .001], depending on breadth of disease definition and inclusion or exclusion of inferred genotypes). Confirmation of this finding will depend on either replication in other samples or the identification of a transmitted functional mutation within this sample. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Genetikken bag Gilles de laTourettes syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, L.; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge about the aetiology of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is very limited. GTS has a complex mode of inheritance in which both genetic and environmental factors are believed to be involved in disease development. Different approaches to identify GTS associated genes have led to the di......Knowledge about the aetiology of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is very limited. GTS has a complex mode of inheritance in which both genetic and environmental factors are believed to be involved in disease development. Different approaches to identify GTS associated genes have led...

  7. The dopamine transporter protein gene (SLC6A3): Primary linage mapping and linkage studies in Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelernter, J.; Kruger, S.D.; Pakstis, A.J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)]|[West Haven Veterans Affairs Medical Center, CT (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    The dopamine transporter, the molecule responsible for presynaptic reuptake of dopamine and a major site of action of psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine, is encoded by locus SLC6A3 (alias DAT1). The protein`s actions and DAT`s specific localization to dopaminergic neurons make it a candidate gene for several psychiatric illnesses. SLC6A3 has been mapped to distal chromosome 5p, using physical methods. Genetic linkage methods were used to place SLC6A3 in the genetic linkage map. Four extended pedigrees (one of which overlaps with CEPH) were typed. Linkage with Tourette syndrome (TS) was also examined. SLC6A3 showed close linkage with several markers previously mapped to distal chromosome 5p, including D5S11 (Z{sub max} = 16.0, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0.03, results from four families) and D5S678 (Z{sub max} = 7.84, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0, results from two families). Observed crossovers established that SLC6A3 is a distal marker close to D5S10 and D5S678, but these three distal markers could not be ordered. Linkage between TS and SLC6A3 could be excluded independently in two branches of a large kindred segregating TS; the lod score in a third family was also negative, but not significant. Cumulative results show a lod score of -6.2 at {theta} = 0 and of -3.9 at {theta} = 0.05 (dominant model, narrow disease definition). SLC6A3 thus maps to distal chromosome 5p by linkage analysis, in agreement with previous physical mapping data. A mutation at SLC6A3 is not causative for TS in the two large families that generated significant negative lod scores (if the parameters of our analyses were correct) and is unlikely to be causative in the family that generated a negative lod score that did not reach significance. These results do not exclude a role for the dopamine transporter in influencing risk for TS in combination with other loci. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Tourette Syndrome in Children: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Chieh Du

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is a common neuropsychiatric disorder in children characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics that fluctuate in severity and lasting for at least 1 year. Boys are more commonly affected than girls. Symptoms usually begin with simple motor or vocal tics which then evolve into more complex motor and vocal tics over time. Premonitory sensory urges are common in children over the age of 8 years, and these urges help distinguish tics from symptoms of other movement disorders. Common comorbidities of TS include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and learning difficulties. Several genes have been assessed as candidate genes for TS; environmental factors such as stress and streptococcal infections might also contribute to its etiology. The pathophysiology of TS mainly involves dysfunction of basal ganglia-related circuits and hyperactive dopaminergic innervations. A thorough history assessment and neurological examination are important for the correct diagnosis and differentiation from other movement disorders. Treatment for TS should focus on improving the patient's social functioning, minimizing the impairment from cormobid disorders, and controlling tics, if they are severe. Commonly used medications for TS include a2-adrenergic agonists and atypical neuroleptics. Habit reversal therapy is an effective option for TS, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be a promising approach for severe cases.

  9. Tics and Tourette syndrome: an adult perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Jimenez, Nestor

    2012-07-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a disorder characterized by childhood onset multiple motor and vocal tics often accompanied by features of obsessive compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or other behavioral manifestations. Tics may be simple or complex, and may include motor and vocal components. Abnormal function of the basal ganglia is thought to be an important underlying cause of tics and other movement disorders. Treatment of TS requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenology of the disease for the individual patient, and should focus on symptoms that are especially troubling. Some nonpharmacologic approaches may help to improve tic severity, including conditioning techniques, relaxation training, and hypnosis. Options for pharmacotherapy include dopamine blockers and depleters, benzodiazepines, central alpha-adrenergic blockers, and botulinum toxin. Many patients require therapy for comorbid conditions such as anxiety, depression, or ADHD. In case studies and small patient series, deep brain stimulation has been shown to markedly reduce tic severity and functional impairment associated with TS. While onset is most frequently in childhood, TS should not be considered exclusively a disorder of pediatric patients. The complications and comorbidities that are encountered in children and adolescents often persist into adulthood.

  10. Treatment of Tourette Syndrome with Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten R. Müller-Vahl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids have been used for hundred of years for medical purposes. To day, the cannabinoid delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and the cannabis extract nabiximols are approved for the treatment of nausea, anorexia and spasticity, respectively. In Tourette syndrome (TS several anecdotal reports provided evidence that marijuana might be effective not only in the suppression of tics, but also in the treatment of associated behavioural problems. At the present time there are only two controlled trials available investigating the effect of THC in the treatment of TS. Using both self and examiner rating scales, in both studies a significant tic reduction could be observed after treatment with THC compared to placebo, without causing significant adverse effects. Available data about the effect of THC on obsessive-compulsive symptoms are inconsistent. According to a recent Cochrane review on the efficacy of cannabinoids in TS, definite conclusions cannot be drawn, because longer trials including a larger number of patients are missing. Notwithstanding this appraisal, by many experts THC is recommended for the treatment of TS in adult patients, when first line treatments failed to improve the tics. In treatment resistant adult patients, therefore, treatment with THC should be taken into consideration.

  11. Treatment strategies for tics in Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Clare M.; Rickards, Hugh E.; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics: repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations. These symptoms can have a significant impact on patients’ daily functioning across many domains. Tics tend to be most severe in child and adolescent sufferers, so their presence has the potential to impact a period of life that is both critical for learning and is often associated with the experience of greater social tension and self-consciousness than adulthood. Furthermore, control over tics that lead to physical impairment or self-injurious behaviour is of vital importance in maintaining health and quality of life. There are numerous complicating factors in the prescription of treatment for tics, due to both the side effects associated with alleviating agents and patient characteristics, such as age and comorbid conditions. This review summarizes literature pertaining to the efficacy and safety of both traditionally prescribed and more modern medications. We also discuss the merits of behavioural and surgical techniques and highlight newer emerging treatments. Although treatment response is to some extent variable, there are a number of agents that are clearly useful as first-line treatments for TS. Other interventions may be of most benefit to patients exhibiting refractory tics or more specific symptom profiles. PMID:21339906

  12. Penetrance and clinical consequences of a gross SDHB deletion in a large family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, D C; Burnichon, N; Timmers, H J L M; Raygada, M J; Kozupa, A; Merino, M J; Makey, D; Adams, K T; Venisse, A; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A-P; Pacak, K

    2009-04-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding subunit B of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB) are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and are associated with hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) and pheochromocytoma. The phenotype of patients with SDHB point mutations has been previously described. However, the phenotype and penetrance of gross SDHB deletions have not been well characterized as they are rarely described. The objective was to describe the phenotype and estimate the penetrance of an exon 1 large SDHB deletion in one kindred. A retrospective and prospective study of 41 relatives across five generations was carried out. The main outcome measures were genetic testing, clinical presentations, plasma catecholamines and their O-methylated metabolites. Of the 41 mutation carriers identified, 11 were diagnosed with PGL, 12 were found to be healthy carriers after evaluation, and 18 were reportedly healthy based on family history accounts. The penetrance of PGL related to the exon 1 large SDHB deletion in this family was estimated to be 35% by age 40. Variable expressivity of the phenotype associated with a large exon 1 SDHB deletion was observed, including low penetrance, diverse primary PGL tumor locations, and malignant potential.

  13. A contribuição de Charcot para o estudo da síndrome de Tourette Charcot's contribution to the study of Tourette's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Revisamos a história da síndrome de Tourette, com ênfase a contribuição de Jean-Martin Charcot.We review the history of Tourette syndrome, emphasizing the contribution of Jean-Martin Charcot.

  14. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eNagai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in Epilepsy and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS. In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g. syncope, or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP. Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behaviour influence central nervous system thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated

  15. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in epilepsy and TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behavior influence central thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated to gain a strong position within the next generation of treatment for epilepsy, as a non-invasive technique with minimal side effects. This approach also takes advantage of the current practical opportunity to utilize growing digital health technology.

  16. Treating Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders: A Guide for Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Douglas W., Ed.; Piacentini, John C., Ed.; Walkup, John T., Ed

    2007-01-01

    Grounded in a comprehensive model of Tourette syndrome (TS) and related disorders, this state-of-the-art volume provides a multidisciplinary framework for assessment and treatment. Leading authorities present the latest knowledge on the neurobehavioral underpinnings of TS, its clinical presentation, and how to distinguish it from frequently…

  17. Autism Spectrum Symptoms in a Tourette's Disorder Sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darrow, Sabrina M.; Grados, Marco; Sandor, Paul; Hirschtritt, Matthew E.; Illmann, Cornelia; Osiecki, Lisa; Dion, Yves; King, Robert; Pauls, David; Budman, Cathy L.; Cath, Danielle C.; Greenberg, Erica; Lyon, Gholson J.; McMahon, William M.; Lee, Paul C.; Delucchi, Kevin L.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Mathews, Carol A.

    Objective: Tourette's disorder (TD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) share clinical features and possibly an overlapping etiology. The aims of this study were to examine ASD symptom rates in participants with TD, and to characterize the relationships between ASD symptom patterns and TD,

  18. Atomoxetine Treatment of ADHD in Children with Comorbid Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Sallee, F. Randy; Gilbert, Donald L.; Dunn, David W.; McCracken, James T.; Coffey, Barbara J.; Budman, Cathy L.; Ricardi, Randall K.; Leonard, Henrietta L.; Allen, Albert J.; Milton, Denai R.; Feldman, Peter D.; Kelsey, Douglas K.; Geller, Daniel A.; Linder, Steven L.; Lewis, Donald W.; Winner, Paul K.; Kurlan, Roger M.; Mintz, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study examines changes in severity of tics and ADHD during atomoxetine treatment in ADHD patients with Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: Subjects (7-17 years old) with ADHD ("Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DSM-IV") and TS were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with placebo (n = 56) or atomoxetine…

  19. Autism Spectrum Symptoms in a Tourette's Disorder Sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darrow, Sabrina M; Grados, Marco A; Sandor, Paul; Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Illmann, Cornelia; Osiecki, Lisa; Dion, Yves; King, Robert A; Pauls, David L; Budman, Cathy L; Cath, Danielle C.; Greenberg, Erica; Lyon, Gholson J; McMahon, William M; Lee, Paul C; Delucchi, Kevin L; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Mathews, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    Objective Tourette's disorder (TD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) share clinical features and possibly an overlapping etiology. The aims of this study were to examine ASD symptom rates in participants with TD, and to characterize the relationships between ASD symptom patterns and TD,

  20. Go/NoGo performance in boys with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichele, Heike; Eichele, Tom; Hammar, Asa

    2010-01-01

    This study compared performance and performance monitoring in 19 boys with Tourette syndrome (TS) (12.64 years, +/- 2.05) and 19 age-matched controls (13.16 years, +/- 2.29) using a Go/NoGo task. The results indicated similar performance accuracy in the TS group and the control group. TS particip...

  1. Long-Term Outcome of Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Videotapes recorded 1978 through 1991 of 56 children (ages 8 to 14 with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS were reviewed and 31 of the patients (28 men and 3 women, age>20 years were recruited for a second videotape and in-person assessment at Rush-Presbyterian-St Luke’s Movement Disorder Center, Chicago, IL.

  2. Structural Connectivity in Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Centre de Reference National Maladie Rare ‘Syndrome Gilles de la Tourette’ and Sorbonne University report white matter abnormalities in the pathways connecting the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and thalamus in a group of 49 adults with Tourette syndrome (TS.

  3. A case of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome is an uncommon illness associated with repetitive un-voluntary abnormal movements and utterance. It is often associated with other psychiatric morbidities. Management requires awareness of this uncommon illness, keen observation, relevant evaluation, and combination of pharmacology and psychotherapy for an optimal outcome. This case is brought out here for florid presentation and nuances of management.

  4. Tourette Syndrome and Associated Features and the School Aged Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Christopher

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is described as a genetically based, chronic constellation of neurobehavioral symptoms and associated features involving repetitive, simple, and/or complex motor and phonic tics. Treatment generally involves neuroleptic medication. Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, learning…

  5. Teaching Children with Tourette Syndrome. ERIC Digest E570.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Bernadette

    This digest provides basic information on Tourette Syndrome (TS) as well as guidelines for appropriate classroom accommodations. It reports that about 100,000 Americans have diagnosed TS with symptoms including multiple motor and vocal tics; frequent (daily) occurrence of bouts of tics; periodic changes in the number, frequency, and severity of…

  6. Neurobiology and neuroimmunology of Tourette's syndrome : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Anderson, GM; Limburg, PC; Korf, J; Kallenberg, CGM; Minderaa, RB

    Tourette's syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of both multiple motor and vocal tics. While the pathogenesis at a molecular and cellular level remains unknown, structural and functional neuroimaging studies point to the involvement of the basal

  7. Involvement of astrocyte metabolic coupling in Tourette syndrome pathogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, C.A.; Goudriaan, A.; Smit, A.B.; Yu, D.; Mathews, C.A.; Scharf, J.M.; Verheijen, M.H.G.; Posthuma, D.

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a heritable neurodevelopmental disorder whose pathophysiology remains unknown. Recent genome-wide association studies suggest that it is a polygenic disorder influenced by many genes of small effect. We tested whether these genes cluster in cellular function by applying gene-set

  8. Involvement of astrocyte metabolic coupling in Tourette syndrome pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); A. Goudriaan (Andrea); A.B. Smit (August B.); D. Yu (D.); C.A. Mathews (Carol A.); J.M. Scharf; M.H.G. Verheijen (Mark H.); D. Posthuma (Danielle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTourette syndrome is a heritable neurodevelopmental disorder whose pathophysiology remains unknown. Recent genome-wide association studies suggest that it is a polygenic disorder influenced by many genes of small effect. We tested whether these genes cluster in cellular function by

  9. Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics in Children with Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John C.; Walkup, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is one of three separate tic disorders. By definition, children with TS must have at least two motor (movement) tics and one vocal (or sound tic) for at least a year. The other tic disorders are chronic tic disorder (motor or vocal tics, but not both for at least one year) and transient tic disorder (motor and/or vocal tics…

  10. Treating Tics and Tourette's Disorder in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Tesoro, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Children with Tourette's Disorder (TD) and other forms of tic disorders display a range of academic and psychosocial impairments that place them at risk for experiencing long-term negative life outcomes. Fortunately, effective treatments and interventions such as habit reversal training (HRT) have been developed and implemented in clinical…

  11. Identifying the Child with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donna J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics and obsessive-compulsive behaviors). It describes the nature of the disorder, treatment, and service provision (evaluation and assessment and the Individual Education Plan). (DB)

  12. Genetikken bag Gilles de laTourettes syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea Cecilie; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge about the aetiology of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is very limited. GTS has a complex mode of inheritance in which both genetic and environmental factors are believed to be involved in disease development. Different approaches to identify GTS associated genes have led...

  13. Amygdala hypersensitivity in response to emotional faces in Tourette's patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Irene; Kellermann, Thilo; Stöcker, Tony; Kircher, Tilo; Habel, Ute; Shah, Jon N; Schneider, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Tourette's syndrome is characterised by motor and vocal tics as well as a high level of impulsivity and emotional dysregulation. Neuroimaging studies point to structural changes of the basal ganglia, prefrontal cortex and parts of the limbic system. However, there is no link between behavioural symptoms and the structural changes in the amygdala. One aspect of daily social interaction is the perception of emotional facial expressions, closely linked to amgydala function. We therefore investigated via fMRI the implicit discrimination of six emotional facial expressions in 19 adult Tourette's patients. In comparison to healthy control group, Tourette's patients showed significantly higher amygdala activation, especially pronounced for fearful, angry and neutral expressions. The BOLD-activity of the left amygdala correlated negatively with the personality trait extraversion. We will discuss these findings as a result of either deficient frontal inhibition due to structural changes or a desynchronization in the interaction of the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical network within structures of the limbic system. Our data show an altered pattern of implicit emotion discrimination and emphasize the need to consider motor and non-motor symptoms in Tourette's syndrome in the choice of both behavioural and pharmacological treatment.

  14. Understanding Tourette Syndrome: An Educators' Guide for the Inclusive Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Diane

    1999-01-01

    This guide to Tourette Syndrome addresses prevalence and etiology, associated behaviors (such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), treatment approaches and medication, and classroom management techniques (such as handling tic release/stress and managing hyperactivity/controlling attentional impulses). (DB)

  15. Increasing the Effectiveness of Education for Students with Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeni; Shrimpton, Bradley

    This paper examines the educational implications for students with Tourette syndrome (TS) and outlines a multi-dimensional approach for improving their education. It presents data from two qualitative studies in Australia. TS is a debilitating neurological disorder that causes involuntary vocal and motor tics. The first study investigated the…

  16. Modalities of Educational Management of the Tourette Syndrome Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Renee

    Questionnaires were sent to 42 schools in New Jersey to determine the educational procedures used with students having Tourette Syndrome, a neurological condition resulting in body tics and inappropriate vocalization. Parents of an elementary child with the syndrome who was mainstreamed were interviewed and his classroom teacher was also queried…

  17. Psychosocial outcome and psychiatric comorbidity in older adolescents with Tourette syndrome: controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Daniel A; Thompson, Nancy; Plessen, Kerstin J; Robertson, Mary M; Leckman, James F; Peterson, Bradley S

    2010-07-01

    Children with Tourette syndrome generally experience improvement of tics by age 18 years, but psychosocial and comorbidity outcomes at this age are unclear. To compare psychosocial outcomes and lifetime comorbidity rates in older adolescents with Tourette syndrome and controls. We hypothesised a priori that individuals with Tourette syndrome would have lower Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) scores. A total of 65 individuals with Tourette syndrome, identified in childhood, and 65 matched community controls without tic or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms were assessed around 18 years of age regarding psychosocial functioning and lifetime psychiatric disorders. Compared with controls, individuals with Tourette syndrome had substantially lower CGAS scores (P = 10(-8)) and higher rates of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), major depression, learning disorder and conduct disorder (Ptic severity. Clinically ascertained children with Tourette syndrome typically have impaired psychosocial functioning and high comorbidity rates in late adolescence.

  18. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Robertson, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person’s experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted. PMID:27375503

  19. Pharmacological treatment of tic disorders and Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessner, Veit; Schoenefeld, Katja; Buse, Judith; Bender, Stephan; Ehrlich, Stefan; Münchau, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    The present review gives an overview of current pharmacological treatment options of tic disorders and Tourette Syndrome (TS). After a short summary on phenomenology, clinical course and comorbid conditions we review indications for pharmacological treatment in detail. Unfortunately, standardized and large enough drug trials in TS patients fulfilling evidence based medicine standards are still scarce. Treatment decisions are often guided by individual needs and personal experience of treating clinicians. The present recommendations for pharmacological tic treatment are therefore based on both scientific evidence and expert opinion. As first-line treatment of tics risperidone (best evidence level for atypical antipsychotics) or tiapride (largest clinical experience in Europe and low rate of adverse reactions) are recommended. Aripiprazole (still limited but promising data with low risk for adverse reactions) and pimozide (best evidence of the typical antipsychotics) are agents of second choice. In TS patients with comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) atomoxetine, stimulants or clonidine should be considered, or, if tics are severe, a combination of stimulants and risperidone. When mild to moderate tics are associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression or anxiety sulpiride monotherapy can be helpful. In more severe cases the combination of risperidone and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor should be given. In summary, further studies, particularly randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials including larger and/or more homogenous patient groups over longer periods are urgently needed to enhance the scientific basis for drug treatment in tic disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Neurodevelopmental Disorders'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolutionary mechanisms driving the evolution of a large polydnavirus gene family coding for protein tyrosine phosphatases

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    Serbielle Céline

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplications have been proposed to be the main mechanism involved in genome evolution and in acquisition of new functions. Polydnaviruses (PDVs, symbiotic viruses associated with parasitoid wasps, are ideal model systems to study mechanisms of gene duplications given that PDV genomes consist of virulence genes organized into multigene families. In these systems the viral genome is integrated in a wasp chromosome as a provirus and virus particles containing circular double-stranded DNA are injected into the parasitoids’ hosts and are essential for parasitism success. The viral virulence factors, organized in gene families, are required collectively to induce host immune suppression and developmental arrest. The gene family which encodes protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs has undergone spectacular expansion in several PDV genomes with up to 42 genes. Results Here, we present strong indications that PTP gene family expansion occurred via classical mechanisms: by duplication of large segments of the chromosomally integrated form of the virus sequences (segmental duplication, by tandem duplications within this form and by dispersed duplications. We also propose a novel duplication mechanism specific to PDVs that involves viral circle reintegration into the wasp genome. The PTP copies produced were shown to undergo conservative evolution along with episodes of adaptive evolution. In particular recently produced copies have undergone positive selection in sites most likely involved in defining substrate selectivity. Conclusion The results provide evidence about the dynamic nature of polydnavirus proviral genomes. Classical and PDV-specific duplication mechanisms have been involved in the production of new gene copies. Selection pressures associated with antagonistic interactions with parasitized hosts have shaped these genes used to manipulate lepidopteran physiology with evidence for positive selection involved in

  1. The neural circuits that generate tics in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhishun; Maia, Tiago V; Marsh, Rachel; Colibazzi, Tiziano; Gerber, Andrew; Peterson, Bradley S

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine neural activity and connectivity within cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits and to reveal circuit-based neural mechanisms that govern tic generation in Tourette's syndrome. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 13 individuals with Tourette's syndrome and 21 healthy comparison subjects during spontaneous or simulated tics. Independent component analysis with hierarchical partner matching was used to isolate neural activity within functionally distinct regions of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits. Granger causality was used to investigate causal interactions among these regions. The Tourette's syndrome group exhibited stronger neural activity and interregional causality than healthy comparison subjects throughout all portions of the motor pathway, including the sensorimotor cortex, putamen, pallidum, and substantia nigra. Activity in these areas correlated positively with the severity of tic symptoms. Activity within the Tourette's syndrome group was stronger during spontaneous tics than during voluntary tics in the somatosensory and posterior parietal cortices, putamen, and amygdala/hippocampus complex, suggesting that activity in these regions may represent features of the premonitory urges that generate spontaneous tic behaviors. In contrast, activity was weaker in the Tourette's syndrome group than in the healthy comparison group within portions of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits that exert top-down control over motor pathways (the caudate and anterior cingulate cortex), and progressively less activity in these regions accompanied more severe tic symptoms, suggesting that faulty activity in these circuits may result in their failure to control tic behaviors or the premonitory urges that generate them. Our findings, taken together, suggest that tics are caused by the combined effects of excessive activity in motor pathways and reduced activation in control portions of cortico

  2. Deutetrabenazine in Tics Associated with Tourette Syndrome

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    Joseph Jankovic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deutetrabenazine, an inhibitor of vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2 depletes presynaptic dopamine and is useful in the treatment of hyperkinetic movement disorders. This study explored the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of deutetrabenazine in adolescents with moderate-to-severe tics associated with Tourette syndrome (TS. Methods: In this open-label study of 12–18-year-old patients with TS-related tics, deutetrabenazine was titrated up to 36 mg/day over 6 weeks to adequately suppress tics without bothersome adverse effects (AEs, followed by maintenance at optimal dose for 2 weeks. An independent blinded rater assessed tic severity using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS, which was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures included the TS Clinical Global Impression (TS-CGI and TS Patient Global Impression of Change (TS-PGIC. Results: Twenty-three enrolled patients received deutetrabenazine and had at least 1 post-baseline YGTSS assessment. The mean (SD [standard deviation] baseline YGTSS Total Tic Severity Score (TTS was 31.6 (7.9 and had decreased by 11.6 (8.2 points at week 8, a 37.6% reduction in tic severity (p<0.0001. The TS-CGI score improved by 1.2 (0.81 points (p<0.0001 and the TS-PGIC results at week 8 indicated that 76% of patients were much improved or very much improved compared with baseline. The mean (SD daily deutetrabenazine dose at week 8 was 32.1 (6.6 mg (range 18–36 mg. One week after withdrawal of deutetrabenazine, the TTS scores increased by 5.6 (8.4 points, providing confirmation of the drug effect. No serious or severe adverse events were reported. Discussion: The results of this open-label 8-week study suggest that deutetrabenazine is safe and associated with improvement in tic severity in adolescents with TS and troublesome tics.

  3. Tourette Syndrome and Consciousness of Action

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    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tourette syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the chronic presence of multiple motor tics and at least one vocal/phonic tic since childhood. Tics typically change and vary in both intensity and severity over time, with remission and exacerbation common. In the vast majority of patients, tic expression is characteristically accompanied by discomforting bodily sensations, known as sensory phenomena or premonitory urges.Methods: We reviewed the existing literature on premonitory urges associated with the sense of voluntariness of action in TS.Results: Although the wish to move is perceived by the patient as involuntary, the decision to release the tic is often perceived by the patient as a voluntary capitulation to the subjective urge. Most patients with TS can exert a degree of control over the urge and constantly try to inhibit the movement. Based on these features, it has been suggested that tics performed in response to an urge to move should be classified as ‘unvoluntary’, as opposed to voluntary or involuntary acts. However, recent experimental data suggest that the brain areas involved in the generation of the wish to act show considerable overlap between healthy subjects and patients with TS.Discussion: The simultaneous presence of both voluntary and involuntary aspects in the expression of tic symptoms by patients with TS is consistent with the hypothesis that tics can have the same neurophysiologic substrate as voluntary acts, even though they are misperceived as being involuntary. This reinforces the view of TS as a hyperkinetic movement disorder primarily affecting the conscious experience of action.

  4. Behavior Therapy for Tourette Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wile, Daryl J; Pringsheim, Tamara M

    2013-08-01

    When tics caused by Tourette Syndrome cause meaningful impairment for patients, a comprehensive treatment approach includes education of patients, peers, and family, treatment of comorbid behavioral disorders if present, and consideration of behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy for tics themselves. This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates that behavior therapies based on Habit Reversal Therapy, including the Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics are effective in reducing tic severity when compared with supportive psychotherapy. When these behavior therapies are unavailable, Exposure with Response Prevention may also be effective. Both face-to-face and telehealth delivery methods for behavior therapy improve tic severity, and broader distribution of behavior therapy through increased training or telehealth methods is encouraged. High-quality randomized trials comparing behavior therapies for tics with pharmacotherapy are needed.

  5. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome : objectives and methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V.; King, Robert A.; State, Matthew W.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heiman, Gary A.

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarified

  6. Genetic Predisposition Increases the Tic Severity, Rate of Comorbidities, and Psychosocial and Educational Difficulties in Children With Tourette Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition...... to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related...... to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic...

  7. A large and functionally diverse family of Fad2 genes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.

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    Cao Shijiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application and nutritional value of vegetable oil is highly dependent on its fatty acid composition, especially the relative proportion of its two major fatty acids, i.e oleic acid and linoleic acid. Microsomal oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase encoded by FAD2 gene is known to introduce a double bond at the Δ12 position of an oleic acid on phosphatidylcholine and convert it to linoleic acid. The known plant FAD2 enzymes are encoded by small gene families consisting of 1-4 members. In addition to the classic oleate Δ12-desaturation activity, functional variants of FAD2 that are capable of undertaking additional or alternative acyl modifications have also been reported in a limited number of plant species. In this study, our objective was to identify FAD2 genes from safflower and analyse their differential expression profile and potentially diversified functionality. Results We report here the characterization and functional expression of an exceptionally large FAD2 gene family from safflower, and the temporal and spatial expression profiles of these genes as revealed through Real-Time quantitative PCR. The diversified functionalities of some of the safflower FAD2 gene family members were demonstrated by ectopic expression in yeast and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CtFAD2-1 and CtFAD2-10 were demonstrated to be oleate desaturases specifically expressed in developing seeds and flower head, respectively, while CtFAD2-2 appears to have relatively low oleate desaturation activity throughout the plant. CtFAD2-5 and CtFAD2-8 are specifically expressed in root tissues, while CtFAD2-3, 4, 6, 7 are mostly expressed in the cotyledons and hypocotyls in young safflower seedlings. CtFAD2-9 was found to encode a novel desaturase operating on C16:1 substrate. CtFAD2-11 is a tri-functional enzyme able to introduce a carbon double bond in either cis or trans configuration, or a carbon triple (acetylenic bond

  8. Consequences of a novel caveolin-3 mutation in a large German family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dirk; Schroers, Anja; Blümcke, Ingmar; Urbach, Horst; Zerres, Klaus; Mortier, Wilhelm; Vorgerd, Matthias; Schröder, Rolf

    2003-02-01

    Mutations in the human caveolin-3 gene (cav-3) on chromosome 3p25 have been described in limb girdle muscular dystrophy, rippling muscle disease, hyperCKemia, and distal myopathy. Here, we describe the genetic, myopathological, and clinical findings in a large German family harboring a novel heterozygous mutation (GAC-->GAA) in codon 27 of the cav-3 gene. This missense mutation causes an amino acid change from asparagine to glutamate (Asp27Glu) in the N-terminal region of the Cav-3 protein, which leads to a drastic decrease of Cav-3 protein expression in skeletal muscle tissue. In keeping with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, this novel cav-3 mutation was found to cosegregate with neuromuscular involvement in the reported family. Ultrastructural analysis of Cav-3-deficient muscle showed an abnormal folding of the plasma membrane as well as multiple vesicular structures in the subsarcolemmal region. Neurological examination of all nine subjects from three generations harboring the novel cav-3 mutation showed clear evidence of rippling muscle disease. However, only two of these nine patients showed isolated signs of rippling muscle disease without muscle weakness or atrophy, whereas five had additional signs of a distal myopathy and two fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of a coexisting limb girdle muscular dystrophy. These findings indicate that mutations in the human cav-3 gene can lead to different and overlapping clinical phenotypes even within the same family. Different clinical phenotypes in caveolinopathies may be attributed to so far unidentified modifying factors/genes in the individual genetic background of affected patients.

  9. [The economic-financial sustainability of the Family Health Strategy in large municipalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Gustavo Zoio; Ribeiro, José Mendes

    2011-03-01

    The universalization of basic care and commitment budget of the Ministry of Health with the Family Health Strategy (ESF) through new systematic financing incentives have been highlighted in the Brazilian health policy scenario. One of the great problems observed is the expansion of the strategy for large urban centres. This paper studies the economic-financial sustainability of ESF in Brazilian municipalities of more than 100 thousand inhabitants according to some selected indicators, considering the geographical region to which they belong, their population size and participation in Project for the Expansion and Consolidation Family Health (Proesf). Municipalities belonging to the Southeast region, more developed of the country, have on average better economic-financial performance, but lower average values of coverage of ESF. Municipalities from the North and Northeast, with the lowest average for economic-financial sustainability indicators, were the ones that made more effort to developments in the period. Thus, we observed the dynamics between bigger fiscal capacity and budgetary commitment with the Health Sector for biggest municipalities and in more economically developed regions, and greater vulnerability and dependence of federative transferences for municipalities with less people, in less developed areas.

  10. Members of a large retroposon family are determinants of post-transcriptional gene expression in Leishmania.

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    Frédéric Bringaud

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis, Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness, and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease. Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements--LmSIDER1 (785 copies and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies--that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are approximately 70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3'UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function.

