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Sample records for large surface neutron

  1. Large area window on vacuum chamber surface for neutron scattering instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shinichi; Yokoo, Tetsuya; Ueno, Kenji; Suzuki, Junichi; Teraoku, Takuji; Tsuchiya, Masao

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of a large area window using a thin aluminum plate on the surface of the vacuum chamber for neutron scattering instruments at a pulsed neutron source was investigated. In the prototype investigation for a window with an area of 1m×1.4m and a thickness of 1 mm, the measured pressure dependence of the displacement agreed well with a calculation using a nonlinear strain–stress curve up to the plastic deformation region. In addition, we confirmed the repetition test up to 2000 pressurization-and-release cycles, which is sufficient for the lifetime of the vacuum chamber for neutron scattering instruments. Based on these investigations, an actual model of the window to be mounted on the vacuum chamber of the High Resolution Chopper Spectrometer (HRC) at J-PARC was designed. By using a calculated stress distribution on the window, the clamping structure capable of balancing the tension in the window was determined. In a model with a structure identical to the actual window, we confirmed the repetition test over more than 7000 pressurization-and-release cycles, which shows a lifetime long enough for the actual usage of the vacuum chamber on the HRC.

  2. Large area solid target neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.C.; Bauer, W.

    1974-01-01

    A potentially useful neutron source may result from the combination of a solid deuterium-tritium loaded target with the large area, high energy ion beams from ion sources being developed for neutral beam injection. The resulting neutron source would have a large radiating area and thus produce the sizable experimental volume necessary for future studies of bulk and synergistic surface radiation effects as well as experiments on engineering samples and small components. With a 200 keV D + T + beam and 40 kW/cm 2 power dissipation on a 200 cm 2 target spot, a total neutron yield of about 4 x 10 15 n/sec may be achieved. Although the useable neutron flux from this source is limited to 1 to 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /sec, this flux can be produced 3 cm in front of the target and over about 300 cm 3 of experimental volume. Problems of total power dissipation, sputtering, isotopic flushing and thermal dissociation are reviewed. Neutron flux profiles and potential experimental configurations are presented and compared to other neutron source concepts. (U.S.)

  3. Zeeman splitting of surface-scattered neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.; Adenwalla, S.; De Haan, V.O.; Van Well, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    If a beam of slow neutrons impinges on a solid at grazing incidence, the neutrons reflected can be used to probe the composition and magnetization of the solid near its surface. In this process, the incident and reflected neutrons generally have identical kinetic energies. Here we report the results of an experiment in which subtle inelastic scattering processes are revealed as relatively large deviations in scattering angle. The neutrons are scattered from a ferromagnetic surface in the presence of a strong ambient magnetic field, and exhibit a small but significant variation in kinetic energy as a function of the reflection angle. This effect is attributable to the Zeeman splitting of the energies of the neutron spin states due to the ambient magnetic field: some neutrons flip their spins upon reflection from the magnetized surface, thereby exchanging kinetic energy for magnetic potential energy. The subtle effects of Zeeman splitting are amplified by the extreme sensitivity of grazing-angle neutron scattering, and might also provide a useful spectroscopic tool if significant practical obstacles (such as low interaction cross-sections) can be overcome. (author)

  4. Numerical and experimental investigations to describe the mode of operation and effectivity of large surface high sensitive SPNDs (Self-Powered-Neutron-Detectors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dabagh, D.

    1981-08-01

    First a computer model for the parametric calculation of the (n,γ)-reaction rates in the emitter of the SPND was developed under use of the Monte-Carlo Program KENO II. To determine the escape-probability of the electrons produced via Compton- or photoelectric effect by the emitter as well as from the surrounding isolator, a new Monte-Carlo-Program was implemented under consideration of the Klein-Nishina-formula and the energy-range relationships for electrons. The approximate calculations performed for the electrons produced in the isolator show that the 'isolator flux' can give an important contribution to the total signal of the SPND. Subsequently with this program system an optimization of the neutron sensitivity was performed by a suitable choice of geometry (emitter thickness, isolator thickness). For a specially built large surface SPND with Gadolinium-emitter the neutron sensitivity was calculated. These results were checked by an In-Pile-Experiment in the FRJ-1 reactor. Very good agreement was found. The detector was also shown to exhibit excellent linearity and showed also the expected enhanced sensitivity. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample

  6. Large subcriticality measurement by pulsed neutron method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Nishina, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kanda, K.

    1985-01-01

    To establish the method determining large subcriticalities in the field of nuclear criticality safety, the authors performed pulsed neutron experiments using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University and the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator attached to the assembly. The area-ratio method proposed by Sjoestrand was employed to evaluate subcriticalities from neutron decay curves measured. This method has the shortcomings that the neutron component due to a decay of delayed neutrons remarkably decreases as the subcriticality of an objective increases. To overcome the shortcoming, the authors increased the frequency of pulsed neutron generation. The integral-version of the area-ratio method proposed by Kosaly and Fisher was employed in addition in order to remove a contamination of spatial higher modes from the decay curve. The latter becomes significant as subcriticality increases. The largest subcriticality determined in the present experiments was 125.4 dollars, which was equal to 0.5111 in a multiplication factor. The calculational values evaluated by the computer code KENO-IV with 137 energy groups based on the Monte Carlo method agreed well with those experimental values

  7. A large angle cold neutron bender using sequential garland reflections for pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, T.; Tasaki, S. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Soyama, K.; Suzuki, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    We discuss a basic structure and performance of a new cold neutron bender using sequential garland reflections, in order to bend a neutron beam with large divergence by large angle. Using this bender for a pulsed neutron source we could not only avoid the frame overlap for cold neutrons but also install a plural spectrometers at a cold guide and obtain polarized neutron beams if necessary. (author)

  8. A large angle cold neutron bender using sequential garland reflections for pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, T.; Tasaki, S.; Soyama, K.; Suzuki, J.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a basic structure and performance of a new cold neutron bender using sequential garland reflections, in order to bend a neutron beam with large divergence by large angle. Using this bender for a pulsed neutron source we could not only avoid the frame overlap for cold neutrons but also install a plural spectrometers at a cold guide and obtain polarized neutron beams if necessary. (author)

  9. Parasitic neutron bragg reflections from large imperfect single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M

    1998-12-01

    A formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total Bragg scattering from different (hkl) planes to the neutron transmission through a large imperfect single crystals. The formula takes into account the crystal structure type, its mosaic spread value, the plane along which the crystal surface is cut along and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program ISCANF-1 was developed to calculate the total parasitic scattering cross-section from different (hkl) planes as well as the nuclear and diffuse scattering cross-sections. The ISCANF-1 program was applied to calculate the neutron attenuation through Cu and Zn single crystals, each of them cut along (002) planes. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through Cu and Zn crystals were compared with the measured ones in the wavelength range 0.21-0.47 nm and 0.04-0.52 nm respectively. The measured and calculated values were found to be in reasonable agreement within the statistical accuracy. The computer program ISCANF-1 was also applied to investigate the effect of parasitic Bragg scattering on the neutron filtering characteristics of both Zn and Cu single crystals as a function of their physical parameters.

  10. Parasitic neutron bragg reflections from large imperfect single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M.

    1998-01-01

    A formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total Bragg scattering from different (hkl) planes to the neutron transmission through a large imperfect single crystals. The formula takes into account the crystal structure type, its mosaic spread value, the plane along which the crystal surface is cut along and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program ISCANF-1 was developed to calculate the total parasitic scattering cross-section from different (hkl) planes as well as the nuclear and diffuse scattering cross-sections. The ISCANF-1 program was applied to calculate the neutron attenuation through Cu and Zn single crystals, each of them cut along (002) planes. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through Cu and Zn crystals were compared with the measured ones in the wavelength range 0.21-0.47 nm and 0.04-0.52 nm respectively. The measured and calculated values were found to be in reasonable agreement within the statistical accuracy. The computer program ISCANF-1 was also applied to investigate the effect of parasitic Bragg scattering on the neutron filtering characteristics of both Zn and Cu single crystals as a function of their physical parameters

  11. Neutron recognition in the LAND detector for large neutron multiplicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlowski, P., E-mail: piotr.pawlowski@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Brzychczyk, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Leifels, Y.; Trautmann, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Adrich, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, PL-00681 Warsaw (Poland); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bacri, C.O. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite, F-91406 Orsay (France); Barczyk, T. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Bassini, R. [Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi and INFN, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bianchin, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boiano, C. [Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi and INFN, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Boretzky, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boudard, A. [IRFU/SPhN, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chbihi, A. [GANIL, CEA et IN2P3-CNRS, F-14076 Caen (France); Cibor, J.; Czech, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); De Napoli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia-Universita and INFN-CT and LNS, I-95123 Catania (Italy); and others

    2012-12-01

    The performance of the LAND neutron detector is studied. Using an event-mixing technique based on one-neutron data obtained in the S107 experiment at the GSI laboratory, we test the efficiency of various analytic tools used to determine the multiplicity and kinematic properties of detected neutrons. A new algorithm developed recently for recognizing neutron showers from spectator decays in the ALADIN experiment S254 is described in detail. Its performance is assessed in comparison with other methods. The properties of the observed neutron events are used to estimate the detection efficiency of LAND in this experiment.

  12. A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui, E-mail: zwang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hoffbauer, M.A.; Morris, C.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Callahan, N.B.; Adamek, E.R. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Bacon, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blatnik, M. [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115 (United States); Brandt, A.E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Broussard, L.J.; Clayton, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cude-Woods, C. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Currie, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dees, E.B. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ding, X. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gao, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gray, F.E. [Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Hickerson, K.P. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Holley, A.T. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Ito, T.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, C.-Y. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); and others

    2015-10-21

    A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is described. The top {sup 10}B layer is exposed to vacuum and directly captures UCNs. The ZnS:Ag layer beneath the {sup 10}B layer is a few microns thick, which is sufficient to detect the charged particles from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li neutron-capture reaction, while thin enough that ample light due to α and {sup 7}Li escapes for detection by photomultiplier tubes. A 100-nm thick {sup 10}B layer gives high UCN detection efficiency, as determined by the mean UCN kinetic energy, detector materials, and other parameters. Low background, including negligible sensitivity to ambient neutrons, has also been verified through pulse-shape analysis and comparison with other existing {sup 3}He and {sup 10}B detectors. This type of detector has been configured in different ways for UCN flux monitoring, development of UCN guides and neutron lifetime research.

  13. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Zimmer, O.; Grigoriev, A. D.; Ziman, T.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyze the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons, and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed 1 h, and rapidly increases with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the sequence of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved tests of short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron β -decay experiments. We also sketch new experimental propositions for level population and trapping of ultracold neutrons above a flat horizontal mirror.

  14. Neutron lifetime measurements with a large gravitational trap for ultracold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Fomin, A. K.; Krasnoshchekova, I. A.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Prudnikov, D. M.; Shoka, I. V.; Chechkin, A. V.; Chaikovskiy, M. E.; Varlamov, V. E.; Ivanov, S. N.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Geltenbort, P.; Zimmer, O.; Jenke, T.; Van der Grinten, M.; Tucker, M.

    2018-05-01

    Neutron lifetime is one of the most important physical constants: it determines parameters of the weak interaction and predictions of primordial nucleosynthesis theory. There remains the unsolved problem of a 3.9σ discrepancy between measurements of this lifetime using neutrons in beams and those with stored ultracold neutrons (UCN). In our experiment we measure the lifetime of neutrons trapped by Earth's gravity in an open-topped vessel. Two configurations of the trap geometry are used to change the mean frequency of UCN collisions with the surfaces; this is achieved by plunging an additional surface into the trap without breaking the vacuum. The trap walls are coated with a hydrogen-less fluorine-containing polymer to reduce losses of UCN. The stability of this coating over multiple thermal cycles between 80 and 300 K was tested. At 80 K, the probability of UCN loss due to collisions with the trap walls is just 1.5% of the probability of β decay. The free neutron lifetime is determined by extrapolation to an infinitely large trap with zero collision frequency. The result of these measurements is τn=881.5 ±0 .7stat ±0 .6syst s which is consistent with the conventional value of 880.2 ± 1.0 s presented by the Particle Data Group. Future prospects for this experiment are in further cooling to 10 K, which will lead to an improved accuracy of measurement. In conclusion we present an analysis of currently available data on various measurements of the neutron lifetime.

  15. A large solid angle multiparameter neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricco, G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Corvisiero, P.; Durante, E.; Maggiolo, S.; Prati, P.; Rottura, A.; Taiuti, M.

    1991-01-01

    A 4π neutron detector has been realized using organic scintillators: the detector is suitable for high efficiency, low background measurements of very low neutron rates in the 0.6-5 MeV energy range. Gamma-neutron discrimination has been performed by pulse shape, energy and neutron lifetime analysis and backgrounds have been reduced by anticoincidence detectors and paraffin-lead shielding. Tests of efficiency, energy resolution and radiation identification have been made with a low intensity Am-Be neutron source. (orig.)

  16. Surface roughness effect on ultracold neutron interaction with a wall and implications for computer simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Steyerl, A.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.; Kaufman, C.

    2009-01-01

    We review the diffuse scattering and the loss coefficient in ultracold neutron reflection from slightly rough surfaces, report a surprising reduction in loss coefficient due to roughness, and discuss the possibility of transition from quantum treatment to ray optics. The results are used in a computer simulation of neutron storage in a recent neutron lifetime experiment that re-ported a large discrepancy of neutron lifetime with the current particle data value. Our partial re-analysis suggest...

  17. Time dispersion in large plastic scintillation neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Sen, D.

    1993-01-01

    Time dispersion (TD) has been computed for large neutron detectors using plastic scintillators. It has been shown that TD seen by the PM tube does not necessarily increase with incident neutron energy, a result not fully in agreement with the usual finding

  18. Surface energy of very neutron rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Von Groote, H

    1976-01-01

    For a microscopic model calculation of the nuclear surface-energy coefficient sigma the surface energy is defined as the energy loss of an uncharged, semiinfinite (inhomogeneous) two-component system compared to an infinite (homogeneous) system with the same particle asymmetry delta . Using the Thomas-Fermi model the calculations are performed for a series of systems with increasing delta , starting from symmetric matter ( delta =0) and extending beyond the drip line of the neutrons, until the system undergoes a phase transition to a homogeneous system. The results for the surface energy as well as for the neutron skin and for the surface diffuseness are compared to the macroscopic approach of the Droplet Model (DM), which turns out to be a good approximation for small asymmetries typical for the region of the valley of beta -stability. For larger asymmetries, close to the drip lines, terms of higher order than contained in the DM approach are no longer negligible. Beyond the drip lines the pressure of the ou...

  19. A pulsed source neutron reflectometer for surface studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, J.; Williams, W.G.

    1985-05-01

    A design for a neutron reflectometer for surface studies to be constructed at the SNS is presented. Examples of its use to study problems in surface chemistry, surface magnetism and low dimensional structures are highlighted. (author)

  20. A large animal model for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Kraft, S.L.; DeHaan, C.E.; Moore, M.P.; Griebenow, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    An epithermal neutron beam is needed to treat relatively deep seated tumors. The scattering characteristics of neutrons in this energy range dictate that in vivo experiments be conducted in a large animal to prevent unacceptable total body irradiation. The canine species has proven an excellent model to evaluate the various problems of boron neutron capture utilizing an epithermal neutron beam. This paper discusses three major components of the authors study: (1) the pharmacokinetics of borocaptate sodium (NA 2 B 12 H 11 SH or BSH) in dogs with spontaneously occurring brain tumors, (2) the radiation tolerance of normal tissues in the dog using an epithermal beam alone and in combination with borocaptate sodium, and (3) initial treatment of dogs with spontaneously occurring brain tumors utilizing borocaptate sodium and an epithermal neutron beam

  1. Prospects for accelerator neutron sources for large volume minerals analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.G.; Spackman, R.

    1988-01-01

    The electron Linac can be regarded as a practical source of thermal neutrons for activation analysis of large volume mineral samples. With a suitable target and moderator, a neutron flux of about 10 10 n/cm/s over 2-3 kg of rock can be generated. The proton Linac gives the possibility of a high neutron yield (> 10 12 n/s) of fast neutrons at selected energies. For the electron Linac, targets of W-U and W-Be are discussed. The advantages and limitations of the system are demonstrated for the analysis of gold in rocks and ores and for platinum in chromitite. These elements were selected as they are most likely to justify an accelerator installation at the present time. Errors due to self shielding in gold particles for thermal neutrons are discussed. The proton Linac is considered for neutrons generated from a lithium target through the 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be reaction. The analysis of gold by fast neutron activation is considered. This approach avoids particle self-absorption and, by appropriate proton energy selection, avoids potentially dominating interfering reactions. The analysis of 235 U in the presence of 238 U and 232 Th is also considered. (author)

  2. Surface roughness effect on ultracold neutron interaction with a wall and implications for computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyerl, A.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.; Kaufman, C.

    2010-01-01

    We review the diffuse scattering and the loss coefficient in ultracold neutron reflection from slightly rough surfaces, report a surprising reduction in loss coefficient due to roughness, and discuss the possibility of transition from quantum treatment to ray optics. The results are used in a computer simulation of neutron storage in a recent neutron lifetime experiment that reported a large discrepancy of neutron lifetime with the current particle data value. Our partial reanalysis suggests the possibility of systematic effects that were not included in this publication.

  3. ARMA modelling of neutron stochastic processes with large measurement noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaljevski, N.; Kostic, Lj.; Pesic, M.