  11. Work-family spillover among Japanese dual-earner couples: a large community-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimada, K.; Shimazu, A.; Bakker, A.B.; Demerouti, E.; Kawakami, N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effects of multiple types of work-family spillover (work-to-family negative spillover, WFNS; family-to-work negative spillover, FWNS; and work-family positive spillover, WFPS) on psychological distress among Japanese dual-earner couples with preschool children. Methods:

  12. Botulinum toxin for motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Kirubakaran, Richard; Berman, Brian D

    2018-01-05

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, or Tourette's syndrome, is defined as the presence of both motor and vocal (phonic) tics for more than 12 months, that manifest before the age of 18 years, in the absence of secondary causes. Treatment of motor and phonic tics is difficult and challenging. To determine the safety and effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treating motor and phonic tics in people with Tourette's syndrome, and to analyse the effect of botulinum toxin on premonitory urge and sensory tics. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and two trials registers to 25 October 2017. We reviewed reference lists of relevant articles for additional trials. We considered all randomised, controlled, double-blind studies comparing botulinum toxin to placebo or other medications for the treatment of motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome for this review. We sought both parallel group and cross-over studies of children or adults, at any dose, and for any duration. We followed standard Cochrane methods to select studies, assess risk of bias, extract and analyse data. All authors independently abstracted data onto standardized forms; disagreements were resolved by mutual discussion. Only one randomised placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study met our selection criteria. In this study, 20 participants with motor tics were enrolled over a three-year recruitment period; 18 (14 of whom had a diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome) completed the study; in total, 21 focal motor tics were treated. Although we considered most bias domains to be at low risk of bias, the study recruited a small number of participants with relatively mild tics and provided limited data for our key outcomes. The effects of botulinum toxin injections on tic frequency, measured by videotape or rated subjectively, and on premonitory urge, are uncertain (very low-quality evidence). The quality of evidence for adverse events following botulinum toxin was

  13. Association of Tourette Syndrome and Chronic Tic Disorders With Objective Indicators of Educational Attainment: A Population-Based Sibling Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vigil, Ana; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Brander, Gustaf; Isomura, Kayoko; Jangmo, Andreas; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Hesselmark, Eva; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Larsson, Henrik; Mataix-Cols, David

    2018-05-29

    The influence of Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorders on academic performance has not been objectively quantified. To investigate the association of Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorders with objectively measured educational outcomes, adjusting for measured covariates and unmeasured factors shared between siblings and taking common psychiatric comorbidities into account. A population-based birth cohort consisting of all individuals born in Sweden from 1976 to 1998 was followed up until December 2013. Individuals with organic brain disorders, mental retardation, and 2 foreign-born parents were excluded. We further identified families with at least 2 singleton full siblings and families with siblings discordant for Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorders. Previously validated International Classification of Diseases diagnoses of Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorders in the Swedish National Patient Register. Eligibility to access upper secondary school after compulsory education, finishing upper secondary school, starting a university degree, and finishing a university degree. Of the 2 115 554 individuals in the cohort, 3590 had registered a diagnosis of Tourette syndrome or a chronic tic disorder in specialist care (of whom 2822 [78.6%] were male; median [interquartile] age at first diagnosis, 14.0 [11-18] years). Of 726 198 families with at least 2 singleton full siblings, 2697 included siblings discordant for these disorders. Compared with unexposed individuals, people with Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorders were significantly less likely to pass all core and additional courses at the end of compulsory school (odds ratios ranging from 0.23 [95% CI, 0.20-0.26] for the handcraft textile/wood course to 0.36 [95% CI, 0.31-0.41] for the English language course) and to access a vocational program (adjusted OR [aOR], 0.31; 95% CI, 0.28-0.34) or academic program (aOR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.39-0.47) in upper secondary education. Individuals with

  14. Impaired inhibition of prepotent motor actions in patients with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Scott A; Claassen, Daniel O; Kanoff, Kristen E; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M

    2013-09-01

    Evidence that tic behaviour in individuals with Tourette syndrome reflects difficulties inhibiting prepotent motor actions is mixed. Response conflict tasks produce sensitive measures of response interference from prepotent motor impulses and the proficiency of inhibiting these impulses as an act of cognitive control. We tested the hypothesis that individuals with Tourette syndrome show a deficit in inhibiting prepotent motor actions. Healthy controls and older adolescents/adults with persistent Tourette syndrome without a history of obsessive-compulsive disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and presenting with stable mood functioning (i.e., no history of well-treated anxiety or depression) participated in this study. They performed a Simon task that induced conflict between prepotent actions and goal-directed actions. A novel theoretical framework distinguished group differences in acting impulsively (i.e., fast motor errors) from the proficiency of inhibiting interference by prepotent actions (i.e., slope of interference reduction). We included 27 controls and 28 individuals with Tourette syndrome in our study. Both groups showed similar susceptibility to making fast, impulsive motor errors (Tourette syndrome 26% v. control 23%; p = 0.10). The slope (m) reduction of the interference effect was significantly less pronounced among participants with Tourette syndrome than controls (Tourette syndrome: m = -0.07 v. control: m = -0.23; p = 0.022), consistent with deficient inhibitory control over prepotent actions in Tourette syndrome. This study does not address directly the role of psychiatric comorbidities and medication effects on inhibitory control over impulsive actions in individuals with Tourette syndrome. The results offer empirical evidence for deficient inhibitory control over prepotent motor actions in individuals with persistent Tourette syndrome with minimal to absent psychiatric comorbidities. These findings also suggest that the frontal

  15. The Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: the current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary May

    2012-10-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is characterised by multiple motor and one or more vocal/phonic tics. GTS was once thought to be rare, but many relatively recent studies suggest that the prevalence is about 1% of the worldwide community, apart from in Sub-Saharan Black Africa. Comorbidity and coexistent psychopathology are common, occurring in about 90% of clinical cohorts and individuals in the community. The most common comorbidities are attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, and disorder, and autistic spectrum disorders, while the most common coexisting psychopathologies are depression, anxiety and behavioural disorders such as oppositional defiant and conduct disorder. There has been an increasing amount of evidence to show that the quality of life in young people is reduced when compared with normative data or healthy control populations. It is widely accepted that most cases of GTS are inherited, but the genetic mechanisms appear much more complex than previously understood, as evidenced by many recent studies; indeed, there have been suggestions of 'general neurodevelopmental genes' which affect the brain development after which the 'specific GTS gene(s)' may further affect the phenotype. Other aetiopathogenetic suggestions have included environmental factors such as neuro-immunological factors, infections, prenatal and peri-natal difficulties and androgen influences. Few studies have addressed aetiology and phenotype, but initial results are exciting. The search for endophenotypes has followed subsequently. Intriguing neuroanatomical and brain circuitry abnormalities have now been suggested in GTS; the most evidence is for cortical thinning and a reduction in the size of the caudate nucleus. Thorough assessment is imperative and multidisciplinary management is the ideal. Treatment should be 'symptom targeted', and in mild cases, psycho-education and reassurance for the patient and the family may be sufficient

  16. Several Families of Sequences with Low Correlation and Large Linear Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanxin; Zhang, Zhenyu

    In DS-CDMA systems and DS-UWB radios, low correlation of spreading sequences can greatly help to minimize multiple access interference (MAI) and large linear span of spreading sequences can reduce their predictability. In this letter, new sequence sets with low correlation and large linear span are proposed. Based on the construction Trm1[Trnm(αbt+γiαdt)]r for generating p-ary sequences of period pn-1, where n=2m, d=upm±v, b=u±v, γi∈GF(pn), and p is an arbitrary prime number, several methods to choose the parameter d are provided. The obtained sequences with family size pn are of four-valued, five-valued, six-valued or seven-valued correlation and the maximum nontrivial correlation value is (u+v-1)pm-1. The simulation by a computer shows that the linear span of the new sequences is larger than that of the sequences with Niho-type and Welch-type decimations, and similar to that of [10].

  17. A canonical splice site mutation in GIPC3 causes sensorineural hearing loss in a large Pakistani family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiqi, S.; Ismail, M.; Oostrik, J.; Munawar, S.; Mansoor, A.; Kremer, H.; Qamar, R.; Schraders, M.

    2014-01-01

    With homozygosity mapping we have identified two large homozygous regions on chromosome 3q13.11-q13.31 and chromosome 19p13.3-q31.32 in a large Pakistani family suffering from autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI). The region on chromosome 19 overlaps with the previously

  18. Family Ratings of Communication Largely Reflect Expressive Language and Conversation-Level Ability in People With Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucetola, Robert; Tabor Connor, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    Family ratings of communication and social interactions represent an important source of information about people with aphasia. Because of the reliance on family/partner ratings as an outcome measure in many aphasia treatment studies and in the clinic, there is a great need for the validation of commonly used family/partner rating measures, and a better understanding of predictors of family ratings of communication. The communication ability of 130 individuals with aphasia due to neurologic illness was rated by family members/partners on the Communicative Effectiveness Index (CETI; Lomas et al., 1989). Information on aphasia severity, mood, quality of life, nonverbal cognitive functioning, and various demographic factors was collected. Principal component analysis confirmed a 2-factor model best represents the relationships among CETI rating items, and this model largely consists of a conversation-level ability factor. Family ratings were largely predicted by the patient's expressive (not receptive) language but also patient self-perceived quality of communication life. Family/partners typically rate the effectiveness of communication based largely on expressive language, despite the fact that other aspects of the aphasia (e.g., listening comprehension) are as important for everyday communication.

  19. A Comprehensive Review of Tourette Syndrome and Complementary Alternative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Duda, L; Mainali, G; Asghar, S; Byler, D

    2018-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric condition defined by both motor and phonic tics over a period of at least 1 year with the onset before 18 years of age. The purpose of this article is to review the use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in children and adults with Tourette syndrome with emphasis on recent research. Most patients do not tell their physician about the use of CAM unless if specifically asked. Of the studies reviewed, description of the treatment and the frequency of use were most often reported. Few studies examine the role or effectiveness of CAM in the treatment of TS specifically. Practitioners should be aware of current research regarding various CAM modalities used for TS patients, including efficacy, potential adverse effects, and interactions with medications. Robust data about the use of CAM, efficacy, and potential side effects is lacking and requires further research to clarify optimal use.

  20. Go/NoGo performance in boys with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichele, Heike; Eichele, Tom; Hammar, Asa

    2010-01-01

    This study compared performance and performance monitoring in 19 boys with Tourette syndrome (TS) (12.64 years, +/- 2.05) and 19 age-matched controls (13.16 years, +/- 2.29) using a Go/NoGo task. The results indicated similar performance accuracy in the TS group and the control group. TS particip......This study compared performance and performance monitoring in 19 boys with Tourette syndrome (TS) (12.64 years, +/- 2.05) and 19 age-matched controls (13.16 years, +/- 2.29) using a Go/NoGo task. The results indicated similar performance accuracy in the TS group and the control group. TS...

  1. The Relation Between Attention and Tic Generation in Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many neuropsychiatric disorders involve abnormal attentional processing. Systematic investigations of how attention may affect tic frequency in Tourette syndrome are lacking. Method: Patients performed rhythmic finger movements, approximately once every 2 s. Each movement triggered a unique visual color stimulus. Patients were asked to monitor and remember their finger actions, the external colors caused by their actions, or their tics. Sixteen adult Tourette syndrome patients performed each task twice: once while inhibiting tics, and once without inhibiting tics. Results: During the “freely tic” condition, patients had significantly fewer tics when attending to finger movements, or to the ensuing colors, compared with when attending to their tics. Attention to fingers produced the fewest tics overall. During tic suppression, tic frequency was reduced to an equal level in all conditions. Conclusions: Focusing attention away from tics significantly reduces tic frequency. This attentional process may operate by regulating motor noise. PMID:25486384

  2. The relation between attention and tic generation in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misirlisoy, Erman; Brandt, Valerie; Ganos, Christos; Tübing, Jennifer; Münchau, Alexander; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    Many neuropsychiatric disorders involve abnormal attentional processing. Systematic investigations of how attention may affect tic frequency in Tourette syndrome are lacking. Patients performed rhythmic finger movements, approximately once every 2 s. Each movement triggered a unique visual color stimulus. Patients were asked to monitor and remember their finger actions, the external colors caused by their actions, or their tics. Sixteen adult Tourette syndrome patients performed each task twice: once while inhibiting tics, and once without inhibiting tics. During the "freely tic" condition, patients had significantly fewer tics when attending to finger movements, or to the ensuing colors, compared with when attending to their tics. Attention to fingers produced the fewest tics overall. During tic suppression, tic frequency was reduced to an equal level in all conditions. Focusing attention away from tics significantly reduces tic frequency. This attentional process may operate by regulating motor noise. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. The role of atypical antipsychotics for treatment of Tourette's syndrome: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budman, Cathy L

    2014-07-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder of childhood onset characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics that fluctuate over time. Tic symptoms often improve by late adolescence, but some children and adults with TS may experience significant tic-related morbidity, including social and family problems, academic difficulties, and pain. When more conservative interventions are not successful, and when certain psychiatric co-morbidities further complicate the clinical profile, treating TS with an atypical antipsychotic medication may be a reasonable second-tier approach. However, the evidence supporting efficacy and safety of the atypical antipsychotics for treatment of tics is still very limited. The objective of this paper is to provide an updated overview of the role of atypical antipsychotics for treatment of TS, with evidence-based guidance on their use. Evidence for efficacy of different typical and atypical antipsychotics for treatment of tics was examined by conducting a systematic, keyword-related search of 'atypical antipsychotics' and 'Tourette's syndrome' in PubMed (National Library of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA). Four recent treatment consensus publications were also reviewed. This review focused on literature published from 2000 to 2013 and on available randomized controlled trials in TS. Evidence supporting the use of atypical antipsychotics for treatment of TS is limited. There are few randomized medication treatment trials in TS (i.e. risperidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone), which employed varying methodologies, thereby restricting meaningful comparisons among studies. Future collaborations among clinical sites with TS expertise employing high-quality study design may better elucidate the role of atypical antipsychotics for treatment of TS.

  4. Implications of the Small Spin Changes Measured for Large Jupiter-Family Comet Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotanekova, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Lacerda, P.; Green, S. F.; Nikolov, P.; Bonev, T.

    2018-06-01

    Rotational spin-up due to outgassing of comet nuclei has been identified as a possible mechanism for considerable mass-loss and splitting. We report a search for spin changes for three large Jupiter-family comets (JFCs): 14P/Wolf, 143P/Kowal-Mrkos, and 162P/Siding Spring. None of the three comets has detectable period changes, and we set conservative upper limits of 4.2 (14P), 6.6 (143P) and 25 (162P) minutes per orbit. Comparing these results with all eight other JFCs with measured rotational changes, we deduce that none of the observed large JFCs experiences significant spin changes. This suggests that large comet nuclei are less likely to undergo rotationally-driven splitting, and therefore more likely to survive more perihelion passages than smaller nuclei. We find supporting evidence for this hypothesis in the cumulative size distributions of JFCs and dormant comets, as well as in recent numerical studies of cometary orbital dynamics. We added 143P to the sample of 13 other JFCs with known albedos and phase-function slopes. This sample shows a possible correlation of increasing phase-function slopes for larger geometric albedos. Partly based on findings from recent space missions to JFCs, we hypothesise that this correlation corresponds to an evolutionary trend for JFCs. We propose that newly activated JFCs have larger albedos and steeper phase functions, which gradually decrease due to sublimation-driven erosion. If confirmed, this could be used to analyse surface erosion from ground and to distinguish between dormant comets and asteroids.

  5. Analysis of large deletions in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 genes in Finnish breast and ovarian cancer families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pylkäs, Katri; Erkko, Hannele; Nikkilä, Jenni; Sólyom, Szilvia; Winqvist, Robert

    2008-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two most important genes associated with familial breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. In addition, PALB2 has recently been identified as a breast cancer susceptibility gene in several populations. Here we have evaluated whether large genomic rearrangement in these genes could explain some of Finnish breast and/or ovarian cancer families. Altogether 61 index patients of Northern Finnish breast and/or ovarian cancer families were analyzed by Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method in order to identify exon deletions and duplications in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. The families have been comprehensively screened for germline mutation in these genes by conventional methods of mutation analysis and were found negative. We identified one large deletion in BRCA1, deleting the most part of the gene (exon 1A-13) in one family with family history of ovarian cancer. No large genomic rearrangements were identified in either BRCA2 or PALB2. In Finland, women eligible for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation screening, when found negative, could benefit from screening for large genomic rearrangements at least in BRCA1. On the contrary, the genomic rearrangements in PALB2 seem not to contribute to the hereditary breast cancer susceptibility

  6. Pediatric Tourette Syndrome: A Tic Disorder with a Tricky Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Qurratul Warsi; Caroline Kirby; Mirza Beg

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a condition in which disruption of the swallowing process interferes with a patient's ability to eat. This may result in coughing or choking while swallowing, food sticking in the throat, or globus sensation. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated disease with a varied clinical spectrum of symptoms including dysphagia. Tourette syndrome (TS) is an inherited neurological disorder that manifests itself as a series of motor and vocal tics and may include orophar...

  7. Enhanced habit formation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Cécile; Salvador, Alexandre; Valabrègue, Romain; Roze, Emmanuel; Palminteri, Stefano; Vidailhet, Marie; de Wit, Sanne; Robbins, Trevor; Hartmann, Andreas; Worbe, Yulia

    2016-02-01

    Tics are sometimes described as voluntary movements performed in an automatic or habitual way. Here, we addressed the question of balance between goal-directed and habitual behavioural control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and formally tested the hypothesis of enhanced habit formation in these patients. To this aim, we administered a three-stage instrumental learning paradigm to 17 unmedicated and 17 antipsychotic-medicated patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and matched controls. In the first stage of the task, participants learned stimulus-response-outcome associations. The subsequent outcome devaluation and 'slip-of-action' tests allowed evaluation of the participants' capacity to flexibly adjust their behaviour to changes in action outcome value. In this task, unmedicated patients relied predominantly on habitual, outcome-insensitive behavioural control. Moreover, in these patients, the engagement in habitual responses correlated with more severe tics. Medicated patients performed at an intermediate level between unmedicated patients and controls. Using diffusion tensor imaging on a subset of patients, we also addressed whether the engagement in habitual responding was related to structural connectivity within cortico-striatal networks. We showed that engagement in habitual behaviour in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome correlated with greater structural connectivity within the right motor cortico-striatal network. In unmedicated patients, stronger structural connectivity of the supplementary motor cortex with the sensorimotor putamen predicted more severe tics. Overall, our results indicate enhanced habit formation in unmedicated patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Aberrant reinforcement signals to the sensorimotor striatum may be fundamental for the formation of stimulus-response associations and may contribute to the habitual behaviour and tics of this syndrome. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  8. Handwriting Tics in Tourette's Syndrome: A Single Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanaboni Dina, Carlotta; Bona, Alberto R; Zekaj, Edvin; Servello, Domenico; Porta, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically defined by multiple motor tics and at least one sound tic, beginning in childhood or in adolescence. Handwriting is one of the most impaired school activities for TS patients because of the presence of tics that hamper learning processes. In this paper, we present a case of handwriting tics in a TS patient highlighting the main features.

  9. Tic Exacerbation in Adults with Tourette Syndrome: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Sara M. Schaefer; Christopher A. Chow; Elan D. Louis; Daphne Robakis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tourette syndrome (TS) has been described as peaking in adolescence with subsequent regression. We report patients who were diagnosed with TS during childhood who experienced a latent period (significant reduction in or absence of tics) followed by tic re-emergence in adulthood.Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of outpatients over age 21 seen at the Yale neurology clinic between January 2012 and July 2016 who were diagnosed with childhood-onset tics, and...

  10. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015 [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A. Richards

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS.

  11. European clinical guidelines for Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders. Part I : assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cath, Danielle C.; Hedderly, Tammy; Ludolph, Andrea G.; Stern, Jeremy S.; Murphy, Tara; Hartmann, Andreas; Czernecki, Virginie; Robertson, Mary May; Martino, Davide; Munchau, A.; Rizzo, R.

    A working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS) has developed the first European assessment guidelines of Tourette Syndrome (TS). The available literature including national guidelines was thoroughly screened and extensively discussed in the expert group of ESSTS

  12. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part IV : deep brain stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Vahl, Kirsten R.; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Dehning, Sandra; Porta, Mauro; Robertson, Mary M.; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle

    Ten years ago deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been introduced as an alternative and promising treatment option for patients suffering from severe Tourette syndrome (TS). It seemed timely to develop a European guideline on DBS by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette

  13. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor binding is increased in patients with Tourette's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugbøl, Steven; Pinborg, Lars H.; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data have suggested that abnormalities in the serotonergic neurotransmissions in frontal-subcortical circuits are involved in Tourette's syndrome. To test the hypothesis that the brain's 5-HT2A receptor binding is increased in patients with Tourette's syndrome, PET imagi...

  14. Further Psychometric Properties of the Tourette's Disorder Scale-Parent Rated Version (TODS-PR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Soto, Ohel; Sajid, Muhammad; Allen, Pam; Roberti, Jonathan W.; Killiany, Erin M.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Tourette's Disorder Scale-Parent Rated (TODS-PR), a 15-item parent-rated instrument that assesses a range of common symptoms seen in childhood Tourette's Disorder (TD) patients including tics, obsessions, compulsions, inattention, hyperactivity, aggression, and emotional disturbances.…

  15. Clinical correlates of parenting stress in children with Tourette syndrome and in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Stephanie B; Greene, Deanna J; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Church, Jessica A; Schlaggar, Bradley L

    2015-05-01

    To determine the impact of tic severity in children with Tourette syndrome on parenting stress and the impact of comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptomatology on parenting stress in both children with Tourette syndrome and typically developing children. Children with diagnosed Tourette syndrome (n=74) and tic-free typically developing control subjects (n=48) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Parenting stress was greater in the group with Tourette syndrome than the typically developing group. Increased levels of parenting stress were related to increased ADHD symptomatology in both children with Tourette syndrome and typically developing children. Symptomatology of OCD was correlated with parenting stress in Tourette syndrome. Parenting stress was independent of tic severity in patients with Tourette syndrome. For parents of children with Tourette syndrome, parenting stress appears to be related to the child's ADHD and OCD comorbidity and not to the severity of the child's tic. Subthreshold ADHD symptomatology also appears to be related to parenting stress in parents of typically developing children. These findings demonstrate that ADHD symptomatology impacts parental stress both in children with and without a chronic tic disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Supporting Students with Tourette Syndrome in Secondary School: A Survey of Staff Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadman, Ruth; Glazebrook, Cris; Parkes, Emma; Jackson, Georgina M.

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurological condition involving involuntary movements and sounds (tics) and is thought to affect as many as 1% of school-aged children. Some young people with Tourette syndrome experience educational difficulties and social difficulties. Current clinical guidelines suggest educators can play an important role in maximising…

  17. A Qualitative Exploration of the Experiences of Children and Adolescents with Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kim R.; Mendlowitz, Sandra; Jackson, Elana; Champigny, Claire; Specht, Matt; Arnold, Paul; Gorman, Daniel; Dimitropoulos, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of youth with Tourette Syndrome (TS). Method Thirteen participants with TS were recruited from a large tertiary care hospital to complete semi-structured interviews and two questionnaires pertaining to demographic information and tic severity. Thematic analysis was utilized to systematically analyze the data. Results Three main themes were identified: 1) beliefs about TS; 2) TS related distress and impairment; and, 3) coping with TS. Conclusion The findings from this study suggest that most participants were aware of their tics but unaware of the cause of tics/TS. The interviews also highlighted that, for most participants, TS caused emotional, social, physical, and/or occupational impairment. Despite their distress, participants provided several suggestions for coping with TS and for supporting those who are diagnosed with this condition. PMID:28331502

  18. Microglial Dysregulation in OCD, Tourette Syndrome, and PANDAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Frick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that immune dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, Tourette syndrome, and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS. The mechanistic details of this pathophysiology, however, remain unclear. Here we focus on one particular component of the immune system: microglia, the brain’s resident immune cells. The role of microglia in neurodegenerative diseases has been understood in terms of classic, inflammatory activation, which may be both a consequence and a cause of neuronal damage. In OCD and Tourette syndrome, which are not characterized by frank neural degeneration, the potential role of microglial dysregulation is much less clear. Here we review the evidence for a neuroinflammatory etiology and microglial dysregulation in OCD, Tourette syndrome, and PANDAS. We also explore new hypotheses as to the potential contributions of microglial abnormalities to pathophysiology, beyond neuroinflammation, including failures in neuroprotection, lack of support for neuronal survival, and abnormalities in synaptic pruning. Recent advances in neuroimaging and animal model work are creating new opportunities to elucidate these issues.

  19. Microglial Dysregulation in OCD, Tourette Syndrome, and PANDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that immune dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette syndrome, and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS). The mechanistic details of this pathophysiology, however, remain unclear. Here we focus on one particular component of the immune system: microglia, the brain's resident immune cells. The role of microglia in neurodegenerative diseases has been understood in terms of classic, inflammatory activation, which may be both a consequence and a cause of neuronal damage. In OCD and Tourette syndrome, which are not characterized by frank neural degeneration, the potential role of microglial dysregulation is much less clear. Here we review the evidence for a neuroinflammatory etiology and microglial dysregulation in OCD, Tourette syndrome, and PANDAS. We also explore new hypotheses as to the potential contributions of microglial abnormalities to pathophysiology, beyond neuroinflammation, including failures in neuroprotection, lack of support for neuronal survival, and abnormalities in synaptic pruning. Recent advances in neuroimaging and animal model work are creating new opportunities to elucidate these issues. PMID:28053994

  20. [Neuropsychology of Tourette's disorder: cognition, neuroimaging and creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espert, R; Gadea, M; Alino, M; Oltra-Cucarella, J

    2017-02-24

    Tourette's disorder is the result of fronto-striatal brain dysfunction affecting people of all ages, with a debut in early childhood and continuing into adolescence and adulthood. This article reviews the main cognitive, functional neuroimaging and creativity-related studies in a disorder characterized by an excess of dopamine in the brain. Given the special cerebral configuration of these patients, neuropsychological alterations, especially in executive functions, should be expected. However, the findings are inconclusive and are conditioned by factors such as comorbidity with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder, age or methodological variables. On the other hand, the neuroimaging studies carried out over the last decade have been able to explain the clinical symptoms of Tourette's disorder patients, with special relevance for the supplementary motor area and the anterior cingulate gyrus. Finally, although there is no linear relationship between excess of dopamine and creativity, the scientific literature emphasizes an association between Tourette's disorder and musical creativity, which could be translated into intervention programs based on music.

  1. Tics and Tourette's: update on pathophysiology and tic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos

    2016-08-01

    To describe recent advances in the pathophysiology of tics and Tourette syndrome, and novel insights on tic control. The cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops are implicated in generation of tics. Disruption of GABAergic inhibition lies at the core of tic pathophysiology, but novel animal models also implicate cholinergic and histaminergic neurotransmission. Tourette syndrome patients have altered awareness of volition and enhanced formation of habits. Premonitory urges are not the driving force behind all tics. The intensity of premonitory urges depends on patients' capacity to perceive interoceptive signals. The insular cortex is a key structure in this process. The trait intensity of premonitory urges is not a prerequisite of voluntary tic inhibition, a distinct form of motor control. Voluntary tic inhibition is most efficient in the body parts that tic the least. The prefrontal cortex is associated with the capacity to inhibit tics. The management of tics includes behavioral, pharmacological and surgical interventions. Treatment recommendations differ based on patients' age. The study of Tourette syndrome pathophysiology involves different neural disciplines and provides novel, exciting insights of brain function in health and disease. These in turn provide the basis for innovative treatment approaches of tics and their associations.

  2. Biofeedback treatment for Tourette syndrome: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko; Cavanna, Andrea E; Critchley, Hugo D; Stern, Jeremy J; Robertson, Mary M; Joyce, Eileen M

    2014-03-01

    To study the clinical effectiveness of biofeedback treatment in reducing tics in patients with Tourette syndrome. Despite advances in the pharmacologic treatment of patients with Tourette syndrome, many remain troubled by their tics, which may be resistant to multiple medications at tolerable doses. Electrodermal biofeedback is a noninvasive biobehavioral intervention that can be useful in managing neuropsychiatric and neurologic conditions. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of electrodermal biofeedback training in 21 patients with Tourette syndrome. After training the patients for 3 sessions a week over 4 weeks, we observed a significant reduction in tic frequency and improved indices of subjective well-being in both the active-biofeedback and sham-feedback (control) groups, but there was no difference between the groups in these measurements. Furthermore, the active-treatment group did not demonstrably learn to reduce their sympathetic electrodermal tone using biofeedback. Our findings indicate that this form of biofeedback training was unable to produce a clinical effect greater than placebo. The main confounding factor appeared to be the 30-minute duration of the training sessions, which made it difficult for patients to sustain a reduction in sympathetic tone when their tics themselves were generating competing phasic electrodermal arousal responses. Despite a negative finding in this study, electrodermal biofeedback training may have a role in managing tics if optimal training schedules can be identified.

  3. Famous people with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Francesco; Servo, Serena; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2009-12-01

    Virtually no neurologist nor psychiatrist today can be unaware of the diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). Although the eponymous description by Dr. Georges Gilles de la Tourette was published in 1885, familiarity with this syndrome has been achieved only recently. In this article, the two most renown accounts of exceptional individuals retrospectively diagnosed with GTS are critically analyzed: British lexicographer Samuel Johnson and Austrian musician Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. In both cases, clinical descriptions have been retrieved from written documents predating Gilles de la Tourette's original publication. The case for Samuel Johnson having GTS is strong, mainly based on Boswell's extensive biographical account. Johnson was reported to have a great range of tics and compulsions, including involuntary utterances, repetitive ejaculations, and echo-phenomena. On the other hand, there is circumstantial evidence that Mozart may have had hyperactivity, restlessness, sudden impulses, odd motor behaviors, echo/palilalia, love of nonsense words, and scatology, the latter being documented in autograph letters ("coprographia"). However, the evidence supporting the core features of GTS, i.e., motor and vocal tics, is rather inconsistent. Thus, GTS seems to be an implausible diagnosis in Mozart's medical history and completely unrelated to his undisputed musical genius.

  4. Famous people with Tourette's syndrome: Dr. Samuel Johnson (yes) & Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (may be): Victims of Tourette's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B; Rai, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a clinical condition characterized by multiple motor tics and vocal tics which occurs in the age range 5-25 years and the intensity of the symptoms changes with time. It is felt that at least two remarkable personalities namely, Dr. Samuel Johnson from England, a man of letters and the compiler of the first ever English dictionary, and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart from Austria, one of the greatest musical genius of all time, possibly suffered from this condition. Tourette's syndrome is often described as the classical borderzone between neurology and psychiatry and every neurologist wonders at the curious and fascinating clinical features of this condition. It seems that at least two remarkable personalities, Dr. Samuel Johnson, a man of letters and the first person to compile an English dictionary, and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, arguably the most creative musical composer of all time, were possibly afflicted with this condition.

  5. Emergence of switch-like behavior in a large family of simple biochemical networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Siegal-Gaskins

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Bistability plays a central role in the gene regulatory networks (GRNs controlling many essential biological functions, including cellular differentiation and cell cycle control. However, establishing the network topologies that can exhibit bistability remains a challenge, in part due to the exceedingly large variety of GRNs that exist for even a small number of components. We begin to address this problem by employing chemical reaction network theory in a comprehensive in silico survey to determine the capacity for bistability of more than 40,000 simple networks that can be formed by two transcription factor-coding genes and their associated proteins (assuming only the most elementary biochemical processes. We find that there exist reaction rate constants leading to bistability in ∼90% of these GRN models, including several circuits that do not contain any of the TF cooperativity commonly associated with bistable systems, and the majority of which could only be identified as bistable through an original subnetwork-based analysis. A topological sorting of the two-gene family of networks based on the presence or absence of biochemical reactions reveals eleven minimal bistable networks (i.e., bistable networks that do not contain within them a smaller bistable subnetwork. The large number of previously unknown bistable network topologies suggests that the capacity for switch-like behavior in GRNs arises with relative ease and is not easily lost through network evolution. To highlight the relevance of the systematic application of CRNT to bistable network identification in real biological systems, we integrated publicly available protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA interaction, and gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified several GRNs predicted to behave in a bistable fashion.

  6. Association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorder in the ALSPAC cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Miller, Laura L; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Lawlor, Debbie A; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorder are heritable but aetiologically complex. Although environment plays a role in their development, existing studies of non-genetic risk factors are inconsistent. To examine the association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) prospective longitudinal pre-birth cohort. Relationships between exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder were examined in 6090 children using logistic regression. Maternal alcohol and cannabis use, inadequate maternal weight gain and parity were associated with Tourette syndrome or Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder. Other previously reported exposures, including birth weight and prenatal maternal smoking, were not associated with Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder. This study supports previously reported relationships between Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder and prenatal alcohol exposure, and identifies additional previously unexplored potential prenatal risk factors.

  7. Association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorder in the ALSPAC cohort†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Miller, Laura L.; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorder are heritable but aetiologically complex. Although environment plays a role in their development, existing studies of non-genetic risk factors are inconsistent. Aims To examine the association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) prospective longitudinal pre-birth cohort. Method Relationships between exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder were examined in 6090 children using logistic regression. Results Maternal alcohol and cannabis use, inadequate maternal weight gain and parity were associated with Tourette syndrome or Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder. Other previously reported exposures, including birth weight and prenatal maternal smoking, were not associated with Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder. Conclusions This study supports previously reported relationships between Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder and prenatal alcohol exposure, and identifies additional previously unexplored potential prenatal risk factors. PMID:24262815

  8. Phenotypic Progression of Stargardt Disease in a Large Consanguineous Tunisian Family Harboring New ABCA4 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousra Falfoul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the progression of Stargardt (STGD disease over nine years in two branches of a large consanguineous Tunisian family. Initially, different phenotypes were observed with clinical intra- and interfamilial variations. At presentation, four different retinal phenotypes were observed. In phenotype 1, bull’s eye maculopathy and slight alteration of photopic responses in full-field electroretinography were observed in the youngest child. In phenotype 2, macular atrophy and yellow white were observed in two brothers. In phenotype 3, diffuse macular, peripapillary, and peripheral RPE atrophy and hyperfluorescent dots were observed in two sisters. In phenotype 4, Stargardt disease-fundus flavimaculatus phenotype was observed in two cousins with later age of onset. After a progression of 9 years, all seven patients displayed the same phenotype 3 with advanced stage STGD and diffuse atrophy. WES and MLPA identified two ABCA4 mutations M1: c.[(?_4635_(5714+?dup; (?_6148_(6479_+? del] and M2: c.[2041C>T], p.[R681∗]. In one branch, the three affected patients had M1/M1 causal mutations and in the other branch the two affected patients had M1/M2 causal mutations. After 9-year follow-up, all patients showed the same phenotypic evolution, confirming the progressive nature of the disease. Genetic variations in the two branches made no difference to similar end-stage disease.

  9. Pathological glutamatergic neurotransmission in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Ahmad Seif; Gerasch, Sarah; García-García, Isabel; Lampe, Leonie; Pampel, André; Anwander, Alfred; Near, Jamie; Möller, Harald E; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a hereditary, neuropsychiatric movement disorder with reported abnormalities in the neurotransmission of dopamine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Spatially focalized alterations in excitatory, inhibitory and modulatory neurochemical ratios within specific functional subdivisions of the basal ganglia, may lead to the expression of diverse motor and non-motor features as manifested in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Current treatment strategies are often unsatisfactory thus provoking the need for further elucidation of the underlying pathophysiology. In view of (i) the close spatio-temporal synergy exhibited between excitatory, inhibitory and modulatory neurotransmitter systems; (ii) the crucial role played by glutamate (Glu) in tonic/phasic dopaminergic signalling; and (iii) the interdependent metabolic relationship exhibited between Glu and GABA via glutamine (Gln); we postulated that glutamatergic signalling is related to the pathophysiology of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. As such, we examined the neurochemical profile of three cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical regions in 37 well-characterized, drug-free adult patients and 36 age/gender-matched healthy control subjects via magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T. To interrogate the influence of treatment on metabolite concentrations, spectral data were acquired from 15 patients undergoing a 4-week treatment with aripiprazole. Test-retest reliability measurements in 23 controls indicated high repeatability of voxel localization and metabolite quantitation. We report significant reductions in striatal concentrations of Gln, Glu + Gln (Glx) and the Gln:Glu ratio, and thalamic concentrations of Glx in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome in comparison to controls. ON-treatment patients exhibited no significant metabolite differences when compared to controls but significant increases in striatal Glu and Glx, and trends for increases in striatal Gln and thalamic Glx compared to baseline

  10. Convulsive Tic Disorder Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Guinon and Grasset on the Phenomenology and Psychopathology of Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M. Robertson

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette gained eponymous fame when he described nine cases of multiple tics, coprolalia and echolalia, and later he, Guinon and Grasset were the first to document the psychopathology of the Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. In particular, they noted the association between obsessional thoughts and behaviours and the tic disorder. In this paper we present the first English translations of their works referring to the psychopathology, comparing and contrasting their ideas to current concepts.

  11. Familiality of co-existing ADHD and tic disorders: evidence from a large sibling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit Roessner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: The association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and tic disorder (TD is frequent and clinically important. Very few and inconclusive attempts have been made to clarify if and how the combination of ADHD+TD runs in families. Aim: To determine the first time in a large-scale ADHD sample whether ADHD+TD increases the risk of ADHD+TD in siblings and, also the first time, if this is independent of their psychopathological vulnerability in general. Methods: The study is based on the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics (IMAGE study. The present sub-sample of 2815 individuals included ADHD-index patients with co-existing TD (ADHD+TD, n=262 and without TD (ADHD-TD, n=947 as well as their 1606 full siblings (n=358 of the ADHD+TD index patients and n=1248 of the ADHD-TD index patients. We assessed psychopathological symptoms in index patients and siblings by using the strength and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ and the parent and teacher Conners’ long version Rating Scales (CRS. For disorder classification the Parental Account of Childhood Symptoms (PACS-Interview was applied in n = 271 children. Odds ratio with the GENMOD procedure (PROCGENMOD was used to test if the risk for ADHD, TD and ADHD+TD in siblings was associated with the related index patients’ diagnoses. In order to get an estimate for specificity we compared the four groups for general psychopathological symptoms.Results: Co-existing ADHD+TD in index patients increased the risk of both comorbid ADHD+TD and TD in the siblings of these index patients. These effects did not extend to general psychopathology. Interpretation: Co-existence of ADHD+TD may segregate in families. The same holds true for TD (without ADHD. Hence, the segregation of TD (included in both groups seems to be the determining factor, independent of further behavioral problems. This close relationship between ADHD and TD supports the clinical approach to carefully assess ADHD in

  12. Work-family spillover among Japanese dual-earner couples: a large community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kyoko; Shimazu, Akihito; Bakker, Arnold B; Demerouti, Evangelia; Kawakami, Norito

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of multiple types of work-family spillover (work-to-family negative spillover, WFNS; family-to-work negative spillover, FWNS; and work-family positive spillover, WFPS) on psychological distress among Japanese dual-earner couples with preschool children. 2,346 parents completed questionnaires measuring work-family spillover, work- and family-specific variables (i.e., job demands and resources, family demands and resources), and psychological distress. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted by entering demographic characteristics (gender, age, age of the youngest child, and job contract) in step 1, job demands and resources in step 2, family demands and resources in step 3, work-family spillover in step 4, and three two-way interactions between types of work-family spillover and gender in the final step. Both WFNS and FWNS were positively related to psychological distress after controlling for demographic characteristics and domain specific variables (i.e. job and family demands/resources), and FWNS (β=0.26) had a stronger relation with psychological distress than WFNS (β=0.16). Although WFPS was significantly and negatively related to psychological distress, the relationship was weak (β=-0.05). In addition, two-way interactions of WFNS and FWNS with gender were found; the impact of both WFNS and FWNS on psychological distress is stronger for females than for males. No significant interaction effect was observed between WFPS and gender. In this study of Japanese dual-earner couples with preschool children, work-family negative spillover had a stronger relationship with psychological distress than positive spillover. Gender had a moderating effect on the relationship between negative spillover and psychological distress.

  13. Increased rates of cesarean sections and large families: a potentially dangerous combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ahmed M; Dudenhausen, Joachim W; Ahmed, Badreldeen

    2017-07-26

    Rates of cesarean sections have been on the rise over the past three decades all over the world, despite the ideal rate of 10-15% that had been set by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1985, in Fortaleza, Brazil. This epidemic increase in the rate of cesarean delivery is due to many factors which include, cesarean delivery on request, advanced maternal age at first pregnancy, decrease in number of patients who are willing to try vaginal birth after cesarean delivery, virtual disappearance of vaginal breech delivery, perceived increase in the weight of the fetus and increase in the number of women with chronic medical conditions such as Diabetes Mellitus and congenital heart disease in the reproductive age. There is no doubt that cesarean delivery is a safe procedure and it is getting safer and safer for many reasons. However, like all other surgical procedures it is not without risks both to the mother and the new born. There is a substantial increase in the incidence of morbidly adherent placenta and the risk of scar pregnancy. In the Middle East and many African and Asian countries women tend to have large families. The number of previous cesarean section deliveries is directly proportional to the risk of developing morbidly adherent placenta. Morbidly adherent placenta is the most common cause of emergency postpartum hysterectomy, which is often associated with multiple surgical complications, severe maternal morbidity and mortality. The increased rates of cesarean sections lead to increased rates of scar pregnancies, which can have lethal consequences. Cesarean delivery has a negative impact on the infant immune system. This effect on the infant led to the introduction of a new concept called "Vaginal seeding". This refers to the practice of transferring some maternal vaginal fluid to the infant born via cesarean section in an effort to enhance its immune system.

  14. Screening for large genomic rearrangements in the FANCA gene reveals extensive deletion in a Finnish breast cancer family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyom, Szilvia; Winqvist, Robert; Nikkilä, Jenni; Rapakko, Katrin; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Kokkonen, Hannaleena; Pylkäs, Katri

    2011-03-28

    A portion of familial breast cancer cases are caused by mutations in the same genes that are inactivated in the downstream part of Fanconi anemia (FA) signaling pathway. Here we have assessed the FANCA gene for breast cancer susceptibility by examining blood DNA for aberrations from 100 Northern Finnish breast cancer families using the MLPA method. We identified a novel heterozygous deletion, removing the promoter and 12 exons of the gene in one family. This allele was absent from 124 controls. We conclude that FANCA deletions might contribute to breast cancer susceptibility, potentially in combination with other germline mutations. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting a large deletion in an upstream FA gene in familial breast cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reconstruction of Oomycete Genome Evolution Identifies Differences in Evolutionary Trajectories Leading to Present-Day Large Gene Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, M.F.; Ackerveken, van den G.; Govers, F.; Snel, B.

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic class of oomycetes contains numerous pathogens of plants and animals but is related to nonpathogenic diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes have flexible genomes comprising large gene families that play roles in pathogenicity. The evolutionary processes that shaped the gene content have

  16. Lethal/severe osteogenesis imperfecta in a large family: a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation and bone histological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; den Hollander, Nicolette S.; Nesbitt, Isabel M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    We report a large consanguineous Turkish family in which multiple individuals are affected with autosomal recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) due to a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation. In one affected individual histological studies of bone tissue were performed, which may

  17. Retrospective analysis of cohort database: Phenotypic variability in a large dataset of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raal, Frederick J.; Sjouke, Barbara; Hovingh, G. Kees; Isaac, Barton F.

    2016-01-01

    These data describe the phenotypic variability in a large cohort of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Herein, we describe the observed relationship of treated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with age. We also overlay the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

  18. Parent and self-report health-related quality of life measures in young patients with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Luoni, Chiara; Selvini, Claudia; Blangiardo, Rosanna; Eddy, Clare M; Silvestri, Paola R; Cali', Paola V; Gagliardi, Emanuela; Balottin, Umberto; Cardona, Francesco; Rizzo, Renata; Termine, Cristiano

    2013-10-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics and comorbid behavioral problems. This study compared child- and parent-reported quality of life and everyday functioning. We assessed 75 children with Tourette syndrome, of which 42 (56%) had comorbid conditions (obsessive-compulsive disorder = 25; attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder = 6; both comorbidities = 4). All patients completed psychometric instruments, including the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome-Quality of Life Scale for Children and Adolescents (child report) and the Child Tourette's Syndrome Impairment Scale (parent report). Data were compared for patients with pure Tourette syndrome, Tourette syndrome + obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome + attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Tourette syndrome + both comorbidities. There were no group differences in quality of life. However, there were differences for total, school, and home activities impairment scores. Children and parents may not share similar views about the impact of Tourette syndrome on functioning. The measurement of health-related quality of life in Tourette syndrome is more complex in children than adults.

  19. Tourette syndrome deep brain stimulation: a review and updated recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Lauren E; Mink, Jonathan W; Woods, Douglas W; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Dominico; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Silburn, Peter A; Foltynie, Thomas; Walker, Harrison C; Shahed-Jimenez, Joohi; Savica, Rodolfo; Klassen, Bryan T; Machado, Andre G; Foote, Kelly D; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Ackermans, Linda; Temel, Yasin; Mari, Zoltan; Changizi, Barbara K; Lozano, Andres; Auyeung, M; Kaido, Takanobu; Agid, Yves; Welter, Marie L; Khandhar, Suketu M; Mogilner, Alon Y; Pourfar, Michael H; Walter, Benjamin L; Juncos, Jorge L; Gross, Robert E; Kuhn, Jens; Leckman, James F; Neimat, Joseph A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may improve disabling tics in severely affected medication and behaviorally resistant Tourette syndrome (TS). Here we review all reported cases of TS DBS and provide updated recommendations for selection, assessment, and management of potential TS DBS cases based on the literature and implantation experience. Candidates should have a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM V) diagnosis of TS with severe motor and vocal tics, which despite exhaustive medical and behavioral treatment trials result in significant impairment. Deep brain stimulation should be offered to patients only by experienced DBS centers after evaluation by a multidisciplinary team. Rigorous preoperative and postoperative outcome measures of tics and associated comorbidities should be used. Tics and comorbid neuropsychiatric conditions should be optimally treated per current expert standards, and tics should be the major cause of disability. Psychogenic tics, embellishment, and malingering should be recognized and addressed. We have removed the previously suggested 25-year-old age limit, with the specification that a multidisciplinary team approach for screening is employed. A local ethics committee or institutional review board should be consulted for consideration of cases involving persons younger than 18 years of age, as well as in cases with urgent indications. Tourette syndrome patients represent a unique and complex population, and studies reveal a higher risk for post-DBS complications. Successes and failures have been reported for multiple brain targets; however, the optimal surgical approach remains unknown. Tourette syndrome DBS, though still evolving, is a promising approach for a subset of medication refractory and severely affected patients. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Tourette Syndrome and comorbid ADHD: current pharmacological treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Renata; Gulisano, Mariangela; Calì, Paola V; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common co-morbid condition encountered in people with tics and Tourette Syndrome (TS). The co-occurrence of TS and ADHD is associated with a higher psychopathological, social and academic impairment and the management may represent a challenge for the clinicians. To review recent advances in management of patients with tic, Tourette Syndrome and comorbid Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. We searched peer reviewed and original medical publications (PUBMED 1990-2012) and included randomized, double-blind, controlled trials related to pharmacological treatment for tic and TS used in children and adolescents with comorbid ADHD. "Tourette Syndrome" or "Tic" and "ADHD", were cross referenced with the words "pharmacological treatment", "α-agonist", "psychostimulants", "selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor", "antipsychotics". Three classes of drugs are currently used in the treatment of TS and comorbid ADHD: α-agonists (clonidine and guanfacine), stimulants (amphetamine enantiomers, methylphenidate enantiomers or slow release preparation), and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (atomoxetine). It has been recently suggested that in a few selected cases partial dopamine agonists (aripiprazole) could be useful. Level A of evidence supported the use of noradrenergic agents (clonidine). Reuptake inhibitors (atomoxetine) and stimulants (methylphenidate) could be, also used for the treatment of TS and comorbid ADHD. Taking into account the risk-benefit profile, clonidine could be used as the first line treatment. However only few studies meet rigorous quality criteria in terms of study design and methodology; most trials have low statistical power due to small sample size or short duration. Treatment should be "symptom targeted" and personalized for each patient. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A large deletion in GPR98 causes type IIC Usher syndrome in male and female members of an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgert, N; Kahrizi, K; Dieltjens, N; Bazazzadegan, N; Najmabadi, H; Smith, R J H; Van Camp, G

    2009-04-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. The three recognised clinical phenotypes (types I, II and III; USH1, USH2 and USH3) are caused by mutations in nine different genes. USH2C is characterised by moderate to severe hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and normal vestibular function. One earlier report describes mutations in GPR98 (VLGR1) in four families segregating this phenotype. To detect the disease-causing mutation in an Iranian family segregating USH2C. In this family, five members had a phenotype compatible with Usher syndrome, and two others had nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mutation analysis of all 90 coding exons of GPR98. Consistent with these clinical findings, the five subjects with USH carried a haplotype linked to the USH2C locus, whereas the two subjects with nonsyndromic hearing loss did not. We identified a new mutation in GPR98 segregating with USH2C in this family. The mutation is a large deletion g.371657_507673del of exons 84 and 85, presumably leading to a frameshift. A large GPR98 deletion of 136 017 bp segregates with USH2C in an Iranian family. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of a GPR98 mutation, and the first report on male subjects with USH2C and a GPR98 mutation.

  2. Sleep Bruxism-Tooth Grinding Prevalence, Characteristics and Familial Aggregation: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey and Polysomnographic Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Samar; Carra, Maria Clotilde; Huynh, Nelly; Montplaisir, Jacques; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep bruxism (SB) is characterized by tooth grinding and jaw clenching during sleep. Familial factors may contribute to the occurrence of SB. This study aims are: (1) revisit the prevalence and characteristics of SB in a large cross-sectional survey and assess familial aggregation of SB, (2) assess comorbidity such as insomnia and pain, (3) compare survey data in a subset of subjects diagnosed using polysomnography research criteria. Methods: A sample of 6,357 individuals from the general population in Quebec, Canada, undertook an online survey to assess the prevalence of SB, comorbidities, and familial aggregation. Data on familial aggregation were compared to 111 SB subjects diagnosed using polysomnography. Results: Regularly occurring SB was reported by 8.6% of the general population, decreases with age, without any gender difference. SB awareness is concomitant with complaints of difficulties maintaining sleep in 47.6% of the cases. A third of SB positive probands reported pain. A 2.5 risk ratio of having a first-degree family member with SB was found in SB positive probands. The risk of reporting SB in first-degree family ranges from 1.4 to 2.9 with increasing severity of reported SB. Polysomnographic data shows that 37% of SB subjects had at least one first-degree relative with reported SB with a relative risk ratio of 4.625. Conclusions: Our results support the heritability of SB-tooth grinding and that sleep quality and pain are concomitant in a significant number of SB subjects. Citation: Khoury S, Carra MC, Huynh N, Montplaisir J, Lavigne GJ. Sleep bruxism-tooth grinding prevalence, characteristics and familial aggregation: a large cross-sectional survey and polysomnographic validation. SLEEP 2016;39(11):2049–2056. PMID:27568807

  3. Trials of Pharmacological Interventions for Tourette Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Waldon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS is a childhood-onset hyperkinetic movement disorder defined by the chronic presence of multiple motor tics and at least one vocal tic and often complicated by co-morbid behavioural problems. The pharmacological treatment of GTS focuses on the modulation of monoaminergic pathways within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuitry. This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety profiles of pharmacological agents used in the treatment of tics in patients with GTS, in order to provide clinicians with an evidence-based rationale for the pharmacological treatment in GTS.

  4. Retrospective analysis of cohort database: Phenotypic variability in a large dataset of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick J. Raal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available These data describe the phenotypic variability in a large cohort of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Herein, we describe the observed relationship of treated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with age. We also overlay the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR functional status with these phenotypic data. A full description of these data is available in our recent study published in Atherosclerosis, “Phenotype Diversity Among Patients With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia: A Cohort Study” (Raal et al., 2016 [1].

  5. Atypical Features in a Large Turkish Family Affected with Friedreich Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semiha Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the clinical features of several members of the same family diagnosed with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA and cerebral lesions, demyelinating neuropathy, and late-age onset without a significant cardiac involvement and presenting with similar symptoms, although genetic testing was negative for the GAA repeat expansion in one patient of the family. The GAA repeat expansion in the frataxin gene was shown in all of the family members except in a young female patient. MRI revealed arachnoid cysts in two patients; MRI was consistent with both cavum septum pellucidum-cavum vergae and nodular signal intensity increase in one patient. EMG showed demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy in another patient. The GAA expansion-negative 11-year-old female patient had mental-motor retardation, epilepsy, and ataxia. None of the patients had significant cardiac symptoms. Description of FRDA families with different ethnic backgrounds may assist in identifying possible phenotypic and genetic features of the disease. Furthermore, the genetic heterogeneity observed in this family draws attention to the difficulty of genetic counseling in an inbred population and to the need for genotyping all affected members before delivering comprehensive genetic counseling.

  6. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Predisposition in a Large Family with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing has become more widely used to reveal genetic defect in monogenic disorders. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, the leading cause of hereditary blindness worldwide, has been attributed to more than 67 disease-causing genes. Due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity, using general molecular screening alone is inadequate for identifying genetic predispositions in susceptible individuals. In order to identify underlying mutation rapidly, we utilized next-generation sequencing in a four-generation Chinese family with RP. Two affected patients and an unaffected sibling were subjected to whole exome sequencing. Through bioinformatics analysis and direct sequencing confirmation, we identified p.R135W transition in the rhodopsin gene. The mutation was subsequently confirmed to cosegregate with the disease in the family. In this study, our results suggest that whole exome sequencing is a robust method in diagnosing familial hereditary disease.

  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Comorbidities of Tourette's Syndrome and Bipolar Disorder in A 10-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Wei Wang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in moods are one of the comorbid psychiatric manifestations that frequently occur in patients with Tourette's syndrome. The assessment of a manic episode in children with Tourette's syndrome is challenging. Furthermore, the treatment of children with comorbid mania and Tourette's syndrome has not been extensively studied. We present a 10-year-old boy who suffered from both Tourette's syndrome and mania, whose symptoms improved after using lithium and risperidone. The child was diagnosed with Tourette's syndrome at 7 years of age when he suffered from tics and experienced his first manic episode. He received monotherapy, including haloperidol, risperidone and aripiprazole, and the response was poor. When the combination of lithium and risperidone was used, the tics and mania subsided. It is important to assess individuals with Tourette's syndrome for associated bipolar disorder. The treatment of children with both disorders is a major clinical issue, and our case may serve as an example for successful treatment strategies.

  8. BoS: a large and diverse family of short interspersed elements (SINEs) in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wessler, Susan R

    2005-05-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are nonautonomous non-LTR retrotransposons that populate eukaryotic genomes. Numerous SINE families have been identified in animals, whereas only a few have been described in plants. Here we describe a new family of SINEs, named BoS, that is widespread in Brassicaceae and present at approximately 2000 copies in Brassica oleracea. In addition to sharing a modular structure and target site preference with previously described SINEs, BoS elements have several unusual features. First, the head regions of BoS RNAs can adopt a distinct hairpin-like secondary structure. Second, with 15 distinct subfamilies, BoS represents one of the most diverse SINE families described to date. Third, several of the subfamilies have a mosaic structure that has arisen through the exchange of sequences between existing subfamilies, possibly during retrotransposition. Analysis of BoS subfamilies indicate that they were active during various time periods through the evolution of Brassicaceae and that active elements may still reside in some Brassica species. As such, BoS elements may be a valuable tool as phylogenetic makers for resolving outstanding issues in the evolution of species in the Brassicaceae family.

  9. Lifetime prevalence, age of risk, and genetic relationships of comorbid psychiatric disorders in Tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirschtritt, M.E.; Lee, P.C.; Pauls, D.L.; Dion, Y.; Grados, M.A.; Illmann, C.; King, R.A.; Sandor, P.; McMahon, W.M.; Lyon, G.J.; Cath, D.C.; Kurlan, R.; Robertson, M.M.; Osiecki, L.; Scharf, J.M.; Mathews, C.A.; Posthuma, D.; Singer, H.S.; Yu, D.; Cox, N.J.; Freimer, N.B.; Budman, C.L.; Chouinard, S.; Rouleau, G.; Barr, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance: Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by high rates of psychiatric comorbidity; however, fewstudies have fully characterized these comorbidities. Furthermore, most studies have included relatively fewparticipants (< 200), and none has examined the ages of highest risk for each

  10. Lifetime Prevalence, Age of Risk, and Genetic Relationships of Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Lee, Paul C; Pauls, David L; Dion, Yves; Grados, Marco A; Illmann, Cornelia; King, Robert A; Sandor, Paul; McMahon, William M; Lyon, Gholson J; Cath, Danielle C; Kurlan, Roger; Robertson, Mary M; Osiecki, Lisa; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Mathews, Carol A

    IMPORTANCE: Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by high rates of psychiatric comorbidity; however, few studies have fully characterized these comorbidities. Furthermore, most studies have included relatively few participants (<200), and none has examined the ages of highest risk for each

  11. Brief Report: Cases for an Association between Tourette Syndrome, Autistic Disorder, and Schizophrenia-Like Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverd, Jeffrey; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on two children diagnosed as having co-occurring autistic disorder, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and Tourette syndrome, and two autistic adults who had tics and episodes of schizophrenia-like psychosis. (JDD)

  12. Tourette syndrome research highlights from 2016 [version 2; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Black

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents highlights chosen from research that appeared during 2016 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Selected articles felt to represent meaningful advances in the field are briefly summarized.

  13. Tourette syndrome research highlights from 2016 [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Black

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents highlights chosen from research that appeared during 2016 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Selected articles felt to represent meaningful advances in the field are briefly summarized.

  14. Impaired inhibition of prepotent motor actions in patients with Tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wylie, S.A.; Claassen, D.O.; Kanoff, K.E.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Evidence that tic behaviour in individuals with Tourette syndrome reflects difficulties inhibiting prepotent motor actions is mixed. Response conflict tasks produce sensitive measures of response interference from prepotent motor impulses and the proficiency of inhibiting these impulses

  15. Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome: A Review and Implications for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Laurie A.; Barber, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by multiple involuntary motor and verbal tics. This review covers the history, symptoms, diagnostic criteria, past and present treatments, associated disorders, and various educational techniques. (Author/DB)

  16. From Genetics to Epigenetics: New Perspectives in Tourette Syndrome Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaroli, Luca; Vető, Borbála; Arányi, Tamás; Barta, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by the appearance of multiple involuntary motor and vocal tics. TS presents high comorbidity rates with other disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). TS is highly heritable and has a complex polygenic background. However, environmental factors also play a role in the manifestation of symptoms. Different epigenetic mechanisms may represent the link between these two causalities. Epigenetic regulation has been shown to have an impact in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders, however very little is known about its effects on Tourette Syndrome. This review provides a summary of the recent findings in genetic background of TS, followed by an overview on different epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNAs in the regulation of gene expression. Epigenetic studies in other neurological and psychiatric disorders are discussed along with the TS-related epigenetic findings available in the literature to date. Moreover, we are proposing that some general epigenetic mechanisms seen in other neuropsychiatric disorders may also play a role in the pathogenesis of TS. PMID:27462201

  17. Tourette's syndrome and associated disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara R. Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compile data on Tourette's syndrome (TS, tics and associated disorders.Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the 5S levels of organization of healthcare research evidence (systems, summaries, synopses, syntheses, studies, based on the model described by Haynes. The search keywords were Tourette, tics and comorbidity, which were cross-referenced. Studies provided by publishers and articles being processed on July 31, 2013, were also included.Results: Of all studies retrieved during the search, 64 were selected because they analyzed the epidemiology, clinical features and etiopathogenesis of TS and its comorbidities. TS is classified as a hyperkinetic movement disorder, and at least 90% of the patients have neuropsychiatric comorbidities, of which attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive-compulsive disorders are the most common. The syndrome is clinically heterogeneous and has been associated with a dysfunction of cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuits involving various neurotransmitters. Although its genetic etiology has been widely studied, other factors may be important to understand this syndrome and its associated disorders.Conclusions: TS is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from the impact of stress factors on a vulnerable biological substrate during the critical periods of neurodevelopment. The study of TS and its comorbidities may contribute, at different levels, to the understanding of several neuropsychiatric disorders of clinical and therapeutic relevance.

  18. Counterfactual thinking in Tourette's syndrome: a study using three measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Stefano; Delli Ponti, Adriana; Mastroianni, Silvia; Solca, Federica; Tomasini, Emanuele; Poletti, Barbara; Inglese, Silvia; Sartori, Giuseppe; Porta, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological evidence suggests an involvement of frontostriatal circuits in Tourette syndrome (TS) and cognitive abnormalities have been detected in tasks sensitive to cognitive deficits associated with prefrontal damage (verbal fluency, planning, attention shifting, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and social reasoning). A disorder in counterfactual thinking (CFT), a behavioural executive process linked to the prefrontal cortex functioning, has not been investigated in TS. CFT refers to the generation of a mental simulation of alternatives to past factual events, actions, and outcomes. It is a pervasive cognitive feature in everyday life and it is closely related to decision-making, planning, problem-solving, and experience-driven learning-cognitive processes that involve wide neuronal networks in which prefrontal lobes play a fundamental role. Clinical observations in patients with focal prefrontal lobe damage or with neurological and psychiatric diseases related to frontal lobe dysfunction (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and schizophrenia) show counterfactual thinking impairments. In this work, we evaluate the performance of CFT in a group of patients with Tourette's syndrome compared with a group of healthy participants. Overall results showed no statistical differences in counterfactual thinking between TS patients and controls in the three counterfactual measures proposed. The possible explanations of this unexpected result are discussed below.

  19. Neural correlates of behavior therapy for Tourette's disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Chou, Tina; Britton, Jennifer C; Carlson, Lindsay E; Reese, Hannah E; Siev, Jedidiah; Scahill, Lawrence; Piacentini, John C; Woods, Douglas W; Walkup, John T; Peterson, Alan L; Dougherty, Darin D; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2014-12-30

    Tourette's disorder, also called Tourette syndrome (TS), is characterized by motor and vocal tics that can cause significant impairment in daily functioning. Tics are believed to be due to failed inhibition of both associative and motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical pathways. Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT), which is an extension of Habit Reversal Therapy (HRT), teaches patients to become more aware of sensations that reliably precede tics (premonitory urges) and to initiate competing movements that inhibit the occurrence of tics. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural changes associated with CBIT treatment in subjects with TS. Eight subjects with TS were matched with eight healthy controls in gender, education, age, and handedness. Subjects completed the Visuospatial Priming (VSP) task, a measure of response inhibition, during fMRI scanning before and after CBIT treatment (or waiting period for controls). For TS subjects, we found a significant decrease in striatal (putamen) activation from pre- to post-treatment. Change in VSP task-related activation from pre- to post-treatment in Brodmann's area 47 (the inferior frontal gyrus) was negatively correlated with changes in tic severity. CBIT may promote normalization of aberrant cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical associative and motor pathways in individuals with TS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic linkage analyses and Cx50 mutation detection in a large multiplex Chinese family with hereditary nuclear cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Xin; Chen, Jiajing; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Feng; Dai, Qiushi; Cui, Hao; Wang, Duen-Mei; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian; Lu, Shan

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the underlying mutation in a large multiplex Chinese family with hereditary nuclear cataract. A 6-generation Chinese family having hereditary nuclear cataract was recruited and clinically verified. Blood DNA samples were obtained from 53 available family members. Linkage analyses were performed on the known candidate regions for hereditary cataract with 36 polymorphic microsatellite markers. To identify mutations related to cataract, a direct sequencing approach was applied to a candidate gene residing in our linkage locus. A linkage locus was identified with a maximum 2-point LOD score of 4.31 (recombination fraction = 0) at marker D1S498 and a maximum multipoint LOD score of 5.7 between markers D1S2344 and D1S498 on chromosome 1q21.1, where the candidate gene Cx50 is located. Direct sequencing of Cx50 showed a 139 G to A transition occurred in all affected family members. This transitional mutation resulted in a replacement of aspartic acid by asparagine at residue 47 (D47N) and led to a loss-of-function of the protein. The D47N mutation of Cx50 causes the hereditary nuclear cataract in this family in an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance.

  1. A Novel Locus Harbouring a Functional CD164 Nonsense Mutation Identified in a Large Danish Family with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) is a highly heterogeneous condition with more than eighty known causative genes. However, in the clinical setting, a large number of NSHI families have unexplained etiology, suggesting that there are many more genes to be identified. In this study we used SNP......-based linkage analysis and follow up microsatellite markers to identify a novel locus (DFNA66) on chromosome 6q15-21 (LOD 5.1) in a large Danish family with dominantly inherited NSHI. By locus specific capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a c.574C>T heterozygous nonsense mutation (p.R192......-genome and exome sequence data. The predicted effect of the mutation was a truncation of the last six C-terminal residues of the cytoplasmic tail of CD164, including a highly conserved canonical sorting motif (YXX phi). In whole blood from an affected individual, we found by RT-PCR both the wild...

  2. Altered synaptic plasticity in Tourette's syndrome and its relationship to motor skill learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Cathérine Brandt

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics that can be considered motor responses to preceding inner urges. It has been shown that Tourette patients have inferior performance in some motor learning tasks and reduced synaptic plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, it has not been investigated whether altered synaptic plasticity is directly linked to impaired motor skill acquisition in Tourette patients. In this study, cortical plasticity was assessed by measuring motor-evoked potentials before and after paired associative stimulation in 14 Tourette patients (13 male; age 18-39 and 15 healthy controls (12 male; age 18-33. Tic and urge severity were assessed using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale and the Premonitory Urges for Tics Scale. Motor learning was assessed 45 minutes after inducing synaptic plasticity and 9 months later, using the rotary pursuit task. On average, long-term potentiation-like effects in response to the paired associative stimulation were present in healthy controls but not in patients. In Tourette patients, long-term potentiation-like effects were associated with more and long-term depression-like effects with less severe urges and tics. While motor learning did not differ between patients and healthy controls 45 minutes after inducing synaptic plasticity, the learning curve of the healthy controls started at a significantly higher level than the Tourette patients' 9 months later. Induced synaptic plasticity correlated positively with motor skills in healthy controls 9 months later. The present study confirms previously found long-term improvement in motor performance after paired associative stimulation in healthy controls but not in Tourette patients. Tourette patients did not show long-term potentiation in response to PAS and also showed reduced levels of motor skill consolidation after 9 months compared to healthy controls. Moreover

  3. The Effect of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation on a Child with Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood. New therapies are needed to effectively manage and treat this condition. Gut microbiota can affect central physiology and function via the microbiota-gut-brain axis. Here, we report a case in which fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is used to treat a child with Tourette syndrome, whose symptoms ameliorated dramatically in the following eight weeks.

  4. Involvement of immunologic and biochemical mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Tourette's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Yuval Eliahu; Steinberg, Tamar; Richmand, Brian; Leckman, James Frederick; Apter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder clinically characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. It is likely that a neurobiological susceptibility to the disorder is established during development by the interaction of genetic, biochemical, immunological, and environmental factors. This study sought to investigate the possible correlation of several immunological and biochemical markers with Tourette's syndrome. Children with Tourette's syndrome attending a tertiary pediatric medical center from May 2008 to April 2010, and healthy age-matched control subjects underwent a comprehensive biochemical and immunological work-up. Demographic data were abstracted from the medical records. Findings were compared between the groups and analyzed statistically. Sixty-eight children with Tourette's syndrome (58 males, 85.3%) and 36 healthy children (25 males, 69.4%) were recruited. Compared with the control group, the Tourette's syndrome group had significantly higher levels of ferritin (p = 0.01) and hemoglobin (p = 0.02), a lower level of zinc (p = 0.05), and a lower percentage of non-ceruloplasmin copper (p = 0.01). Analysis of the immunological markers revealed no significant between-group differences in IgA, IgM or IgG; however, IgE and IgG-4 levels were significantly higher in the Tourette's syndrome group (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively). Children with Tourette's syndrome have high levels of biochemical indices of oxidative stress and the quantitative immunoglobulins. These findings add to the still-limited knowledge on the pathogenesis of Tourette's syndrome and may have implications for the development of novel therapeutic modalities. PMID:22139323

  5. Frihet & struktur : en kvalitativ studie av skolelivskvalitet hos ungdom med Tourette syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Siverts, Torstein

    2005-01-01

    Sammendrag. Tittel: Skolelivskvalitet hos ungdom med Tourette Syndrom Med bakgrunn i egen erfaring fra arbeid med elever med Tourette Syndrom i grunnskolen, og i studier i spesialpedagogisk teori og empiri, etterstrebes det i denne studien å utvikle økt forståelse for hva slags erfaringer fra og perspektiver på sitt skoleliv elever med denne funksjonshemmende lidelsen har. Med grunnlag i analyser av intervjuer med elever om deres erfaringer og perspektiver, har jeg prøvd å b...

  6. "I swear it is Tourette's!": On functional coprolalia and other tic-like vocalizations.

    OpenAIRE

    Ganos, C; Edwards, MJ; Müller-Vahl, K

    2016-01-01

    Coprolalia in neuropsychiatry is typically associated with tic disorders, in particular Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. To date, there has been no report of functional coprolalia. Here, we provide the clinical characteristics of 13 adolescent and adult patients with coprolalic and other functional tic-like complex vocalizations who, on the basis of these symptoms, were misdiagnosed with a primary tic disorder, most commonly Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We describe similarities and highligh...

  7. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yoko eNagai

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of e...

  8. A closer look at the history and genetics of Tourette syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Anzaldúa, Adriana; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2008-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) was named after Georges Albert Edouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette, who made its first formal description at the end of the 19th century. Nevertheless, some evidence indicates the disorder may have been recognised at least two thousand years ago. Tic like behaviours were recorded by Aretaeus of Cappadocia and several centuries later by Sprenger and Kraemer, followed by other descriptions. The English writer Samuel Johnson, author of the first English Language Dictionar...