    1994-01-01

    An autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of the neutron fluctuations with large measurement noise is derived from langevin stochastic equations and validated using time series data obtained during prompt neutron decay constant measurements at the zero power reactor RB in Vinca. Model parameters are estimated using the maximum likelihood (ML) off-line algorithm and an adaptive pole estimation algorithm based on the recursive prediction error method (RPE). The results show that subcriticality can be determined from real data with high measurement noise using much shorter statistical sample than in standard methods. (author)

  4. Calibration technique for the neutron surface moisture measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, W.T.; Shreve, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for calibrating the response of a surface neutron moisture measurement probe to material moisture concentration has been devised. Tests to ensure that the probe will function in the expected in-tank operating environment are also outlined

  5. Surface analysis of Borkron glass for neutron optics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnoux, B.; Maaza, M.; Maaza, M.; Samuel, F.; Sella, C.

    1991-01-01

    Grazing Angle Neutron Reflectometry, Optical and Mechanical Roughness Profilometry techniques have been used to study the effects of the polishing operations on the surface of Borkron Schott glass (special borosilicate glass for neutron optics applications) as the polishing tool pressure P and the mean grain size of the polishing powder Φ. The neutron reflectivity investigations have shown that there is formation of a layer at the surface glass substrate. This layer is less dense than the bulk substrate and its thickness is around 60A. The optical and mechanical profilometry measurements have shown that both roughness and waviness decrease with P and Φ. All the experimental results show a good correlation between the neutron refractive index, the thickness and the roughness of the surface layer and the waviness of the glass surface with the two mechanical polishing parameters. The previous techniques have been completed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy measurements

  6. ROLE OF NUCLEONIC FERMI SURFACE DEPLETION IN NEUTRON STAR COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J. M.; Zuo, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lombardo, U. [Universita di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN), Catania I-95123 (Italy); Zhang, H. F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-01-20

    The Fermi surface depletion of beta-stable nuclear matter is calculated to study its effects on several physical properties that determine the neutron star (NS) thermal evolution. The neutron and proton Z factors measuring the corresponding Fermi surface depletions are calculated within the Brueckner–Hartree–Fock approach, employing the AV18 two-body force supplemented by a microscopic three-body force. Neutrino emissivity, heat capacity, and in particular neutron {sup 3}PF{sub 2} superfluidity, turn out to be reduced, especially at high baryonic density, to such an extent that the cooling rates of young NSs are significantly slowed.

  7. Large sample neutron activation analysis of a reference inhomogeneous sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilopoulou, T.; Athens National Technical University, Athens; Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.; Koster-Ammerlaan, M.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    A benchmark experiment was performed for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) of a large inhomogeneous sample. The reference sample was developed in-house and consisted of SiO 2 matrix and an Al-Zn alloy 'inhomogeneity' body. Monte Carlo simulations were employed to derive appropriate correction factors for neutron self-shielding during irradiation as well as self-attenuation of gamma rays and sample geometry during counting. The large sample neutron activation analysis (LSNAA) results were compared against reference values and the trueness of the technique was evaluated. An agreement within ±10% was observed between LSNAA and reference elemental mass values, for all matrix and inhomogeneity elements except Samarium, provided that the inhomogeneity body was fully simulated. However, in cases that the inhomogeneity was treated as not known, the results showed a reasonable agreement for most matrix elements, while large discrepancies were observed for the inhomogeneity elements. This study provided a quantification of the uncertainties associated with inhomogeneity in large sample analysis and contributed to the identification of the needs for future development of LSNAA facilities for analysis of inhomogeneous samples. (author)

  8. Deduction of solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimori, Masato; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares are deduced from accelerated proton spectra and numbers derived from the gamma-ray observations. The deduced solar neutron fluences range from 1 to 200 neutrons cm -2 . The present result indicates a possibility that high sensitivity ground-based neutron monitors can detect solar neutron events, just as detected by the Jungfraujoch and Rome neutron monitors. (author)

  9. Technique investigation on large area neutron scintillation detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiabin

    2006-12-01

    The detailed project for developing Large Area Neutron Scintillation Detector Array (LaNSA) to be used for measuring fusion fuel area density on Shenguang III prototype is presented, including experimental principle, detector working principle, electronics system design and the needs for target chamber etc. The detailed parameters for parts are given and the main causes affecting the system function are analyzed. The realization path is introduced. (authors)

  10. VLAD for epithermal neutron scattering experiments at large energy transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G; Perelli-Cippo, E; Andreani, C; Imberti, S; Pietropaolo, A; Senesi, R; Rhodes, N R; Schooneveld, E M

    2006-01-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank will extend the kinematical region covered by today's epithermal neutron scattering experiments to low momentum transfer ( -1 ) together with large energy transfer 0 -4 0 . In this paper the design of VLAD is presented together with Montecarlo simulations of the detector performances. The results of tests made with prototype VLAD detectors are also presented, confirming the usefulness of the Resonance Detector for measurements at very low scattering angles

  11. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sperduti, A. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN–Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-01-21

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a {sup 241}Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} to 1000 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  12. Investigation of Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles for Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA missions will focus on deep space and Mars surface operations with large structures necessary for transportation of crew and cargo. In addition to the challenges of manufacturing these large structures, there are added challenges from the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, electronics, and vehicle materials. Primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle and the elements inside the vehicle. These interactions lead to the primary radiation being absorbed or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high-energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, which can be significant enough to cause concern. In a previous paper, we embarked upon our first steps toward studying neutron production from large vehicles by validating our radiation transport codes for neutron environments against flight data. The following paper will extend the previous work to focus on the deep space environment and the resulting neutron flux from large vehicles in this deep space environment.

  13. Isolated Neutron Stars: From the Surface to the Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Zane, Silvia; Page, Dany

    2007-01-01

    This book collects the contributions presented at the conference Isolated Neutron Stars: From the Surface to the Interior, held in London in April 2006. Forty years after the discovery of radio pulsars it presents an up-to-date description of the new vision of isolated neutron stars that has emerged in recent years with the advance of multi-wavelength observations. The great variety of isolated neutron stars, from pulsars to magnetars, some of them discovered very recently and many of them not detectable in radio wavelengths, is amply covered by descriptions of recent observational results and presentations of the latest theoretical interpretation of these data.

  14. Large animal normal tissue tolerance with boron neutron capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, P R; Kraft, S L; DeHaan, C E; Swartz, C D; Griebenow, M L

    1994-03-30

    Normal tissue tolerance of boron neutron capture irradiation using borocaptate sodium (NA2B12H11SH) in an epithermal neutron beam was studied. Large retriever-type dogs were used and the irradiations were performed by single dose, 5 x 10 dorsal portal. Fourteen dogs were irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam alone and 35 dogs were irradiated following intravenous administration of borocaptate sodium. Total body irradiation effect could be seen from the decreased leukocytes and platelets following irradiation. Most values returned to normal within 40 days postirradiation. Severe dermal necrosis occurred in animals given 15 Gy epithermal neutrons alone and in animals irradiated to a total peak physical dose greater than 64 Gy in animals following borocaptate sodium infusion. Lethal brain necrosis was seen in animals receiving between 27 and 39 Gy. Lethal brain necrosis occurred at 22-36 weeks postirradiation. A total peak physical dose of approximately 27 Gy and blood-boron concentrations of 25-50 ppm resulted in abnormal magnetic resonance imaging results in 6 months postexamination. Seven of eight of these animals remained normal and the lesions were not detected at the 12-month postirradiation examination. The bimodal therapy presents a complex challenge in attempting to achieve dose response assays. The resultant total radiation dose is a composite of low and high LET components. The short track length of the boron fission fragments and the geometric effect of the vessels causes much of the intravascular dose to miss the presumed critical target of the endothelial cells. The results indicate a large dose-sparing effect from the boron capture reactions within the blood.

  15. Large animal normal tissue tolerance with boron neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Swartz, C.D.; Kraft, S.L.; Briebenow, M.L.; DeHaan, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Normal tissue tolerance of boron neutron capture irradiation using borocaptate sodium (NA 2 B 12 H 11 SH) in an epithermal neutron beam was studied. Large retriever-type dogs were used and the irradiations were performed by single dose, 5 x 10 dorsal portal. Fourteen dogs were irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam alone and 35 dogs were irradiated following intravenous administration of borocaptate sodium. Total body irradiation effect could be seen from the decreased leukocytes and platelets following irradiation. Most values returned to normal within 40 days postirradiation. Severe dermal necrosis occurred in animals given 15 Gy epithermal neutrons alone and in animals irradiated to a total peak physical dose greater than 64 Gy in animals following borocaptate sodium infusion. Lethal brain necrosis was seen in animals receiving between 27 and 39 Gy. Lethal brain necrosis occurred at 22-36 weeks postirradiation. A total peak physical dose of approximately 27 Gy and blood-boron concentrations of 25-50 ppm resulted in abnormal magnetic resonance imaging results in 6 months postexamination. Seven of eight of these animals remained normal and the lesions were not detected at the 12-month postirradiation examination. The bimodal therapy presents a complex challenge in attempting to achieve dose response assays. The resultant total radiation dose is a composite of low and high LET components. The short track length of the boron fission fragments and the geometric effect of the vessels causes much of the intravascular dose to miss the presumed critical target of the endothelial cells. The results indicate a large dose-sparing effect from the boron capture reactions within the blood. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Ruiz, R F; Blaum, K; Ekström, A; Frömmgen, N; Hagen, G; Hammen, M; Hebeler, K; Holt, J D; Jansen, G R; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Nazarewicz, W; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papenbrock, T; Papuga, J; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Wendt, K A; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-...

  17. Neutron radiography of aircraft composite flight control surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.J.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Chalovich, T.R.; Francescone, O.

    2001-01-01

    A small (20 kWth), safe, pool-type nuclear research reactor called the SLOWPOKE-2 is located at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC). The reactor was originally installed for teaching, training, research and semi-routine analysis, specifically, neutron activation analysis. It was envisioned that the neutrons from the SLOWPOKE-2 could also be used for neutron radiography, and so a research program was initiated to develop this technology. Over a period of approximately 15 years, and through a series of successive modifications, a neutron radiography system (NRS) was developed. Once completed, several applications of the technology have been demonstrated, including the nondestructive examination of the composite flight control surfaces from the Canadian Air Force's primary jet fighter, the CF18 Hornet aircraft. An initial trial was setup to investigate the flight control surfaces of 3 aircraft, to determine the parameters for a final licensed system, and to compare the results to other nondestructive methods. Over 500 neutron radiographs were made for these first 3 aircraft, and moisture and corrosion were discovered in the honeycomb structure and hydration was found in the composite and adhesive layers. In comparison with other NDT methods, neutron radiography was the only method that could detect the small areas of corrosion and moisture entrapment. However, before examining an additional 7 aircraft, the recommended modifications to the NRS were undertaken. These modifications were necessary to accommodate the larger flight control surfaces safely by incorporating flexible conformable shielding. As well, to expedite inspections so that all flight control surfaces from one aircraft could be completed in less than two weeks, there was a need to decrease the exposure time by both faster film/conversion screen combinations and by incorporating the capability of near realtime, digital radioscopy. Finally, as there are no inspection specific image quality

  18. Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis of Heterogeneous Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatelatos, I.E.; Vasilopoulou, T.; Tzika, F.

    2018-01-01

    A Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis (LSNAA) technique was developed for non-destructive analysis of heterogeneous bulk samples. The technique incorporated collimated scanning and combining experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for the identification of inhomogeneities in large volume samples and the correction of their effect on the interpretation of gamma-spectrometry data. Corrections were applied for the effect of neutron self-shielding, gamma-ray attenuation, geometrical factor and heterogeneous activity distribution within the sample. A benchmark experiment was performed to investigate the effect of heterogeneity on the accuracy of LSNAA. Moreover, a ceramic vase was analyzed as a whole demonstrating the feasibility of the technique. The LSNAA results were compared against results obtained by INAA and a satisfactory agreement between the two methods was observed. This study showed that LSNAA is a technique capable to perform accurate non-destructive, multi-elemental compositional analysis of heterogeneous objects. It also revealed the great potential of the technique for the analysis of precious objects and artefacts that need to be preserved intact and cannot be damaged for sampling purposes. (author)

  19. A large neutron missing mass spectrometer using long plastic scintillators with electronical determination of the neutron interaction point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, W.D.; Mueller, H.; Schinzel, D.; Sigurdsson, G.; Staudenmaier, H.M.; Stier, U.

    1975-11-01

    A large acceptance and high efficiency neutron detector is described. The sensitive area and volume of the detector is 3.07 m 2 and 1.03 m 3 respectively. The detector consists of sixteen elements of plastic scintillator, each having the dimensions (16 x 16 x 240) cm 3 . The mean detection efficiency is about 33% for neutrons of 100-500 MeV/c momentum. An interesting feature of this instrument is the accuracy achieved in locating incident particles, which is +-3 cm for charged particles and +-4 cm for neutrons. The accuracy achieved for the time-of-flight measurement is +-1 nsec for fast neutrons. (orig.) [de

  20. Inspection of CF188 composite flight control surfaces with neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.J.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Mullin, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    At the Royal Military College of Canada's SLOWPOKE-2 Facility, a neutron radiography facility has been designed and installed using a small (20kWth), pool-type research reactor called the SLOWPOKE-2 (Safe Low Power c(K)ritical Experiment) as the neutron source. Since then, the research has continued along two fronts: developing applications and improving the quality of the neutron beam. The most interesting applications investigated to date has been the inspection of various metal ceramic composites and the inspection of the composite flight control surfaces of some of the CF188 Hornet aircraft. As part of the determination of the integrity of the aircraft, it was decided to inspect an aircraft with the highest flight house using both X- and neutron radiography. The neutron radiography and, to a lesser extent, X-radiography inspections completed at McClellan AFB revealed 93 anomalies. After returning to Canada, the component with the greatest structural significance, namely the right hand rudder from the vertical stabilizer, was removed from the aircraft and put through a rigorous program of numerous NDT inspections, including X-radiography (film and real-time), eddy current, ultrasonics (through transmission and pitch-catch), infrared thermography, and neutron radiography. Therefore, of all the techniques investigated, only through transmission ultrasonics and neutron radiography were able to identify large areas of hydration. However, only neutron radiography could identify the small areas of moisture and hydration. Given the structural significance of the flight control surfaces in modern fighter aircraft, even the smallest amounts of hydration could potentially lead to catastrophic results

  1. Study of a large scale neutron measurement channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarouayache, Anissa; Ben Hadid, Hayet.

    1982-12-01

    A large scale measurement channel allows the processing of the signal coming from an unique neutronic sensor, during three different running modes: impulses, fluctuations and current. The study described in this note includes three parts: - A theoretical study of the large scale channel and its brief description are given. The results obtained till now in that domain are presented. - The fluctuation mode is thoroughly studied and the improvements to be done are defined. The study of a fluctuation linear channel with an automatic commutation of scales is described and the results of the tests are given. In this large scale channel, the method of data processing is analogical. - To become independent of the problems generated by the use of a an analogical processing of the fluctuation signal, a digital method of data processing is tested. The validity of that method is improved. The results obtained on a test system realized according to this method are given and a preliminary plan for further research is defined [fr

  2. Development of concept and neutronic calculation method for large LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Ikegami, T.; Sanda, T.; Kaneto, K.; Kawashima, M.; Kaise, Y.; Shirakawa, M.; Hibi, K.

    1991-01-01

    Presented in this paper is the state of the art of reactor physics R and Ds for the development of concept and neutronic calculation method for large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) core. Physics characteristics of concepts for mixed oxide (MOX) fueled large FBR core were investigated by a series of benchmark critical experiments. Next, an adequacy and accuracy of the current neutronic calculation method was assessed by the experiments analyses, and then neutronic prediction accuracies by the method were evaluated for physics characteristics of the large core. Concerns on core development were discussed in terms of neutronics. (author)

  3. Optimized method for manufacturing large aspheric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xusheng; Li, Shengyi; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui

    2007-12-01

    Aspheric optics are being used more and more widely in modern optical systems, due to their ability of correcting aberrations, enhancing image quality, enlarging the field of view and extending the range of effect, while reducing the weight and volume of the system. With optical technology development, we have more pressing requirement to large-aperture and high-precision aspheric surfaces. The original computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) technique cannot meet the challenge of precision and machining efficiency. This problem has been thought highly of by researchers. Aiming at the problem of original polishing process, an optimized method for manufacturing large aspheric surfaces is put forward. Subsurface damage (SSD), full aperture errors and full band of frequency errors are all in control of this method. Lesser SSD depth can be gained by using little hardness tool and small abrasive grains in grinding process. For full aperture errors control, edge effects can be controlled by using smaller tools and amendment model with material removal function. For full band of frequency errors control, low frequency errors can be corrected with the optimized material removal function, while medium-high frequency errors by using uniform removing principle. With this optimized method, the accuracy of a K9 glass paraboloid mirror can reach rms 0.055 waves (where a wave is 0.6328μm) in a short time. The results show that the optimized method can guide large aspheric surface manufacturing effectively.

  4. Neutron Detection with Large Plastic Scintillators for RPM Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corre, G.; Boudergui, K.; Sannie, G.; Kondrasovs, V.

    2015-01-01

    Homeland security requests the use Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM). They must be able to detect and differentiate gamma and neutron radiation. Gamma detection is required for illicit transportation of radioactive matter detection. Neutron detection is important to control nonproliferation of enriched material. Manufacturers worldwide propose sensors based on 3 He which give the actual state of art in term of neutron detection. The imminent shortage of 3 He forces manufacturers to find viable alternative. From 10 years sensors providers have the challenge to replace previous 3 He detectors that are known to be the most commonly deployed neutron sensor. As 3 He detectors can only detect neutron, they must be completed with gamma detector. The proposed approach is based on pulse time correlation between adjacent sensors from signal collected by EJ200 plastic scintillators. Results obtained during FP7 Scintilla project test campaigns show the system relevance for replacement of today's 3 He detectors. (authors)

  5. LANSA: A large neutron scintillator array for neutron spectroscopy at Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, M.B.; Cable, M.D.; Bennett, C.K.; Mant, G.