  9. Parent and Self-Report Health-Related Quality of Life Measures in Young Patients With Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoni, Chiara; Selvini, Claudia; Blangiardo, Rosanna; Eddy, Clare M.; Silvestri, Paola R.; Cali’, Paola V.; Gagliardi, Emanuela; Balottin, Umberto; Cardona, Francesco; Rizzo, Renata; Termine, Cristiano

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics and comorbid behavioral problems. This study compared child- and parent-reported quality of life and everyday functioning. We assessed 75 children with Tourette syndrome, of which 42 (56%) had comorbid conditions (obsessive-compulsive disorder = 25; attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder = 6; both comorbidities = 4). All patients completed psychometric instruments, including the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome–Quality of Life Scale for Children and Adolescents (child report) and the Child Tourette’s Syndrome Impairment Scale (parent report). Data were compared for patients with pure Tourette syndrome, Tourette syndrome + obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome + attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Tourette syndrome + both comorbidities. There were no group differences in quality of life. However, there were differences for total, school, and home activities impairment scores. Children and parents may not share similar views about the impact of Tourette syndrome on functioning. The measurement of health-related quality of life in Tourette syndrome is more complex in children than adults. PMID:22952315

  10. bZIPs and WRKYs: two large transcription factor families executing two different functional strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles eMarco Llorca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available bZIPs and WRKYs are two important plant transcription factor families regulating diverse developmental and stress-related processes. Since a partial overlap in these biological processes is obvious, it can be speculated that they fulfill non-redundant functions in a complex regulatory network. Here, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms that are so far described for bZIPs and WRKYs. bZIP factors need to heterodimerize for DNA-binding and regulation of transcription, and based on a bioinformatics approach, bZIPs can build up more than the double of protein interactions than WRKYs. In contrast, an enrichment of the WRKY DNA-binding motifs can be found in WRKY promoters, a phenomenon which is not observed for the bZIP family. Thus, the two transcription factor families follow two different functional strategies in which WRKYs regulate each other’s transcription in a transcriptional network whereas bZIP action relies on intensive heterodimerization.

  11. Annotation and analysis of a large cuticular protein family with the R&R Consensus in Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ningjia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most abundant family of insect cuticular proteins, the CPR family, is recognized by the R&R Consensus, a domain of about 64 amino acids that binds to chitin and is present throughout arthropods. Several species have now been shown to have more than 100 CPR genes, inviting speculation as to the functional importance of this large number and diversity. Results We have identified 156 genes in Anopheles gambiae that code for putative cuticular proteins in this CPR family, over 1% of the total number of predicted genes in this species. Annotation was verified using several criteria including identification of TATA boxes, INRs, and DPEs plus support from proteomic and gene expression analyses. Two previously recognized CPR classes, RR-1 and RR-2, form separate, well-supported clades with the exception of a small set of genes with long branches whose relationships are poorly resolved. Several of these outliers have clear orthologs in other species. Although both clades are under purifying selection, the RR-1 variant of the R&R Consensus is evolving at twice the rate of the RR-2 variant and is structurally more labile. In contrast, the regions flanking the R&R Consensus have diversified in amino-acid composition to a much greater extent in RR-2 genes compared with RR-1 genes. Many genes are found in compact tandem arrays that may include similar or dissimilar genes but always include just one of the two classes. Tandem arrays of RR-2 genes frequently contain subsets of genes coding for highly similar proteins (sequence clusters. Properties of the proteins indicated that each cluster may serve a distinct function in the cuticle. Conclusion The complete annotation of this large gene family provides insight on the mechanisms of gene family evolution and clues about the need for so many CPR genes. These data also should assist annotation of other Anopheles genes.

  12. Stigma in youth with Tourette's syndrome: a systematic review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malli, Melina A; Forrester-Jones, Rachel; Murphy, Glynis

    2016-02-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder, characterised by tics. To our knowledge, no systematic reviews exist which focus on examining the body of literature on stigma in association with children and adolescents with TS. The aim of the article is to provide a review of the existing research on (1) social stigma in relation to children and adolescents with TS, (2) self-stigma and (3) courtesy stigma in family members of youth with TS. Three electronic databases were searched: PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science. Seventeen empirical studies met the inclusion criteria. In relation to social stigma in rating their own beliefs and behavioural intentions, youth who did not have TS showed an unfavourable attitude towards individuals with TS in comparison to typically developing peers. Meanwhile, in their own narratives about their lives, young people with TS themselves described some form of devaluation from others as a response to their disorder. Self-degrading comments were denoted in a number of studies in which the children pointed out stereotypical views that they had adopted about themselves. Finally, as regards courtesy stigma, parents expressed guilt in relation to their children's condition and social alienation as a result of the disorder. Surprisingly, however, there is not one study that focuses primarily on stigma in relation to TS and further studies that examine the subject from the perspective of both the 'stigmatiser' and the recipient of stigma are warranted.

  13. Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome: Clinical Features of 75 Cases from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Micheli

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 75 cases of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS from Argentina, whose ages ranged from 6 to 55 with a mean of 20.02, were evaluated to compare findings with those reported for other countries. Mean age at onset was 7.44 years and mean overall duration of symptoms was 12.58 years; 6.7% of cases were mild, 49% moderate and 44.3% severe. Most frequent presenting motor tics were excessive blinking in 41 followed by head jerking in 16 and eye winking in six, while phonic tics included coprolalia in 28.0%, echolalia in 17.5% and palilalia in 10.8%. Abnormal perinatal events were reported in 40.5%, while positive family history for tics was present in 26.66%. Obsessive–compulsive behaviour was evident in 66% and attention deficit disorder in 16% of cases. Self-injurious behaviour comprised onychophagia in 28 patients, lip-biting in seven and self-slapping in eight cases. Almost half of our patients were initially interpreted as having a psychogenic disorder indicating that GTS in Argentina is most likely underdiagnosed. It may be concluded that the overall pattern of GTS is not dissimilar to that described for European, Asian and American populations, thus highlighting the previously recognized cross-cultural uniformity.

  14. A phenomenological investigation of women with Tourette or other chronic tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A; Conelea, Christine A; Woods, Douglas W; Scahill, Lawrence D; Compton, Scott N; Zinner, Samuel H; Budman, Cathy L; Walkup, John T

    2012-07-01

    There are little data concerning clinical characteristics of women with Tourette disorder and chronic tic disorders in the extant literature and what is available mostly focuses on treatment-seeking individuals. The present research was conducted to provide a phenomenological characterization of tic disorders among 185 adult women with tic disorders. In addition to providing a descriptive overview of specific tic symptoms, tic severity, self-reported history of other psychiatric conditions, and impairment/lifestyle impact due to tics, this study compares 185 women and 275 men between 18 and 79 years old with tic disorders (who completed an identical battery of measures) based on demographic, social/economic status indicators, psychiatric variables (comorbidity, family psychiatric history, symptom presentation), adaptive functioning/quality of life, and impairment variables among a nonclinical adult sample. Finally, this research examines the relationship between tic severity and impairment indicators among women with tics. Sixty-eight percent of women in our sample reported severe motor tics and 40% reported severe phonic tics. Our exploratory data suggest that a sizeable number of adult women with persistent tics are suffering from psychiatric comorbidity and psychosocial consequences such as underachievement and social distress. Tic severity in women may be associated with lifestyle interference as well as with symptoms of depression and anxiety, and such symptoms may be more common among women with tics than in men with tics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Histidine Decarboxylase Knockout Mice as a Model of the Pathophysiology of Tourette Syndrome and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    While the normal functions of histamine (HA) in the central nervous system have gradually come into focus over the past 30 years, the relationship of abnormalities in neurotransmitter HA to human disease has been slower to emerge. New insight came with the 2010 description of a rare nonsense mutation in the biosynthetic enzyme histidine decarboxylase (Hdc) that was associated with Tourette syndrome (TS) and related conditions in a single family pedigree. Subsequent genetic work has provided further support for abnormalities of HA signaling in sporadic TS. As a result of this genetic work, Hdc knockout mice, which were generated more than 15 years ago, have been reexamined as a model of the pathophysiology of TS and related conditions. Parallel work in these KO mice and in human carriers of the Hdc mutation has revealed abnormalities in the basal ganglia system and its modulation by dopamine (DA) and has confirmed the etiologic, face, and predictive validity of the model. The Hdc-KO model thus serves as a unique platform to probe the pathophysiology of TS and related conditions, and to generate specific hypotheses for subsequent testing in humans. This chapter summarizes the development and validation of this model and recent and ongoing work using it to further investigate pathophysiological changes that may contribute to these disorders.

  16. Exome sequencing of a large family identifies potential candidate genes contributing risk to bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianxiao; Hou, Liping; Chen, David T; McMahon, Francis J; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Rice, John P

    2018-03-01

    Bipolar disorder is a mental illness with lifetime prevalence of about 1%. Previous genetic studies have identified multiple chromosomal linkage regions and candidate genes that might be associated with bipolar disorder. The present study aimed to identify potential susceptibility variants for bipolar disorder using 6 related case samples from a four-generation family. A combination of exome sequencing and linkage analysis was performed to identify potential susceptibility variants for bipolar disorder. Our study identified a list of five potential candidate genes for bipolar disorder. Among these five genes, GRID1(Glutamate Receptor Delta-1 Subunit), which was previously reported to be associated with several psychiatric disorders and brain related traits, is particularly interesting. Variants with functional significance in this gene were identified from two cousins in our bipolar disorder pedigree. Our findings suggest a potential role for these genes and the related rare variants in the onset and development of bipolar disorder in this one family. Additional research is needed to replicate these findings and evaluate their patho-biological significance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishment of the reliability and validity of the Stress Index for Children or Adolescents with Tourette Syndrome (SICATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kuo-Yu; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chang, Hsueh-Ling; Wang, Yi-Wen; See, Lai-Chu

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is a chronic tic disorder, which occurs in childhood. Children with Tourette syndrome exhibit sudden and unexpected voices or movements that may have influence on their daily activities and cause interaction barriers for children with Tourette syndrome. Therefore, a self-report stress index is necessary for children with Tourette syndrome to quickly measure the stress they have. Eight experts rated appropriateness, comprehensiveness and relevance of the questionnaire to establish content validity. A total of 116 paediatric patients filled out the stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome to evaluate its construct validity using exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency. Data from 90 pairs of paediatric patients and their caregivers were used to evaluate the inter-rater reliability. The criterion validity index ranged from 80-98%. One item was deleted because of a small item-to-total correlation. Therefore, 26 items made up the final stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome. In exploratory factor analysis, four factors (unfairly treated, psychological, symptom control and future concern) were achieved and accounted for 52.3% of the total variance. Cronbach's alphas of the stress index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome were 0.89. The inter-rater reliability of stress Index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome (Pearson correlation coefficient between patients and their caregivers) was 0.56. The stress Index for 10-18-years-old children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome is a self-administered tool to assess the stress of children or adolescents with Tourette syndrome. Validity (content and construct) and reliability (internal consistency and inter

  18. Clinical and neurophysiological investigation of a large family with dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 disease with pyramidal signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Luis de Aquino Neves

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a hereditary neuropathy of motor and sensory impairment with distal predominance. Atrophy and weakness of lower limbs are the first signs of the disease. It can be classified, with the aid of electromyography and nerve conduction studies, as demyelinating (CMT1 or axonal (CMT2. OBJECTIVE: Clinical and neurophysiological investigation of a large multigenerational family with CMT2 with autosomal dominant mode of transmission. METHOD: Fifty individuals were evaluated and neurophysiological studies performed in 22 patients. RESULTS: Thirty individuals had clinical signs of motor-sensory neuropathy. Babinski sign was present in 14 individuals. Neurophysiological study showed motor-sensory axonal polyneuropathy. CONCLUSION: The clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of this family does not differ from those observed with other forms of CMT, except for the high prevalence of Babinski sign.

  19. Mutation in TWINKLE in a Large Iranian Family with Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia, Myopathy, Dysphagia and Dysphonia, and Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafakhori, Abbas; Yu Jin Ng, Alvin; Tohari, Sumanty; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lee, Hane; Eskin, Ascia; Nelson, Stanley F; Bonnard, Carine; Reversade, Bruno; Kariminejad, Ariana

    2016-02-01

    TWINKLE (c10orf2) gene is responsible for autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). In rare cases, additional features such as muscle weakness, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, cardiomyopathy, dysphagia, dysphonia, cataracts, depression, dementia, parkinsonism, and hearing loss have been reported in association with heterozygous mutations of the TWINKLE gene. We have studied a large Iranian family with myopathy, dysphonia, dysphagia, and behavior change in addition to PEO in affected members. We identified a missense mutation c.1121G > A in the c10orf2 gene in all affected members. Early death is a novel feature seen in affected members of this family that has not been reported to date. The association of PEO, myopathy, dysphonia, dysphagia, behavior change and early death has not been previously reported in the literature or other patients with this mutation.

  20. Homozygous missense mutation in the LMAN2L gene segregates with intellectual disability in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiullah, Rafiullah; Aslamkhan, Muhammad; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Thiel, Christian; Mustafa, Ghulam; Wiemann, Stefan; Schlesner, Matthias; Wade, Rebecca C; Rappold, Gudrun A; Berkel, Simone

    2016-02-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting 1%-3% of the population worldwide. It is characterised by high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity and in most cases the underlying cause of the disorder is unknown. In our study we investigated a large consanguineous family from Baluchistan, Pakistan, comprising seven affected individuals with a severe form of autosomal recessive ID (ARID) and epilepsy, to elucidate a putative genetic cause. Whole exome sequencing (WES) of a trio, including a child with ID and epilepsy and its healthy parents that were part of this large family, revealed a homozygous missense variant p.R53Q in the lectin mannose-binding 2-like (LMAN2L) gene. This homozygous variant was co-segregating in the family with the phenotype of severe ID and infantile epilepsy; unaffected family members were heterozygous variant carriers. The variant was predicted to be pathogenic by five different in silico programmes and further three-dimensional structure modelling of the protein suggests that variant p.R53Q may impair protein-protein interaction. LMAN2L (OMIM: 609552) encodes for the lectin, mannose-binding 2-like protein which is a cargo receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum important for glycoprotein transport. Genome-wide association studies have identified an association of LMAN2L to different neuropsychiatric disorders. This is the first report linking LMAN2L to a phenotype of severe ARID and seizures, indicating that the deleterious homozygous p.R53Q variant very likely causes the disorder. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Maternal intrusiveness, family financial means, and anxiety across childhood in a large multiphase sample of community youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Vince, Christine E.; Pincus, Donna B.; Comer, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive parenting has been positively associated with child anxiety, although examinations of this relationship to date have been largely confined to middle to upper middle class families and have rarely used longitudinal designs. With several leading interventions for child anxiety emphasizing the reduction of parental intrusiveness, it is critical to determine whether the links between parental intrusiveness and child anxiety broadly apply to families of all financial means, and whether parental intrusiveness prospectively predicts the development of child anxiety. This study employed latent growth curve analysis to evaluate the interactive effects of maternal intrusiveness and financial means on the developmental trajectory of child anxiety from 1st grade to age 15 in 1,121 children (50.7% male) and their parents from the NICHD SECCYD. The overall model was found to provide good fit, revealing that early maternal intrusiveness and financial means did not impact individual trajectories of change in child anxiety, which were stable from 1st to 5th grade, and then decrease from 5th grade to age 15. Cross-sectional analyses also examined whether family financial means moderated contemporaneous relationships between maternal intrusiveness and child anxiety in 3rd and 5th grades. The relationship between maternal intrusiveness and child anxiety was moderated by family financial means for 1st graders, with stronger links found among children of lower family financial means, but not for 3rd and 5th graders. Neither maternal intrusiveness nor financial means in 1st grade predicted subsequent changes in anxiety across childhood. Findings help elucidate for whom and when maternal intrusiveness has the greatest link with child anxiety and can inform targeted treatment efforts. PMID:23929005

  2. A recurrent G367R mutation in MYOC associated with juvenile open angle glaucoma in a large Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hua Yao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the mutations of MYOC, OPTN, CYP1B1 and WDR36 in a large Chinese family affected by juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG. METHODS: Of 114 members of one family were recruited in this study. Blood samples from twelve members of this pedigree were collected for further research. As a control, 100 unrelated subjects were recruited from the same hospital. The exon and flanking intron sequences of candidate genes were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing. RESULTS: The proband (III:10 was a seventy-three years old woman with binocular JOAG at the age of 31. A recurrent heterozygous mutation (c.1099G>A of MYOC was identified in the three JOAG patients and another suspect. This transition was located in the first base pair of codon 367 (GGA>AGA in exon 3 of MYOC and was predicted to be a missense substitution of glycine to arginine (p.G367R in myocilin. Mutations in OPTN, CYP1B1 or WDR36 were not detected in this study. The G367R mutation was not present in unaffected family members or in 100 ethnically matched controls. Other variants of the coding regions of candidate genes were not detected in all participants. To date, this family was the largest to have been identified as carrying a certain MYOC mutation in China, further evidence of a founder effect for the G367R MYOC mutant was provided by our data. CONCLUSION: A MYOC c.1099G>A mutation in an autosomal dominant JOAG family is identified and the characteristic phenotypes among the patients are summarized. Genetic testing could be utilized in high-risk populations and be helpful not only for genetic counseling, but also for early diagnosis and treatment of affected patients or carriers of inherited JOAG.

  3. Genetic association signal near NTN4 in Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Peristera; Yu, Dongmei; Gerber, Gloria; Evans, Patrick; Tsetsos, Fotis; Davis, Lea K.; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Chaponis, Jonathan; Gamazon, Eric; Mueller-Vahl, Kirsten; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Stamenkovic, Mara; Hebebrand, Johannes; Noethen, Markus; Nagy, Peter; Barta, Csaba; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Depienne, Christel; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Cath, Danielle C.; Budman, Cathy L.; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy; Wolanczyk, Thomas; Singer, Harvey; Chou, I-Ching; Grados, Marco; Posthuma, Danielle; Rouleau, Guy A.; Aschauer, Harald; Freimer, Nelson B.; Pauls, David L.; Cox, Nancy J.; Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.

    2014-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Through an international collaboration, we genotyped 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)(p<10−3) from the recent TS genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 609 independent cases and 610 ancestry-matched controls. Only rs2060546 on chromosome 12q22 (p=3.3×10−4) remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Meta-analysis with the original GWAS yielded the strongest association to date (p=5.8×10−7). Although its functional significance is unclear, rs2060546 lies closest to NTN4, an axon guidance molecule expressed in developing striatum. Risk score analysis significantly predicted case/control status (p=0.042), suggesting that many of these variants are true TS risk alleles. PMID:25042818

  4. The Role of Interneurons in Autism and Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Frick, Luciana Romina; Pittenger, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    The brain includes multiple types of interconnected excitatory and inhibitory neurons that together allow us to move, think, feel, and interact with the environment. Inhibitory interneurons (INs) comprise a small, heterogeneous fraction, but they exert a powerful and tight control over neuronal activity and consequently modulate the magnitude of neuronal output and, ultimately, information processing. IN abnormalities are linked to two pediatric psychiatric disorders with high comorbidity: autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Studies probing the basis of this link have been contradictory regarding whether the causative mechanism is a reduction in number, dysfunction, or gene aberrant expression (or a combination thereof). Here, we integrate different theories into a more comprehensive view of INs as responsible for the symptomatology observed in these disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pediatric Tourette Syndrome: A Tic Disorder with a Tricky Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Qurratul; Kirby, Caroline; Beg, Mirza

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a condition in which disruption of the swallowing process interferes with a patient's ability to eat. This may result in coughing or choking while swallowing, food sticking in the throat, or globus sensation. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated disease with a varied clinical spectrum of symptoms including dysphagia. Tourette syndrome (TS) is an inherited neurological disorder that manifests itself as a series of motor and vocal tics and may include oropharyngeal dysphagia. Dysphagia as a result of TS generally affects female, elderly patients and is not reported in children. While the pathophysiology is relatively unknown, experts believe TS is closely linked to damage or abnormalities in the basal ganglia of the brain. We present this interesting pediatric case of dysphagia due to EoE, which had been previously thought to be related to the patient's TS.

  6. Pediatric Tourette Syndrome: A Tic Disorder with a Tricky Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurratul Warsi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a condition in which disruption of the swallowing process interferes with a patient’s ability to eat. This may result in coughing or choking while swallowing, food sticking in the throat, or globus sensation. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is a chronic immune-mediated disease with a varied clinical spectrum of symptoms including dysphagia. Tourette syndrome (TS is an inherited neurological disorder that manifests itself as a series of motor and vocal tics and may include oropharyngeal dysphagia. Dysphagia as a result of TS generally affects female, elderly patients and is not reported in children. While the pathophysiology is relatively unknown, experts believe TS is closely linked to damage or abnormalities in the basal ganglia of the brain. We present this interesting pediatric case of dysphagia due to EoE, which had been previously thought to be related to the patient’s TS.

  7. Complex phonic tic and disinhibition in Tourette syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Débora Palmini

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by a combination of multiple motor tics and at least one phonic tic. TS patients often have associated behavioral abnormalities such as obsessive compulsive disorder, attention deficit and hyperactive disorder. Coprolalia, defined as emission of obscenities or swearing, is one type of complex vocal tic, present in 8% to 26% of patients. The pathophysiology of coprolalia and other complex phonic tics remains ill-defined. We report a patient whose complex phonic tic was characterized by repetitively saying "breast cancer" on seeing the son of aunt who suffered from this condition. The patient was unable to suppress the tic and did not meet criteria for obsessive compulsive disorder. The phenomenology herein described supports the theory that complex phonic tics result from disinhibition of the loop connecting the basal ganglia with the limbic cortex.

  8. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome.

  9. An introduction to the clinical phenomenology of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Davide; Madhusudan, Namrata; Zis, Panagiotis; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is the primary tic disorder that reaches most commonly medical attention and monitoring, with an estimated prevalence close to 1% between 5 and 18 years of age. Motor and phonic tics are the core features of TS. In addition to their well-characterized phenomenology, tics display a peculiar variability over time, which is strongly influenced by a variety of contextual factors. The sensory phenomena of TS are increasingly recognized as another crucial symptom of TS and consist of premonitory urges and somatic hypersensitivity. A relevant proportion of patients with TS display complex, tic-like, repetitive behaviors that include echophenomena, coprophenomena, and nonobscene socially inappropriate behaviors (NOSIBs). The burden of behavioral comorbidities is very important in determining the degree of disability of TS patients. Only a small minority of TS patients presents exclusively with a tic disorder. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms and related disorder (OCD) are common in TS, and the clinical distinction between compulsions and complex tics may be difficult in some cases. Probably, the presence of comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the main determinant of cognitive dysfunction in TS patients and influences heavily also the risk of developing disruptive behaviors. Affective disorders, impulse control disorders, autism spectrum disorders, and personality disorders complete the wide psychopathological spectrum of this condition, but have been less investigated than OCD and ADHD. The complexity of the Tourette spectrum has been confirmed by cluster and factor analytical approaches, and is likely to inform the study of the genetic basis of this disorder, as well as future reappraisal of its nosography, with the development of novel clinical subtypes. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prenatal risk factors for Tourette Syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Jing; Pringsheim, Tamara

    2014-01-30

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) appears to be an inherited disorder, although genetic abnormalities have been identified in less than 1% of patients, and the mode of inheritance is uncertain. Many studies have investigated environmental factors that might contribute to the onset and severity of tics and associated comorbidities such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). A systematic review and qualitative analysis were performed to provide a broad view of the association between pre- and perinatal factors and TS. The Medline, Embase and PsycINFO databases were searched using terms specific to Tourette's syndrome and keywords such as "pregnancy", "prenatal", "perinatal", "birth" and "neonatal". Studies were limited to studies on human subjects published in English or French through October 2012. 22 studies were included. Studies were of limited methodological quality, with most samples derived from specialty clinics, and most exposures ascertained retrospectively. The majority of the results for demographic factors of parents, including age, education, socioeconomic status, and marital status, revealed no significant association with the onset of TS, or the presence of comorbidity. Many factors were reported to be significantly associated with the onset of TS, the presence of comorbidity and symptom severity, but the most consistently reported factors were maternal smoking and low birth weight. There are few studies evaluating the relationship between pre and perinatal events and TS, and existing studies have major limitations, including the use of clinic rather than epidemiologically derived samples, retrospective data collection on pre and perinatal events and multiple hypothesis testing without appropriate statistical correction. The mechanism by which prenatal and perinatal adversities could lead to TS onset or symptom severity is unknown, but may be related to changes in the dopaminergic system as a result of early

  11. Cortical and brainstem plasticity in Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppa, Antonio; Marsili, Luca; Di Stasio, Flavio; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Pasquini, Massimo; Cardona, Francesco; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2014-10-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is characterized by motor/vocal tics commonly associated with psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. We investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in Tourette patients, exposed and unexposed to chronic drug treatment, with and without psychiatric disturbances. We also investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We studied 20 Tourette patients with and without psychiatric disturbances, 15 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 20 healthy subjects. All groups included drug-naïve patients. We conditioned the left primary motor cortex with intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation and recorded motor evoked potentials. We conditioned the supraorbital nerve with facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation and recorded the blink reflex late response area. In healthy subjects, intermittent theta-burst increased and continuous theta-burst stimulation decreased motor evoked potentials. Differently, intermittent theta-burst failed to increase and continuous theta-burst stimulation failed to decrease motor evoked potentials in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances. In obsessive-compulsive disorder, intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation elicited normal responses. In healthy subjects and in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder, the blink reflex late response area increased after facilitatory high-frequency and decreased after inhibitory high-frequency stimulation. Conversely, in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances, facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation left the blink reflex late response area unchanged. Theta-burst and high-frequency stimulation elicited similar responses in drug-naïve and chronically treated patients. Tourette patients have reduced plasticity regardless of psychiatric disturbances. These findings suggest that abnormal plasticity contributes to the

  12. Cbl-family ubiquitin ligases and their recruitment of CIN85 are largely dispensable for epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Gulzar; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Schulte, Nancy A.; Nadeau, Scott; Luan, Haitao; Zutshi, Neha; Tom, Eric; Ortega-Cava, Cesar; Tu, Chun; Sanada, Masashi; Ogawa, Seishi; Toews, Myron L.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Casitas B-Lineage Lymphoma (Cbl) family (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) of ubiquitin ligases serve as negative regulators of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). An essential role of Cbl-family protein-dependent ubiquitination for efficient ligand-induced lysosomal targeting and degradation is now well-accepted. However, a more proximal role of Cbl and Cbl-b as adapters for CIN85-endophilin recruitment to mediate ligand-induced initial internalization of RTKs is supported by some studies but refuted by others. Overexpression and/or incomplete depletion of Cbl proteins in these studies is likely to have contributed to this dichotomy. To address the role of endogenous Cbl and Cbl-b in the internalization step of RTK endocytic traffic, we established Cbl/Cbl-b double-knockout (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and demonstrated that these cells lack the expression of both Cbl-family members as well as endophilin A, while they express CIN85. We show that ligand-induced ubiquitination of EGFR, as a prototype RTK, was abolished in DKO MEFs, and EGFR degradation was delayed. These traits were reversed by ectopic human Cbl expression. EGFR endocytosis, assessed using the internalization of 125I-labeled or fluorescent EGF, or of EGFR itself, was largely retained in Cbl/Cbl-b DKO compared to wild type MEFs. EGFR internalization was also largely intact in Cbl/Cbl-b depleted MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cell line. Inducible shRNA-mediated knockdown of CIN85 in wild type or Cbl/Cbl-b DKO MEFs had no impact on EGFR internalization. Our findings, establish that, at physiological expression levels, Cbl, Cbl-b and CIN85 are largely dispensable for EGFR internalization. Our results support the model that Cbl-CIN85-endophilin complex is not required for efficient internalization of EGFR, a prototype RTK. PMID:25449262

  13. High incidence of large deletions in the PMS2 gene in Spanish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Fernández, A J; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J M; Alenda, C; Fernández-Rozadilla, C; Cubiella, J; Clofent, J; Reñé, J M; Anido, U; Milá, M; Balaguer, F; Castells, A; Castellvi-Bel, S; Jover, R; Carracedo, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C

    2014-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in one of the four mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Defects in this pathway lead to microsatellite instability (MSI) in DNA tumors, which constitutes the molecular hallmark of this disease. Selection of patients for genetic testing in LS is usually based on fulfillment of diagnostic clinical criteria (i.e. Amsterdam criteria or the revised Bethesda guidelines). However, following these criteria PMS2 mutations have probably been underestimated as their penetrances appear to be lower than those of the other MMR genes. The use of universal MMR study-based strategies, using MSI testing and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, is being one proposed alternative. Besides, germline mutation detection in PMS2 is complicated by the presence of highly homologous pseudogenes. Nevertheless, specific amplification of PMS2 by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the improvement of the analysis of large deletions/duplications by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) overcome this difficulty. By using both approaches, we analyzed 19 PMS2-suspected carriers who have been selected by clinical or universal strategies and found five large deletions and one frameshift mutation in PMS2 in six patients (31%). Owing to the high incidence of large deletions found in our cohort, we recommend MLPA analysis as the first-line method for searching germline mutations in PMS2. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A large gene family in fission yeast encodes spore killers that subvert Mendel’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; Jiang, Zhao-Di; Suo, Fang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; He, Wan-Zhong; Du, Li-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Spore killers in fungi are selfish genetic elements that distort Mendelian segregation in their favor. It remains unclear how many species harbor them and how diverse their mechanisms are. Here, we discover two spore killers from a natural isolate of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both killers belong to the previously uncharacterized wtf gene family with 25 members in the reference genome. These two killers act in strain-background-independent and genome-location-independent manners to perturb the maturation of spores not inheriting them. Spores carrying one killer are protected from its killing effect but not that of the other killer. The killing and protecting activities can be uncoupled by mutation. The numbers and sequences of wtf genes vary considerably between S. pombe isolates, indicating rapid divergence. We propose that wtf genes contribute to the extensive intraspecific reproductive isolation in S. pombe, and represent ideal models for understanding how segregation-distorting elements act and evolve. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26057.001 PMID:28631610

  15. The relationship between types and severity of repetitive behaviors in Gilles de la Tourette's disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cath, D.C.; Spinhoven, P.; Wetering, B.J.M. van de; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Landman, A.D.; Woerkom, T.C.A.M. van; Roos, R.A.C.; Rooijmans, H.G.M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study investigated which categories of obsessive-compulsive and Tourette-related behaviors in Gilles de la Tourette's disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) without tics are experienced as most severe across the study groups and what the differences are in symptom

  16. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying...

  17. Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome, Depression, Depressive Illness, and Correlates in a Child and Adolescent Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Renata; Gulisano, Mariangela; Martino, Davide; Robertson, Mary May

    2017-04-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and depression are both common disorders. It has been suggested that depression occurs in 13%-76% GTS patients. Despite this, there are few studies into the specific relationships and correlates between the two disorders. There is only some consensus as to the precise relationship between the two disorders. We undertook the study to investigate the relationship between depressive symptomatology and the core clinical features of GTS in a well-characterized clinical population of youth with this disorder. Our aim was to verify the association between depression and comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and explore further other potential associations highlighted in some, but not all, of the studies focused on this topic. Our results demonstrated that (1) the GTS patients were significantly older than the controls, (2) the GTS patients were significantly more depressed than controls, (3) depression was associated with tic severity, (4) the Diagnostic Confidence Index scores were higher in GTS patients without depression, (5) anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder (CD), and behavioral problems were significantly associated with depression, and (6) finally, patients with GTS and depression have a positive family history of depression. However, obsessionality (CY-BOCS) did not differentiate between depressed and not depressed GTS patients. Depression is common in patients with GTS and occurs significantly more in GTS than in controls. Depression is significantly associated with GTS factors such as tic severity, comorbidity with ADHD, and the presence of coexistent anxiety, CDs, and behavior problems. Depression is importantly significantly associated with a positive family history of depression. Intriguingly, depression in our sample was not related to obsessionality.

  18. Variable phenotypic expression and onset in MYH14 distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype in a large, multigenerational North American family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadurai, Stanley; Arnold, W David; Kissel, John T; Ruhno, Corey; Mcgovern, Vicki L; Snyder, Pamela J; Prior, Thomas W; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) causes distal-predominant weakness without prominent sensory loss. Myosin heavy chain disorders most commonly result in distal myopathy and cardiomyopathy with or without hearing loss, but a complex phenotype with dHMN, myopathy, hoarseness, and hearing loss was reported in a Korean family with a c.2822G>T mutation in MYH14. In this study we report phenotypic features in a North American family with the c.2822G>T in MYH14. Clinical and molecular characterization was performed in a large, 6-generation, Caucasian family with MYH14 dHMN. A total of 11 affected and 7 unaffected individuals were evaluated and showed varying age of onset and severity of weakness. Genotypic concordance was confirmed with molecular analysis. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated distal motor axonal degeneration without myopathy in all affected subjects tested. Mutation of MYH14 can result in a range of neuromuscular phenotypes that includes a dHMN and hearing loss phenotype with variable age of onset. Muscle Nerve 56: 341-345, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Short-term sulpiride treatment of children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Che-Sheng; Chen, Hui-Ju; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Shen, Ein-Yiao; Lue, Hung-Chi

    2009-10-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by motor and vocal tics, and its diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. Dopamine-blocking neuroleptics are regarded as the most effective drugs for the treatment of TS. Sulpiride is a selective dopamine D2 antagonist. However, only one study with a large number of patients has reported the effect of treatment of TS with sulpiride. The purpose of this study was to evaluate prospectively the effect of sulpiride treatment of children and adolescents with TS or chronic tic disorder. The inclusion criteria were patients who fulfilled the diagnosis of TS or chronic tic disorder, and who had not received previous treatment. The severity of TS was assessed by the Yale Global Tic Severity Score (YGTSS) every 2 weeks for a total of 6 weeks. The patients started treatment with low-dose sulpiride according to their age on the first visit. The adverse effects of sulpiride were evaluated by subjective complaints from the patients themselves or their parents. The change in scores between each assessment point was analyzed by repeated measures one-way analysis of variance, with SPSS version 12.0 software. One hundred and eighty-nine patients were enrolled. Their average age was 8.0 +/- 2.5 years (range, 3-15 years). Most patients were male (n = 165, 87.3%). Six weeks' treatment significantly improved motor tics (p tics (p tic disorder, and has few adverse effects.

  1. Patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome have widespread personality differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillini, Morounke O; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R

    2015-08-30

    Only little is known about pathological personality traits in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). The aim of this study was to further investigate the prevalence of personality traits in adults with GTS. We used a variety of rating scales to assess not only personality traits, but also severity of tics, quality of life, and comorbidities (obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression), in a large group (n=50) of patients. Our major finding was that pathological personality traits are very common in patients with GTS encompassing a wide range of different personality traits, but most typically personality traits related to cluster C. Demand-anxious was the most common personality trait, while histrionic personality trait was absent. Patients' quality of life was more impaired by personality traits than comorbidities. Personality traits were more common in patients with comorbid OCD and depression, while comorbid ADHD had no influence. Our findings, therefore, corroborate the hypothesis that GTS plus OCD represents a more severe subtype of GTS, and support the assumption that OCD and depression, but not ADHD, are part of the GTS spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Current Approaches and New Developments in the Pharmacological Management of Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Julio; Coffman, Keith A

    2018-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown etiology characterized by spontaneous, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. Once thought to be rare, TS affects 0.3-1% of the population. Tics can cause physical discomfort, emotional distress, social difficulties, and can interfere with education and desired activities. The pharmacologic treatment of TS is particularly challenging, as currently the genetics, neurophysiology, and neuropathology of this disorder are still largely unknown. However, clinical experience gained from treating TS has helped us better understand its pathogenesis and, as a result, derive treatment options. The strongest data exist for the antipsychotic agents, both typical and atypical, although their use is often limited in children and adolescents due to their side-effect profiles. There are agents in a variety of other pharmacologic categories that have evidence for the treatment of TS and whose side-effect profiles are more tolerable than the antipsychotics; these include clonidine, guanfacine, baclofen, topiramate, botulinum toxin A, tetrabenazine, and deutetrabenazine. A number of new agents are being developed and tested as potential treatments for TS. These include valbenazine, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabidiol, and ecopipam. Additionally, there are agents with insufficient data for efficacy, as well as agents that have been shown to be ineffective. Those without sufficient data for efficacy include clonazepam, ningdong granule, 5-ling granule, omega-3 fatty acids, and n-acetylcysteine. The agents that have been shown to be ineffective include pramipexole and metoclopramide. We will review all of the established pharmacologic treatments, and discuss those presently in development.

  3. Altered structural connectivity of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic networks in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worbe, Yulia; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Lecomte, Sophie; Valabregue, Romain; Poupon, Fabrice; Guevara, Pamela; Tucholka, Alan; Mangin, Jean-François; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehericy, Stephane; Hartmann, Andreas; Poupon, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a childhood-onset syndrome characterized by the presence and persistence of motor and vocal tics. A dysfunction of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks in this syndrome has been supported by convergent data from neuro-pathological, electrophysiological as well as structural and functional neuroimaging studies. Here, we addressed the question of structural integration of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We specifically tested the hypothesis that deviant brain development in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome could affect structural connectivity within the input and output basal ganglia structures and thalamus. To this aim, we acquired data on 49 adult patients and 28 gender and age-matched control subjects on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We used and further implemented streamline probabilistic tractography algorithms that allowed us to quantify the structural integration of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks. To further investigate the microstructure of white matter in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, we also evaluated fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity in these pathways, which are both sensitive to axonal package and to myelin ensheathment. In patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome compared to control subjects, we found white matter abnormalities in neuronal pathways connecting the cerebral cortex, the basal ganglia and the thalamus. Specifically, striatum and thalamus had abnormally enhanced structural connectivity with primary motor and sensory cortices, as well as paracentral lobule, supplementary motor area and parietal cortices. This enhanced connectivity of motor cortex positively correlated with severity of tics measured by the Yale Global Tics Severity Scale and was not influenced by current medication status, age or gender of patients. Independently of the severity of tics, lateral and medial orbito

  4. The prevalence of diagnosed tourette syndrome in Canada: A national population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaeun; Hirsch, Lauren; Martino, Davide; Jette, Nathalie; Roberts, Jodie; Pringsheim, Tamara

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine: (1) the prevalence of diagnosed Tourette syndrome in Canada by sex in youth (aged 12-17) and adults and (2) socioeconomic factors in this population. The majority of epidemiological studies of tics have focused on children and youth, with few studies describing the prevalence of tics in adult populations. Canadian data on Tourette syndrome prevalence were derived from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2010 and 2011 cycles, a Statistics Canada population-based cross-sectional survey that collects information related to health status. We determined the prevalence of diagnosed Tourette syndrome and examined sociodemographic factors, including age, sex, education, income, employment, and birthplace. Overall, 122,884 Canadians participated in the surveys, with 122 participants diagnosed with Tourette syndrome. The prevalence of Tourette syndrome was higher in males in youth: 6.03 per 1000 (95% confidence interval: 3.24-8.81) in males versus 0.48 per 1,000 (95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.91) in females, with a prevalence risk ratio of 5.31 (95% confidence interval: 2.38-11.81). In adults, the prevalence of Tourette syndrome was 0.89 per 1,000 (95% confidence interval: 0.48-1.29) in males versus 0.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.16.0-0.71) in females, with a prevalence risk ratio of 1.93 (95% confidence interval: 1.21-3.08). After adjusting for age and sex, adults with Tourette syndrome had lower odds of receiving postsecondary education or being employed and higher odds of having income lower than the median and receiving governmental support. Data on the prevalence of Tourette syndrome in adults are scarce because most studies focus on children. Our data demonstrate a decreasing prevalence risk ratio for sex in adults compared to children. A diagnosis of Tourette syndrome is associated with lower education, income, and employment in adulthood. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016

  5. Learning to Voice? The Evolving Roles of Family Farmers in the Coordination of Large-Scale Irrigation Schemes in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Faysse

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In Morocco, large-scale irrigation schemes have evolved over the past twenty years from the centralised management of irrigation and agricultural production into more complex multi-actor systems. This study analysed whether, and how, in the context of state withdrawal, increased farmer autonomy and political liberalisation, family farmers currently participate in the coordination and negotiation of issues that affect them and involve scheme-level organisations. Issues related to water management, the sugar industry and the dairy sector were analysed in five large-scale irrigation schemes. Farmer organisations that were set up to intervene in water management and sugar production were seen to be either inactive or to have weak links with their constituency; hence, the irrigation administration and the sugar industry continue to interact directly with farmers in a centralised way. Given their inability to voice their interests, when farmers have the opportunity, many choose exit strategies, for instance by resorting to the use of groundwater. In contrast, many community-based milk collection cooperatives were seen to function as accountable intermediaries between smallholders and dairy firms. While, as in the past, family farmers are still generally not involved in decision making at scheme level, in the milk collection cooperatives studied, farmers learn to coordinate and negotiate for the development of their communities.

  6. A novel COL4A3 mutation causes autosomal-recessive Alport syndrome in a large Turkish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzak, Asli Subasioglu; Tokgoz, Bulent; Dundar, Munis; Tekin, Mustafa

    2013-03-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by hematuria, progressive renal failure typically resulting in end-stage renal disease, sensorineural hearing loss, and variable ocular abnormalities. Only 15% of cases with AS are autosomal recessive and are caused by mutations in the COL4A3 or COL4A4 genes, encoding type IV collagen. Clinical data in a large consanguineous family with four affected members were reviewed, and genomic DNA was extracted. For mapping, 15 microsatellite markers flanking COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5 in 16 family members were typed. For mutation screening, all coding exons of COL4A3 were polymerase chain reaction- amplified and Sanger-sequenced from genomic DNA. The disease locus was mapped to chromosome 2q36.3, where COL4A3 and COL4A4 reside. Sanger sequencing revealed a novel mis-sense mutation (c.2T>C; p.M1T) in exon 1 of COL4A3. The identified nucleotide change was not found in 100 healthy ethnicity-matched controls via Sanger sequencing. We present a large consanguineous Turkish family with AS that was found to have a COL4A3 mutation as the cause of the disease. Although the relationship between the various genotypes and phenotypes in AS has not been fully elucidated, detailed clinical and molecular analyses are helpful for providing data to be used in genetic counseling. It is important to identify new mutations to clarify their clinical importance, to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to avoid renal biopsy for final diagnosis.

  7. Personality Profile of Male Adolescents With Tourette Syndrome: A Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balottin, Laura; Selvini, Claudia; Luoni, Chiara; Mannarini, Stefania; Chiappedi, Matteo; Seri, Stefano; Termine, Cristiano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-03-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple tics and commonly associated with behavioral problems, especially obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The presence of specific personality traits has been documented in adult clinical populations with Tourette syndrome but has been underresearched in younger patients. We assessed the personality profiles of 17 male adolescents with Tourette syndrome and 51 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent version, along with a standardized psychometric battery. All participants scored within the normal range across all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent version scales. Patients with Tourette syndrome scored significantly higher than healthy controls on the Obsessiveness Content Scale only (P = .046). Our findings indicate that younger male patients with Tourette syndrome do not report abnormal personality traits and have similar personality profiles to healthy peers, with the exception of obsessionality traits, which are likely to be related to the presence of comorbid obsessive compulsive symptoms rather than tics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Role of the right dorsal anterior insula in the urge to tic in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinaz, Sule; Malone, Patrick; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G

    2015-08-01

    The mid-posterior part of the insula is involved in processing bodily sensations and urges and is activated during tic generation in Tourette syndrome. The dorsal anterior part of the insula, however, integrates sensory and emotional information with cognitive valuation and is implicated in interoception. The right dorsal anterior insula also participates in urge suppression in healthy subjects. This study examined the role of the right dorsal anterior insula in the urge to tic in Tourette syndrome. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 13 adult Tourette patients and 13 matched controls. The role of the right dorsal anterior insula within the urge-tic network was investigated using graph theory-based neural network analysis. The functional connectivity of the right dorsal anterior insula was also correlated with urge and tic severity. Even though the patients did not exhibit any overt tics, the right dorsal anterior insula demonstrated higher connectivity, especially with the frontostriatal nodes of the urge-tic network in patients compared with controls. The functional connectivity between the right dorsal anterior insula and bilateral supplementary motor area also correlated positively with urge severity in patients. These results suggest that the right dorsal anterior insula is part of the urge-tic network and could influence the urge- and tic-related cortico-striato-thalamic regions even during rest in Tourette syndrome. It might be responsible for heightened awareness of bodily sensations generating premonitory urges in Tourette syndrome. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Deep Brain Stimulation in Tourette Syndrome: The International Tourette Syndrome Deep Brain Stimulation Public Database and Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Leckman, James Frederick; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Domenico; Meng, Fan-Gang; Kuhn, Jens; Huys, Daniel; Baldermann, Juan Carlos; Foltynie, Thomas; Hariz, Marwan I; Joyce, Eileen M; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Silburn, Peter; Coyne, Terry; Mogilner, Alon Y; Pourfar, Michael H; Khandhar, Suketu M; Auyeung, Man; Ostrem, Jill Louise; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc; Karachi, Carine; Houeto, Jean Luc; Klassen, Bryan Timothy; Ackermans, Linda; Kaido, Takanobu; Temel, Yasin; Gross, Robert E; Walker, Harrison C; Lozano, Andres M; Walter, Benjamin L; Mari, Zoltan; Anderson, William S; Changizi, Barbara Kelly; Moro, Elena; Zauber, Sarah Elizabeth; Schrock, Lauren E; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Rizer, Kyle; Monari, Erin H; Foote, Kelly D; Malaty, Irene A; Deeb, Wissam; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2018-03-01

    Collective evidence has strongly suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for Tourette syndrome. To assess the efficacy and safety of DBS in a multinational cohort of patients with Tourette syndrome. The prospective International Deep Brain Stimulation Database and Registry included 185 patients with medically refractory Tourette syndrome who underwent DBS implantation from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2016, at 31 institutions in 10 countries worldwide. Patients with medically refractory symptoms received DBS implantation in the centromedian thalamic region (93 of 163 [57.1%]), the anterior globus pallidus internus (41 of 163 [25.2%]), the posterior globus pallidus internus (25 of 163 [15.3%]), and the anterior limb of the internal capsule (4 of 163 [2.5%]). Scores on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale and adverse events. The International Deep Brain Stimulation Database and Registry enrolled 185 patients (of 171 with available data, 37 females and 134 males; mean [SD] age at surgery, 29.1 [10.8] years [range, 13-58 years]). Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder were present in 97 of 151 patients (64.2%) and 32 of 148 (21.6%) had a history of self-injurious behavior. The mean (SD) total Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score improved from 75.01 (18.36) at baseline to 41.19 (20.00) at 1 year after DBS implantation (P tic subscore improved from 21.00 (3.72) at baseline to 12.91 (5.78) after 1 year (P tic subscore improved from 16.82 (6.56) at baseline to 9.63 (6.99) at 1 year (P Tourette syndrome but also with important adverse events. A publicly available website on outcomes of DBS in patients with Tourette syndrome has been provided.

  10. Genetic heterogeneity in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy; exclusion of the EVR1 locus on chromosome 11q in a large autosomal dominant pedigree

    OpenAIRE

    Bamashmus, M; Downey, L; Inglehearn, C; Gupta, S; Mansfield, D

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is associated with mutations in the Norrie disease gene in X linked pedigrees and with linkage to the EVR1 locus at 11q13 in autosomal dominant cases. A large autosomal dominant FEVR family was studied, both clinically and by linkage analysis, to determine whether it differed from the known forms of FEVR.
METHODS—Affected members and obligate gene carriers from this family were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmos...

  11. R47H Variant of TREM2 Associated With Alzheimer Disease in a Large Late-Onset Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korvatska, Olena; Leverenz, James B.; Jayadev, Suman; McMillan, Pamela; Kurtz, Irina; Guo, Xindi; Rumbaugh, Malia; Matsushita, Mark; Girirajan, Santhosh; Dorschner, Michael O.; Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Yu, Chang-En; Brkanac, Zoran; Garden, Gwenn A.; Raskind, Wendy H.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The R47H variant in the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 gene (TREM2), a modulator of the immune response of microglia, is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. Objective To investigate a large family with late-onset AD (LOAD), in which R47H cosegregated with 75% of cases. Design, Setting, and Participants This study includes genetic and pathologic studies of families with LOAD from 1985 to 2014. A total of 131 families with LOAD (751 individuals) were included from the University of Washington Alzheimer Disease Research Center. To identify LOAD genes/risk factors in the LOAD123 family with 21 affected members and 12 autopsies, we sequenced 4 exomes. Candidate variants were tested for cosegregation with the disease. TREM2 R47H was genotyped in an additional 130 families with LOAD. We performed clinical and neuropathological assessments of patients with and without R47H and evaluated the variant's effect on brain pathology, cellular morphology, and expression of microglial markers. Main Outcomes and Measures We assessed the effect of TREM2 genotype on age at onset and disease duration. We compared Braak and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease scores, presence of α-synuclein and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 aggregates, and additional vascular or Parkinson pathology in TREM2 R47H carriers vs noncarriers. Microglial activation was assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry and morphometry. Results Twelve of 16 patients with AD in the LOAD123 family carried R47H. Eleven patients with dementia had apolipoprotein E 4 (ApoE4) and R47H genotypes. We also found a rare missense variant, D353N, in a nominated AD risk gene, unc-5 homolog C (UNC5C), in 5 affected individuals in the LOAD123 family. R47H carriers demonstrated a shortened disease duration (mean [SD], 6.7 [2.8] vs 11.1 [6.6] years; 2-tailed t test; P = .04) and more frequent α-synucleinopathy. The

  12. Clinical experience in the screening and management of a large kindred with familial isolated pituitary adenoma due to an aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Fred; Hunter, Steven; Bradley, Lisa; Chahal, Harvinder S; Storr, Helen L; Akker, Scott A; Kumar, Ajith V; Orme, Stephen M; Evanson, Jane; Abid, Noina; Morrison, Patrick J; Korbonits, Márta; Atkinson, A Brew

    2014-04-01

    Germline AIP mutations usually cause young-onset acromegaly with low penetrance in a subset of familial isolated pituitary adenoma families. We describe our experience with a large family with R304* AIP mutation and discuss some of the diagnostic dilemmas and management issues. The aim of the study was to identify and screen mutation carriers in the family. Forty-three family members participated in the study. The study was performed in university hospitals. We conducted genetic and endocrine screening of family members. We identified 18 carriers of the R304* mutation, three family members with an AIP-variant A299V, and two family members who harbored both changes. One of the two index cases presented with gigantism and pituitary apoplexy, the other presented with young-onset acromegaly, and both had surgery and radiotherapy. After genetic and clinical screening of the family, two R304* carriers were diagnosed with acromegaly. They underwent transsphenoidal surgery after a short period of somatostatin analog treatment. One of these two patients is in remission; the other achieved successful pregnancy despite suboptimal control of acromegaly. One of the A299V carrier family members was previously diagnosed with a microprolactinoma; we consider this case to be a phenocopy. Height of the unaffected R304* carrier family members is not different compared to noncarrier relatives. Families with AIP mutations present particular problems such as the occurrence of large invasive tumors, poor response to medical treatment, difficulties with fertility and management of pregnancy, and the finding of AIP sequence variants of unknown significance. Because disease mostly develops at a younger age and penetrance is low, the timing and duration of the follow-up of carriers without overt disease requires further study. The psychological and financial impact of prolonged clinical screening must be considered. Excellent relationships between the family, endocrinologists, and

  13. Increased beta rhythm as an indicator of inhibitory mechanisms in tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolai, Valentina; van Dijk, Hanneke; Franzkowiak, Stephanie; Finis, Jennifer; Südmeyer, Martin; Jonas, Melanie; Thomalla, Götz; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten; Münchau, Alexander; Schnitzler, Alfons; Biermann-Ruben, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitory oscillatory mechanisms subserving tic compensation have been put forward in Tourette syndrome. Modulation of the beta rhythm (15-25 Hz) as the well-established oscillatory movement execution-inhibition indicator was tested during a cognitive-motor task in patients with Tourette syndrome. Performing a Go/NoGo task, 12 patients with Tourette syndrome and 12 matched controls were recorded using whole-head magnetoencephalography. Compared to healthy participants, patients showed less beta suppression in the sensorimotor area and enhanced beta power in parieto-occipital brain regions contralaterally to the response hand. Average beta power and power gain correlated negatively with tic severity. Increased motor inhibitory as well as visuomotor attentional processes are likely to subserve tic compensation. Correlational results suggest that stronger inhibitory compensation accompanies less tic severity. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Deep Brain Stimulation of the H Fields of Forel Alleviates Tics in Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Neudorfer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The current rationale for target selection in Tourette syndrome revolves around the notion of cortico-basal ganglia circuit involvement in the pathophysiology of the disease. However, despite extensive research, the ideal target for deep brain stimulation (DBS is still under debate, with many structures being neglected and underexplored. Based on clinical observations and taking into account the prevailing hypotheses of network processing in Tourette syndrome, we chose the fields of Forel, namely field H1, as a target for DBS. The fields of Forel constitute the main link between the striatopallidal system and the thalamocortical network, relaying pallidothalamic projections from core anatomical structures to the thalamic ventral nuclear group. In a retrospective study we investigated two patients suffering from chronic, medically intractable Tourette syndrome who underwent bilateral lead implantation in field H1 of Forel. Clinical scales revealed significant alleviation of tics and comorbid symptoms, namely depression and anxiety, in the postoperative course in both patients.

  15. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Protocol for the Screening and Phenotyping of Individuals with Tourette Syndrome for Genetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Crystelle; Marakovitz, Susan; O’Rourke, Julia; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Barton, Lauren; McLaughlin, Elizabeth; Proujansky, Rachel; Royal, Justin; Cowley, Heather; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Pauls, David; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Mathews, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and other emerging technologies offer great promise for the identification of genetic risk factors for complex psychiatric disorders, yet such studies are constrained by the need for large sample sizes. Web-based collection offers a relatively untapped resource for increasing participant recruitment. Therefore, we developed and implemented a novel web-based screening and phenotyping protocol for genetic studies of Tourette Syndrome (TS), a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics. Participants were recruited over a 13 month period through the membership of the Tourette Syndrome Association (TSA) (n=28,878). Of the TSA members contacted, 4.3% (1,242) initiated the questionnaire, and 79.5% (987) of these were enrollment eligible. 63.9% (631) of enrolled participants completed the study by submitting phenotypic data and blood specimens. Age was the only variable that predicted study completion; children and young adults were significantly less likely to be study completers than adults 26 and older. Compared to a clinic-based study conducted over the same time period, the web-based method yielded a 60% larger sample. Web-based participants were older and more often female; otherwise, the sample characteristics did not differ significantly. TS diagnoses based on the web-screen demonstrated 100% accuracy compared to those derived from in-depth clinical interviews. Our results suggest that a web-based approach is effective for increasing the sample size for genetic studies of a relatively rare disorder and that our web-based screen is valid for diagnosing TS. Findings from this study should aid in the development of web-based protocols for other disorders. PMID:23090870

  16. The International Deep Brain Stimulation Registry and Database for Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome: How Does it Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam eDeeb

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disease characterized by a combination of motor and vocal tics. Deep brain stimulation (DBS, already widely utilized for Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, is an emerging therapy for select and severe cases of TS that are resistant to medication and behavioral therapy. Over the last two decades, DBS has been used experimentally to manage severe TS cases. The results of case reports and small case series have been variable but in general positive. The reported interventions have, however, been variable, and there remain non-standardized selection criteria, various brain targets, differences in hardware, as well as variability in the programming parameters utilized. DBS centers perform only a handful of TS DBS cases each year, making large-scale outcomes difficult to study and to interpret. These limitations, coupled with the variable effect of surgery, and the overall small numbers of TS patients with implanted DBS worldwide, have delayed regulatory agency approval (e.g. FDA and equivalent agencies around the world. The Tourette Association of America, in response to the worldwide need for a more organized and collaborative effort, launched an international TS DBS registry and database. The main goal of the project has been to share data, uncover best practices, improve outcomes, and to provide critical information to regulatory agencies. The international registry and database has improved the communication and collaboration among TS DBS centers worldwide. In this paper we will review some of the key operation details for the international TS DBS database and registry.

  17. Identification of Variants in RET and IHH Pathway Members in a Large Family With History of Hirschsprung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sribudiani, Y; Chauhan, R K; Alves, M M; Petrova, L; Brosens, E; Harrison, C; Wabbersen, T; de Graaf, B M; Rügenbrink, T; Burzynski, G; Brouwer, R W W; IJcken, W F J van; Maas, S M; de Klein, A; Osinga, J; Eggen, B J L; Burns, A J; Brooks, A S; Shepherd, I T; Hofstra, R M W

    2018-03-27

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is an inherited congenital disorder characterized by absence of enteric ganglia in the distal part of the gut. Variants in ret proto-oncogene (RET) have been associated with up to 50% of familial and 35% of sporadic cases. We searched for variants that affect disease risk in a large, multi-generational family with history of HSCR in a linkage region previously associated with the disease (4q31.3-q32.3) and exome wide. We performed exome sequencing analyses of a family in the Netherlands with 5 members diagnosed with HSCR and 2 members diagnosed with functional constipation. We initially focused on variants in genes located in 4q31.3-q32.3. However, we also performed an exome-wide analysis in which known HSCR or HSCR-associated gene variants predicted to be deleterious were prioritized for further analysis. Candidate genes were expressed in HEK293, COS-7, and Neuro-2a cells and analyzed by luciferase and immunoblot assays. Morpholinos were designed to target exons of candidate genes and injected into 1-cell stage zebrafish embryos. Embryos were allowed to develop and stained for enteric neurons. Within the linkage region, we identified 1 putative splice variant in the LPS responsive beige-like anchor protein gene (LRBA). Functional assays could not confirm its predicted effect on mRNA splicing or on expression of the mab-21 like 2 gene (MAB21L2), which is embedded in LRBA. Zebrafish that developed following injection of the lrba morpholino had a shortened body axis and subtle gut morphological defects, but no significant reduction in number of enteric neurons compared with controls. Outside the linkage region, members of 1 branch of the family carried a previously unidentified RET variant or an in-frame deletion in the glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF), which encodes a ligand of RET. This deletion was located 6 base pairs before the last codon. We also found variants in the indian hedgehog gene (IHH) and its mediator

  18. Disease-specific quality of life in young patients with tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Luoni, Chiara; Selvini, Claudia; Blangiardo, Rosanna; Eddy, Clare M; Silvestri, Paola R; Calì, Paola V; Gagliardi, Emanuela; Balottin, Umberto; Cardona, Francesco; Rizzo, Renata; Termine, Cristiano

    2013-02-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple tics and is often associated with comorbid behavioral problems. Research with generic instruments in child populations showed that comorbid disorders can have a greater impact on health-related quality of life than tic severity. This study investigated the usefulness of a newly developed disease-specific instrument, the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome-Quality of Life Scale for Children and Adolescents (GTS-QOL-C&A), in assessing health-related quality of life in young patients with Tourette syndrome with and without behavioral comorbidity. We recruited 75 patients with Tourette syndrome (60 males; age 12.4 ± 3.2 years). All participants were evaluated by a neuropsychiatrist and completed a standardized psychometric battery, including the GTS-QOL-C&A, Child Depression Inventory, and Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children. Forty-two patients (56%) fulfilled diagnostic criteria for at least one comorbidity: obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 25 patients [33.3%]); attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 6 patients [8%]); both (n = 11 patients [14.7%]). The GTS-QOL-C&A demonstrated usefulness in differentiating "pure" Tourette syndrome from Tourette syndrome "plus" behavioral problems with regard to health-related quality of life scores for the obsessive-compulsive subscale. In addition to focusing on core tic symptoms, the GTS-QOL-C&A showed sensitivity to the impact of behavioral comorbidities on health-related quality of life and can usefully complement existing nonspecific instruments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Temporal relationship between premonitory urges and tics in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Valerie C; Beck, Christian; Sajin, Valeria; Baaske, Magdalena K; Bäumer, Tobias; Beste, Christian; Anders, Silke; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Tourette syndrome and are commonly viewed as the driving force of tics, building up before and subsiding after the execution of tics. Although the urge-tic interplay is one of the most preeminent features in Tourette syndrome, the temporal relationship between tics and urges has never been examined experimentally, mainly due to the lack of an appropriate assessment tool. We investigated the temporal relationship between urge intensity and tics in 17 Tourette patients and between urge intensity and eye blinks in 16 healthy controls in a free ticcing/blinking condition and a tic/blink suppression condition. For this purpose, an urge assessment tool was developed that allows real-time monitoring and quantification of urge intensity. Compared to free ticcing/blinking, urge intensity was higher during the suppression condition in both Tourette patients and healthy controls, while tics and blinks occurred less frequently. The data show that urge intensity increases prior to tics and decreases after tics in a time window of approximately ±10 sec. Tic suppression had a significant effect on the shape of the urge distribution around tics and led to a decrease in the size of the correlation between urge intensity and tics, indicating that tic suppression led to a de-coupling of tics and urges. In healthy controls, urges to blink were highly associated with eye blink execution, albeit in a narrower time frame (∼±5 sec). Blink suppression had a similar effect on the urge distribution associated with eye blinks as tic suppression had on the urge to tic in Tourette patients. These results corroborate the negative reinforcement model, which proposes that tics are associated with a relief in urges, thereby perpetuating ticcing behaviour. This study also documents similarities and differences between urges to act in healthy controls and urges to tic in Tourette syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Epidemiological methods used in studies in the prevalence of Tourette syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoff, Paweł; Mazurek, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) prevalence was studied since the early 80-ies. Its clinical course is characterised by co-occurrence of motor and vocal tics. Results of previous epidemiological studies were surprisingly divergent: the prevalence varied from 0.5 to 115 cases per 10,000 population. The disease previously recognised as extremely rare and severe is now considered as quite common, with often moderate course. Selected methods used in studies of TS prevalence and analysis of their possible impact on study results are presented. The studies were divided into 3 groups: studies of the hospitalised population, large-scale screenings and studies involving school population, basing on characteristic and size of population, methods of selection of subjects, diagnostic and screening methods used. Studies of the hospitalised population involved patients with most severe symptoms, in different age groups, different methods of final diagnosis confirmation were used. TS prevalence varied from 0.5 up to 15 cases per 10,000 population. Procedures used in large-scale screening studies made possible the elimination of potential selection bias. Large populations were studied using transparent and repetitive confirmation of diagnoses. Their validity was additionally checked in parallel validity studies. TS prevalence was in the range 4.3 to 10 cases per 10,000 population. The highest TS prevalence was obtained in studies involving schoolchildren. Data were gathered from multiple sources: from parents, teachers and children, as well as from classroom observation. Diagnoses were made by experienced clinicians. TS prevalence obtained in school population studies was between 36.2 up to 115 per 10,000 population.

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Michael

    2009-12-01

    The cause of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS), a chronic motor and vocal tic disorder of childhood onset, remains unknown. Abnormalities in basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits presumably play an important role in the pathophysiology underlying the involuntary tics. The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive and painless tool to examine the excitability of several different circuits in the human motor cortex has advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology. Motor thresholds are similar in GTS and healthy subjects; in the resting state, recruitment of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) above threshold is more gradual in patients than controls. In contrast, recruitment of MEPs during preactivation is similar in both groups, as is the duration of the cortical silent period. This suggests that the distribution of excitability in the corticospinal system in patients at rest is different to that in healthy individuals. Importantly, correlation analysis showed that reduced levels of excitability at rest relate, in pure GTS patients, to video ratings of complex tics, and hand and finger tics, with less excitability predicting fewer tics. The correlations disappear for measures made during voluntary activation. This suggests that this is an adaptive response to abnormal basal ganglia-motor cortex inputs in an effort to reduce unwanted movements, a notion supported by electroencephalography-coherence studies that show increased cortico-cortical coupling. Compared to the healthy control group, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) thresholds are similar. However, above-threshold SICI recruitment and sensory afferent inhibition (SAI), a paradigm to examine sensory motor integration, are reduced in patients. This is consistent with the suggestion that reduced excitability of cortical inhibition is one factor that contributes to the difficulty that patients have in suppressing involuntary tics. In addition the reduced SAI indicates that impaired

  2. A large family of antivirulence regulators modulates the effects of transcriptional activators in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli E Santiago

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that transcription of a hypothetical small open reading frame (orf60 in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC strain 042 is impaired after mutation of aggR, which encodes a global virulence activator. We have also reported that the cryptic orf60 locus was linked to protection against EAEC diarrhea in two epidemiologic studies. Here, we report that the orf60 product acts as a negative regulator of aggR itself. The orf60 protein product lacks homology to known repressors, but displays 44-100% similarity to at least fifty previously undescribed small (<10 kDa hypothetical proteins found in many gram negative pathogen genomes. Expression of orf60 homologs from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC repressed the expression of the AraC-transcriptional ETEC regulator CfaD/Rns and its regulon in ETEC strain H10407. Complementation in trans of EAEC 042orf60 by orf60 homologs from ETEC and the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium resulted in dramatic suppression of aggR. A C. rodentium orf60 homolog mutant showed increased levels of activator RegA and increased colonization of the adult mouse. We propose the name Aar (AggR-activated regulator for the clinically and epidemiologically important orf60 product in EAEC, and postulate the existence of a large family of homologs among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae. We propose the name ANR (AraC Negative Regulators for this family.

  3. Economic incentives of family controlling shareholders and the monitoring role of non-dominant large shareholders in corporate governance: Evidence from the manufacturing firms in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Fei Goh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the economic incentives of dominant controlling shareholders with regard to the expropriation of minority shareholders, on the one hand, and the monitoring role of non-dominant large shareholders in family firms, on the other. The authors argue that family controlling shareholders (or family owners do not share common interests with other shareholders. Drawing on 141 family firms in the manufacturing sector that were listed on Bursa Malaysia (the Malaysian stock exchange from 2003 to 2006, the article finds an inverted U-shaped relationship between excess control rights and a firm's market performance. The findings also show that both the cash flow rights (i.e. claims on cash payouts of family controlling shareholders and the presence of non-dominant large shareholders with the ability to contest control of the firm have a positive relationship with market performance.  This study contributes to the literature by indicating that family owners are unlikely to collude with other large shareholders to expropriate minority shareholders. Furthermore, low levels of excess family-owner control rights are beneficial for market performance because firms may benefit from group affiliations and receive patronage from wealthy owners. However, high levels of excess control rights are understood to be an economic incentive for family owners to expropriate minority shareholders during non-crisis periods.

  4. Reduced white matter connectivity in the corpus callosum of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Grüner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects......, and these anatomical features have been understood to reflect neural plasticity that helps to attenuate the severity of tics. METHOD: CC white matter connectivity, as measured by the Fractional Anisotropy (FA) index from diffusion tensor images, was assessed in 20 clinically well-defined boys with Tourette syndrome...

  5. Gifles de la Tourett's Disease a Single case study A Discussion on Aetiology and Treatment

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    C. Izadi

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of Gille de la Tourett's syndrome is reported and discussed 111 the light of conflicting views on the aetiology of the condition. It is hypothesized that if Tourette's syndrome is to be considered as a sort of reaction against adaption to an unhealthy environment, this reaction and its continuity can be attributed to permanent eNS damage (Probably in the area of corpora striata beginning in childhood. Treatment with haloperidol is suggested as a most effective method of symptomatic treatment.

  6. Partitioning the heritability of Tourette syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder reveals differences in genetic architecture.

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    Lea K Davis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The direct estimation of heritability from genome-wide common variant data as implemented in the program Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA has provided a means to quantify heritability attributable to all interrogated variants. We have quantified the variance in liability to disease explained by all SNPs for two phenotypically-related neurobehavioral disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and Tourette Syndrome (TS, using GCTA. Our analysis yielded a heritability point estimate of 0.58 (se = 0.09, p = 5.64e-12 for TS, and 0.37 (se = 0.07, p = 1.5e-07 for OCD. In addition, we conducted multiple genomic partitioning analyses to identify genomic elements that concentrate this heritability. We examined genomic architectures of TS and OCD by chromosome, MAF bin, and functional annotations. In addition, we assessed heritability for early onset and adult onset OCD. Among other notable results, we found that SNPs with a minor allele frequency of less than 5% accounted for 21% of the TS heritability and 0% of the OCD heritability. Additionally, we identified a significant contribution to TS and OCD heritability by variants significantly associated with gene expression in two regions of the brain (parietal cortex and cerebellum for which we had available expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs. Finally we analyzed the genetic correlation between TS and OCD, revealing a genetic correlation of 0.41 (se = 0.15, p = 0.002. These results are very close to previous heritability estimates for TS and OCD based on twin and family studies, suggesting that very little, if any, heritability is truly missing (i.e., unassayed from TS and OCD GWAS studies of common variation. The results also indicate that there is some genetic overlap between these two phenotypically-related neuropsychiatric disorders, but suggest that the two disorders have distinct genetic architectures.