    1992-01-01

    A very sensitive neutron time-of-flight spectrometer is now in use at Nova. LANSA consists of 960 channels of a neutron sensitive liquid scintillator (10 x lO x lO cm) coupled to a photomultiplier tube followed by a discriminator, TDC and ADC to allow the measurement of neutron arrival time as well as pulse size. LANSA is capable of measuring yields as low as 2.3 x 10 5 DT neutrons (100 detected hits) with resolution of 2.3 ns (170 key for 14 MeV neutrons with 20 m flight path). Shielding and collimation provide background levels low enough to allow measurement of secondary and tertiary reaction neutrons. Details of design, testing, calibration and experimental results will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48

  6. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W. [Australian Nucl. Sci. and Tech. Organ., Menai, NSW (Australia). Phys. Div.; Smith, G.C. [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    1997-06-21

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm{sup 2}. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimise parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa {sup 3}He plus 100 kPa CF{sub 4}, and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count rate of the detector was 10{sup 5} events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 A neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm{sup 2}) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise line width of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The proportional counter operating system (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp, USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display. (orig.).

  7. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W.; Smith, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm 2 . To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimize parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa 3 He plus 100 kPa CF 4 and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count-rate of the detector was 10 5 events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 angstrom neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm 2 ) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16 channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise linewidth of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display

  8. Decontamination of large horizontal concrete surfaces outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, M.M.; Chester, C.V.

    1980-01-01

    A study is being conducted of the resources and planning that would be required to clean up an extensive contamination of the outdoor environment. As part of this study, an assessment of the fleet of machines needed for decontaminating large outdoor surfaces of horizontal concrete will be attempted. The operations required are described. The performance of applicable existing equipment is analyzed in terms of area cleaned per unit time, and the comprehensive cost of decontamination per unit area is derived. Shielded equipment for measuring directional radiation and continuously monitoring decontamination work are described. Shielding of drivers' cabs and remote control vehicles is addressed

  9. Electrostatic Deposition of Large-Surface Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Trudeau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a method for electrostatic deposition of graphene over a large area using controlled electrostatic exfoliation from a Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG block. Deposition over 130 × 130 µm2 with 96% coverage is achieved, which contrasts with sporadic micro-scale depositions of graphene with little control from previous works on electrostatic deposition. The deposition results are studied by Raman micro-spectroscopy and hyperspectral analysis using large fields of view to allow for the characterization of the whole deposition area. Results confirm that laser pre-patterning of the HOPG block prior to cleaving generates anchor points favoring a more homogeneous and defect-free HOPG surface, yielding larger and more uniform graphene depositions. We also demonstrate that a second patterning of the HOPG block just before exfoliation can yield features with precisely controlled geometries.

  10. The plasma focus as a large fluence neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. With I 5 scaling, predicted from analysis of existing machines, yields of 10 16 -10 17 neutrons per pulse are postulated. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Simulations of muon-induced neutron flux at large depths underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Spooner, N.J.C.; McMillan, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    The production of neutrons by cosmic-ray muons at large depths underground is discussed. The most recent versions of the muon propagation code MUSIC, and particle transport code FLUKA are used to evaluate muon and neutron fluxes. The results of simulations are compared with experimental data

  12. An investigation on detection and measurement of fusion neutron spectrum and radiation flux in large tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinwei; Li Wenzhong; Zhang Wei

    2003-01-01

    The detection methods, detectors and spectrometers of D-D and D-T fusion neutron have been overviewed in large tokamaks. Some options are proposed for developing new detection systems of fusion neutrons suitable to the HL-2A tokamak. (authors)

  13. Time dispersion in large plastic scintillation neutron detector [Paper No.:B3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Sen, D.

    1993-01-01

    Time dispersion seen by photomultiplier (PM) tube in large plastic scintillation neutron detector and the light collection mechanism by the same have been computed showing that this time dispersion (TD) seen by the PM tube does not necessarily increase with increasing incident neutron energy in contrast to the usual finding that TD increases with increasing energy. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  14. A large-area, position-sensitive neutron detector with neutron/γ-ray discrimination capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecher, P.D.; Galonsky, A.; Kruse, J.J.; Gaff, S.J.; Ottarson, J.; Wang, J.; Seres, Z.; Ieki, K.; Iwata, Y.; Schelin, H.

    1997-01-01

    To further study neutron-rich halo nuclei, we have constructed a neutron detector array. The array consists of two separate banks of detectors, each of area 2 x 2 m 2 and containing 250 l of liquid scintillator. Each bank is position-sensitive to better than 10 cm. For neutron time-of-flight measurements, the time resolution of the detector has been demonstrated to be about 1 ns. By using the scintillator NE-213, we are able to distinguish between neutron and γ-ray signals above 1 MeV electron equivalent energy. Although the detector array was constructed for a particular experiment it has also been used in a number of other experiments. (orig.)

  15. Neutron diffraction on a large block mosaic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Chir Sen; Nitts, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron diffraction by the mosaic single crystal with size of crystallites sufficient to achieve the primary extinction saturation is considered. Two cases where the proportionality between the reflection intensity and the structure amplitude is performed are analysed. Such a dependence is convenient for structure investigations. The difficulties connected with the accounting of the extinction are eliminated considerably

  16. Study on neutron streaming effect in large fast critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Yamaoka, Mitsuaki; Sakurai, Shungo; Tanimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yuhei

    1981-03-01

    A cell calculation method taking into account the neutron leakage from a cell and a transport calculation method treating the neutron streaming have been developed, and their applicability has been investigated. In the cell calculation method, the neutron leakage in the perpendicular direction to plates was treated by introducing an albedo collision probability which is a first-flight collision probability incorporating albedos at cell boundaries, and that in the parallel direction was treated by the pseudo absorption method. The use of the albedo collision probability made it possible to calculate the flux tilt in a cell exactly. This cell calculation method was applied to two slab models where fuel drawers were stacked in perpendicular and parallel directions to plates. Cell averaged cross sections calculated by the proposed method agreed well with those obtained from exact transport calculations treating the plate-wise heterogeneity, while the infinite cell calculation and the conventional pseudo absorption method produced about 2% errors in the cell-averaged cross sections. The cell-averaging procedure for control-rod channels was also proposed, and this method was applied to the calculation of control-rod worths and control-rod position worths. A transport calculation method based on the response matrix method has been proposed to treat the neutron streaming in fast critical assemblies directly. A response matrix code in two dimensional XY geometry RES2D was made. The accuracy of response matrices obtained from the RES2D code was checked by applying it to a slab cell and by comparing cell-averaged cross sections and k-infinity with those from a reference cell calculation based on the collision probability. The agreement of the results was good, and it was found that the response matrix method is very promising for the treatment of the neutron streaming in fast critical assemblies. (author)

  17. Correlation of DT and DD fusion neutron damage in silicon surface barrier detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Toshiyuki; Sueyoshi, Yasuhiro; Sunarno; Takahashi, Akito

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the correlation of DT and DD fusion neutron damage in Si, a silicon surface barrier detector (Si-SBD) was irradiation with neutrons from a deuteron accelerator. The leakage current increased proportionally with neutron fluence, which determined the neutron damage constant for the Si-SBD. The correlation factor of the DT and DD neutron damage in the Si-SBD was determined from the ratio of the DT and DD neutron damage constants and was found to be 2.3. We also calculated the rate of DT and DD neutron displacement damage for Si by using the TRIM-90 computer program and actual data on neutron reactions in the Si-SBD. The correlation factor of DT and DD neutron damage from the calculation agreed with that from the Si-SBD irradiation experiment. (author)

  18. Excitation of surface waves of ultracold neutrons on absorbing trap walls as anomalous loss factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokun, R.Ch.

    2006-01-01

    One analyzed probability of excitation of surface waves of ultracold neutrons in terms of a plane model consisting of three media: vacuum, a finite depth neutron absorbing substance layer and a neutron reflecting substrate. One demonstrated the absence of the mentioned surface waves in terms of the generally accepted model of two media: vacuum contiguous to the plane surface of a substance filled half-space. One pointed out the effect of the excited surface waves of ultracold neutrons on the increase of their anomalous losses in traps [ru

  19. Readout for a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yiming [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Yang, Yigang, E-mail: yangyigang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Wang, Xuewu; Li, Yuanjing [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-01

    A neutron sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detector was developed for neutron imaging on the beamline of a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS). The detector was set up with a Wedge-and-Strip Anode (WSA) and a delay line anode readout to compare the spatial resolution and throughput with these two anodes. Tests show that the WSA readout is suitable for small area imaging with a spatial resolution of 200 μm with low energy X-rays in a 50 mm diameter MCP–WSA assembly. However, the spatial resolution deteriorated to ~2 mm in a 106 mm diameter MCP–WSA assembly because the noise caused by the parasitic capacitance is 10 times larger in the larger assembly than in the 50 mm diameter assembly. A 120 mm by 120 mm delay line anode was then used for the 106 mm MCP readout. The spatial resolution was evaluated for various voltages applied to the MCP V-stack, various readout voltages and various distances between the MCP V-stack rear face and the delay line. The delay line readout had resolutions of 65.6 μm in the x direction and 63.7 μm in the y direction and the throughput was greater than 600 kcps. The MCP was then used to acquire a neutron image of an USAF1951 Gd-mask.

  20. Comparison and Validation of FLUKA and HZETRN as Tools for Investigating the Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals are focused on deep space travel and Mars surface operations. To accomplish these goals, large structures will be necessary to transport crew and logistics in the initial stages, and NASA will need to keep the crew and the vehicle safe during transport and any surface activities. One of the major challenges of deep space travel is the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, the electronics, and the vehicle materials. The primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle. These interactions lead to some of the primary radiation being absorbed, being modified, or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles that have large shielding masses, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, and this secondary radiation can be significant enough to cause concern. When considering surface operations, there is also a secondary radiation source from the surface of the planet, known as albedo, with neutrons being one of the most significant species. Given new vehicle designs for deep space and Mars missions, the secondary radiation environment and the implications of that environment is currently not well understood. Thus, several studies are necessary to fill the knowledge gaps of this secondary radiation environment. In this paper, we put forth the initial steps to increasing our understanding of neutron production from large vehicles by comparing the neutron production resulting from our radiation transport codes and providing a preliminary validation of our results against flight data. This paper will review the details of these results and discuss the finer points of the analysis.

  1. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    KAUST Repository

    Haddon, E. K.; Amos, C. B.; Zielke, Olaf; Jayko, A. S.; Burgmann, R.

    2016-01-01

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from approximate to 1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.31.1 m (2 sigma). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between approximate to 0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.80.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is approximate to 6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.41.5 m, corresponding to a geologic M-w approximate to 7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.12.0 m, 12.8 +/- 1.5 m, and 16.6 +/- 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between approximate to 0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1 sigma) over the late Quaternary.

  2. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    KAUST Repository

    Haddon, E. K.

    2016-01-10

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from approximate to 1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.31.1 m (2 sigma). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between approximate to 0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.80.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is approximate to 6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.41.5 m, corresponding to a geologic M-w approximate to 7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.12.0 m, 12.8 +/- 1.5 m, and 16.6 +/- 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between approximate to 0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1 sigma) over the late Quaternary.

  3. Neutron probe measurement of soil water content close to soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faleiros, M.C.; Ravelo S, A.; Souza, M.D. de

    1993-01-01

    The problem of neutron probe soil water content measurements close to soil surface is analysed from the spatial variability and also from the slow neutron loss to the atmosphere points of view. Results obtained on a dark red latosol of the county of Piracicaba, SP, indicate the possibility of precisely measuring the neutron sphere of influence when different media are used on soil surface. (author). 7 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  4. Surface erosion of fusion reactor components due to radiation blistering and neutron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation blistering and neutron sputtering can lead to the surface erosion of fusion reactor components exposed to plasma radiations. Recent studies of methods to reduce the surface erosion caused by these processes are discussed

  5. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, E.K.; Amos, C.B.; Zielke, O.; Jayko, Angela S.; Burgmann, R.

    2016-01-01

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from ∼1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.3 ± 1.1 m (2σ). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between ∼0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is ∼6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7–11 m and net average of 4.4 ± 1.5 m, corresponding to a geologic Mw ∼7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.1 ± 2.0 m, 12.8 ± 1.5 m, and 16.6 ± 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between ∼0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1σ) over the late Quaternary.

  6. Assessment of large aperture scintillometry for large-area surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    29

    1995), flat pastoral surfaces. (McAneny ... heat flux using net radiometer and soil heat flux plate, respectively and synchronized with ..... order to facilitates development of satellite based application for ET and drought monitoring, the .... daytime sensible heat flux and momentum fluxes;Boundary- Layer Meteorol.,68 357-373.

  7. Measuring fast neutrons with large liquid scintillation detector for ultra-low background experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C. [Department of Physics, The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); College of Sciences, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Mei, D.-M., E-mail: dongming.mei@usd.edu [Department of Physics, The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Davis, P.; Woltman, B. [Department of Physics, The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Gray, F. [Department of Physics and Computational Science, Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    We developed a 12-liter volume neutron detector filled with the liquid scintillator EJ301 that measures neutrons in an underground laboratory where dark matter and neutrino experiments are located. The detector target is a cylindrical volume coated on the inside with reflective paint (95% reflectivity) that significantly increases the detector's light collection. We demonstrate several calibration techniques using point sources and cosmic-ray muons for energies up to 20 MeV for this large liquid scintillation detector. Neutron–gamma separation using pulse shape discrimination with a few MeV neutrons to hundreds of MeV neutrons is shown for the first time using a large liquid scintillator.

  8. Global Distribution of Shallow Water on Mars: Neutron Mapping of Summer-Time Surface by HEND/Odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Boynton, W.; Hamara, D.; Shinohara, C.; Saunders, R. S.; Drake, D.

    2003-01-01

    Orbital mapping of induced neutrons and gamma-rays by Odyssey has recently successfully proven the applicability of nuclear methods for studying of the elementary composition of Martian upper-most subsurface. In particular, the suite of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has discovered the presence of large water-ice rich regions southward and northward on Mars. The data of neutron mapping of summer-time surface are presented below from the Russian High Energy Neutron Spectrometer (HEND), which is a part of GRS suite. These maps represent the content of water in the soil for summer season at Southern and Northern hemispheres, when the winter deposit of CO2 is absent on the surface. The seasonal evolution of CO2 coverage on Mars is the subject of the complementary paper.

  9. New computational methodology for large 3D neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmani, M.; Roy, R.; Koclas, J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new computational methodology, based on 3D characteristics method, dedicated to solve very large 3D problems without spatial homogenization. In order to eliminate the input/output problems occurring when solving these large problems, we set up a new computing scheme that requires more CPU resources than the usual one, based on sweeps over large tracking files. The huge capacity of storage needed in some problems and the related I/O queries needed by the characteristics solver are replaced by on-the-fly recalculation of tracks at each iteration step. Using this technique, large 3D problems are no longer I/O-bound, and distributed CPU resources can be efficiently used. (authors)

  10. Aerial Neutron Detection of Cosmic-Ray Interactions with the Earth's Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Maurer

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated the ability to measure the neutron flux produced by the cosmic-ray interaction with nuclei in the ground surface using aerial neutron detection. High energy cosmic-rays (primarily muons with GeV energies) interact with the nuclei in the ground surface and produce energetic neutrons via spallation. At the air-surface interface, the neutrons produced by spallation will either scatter within the surface material, become thermalized and reabsorbed, or be emitted into the air. The mean free path of energetic neutrons in air can be hundreds of feet as opposed to a few feet in dense materials. As such, the flux of neutrons escaping into the air provides a measure of the surface nuclei composition. It has been demonstrated that this effect can be measured at long range using neutron detectors on low flying helicopters. Radiological survey measurements conducted at Government Wash in Las Vegas, Nevada, have shown that the neutron background from the cosmic-soil interactions is repeatable and directly correlated to the geological data. Government Wash has a very unique geology, spanning a wide variety of nuclide mixtures and formations. The results of the preliminary measurements are presented

  11. Investigation of inelastic scattering of ultracold neutrons with small energy transfer at solid state surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lychagin, E.V.; Muzychka, A.Yu.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Strelkov, A.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Nesvizhevskij, V.V.; Tal'daev, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of neutrons with small energy transfer of ∼10 -7 eV was investigated using gravitational UCN spectrometer. The probability of such a process at stainless steel and beryllium surfaces was measured. It was also estimated at copper surface. The measurement showed that the detected flux of neutrons scattered at beryllium and copper surfaces is ∼ 2 times higher at room temperature compared to that at the liquid nitrogen temperature. (author)

  12. Swarm Manipulation of Large Surface Vessels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Erik T

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this Trident project was to develop an independent control scheme to allow a team of autonomous tugboats to move a large disabled vessel, such as a barge, to a desired position and orientation...

  13. Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis: A Challenge in Cultural Heritage Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatelatos, I.E.; Tzika, F.

    2007-01-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis compliments and significantly extends the analytical tools available for cultural heritage and authentication studies providing unique applications of non-destructive, multi-element analysis of materials that are too precious to damage for sampling purposes, representative sampling of heterogeneous materials or even analysis of whole objects. In this work, correction factors for neutron self-shielding, gamma-ray attenuation and volume distribution of the activity in large volume samples composed of iron and ceramic material were derived. Moreover, the effect of inhomogeneity on the accuracy of the technique was examined

  14. Investigation of the neutron production phases of a large plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayd, A.; Maurer, M.; Meinke, P.; Herold, H.; Bertalot, L.; Deutsch, R.; Grauf, W.; Jaeger, U.; Kaeppeler, H.J.; Lepper, F.; Oppenlaender, T.; Schmidt, H.; Schmidt, R.; Schwarz, J.; Schwoerer, K.; Shakhatre, M.

    1982-09-01

    Plasma dynamic behavior and neutron production in large focus devices with pinch currents of approximately 1 MA have been studied with theoretical as well as experimental methods. For treating turbulent plasma motion, a hybrid code based on the analytical computer algorithm REDUCE was developed. Experimental diagnostics include schlieren photographs, reaction proton localization with pinhole cameras and neutron measurements with Ag-counters and scintillators. Calculated and measured data concern the 280 kJ, 60 kV operational mode of the POSEIDON plasma focus. It is shown that for large pinch currents ( > 500 kA), neutron emission also appears before m = 0 onset in the intermediate phase. This part of the neutron production becomes predominant for very large currents. The lifetime of this intermediate phase strongly increases with increasing current. According to theory, the late phase of the focus is governed by strong turbulence phenomena. The lifetime of the turbulence packets is approximately 150 ns and seems to explain the long lasting neutron emission in this phase. (orig.)

  15. Calculation of neutron die-away times in a large-vehicle portal monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been used to calculate neutron die-away times in a large-vehicle portal monitor. These calculations were performed to investigate the adequacy of using neutron die-away time measurements to detect the clandestine movement of shielded nuclear materials. The geometry consisted of a large tunnel lined with He 3 proportional counters. The time behavior of the (n,p) capture reaction in these counters was calculated when the tunnel contained a number of different tractor-trailer load configurations. Neutron die-away times obtained from weighted least squares fits to these data were compared. The change in neutron die-away time due to the replacement of cargo in a fully loaded truck with a spherical shell containing 240 kg of borated polyethylene was calculated to be less than 3%. This result together with the overall behavior of neutron die-away time versus mass inside the tunnel strongly suggested that measurements of this type will not provide a reliable means of detecting shielded nuclear materials in a large vehicle. 5 figures, 4 tables

  16. {sup 10}B multi-grid proportional gas counters for large area thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, K. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bigault, T. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Birch, J. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Buffet, J. C.; Correa, J. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Hall-Wilton, R. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Hultman, L. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Höglund, C. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Guérard, B., E-mail: guerard@ill.fr [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Jensen, J. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Khaplanov, A. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Kirstein, O. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Piscitelli, F.; Van Esch, P. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Vettier, C. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2013-08-21

    {sup 3}He was a popular material in neutrons detectors until its availability dropped drastically in 2008. The development of techniques based on alternative convertors is now of high priority for neutron research institutes. Thin films of {sup 10}B or {sup 10}B{sub 4}C have been used in gas proportional counters to detect neutrons, but until now, only for small or medium sensitive area. We present here the multi-grid design, introduced at the ILL and developed in collaboration with ESS for LAN (large area neutron) detectors. Typically thirty {sup 10}B{sub 4}C films of 1 μm thickness are used to convert neutrons into ionizing particles which are subsequently detected in a proportional gas counter. The principle and the fabrication of the multi-grid are described and some preliminary results obtained with a prototype of 200 cm×8 cm are reported; a detection efficiency of 48% has been measured at 2.5 Å with a monochromatic neutron beam line, showing the good potential of this new technique.

  17. Neutron flux shape effects in large fast reactor safety calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galati, A.; Loizzo, P.; Musco, A.

    1978-01-01

    Three classes of accidents in a large fast reactor were studied by the two-dimensional core dynamics code NADYP-2. A Modified version of the code, including a point kinetics module, allowed comparison between 2D and 0D power, reactivity and temperature histories. A strong shape effect was evidenced by these calculations in the boiling phase of LOF accidents as well as in the accident generated by control rod removal. Some future possibilities of by passing the consequences of this effect are indicated

  18. Using Java to visualize and manipulate large arrays of neutron scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelson, D.; Worlton, T.; Chatterjee, A.; Hammonds, J.; Chen, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory is a world class pulsed neutron source with thirteen instruments designed to characterize materials using time-of-flight neutron scattering techniques. For each instrument, a collimated pulse of neutrons is directed to a material sample. The neutrons are scattered by the sample and detected by arrays of detectors. The type, number and arrangement of detectors vary widely from instrument to instrument, depending on which properties of materials are being studied. In all cases, the faster, higher energy neutrons reach the detectors sooner than the lower energy neutrons. This produces a time-of-flight spectrum at each detector element. The time-of-flight spectrum produced by each detector element records the scattering intensity at hundreds to thousands of discrete time intervals. Since there are typically between two hundred and ten thousand distinct detector elements, a single set of raw data can include millions of points. Often many such datasets are collected for a single sample to determine the effect of different conditions on the microscopic structure and dynamics of the sample. In this project, Java was used to construct a portable highly interactive system for viewing and operating on large collections of time-of-flight spectra. Java performed surprisingly well in handling large amounts of data quickly was fast enough even with standard PC hardware. Although Java may not be the choice at this time for applications where computational efficiency is the primary refinement, any disadvantages in this case were outweighed by the advantages of a clean object oriented language with a portable set of GUI components. The authors anticipate that Java will prove useful for scientific computing and data visualization in situations where portability, case of use and effective use of software development manpower are critical

  19. Large-area self-powered neutron-detectors for neutron-flux measurements in HTRs. Status of developmental work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Serpekian, T.; Benninghofen, G.; Serafin, N.; Spillekothen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The development is described of the large-area SPN-detector as an out of core power monitoring system. Gadolinium or cobalt was used as the emitter. Response functions of the gadolinium SPN-detector were found with regard to the reactor power, the effect of the gamma field, its short-term behaviour following reactor shutdown and long-term behaviour during reactor operation. It was shown that a detector of 0.1 mm emitter thickness can withstand an integral thermal neutron flux of 2.10 20 nvt almost without efficiency loss thus indicating that the large-area gadolinium SPN-detector is a suitable means for power monitoring in large HTGR's

  20. Exactly soluble models for surface partition of large clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugaev, K.A.; Bugaev, K.A.; Elliott, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    The surface partition of large clusters is studied analytically within a framework of the 'Hills and Dales Model'. Three formulations are solved exactly by using the Laplace-Fourier transformation method. In the limit of small amplitude deformations, the 'Hills and Dales Model' gives the upper and lower bounds for the surface entropy coefficient of large clusters. The found surface entropy coefficients are compared with those of large clusters within the 2- and 3-dimensional Ising models

  1. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastukhov, V.I. [Joint Stock Company “Institute of Nuclear Materials” (JSC “INM”), Zarechny, Sverdlovsk Region (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University Named After the First President of Russia, B. N. Yeltsyn, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Averin, S.A.; Panchenko, V.L. [Joint Stock Company “Institute of Nuclear Materials” (JSC “INM”), Zarechny, Sverdlovsk Region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Portnykh, I.A. [Joint Stock Company “Institute of Nuclear Materials” (JSC “INM”), Zarechny, Sverdlovsk Region (Russian Federation); Freyer, P.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Giannuzzi, L.A. [L.A. Giannuzzi & Associates LLC, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Garner, F.A., E-mail: frank.garner@dslextreme.com [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Radiation Effects Consulting LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-11-15

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ∼500–700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  2. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Myong-Seop; Park Byung-Gun; Kang Gi-Doo

    2018-01-01

    A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affe...

  3. Characteristics of the NE-213 large-volume neutron counters for muon catalyzed fusion investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritsky, V.M.; Wozniak, J.; Zinov, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Monte-Carlo method was used to establish the properties and feasibility of a large-volume NE-213 scin illator as an efficient neutron detector. The recoil proton spectra, calculated efficiencies for different detection thresholds and scintillator sizes are presented for the neutron energy up to 15 MeV. The time characteristics, e. g., time resolution, are discussed. It is also shown that no strong influence of light attenuation by the scintilla or itself on calculated efficiencies is observed, when gamma-calibration technique is used. The detector vol me of approximately 100 l is suggested for application in investigations of μ-atom and μ-molecular processes

  4. NANOMETER PRECISION IN LARGE SURFACE PROFILOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TAKACS, P.Z.

    1999-01-01

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is in use at many synchrotron radiation (SR) laboratories throughout the world and by a number of manufacturers who specialize in fabricating grazing incidence mirrors for SR and x-ray telescope applications. Recent improvements in the design and operation of the LTP system have reduced the statistical error in slope profile measurement to the 1 standard deviation level of 0.3 microradian for 0.5 meter long mirrors. This corresponds to a height error on the order of 10-20 nanometers. This level of performance allows one to measure with confidence the absolute shape of large cylindrical aspheres and spheres that have kilometer radii of curvature in the axial direction. The LTP is versatile enough to make measurements of a mirror in the face up, sideways, and face down configurations. We will illustrate the versatility of the current version of the instrument, the LTP II, and present results from two new versions of the instrument: the in situ LTP (ISLTP) and the Vertical Scan LTP (VSLTP). Both of them are based on the penta prism LTP (ppLTP) principle that utilizes a stationary optical head and moving penta prism. The ISLTP is designed to measure the distortion of high heat load mirrors during actual operation in SR beam lines. The VSLTP is designed to measure the complete 3-dimensional shape of x-ray telescope cylinder mirrors and mandrels in a vertical configuration. Scans are done both in the axial direction and in the azimuthal direction

  5. Recent development of the Multi-Grid detector for large area neutron scattering instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerard, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most of the Neutron Scattering facilities are committed in a continuous program of modernization of their instruments, requiring large area and high performance thermal neutron detectors. Beside scintillators detectors, 3 He detectors, like linear PSDs (Position Sensitive Detectors) and MWPCs (Multi-Wires Proportional Chambers), are the most current techniques nowadays. Time Of Flight instruments are using 3 He PSDs mounted side by side to cover tens of m 2 . As a result of the so-called ' 3 He shortage crisis , the volume of 3He which is needed to build one of these instruments is not accessible anymore. The development of alternative techniques requiring no 3He, has been given high priority to secure the future of neutron scattering instrumentation. This is particularly important in the context where the future ESS (European Spallation Source) will start its operation in 2019-2020. Improved scintillators represent one of the alternative techniques. Another one is the Multi-Grid introduced at the ILL in 2009. A Multi-Grid detector is composed of several independent modules of typically 0.8 m x 3 m sensitive area, mounted side by side in air or in a vacuum TOF chamber. One module is composed of segmented boron-lined proportional counters mounted in a gas vessel; the counters, of square section, are assembled with Aluminium grids electrically insulated and stacked together. This design provides two advantages: First, magnetron sputtering techniques can be used to coat B 4 C films on planar substrates, and second, the neutron position along the anode wires can be measured by reading out individually the grid signals with fast shaping amplifiers followed by comparators. Unlike charge division localisation in linear PSDs, the individual readout of the grids allows operating the Multi-Grid at a low amplification gain, hence this detector is tolerant to mechanical defects and its production accessible to laboratories equipped with standard equipment. Prototypes of

  6. Recent development of the Multi-Grid detector for large area neutron scattering instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerard, Bruno [ILL-ESS-LiU collaboration, CRISP project, Institut Laue Langevin - ILL, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    Most of the Neutron Scattering facilities are committed in a continuous program of modernization of their instruments, requiring large area and high performance thermal neutron detectors. Beside scintillators detectors, {sup 3}He detectors, like linear PSDs (Position Sensitive Detectors) and MWPCs (Multi-Wires Proportional Chambers), are the most current techniques nowadays. Time Of Flight instruments are using {sup 3}He PSDs mounted side by side to cover tens of m{sup 2}. As a result of the so-called '{sup 3}He shortage crisis{sup ,} the volume of 3He which is needed to build one of these instruments is not accessible anymore. The development of alternative techniques requiring no 3He, has been given high priority to secure the future of neutron scattering instrumentation. This is particularly important in the context where the future ESS (European Spallation Source) will start its operation in 2019-2020. Improved scintillators represent one of the alternative techniques. Another one is the Multi-Grid introduced at the ILL in 2009. A Multi-Grid detector is composed of several independent modules of typically 0.8 m x 3 m sensitive area, mounted side by side in air or in a vacuum TOF chamber. One module is composed of segmented boron-lined proportional counters mounted in a gas vessel; the counters, of square section, are assembled with Aluminium grids electrically insulated and stacked together. This design provides two advantages: First, magnetron sputtering techniques can be used to coat B{sub 4}C films on planar substrates, and second, the neutron position along the anode wires can be measured by reading out individually the grid signals with fast shaping amplifiers followed by comparators. Unlike charge division localisation in linear PSDs, the individual readout of the grids allows operating the Multi-Grid at a low amplification gain, hence this detector is tolerant to mechanical defects and its production accessible to laboratories equipped with standard

  7. A large, high performance, curved 2D position-sensitive neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Fried, J W; Mahler, G J; Makowiecki, D S; Mead, J A; Radeka, V; Schaknowski, N A; Smith, G C; Yu, B

    2002-01-01

    A new position-sensitive neutron detector has been designed and constructed for a protein crystallography station at LANL's pulsed neutron source. This station will be one of the most advanced instruments at a major neutron user facility for protein crystallography, fiber and membrane diffraction. The detector, based on neutron absorption in sup 3 He, has a large sensitive area of 3000 cm sup 2 , angular coverage of 120 deg. , timing resolution of 1 mu s, rate capability in excess of 10 sup 6 s sup - sup 1 , position resolution of about 1.5 mm FWHM, and efficiency >50% for neutrons of interest in the range 1-10 A. Features that are key to these remarkable specifications are the utilization of eight independently operating segments within a single gas volume, fabrication of the detector vessel and internal segments with a radius of curvature of about 70 cm, optimized position readout based on charge division and signal shaping with gated baseline restoration, and engineering design with high-strength aluminum ...

  8. Surface Properties of a Nanocrystalline Fe-Ni-Nb-B Alloy After Neutron Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavùk, Milan; Sitek, Jozef; Sedlačková, Katarína

    2014-09-01

    The effect of neutron radiation on the surface properties of the nanocrystalline (Fe0.25Ni0.75)81Nb7B12 alloy was studied. Firstly, amorphous (Fe0.25Ni0.75)81Nb7B12 ribbon was brought by controlled annealing to the nanocrystalline state. After annealing, the samples of the nanocrystalline ribbon were irradiated in a nuclear reactor with neutron fluences of 1×1016cm-2 and 1 × 1017cm-2 . By utilizing the magnetic force microscopy (MFM), topography and a magnetic domain structure were recorded at the surface of the ribbon-shaped samples before and after irradiation with neutrons. The results indicate that in terms of surface the nanocrystalline (Fe0.25Ni0.75)81Nb7B12 alloy is radiation-resistant up to a neutron fluence of 1 × 1017cm-2 . The changes in topography observed for both irradiated samples are discussed

  9. Neutron radiative capture methods for surface elemental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombka, J.I.; Senftle, F.; Schmadebeck, R.

    1970-01-01

    Both an accelerator and a 252Cf neutron source have been used to induce characteristic gamma radiation from extended soil samples. To demonstrate the method, measurements of the neutron-induced radiative capture and activation gamma rays have been made with both Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) detectors, Because of the possible application to space flight geochemical analysis, it is believed that NaI(Tl) detectors must be used. Analytical procedures have been developed to obtain both qualitative and semiquantitative results from an interpretation of the measured NaI(Tl) pulse-height spectrum. Experiment results and the analytic procedure are presented. ?? 1970.

  10. DS86 neutron dose. Monte Carlo analysis for depth profile of {sup 152}Eu activity in a large stone sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Iwatani, Kazuo; Oka, Takamitsu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Fujita, Shoichiro; Hasai, Hiromi

    1999-06-01

    The depth profile of {sup 152}Eu activity induced in a large granite stone pillar by Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons was calculated by a Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). The pillar was on the Motoyasu Bridge, located at a distance of 132 m (WSW) from the hypocenter. It was a square column with a horizontal sectional size of 82.5 cm x 82.5 cm and height of 179 cm. Twenty-one cells from the north to south surface at the central height of the column were specified for the calculation and {sup 152}Eu activities for each cell were calculated. The incident neutron spectrum was assumed to be the angular fluence data of the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). The angular dependence of the spectrum was taken into account by dividing the whole solid angle into twenty-six directions. The calculated depth profile of specific activity did not agree with the measured profile. A discrepancy was found in the absolute values at each depth with a mean multiplication factor of 0.58 and also in the shape of the relative profile. The results indicated that a reassessment of the neutron energy spectrum in DS86 is required for correct dose estimation. (author)

  11. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myong-Seop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affect the SPND current response are analyzed using the Monte Carlo simulation for various irradiation conditions in HANARO. It is confirmed that the effect of the external gamma-rays to the SPND current is dependent on the reactor characteristics, and that it is affected by materials around the detector. The current signals due to the external gamma-rays can be either positive or negative, in that the net flow of the current may be either in the same or the opposite direction as the neutron-induced current by the rhodium emitter. From the above procedure, the effective calibration methodology of multiple SPNDs using the large hole of HANARO is developed. It could be useful for the calibration experiment of the neutron detectors in the research reactors.

  12. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Park, Byung-Gun; Kang, Gi-Doo

    2018-01-01

    A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affect the SPND current response are analyzed using the Monte Carlo simulation for various irradiation conditions in HANARO. It is confirmed that the effect of the external gamma-rays to the SPND current is dependent on the reactor characteristics, and that it is affected by materials around the detector. The current signals due to the external gamma-rays can be either positive or negative, in that the net flow of the current may be either in the same or the opposite direction as the neutron-induced current by the rhodium emitter. From the above procedure, the effective calibration methodology of multiple SPNDs using the large hole of HANARO is developed. It could be useful for the calibration experiment of the neutron detectors in the research reactors.