  7. Identification of two heritable cross-disorder endophenotypes for Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Sabrina M.; Hirschtritt, Matthew E.; Davis, Lea K.; Illmann, Cornelia; Osiecki, Lisa; Grados, Marco; Sandor, Paul; Dion, Yves; King, Robert; Pauls, David; Budman, Cathy L.; Cath, Danielle C.; Greenberg, Erica; Lyon, Gholson J.; Yu, Dongmei; McGrath, Lauren M.; McMahon, William M.; Lee, Paul C.; Delucchi, Kevin L.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Mathews, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Phenotypic heterogeneity in Tourette syndrome (TS) is partly due to complex genetic relationships between TS, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Identifying symptom-based endophenotypes across diagnoses may aid gene-finding efforts. Method 3494 individuals recruited for genetic studies were assessed for TS, OCD, and ADHD symptoms. Symptom-level factor and latent class analyses were conducted in TS families and replicated in an independent sample. Classes were characterized by comorbidity rates and proportion of parents. Heritability and TS-, OCD-, and ADHD-associated polygenic load were estimated. Results We identified two cross-disorder symptom-based phenotypes across analyses: symmetry (symmetry, evening up, checking obsessions; ordering, arranging, counting, writing-rewriting compulsions, repetitive writing tics) and disinhibition (uttering syllables/words, echolalia/palilalia, coprolalia/copropraxia and obsessive urges to offend/mutilate/be destructive). Heritability estimates for both endophenotypes were high (disinhibition factor= 0.35, SE=0.03, p= 4.2 ×10−34; symmetry factor= 0.39, SE=0.03, p= 7.2 ×10−31; symmetry class=0.38, SE=0.10, p=0.001). Mothers of TS probands had high rates of symmetry (49%) but not disinhibition (5%). Polygenic risk scores derived from a TS genome-wide association study (GWAS) were associated with symmetry (p= 0.02), while risk scores derived from an OCD GWAS were not. OCD polygenic risk scores were associated with disinhibition (p =0.03), while TS and ADHD risk scores were not. Conclusions We identified two heritable TS-related endophenotypes that cross traditional diagnostic boundaries. The symmetry phenotype correlated with TS polygenic load, and was present in otherwise “TS-unaffected” mothers, suggesting that this phenotype may reflect additional TS (rather than OCD) genetic liability that is not captured by traditional DSM-based diagnoses. PMID:27809572

  8. Issues and Methodologies in Large-Scale Assessments. Special Issue 2: Measuring Students' Family Background in Large-Scale International Education Studies. IERI Monograph Series

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    Brese, Falk; Mirazchiyski, Plamen

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between students' family background and achievement is often seen as an important topic in regard to equality and equity of educational provision. The results of various education studies show that the family background of students correlates with students' academic achievement at school. This paper focuses on the measurement of…

  9. Clinical Assessment of Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stephanie; Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder involving multiple motor and phonic tics. Tics, which usually begin between the ages of 6 and 8, are sudden, rapid, stereotyped, and apparently purposeless movements or sounds that involve discrete muscle groups. Individuals with TS experience a variety of different sensory phenomena, including premonitory urges prior to tics and somatic hypersensitivity due to impaired sensorimotor gating. In addition to other conditions, stress, anxiety, fatigue, or other heightened emotional states tend to exacerbate tics, while relaxation, playing sports, and focused concentration on a specific task tend to alleviate tic symptoms. Ninety percent of children with TS also have comorbid conditions, such as Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or an impulse control disorder. These disorders often cause more problems for the child both at home and at school than tics do alone. Proper diagnosis and treatment of TS involves appropriate evaluation and recognition, not only of tics, but also of these associated conditions. PMID:23206664

  10. Current pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egolf, A; Coffey, B J

    2014-02-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Although many youth experience attenuation or even remission of tics in adolescence and young adulthood, some individuals experience persistent tics which can be debilitating or disabling. The majority of patients also have one or more psychiatric comorbid disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment is multimodal, including both pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavioral treatment, and requires disentanglement of tics and the comorbid symptoms. Although the only two formally approved medications in the United States are haloperidol and pimozide, these treatments are generally not used as first-line interventions due to their significant potential for adverse effects. The α-adrenoceptor agonists guanfacine and clonidine have an established evidence base for both efficacy and tolerability, and are usually recommended as initial pharmacotherapy. Atypical neuroleptics, such as aripiprazole or risperidone, are typically used if the α-adrenoceptor agonists are ineffective or intolerable. However, many other pharmacological agents reviewed in this manuscript have been studied as treatment alternatives. Copyright 2014 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune-mediated animal models of Tourette syndrome

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    Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2014-01-01

    An autoimmune diathesis has been proposed in Tourette syndrome (TS) and related neuropsychiatric disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism and anorexia nervosa. Environmental triggers including infection and xenobiotics are hypothesized to lead to the production of brain-directed autoantibodies in a subset of genetically susceptible individuals. Although much work has focused on Group A Streptococcus (GAS), the role of this common childhood infection remains controversial. Animal model studies based on immune and autoantibody findings in TS have demonstrated immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits and stereotypic movements and related behavioral disturbances reminiscent of TS following exposure to GAS and other activators of host anti-microbial responses, soluble immune mediators and anti-GAS or anti-neuronal antibodies. Demonstration of the ability to recreate these abnormalities through passive transfer of serum IgG from GAS-immunized mice into naïve mice and abrogation of this activity through depletion of IgG has provided compelling evidence in support of the autoimmune hypothesis. Immunologically-based animal models of TS are a potent tool for dissecting the pathogenesis of this serious neuropsychiatric syndrome. PMID:23313649

  12. Tic Exacerbation in Adults with Tourette Syndrome: A Case Series

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    Sara M. Schaefer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tourette syndrome (TS has been described as peaking in adolescence with subsequent regression. We report patients who were diagnosed with TS during childhood who experienced a latent period (significant reduction in or absence of tics followed by tic re-emergence in adulthood.Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of outpatients over age 21 seen at the Yale neurology clinic between January 2012 and July 2016 who were diagnosed with childhood-onset tics, and who experienced a latent period of greater than 1 year followed by an exacerbation.Results: Sixteen patients were identified. The mean latent period was 16 years. Ten patients (62.5% identified an exacerbation trigger, most commonly changes in substance use (five patients. Seven patients (43.8% reported worsening of tics since childhood. Six patients (37.5% had received pharmacological intervention for tics as children, and 15 patients (93.8% as adults. Six of 15 patients (40.0% had an effective response from those pharmacological intervention(s.Discussion: Our study demonstrates that the decline in symptoms as patients age may represent temporary improvement. The latent period lasted years in our patients, different from the more rapid waxing and waning in children. A change in substance use was an important trigger. Requests for pharmacological intervention were not necessarily correlated with worsening tic severity. 

  13. Influence of gender on Tourette syndrome beyond adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter, D G; Finnegan, S G

    2015-02-01

    Although boys are disproportionately affected by tics in Tourette syndrome (TS), this gender bias is attenuated in adulthood and a recent study has suggested that women may experience greater functional interference from tics than men. The authors assessed the gender distribution of adults in a tertiary University-based TS clinic population and the relative influence of gender and other variables on adult tic severity (YGTSS score) and psychosocial functioning (GAF score). We also determined retrospectively the influence of gender on change in global tic severity and overall TS impairment (YGTSS) since adolescence. Females were over-represented in relation to previously published epidemiologic surveys of both TS children and adults. Female gender was associated with a greater likelihood of tic worsening as opposed to tic improvement in adulthood; a greater likelihood of expansion as opposed to contraction of motor tic distribution; and with increased current motor tic severity and tic-related impairment. However, gender explained only a small percentage of the variance of the YGTSS global severity score and none of the variance of the GAF scale score. Psychosocial functioning was influenced most strongly by tic severity but also by a variety of comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Tic Exacerbation in Adults with Tourette Syndrome: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Sara M; Chow, Christopher A; Louis, Elan D; Robakis, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) has been described as peaking in adolescence with subsequent regression. We report patients who were diagnosed with TS during childhood who experienced a latent period (significant reduction in or absence of tics) followed by tic re-emergence in adulthood. We performed a retrospective chart review of outpatients over age 21 seen at the Yale neurology clinic between January 2012 and July 2016 who were diagnosed with childhood-onset tics, and who experienced a latent period of greater than 1 year followed by an exacerbation. Sixteen patients were identified. The mean latent period was 16 years. Ten patients (62.5%) identified an exacerbation trigger, most commonly changes in substance use (five patients). Seven patients (43.8%) reported worsening of tics since childhood. Six patients (37.5%) had received pharmacological intervention for tics as children, and 15 patients (93.8%) as adults. Six of 15 patients (40.0%) had an effective response from those pharmacological intervention(s). Our study demonstrates that the decline in symptoms as patients age may represent temporary improvement. The latent period lasted years in our patients, different from the more rapid waxing and waning in children. A change in substance use was an important trigger. Requests for pharmacological intervention were not necessarily correlated with worsening tic severity.

  15. [Did Mozart Suffer from Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Sánchez, Leonardo; Botero-Meneses, Juan Sebastián; Vergara-Méndez, Laura Daniela; Pachón, Natalia; Martínez, Arianna; Ramírez, Santiago

    The personal and private lives of great men and women in history, like writers, painters and musicians, have been the subject of great interest for many years. A clear example of this is the vast scrutiny is cast over the famous composer, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. What may have started as curiosity, rapidly evolved into extensive research, as the answers about the musician's legendary talent may lie in the details of his life (his childhood, his relationships, his quirks and his mannerisms). It is usually up to historians, anthropologists or philosophers to delve into the pages of old books, trying to grasp answers and clues. However, for some time, Physicians have sought their own part in solving the puzzle. The long told hypothesis regarding Mozart's diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome will be examined. Could all of the peculiarities and oddities of the genius be caused by a neurological disorder? Or was this musical genius just an eccentric brilliant man?. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical assessment of Tourette syndrome and tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stephanie C; Leckman, James F; Bloch, Michael H

    2013-07-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder involving multiple motor and phonic tics. Tics, which usually begin between the ages of 6 and 8, are sudden, rapid, stereotyped, and apparently purposeless movements or sounds that involve discrete muscle groups. Individuals with TS experience a variety of different sensory phenomena, including premonitory urges prior to tics and somatic hypersensitivity due to impaired sensorimotor gating. In addition to other conditions, stress, anxiety, fatigue, or other heightened emotional states tend to exacerbate tics, while relaxation, playing sports, and focused concentration on a specific task tend to alleviate tic symptoms. Ninety percent of children with TS also have comorbid conditions, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or an impulse control disorder. These disorders often cause more problems for the child both at home and at school than tics do alone. Proper diagnosis and treatment of TS involves appropriate evaluation and recognition, not only of tics, but also of these associated conditions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Altered intrahemispheric structural connectivity in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

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    Bastian Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS is a common developmental neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics and frequent psychiatric comorbidities, often causing significant disability. Tic generation has been linked to disturbed networks of brain areas involved in planning, controlling and execution of actions, particularly structural and functional disorders in the striatum and cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical loops. We therefore applied structural diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to characterize changes in intrahemispheric white matter connectivity in cortico-subcortical circuits engaged in motor control in 15 GTS patients without psychiatric comorbidities. White matter connectivity was analyzed by probabilistic fiber tractography between 12 predefined cortical and subcortical regions of interest. Connectivity values were combined with measures of clinical severity rated by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS. GTS patients showed widespread structural connectivity deficits. Lower connectivity values were found specifically in tracts connecting the supplementary motor areas (SMA with basal ganglia (pre-SMA–putamen, SMA–putamen and in frontal cortico-cortical circuits. There was an overall trend towards negative correlations between structural connectivity in these tracts and YGTSS scores. Structural connectivity of frontal brain networks involved in planning, controlling and executing actions is reduced in adult GTS patients which is associated with tic severity. These findings are in line with the concept of GTS as a neurodevelopmental disorder of brain immaturity.

  18. Nondopaminergic neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvardi, Patrick T; Nespoli, Ester; Rizzo, Francesca; Hengerer, Bastian; Ludolph, Andrea G

    2013-01-01

    A major pathophysiological role for the dopaminergic system in Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been presumed ever since the discovery that dopamine-receptor antagonists can alleviate tics. Especially recent molecular genetic studies, functional imaging studies, and some rare postmortem studies have given more and more hints that other neurotransmitter systems are involved as well. Dysfunction in the dopamine metabolism-in particular during early development-might lead to counter-regulations in the other systems or vice versa. This chapter will give an overview of the studies that prove the involvement of other neurotransmitter systems such as the major monoaminergic neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and histamine; the most important excitatory neurotransmitter, the amino acid glutamate; the major inhibitory neurotransmitter y-aminobutyric acid, as well as acetylcholine, endocannabinoid, corticoid; and others. These studies will hopefully lead to fundamental advances in the psychopharmacological treatment of TS. While tic disorders have been previously treated mainly with dopamine antagonists, some authors already favor alpha-agonists. Clinical trials with glutamate agonists and antagonists and compounds influencing the histaminergic system are currently being conducted. Since the different neurotransmitter systems consist of several receptor subtypes which might mediate different effects on locomotor activity, patients with TS may respond differentially to selective agonists or antagonists. Effects of agonistic or antagonistic compounds on tic symptoms might also be dose dependent. Further studies will lead to a broader spectrum of psychopharmacological treatment options in TS. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Motor-cortical interaction in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

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    Stephanie Franzkowiak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS increased activation of the primary motor cortex (M1 before and during movement execution followed by increased inhibition after movement termination was reported. The present study aimed at investigating, whether this activation pattern is due to altered functional interaction between motor cortical areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 10 GTS-patients and 10 control subjects performed a self-paced finger movement task while neuromagnetic brain activity was recorded using Magnetoencephalography (MEG. Cerebro-cerebral coherence as a measure of functional interaction was calculated. During movement preparation and execution coherence between contralateral M1 and supplementary motor area (SMA was significantly increased at beta-frequency in GTS-patients. After movement termination no significant differences between groups were evident. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data suggest that increased M1 activation in GTS-patients might be due to increased functional interaction between SMA and M1 most likely reflecting a pathophysiological marker of GTS. The data extend previous findings of motor-cortical alterations in GTS by showing that local activation changes are associated with alterations of functional networks between premotor and primary motor areas. Interestingly enough, alterations were evident during preparation and execution of voluntary movements, which implies a general theme of increased motor-cortical interaction in GTS.

  20. An overview of the treatment of Tourette's disorder and tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Párraga, Humberto C; Harris, Kara M; Párraga, Karen L; Balen, George M; Cruz, Cristina

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of various treatments for Tourette's disorder (TD) and tics. This study is a historical review of the treatment modalities prior to the advent of neuroleptics. A review of double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials and open studies on the use of neuroleptics and selected reports was also carried out. The literature review reveals that the treatment of TD and tics has evolved from an early history of marginally effective approaches to the advent of neuroleptics, which started a new era in TD and tic treatment, with a significantly broader range of effectiveness. Although progress has been made, the literature review nevertheless reveals a great deal of confusion as related to the clinical heterogeneity of TD and tics, differences in populations, medication-dose combinations, and outcomes. However, a role for a limited number of pharmacologic agents, combined with psychosocial approaches, has been identified. There is a need for studies in larger, diagnostically homogenous samples and for the use of more sophisticated methodology, to identify intelligible models that would allow the development of more effective treatment approaches.

  1. Self-reported emotion regulation in adults with Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Helena; Wilkinson, Verity; Robertson, Mary M; Channon, Shelley

    2016-11-30

    Recent work has reported mild impairments in social and emotional processing in Tourette's syndrome (TS), but deliberate attempts to use specific emotion regulation strategies have not been investigated previously. In the present study, adult participants with TS and no comorbidities (TS-alone) were compared to healthy control participants on several self-report measures assessing habitual use of reappraisal and suppression emotion regulation strategies. There were no group differences on measures of reappraisal, but the TS-alone group reported using suppression more frequently than the control group and this was true across a range of negative emotions. The groups did not differ on symptomatology scores of anxiety or depression, although more frequent use of suppression was associated with higher depressive symptomatology for the TS-alone group only. Further work is needed to examine potential factors that may influence emotion regulation in TS, including increased emotional reactivity or expertise in applying strategies to suppress tic symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tics and Tourette syndrome: clinical evaluation of 44 cases

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    Teive Hélio A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated 44 patients with tics and Tourette's syndrome (TS emphasising the age of onset of symptoms, sex, classification and localization of tics, associated symptoms and signs and comorbidities. Thirty-three patients (75.2% had TS defined criteria whereas 10 (22.7% had chronic motor and/or vocal tics. Simple motor tics were found in 43 cases (97.7%, mainly affecting the eyes (43.2%, mouth (43.2%, face (34.1%. Simple vocal tics occurred in 33 (75%. Coprolalia was found in just 6 cases (13.6% and copropraxia in just 2 (4.5%. Obsessive compulsive disorder and/or symptoms were found in 26 cases (59.1% and attention deficit in 17 (38.6%. Eighteen patients (40.9% had other disorders, such as alcoholism, tabagism, drug abuse, affective disorders, anxiety, sleep and learning disorders. The data obtained are similar to those found by other authors. We highlight the low frequency of coprolalia, as well as the associated neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Copy Number Variation in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: A Cross-Disorder Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Yu, Dongmei; Marshall, Christian; Davis, Lea K.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Li, Bingbin; Cappi, Carolina; Gerber, Gloria; Wolf, Aaron; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Osiecki, Lisa; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Kirby, Andrew; Illmann, Cornelia; Haddad, Stephen; Gallagher, Patience; Fagerness, Jesen A.; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Black, Donald W.; Bloch, Michael H.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Derks, Eske M.; Dion, Yves; Rosário, Maria C.; Eapen, Valsama; Evans, Patrick; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M.J.; Herrera, Luis D.; Hounie, Ana G.; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L; King, Robert A.; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Lyon, Gholson J.; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; McCracken, James T.; McMahon, William; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L; Neale, Benjamin M; Nurmi, Erika; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark; Robertson, Mary M.; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Nicolini, Humberto; Oostra, Ben A.; Moessner, Rainald; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Heutink, Peter; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson; Petryshen, Tracey; Posthuma, Danielle; Jenike, Michael A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Hanna, Gregory L.; Brentani, Helena; Scherer, Stephen W.; Arnold, Paul D.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Mathews, Carol A.; Knowles, James A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Pauls, David L.; Wang, Kai; Scharf, Jeremiah M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) are heritable, neurodevelopmental disorders with a partially shared genetic etiology. This study represents the first genome-wide investigation of large (>500kb), rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in OCD and the largest genome-wide CNV analysis in TS to date. Method The primary analyses utilized a cross-disorder design for 2,699 patients (1,613 ascertained for OCD, 1,086 ascertained for TS) and 1,789 controls. Parental data facilitated a de novo analysis in 348 OCD trios. Results Although no global CNV burden was detected in the cross-disorder analysis or in secondary, disease-specific analyses, there was a 3.3-fold increased burden of large deletions previously associated with other neurodevelopmental disorders (p=.09). Half of these neurodevelopmental deletions were located in a single locus, 16p13.11 (5 patient deletions: 0 control deletions, p=0.08 in current study, p=0.025 compared to published controls). Three 16p13.11 deletions were confirmed de novo, providing further support to the etiological significance of this region. The overall OCD de novo rate was 1.4%, which is intermediate between published rates in controls (0.7%) and in autism or schizophrenia (2–4%). Conclusion Several converging lines of evidence implicate 16p13.11 deletions in OCD, with weaker evidence for a role in TS. The trend toward increased overall neurodevelopmental CNV burden in TS and OCD suggests that deletions previously associated with other neurodevelopmental disorders may also contribute to these phenotypes. PMID:25062598

  4. Chlamydia abortus YhbZ, a truncated Obg family GTPase, associates with the Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    The stringent stress response is vital for bacterial survival under adverse environmental conditions. Obligate intracellular Chlamydia lack key stringent response proteins, but nevertheless can interrupt the cell cycle and enter stasis or persistence upon amino acid starvation. A possible key protein retained is YhbZ, a homologue of the ObgE guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) superfamily connecting the stringent stress response to ribosome maturation. Curiously, chlamydial YhbZ lacks the ObgE C-terminal domain thought to be essential for binding the large ribosomal subunit. We expressed recombinant Chlamydia abortus YhbZ and showed it to be a functional GTPase, with similar activity to other Obg GTPase family members. As Chlamydia are resistant to genetic manipulation, we performed heterologous expression and gradient centrifugation experiments in Escherichia coli and found that, despite the missing C-terminal domain, C. abortus YhbZ co-fractionates with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. In addition, overexpression of chlamydial YhbZ in E. coli leads to growth defects and elongation, as reported for other Obg members. YhbZ did not complement an E. coli obgE temperature-sensitive mutant, indicating the C-terminal acidic domain may have an additional role. This data supports a role for YhbZ linking the chlamydial stress response to ribosome function and cellular growth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comprehensive clinical evaluation of a large Spanish family with Anderson-Fabry disease, novel GLA mutation and severe cardiac phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román-Monserrat, Irene; Moreno-Flores, Victoria; López-Cuenca, David; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Elena; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Beatriz; Alegría-Fernández, Marisol; Poza-Cisneros, Gabriela; Piñero-Fernández, Juan A; Sornichero-Martínez, Javier; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R

    2014-06-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked multisystemic lysosomal-storage condition. We describe a large family with a novel GLA mutation: p.M187R/g7219 T>G. Anamnesis/physical-exam, blood/urine analysis, α-Gal-A activity and/or genetic study of at-risk individuals and multidisciplinary evaluation in confirmed cases. 4 males and 13 heterozygous-females displayed the mutation. Cardiac/renal/neurological disease was diagnosed at a mean age of 41/29/39 years in males and 51/56/46 years in females. Onset mean age was 20 years versus 42 years. 9/15 had cardiomyopathy. Delta wave suggestive of accessory pathway was identified in 1 male and 2 females. 1 female had cardiac arrest (ventricular fibrillation, 61 years). 2 females and 1 male died suddenly (63, 64 and 57 years). Cardiac-subscore of Mainz Severity-Score-Index was severe for males and females over 40 years. 4/15(26%) developed early renal disease. 2 males needed dialysis. 1 male died at 69 years in spite of kidney-heart transplant. We describe the largest genetically confirmed Spanish family using multidisciplinary evaluation and MSSI calculation. The novel mutation p.M187R/g7219 T>G is associated with a particularly malignant cardiac phenotype in males and females over 40 years. Severity was higher than that of the largest Spanish FOS-cohort. Short-PR with delta is being reported for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Procedural learning in Tourette syndrome, ADHD, and comorbid Tourette-ADHD: Evidence from a probabilistic sequence learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Ádám; Shilon, Yuval; Janacsek, Karolina; Kóbor, Andrea; Tremblay, Antoine; Németh, Dezső; Ullman, Michael T

    2017-10-01

    Procedural memory, which is rooted in the basal ganglia, plays an important role in the implicit learning of motor and cognitive skills. Few studies have examined procedural learning in either Tourette syndrome (TS) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), despite basal ganglia abnormalities in both of these neurodevelopmental disorders. We aimed to assess procedural learning in children with TS (n=13), ADHD (n=22), and comorbid TS-ADHD (n=20), as well as in typically developing children (n=21). Procedural learning was measured with a well-studied implicit probabilistic sequence learning task, the alternating serial reaction time task. All four groups showed evidence of sequence learning, and moreover did not differ from each other in sequence learning. This result, from the first study to examine procedural memory across TS, ADHD and comorbid TS-ADHD, is consistent with previous findings of intact procedural learning of sequences in both TS and ADHD. In contrast, some studies have found impaired procedural learning of non-sequential probabilistic categories in TS. This suggests that sequence learning may be spared in TS and ADHD, while at least some other forms of learning in procedural memory are impaired, at least in TS. Our findings indicate that disorders associated with basal ganglia abnormalities do not necessarily show procedural learning deficits, and provide a possible path for more effective diagnostic tools, and educational and training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Toward a Multifactorial Conception of the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome and Persistent Chronic Tic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Marc E; O'Connor, Kieron

    2017-06-02

    Despite recent giant leaps in understanding Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (now Tourette Disorder in the DSM 5), accurate multi-modal description, rigorous assessment procedures, and the improvement of evidence-based treatment currently pose a considerable challenge. In this context, the current special edition aims to elaborate three important dimensions in Tourette Disorder. Firstly, the effective characterization and etiological basis of the disorder are reviewed, since such characterization impacts accurate assessment. Secondly, subsequent articles cover the comprehensive evaluation and assessment of tic disorders, essential for treatment planning. Thirdly, the final group of articles propose novel and innovative treatment strategies for pharmacologically and behaviorally reducing tic frequency. In the current editorial address, two main issues seem crucial to the development of interventions for Tourette disorder. Primarily, integrating new technology in treatments, while supporting cognitive and behavioral recovery through learning self-controlled strategies. Additionally, the dissemination of study results to frontline resources, needs streamlining and empirically validated treatments for tic disorders should be the subject of knowledge translation to community organizations and be more widely available to the public.

  8. Catecholamine-related gene expression in blood correlates with tic severity in tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunther, Joan; Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Lit, Lisa; Corbett, Blythe; Ander, Brad; Zhan, Xinhua; Jickling, Glen; Bos-Veneman, Netty; Liu, Da; Hoekstra, Pieter; Sharp, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable disorder characterized by tics that are decreased in some patients by treatment with alpha adrenergic agonists and dopamine receptor blockers. Thus, this study examines the relationship between catecholamine gene expression in blood and tic severity. TS

  9. Basal ganglia structure in Tourette's disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forde, N.J.; Zwiers, M.P.; Naaijen, J.; Akkermans, S.E.A.; Openneer, T.J.; Visscher, F.; Dietrich, A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tourette's disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder often co-occur and have both been associated with structural variation of the basal ganglia. However, findings are inconsistent and comorbidity is often neglected. METHODS: T1-weighted magnetic resonance images from

  10. Psychosocial outcome and psychiatric comorbidity in older adolescents with Tourette syndrome: controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorman, Daniel A; Thompson, Nancy; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2010-01-01

    assessed around 18 years of age regarding psychosocial functioning and lifetime psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: Compared with controls, individuals with Tourette syndrome had substantially lower CGAS scores (P = 10(-8)) and higher rates of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), major depression...

  11. Fine motor skills in adult Tourette patients are task-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuner Irene

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics. Deficient motor inhibition underlying tics is one of the main hypotheses in its pathophysiology. Therefore the question arises whether this supposed deficient motor inhibition affects also voluntary movements. Despite severe motor tics, different personalities who suffer from Tourette perform successfully as neurosurgeon, pilot or professional basketball player. Methods For the investigation of fine motor skills we conducted a motor performance test battery in an adult Tourette sample and an age matched group of healthy controls. Results The Tourette patients showed a significant lower performance in the categories steadiness of both hands and aiming of the right hand in comparison to the healthy controls. A comparison of patients’ subgroup without comorbidities or medication and healthy controls revealed a significant difference in the category steadiness of the right hand. Conclusions Our results show that steadiness and visuomotor integration of fine motor skills are altered in our adult sample but not precision and speed of movements. This alteration pattern might be the clinical vignette of complex adaptations in the excitability of the motor system on the basis of altered cortical and subcortical components. The structurally and functionally altered neuronal components could encompass orbitofrontal, ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortices, the anterior cingulate, amygdala, primary motor and sensorimotor areas including altered corticospinal projections, the corpus callosum and the basal ganglia.

  12. Limbic and motor circuits involved in symmetry behavior in Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, F.E.; van den Heuvel, O.A.; Cath, D.C.; Groenewegen, H.J.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Boellaard, R.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Veltman, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    The need for symmetry and ordering objects related to a "just right"-feeling is a common symptom in Tourette's syndrome (TS) and resembles symmetry behavior in obsessive-compulsive disorder, but its pathophysiology is unknown. We used a symptom provocation paradigm to investigate the neural

  13. Structural Changes in the Somatosensory System Correlate with Tic Severity in Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomalla, Gotz; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Jonas, Melanie; Baumer, Tobias; Biermann-Ruben, Katja; Hummel, Friedhelm; Gerloff, Christian; Muller-Vahl, Kirsten; Schnitzler, Alfons; Orth, Michael; Munchau, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Previous structural MRI studies have identified regional abnormalities in grey matter, especially in the basal ganglia. These findings are consistent with the assumption of alterations in cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits and…

  14. Randomized Trial of Anger Control Training for Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhdolsky, Denis G.; Vitulano, Lawrence A.; Carroll, Deirdre H.; McGuire, Joseph; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A randomized trial to examine the efficacy of anger control training for treating adolescents with Tourette's syndrome and disruptive behavior reveals that those administered with the anger control training showed a decrease in their Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale score by 52 percent as compared with a decrease of 11 percent in the treatment as…

  15. Control Networks in Paediatric Tourette Syndrome Show Immature and Anomalous Patterns of Functional Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jessica A.; Fair, Damien A.; Dosenbach, Nico U. F.; Cohen, Alexander L.; Miezin, Francis M.; Petersen, Steven E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2009-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder characterized by unwanted, repetitive behaviours that manifest as stereotyped movements and vocalizations called "tics". Operating under the hypothesis that the brain's control systems may be impaired in TS, we measured resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) between 39 previously…

  16. Neuropsychological Functioning in Children with Tourette Syndrome with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Scahill, Lawrence; Leckman, James F.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Neuropsychological functioning in children with Tourette syndrome (TS) has been characterized by subtle deficits in response inhibition, visual-motor integration, and fine-motor coordination. The association of these deficits with the tics of the TS versus co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has not been well…

  17. Tiques e síndrome de Gilles de la Tourette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Pitágoras de Mattos

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores revisam a literatura a propósito dos tiques e da síndrome de Gilles de la Tourette, abordando os aspectos históricos, etiopatogênicos, neuropatológicos, semiológicos, clínicos e terapêuticos.

  18. Prevalence of Diagnosed Tourette Syndrome in Persons Aged 6-17 Years--United States, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is an inheritable, childhood-onset neurologic disorder marked by persistent multiple motor tics and at least one vocal tic. Tics are involuntary, repetitive, stereotypic movements or vocalizations that are usually sudden and rapid and often can be suppressed for short periods. The prevalence of TS is uncertain; the broad…

  19. Study of medication-free children with Tourette syndrome do not show imaging abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Signe Søndergaard; Debes, Nanette Mol; Simonsen, Helle Juhl

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Imaging studies of patients with Tourette's syndrome (TS) across different cohorts have shown alterations in gray and white matter in areas associated with the cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) pathways; however, no consistent findings have subsequently established a clear...

  20. Mother-child agreement on behavioral ratings in Tourette syndrome: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termine, Cristiano; Luoni, Chiara; Selvini, Claudia; Bandera, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Eddy, Clare M; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    In Tourette syndrome, motor and phonic tics are associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders. As proxy report instruments are commonly used to assess children with Tourette syndrome, we investigated the relationship between child and mother ratings of behavioral problems. We enrolled 28 children with Tourette syndrome (25 males; mean age, 13.9 years) and 61 gender- and age-matched healthy controls (55 males; mean age, 14.7 years). Clinicians completed measures of tic severity, and all children completed the Youth Self-Report version of the Child Behavior Checklist, while their mothers completed the Child Behavior Checklist. In the clinical group, Youth Self-Report scores were significantly lower than mothers' Child Behavior Checklist scores across the majority of subscales (especially affect and somatization). In contrast, for the control group, mother and child ratings only differed for the externalizing behavior subscales. Clinicians should be aware of these differences between self and mother ratings for specific behavioral problems in Tourette syndrome.

  1. Tourette's Disorder: Genetic Update, Neurological Correlates, and Evidence-Based Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, LeAdelle

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an update of the search for genetic markers related to Tourette's Disorder. The probable neurophysiology of the disorder is reviewed. Frequently prescribed medications are related to the probable biological bases of the disorder. Behavioral interventions and assessment tools are examined. It is concluded that evidence based…

  2. Case Study: Severe Self-Injurious Behavior in Comorbid Tourette's Disorder and OCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Korey K.; Baptista-Neto, Lourival; Beasley, Pamela J.; Lobis, Robert; Pravdova, Iva

    2004-01-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of severe self-injurious behavior in a 16-year-old adolescent with Tourette's disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment is described from initial presentation to the emergency department for severe self-inflicted oral lacerations through discharge from the inpatient psychiatric…

  3. Habituation of Premonitory Sensations during Exposure and Response Prevention Treatment in Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdellen, Cara W. J.; Hoogduin, Cees A. L.; Kato, Bernet S.; Keijsers, Ger P. J.; Cath, Danielle C.; Hoijtink, Herbert B.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to premonitory sensations and response prevention of tics (ER) has been shown to be a promising new treatment for Tourette's syndrome (TS). The present study tested the hypothesis that habituation to unpleasant premonitory sensations associated with the tic is an underlying mechanism of change in ER. Patients rated the severity of…

  4. An Investigation of Tic Suppression and the Rebound Effect in Tourette's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Amy L.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Himle, Michael; Omvig, Matthew; Trainor, Casey; Crosby, Ross

    2005-01-01

    Many patients, parents of children with Tourettes disorder, and professionals have suggested that following a period of suppression, tics will rebound to a rate that will exceed the average rate of occurrence. At present, there are no empirical data to support or refute such an effect. This experiment utilized an A-B-A design with replication to…

  5. Advances in the Behavior Analytic Treatment of Trichotillomania and Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himle, Michael B.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.

    2004-01-01

    Tourette's Syndrome (TS) and Trichotillomania (TTM) are both subsumed under a larger category of repetitive behavior disorders. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the most recent behavioral research on TS and TTM. A description of both disorders is provided along with the most recent research on their etiology and maintenance.…

  6. Social Cognition in Tourette's Syndrome: Intact Theory of Mind and Impaired Inhibitory Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Shelley; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Waller, Denise; Healey, Louise; Robertson, Mary M.

    2004-01-01

    Although associations between social cognition involving theory of mind and non-social executive skills have frequently been reported, dissociations in performance have also been found. The present study was designed to examine social and non-social cognition in uncomplicated Tourette Syndrome (TS). Adult TS participants without comorbid diagnoses…

  7. The Semantic Simon Effect in Tourette's Syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankins, D.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Georgiou-Karistianis, N.

    2006-01-01

    Core symptoms of Tourette's syndrome (TS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may be attributed to an impairment in inhibitory control. Neuropsychological studies have addressed inhibition in both disorders, but findings have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine cognitive inhibition, using a semantic Simon effect paradigm,…

  8. Local-Global Processing in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Comorbid Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankins, D.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Georgiou-Karistianis, N.