  13. Large lattice relaxation deep levels in neutron-irradiated GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Zhang, J.D.; Beling, C.D.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.X.; Gong, M.; Sarkar, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) measurements have been carried out in neutron-irradiated n-type hydride-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown GaN. A defect center characterized by a DLTS line, labeled as N1, is observed at E C -E T =0.17 eV. Another line, labeled as N2, at E C -E T =0.23 eV, seems to be induced at the same rate as N1 under irradiation and may be identified with E1. Other defects native to wurtzite GaN such as the C and E2 lines appear to enhance under neutron irradiation. The DLOS results show that the defects N1 and N2 have large Frank-Condon shifts of 0.64 and 0.67 eV, respectively, and hence large lattice relaxations. The as-grown and neutron-irradiated samples all exhibit the persistent photoconductivity effect commonly seen in GaN that may be attributed to DX centers. The concentration of the DX centers increases significantly with neutron dosage and is helpful in sustaining sample conductivity at low temperatures, thus making possible DLTS measurements on N1 an N2 in the radiation-induced deep-donor defect compensated material which otherwise are prevented by carrier freeze-out

  14. Small-angle neutron scattering study of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Ito, Y.; Kameyama, K.; Imai, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Takagi, T.

    1995-02-01

    The overall and internal structure of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particles was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering using the contrast variation method. The vaccine is a nearly spherical particle, and its contrast-matching point was determined to be at about 24% D 2O content, indicating that a large part of the vaccine particle is occupied by lipids and carbohydrates from the yeast. The Stuhrmann plot suggests that the surface antigens exist predominantly in the peripheral region of the particle, which is favorable to the induction of anti-virus antibodies.

  15. Calibration of a large multi-element neutron counter in the energy range 85-430 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, J A; Esterling, R J; Garvey, J; Green, M G; Harnew, N; Jane, M R; Jobes, M; Mawson, J; McMahon, T; Robertson, A W; Thomas, D H

    1978-01-01

    Describes the calibration of a large 60 element neutron counter with a threshold of 2.7 MeV equivalent electron energy. The performance of the counter has been measured in the neutron kinetic energy range 8.5-430 MeV using a neutron beam at the CERN Synchrocyclotron. The results obtained for the efficiency as a function of energy are in reasonable agreement with a Monte Carlo calculation. (7 refs).

  16. Surface damage in the small intestine of the mouse after X - or neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.E.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1981-01-01

    Damage after X-irradiation includes lateral villous collapse, progressing after 3 - 5 days to villi which sometimes show signs of vertical collapse. After neutron irradiation vertical villous collapse is established earlier, with less swelling of villous tips. It seems, therefore, that at radiobiologically equivalent doses, neutron and X-irradiation produce different levels of surface damage, with neutron irradiation being the more destructive. Early villous tip damage may perhaps be due to disruption of susceptible cells already at the extrusion zone, or to stromal damage

  17. A time-of-flight neutron reflectometer for surface and interfacial studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, J.; Ward, R.C.; Williams, W.G.

    1987-03-01

    A time-of-flight neutron reflectometer constructed for surface and interfacial studies, and installed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source, is described. One of its important design features is its inclined incident beam, since this allows both liquid and solid surface phenomena to be investigated. Measurements are presented to show the performance of the instrument, and new representative results, which include studies of liquid surfaces, Langmuir-Blodgett films, and thin film multilayers, are included as illustrations of the scientific potential of the method. (author)

  18. On determination of the dynamics of hydrocarbon molecules on catalyst's surfaces by means of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockmeyer, R.

    1976-01-01

    The intensity distribution of slow neutrons scattered by adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules contains information on the dynamics of the molecules. In this paper the scattering law for incoherently scattering molecules is derived taking into account the very different mobility perpendicular and parallel to the surface. In contrast to the well known scattering law of threedimensionally diffusing particles the scattering law for twodimensional diffusion diverges logarithmically at zero energy transfer. Conclusions relevant to the interpretation of neutron scattering data are discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems

  20. Feasibility studies on large sample neutron activation analysis using a low power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyampo, O.

    2008-06-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) can be directly applied to samples with masses in grams. Samples weights were in the range of 0.5g to 5g. Therefore, the representativity of the sample is improved as well as sensitivity. Irradiation of samples was done using a low power research reactor. The correction for the neutron self-shielding within the sample is determined from measurement of the neutron flux depression just outside the sample. Correction for gamma ray self-attenuation in the sample was performed via linear attenuation coefficients derived from transmission measurements. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of data were done using gamma ray spectrometry (HPGe detector). The results of this study on the possibilities of large sample NAA using a miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) show clearly that the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) at the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) can be used for sample analyses up to 5 grams (5g) using the pneumatic transfer systems.

  1. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Super-??Kamiokande Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl 3 . This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl 3 as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl 3 extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants

  2. Experimental Study of the Phenomenology of Spallation Neutrons in a Large Lead Block

    CERN Multimedia

    Galvez Altamirano, J; Lopez, C; Perlado, J M; Perez-Navarro, A

    2002-01-01

    %PS211 %title \\\\ \\\\The purpose of PS211 is to determine how neutrons, produced by spallation inside a large Lead volume are slowed down by undergoing a very large number of scatterings, losing each time a small fraction ($\\sim$ 1\\%) of their kinetic energy. The focus is in determining the probability for a spallation neutron produced at an energy of several MeV or more, to survive capture on Lead resonances and to reach resonance energies of materials to be transmuted, such as 5.6 eV for $^{99}$Tc. This process, of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing, involves a subtle interplay between the capture resonances of the Lead medium and of selected impurities. This phenomenology of spallation neutrons in a large Lead volume, is the physics foundation of the Fast Energy Amplifier proposed by C. Rubbia, and could open up new possibilities in the incineration of long-lived nuclear waste such as Actinides or Fission Fragments (e.g. $^{99}$Tc, $^{129}$I, etc.).\\\\ \\\\334 tons of high purity Lead, installed in t7, are exposed to...

  3. Large sample neutron activation analysis: establishment at CDTN/CNEN, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C., E-mail: menezes@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Jacimovic, Radojko, E-mail: radojko.jacimovic@ijs.s [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences. Group for Radiochemistry and Radioecology

    2011-07-01

    In order to improve the application of the neutron activation technique at CDTN/CNEN, the large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis is being established, IAEA BRA 14798 and FAPEMIG APQ-01259-09 projects. This procedure, LS-INAA, usually requires special facilities for the activation as well as for the detection. However, the TRIGA Mark I IPR R1, CDTN/CNEN has not been adapted for the irradiation and the usual gamma spectrometry has being carried out. To start the establishment of the LS-INAA, a 5g sample - IAEA/Soil 7 reference material was analyzed by k{sub 0}-standardized method. This paper is about the detector efficiency over the volume source using KayWin v2.23 and ANGLE V3.0 software. (author)

  4. Large area imaging of hydrogenous materials using fast neutrons from a DD fusion generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, J.T., E-mail: ted@adelphitech.com [Adelphi Technology Inc., 2003 East Bayshore Road, Redwood City, California 94063 (United States); Williams, D.L.; Gary, C.K.; Piestrup, M.A.; Faber, D.R.; Fuller, M.J.; Vainionpaa, J.H.; Apodaca, M. [Adelphi Technology Inc., 2003 East Bayshore Road, Redwood City, California 94063 (United States); Pantell, R.H.; Feinstein, J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-05-21

    A small-laboratory fast-neutron generator and a large area detector were used to image hydrogen-bearing materials. The overall image resolution of 2.5 mm was determined by a knife-edge measurement. Contact images of objects were obtained in 5-50 min exposures by placing them close to a plastic scintillator at distances of 1.5 to 3.2 m from the neutron source. The generator produces 10{sup 9} n/s from the DD fusion reaction at a small target. The combination of the DD-fusion generator and electronic camera permits both small laboratory and field-portable imaging of hydrogen-rich materials embedded in high density materials.

  5. Uses of AES and RGA to study neutron-irradiation-enhanced segregation to internal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessel, G.R.; White, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The high flux of point defects to sinks during neutron irradiation can result in segregation of impurity or alloy additions to metals. Such segregants can be preexisting or produced by neutron-induced transmutations. This segregation is known to strongly influence swelling and mechanical properties. Over a period of years, facilities have been developed at ORNL incorporating AES and RGA to examine irradiated materials. Capabilities of this system include in situ tensile fracture at elevated temperatures under ultrahigh vacuum 10 -10 torr and helium release monitoring. AES and normal incidence inert ion sputtering are exploited to examine segregation at the fracture surface and chemical gradients near the surface

  6. Large optical conductivity of Dirac semimetal Fermi arc surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-kun; Song, Justin C. W.

    2017-08-01

    Fermi arc surface states, a hallmark of topological Dirac semimetals, can host carriers that exhibit unusual dynamics distinct from that of their parent bulk. Here we find that Fermi arc carriers in intrinsic Dirac semimetals possess a strong and anisotropic light-matter interaction. This is characterized by a large Fermi arc optical conductivity when light is polarized transverse to the Fermi arc; when light is polarized along the Fermi arc, Fermi arc optical conductivity is significantly muted. The large surface spectral weight is locked to the wide separation between Dirac nodes and persists as a large Drude weight of Fermi arc carriers when the system is doped. As a result, large and anisotropic Fermi arc conductivity provides a novel means of optically interrogating the topological surfaces states of Dirac semimetals.

  7. Active Surface Compensation for Large Radio Telescope Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congsi Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of radio telescope antennas with large apertures, high gain, and wide frequency bands, compensation methods, such as mechanical or electronic compensation, are obviously essential to ensure the electrical performance of antennas that work in complex environments. Since traditional compensation methods can only adjust antenna pointing but not the surface accuracy, which are limited for obtaining high surface precision and aperture efficiency, active surface adjustment has become an indispensable tool in this field. Therefore, the development process of electrical performance compensation methods for radio telescope antennas is introduced. Further, a series of analyses of the five key technologies of active surface adjustment is presented. Then, four typical large antennas that have been designed with active main reflector technology are presented and compared. Finally, future research directions and suggestions for reflector antenna compensation methods based on active surface adjustment are presented.

  8. Plant protection system optimization studies to mitigate consequences of large breaks in the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, M.I.; March-Leuba, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents some of the optimization studies performed to maximize the performance of the engineered safety features and scram systems to mitigate the consequences of large breaks in the primary cooling system of the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor. The ANS is a new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides beams of neutrons for measurements and experiments in the field of material science and engineering, biology, chemistry, material analysis, and nuclear science. To achieve the high neutron fluxes for these state-of-the-art experiments, the ANS design has a very high power density core (330 MW fission with an active volume of 67.6 ell) surrounded by a large heavy-water reflector, where most neutrons are moderated. This design maximizes the number of neutrons available for experiments but results in a low heat capacity core that creates unique challenges to the design of the plant protection system

  9. Neutron physical investigations on the use of burnable poisons and gray absorber rods in large pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, C.; Katinger, T.; Kollmar, W.; Thieme, K.; Wagner, M.R.

    1977-11-01

    Methods and results of neutron physics calculations are described using burnable poisons and gray absorber rods in large PWR's. Calculated and measured values are compared, the effort for programming has been guessed. (orig.) [de

  10. Plant protection system optimization studies to mitigate consequences of large breaks in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, M.I.; March-Leuba, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents some of the optimization studies performed to maximize the performance of the engineered safety features and scram systems to mitigate the consequences of large breaks in the primary cooling system of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor

  11. Development of a large area thermal neutron detector based on a scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the development and construction of a detector prototype based on wavelength shifting fiber in combination with a scintillator has been investigated and optimized. This development aims at an alternative for large area neutron detectors based on "3He detectors, which was the main construction in the past. After the study of the components and assemblies, such as: the scintillator, the wavelength-shifting-fibers and available photomultiplier tubes, the construction of the first prototype module begun. The neutron converter was selected as a "6LiF/ZnS scintillator, which produces a big light yield per absorbed neutron. The prototype itself is square and has an edge length of 30 cm in combination with two orthogonal layers of crossed wavelength-shifting-fibers. The top fiber layer, which is closer to the "6LiF/ZnS top scintillator produces the x-coordinates and the lower layer produces the y-coordinates for each event. In the prototype, MSJ-fibers from the company Kuraray were used with 1 mm diameter and spacing in the top layer of 1.5 mm and 1 mm in the lower layer. Due to the orthogonal arrangement of the wires in the two layers, one may identify where the neutron was absorbed in the scintillator and produced the light yield. In order to reduce the light loss of the absorbed photons inside the fibers, a bending radius of greater than 20 mm was used and achieved by warming up the fibers to 80 C during the bending process. The increased temperature reduces the crack formation in the fibers which increases the light loss. At this time it is expected that a photomultiplier from Hamamatsu with 256 individual pixels for readout will be used. This H9500 flat panel photomultiplier has the advantage of readout of all fibers of the prototype in one photomultiplier housing. In combination with integrated readout electronics one can minimize the homogeneity/gain differences of the photocathode pixels, the different light loss in each fiber, and the gain

  12. A new method for protein estimation in large seeds using fast-neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, U.C.; Misra, S.C.; Rao, U.S.

    1974-01-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of protein content of large seeds, using powders of different N content. The powders were obtained by mixing glucose with amino acids in different proportions and were irradiated with and without the seeds in the MeV neutron flux. The irradiated samples were counted under identical conditions and their activities were used to calculate the protein content of the seeds. The results were compared with those obtained by conventional activation technique and were found to be in good agreement. This new method has the advantage of being non-destructive. (author)

  13. A Large Neutrino Detector Facility at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, Y.V.

    1999-01-01

    The ORLaND (Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector) collaboration proposes to construct a large neutrino detector in an underground experimental hall adjacent to the first target station of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The main mission of a large (2000 ton) Scintillation-Cherenkov detector is to measure bar ν μ -> bar ν e neutrino oscillation parameters more accurately than they can be determined in other experiments, or significantly extending the covered parameter space below (sin'20 le 10 -4 ). In addition to the neutrino oscillation measurements, ORLaND would be capable of making precise measurements of sin 2 θ W , search for the magnetic moment of the muon neutrino, and investigate the anomaly in the KARMEN time spectrum, which has been attributed to a new neutral particle. With the same facility an extensive program of measurements of neutrino nucleus cross sections is also planned to support nuclear astrophysics

  14. Predicting Surface Runoff from Catchment to Large Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Predicting surface runoff from catchment to large region is a fundamental and challenging task in hydrology. This paper presents a comprehensive review for various studies conducted for improving runoff predictions from catchment to large region in the last several decades. This review summarizes the well-established methods and discusses some promising approaches from the following four research fields: (1 modeling catchment, regional and global runoff using lumped conceptual rainfall-runoff models, distributed hydrological models, and land surface models, (2 parameterizing hydrological models in ungauged catchments, (3 improving hydrological model structure, and (4 using new remote sensing precipitation data.

  15. Neutron activation analysis to the profile surface sediments from several sites on the Havana Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Riso, O.; Gelen, A.; Lopez, N.; Gonzalez, H.; Manso, M.V.; Graciano, A.M.; Nogueira, C.A.; Beltran, J.; Soto, J.

    2003-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique was employed to analyze the surface sediments from several sites on the Havana Bay, Cuba. Measurements of heavy and trace elements in the sediments are reported. The results show that the concentration of the elements is site dependent. The data suggest that an anthropogenic input into the bay from domestic sewage and industries occurred

  16. Surface properties of a nanocrystalline Fe-Ni-Nb-B alloy after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavuk, M.; Sitek, J.; Sedlackova, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we studied the impact of a neutron radiation on the surface properties of the nanocrystalline (Fe_0_._2_5Ni_0_._7_5)_8_1Nb_7B_1_2 alloy. Changes in topography and domain structure were observed by means of magnetic force microscopy (MFM). (authors)

  17. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    of desired information. In the course, an introduction into the method and an overview on selected instruments at large scale facilities will be presented. Examples will be given that illustrate the potential of the method, mostly based on organic films. Results from the investigation of layered films......Neutron (and X-ray) reflectometry constitute complementary interfacially sensitive techniques that open access to studying the structure within thin films of both soft and hard condensed matter. Film thickness starts oxide surfaces on bulk substrates, proceeding to (pauci-)molecular layers and up...... films or films with magnetic properties. The reason is the peculiar property of neutron light since the mass of a neutron is close to the one of a proton, and since it bears a magnetic moment. The optical properties of matter, when interacting with neutrons, are described by a refractive index...

  18. Determination of planetary surfaces elemental composition by gamma and neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, B.

    2009-06-01

    Measuring the neutron and gamma ray fluxes produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with planetary surfaces allow constraining the chemical composition of the upper tens of centimeters of material. Two different angles are proposed to study neutron and gamma spectroscopy: data processing and data interpretation. The present work is in line with two experiments, the Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer (MONS) and the Selene Gamma Ray Spectrometer. A review of the processing operations applied to the MONS dataset is proposed. The resulting dataset is used to determine the depth of the hydrogen deposits below the Martian surface. In water depleted regions, neutron data allow constraining the concentration in elements likely to interact with neutrons. The confrontation of these results to those issued from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer onboard Mars Odyssey provides interesting insight on the geologic context of the Central Elysium Planitia region. These martian questions are followed by the study of the Selene gamma ray data. Although only preliminary processing has been done to date, qualitative lunar maps of major elements (Fe, Ca, Si, Ti, Mg, K, Th, U) have already been realized. (author)

  19. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  20. On the moment of inertia and surface redshift of neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenfei; Zhang Fengshou; Chen Liewen

    2001-01-01

    Using temperature, density and isospin dependent nuclear equation of state, the authors calculated the moment of inertia and surface redshift of neutron star by resolving Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation. It is found that the moment of inertia and surface redshift strongly depend on the nuclear equation of state. The equation of state with high value of un-compressibility and symmetry energy strength coefficient provides a big moment of inertia, while effective mass of nucleon has almost no effect on moment of inertia. Meanwhile, the equation of state with high value of un-compressibility and effective mass of nucleon provides a big surface redshift, while the symmetry energy strength coefficient has almost no effect on surface redshift of neutron star. The relationship between moment of inertia and mass is also given. By comparing the calculated results with the one obtained semi-empirically from astronomy, the authors find that a softer equation of state can provide a more reasonable result

  1. PANDORA, a large volume low-energy neutron detector with real-time neutron-gamma discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, L.; Sasano, M.; Yako, K.; Yasuda, J.; Baba, H.; Ota, S.; Uesaka, T.

    2017-09-01

    The PANDORA (Particle Analyzer Neutron Detector Of Real-time Acquisition) system, which was developed for use in inverse kinematics experiments with unstable isotope beams, is a neutron detector based on a plastic scintillator coupled to a digital readout. PANDORA can be used for any reaction study involving the emission of low energy neutrons (100 keV-10 MeV) where background suppression and an increased signal-to-noise ratio are crucial. The digital readout system provides an opportunity for pulse shape discrimination (PSD) of the detected particles as well as intelligent triggering based on PSD. The figure of merit results of PANDORA are compared to the data in literature. Using PANDORA, 91 ± 1% of all detected neutrons can be separated, while 91 ± 1% of the detected gamma rays can be excluded, reducing the gamma ray background by one order of magnitude.

  2. Virtual neutron scattering experiments - Training and preparing students for large-scale facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hougaard Overgaard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dansk Vi beskriver, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter kan udnyttes i et læringsdesign ved at forberede de studerende til hands-on-eksperimenter ved storskalafaciliteter. Vi illustrerer designet ved at vise, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter bruges på Niels Bohr Institutets kandidatkursus om neutronspredning. I den sidste uge af kurset, rejser studerende til et storskala neutronspredningsfacilitet for at udføre neutronspredningseksperimenter. Vi bruger studerendes udsagn om deres oplevelser til at argumentere for, at arbejdet med virtuelle experimenter forbereder de studerende til at engagere sig mere frugtbart med eksperimenter ved at lade dem fokusere på fysikken og relevante data i stedet for instrumenternes funktion. Vi hævder, at det er, fordi de kan overføre deres erfaringer med virtuelle eksperimenter til rigtige eksperimenter. Vi finder dog, at læring stadig er situeret i den forstand, at kun kendskab til bestemte eksperimenter overføres. Vi afslutter med at diskutere de muligheder, som virtuelle eksperimenter giver. English We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering. In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred. We proceed to

  3. Improvement to surface lagging systems in a nuclear reactor, particularly of the fast neutron type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1979-01-01

    Improvements to surface lagging systems in a nuclear reactor, particularly of the fast neutron kind. This system is composed of an assembly of panels each formed of a stack of metal fabric or trellis held against the surface to be protected, by a double fixing system comprising (a) a tubular component passing through a hole in the panel and applying it against the surface through a bearing plate, and (b) a bolt fitted in the centre of the tubular component, also secured to the surface and holding a washer capable of preventing the fall of the tubular component and the panel should the tubular component fracture [fr

  4. The influence of fast neutron irradiation on the noise properties of silicon surface-barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, W.; Korbel, K.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility to the fast neutron irradiation of silicon surface-barrier detectors has been investigated. It was shown that the 1/f-noise decreases substantially with increasing fluence in the range from 10 10 n/cm 2 to 10 11 n/cm 2 . The deterioration of the detector performance is caused mainly by the positively-charged defects induced by the radiation. The critical value of the neutron fluence, at which the detector performance begins to be worsened was also determined. 5 refs., 5 figs. (author)

  5. Direct observation of the near-surface layer in Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, K.H.; Whan, T.; Fox, J.H.; Luo, H.; Viehland, D.; Li, J.F.; Stock, C.; Shirane, G.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially resolved neutron diffraction as a function of crystal depth in Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 reveals the presence of a distinct near-surface region where a strong distortion in the lattice exists. A dramatic change in both the lattice constant and the Bragg peak intensity as a function of crystal depth is observed to occur in this region over a length scale ∼100 μm. This confirms a previous assertion, based on a comparison between high-energy x rays and neutrons, that such a near surface region exists in the relaxors. Consequences to both single crystal and powder diffraction measurements and previous bulk neutron diffraction measurements on large single crystals are discussed

  6. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  7. The use of large area silicon sensors for thermal neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.L.; Swanson, F.; Kesselman, M.

    1994-01-01

    The use of large area planar silicon detectors coupled with gadolinium foils has been investigated to develop a thermal neutron detector having a large area-efficiency (Aε) product. Noise levels due to high detector capacitance limit the size of silicon detectors that can be utilized. Calculations using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, have been made to determine the variation of intrinsic detection efficiency as a function of the discriminator threshold level required to eliminate the detector noise. Measurements of the noise levels for planar silicon detectors of various resistivities (400, 3000 and 5000 Ω cm) have been made and the optimal detector area-efficiency products have been determined. The response of a Si-Gd-Si sandwich detector with areas between 1 cm 2 and 10.5 cm 2 is presented and the effects of the detector capacitance and reverse current are discussed. ((orig.))

  8. The use of large area silicon sensors for thermal neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, R.L. (Research and Development Center, Mail Stop: A01-26, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY 11714 (United States)); Swanson, F. (Research and Development Center, Mail Stop: A01-26, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY 11714 (United States)); Kesselman, M. (Research and Development Center, Mail Stop: A01-26, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY 11714 (United States))

    1994-12-30

    The use of large area planar silicon detectors coupled with gadolinium foils has been investigated to develop a thermal neutron detector having a large area-efficiency (A[epsilon]) product. Noise levels due to high detector capacitance limit the size of silicon detectors that can be utilized. Calculations using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, have been made to determine the variation of intrinsic detection efficiency as a function of the discriminator threshold level required to eliminate the detector noise. Measurements of the noise levels for planar silicon detectors of various resistivities (400, 3000 and 5000 [Omega] cm) have been made and the optimal detector area-efficiency products have been determined. The response of a Si-Gd-Si sandwich detector with areas between 1 cm[sup 2] and 10.5 cm[sup 2] is presented and the effects of the detector capacitance and reverse current are discussed. ((orig.))

  9. PREFACE: Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    measurement. Advances in such technologies are bringing with them new opportunities in surface and buried interface science. In the not too distant future, we will publish a special issue or a book detailing such progress. Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques contents Lateral uniformity in chemical composition along a buried reaction front in polymers using off-specular reflectivity Kristopher A Lavery, Vivek M Prabhu, Sushil Satija and Wen-li Wu Orientation dependence of Pd growth on Au electrode surfaces M Takahasi, K Tamura, J Mizuki, T Kondo and K Uosaki A grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering analysis on capped Ge nanodots in layer structures Hiroshi Okuda, Masayuki Kato, Keiji Kuno, Shojiro Ochiai, Noritaka Usami, Kazuo Nakajima and Osami Sakata High resolution grazing-incidence in-plane x-ray diffraction for measuring the strain of a Si thin layer Kazuhiko Omote X-ray analysis of mesoporous silica thin films templated by Brij58 surfactant S Fall, M Kulij and A Gibaud Review of the applications of x-ray refraction and the x-ray waveguide phenomenon to estimation of film structures Kouichi Hayashi Epitaxial growth of largely mismatched crystals on H-terminated Si(111) surfaces Hidehito Asaoka Novel TiO2/ZnO multilayer mirrors at 'water-window' wavelengths fabricated by atomic layer epitaxy H Kumagai, Y Tanaka, M Murata, Y Masuda and T Shinagawa Depth-selective structural analysis of thin films using total-external-reflection x-ray diffraction Tomoaki Kawamura and Hiroo Omi Structures of Yb nanoparticle thin films grown by deposition in He and N2 gas atmospheres: AFM and x-ray reflectivity studies Martin Jerab and Kenji Sakurai Ga and As composition profiles in InP/GaInAs/InP heterostructures—x-ray CTR scattering and cross-sectional STM measurements Yoshikazu Takeda, Masao Tabuchi and Arao Nakamura Polarized neutron reflectivity study of a thermally treated MnIr/CoFe exchange bias system Naoki

  10. A Monte-Carlo code for neutron efficiency calculations for large volume Gd-loaded liquid scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzcinski, A.; Zwieglinski, B. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Lynen, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Pochodzalla, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    This paper reports on a Monte-Carlo program, MSX, developed to evaluate the performance of large-volume, Gd-loaded liquid scintillation detectors used in neutron multiplicity measurements. The results of simulations are presented for the detector intended to count neutrons emitted by the excited target residue in coincidence with the charged products of the projectile fragmentation following relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The latter products could be detected with the ALADIN magnetic spectrometer at GSI-Darmstadt. (orig.) 61 refs.

  11. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  12. Measurement and modeling of polarized specular neutron reflectivity in large magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranville, Brian B; Kirby, Brian J; Grutter, Alexander J; Kienzle, Paul A; Majkrzak, Charles F; Liu, Yaohua; Dennis, Cindi L

    2016-08-01

    The presence of a large applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the vacuum energy states for spin-up and spin-down neutrons. For polarized neutron reflectometry, this must be included in the reference potential energy of the Schrödinger equation that is used to calculate the expected scattering from a magnetic layered structure. For samples with magnetization that is purely parallel or antiparallel to the applied field which defines the quantization axis, there is no mixing of the spin states (no spin-flip scattering) and so this additional potential is constant throughout the scattering region. When there is non-collinear magnetization in the sample, however, there will be significant scattering from one spin state into the other, and the reference potentials will differ between the incoming and outgoing wavefunctions, changing the angle and intensities of the scattering. The theory of the scattering and recommended experimental practices for this type of measurement are presented, as well as an example measurement.

  13. A modular approach to creating large engineered cartilage surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Audrey C; Chui, Wan Fung; Zeng, Anne Y; Nandy, Aditya; Liebenberg, Ellen; Carraro, Carlo; Kazakia, Galateia; Alliston, Tamara; O'Connell, Grace D

    2018-01-23

    Native articular cartilage has limited capacity to repair itself from focal defects or osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering has provided a promising biological treatment strategy that is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. However, current approaches in translating these techniques to developing large engineered tissues remains a significant challenge. In this study, we present a method for developing large-scale engineered cartilage surfaces through modular fabrication. Modular Engineered Tissue Surfaces (METS) uses the well-known, but largely under-utilized self-adhesion properties of de novo tissue to create large scaffolds with nutrient channels. Compressive mechanical properties were evaluated throughout METS specimens, and the tensile mechanical strength of the bonds between attached constructs was evaluated over time. Raman spectroscopy, biochemical assays, and histology were performed to investigate matrix distribution. Results showed that by Day 14, stable connections had formed between the constructs in the METS samples. By Day 21, bonds were robust enough to form a rigid sheet and continued to increase in size and strength over time. Compressive mechanical properties and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of METS and individual constructs increased significantly over time. The METS technique builds on established tissue engineering accomplishments of developing constructs with GAG composition and compressive properties approaching native cartilage. This study demonstrated that modular fabrication is a viable technique for creating large-scale engineered cartilage, which can be broadly applied to many tissue engineering applications and construct geometries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenstrup, S.

    Briefly surveys recent developments in research work with ultracold neutrons (neutrons of very low velocity, up to 10 m/s at up to 10 -7 eV and 10 -3 K). Slow neutrons can be detected in an ionisation chamber filled with B 10 F 3 . Very slow neutrons can be used for investigations into the dipole moment of neutrons. Neutrons of large wave length have properties similar to those of light. The limit angle for total reflection is governed by the wave length and by the material. Total reflection can be used to filter ultracold neutrons out of the moderator material of a reactor. Total reflection can also be used to store ultracold neutrons but certain problems with storage have not yet been clarified. Slow neutrons can be made to lose speed in a neutron turbine, and come out as ultracold neutrons. A beam of ultracold neutrons could be used in a neutron microscope. (J.S.)

  15. Specifics of surface runoff contents and treatment in large cities

    OpenAIRE

    V.N. Chechevichkin; N.I. Vatin

    2014-01-01

    The degree of surface runoff pollution in large cities has been assessed in modern conditions in the case study of production sites of St. Petersburg. Increased content of petroleum derivatives and heavy metal ions both in rainwater runoff and especially in snowmelt runoff has been revealed. It has been established that the composition of infiltration runoff from the newly built-up sites within the city limits commonly depends on their background, especially in the places of former unaut...

  16. Utilization of Large Scale Surface Models for Detailed Visibility Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caha, J.; Kačmařík, M.

    2017-11-01

    This article demonstrates utilization of large scale surface models with small spatial resolution and high accuracy, acquired from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle scanning, for visibility analyses. The importance of large scale data for visibility analyses on the local scale, where the detail of the surface model is the most defining factor, is described. The focus is not only the classic Boolean visibility, that is usually determined within GIS, but also on so called extended viewsheds that aims to provide more information about visibility. The case study with examples of visibility analyses was performed on river Opava, near the Ostrava city (Czech Republic). The multiple Boolean viewshed analysis and global horizon viewshed were calculated to determine most prominent features and visibility barriers of the surface. Besides that, the extended viewshed showing angle difference above the local horizon, which describes angular height of the target area above the barrier, is shown. The case study proved that large scale models are appropriate data source for visibility analyses on local level. The discussion summarizes possible future applications and further development directions of visibility analyses.

  17. On the accuracy of protein determination in large biological samples by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasviki, K. [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Radiation Protection, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attikis 15310 (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Stamatelatos, I.E. [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Radiation Protection, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attikis 15310 (Greece)], E-mail: ion@ipta.demokritos.gr; Yannakopoulou, E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attikis 15310 (Greece); Papadopoulou, P. [Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, NAGREF, Lycovrissi, Attikis 14123 (Greece); Kalef-Ezra, J. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece)

    2007-10-15

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been developed for the determination of nitrogen and thus total protein in large volume biological samples or the whole body of small animals. In the present work, the accuracy of nitrogen determination by PGNAA in phantoms of known composition as well as in four raw ground meat samples of about 1 kg mass was examined. Dumas combustion and Kjeldahl techniques were also used for the assessment of nitrogen concentration in the meat samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the concentrations assessed by the three techniques. The results of this work demonstrate the applicability of PGNAA for the assessment of total protein in biological samples of 0.25-1.5 kg mass, such as a meat sample or the body of small animal even in vivo with an equivalent radiation dose of about 40 mSv.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering and calorimetric studies of large unilamellar vesicles of the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, P.C.; Gaulin, B.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (CANADA); Epand, R.M. [Department of Biochemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (CANADA); Wignall, G.D.; Lin, J.S. [Center for Small-Angle Scattering Research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    1999-03-01

    High-resolution differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments have been conducted on large unilamellar vesicles (LUV{close_quote}s) of the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in excess water. The DSC results indicate a phase transition at temperatures corresponding to the gel (L{sub {beta}{sup {prime}}}) to ripple (P{sub {beta}{sup {prime}}}) phase transition seen in multilamellar vesicles of DPPC while the SANS experiments provide direct evidence for the formation of the P{sub {beta}{sup {prime}}} phase in these systems. In addition, it is shown that SANS is an effective technique for extracting structural parameters such as vesicle radius and thickness in LUV model membrane systems. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. On the accuracy of protein determination in large biological samples by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasviki, K.; Stamatelatos, I.E.; Yannakopoulou, E.; Papadopoulou, P.; Kalef-Ezra, J.

    2007-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been developed for the determination of nitrogen and thus total protein in large volume biological samples or the whole body of small animals. In the present work, the accuracy of nitrogen determination by PGNAA in phantoms of known composition as well as in four raw ground meat samples of about 1 kg mass was examined. Dumas combustion and Kjeldahl techniques were also used for the assessment of nitrogen concentration in the meat samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the concentrations assessed by the three techniques. The results of this work demonstrate the applicability of PGNAA for the assessment of total protein in biological samples of 0.25-1.5 kg mass, such as a meat sample or the body of small animal even in vivo with an equivalent radiation dose of about 40 mSv

  20. Neutron Star Astronomy in the era of the European Extremely Large Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignani, Roberto P.

    2011-01-01

    About 25 isolated neutron stars (INSs) are now detected in the optical domain, mainly thanks to the HST and to VLT-class telescopes. The European Extremely Large Telescope(E-ELT) will yield ∼100 new identifications, many of which from the follow-up of SKA, IXO, and Fermi observations. Moreover, the E-ELT will allow to carry out, on a much larger sample, INS observations which still challenge VLT-class telescopes, enabling studies on the structure and composition of the NS interior, of its atmosphere and magnetosphere, as well as to search for debris discs. In this contribution, I outline future perspectives for NS optical astronomy with the E-ELT.