    2005-01-01

    Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies implicate attentional difficulties in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but results are inconsistent due possibly to sample heterogeneity and lack of control of comorbid disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome (TS). Nevertheless, it has been suggested that OCD symptomatology may be a result of…

  9. Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome in Childhood: A Guide for School Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Abbe L.; Carter, Alice S.

    1997-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome (GTS) is considered a neuropsychiatric condition characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. With some cases, a variety of neurocognitive, social, and emotional difficulties are present. Describes core features of GTS and highlights how symptoms and their features may interfere with school functioning. School…

  10. Neural Plasticity in Functional and Anatomical MRI Studies of Children with Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Eichele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tourette syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disorder with childhood onset characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. The typical clinical course of an attenuation of symptoms during adolescence in parallel with the emerging self-regulatory control during development suggests that plastic processes may play an important role in the development of tic symptoms.

  11. Do obsessional beliefs discriminate OCD without tic patients from OCD with tic and Tourette's syndrome patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anholt, G.E.; Cath, D.C.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; van Oppen, P.; Smit, J.H.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    There is considerable overlap in symptomatology between Tourette's syndrome (TS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Increased rates of tics are found in OCD and up to 60% obsessive-compulsive symptoms in TS. However, in OCD obsessive-compulsive symptoms are more often anxiety-related and, as a

  12. Fronto-striatal glutamate in children with Tourette's disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naaijen, Jilly; Forde, Natalie J.; Lythgoe, David J.; Akkermans, Sophie E. A.; Openneer, Thaira J. C.; Dietrich, Andrea; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Both Tourette's disorder (TD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been related to abnormalities in glutamatergic neurochemistry in the fronto-striatal circuitry. TD and ADHD often co-occur and the neural underpinnings of this co-occurrence have been insufficiently

  13. Tourette's Syndrome: Performance on Tests of Behavioural Inhibition, Working Memory and Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sarah; Channon, Shelley; Robertson, Mary M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with fronto-striatal dysfunction. There is debate as to the extent to which TS is associated with cognitive impairment. Some authors argue that any impairments seen are attributable to comorbid psychiatric symptomatology, whilst others have suggested that…

  14. Rare Copy Number Variants in NRXN1 and CNTN6 Increase Risk for Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Alden Y.; Yu, Dongmei; Davis, Lea K; Sul, Jae Hoon; Tsetsos, Fotis; Ramensky, Vasily; Zelaya, Ivette; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Osiecki, Lisa; Chen, Jason A.; McGrath, Lauren M; Illmann, Cornelia; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Grados, Marco A; Singer, Harvey S; Nöthen, Markus M.; Hebebrand, Johannes; King, Robert A; Dion, Yves; Rouleau, Guy A; Budman, Cathy L; Depienne, Christel; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Aschauer, Harald; Stamenkovic, Mara; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Lyon, Gholson J; McMahon, William M; Barta, Csaba; Tarnok, Zsanett; Nagy, Peter; Batterson, James R.; Rizzo, Renata; Cath, Danielle C.; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Berlin, Cheston; Malaty, Irene A.; Okun, Michael S.; Woods, Douglas W.; Rees, Elliott; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Knowles, James A; Posthuma, Danielle; Pauls, David L; Cox, Nancy J; Neale, Benjamin M; Freimer, Nelson B; Paschou, Peristera; Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Coppola, Giovanni; Bruun, Ruth D; Chouinard, Sylvain; Darrow, Sabrina M; Greenberg, Erica; Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Kurlan, Roger; Leckman, James F; Robertson, Mary M; Smit, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a model neuropsychiatric disorder thought to arise from abnormal development and/or maintenance of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits. TS is highly heritable, but its underlying genetic causes are still elusive, and no genome-wide significant loci have been

  15. Three Cases of Palatal Tics and Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzo, Renata; Cath, Danielle; Pavone, Piero; Tijssen, Marina; Robertson, Mary M.

    Five patients with palatal tics and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome have been previously reported. Little is known about the characteristics of palatal tics given that there are so few reports. On one hand, palatal tics may be rare. Alternatively, they may be less well recognized than repetitive eye

  16. Tourette Syndrome: School-Based Interventions for Tics and Associated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoklenis, Athanasios; Theodoridou, Zoe

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics that follow a fluctuating pattern of severity, intensity and frequency. TS is often associated with other conditions such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and learning difficulties. This complex phenotype affects the…

  17. Peer Victimization in Youth with Tourette Syndrome and Other Chronic Tic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Samuel H.; Conelea, Christine A.; Glew, Gwen M.; Woods, Douglas W.; Budman, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic tic disorders including Tourette syndrome have negative impact across multiple functional domains. We explored associations between peer victimization status and tic subtypes, premonitory urges, internalizing symptoms, explosive outbursts, and quality of life among youth with chronic tic disorders, as part of the internet-based omnibus…

  18. Repetitive behaviors in Tourette's syndrome and OCD with and without tics: What are the differences?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cath, D.C.; Spinhoven, P.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Landman, A.D.; Woerkom, T.C.A.M. van; Wetering, B.J.M. van de; Roos, R.A.C.; Rooijmans, H.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) share obsessive–compulsive phenomena. The aims of this study were to compare the OC symptom distribution between GTS and OCD and to investigate whether a subdivision of these phenomena into obsessions, compulsions and

  19. Tourette Syndrome and Stigma: A Place from Which Parents Advocate. Special Project in Sociology/Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Kelly

    This paper presents a historical background and definition of Tourette Syndrome (TS), a review of the literature, and a view of the TS person as stigmatized in society. Social processes are examined through the eyes of the TS individual, and the impact of education on the TS person is examined. TS is viewed as the presence of motor or vocal tics,…

  20. Tourette Syndrome: A Case for Establishing the Individual Needs of Children at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeni; Shrimpton, Bradley

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by multiple, involuntary, and repetitive motor and vocal tics. This paper addresses the educational needs of students with TS noting that, without proper intervention and appropriate learning experiences, these children often experience personal distress, reduced self-esteem, social…

  1. Parent and Patient Perceptions of Functional Impairment Due to Tourette Syndrome: Development of a Shortened Version of the Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfell, Kara S Francis; Snyder, Ryan R; Isaacs-Cloes, Kelly M; Garris, Jordan F; Roeckner, Alyssa R; Horn, Paul S; Guthrie, Michael D; Wu, Steve W; Gilbert, Donald L

    2017-07-01

    The Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale (CTIM) rates 37 problems in school, social, and home domains separately for tics and for comorbid diagnoses. However, a shorter version would be easier to implement in busy clinics. Using published data from 85 children with Tourette syndrome, 92 controls, and parents, factor analysis was used to generate a "mini-CTIM" composed of 12 items applied to tic and comorbid diagnoses. Child- and parent-rated mini-CTIM scores were compared and correlated across raters and accounting for clinician-rated tic severity and presence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The mini-CTIM achieved domain Cronbach alphas ranging from 0.71 to 0.94 and intra-item correlation coefficients ranging from 0.84 to 0.96. The resulting scale correlated with clinician-rated tic severity and reflected the presence of ADHD and OCD. The mini-CTIM appears promising as a practical assessment tool for tic- and non-tic-related impairment in children with Tourette syndrome.

  2. The analysis of a large Danish family supports the presence of a susceptibility locus for adenoma and colorectal cancer on chromosome 11q24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Eiberg, Hans; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer accounts for approximately 30 % of all colorectal cancers, but currently only 5 % of these families can be explained by highly penetrant, inherited mutations. In the remaining 25 % it is not possible to perform a gene test to identify the family members who would...... benefit from prophylactic screening. Consequently, all family members are asked to follow a screening program. The purpose of this study was to localize a new gene which causes colorectal cancer. We performed a linkage analysis using data from a SNP6.0 chip in one large family with 12 affected family...... areas on chromosome 2 and chromosome 11 with the highest possible LOD scores of 2.6. Two other studies have identified 11q24 as a candidate area for colorectal cancer susceptibility and this area is supported by our results....

  3. Tourette syndrome: a disorder of the social decision-making network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Roger L

    2018-02-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common neurodevelopmental disorder defined by characteristic involuntary movements, tics, with both motor and phonic components. Tourette syndrome is usually conceptualized as a basal ganglia disorder, with an emphasis on striatal dysfunction. While considerable evidence is consistent with these concepts, imaging data suggest diffuse functional and structural abnormalities in Tourette syndrome brain. Tourette syndrome exhibits features that are difficult to explain solely based on basal ganglia circuit dysfunctions. These features include the natural history of tic expression, with typical onset of tics around ages 5 to 7 years and exacerbation during the peri-pubertal years, marked sex disparity with higher male prevalence, and the characteristic distribution of tics. The latter are usually repetitive, somewhat stereotyped involuntary eye, facial and head movements, and phonations. A major functional role of eye, face, and head movements is social signalling. Prior work in social neuroscience identified a phylogenetically conserved network of sexually dimorphic subcortical nuclei, the Social Behaviour Network, mediating many social behaviours. Social behaviour network function is modulated developmentally by gonadal steroids and social behaviour network outputs are stereotyped sex and species specific behaviours. In 2011 O'Connell and Hofmann proposed that the social behaviour network interdigitates with the basal ganglia to form a greater network, the social decision-making network. The social decision-making network may have two functionally complementary limbs: the basal ganglia component responsible for evaluation of socially relevant stimuli and actions with the social behaviour network component responsible for the performance of social acts. Social decision-making network dysfunction can explain major features of the neurobiology of Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome may be a disorder of social communication resulting from

  4. An Empirical Examination of Symptom Substitution Associated with Behavior Therapy for Tourette's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Alan L.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Piacentini, John; Woods, Douglas W.; Walkup, John T.; Hatch, John P.; Villarreal, Robert; Scahill, Lawrence

    2018-01-01

    Over the past 6 decades, behavior therapy has been a major contributor to the development of evidence-based psychotherapy treatments. However, a longstanding concern with behavior therapy among many nonbehavioral clinicians has been the potential risk for symptom substitution. Few studies have been conducted to evaluate symptom substitution in response to behavioral treatments, largely due to measurement and definitional challenges associated with treated psychiatric symptoms. Given the overt motor and vocal tics associated with Tourette’s disorder, it presents an excellent opportunity to empirically evaluate the potential risk for symptom substitution associated with behavior therapy. The present study examined the possible presence of symptom substitution using 4 methods: (1) the onset of new tic symptoms; (2) the occurrence of adverse events; (3) change in tic medications; and (4) worsening of co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. Two hundred twenty-eight participants with Tourette’s disorder or persistent motor or vocal tic disorders were randomly assigned to receive behavioral therapy or supportive therapy for tics. Both therapies consisted of 8 sessions over 10 weeks. Results indicated that participants treated with behavior therapy were not more likely to have an onset of new tic symptoms, experience adverse events, increase tic medications, or have an exacerbation in co-occurring psychiatric symptoms relative to participants treated with supportive therapy. Further analysis suggested that the emergence of new tics was attributed with the normal waxing and waning nature of Tourette’s disorder. Findings provide empirical support to counter the longstanding concern of symptom substitution in response to behavior therapy for individuals with Tourette's Disorder. PMID:26763495

  5. Co-morbidities, social impact and quality of life in Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsamma eEapen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied co-morbidities as well as the social impact and Quality of Life (QoL in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person’s experiences, perceptions and interactions with the environment. Further, associated clinical features, co-morbidities and co-existing psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. The common co-morbidities in this regard include Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and disruptive behaviours, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, and co-existent problems include anxiety, depression and low self esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated co-morbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiralling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying and discrimination is considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related co-morbidities & other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long term outcomes is also warranted.

  6. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans

    2011-01-01

    done in all sampled individuals in the family. The nuclear central loop in the five generation family showed homozygosity for a 6-Mb telomeric region on 11p15, whereas all other linkage regions were excluded by calculation of logarithm of odds (LOD) for the SNP microarray data. A maximum LOD score of Z......Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive...

  7. Cross-Disorder Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest a Complex Genetic Relationship Between Tourette's Syndrome and OCD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Davis, Lea K.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Derks, Eske M.; Evans, Patrick; Edlund, Christopher K.; Crane, Jacquelyn; Osiecki, Lisa; Gallagher, Patience; Gerber, Gloria; Haddad, Stephen; Illmann, Cornelia; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Arepalli, Sampath; Barlassina, Cristina; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrio, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Black, Donald W.; Bloch, Michael H.; Brentani, Helena; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond D.; Cappi, Carolina; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Cook, Edwin H.; Cookson, M. R.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Cusi, Daniete; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Dion, Yves; Eapen, Valsama; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Gilbert, Donald L.; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Gruenblatt, Edna; Hardy, John; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Herrera, Luis D.; Hezel, Dianne M.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; Manunta, Paolo; Marconi, Maurizio; McCracken, James T.; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Moessner, Rainald; Moorjani, Priya; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Nurmi, Erika; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlo N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosario, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sabatti, Chiara; Salvi, Erika; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Service, Susan K.; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, Eric; Tischfield, Jay A.; Turiel, Maurizio; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Weale, Mike; Weiss, Robert; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Hounie, Ana G.; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Nicolini, Humberto; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cath, Danielle C.; McMahon, William; Posthuma, Danielle; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Routeau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Jenike, Michael A.; Heutink, Peter; Hanna, Gregory L.; Conti, David V.; Arnold, Paul D.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Stewart, Evelyn; Knowles, James A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    Objective: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identification of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. The

  8. Cross-disorder genome-wide analyses suggest a complex genetic relationship between Tourette's syndrome and OCD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Davis, Lea K.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Derks, Eske M.; Evans, Patrick; Edlund, Christopher K.; Crane, Jacquelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A.; Osiecki, Lisa; Gallagher, Patience; Gerber, Gloria; Haddad, Stephen; Illmann, Cornelia; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Arepalli, Sampath; Barlassina, Cristina; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrió, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Black, Donald W.; Bloch, Michael H.; Brentani, Helena; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond D.; Cappi, Carolina; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Cook, Edwin H.; Cookson, M. R.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Cusi, Daniele; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Dion, Yves; Eapen, Valsama; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Gilbert, Donald L.; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Hardy, John; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Herrera, Luis D.; Hezel, Dianne M.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; Manunta, Paolo; Marconi, Maurizio; McCracken, James T.; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C.; Moessner, Rainald; Moorjani, Priya; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Nurmi, Erika; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosário, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sabatti, Chiara; Salvi, Erika; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Service, Susan K.; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, Eric; Tischfield, Jay A.; Turiel, Maurizio; Valencia Duarte, Ana V.; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-Vanderweele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Weale, Mike; Weiss, Robert; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Hounie, Ana G.; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Nicolini, Humberto; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cath, Danielle C.; McMahon, William; Posthuma, Danielle; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Jenike, Michael A.; Heutink, Peter; Hanna, Gregory L.; Conti, David V.; Arnold, Paul D.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Knowles, James A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identification of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. The authors report a

  9. Cross-Disorder Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest a Complex Genetic Relationship Between Tourette's Syndrome and OCD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Neale, Benjamin M; Davis, Lea K; Gamazon, Eric R; Derks, Eske M; Evans, Patrick; Edlund, Christopher K; Crane, Jacquelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Osiecki, Lisa; Gallagher, Patience; Gerber, Gloria; Haddad, Stephen; Illmann, Cornelia; McGrath, Lauren M; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Arepalli, Sampath; Barlassina, Cristina; Barr, Cathy L; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrió, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Black, Donald W; Bloch, Michael H; Brentani, Helena; Bruun, Ruth D; Budman, Cathy L; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond D; Cappi, Carolina; Silgado, Julio C Cardona; Cavallini, Maria C; Chavira, Denise A; Chouinard, Sylvain; Cook, Edwin H; Cookson, M R; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Cusi, Daniele; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Dion, Yves; Eapen, Valsama; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Gilbert, Donald L; Girard, Simon L; Grabe, Hans J; Grados, Marco A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Hardy, John; Heiman, Gary A; Hemmings, Sian M J; Herrera, Luis D; Hezel, Dianne M; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L; King, Robert A; Konkashbaev, Anuar I; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; Manunta, Paolo; Marconi, Maurizio; McCracken, James T; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C; Moessner, Rainald; Moorjani, Priya; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L; Naarden, Allan L; Nurmi, Erika; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A; Pakstis, Andrew J; Pato, Michele T; Pato, Carlos N; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L; Renner, Tobias; Reus, Victor I; Richter, Margaret A; Riddle, Mark A; Robertson, Mary M; Romero, Roxana; Rosário, Maria C; Rosenberg, David; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sabatti, Chiara; Salvi, Erika; Sampaio, Aline S; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Service, Susan K; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S; Smit, Jan H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113700644; Stein, Dan J; Strengman, Eric; Tischfield, Jay A; Turiel, Maurizio; Valencia Duarte, Ana V; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Weale, Mike; Weiss, Robert; Wendland, Jens R; Westenberg, Herman G M; Shugart, Yin Yao; Hounie, Ana G; Miguel, Euripedes C; Nicolini, Humberto; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cath, Danielle C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194111423; McMahon, William; Posthuma, Danielle; Oostra, Ben A; Nestadt, Gerald; Rouleau, Guy A; Purcell, Shaun; Jenike, Michael A; Heutink, Peter; Hanna, Gregory L; Conti, David V; Arnold, Paul D; Freimer, Nelson B; Stewart, S Evelyn; Knowles, James A; Cox, Nancy J; Pauls, David L

    OBJECTIVE: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identification of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. The

  10. Cross-Disorder Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest a Complex Genetic Relationship Between Tourette's Syndrome and OCD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, D.M.; Mathews, C.A.; Scharf, J.M.; Neale, B.M.; Davis, L.K.; Gamazon, E.R.; Derks, E.M.; Evans, P.; Edlund, C.K.; Crane, J.; Osiecki, L.; Gallagher, P.; Gerber, G.; Haddad, S.; Illmann, C.; McGrath, L.M.; Mayerfeld, C.; Arepalli, S.; Barlassina, C.; Barr, C.L.; Bellodi, L.; Benarroch, F.; Berrio, G.B.; Bienvenu, O.J.; Black, D.W.; Bloch, M.H.; Brentani, H.; Bruun, R.D.; Budman, C.L.; Camarena, B.; Campbell, D.D.; Cappi, C.; Silgado, J.C.C.; Cavallini, M.C.; Chavira, D.A.; Chouinard, S.; Cook, E.H.; Cookson, M.R.; Coric, V.; Cullen, B.; Cusi, D.; Delorme, R.; Denys, D.; Dion, Y.; Eapen, V.; Egberts, K.; Falkai, P.; Fernandez, T.; Fournier, E.; Garrido, H.; Geller, D.; Gilbert, D.L.; Girard, S.L.; Grabe, H.J.; Grados, M.A.; Greenberg, B.D.; Gross-Tsur, V.; Grunblatt, E.; Hardy, J.; Heiman, G.A.; Hemmings, S.M.J.; Herrera, L.D.; Hezel, D.M.; Hoekstra, P.J.; Jankovic, J.; Kennedy, J.L.; King, R.A.; Konkashbaev, A.I.; Kremeyer, B.; Kurlan, R.; Lanzagorta, N.; Leboyer, M.; Leckman, J.F.; Lennertz, L.; Liu, C.Y.; Lochner, C.; Lowe, T.L.; Lupoli, S.; Macciardi, F.; Maier, W.; Manunta, P.; Marconi, M.; McCracken, J.T.; Restrepo, S.C.M.; Moessner, R.; Moorjani, P.; Morgan, J.; Muller, H.; Murphy, D.L.; Naarden, A.L.; Nurmi, E.; Ochoa, W.C.; Ophoff, R. A.; Pakstis, A.J.; Pato, M.T.; Pato, C.N.; Piacentini, J.; Pittenger, C.; Pollak, Y.; Smit, J.H.; Posthuma, D.; Cox, N.J.; Pauls, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identi fication of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. The

  11. A calendar savant with autism and Tourette syndrome. Response to treatment and thoughts on the interrelationships of these conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E C; Pribor, E F

    1993-06-01

    A case of a calendar savant with infantile autism and Tourette syndrome is presented. Pharmacotherapy and comorbidity issues are discussed in terms of the interrelationships of these conditions and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  12. Cross-disorder genome-wide analyses suggest a complex genetic relationship between Tourette's syndrome and OCD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Dongmei; Cusi, Daniele; Delorme, Richard; Denys, D.; Dion, Yves; Eapen, Valsama; Heutink, Peter; Cox, Nancy J; Pauls, David L

    OBJECTIVE: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identification of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. The

  13. Widespread abnormality of the γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic system in Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagic, Anto; Simmons, Janine M.; Mari, Zoltan; Bonne, Omer; Xu, Ben; Kazuba, Diane; Herscovitch, Peter; Carson, Richard E.; Murphy, Dennis L.; Drevets, Wayne C.; Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of the γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic system in Tourette syndrome may conceivably underlie the symptoms of motor disinhibition presenting as tics and psychiatric manifestations, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive–compulsive disorder. The purpose of this study was to identify a possible dysfunction of the γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic system in Tourette patients, especially involving the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits and the cerebellum. We studied 11 patients with Tourette syndrome and 11 healthy controls. Positron emission tomography procedure: after injection of 20 mCi of [11C]flumazenil, dynamic emission images of the brain were acquired. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained to provide an anatomical framework for the positron emission tomography data analysis. Images of binding potential were created using the two-step version of the simplified reference tissue model. The binding potential images then were spatially normalized, smoothed and compared between groups using statistical parametric mapping. We found decreased binding of GABAA receptors in Tourette patients bilaterally in the ventral striatum, globus pallidus, thalamus, amygdala and right insula. In addition, the GABAA receptor binding was increased in the bilateral substantia nigra, left periaqueductal grey, right posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral cerebellum. These results are consistent with the longstanding hypothesis that circuits involving the basal ganglia and thalamus are disinhibited in Tourette syndrome patients. In addition, the abnormalities in GABAA receptor binding in the insula and cerebellum appear particularly noteworthy based upon recent evidence implicating these structures in the generation of tics. PMID:22577221

  14. The Neural Circuits that Generate Tics in Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhishun; Maia, Tiago V.; Marsh, Rachel; Colibazzi, Tiziano; Gerber, Andrew; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study neural activity and connectivity within cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits and to reveal circuit-based neural mechanisms that govern tic generation in Tourette syndrome. Method We acquired fMRI data from 13 participants with Tourette syndrome and 21 controls during spontaneous or simulated tics. We used independent component analysis with hierarchical partner matching to isolate neural activity within functionally distinct regions of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits. We used Granger causality to investigate causal interactions among these regions. Results We found that the Tourette group exhibited stronger neural activity and interregional causality than controls throughout all portions of the motor pathway including sensorimotor cortex, putamen, pallidum, and substania nigra. Activity in these areas correlated positively with the severity of tic symptoms. Activity within the Tourette group was stronger during spontaneous tics than during voluntary tics in somatosensory and posterior parietal cortices, putamen, and amygdala/hippocampus complex, suggesting that activity in these regions may represent features of the premonitory urges that generate spontaneous tic behaviors. In contrast, activity was weaker in the Tourette group than in controls within portions of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits that exert top-down control over motor pathways (caudate and anterior cingulate cortex), and progressively less activity in these regions accompanied more severe tic symptoms, suggesting that faulty activity in these circuits may fail to control tic behaviors or the premonitory urges that generate them. Conclusions Our findings taken together suggest that tics are caused by the combined effects of excessive activity in motor pathways and reduced activation in control portions of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits. PMID:21955933

  15. The role of the autonomic nervous system in Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack eHawksley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a neurodevelopmental disorder, consisting of multiple involuntary movements (motor tics and one or more vocal (phonic tics. It affects up to one percent of children worldwide, of whom about one third continue to experience symptoms into adulthood. The central neural mechanisms of tic generation are not clearly understood, however recent neuroimaging investigations suggest impaired cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical activity during motor control. In the current manuscript, we will tackle the relatively under-investigated role of the peripheral autonomic nervous system, and its central influences, on tic activity. There is emerging evidence that both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity influences tic expression. Pharmacological treatments which act on sympathetic tone are often helpful: for example, Clonidine (an alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist is often used as first choice medication for treating TS in children due to its good tolerability profile and potential usefulness for co-morbid attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder. Clonidine suppresses sympathetic activity, reducing the triggering of motor tics. A general elevation of sympathetic tone is reported in patients with TS compared to healthy people, however this observation may reflect transient responses coupled to tic activity. Thus the presence of autonomic impairments in patients with TS remains unclear. Effect of autonomic afferent input to cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit will be discussed schematically. We additionally review how TS is affected by modulation of central autonomic control through biofeedback and Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS. Biofeedback training can enable a patient to gain voluntary control over covert physiological responses by making these responses explicit. Electrodermal biofeedback training to elicit a reduction in sympathetic tone has a demonstrated association with reduced tic frequency. VNS, achieved through an

  16. The role of the autonomic nervous system in Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawksley, Jack; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, consisting of multiple involuntary movements (motor tics) and one or more vocal (phonic) tics. It affects up to one percent of children worldwide, of whom about one third continue to experience symptoms into adulthood. The central neural mechanisms of tic generation are not clearly understood, however recent neuroimaging investigations suggest impaired cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical activity during motor control. In the current manuscript, we will tackle the relatively under-investigated role of the peripheral autonomic nervous system, and its central influences, on tic activity. There is emerging evidence that both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity influences tic expression. Pharmacological treatments which act on sympathetic tone are often helpful: for example, Clonidine (an alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist) is often used as first choice medication for treating TS in children due to its good tolerability profile and potential usefulness for co-morbid attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder. Clonidine suppresses sympathetic activity, reducing the triggering of motor tics. A general elevation of sympathetic tone is reported in patients with TS compared to healthy people, however this observation may reflect transient responses coupled to tic activity. Thus, the presence of autonomic impairments in patients with TS remains unclear. Effect of autonomic afferent input to cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit will be discussed schematically. We additionally review how TS is affected by modulation of central autonomic control through biofeedback and Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS). Biofeedback training can enable a patient to gain voluntary control over covert physiological responses by making these responses explicit. Electrodermal biofeedback training to elicit a reduction in sympathetic tone has a demonstrated association with reduced tic frequency. VNS, achieved through an implanted device

  17. The role of immune mechanisms in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Davide; Zis, Panagiotis; Buttiglione, Maura

    2015-08-18

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset tic disorder associated with abnormal development of brain networks involved in the sensory and motor processing. An involvement of immune mechanisms in its pathophysiology has been proposed. Animal models based on active immunization with bacterial or viral mimics, direct injection of cytokines or patients' serum anti-neuronal antibodies, and transgenic approaches replicated stereotyped behaviors observed in human TS. A crucial role of microglia in the neural-immune crosstalk within TS and related disorders has been proposed by animal models and confirmed by recent post mortem studies. With analogy to autism, genetic and early life environmental factors could foster the involvement of immune mechanisms to the abnormal developmental trajectories postulated in TS, as well as lead to systemic immune dysregulation in this condition. Clinical studies demonstrate an association between TS and immune responses to pathogens like group A Streptococcus (GAS), although their role as risk-modifiers is still undefined. Overactivity of immune responses at a systemic level is suggested by clinical studies exploring cytokine and immunoglobulin levels, immune cell subpopulations, and gene expression profiling of peripheral lymphocytes. The involvement of autoantibodies, on the other hand, remains uncertain and warrants more work using live cell-based approaches. Overall, a body of evidence supports the hypothesis that disease mechanisms in TS, like other neurodevelopmental illnesses (e.g. autism), may involve dysfunctional neural-immune cross-talk, ultimately leading to altered maturation of brain pathways controlling different behavioral domains and, possibly, differences in organising immune and stress responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prenatal risk factors for Tourette Syndrome: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tourette Syndrome (TS) appears to be an inherited disorder, although genetic abnormalities have been identified in less than 1% of patients, and the mode of inheritance is uncertain. Many studies have investigated environmental factors that might contribute to the onset and severity of tics and associated comorbidities such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). A systematic review and qualitative analysis were performed to provide a broad view of the association between pre- and perinatal factors and TS. Methods The Medline, Embase and PsycINFO databases were searched using terms specific to Tourette’s syndrome and keywords such as “pregnancy”, “prenatal”, “perinatal”, “birth” and “neonatal”. Studies were limited to studies on human subjects published in English or French through October 2012. Results 22 studies were included. Studies were of limited methodological quality, with most samples derived from specialty clinics, and most exposures ascertained retrospectively. The majority of the results for demographic factors of parents, including age, education, socioeconomic status, and marital status, revealed no significant association with the onset of TS, or the presence of comorbidity. Many factors were reported to be significantly associated with the onset of TS, the presence of comorbidity and symptom severity, but the most consistently reported factors were maternal smoking and low birth weight. Conclusions There are few studies evaluating the relationship between pre and perinatal events and TS, and existing studies have major limitations, including the use of clinic rather than epidemiologically derived samples, retrospective data collection on pre and perinatal events and multiple hypothesis testing without appropriate statistical correction. The mechanism by which prenatal and perinatal adversities could lead to TS onset or symptom severity is unknown, but may be related

  19. Temporal Course of the Tourette Syndrome Clinical Triad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Shprecher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tourette syndrome (TS is a disorder characterized by childhood onset of motor and phonic tics, often with improvement of tic symptoms by young adult years. The temporal course of tics and commonly comorbid behavioral symptoms is still not well characterized.Methods: In order to clarify the time course of tics and comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD in TS, we administered a brief survey regarding the course of symptoms at a single point in time to 53 TS patients aged 13–31 years.Results: Mean age (±SD at symptom onset was 7.9 (±3.6 years for tics, 7.9 (±3.5 for ADHD, and 9.2 (±5.0 for OCD. Age at peak symptom severity was 12.3 (±4.6 years for tics, 10.8 (±3.8 for ADHD, and 12.6 (±5.5 for OCD. Tics, ADHD, and OCD were reported to be no longer present in 32.0%, 22.8%, and 21.0% of subjects, respectively. Decline in symptom severity began at age 14.7 (±3.7 years for tics, 13.9 (±2.9 for ADHD, and 15.1 (±5.0 for OCD. Remission of symptoms occurred at age 17.4 (±3.8 years for tics, 17.4 (±1.3 for ADHD, and 15.6 (±2.3 for OCD. Discussion: Our data confirm and expand previously reported TS spectrum symptom milestones and may guide design of future research aimed at improving the course of TS.

  20. Dopaminergic activity in Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Damiaan; de Vries, Froukje; Cath, Danielle; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke; Veltman, Dick J; van der Doef, Thalia F; Boellaard, Ronald; Westenberg, Herman; van Balkom, Anton; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2013-11-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) both are neuropsychiatric disorders associated with abnormalities in dopamine neurotransmission. Aims of this study were to quantify striatal D2/3 receptor availability in TS and OCD, and to examine dopamine release and symptom severity changes in both disorders following amphetamine challenge. Changes in [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP(ND)) were assessed using positron emission tomography before and after administration of d-amphetamine (0.3 mg kg(-1)) in 12 TS patients without comorbid OCD, 12 OCD patients without comorbid tics, and 12 healthy controls. Main outcome measures were baseline striatal D2/3 receptor BP(ND) and change in BP(ND) following amphetamine as a measure of dopamine release. Voxel-based analysis revealed significantly decreased baseline [(11)C]raclopride BP(ND) in bilateral putamen of both patient groups vs. healthy controls, differences being more pronounced in the TS than in the OCD group. Changes in BP(ND) following amphetamine were not significantly different between groups. Following amphetamine administration, tic severity increased in the TS group, which correlated with BP(ND) changes in right ventral striatum. Symptom severity in the OCD group did not change significantly following amphetamine challenge and was not associated with changes in BP(ND). This study provides evidence for decreased striatal D2/3 receptor availability in TS and OCD, presumably reflecting higher endogenous dopamine levels in both disorders. In addition, it provides the first direct evidence that ventral striatal dopamine release is related to the pathophysiology of tics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  1. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    -deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1113 participants from the Tourette International...... Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR = 1.......72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR = 2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR = 1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR = 1...

  2. Sifting through genomes with iterative-sequence clustering produces a large, phylogenetically diverse protein-family resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, Thomas J; Jospin, Guillaume; Wu, Dongying; Langille, Morgan G I; Pollard, Katherine S; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2012-10-13

    New computational resources are needed to manage the increasing volume of biological data from genome sequencing projects. One fundamental challenge is the ability to maintain a complete and current catalog of protein diversity. We developed a new approach for the identification of protein families that focuses on the rapid discovery of homologous protein sequences. We implemented fully automated and high-throughput procedures to de novo cluster proteins into families based upon global alignment similarity. Our approach employs an iterative clustering strategy in which homologs of known families are sifted out of the search for new families. The resulting reduction in computational complexity enables us to rapidly identify novel protein families found in new genomes and to perform efficient, automated updates that keep pace with genome sequencing. We refer to protein families identified through this approach as "Sifting Families," or SFams. Our analysis of ~10.5 million protein sequences from 2,928 genomes identified 436,360 SFams, many of which are not represented in other protein family databases. We validated the quality of SFam clustering through statistical as well as network topology-based analyses. We describe the rapid identification of SFams and demonstrate how they can be used to annotate genomes and metagenomes. The SFam database catalogs protein-family quality metrics, multiple sequence alignments, hidden Markov models, and phylogenetic trees. Our source code and database are publicly available and will be subject to frequent updates (http://edhar.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/sifting_families/).

  3. Embodying Emotional Disorders: New Hypotheses about Possible Emotional Consequences of Motor Disorders in Parkinson's Disease and Tourette's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mermillod, Martial; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Jalenques, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Niedenthal, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS) lead to important motor disorders among patients such as possible facial amimia in PD and tics in Tourette's syndrome. Under the grounded cognition framework that shows the importance of motor embodiment in emotional feeling (Niedenthal, 2007), both types of pathology with motor symptoms should be sufficient to induce potential impairments for these patients when recognizing emotional facial expressions (EFE). In this opinion paper, we des...