  1. Calculation of the neutron noise induced by periodic deformations of a large sodium-cooled fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylbersztejn, F.; Tran, H.N.; Pazsit, I.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the calculation of the neutron noise induced by small-amplitude stationary radial variations of the core size (core expansion/compaction, also called core flowering) of a large sodium-cooled fast reactor. The calculations were performed on a realistic model of the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) core with a thermal output of 3600 MW(thermal), using a multigroup neutron noise simulator. The multigroup cross sections and their fluctuations that represent the core geometry changes for the neutron noise calculations were generated by the code ERANOS. The space and energy dependences of the noise source represented by the core expansion/compaction and the induced neutron noise are calculated and discussed. (authors)

  2. Determination of Substances Content of Soil Surface Using Fast Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elin Nuraini; Elisabeth; Sunardi

    2002-01-01

    Determination of substances content of soil surface using neutron activation analysis has been performed. The aim of this research is to determine whether there are any dangerous, hazardous and toxic substances that released from The Research and Development Center for Advanced Technology (RDCAT) as a government institution has possibility in releasing that substances to the environment by surface water, sewage or rain water that give any dangerous the environmental. The fast neutron activation analysis was used to analyze the type and concentration of substances qualitative and quantitatively. The quantitative analysis was performed using relative method. Samples were counted using NaI(TI) detector. The result showed that there are several substances such as Mn-55, Fe-56, P-31, Al-27. Zn,65 and Mg-24. And there are found any hazardous, dangerous and toxic substances in the samples that causing any danger to human and environment. (author)

  3. Behavior of plasma facing surface in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Nobuta, Y.; Sagara, A.

    2002-01-01

    Material probes have been installed at the inner walls along poloidal direction in LHD from the first experimental campaign. After each campaign, the impurity deposition and the gas retention have been examined to clarify the plasma surface interaction and the degree of wall cleaning. In the 2nd campaign, the entire wall was considerably cleaned by helium glow discharge conditionings. For the 3rd and 4th campaigns, graphite tiles were installed at entire divertor strike region, and then the wall condition significantly changed compared to the case of stainless steel wall. The erosion of graphite took place during the main discharges and the eroded carbon deposited on the entire wall. In particular, the deposition thickness was large at the wall far from the plasma. Since the entire wall was well carbonized, amount of retained discharge gas such as H and He became large. In particular, the helium retention was large at the position close to the anodes used for helium glow discharge cleanings. One characteristics of the LHD wall is a large retention of helium gas since the wall temperature is limited below 368 K. In order to reduce the recycling of discharge gas, the wall heating before the experimental campaign and the surface heating between the main discharge shots are planned. (author)

  4. Behavior of plasma facing surface in the large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, T.; Nobuta, Y. [Hokkaido Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Sagara, A. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    2002-11-01

    Material probes have been installed at the inner walls along poloidal direction in LHD from the first experimental campaign. After each campaign, the impurity deposition and the gas retention have been examined to clarify the plasma surface interaction and the degree of wall cleaning. In the 2nd campaign, the entire wall was considerably cleaned by helium glow discharge conditionings. For the 3rd and 4th campaigns, graphite tiles were installed at entire divertor strike region, and then the wall condition significantly changed compared to the case of stainless steel wall. The erosion of graphite took place during the main discharges and the eroded carbon deposited on the entire wall. In particular, the deposition thickness was large at the wall far from the plasma. Since the entire wall was well carbonized, amount of retained discharge gas such as H and He became large. In particular, the helium retention was large at the position close to the anodes used for helium glow discharge cleanings. One characteristics of the LHD wall is a large retention of helium gas since the wall temperature is limited below 368 K. In order to reduce the recycling of discharge gas, the wall heating before the experimental campaign and the surface heating between the main discharge shots are planned. (author)

  5. Behavior of plasma facing surfaces in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Nobuta, Y.; Sagara, A.

    2003-01-01

    Material probes have been installed at the inner walls along the poloidal direction in LHD from the first experimental campaign. After each campaign, the impurity deposition and the gas retention have been examined to clarify the plasma surface interaction and the degree of wall cleaning. In the 2nd campaign, the entire wall was thoroughly cleaned by helium glow discharge conditioning. For the 3rd and 4th campaigns, graphite tiles were installed over the entire divertor strike region, and then the wall condition was significantly changed compared to the case of a stainless steel wall. Graphite erosion took place during the main discharges and the eroded carbon was deposited on the entire wall. In particular, the deposition thickness was large at the wall far from the plasma. Since the entire wall was well carbonized, the amount of retained discharge gases such as H and He became large. In particular, the helium retention was large at the position close to the anodes used for helium glow discharge cleanings. One characteristic of the LHD wall is a large retention of helium gas since the wall temperature is limited to below 368 K. In order to reduce the recycling of discharge gas, wall heating before the experimental campaign and surface heating between the main discharge shots are planned. (author)

  6. Behavior of plasma facing surface in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Nobuta, Y.; Sagara, A.

    2002-10-01

    Material probes have been installed at the inner walls along poloidal direction in LHD from the first experimental campaign. After each the campaign, the impurity deposition and the gas retention have been examined to clarify the plasma surface interaction and the degree of wall cleaning. In the 2nd campaign, the entire wall was considerably cleaned by helium glow discharge conditionings. For the 3rd and 4th campaigns, graphite tiles were installed at entire divertor strike region, and then the wall condition significantly changed compared to the case of stainless steel wall. The erosion of graphite took place during the main discharges and the eroded carbon deposited on the entire wall. In particular, the deposition thickness was large at the wall far from the plasma. Since the entire wall was well carbonized, amount of retained discharge gas such as H and He became large. In particular, the helium retention was large at the position close to the anodes used for helium glow discharge cleanings. One characteristics of the LHD wall is a large retention of helium gas since the wall temperature is limited below 368 K. In order to reduce the recycling of discharge gas, the wall heating before the experimental campaign and the surface heating between the main discharge shots are planned. (author)

  7. Development of Large Sample Neutron Activation Technique for New Applications in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoharojanaphand, S.; Tippayakul, C.; Wonglee, S.; Channuie, J.

    2018-01-01

    The development of the Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis (LSNAA) in Thailand is presented in this paper. The technique had been firstly developed with rice sample as the test subject. The Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1 (TRR-1/M1) was used as the neutron source. The first step was to select and characterize an appropriate irradiation facility for the research. An out-core irradiation facility (A4 position) was first attempted. The results performed with the A4 facility were then used as guides for the subsequent experiments with the thermal column facility. The characterization of the thermal column was performed with Cu-wire to determine spatial distribution without and with rice sample. The flux depression without rice sample was observed to be less than 30% while the flux depression with rice sample increased to within 60%. The flux monitors internal to the rice sample were used to determine average flux over the rice sample. The gamma selfshielding effect during gamma measurement was corrected using the Monte Carlo simulation. The ratio between the efficiencies of the volume source and the point source for each energy point was calculated by the MCNPX code. The research team adopted the k0-NAA methodology to calculate the element concentration in the research. The k0-NAA program which developed by IAEA was set up to simulate the conditions of the irradiation and measurement facilities used in this research. The element concentrations in the bulk rice sample were then calculated taking into account the flux depression and gamma efficiency corrections. At the moment, the results still show large discrepancies with the reference values. However, more research on the validation will be performed to identify sources of errors. Moreover, this LS-NAA technique was introduced for the activation analysis of the IAEA archaeological mock-up. The results are provided in this report. (author)

  8. Applications of Neutron Scattering in the Chemical Industry: Proton Dynamics of Highly Dispersed Materials, Characterization of Fuel Cell Catalysts, and Catalysts from Large-Scale Chemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peter W.; Parker, Stewart F.

    The attractiveness of neutron scattering techniques for the detailed characterization of materials of high degrees of dispersity and structural complexity as encountered in the chemical industry is discussed. Neutron scattering picks up where other analytical methods leave off because of the physico-chemical properties of finely divided products and materials whose absorption behavior toward electromagnetic radiation and electrical conductivity causes serious problems. This is demonstrated by presenting typical applications from large-scale production technology and industrial catalysis. These include the determination of the proton-related surface chemistry of advanced materials that are used as reinforcing fillers in the manufacture of tires, where interrelations between surface chemistry, rheological properties, improved safety, and significant reduction of fuel consumption are the focus of recent developments. Neutron scattering allows surface science studies of the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on nanodispersed, supported precious metal particles of fuel cell catalysts under in situ loading at realistic gas pressures of about 1 bar. Insight into the occupation of catalytically relevant surface sites provides valuable information about the catalyst in the working state and supplies essential scientific input for tailoring better catalysts by technologists. The impact of deactivation phenomena on industrial catalysts by coke deposition, chemical transformation of carbonaceous deposits, and other processes in catalytic hydrogenation processes that result in significant shortening of the time of useful operation in large-scale plants can often be traced back in detail to surface or bulk properties of catalysts or materials of catalytic relevance. A better understanding of avoidable or unavoidable aspects of catalyst deactivation phenomena under certain in-process conditions and the development of effective means for reducing deactivation leads to more energy

  9. I. Surface properties of neutron-rich nuclei. II. Pion condensation at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolehmainen, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    In part I, the energy density formalism, the Thomas-Fermi approximation, and Skyrme-type interactions were used to describe the energy density of a semi-infinite slab of neturon-rich nuclear matter at zero temperature. The existence of a drip phase at low proton fractions is allowed in addition to the more dense nuclear phase, and various bulk properties of both phases are found when the system is in equilibrium. The usual definition of the surface energy is extended to apply to the case where drip is present. Assuming a Fermi function type density profile, a constrained variational calculation is performed to determine the neutron and proton surface diffuseness parameters, the thickness of the neutron skin, and the surface energy. Results are obtained for proton fractions reanging from 0.5 (symmetric nuclear matter) to zero (pure neutron matter) for most Skyrme-type interactions in common use. The results are in close agreement with the predictions of the droplet model, as well as with the results of more exact calculations in those cases where the more exact results exist (only for symmetric or nearly symmetric matter in most cases). Significantly different asymmetry dependences for different interactions are found. In part II, several simple but increasingly complex models are used to calculate the threshold for charged pion condensation in neutron-rich nuclear matter at finite temperature. Unlike in mean field theory descriptions of pion condensation, the effects of thermal excitations of the pion field are included. The thermal pion excitations have two important effects: first, to modify the phase diagram qualitatively from that predicted by mean field theory, and second, to make the phase transition to a spatially nonuniform condensed state at finite temperature always first, rather than second, order

  10. Isotropic Surface Remeshing without Large and Small Angles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Dong-Ming; Liu, Xiaohan; Tang, Chengcheng; Guo, Jianwei; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wonka, Peter

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for isotropic surface remeshing which progressively eliminates obtuse triangles and improves small angles. The main novelty of the proposed approach is a simple vertex insertion scheme that facilitates the removal of large angles, and a vertex removal operation that improves the distribution of small angles. In combination with other standard local mesh operators, e.g., connectivity optimization and local tangential smoothing, our algorithm is able to remesh efficiently a low-quality mesh surface. Our approach can be applied directly or used as a post-processing step following other remeshing approaches. Our method has a similar computational efficiency to the fastest approach available, i.e., real-time adaptive remeshing [1]. In comparison with state-of-the-art approaches, our method consistently generates better results based on evaluations using different metrics.

  11. Isotropic Surface Remeshing without Large and Small Angles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yiqun

    2018-05-18

    We introduce a novel algorithm for isotropic surface remeshing which progressively eliminates obtuse triangles and improves small angles. The main novelty of the proposed approach is a simple vertex insertion scheme that facilitates the removal of large angles, and a vertex removal operation that improves the distribution of small angles. In combination with other standard local mesh operators, e.g., connectivity optimization and local tangential smoothing, our algorithm is able to remesh efficiently a low-quality mesh surface. Our approach can be applied directly or used as a post-processing step following other remeshing approaches. Our method has a similar computational efficiency to the fastest approach available, i.e., real-time adaptive remeshing [1]. In comparison with state-of-the-art approaches, our method consistently generates better results based on evaluations using different metrics.

  12. Large solid-angle polarisation analysis at thermal neutron wavelengths using a sup 3 He spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Heil, W; Cywinski, R; Humblot, H; Ritter, C; Roberts, T W; Stewart, J R

    2002-01-01

    The strongly spin-dependent absorption of neutrons in nuclear spin-polarised sup 3 He opens up the possibility of polarising neutrons from reactors and spallation sources over the full kinematical range of cold, thermal and hot neutrons. In this paper we describe the first large solid-angle polarisation analysis measurement using a sup 3 He neutron spin filter at thermal neutron wavelengths (lambda=2.5 A). This experiment was performed on the two-axis diffractometer D1B at the Institut Laue-Langevin using a banana-shaped filter cell (530 cm sup 3 ) filled with sup 3 He gas with a polarisation of P=52% at a pressure of 2.7 bar. A comparison is made with a previous measurement on D7 using a cold neutron beam on the same sample, i.e. amorphous ErY sub 6 Ni sub 3. Using uniaxial polarisation analysis both the nuclear and magnetic cross-sections could be extracted over the range of scattering-vectors [0.5<=Q(A sup - sup 1)<=3.5]. The results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the D7-data, whe...

  13. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Large Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichman, P.B.; Lavely, E.M.; Ritzwoller, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The general theory of surface NMR imaging of large electromagnetically active systems is considered, motivated by geophysical applications. A general imaging equation is derived for the NMR voltage response, valid for arbitrary transmitter and receiver loop geometry and arbitrary conductivity structure of the sample. When the conductivity grows to the point where the electromagnetic skin depth becomes comparable to the sample size, significant diffusive retardation effects occur that strongly affect the signal. Accounting for these now allows more accurate imaging than previously possible. It is shown that the time constant T 1 may in principle be inferred directly from the diffusive tail of the signal. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  14. Attenuation of Reactor Gamma Radiation and Fast Neutrons Through Large Single-Crystal Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2009-01-01

    A generalized formula is given which, for neutron energies in the range 10-4< E< 10 eV and gamma rays with average energy 2 MeV , permits calculation of the transmission properties of several single crystal materials important for neutron scattering instrumentation. A computer program Filter was developed which permits the calculation of attenuation of gamma radiation, nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg-scattering cross-sections as a function of materials constants, temperature and neutron energy. The applicability of the deduced formula along with the code checked from the obtained agreement between the calculated and experimental neutron transmission through various single-crystals A feasibility study for use of Si, Ge, Pb, Bi and sapphire is detailed in terms of optimum crystal thickness, mosaic spread and cutting plane for efficient transmission of thermal reactor neutrons and for rejection of the accompanying fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  15. Large-Area Neutron Detector based on Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.; Ianakiev, K.D.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Makela, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    Prototypes of a Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber (LiPMIC) have been in development for the past two years for the purpose of providing large-area neutron detector. this system would be suitable for remote deployment for homeland security and counterterrorism needs at borders, ports, and nuclear facilities. A prototype of LiPMIC is expected to provide a similar level of performance to the current industry-standard, He-3 proportional counters, while keeping the initial cost of procurement down by an order of magnitude, especially where large numbers of detectors are required. The overall design aspect and the efficiency optimization process is discussed. Specifically, the MCNP simulations of a single-cell prototype were performed and benchmarked with the experimental results. MCNP simulations of a three dimensional array design show intrinsic efficiency comparable to that of an array of He-3 proportional counters. LiPMIC has shown steady progress toward fulfilling the design expectations and future design modification and optimization are discussed.

  16. General-relativistic Large-eddy Simulations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, David, E-mail: dradice@astro.princeton.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    The flow inside remnants of binary neutron star (NS) mergers is expected to be turbulent, because of magnetohydrodynamics instability activated at scales too small to be resolved in simulations. To study the large-scale impact of these instabilities, we develop a new formalism, based on the large-eddy simulation technique, for the modeling of subgrid-scale turbulent transport in general relativity. We apply it, for the first time, to the simulation of the late-inspiral and merger of two NSs. We find that turbulence can significantly affect the structure and survival time of the merger remnant, as well as its gravitational-wave (GW) and neutrino emissions. The former will be relevant for GW observation of merging NSs. The latter will affect the composition of the outflow driven by the merger and might influence its nucleosynthetic yields. The accretion rate after black hole formation is also affected. Nevertheless, we find that, for the most likely values of the turbulence mixing efficiency, these effects are relatively small and the GW signal will be affected only weakly by the turbulence. Thus, our simulations provide a first validation of all existing post-merger GW models.

  17. A Charged Particle Veto Wall for the Large Area Neutron Array (LANA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, K.; Chajecki, Z.; Anderson, C.; Bromell, J.; Brown, K.; Crosby, J.; Kodali, S.; Lynch, W. G.; Morfouace, P.; Sweany, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Tsang, C.; Brett, J. J.; Swaim, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    Comparison of neutrons and protons emitted in heavy ion collisions is one of the observables to probe symmetry energy, which is related to the properties of neutron star. In general, neutrons are difficult to measure and neutron detectors are not as easy to use or as widely available as charged particle detectors. Two neutron walls (NW) called LANA exist at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. Although the NSCL NW attains excellent discrimination of γ rays and neutron, it fails to discriminate charged particles from neutrons. To ensure near 100% rejection of charged particles, a Charged Particle Veto Wall (VW) is being jointly built by Michigan State University and Western Michigan University. It will be placed in front of one NW. To increase efficiency in detecting neutrons, the second neutron wall is stacked behind it. In this presentation, I will discuss the design, construction and testing of the VW together with the LANA in preparation of two approved NSCL experiments to probe the density and momentum dependence of the symmetry energy potentials in the equation state of the asymmetric nuclear matter. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY 1565546.

  18. The spallation neutron source SINQ. A new large facility for research at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.S.; Crawford, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document is intended to familiarize the non-specialist with the principles of neutron scattering and some of its applications. It presents an overview of the foundations of neutron scattering, the basic types of instruments used, and their principles of operation. The design concept and some technical details of the spallation neutron source are described for the benefit of the scientifically or technically interested reader. In future this source will form the heart of the instruments available to PSI's wide community of neutron scattering researchers. (author) 32 figs., 1 tab

  19. Large chiral diffeomorphisms on Riemann surfaces and W-algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandelloni, G.; Lazzarini, S.

    2006-01-01

    The diffeomorphism action lifted on truncated (chiral) Taylor expansion of a complex scalar field over a Riemann surface is presented in the paper under the name of large diffeomorphisms. After an heuristic approach, we show how a linear truncation in the Taylor expansion can generate an algebra of symmetry characterized by some structure functions. Such a linear truncation is explicitly realized by introducing the notion of Forsyth frame over the Riemann surface with the help of a conformally covariant algebraic differential equation. The large chiral diffeomorphism action is then implemented through a Becchi-Rouet-Stora (BRS) formulation (for a given order of truncation) leading to a more algebraic setup. In this context the ghost fields behave as holomorphically covariant jets. Subsequently, the link with the so-called W-algebras is made explicit once the ghost parameters are turned from jets into tensorial ghost ones. We give a general solution with the help of the structure functions pertaining to all the possible truncations lower or equal to the given order. This provides another contribution to the relationship between Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) flows and W-diffeomorphims

  20. Validating modeled turbulent heat fluxes across large freshwater surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, B. M.; Fujisaki-Manome, A.; Gronewold, A.; Anderson, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Blanken, P.; Spence, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Xiao, C.; Charusambot, U.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat are important physical processes that influence the energy and water budgets of the Great Lakes. Validation and improvement of bulk flux algorithms to simulate these turbulent heat fluxes are critical for accurate prediction of hydrodynamics, water levels, weather, and climate over the region. Here we consider five heat flux algorithms from several model systems; the Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model, the Weather Research and Forecasting model, and the Large Lake Thermodynamics Model, which are used in research and operational environments and concentrate on different aspects of the Great Lakes' physical system, but interface at the lake surface. The heat flux algorithms were isolated from each model and driven by meteorological data from over-lake stations in the Great Lakes Evaporation Network. The simulation results were compared with eddy covariance flux measurements at the same stations. All models show the capacity to the seasonal cycle of the turbulent heat fluxes. Overall, the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment algorithm in FVCOM has the best agreement with eddy covariance measurements. Simulations with the other four algorithms are overall improved by updating the parameterization of roughness length scales of temperature and humidity. Agreement between modelled and observed fluxes notably varied with geographical locations of the stations. For example, at the Long Point station in Lake Erie, observed fluxes are likely influenced by the upwind land surface while the simulations do not take account of the land surface influence, and therefore the agreement is worse in general.