  4. A personal 35 year perspective on Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: prevalence, phenomenology, comorbidities, and coexistent psychopathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    This Series is a personal narrative of my experience with patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and covers its definition and history since the first description in 1825. Controversy entered the prevalence debate early. Although originally considered very rare, in the 1980s, Tourette's syndrome was reported to be common. However, Tourette's syndrome has been shown to occur at a prevalence of about 0·85% to 1%. Tourette's syndrome is more common in the male population, more prominent during childhood, and usually improves, but does not disappear with age. Tourette's syndrome is considered less common in people of sub-Saharan black African, African-American, and American Hispanic ethnic origin. The phenomenology is similar worldwide, indicating a biological basis. The hallmark characteristics are multiple motor and one or more vocal/phonic tics. Other associated features include premonitory urges, a waxing and waning course, and to a much lesser degree, coprolalia. Comorbid disorders are common and are suggested to include obsessive-compulsive disorder and behaviours, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autistic spectrum disorder. Coexistent psychopathologies are suggested to include depression and conduct and personality disorders. Importantly, I argue that Tourette's syndrome is not a unitary condition. Finally, I offer suggestions for future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased risk of epilepsy in children with Tourette syndrome: A population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lee Chin; Huang, Hui-Ling; Weng, Wen-Chin; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Yin, Yun-Ju; Chen, Hong-An; Lee, Wang-Tso; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The association between epilepsy and Tourette syndrome has rarely been investigated. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed a dataset of 1,000,000 randomly sampled individuals from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the risk of epilepsy in children with Tourette syndrome. The study cohort consisted of 1062 patients with Tourette syndrome aged ≤ 18 years, and the control group consisted of three times the number of age- and sex-matched patients without Tourette syndrome, who were insurants, from the same database during the same period. The Tourette syndrome group had an 18.38-fold increased risk of epilepsy than the control group [hazard ratio=18.38, 95% confidence interval (CI)=8.26-40.92; PTourette syndrome group with comorbidities remained high (hazard ratio=16.27, 95% CI=6.26-18.46; PTourette syndrome is associated with a higher risk of epilepsy. A close follow-up of children with Tourette syndrome for the development of epilepsy is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Differences in 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPET perfusion imaging between Tourette's syndrome and chronic tic disorder in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, N.-T.; Lee, B.-F.; Chang, Y.-C.; Huang, C.-C.; Wang, S.-T.

    2001-01-01

    Early differential diagnosis between Tourette's syndrome and chronic tic disorder is difficult but important because both the outcome and the treatment of these two childhood-onset diseases are distinct. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) perfusion imaging in distinguishing the two diseases, and characterized their different cerebral perfusion patterns. Twenty-seven children with Tourette's syndrome and 11 with chronic tic disorder (mean age 9.5 and 8.6 years, respectively) underwent brain SPET with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO). Visual interpretation and semi-quantitative analysis of SPET images were performed. On visual interpretation, 22 of 27 (82%) of the Tourette's syndrome group had lesions characterized by decreased perfusion. The left hemisphere was more frequently involved. None of the children with chronic tic disorder had a visible abnormality. Semi-quantitative analysis showed that, compared with children with chronic tic disorder, children with Tourette's syndrome had significantly lower perfusion in the left lateral temporal area and asymmetric perfusion in the dorsolateral frontal, lateral and medial temporal areas. In conclusion, using the visual approach, brain SPET perfusion imaging is sensitive and specific in differentiating Tourette's syndrome and chronic tic disorder. The perfusion difference between the two groups, demonstrated by semi-quantitative analysis, may be related more to the co-morbidity in Tourette's syndrome than to tics per se. (orig.)

  7. Sifting through genomes with iterative-sequence clustering produces a large, phylogenetically diverse protein-family resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpton Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New computational resources are needed to manage the increasing volume of biological data from genome sequencing projects. One fundamental challenge is the ability to maintain a complete and current catalog of protein diversity. We developed a new approach for the identification of protein families that focuses on the rapid discovery of homologous protein sequences. Results We implemented fully automated and high-throughput procedures to de novo cluster proteins into families based upon global alignment similarity. Our approach employs an iterative clustering strategy in which homologs of known families are sifted out of the search for new families. The resulting reduction in computational complexity enables us to rapidly identify novel protein families found in new genomes and to perform efficient, automated updates that keep pace with genome sequencing. We refer to protein families identified through this approach as “Sifting Families,” or SFams. Our analysis of ~10.5 million protein sequences from 2,928 genomes identified 436,360 SFams, many of which are not represented in other protein family databases. We validated the quality of SFam clustering through statistical as well as network topology–based analyses. Conclusions We describe the rapid identification of SFams and demonstrate how they can be used to annotate genomes and metagenomes. The SFam database catalogs protein-family quality metrics, multiple sequence alignments, hidden Markov models, and phylogenetic trees. Our source code and database are publicly available and will be subject to frequent updates (http://edhar.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/sifting_families/.

  8. Genetic heterogeneity in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy; exclusion of the EVR1 locus on chromosome 11q in a large autosomal dominant pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamashmus, M A; Downey, L M; Inglehearn, C F; Gupta, S R; Mansfield, D C

    2000-04-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is associated with mutations in the Norrie disease gene in X linked pedigrees and with linkage to the EVR1 locus at 11q13 in autosomal dominant cases. A large autosomal dominant FEVR family was studied, both clinically and by linkage analysis, to determine whether it differed from the known forms of FEVR. Affected members and obligate gene carriers from this family were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and in some cases fluorescein angiography. Patient DNAs were genotyped for markers at the EVR1 locus on chromosome 11q13. The clinical evaluation in this family is consistent with previous descriptions of FEVR pedigrees, but linkage analysis proves that it has a form of FEVR genetically distinct from the EVR1 locus on 11q. This proves that there are at least three different loci associated with comparable FEVR phenotypes, a situation similar to that existing for many forms of retinal degeneration.

  9. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Y Lai

    Full Text Available Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the "train-the-trainer" workshop (TTT for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled "Happy Family Kitchen Project" (HFK under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers' competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women. It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees' reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a

  10. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Agnes Y; Mui, Moses W; Wan, Alice; Stewart, Sunita M; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai-Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the "train-the-trainer" workshop (TTT) for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled "Happy Family Kitchen Project" (HFK) under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers' competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women). It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees' reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees) and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a practical example

  11. CONFIRMATION OF X-LINKED INHERITANCE AND PROVISIONAL MAPPING OF THE KERATOSIS FOLLICULARIS SPINULOSA DECALVANS GENE ON XP IN A LARGE DUTCH FAMILY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; NELEN, M; VANZANDVOORT, PM; VANOSCH, LDM; ORANJE, AP; WITTEBOLPOST, D; VANOOST, BA

    In a large Dutch family with keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD, MIM 308800), DNA linkage analysis was performed in order to locate the gene. Pedigree analysis and lod score calculation confirmed X-linked inheritance and revealed significant linkage to DNA markers on Xp. A maximum lod

  12. Tourette syndrome and comorbid early-onset schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbeshian, Jacob; Peng, Chun-Zi; Burd, Larry

    2009-12-01

    A study of the shared phenomenology between Tourette syndrome (TS) and schizophrenia. An illustrative case report is presented. We used a chart review of 399 clinically ascertained patients with TS to identify 10 cases meeting criteria for schizophrenia. From our 10 patients, salient clinical characteristics were then tabulated. We then extracted similar clinical characteristics from a previously published series of patients with comorbid TS and schizophrenia in order to combine cases and allow for a comparison between childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS), adolescent-onset schizophrenia (AdolOS), and adult-onset schizophrenia (AduOS) cases in these groups. We found 10 cases of schizophrenia (all were males) in the 399 TS patients for a prevalence rate of 2.5% (95% CI 0.96-4.04). Mean age of tic onset for TS diagnostic criteria ranged from 2-14 years with a mean of 8.2 years. The mean age of diagnosis for schizophrenia was 14.2 (range 9-23 years). We found six cases of schizophrenia with onset of positive psychotic symptoms by 13 years of age, two cases with onset after 13 years of age and before 18 years of age, and two cases with onset after 18 years of age. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was present at a higher rate (70%) than one would expect in a clinically ascertained group of patients with TS. Comparison between COS, AdolOS and AduOS in our pooled cases noted a sex bias skewed toward males. Catatonic symptoms may be more likely in child or adolescent onset cases and negative symptoms more likely in AduOS cases. The 2.5% prevalence of schizophrenia in our TS sample exceeds the 1% expected rate of schizophrenia in the general population (chi-square=9.14; P=.0025). The six cases of COS (before 13 years of age) exceeds the expected rate of 1-2 per 100,000 (chi-square=4499; P=.0001). The 752-fold increase in observed rates of comorbid TS and COS over expected rates suggests a role for unknown common underlying etiologic factors. Based on clinical features

  13. Moderators and predictors of response to behavior therapy for tics in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G; Woods, Douglas W; Piacentini, John; Wilhelm, Sabine; Peterson, Alan L; Katsovich, Lily; Dziura, James; Walkup, John T; Scahill, Lawrence

    2017-03-14

    To examine moderators and predictors of response to behavior therapy for tics in children and adults with Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorders. Data from 2 10-week, multisite studies (1 in children and 1 in adults; total n = 248) comparing comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) to psychoeducation and supportive therapy (PST) were combined for moderator analyses. Participants (177 male, 71 female) had a mean age of 21.5 ± 13.9 years (range 9-69). Demographic and clinical characteristics, baseline tic-suppressing medication, and co-occurring psychiatric disorders were tested as potential moderators for CBIT vs PST or predictors of outcome regardless of treatment assignment. Main outcomes measures were the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale Total Tic score and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement score assessed by masked evaluators. The presence of tic medication significantly moderated response to CBIT vs PST ( p = 0.01). Participants showed tic reduction after CBIT regardless of tic medication status, but only participants receiving tic medication showed reduction of tics after PST. Co-occurring psychiatric disorders, age, sex, family functioning, tic characteristics, and treatment expectancy did not moderate response. Across both treatments, greater tic severity ( p = 0.005) and positive participant expectancy ( p = 0.01) predicted greater tic improvement. Anxiety disorders ( p = 0.042) and premonitory urge severity ( p = 0.005) predicted lower tic reduction. Presence of co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or anxiety disorders did not moderate response to CBIT. Although participants on tic medication showed improvement after CBIT, the difference between CBIT and PST was greater for participants who were not on tic-suppressing medication. The child and adult CBIT studies are listed on clinical trials.gov (NCT00218777 and NCT00231985, respectively). This study provides Class I evidence that

  14. When One Does Not Want to Be Like Others. The Basis of the Sense of Control among Conservative Laestadian Mothers with Large Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Pesälä

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Large families are the most characteristic feature of the Conservative Laestadian revivalist movement. In this research project belonging to the ? eld of psychology my aim is to describe the facts on which the sense of control of the Laestadian mothers with large families is based. My research method is a qualitative contents analysis. The results indicate that the mothers personal faith is the most important element in their sense of control. The values based on the Conservative Laestadian beliefs give a clear and safe structure for life. The most important role of the spouse is to support his wife emotionally, socially and spiritually. Behind the active parenthood of the mothers are the life management skills acquired in their families of origin as well as the experience acquired from motherhood. Family members share both mental and physical responsibilities, consequently supporting the mother. The mothers did not experience that they should not behave according to the family planning practises characteristic of our time. They do not want to be like others.

  15. Application of a sensitive collection heuristic for very large protein families: Evolutionary relationship between adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL and classic mammalian lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berezovsky Igor

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manually finding subtle yet statistically significant links to distantly related homologues becomes practically impossible for very populated protein families due to the sheer number of similarity searches to be invoked and analyzed. The unclear evolutionary relationship between classical mammalian lipases and the recently discovered human adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL; a patatin family member is an exemplary case for such a problem. Results We describe an unsupervised, sensitive sequence segment collection heuristic suitable for assembling very large protein families. It is based on fan-like expanding, iterative database searches. To prevent inclusion of unrelated hits, additional criteria are introduced: minimal alignment length and overlap with starting sequence segments, finding starting sequences in reciprocal searches, automated filtering for compositional bias and repetitive patterns. This heuristic was implemented as FAMILYSEARCHER in the ANNIE sequence analysis environment and applied to search for protein links between the classical lipase family and the patatin-like group. Conclusion The FAMILYSEARCHER is an efficient tool for tracing distant evolutionary relationships involving large protein families. Although classical lipases and ATGL have no obvious sequence similarity and differ with regard to fold and catalytic mechanism, homology links detected with FAMILYSEARCHER show that they are evolutionarily related. The conserved sequence parts can be narrowed down to an ancestral core module consisting of three β-strands, one α-helix and a turn containing the typical nucleophilic serine. Moreover, this ancestral module also appears in numerous enzymes with various substrate specificities, but that critically rely on nucleophilic attack mechanisms.

  16. Only male matrilineal relatives with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in a large Chinese family carrying the mitochondrial DNA G11778A mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jia; Li Ronghua; Tong Yi; Hu Yongwu; Zhou Xiangtian; Qian Yaping; Lu Fan; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    We report here the characterization of a five-generation large Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Very strikingly, six affected individuals of 38 matrilineal relatives (17 females/21 males) are exclusively males in this Chinese family. These matrilineal relatives in this family exhibited late-onset/progressive visual impairment with a wide range of severity, ranging from blindness to normal vision. The age of onset in visual impairment varies from 17 to 30 years. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome in this pedigree revealed the presence of the G11778A mutation in ND4 gene and 29 other variants. This mitochondrial genome belongs to the Southern Chinese haplogroup B5b. We showed that the G11778A mutation is present at near homoplasmy in matrilineal relatives of this Chinese family but not in 164 Chinese controls. Incomplete penetrance of LHON in this family indicates the involvement of modulatory factors in the phenotypic expression of visual dysfunction associated with the G11778A mutation. However, none of other mtDNA variants are evolutionarily conserved and implicated to have significantly functional consequence. Thus, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) seem to account for the penetrance and phenotypic variability of LHON in this Chinese family carrying the G11778A mutation

  17. A novel RUNX2 missense mutation predicted to disrupt DNA binding causes cleidocranial dysplasia in a large Chinese family with hyperplastic nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoqin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by hypoplastic or absent clavicles, large fontanels, dental dysplasia, and delayed skeletal development. The purpose of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of Chinese family with CCD. Methods Here, a large Chinese family with CCD and hyperplastic nails was recruited. The clinical features displayed a significant intrafamilial variation. We sequenced the coding region of the RUNX2 gene for the mutation and phenotype analysis. Results The family carries a c.T407C (p.L136P mutation in the DNA- and CBFβ-binding Runt domain of RUNX2. Based on the crystal structure, we predict this novel missense mutation is likely to disrupt DNA binding by RUNX2, and at least locally affect the Runt domain structure. Conclusion A novel missense mutation was identified in a large Chinese family with CCD with hyperplastic nails. This report further extends the mutation spectrum and clinical features of CCD. The identification of this mutation will facilitate prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  18. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part IV: deep brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R; Cath, Danielle C; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2011-01-01

    Ten years ago deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been introduced as an alternative and promising treatment option for patients suffering from severe Tourette syndrome (TS). It seemed timely to develop a European guideline on DBS by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette......, randomized controlled studies including a larger number of patients are still lacking. Although persistent serious adverse effects (AEs) have hardly been reported, surgery-related (e.g., bleeding, infection) as well as stimulation-related AEs (e.g., sedation, anxiety, altered mood, changes in sexual function......) may occur. At present time, DBS in TS is still in its infancy. Due to both different legality and practical facilities in different European countries these guidelines, therefore, have to be understood as recommendations of experts. However, among the ESSTS working group on DBS in TS there is general...

  19. "I swear it is Tourette's!": On functional coprolalia and other tic-like vocalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos; Edwards, Mark J; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten

    2016-12-30

    Coprolalia in neuropsychiatry is typically associated with tic disorders, in particular Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. To date, there has been no report of functional coprolalia. Here, we provide the clinical characteristics of 13 adolescent and adult patients with coprolalic and other functional tic-like complex vocalizations who, on the basis of these symptoms, were misdiagnosed with a primary tic disorder, most commonly Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We describe similarities and highlight the differences from primary tic disorders in order to provide a pragmatic list of clinical clues that will facilitate correct diagnostic labeling and thereby treatment. Finally, we emphasize that the distinction between a primary and a functional tic disorder should rely on a combination of neuropsychiatric symptoms and signs and not on the presence of single, however striking, abnormal behaviors, such as coprolalia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Tourette's: syndrome, disorder or spectrum? Classificatory challenges and an appraisal of the DSM criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary May; Eapen, Valsamma

    2014-10-01

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) was released in May 2013 after 14 years of development and almost two decades after the last edition DSM-IV was published in 1994. We review the DSM journey with regards to Tourette Syndrome from the original publication of DSM 1 in 1952 till date. In terms of changes in DSM 5, the major shift has come in the placement of Tourette Syndrome under the 'Neurodevelopmental Disorders' alongside other disorders with a developmental origin. This review provides an overview of the changes in DSM-5 highlighting key points for clinical practice and research along with a snap shot of the current use of DSM as a classificatory system in different parts of the world and suggestions for improving the subtyping and the diagnostic confidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comorbid behavioural problems in Tourette's syndrome are positively correlated with the severity of tic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Leung, Kai Man; Liu, Po-zi; Zhou, Ming; Su, Lin-yan

    2006-01-01

    We studied the comorbid behavioural and mood problems in children with non-psychiatric Tourette's syndrome (TS) and their relationship with severity of tic disorder. Sixty-nine TS children and 69 healthy controls were assessed by Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS). The relationships between behavioural problems and severity of tic symptoms were analysed statistically by comparison, correlation and multiple linear regression. Tourette's syndrome patients scored significantly lower (ptic symptoms is positively correlated with the severity of overall impairment in school and social competence. When the behavioural and mood problems commonly associated with TS were studied in detail, we found that delinquent behaviour, thought problems, attention problems, aggressive behaviour and externalizing are positively correlated with severity of tic symptoms. The findings indicated that children with TS-only also had a broad range of behavioural problems, and some of these were related to the severity of tic symptoms.

  2. Increased beta rhythm as an indicator of inhibitory mechanisms in tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niccolai, Valentina; van Dijk, Hanneke; Franzkowiak, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitory oscillatory mechanisms subserving tic compensation have been put forward in Tourette syndrome. Modulation of the beta rhythm (15-25 Hz) as the well-established oscillatory movement execution-inhibition indicator was tested during a cognitive-motor task in patients with Tour......BACKGROUND: Inhibitory oscillatory mechanisms subserving tic compensation have been put forward in Tourette syndrome. Modulation of the beta rhythm (15-25 Hz) as the well-established oscillatory movement execution-inhibition indicator was tested during a cognitive-motor task in patients...... in parieto-occipital brain regions contralaterally to the response hand. Average beta power and power gain correlated negatively with tic severity. CONCLUSIONS: Increased motor inhibitory as well as visuomotor attentional processes are likely to subserve tic compensation. Correlational results suggest...... that stronger inhibitory compensation accompanies less tic severity. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society....

  3. Mortality risk in a nationwide cohort of individuals with tic disorders and with tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sandra M; Dalsgaard, Søren; Mortensen, Preben B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated mortality risk in individuals with tic disorders. METHODS: We thus measured the risk of premature death in individuals with tic disorders and with Tourette syndrome in a prospective cohort study with 80 million person-years of follow-up. We estimated...... mortality rate ratios and adjusted for calendar year, age, sex, urbanicity, maternal and paternal age, and psychiatric disorders to compare individuals with and without tic disorders. RESULTS: The risk of premature death was higher among individuals with tic disorders (mortality rate ratio, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.......49-2.66) and with Tourette syndrome (mortality rate ratio, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.11-2.28) compared with controls. After the exclusion of individuals with comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and substance abuse, tic disorder remained associated with increased mortality risk (mortality...

  4. Olanzapine treatment for tics in an adult woman with severe tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wen-Juh

    2012-12-01

    Olanzapine had been reported to be effective in the control of tics in a few adult female patients who had a short follow-up period. The author reports the successful outcome of long-term olanzapine treatment in an adult woman with severe Tourette syndrome. A 33-year-old woman who had severe motor and vocal tics (Modified Rush Videotape Rating Scale: 17/20) showed an excellent response to olanzapine 10 mg/day within 2 months. Her tic symptoms were well controlled with gradual reduction of her dose of olanzapine to 2.5 mg/day during the following 8 years. She was symptom-free without medications in the past 2 years. In addition, she had a normal menstrual cycle and became pregnant during the period of olanzapine treatment. Olanzapine may be the drug of first choice for treating severe Tourette syndrome in pubescent female adolescents and young women who wish to have children.

  5. [Tourette syndrome and reading disorder in a boy with left parietofrontal tract disruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Fernández-Mayoralas, D; Fernández-Jaén, A; Gómez Herrera, J J; Jiménez de la Peña, M

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a nine-year-old boy with Tourette syndrome and reading disorder with a history of a severe infectious process in the late neonatal period. Brain MRI showed a left parietal malacotic cavity and diffusion tensor imaging and tractography showed a striking disruption of the white matter bundle that joins the left parietal region with the ipsilateral frontal region with involvement of the left superior longitudinal fasciculus and of the left arcuate fasciculus. Although Tourette syndrome and reading disorder are fundamentally hereditary neuropsychiatric disorders, they can also occur secondary to cerebral alterations like those existing in this boy. The introduction of modern neuroimaging techniques in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders (or the risk of developing them) can be very useful in the diagnosis and prognosis in the future. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Brown, Lawrence W.; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Coffey, Barbara J.; de Bruijn, Sebastian F. T. M.; Elzerman, Lonneke; Garcia-Delgar, Blanca; Gilbert, Donald L.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Hagstrøm, Julie; Hedderly, Tammy; Heyman, Isobel; Hong, Hyun Ju; Huyser, Chaim; Ibanez-Gomez, Laura; Kim, Young Key; Kim, Young-Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kook, Sodahm; Kuperman, Samuel; Lamerz, Andreas; Leventhal, Bennett; Ludolph, Andrea G.; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Maras, Athanasios; Messchendorp, Marieke D.; Mir, Pablo; Morer, Astrid; Münchau, Alexander; Murphy, Tara L.; Openneer, Thaïra J. C.; Plessen, Kerstin J.; Rath, Judith J. G.; Roessner, Veit; Fründt, Odette; Shin, Eun-Young; Sival, Deborah A.; Song, Dong-Ho; Song, Jungeun; Stolte, Anne-Marie; Tübing, Jennifer; van den Ban, Els; Visscher, Frank; Wanderer, Sina; Woods, Martin; Zinner, Samuel H.; State, Matthew W.; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Dietrich, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Pre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention–deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1,113 participants from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR=1.72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR=2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR=1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR=1.46) and severity (b=2.27) of co-occurring OCD and also to ADHD severity (b=1.09). Delivery complications were only related to co-occurring OCD (OR=1.49). We conclude that early exposure to adverse situations during pregnancy is related to the presence of chronic tic disorders. Exposure at a later stage, at birth or during the first weeks of life, appears to be associated with co-occurring OCD and ADHD. PMID:27494079

  7. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Fernandez, Thomas V; Brown, Lawrence W; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Coffey, Barbara J; de Bruijn, Sebastian F T M; Elzerman, Lonneke; Garcia-Delgar, Blanca; Gilbert, Donald L; Grice, Dorothy E; Hagstrøm, Julie; Hedderly, Tammy; Heyman, Isobel; Hong, Hyun Ju; Huyser, Chaim; Ibanez-Gomez, Laura; Kim, Young Key; Kim, Young-Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kook, Sodahm; Kuperman, Samuel; Lamerz, Andreas; Leventhal, Bennett; Ludolph, Andrea G; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Maras, Athanasios; Messchendorp, Marieke D; Mir, Pablo; Morer, Astrid; Münchau, Alexander; Murphy, Tara L; Openneer, Thaïra J C; Plessen, Kerstin J; Rath, Judith J G; Roessner, Veit; Fründt, Odette; Shin, Eun-Young; Sival, Deborah A; Song, Dong-Ho; Song, Jungeun; Stolte, Anne-Marie; Tübing, Jennifer; van den Ban, Els; Visscher, Frank; Wanderer, Sina; Woods, Martin; Zinner, Samuel H; State, Matthew W; Heiman, Gary A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Dietrich, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Pre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1113 participants from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR = 1.72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR = 2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR = 1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR = 1.46) and severity (b = 2.27) of co-occurring OCD and also to ADHD severity (b = 1.09). Delivery complications were only related to co-occurring OCD (OR = 1.49). We conclude that early exposure to adverse situations during pregnancy is related to the presence of chronic tic disorders. Exposure at a later stage, at birth or during the first weeks of life, appears to be associated with co-occurring OCD and ADHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette Syndrome: is there a relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conceição do Rosário

    Full Text Available The authors describe the main characteristics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, the fourth most frequent psychiatric disease, and Tourette Syndrome. Considered completely separate disorders, there is growing scientific evidence that there is a connection between them. The authors present clinical, genetic and neuroimaging data reinforcing this idea, and call attention to the importance of research in this area, as they believe that the definition of more homogenous subgroups will facilitate the identification of biological markers and predictors of treatment response.

  9. Tourette's syndrome: from demonic possession and psychoanalysis to the discovery of gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M.B. Germiniani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we make a brief historical review of the hypothesis concerning the etiology of Tourette's syndrome (TS, focusing on varying trends over time: at first, its presumed relation to witchcraft and demonic possessions, followed by the psychoanalytical theory, which attributed TS to a masturbatory equivalent. Then, progressing to modern time, to the immunological theory and finally the advent of genetics and their role in the etiology of TS.

  10. Tiapride: Therapeutic possibilities of its use in narcology, gerontopsychiatry, and in the treatment of Tourette's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Nikolaevich Basov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review deals with the evaluation of the efficacy and safety of tiapride used in the treatment of addictions of alcohol and psychoactive substances, such as opiate and heroin, vascular dementia with the signs of acute psychic confusion and Tourette's syndrome. The spectrum of neurochemical activity and mechanism of action of tiapride and the possibility of its combination with other drugs to enhance the therapeutic efficacy in the above disorders are described.

  11. Electrophysiological Correlates of Performance Monitoring in Children with Tourette Syndrome. A developmental perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Eichele, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with childhood onset, characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Typically, tic symptoms attenuate during adolescence in parallel with the emerging self-regulatory control during brain development. The voluntary control over thought and action provides the ability to withhold unwanted behaviour and an association between cognitive control and tic control has been suggested. This attenuation of tic symptoms also suggests that neuroplast...

  12. [From tic disorders to Tourette syndrome: current data, comorbidities, and therapeutic approach in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourneret, P; Desombre, H; Broussolle, E

    2014-06-01

    Motor tics are frequently observed in children during development. Usually transient and benign, they can become chronic over time, join various morbid disorders (vocal tics, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorders) and move toward genuine Tourette syndrome. In this case, it will be necessary to prevent impacts - mainly in terms of quality of life and emotional and relational problems - using a global therapeutic strategy combining psychoeducational approaches with appropriate medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Using a wearable near-infrared spectroscopy device in children with Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Pou-Leng; Li, Ting-Yi; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2018-02-01

    1. Background Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, stereotyped, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) can assess brain function non-invasively by detecting changes in blood hemoglobin concentrations associated with neural activity with tasks like Posner's paradigm (concerning response inhibition and attention shifts). 2. Objective To develop a possible noninvasive objective neuroimaging protocol with a wearable wireless device for assessment of brain activities in children with Tourette syndrome. 3. Method Children aged 6-15 years, with TS or healthy control, received functional NIRS (task-based) with the Posner paradigm after informed consent and neuropsychiatric tests (including WISC-IV test, SNAP-IV rating scale, Yale Global Tic Severity Scale Score). Behavioral data (reaction time and error rates (omission, anticipation, orientation) and NIRS data for neural changes by changes in oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin levels were recorded and statistically analyzed using the SPSS software. 4. Results 20 subjects were included, 13 male and 7 female (mean age: 9.79 years; all right-handed). No significant differences in reaction time and error rate between Tourette subjects and control. For the NIRS data, more dominant activation at left prefrontal area with increasing flow with task was seen in control subjects while no dominant activation or flow increase with task was noted in Tourette subjects. 5. Conclusion NIRS with prefrontal channels with the wearable wireless device can effectively assess the frontal activation differences and thus probably act as promising neurofeedback tools for TS or other developmental disorders like autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  14. Interhemispheric motor networks are abnormal in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäumer, Tobias; Thomalla, Götz; Kroeger, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Brain imaging has shown altered corpus callosum (CC) morphology in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). Yet it is unclear whether these morphological changes are associated with altered interhemispheric interactions. Here, we combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with di...... in control subjects but not in patients. Our combined TMS-DTI approach demonstrates abnormal functional interhemispheric connectivity in GTS accompanied by an altered structure-function relationship in the motor CC....

  15. Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome with and without obsessive-compulsive disorder compared with obsessive-compulsive disorder without tics: Which symptoms discriminate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cath, D.C.; Spinhoven, P.; Woerkom, T.C.A.M. van; Wetering, B.J.M. van de; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Landman, A.D.; Roos, R.A.C.; Rooijmans, H.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Stereotyped repetitive behaviors occur in Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome (GTS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The present study was undertaken to compare the distribution of obsessive-compulsive and Tourette-related impulsive behaviors in GTS with (+) OCD, GTS without (-) OCD, tic-free

  16. Development of Performance and ERPs in a Flanker Task in Children and Adolescents with Tourette Syndrome-A Follow-Up Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichele, Heike; Eichele, Tom; Marquardt, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with childhood-onset, with a typical decline in tic severity, as well as an increasing ability to suppress tics in late childhood and adolescence. These processes develop in parallel with general improvement of self......-regulatory abilities, and performance monitoring during this age-span. Hence, changes in performance monitoring over time might provide insight into the regulation of tics in children and adolescents with TS. Method: We measured reaction time, reaction time variability, accuracy, and event-related potentials (ERP...... largely persisted. In terms of ERP, the early P3 developed earlier in children with TS compared with controls at the first assessment, but trajectories converged with maturation. ERP component amplitudes correlated with worst-ever tic scores. Conclusions: Merging trajectories between children with TS...

  17. Mortality risk in a nationwide cohort of individuals with tic disorders and with tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sandra M; Dalsgaard, Søren; Mortensen, Preben B; Leckman, James F; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have investigated mortality risk in individuals with tic disorders. We thus measured the risk of premature death in individuals with tic disorders and with Tourette syndrome in a prospective cohort study with 80 million person-years of follow-up. We estimated mortality rate ratios and adjusted for calendar year, age, sex, urbanicity, maternal and paternal age, and psychiatric disorders to compare individuals with and without tic disorders. The risk of premature death was higher among individuals with tic disorders (mortality rate ratio, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.49-2.66) and with Tourette syndrome (mortality rate ratio, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.11-2.28) compared with controls. After the exclusion of individuals with comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and substance abuse, tic disorder remained associated with increased mortality risk (mortality rate ratio, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.57-3.23), as did also Tourette Syndrome (mortality rate ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.11-2.75). These results are of clinical significance for clinicians and advocacy organizations. Several factors may contribute to this increased risk of premature death, and more research mapping out these factors is needed. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome in a patient with 47(XXX) syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappedi, Matteo; de Vincenzi, Silvia; Dolci, Roberta; De Luca, Sara; Bejor, Maurizio

    2011-11-05

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a comorbidity between Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome and 47 (XXX) syndrome. The clinical picture of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome is well described, while 47 (XXX) syndrome is much more rare and has a broader spectrum of possible phenotypic presentations. An Italian Caucasian girl was referred at the age of 11 to our Rehabilitation Center for anxiety and learning difficulties. The girl had already been diagnosed as having 47(XXX) syndrome; she had some rather typical features of the chromosomal abnormality, but she also showed a high level of anxiety and the presence of motor and vocal tics. When an accurate history was taken, a diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome emerged. The possible interaction between peculiar features of these two syndromes in terms of neuropsychological and affective functioning is both interesting for the specific case and to hypothesize models of rehabilitation for patients with one or both syndromes. Executive functions are specifically reduced in both syndromes, therefore it might be hard to discriminate the contribution of each one to the general impairment; the same applies to anxiety. Moreover, mental retardation (with a significantly lower verbal cognitive functioning) poses relevant problems when suggesting cognitive behavioral or psychoeducational rehabilitative approaches.

  19. Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome in a patient with 47(XXX syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiappedi Matteo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a comorbidity between Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome and 47 (XXX syndrome. The clinical picture of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome is well described, while 47 (XXX syndrome is much more rare and has a broader spectrum of possible phenotypic presentations. Case presentation An Italian Caucasian girl was referred at the age of 11 to our Rehabilitation Center for anxiety and learning difficulties. The girl had already been diagnosed as having 47(XXX syndrome; she had some rather typical features of the chromosomal abnormality, but she also showed a high level of anxiety and the presence of motor and vocal tics. When an accurate history was taken, a diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome emerged. Conclusions The possible interaction between peculiar features of these two syndromes in terms of neuropsychological and affective functioning is both interesting for the specific case and to hypothesize models of rehabilitation for patients with one or both syndromes. Executive functions are specifically reduced in both syndromes, therefore it might be hard to discriminate the contribution of each one to the general impairment; the same applies to anxiety. Moreover, mental retardation (with a significantly lower verbal cognitive functioning poses relevant problems when suggesting cognitive behavioral or psychoeducational rehabilitative approaches.

  20. Tonic and phasic changes in anteromedial globus pallidus activity in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, Michal; Smeets, Anouk Y J M; Bronfeld, Maya; Zeef, Dagmar H; Leentjens, Albert F G; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne; Janssen, Marcus L F; Temel, Yasin; Ackermans, Linda; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-07-01

    Tourette syndrome is a hyperkinetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics. Assess the neuronal changes in the associative/limbic GP associated with Tourette syndrome. Neurophysiological recordings were performed from the anterior (associative/limbic) GPe and GPi of 8 awake patients during DBS electrode implantation surgeries. The baseline firing rate of the neurons was low in a state-dependent manner in both segments of the GP. Tic-dependent transient rate changes were found in the activity of individual neurons of both segments around the time of the tic. Neither oscillatory activity of individual neurons nor correlations in their interactions were observed. The results demonstrate the involvement of the associative/limbic pathway in the underlying pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome and point to tonic and phasic modulations of basal ganglia output as a key mechanisms underlying the abnormal state of the disorder and the expression of individual tics, respectively. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.