  1. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Caliandro, G.A.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Cameron, R.A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Caraveo, P.A.; /Brera Observ.; Casandjian, J.M.; /AIM, Saclay; Cecchi, C.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Charles, E.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Swedish Acad. Sci. /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /AIM, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville /INFN, Padua; /more authors..

    2012-08-17

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  2. Effect of large neutron excess in the region of the Giant Dipole and Quadrupole Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, E G

    1999-01-01

    We study the dipole and quadrupole modes of neutron rich nuclei within the selfconsistent HF + RPA. The presence of neutron skin enhances the mixing of isoscalar and isovector modes. Then it is possible to excite modes of isovector character by an isoscalar probe. In particular we analize the excitation of dipole modes by alpha scattering. The excitation of compressional isoscalar mode is also studied.

  3. Methodology for Quantitative Analysis of Large Liquid Samples with Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis using Am-Be Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idiri, Z.; Mazrou, H.; Beddek, S.; Amokrane, A.

    2009-01-01

    An optimized set-up for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) with Am-Be source is described and used for large liquid samples analysis. A methodology for quantitative analysis is proposed: it consists on normalizing the prompt gamma count rates with thermal neutron flux measurements carried out with He-3 detector and gamma attenuation factors calculated using MCNP-5. The relative and absolute methods are considered. This methodology is then applied to the determination of cadmium in industrial phosphoric acid. The same sample is then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method. Our results are in good agreement with those obtained with ICP method.

  4. Electromagnetic surface waves for large-area RF plasma productions between large-area planar electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, S.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, large-area plasma production has been tested by means of a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency (RF) discharge between a pair of large-area planar electrodes, approximately 0.5 m x 1.4 m, as one of the semiconductor technologies for fabrication of large-area amorphous silicon solar cells in the ''Sunshine Project'' of the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology in Japan. We also confirmed long plasma production between a pair of long electrodes. In this paper, normal electromagnetic (EM) waves propagating in a region between a planar waveguide with one plasma and two dielectric layers are analyzed in order to study the feasibility of large-area plasma productions by EM wave-discharges between a pair of large-area RF electrodes larger than the half-wavelength of RF wave. In conclusion, plasmas higher than an electron plasma frequency will be produced by an odd TMoo surface mode. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs

  5. Neutron activation analysis of archaeological artifacts using the conventional relative method: a realistic approach for analysis of large samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedregal, P.S.; Mendoza, A.; Montoya, E.H.; Cohen, I.M.; Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires; Oscar Baltuano

    2012-01-01

    A new approach for analysis of entire potsherds of archaeological interest by INAA, using the conventional relative method, is described. The analytical method proposed involves, primarily, the preparation of replicates of the original archaeological pottery, with well known chemical composition (standard), destined to be irradiated simultaneously, in a well thermalized external neutron beam of the RP-10 reactor, with the original object (sample). The basic advantage of this proposal is to avoid the need of performing complicated effect corrections when dealing with large samples, due to neutron self shielding, neutron self-thermalization and gamma ray attenuation. In addition, and in contrast with the other methods, the main advantages are the possibility of evaluating the uncertainty of the results and, fundamentally, validating the overall methodology. (author)

  6. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenji, Bijan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  7. Performance of Large Neutron Detectors Containing Lithium-Gadolinium-Borate Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, David M.; Stuart, Cory R.; Klaass, R. Fred; Merrill, David B. [MSI/Photogenics Division, Orem, Utah (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a neutron counter, spectrometer, and dosimeter that is compact, efficient, and accurate. A self-contained neutron detection instrument has wide applications in health physics, scientific research, and programs to detect, monitor, and control strategic nuclear materials (SNM). The 1.3 liter detector head for this instrument is a composite detector with an organic scintillator containing uniformly distributed {sup 6}Li{sub 6}{sup nat}Gd{sup 10}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}:Ce (LGB:Ce) microcrystals. The plastic scintillator acts to slow impinging neutrons and emits light proportional to the energy lost by the neutrons as they moderate in the detector body. Moderating neutrons that have slowed sufficiently capture in one of the Lithium-6, Boron-10, or Gadolinium-157 atoms in the LGB:Ce scintillator, which then releases the capture energy in a characteristic cerium emission pulse. The measured captured pulses indicate the presence of neutrons. When a scintillating fluor is present in the plastic, the light pulse resulting from the neutron moderating in the plastic is paired with the LGB:Ce capture pulse to identify the energy of the neutron. About 2% of the impinging neutrons lose all of their energy in a single collision with the detector. There is a linear relationship between the pulse areas of this group of neutrons and energy. The other 98% of neutrons have a wide range of collision histories within the detector body. When these neutrons are 'binned' into energy groups, each group contains a distribution of pulse areas. This data was used to assist in the unfolding of the neutron spectra. The unfolded spectra were then validated with known spectra, at both neutron emitting isotopes and fission/accelerator facilities. Having validated spectra, the dose equivalent and dose rate are determined by applying standard, regulatory damage coefficients to the measured neutron counts for each energy bin of the spectra. Testing

  8. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  9. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Liang, Cai; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  10. Safety requirements and options for a large size fast neutron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogne, F.; Megy, J.; Robert, E.; Benmergui, A.; Villeneuve, J.

    1977-01-01

    Starting from the experience gained in the safety evaluation of the PHENIX reactor, and from results already obtained in the safety studies on fast neutron reactors, the French regulatory bodies have defined since 1973 what could be the requirements and the recommendations in the matter of safety for the first large size ''prototype'' fast neutron power plant of 1200 MWe. Those requirements and recommendations, while not being compulsory due to the evolution of this type of reactors, will be used as a basis for the technical regulation that will be established in France in this field. They define particularly the care to be taken in the following areas which are essential for safety: the protection systems, the primary coolant system, the prevention of accidents at the core level, the measures to be taken with regard to the whole core accident and to the containment, the protection against sodium fires, and the design as a function of external aggressions. In applying these recommendations, the CREYS-MALVILLE plant designers have tried to achieve redundancy in the safety related systems and have justified the safety of the design with regard to the various involved phenomena. In particular, the extensive research made at the levels of the fuel and of the core instrumentation makes it possible to achieve the best defence to avoid the development of core accidents. The overall examination of the measures taken, from the standpoint of prevention and surveyance as well as from the standpoint of means of action led the French regulatory bodies to propose the construction permit of the CREYS MALVILLE plant, provided that additional examinations by the regulatory bodies be made during the construction of the plant on some technological aspects not fully clarified at the authorization time. The conservatism of the corresponding requirements should be demonstrated prior to the commissioning of the power plant. To pursue a programme on reactors of this type, or even more

  11. Detection for flatness of large surface based on structured light

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenyan; Cao, Xuedong; Long, Kuang; Peng, Zhang

    2016-09-01

    In order to get flatness of a large plane, this paper set up a measurement system, composed by Line Structured Light, imaging system, CCD, etc. Line Structured Light transmits parallel fringes at a proper angle onto the plane which is measured; the imaging system and CCD locate above the plane to catch the fringes. When the plane is perfect, CCD will catch straight fringes; however, the real plane is not perfect; according to the theory of projection, the fringes caught by CCD will be distorted by convex and concave. Extract the center of line fringes to obtain the distortion of the fringe, according to the functional relationship between the distortion of fringes and the height which is measured, then we will get flatness of the entire surface. Data from experiment approached the analysis of theory. In the simulation, the vertical resolution is 0.0075 mm per pixel when measuring a plane of 400mm×400mm, choosing the size of CCD 4096×4096, at the angle 85°. Helped by sub-pixel, the precision will get the level of submicron. There are two obvious advantages: method of surface sampling can increase the efficiency for auto-repairing of machines; considering the center of fringe is required mainly in this system, as a consequence, there is no serious demand for back light.

  12. An Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of Confined Surface Water on Rutile Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Elinor; Levchenko, Andrey; Ross, Nancy; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Woodfield, Brian; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Li, Guangshe

    2009-01-01

    The vibrational density of states (VDOS) for water confined on the surface of rutile-TiO2 nanoparticles has been extracted from low temperature inelastic neutron scattering spectra. Two rutile-TiO2 nanoparticle samples that differ in their respective levels of hydration, namely TiO2 0.37H2O (1) and TiO2 0.22H2O (2) have been studied. The temperature dependency of the heat capacities for the two samples has been quantified from the VDOS. The results from this study are compared with previously reported data for water confined on anatase-TiO2 nanoparticles.

  13. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time. 3 claims

  14. Dynamics of Phenanthrenequinone on Carbon Nano-Onion Surfaces Probed by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.; Overbury, Steven H.; Mavila Chathoth, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to study the dynamics of phenanthrenequinone (PQ) on the surface of onion-like carbon (OLC), or so called carbon onions, as a function of surface coverage and temperature. For both the high- and low-coverage samples, we observed two diffusion processes; a faster process and nearly an order of magnitude slower process. On the high-coverage surface, the slow diffusion process is of long-range translational character, whereas the fast diffusion process is spatially localized on the length scale of ∼ 4.7. On the low-coverage surface, both diffusion processes are spatially localized; on the same length scale of ∼ 4.7 for the fast diffusion and a somewhat larger length scale for the slow diffusion. Arrhenius temperature dependence is observed except for the long-range diffusion on the high-coverage surface. We attribute the fast diffusion process to the generic localized in-cage dynamics of PQ molecules, and the slow diffusion process to the long-range translational dynamics of PQ molecules, which, depending on the coverage, may be either spatially restricted, or long-range. On the low-coverage surface, uniform surface coverage is not attained, and the PQ molecules experience the effect of spatial constraints on their long-range translational dynamics. Unexpectedly, the dynamics of PQ molecules on OLC as a function of temperature and surface coverage bears qualitative resemblance to the dynamics of water molecules on oxide surfaces, including practically temperature-independent residence times for the low-coverage surface. The dynamics features that we observed may be universal across different classes of surface adsorbates.

  15. Experimental studies of the critical scattering of neutrons for large scattering vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciszewski, R.

    1972-01-01

    The most recent results concerned with the critical scattering of neutrons are reviewed. The emphasis is on the so-called thermal shift, that is the shift of the main maximum in the intensity of critically scattered neutrons with temperature changes. Four theories of this phenomenon are described and their shortcomings are shown. It has been concluded that the situation is involved at present and needs further theoretical and experimental study. (S.B.)

  16. Are Titan's radial Labyrinth terrains surface expressions of large laccoliths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmeier, L.; Dombard, A. J.; Malaska, M.; Radebaugh, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Labyrinth terrain unit may be the one of the best examples of the surface expression of Titan's complicated history. They are characterized as highly eroded, dissected, and elevated plateaus and remnant ridges, with an assumed composition that is likely organic-rich based on radar emissivity. How these features accumulated organic-rich sediments and formed topographic highs by either locally uplifting or surviving pervasive regional deflation or erosion is an important question for understanding the history of Titan. There are several subsets of Labyrinth terrains, presumably with differing evolutionary histories and formation processes. We aim to explain the formation of a subset of Labyrinth terrain units informally referred to as "radial Labyrinth terrains." They are elevated and appear dome-like, circular in planform, have a strong radial dissection pattern, are bordered by Undifferentiated Plains units, and are found in the mid-latitudes. Based on their shape, clustering, and dimensions, we suggest that they may be the surface expression of large subsurface laccoliths. A recent study by Manga and Michaut (Icarus, 2017) explained Europa's lenticulae (pits, domes, spots) with the formation of saucer-shaped sills that form laccoliths around the brittle-ductile transition depth within the ice shell (1-5 km). Here, we apply the same scaling relationships and find that the larger size of radial labyrinth terrains with Titan's higher gravity implies deeper intrusion depths of around 20-40 km. This intrusion depth matches the expected brittle-ductile transition on Titan based on our finite element simulations and yield strength envelope analyses. We hypothesize that Titan's radial labyrinth terrains formed as cryovolcanic (water) intrusions that rose to the brittle-ductile transition within the ice shell where they spread horizontally, and uplifted the overlying ice. The organic-rich sedimentary cover also uplifted, becoming more susceptible to pluvial and fluvial

  17. MEGARA Optics: Sub-aperture Stitching Interferometry for Large Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Aguirre, Daniel; Carrasco, Esperanza; Izazaga-Pérez, Rafael; Páez, Gonzalo; Granados-Agustín, Fermín; Percino-Zacarías, Elizabeth; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Iglesias-Páramo, Jorge; Villalobos-Mendoza, Brenda

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we present a detailed analysis of sub-aperture interferogram stitching software to test circular and elliptical clear apertures with diameters and long axes up to 272 and 180 mm, respectively, from the Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía (MEGARA). MEGARA is a new spectrograph for the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). It offers a resolution between 6000 and 20000 via the use of volume phase holographic gratings. It has an integral field unit and a set of robots for multi-object spectroscopy at the telescope focal plane. The output end of the fibers forms the spectrograph pseudo-slit. The fixed geometry of the collimator and camera configuration requires prisms in addition to the flat windows of the volume phase holographic gratings. There are 73 optical elements of large aperture and high precision manufactured in Mexico at the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) and the Centro de Investigaciones en Óptica (CIO). The principle of stitching interferometry is to divide the surface being tested into overlapping small sections, which allows an easier analysis (Kim & Wyant 1981). This capability is ideal for non-contact tests for unique and large optics as required by astronomical instruments. We show that the results obtained with our sub-aperture stitching algorithm were consistent with other methods that analyze the entire aperture. We used this method to analyze the 24 MEGARA prisms that could not be tested otherwise. The instrument has been successfully commissioned at GTC in all the spectral configurations. The fulfillment of the irregularity specifications was one of the necessary conditions to comply with the spectral requirements.

  18. Measurement of integrated coefficients of ultracold neutron reflection from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golikov, V.V.; Kulagin, E.N.; Nikitenko, Yu.V.

    1985-01-01

    The method of measurement of the integrated coefficients of ultracold neutrons (UCN) reflection from solid surfaces is reported. A simple formula is suggested which expresses the integrated coefficients of UCN reflection from a given sample through the measured counting rate of the detector with and without strong absorber (polyethelene). The parameters are determined describing anisotropic and inhomogeneity properties of UCN reflection from Al, Mg, Pb, Zn, Mo, stainless steel, T and V are measured. The thickness of oxide layers is determined within the 5-10A accuracy limits from the experimental coefficients of UCN reflection from metals having on their surfaces the oxides with boundary velocity larger than that for the metal. It has been determined that the density of 5000 A layer of heavy ice freezed on aluminium is 0.83 +- 0.05 from the crystal ice density

  19. Large solid-angle spectrometers for studies of double-differential charged-particle and neutron emission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, M.; Matsuyama, S.; Sanami, T.; Soda, D.; Matsuyama, I.; Ohkubo, T.; Iwasaki, S.; Hirakawa, N.

    1995-01-01

    The large solid-angle spectrometer developed for studies of double-differential cross sections of (n, charged particle) and (n, xn') reactions using a gas-filled gridded-ionization chamber and an 80-cm long liquid scintillator is described. The charged particle spectrometer is a twin gas-filled gridded-ionization chamber with solid angle close to 4 π designed to achieve high stopping power and background suppression. The neutron spectrometer is a long NE213 liquid scintillation detector having position sensitivity. It is used as a large single spectrometer or a position sensitive detector covering wide scattering angle. The facility design, performance and examples of application are discussed. The conclusion is made that the facility provides a useful mean for studies in particular for reactions with small cross sections and/or for neutron sources with low intensity. 15 refs., 15 figs

  20. French surface disposal experience. The disposal of large waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutzer, Michel; Lecoq, Pascal; Duret, Franck; Mandoki, Robert

    2006-01-01

    More than 90 percent of the volume of radioactive waste that are generated in France can be managed in surface disposal facilities. Two facilities are presently operated by ANDRA: the Centre de l'Aube disposal facility that is dedicated to low and intermediate short lived waste and the Morvilliers facility for very low level waste. The Centre de l'Aube facility was designed at the end of the years 1980 to replace the Centre de la Manche facility that ended operation in 1994. In order to achieve as low external exposure as possible for workers it was decided to use remote handling systems as much as possible. Therefore it was necessary to standardize the types of waste containers. But taking into account the fact that these waste were conditioned in existing facilities, it was not possible to change a major part of existing packages. As a consequence, 6 mobile roofs were constructed to handle 12 different types of waste packages in the disposal vaults. The scope of Centre de l'Aube was mainly to dispose operational waste. However some packages, as 5 or 10 m 3 metallic boxes, could be used for larger waste generated by decommissioning activities. The corresponding flow was supposed to be small. After the first years of operations, it appeared interesting to develop special procedures to dispose specific large waste in order to avoid external exposure costly cutting works in the generating facilities. A 40 m 3 box and a large remote handling device were disposed in vaults that were currently used for other types of packages. Such a technique could not be used for the disposal of vessel heads that were replaced in 55 pressurised water power reactors. The duration of disposal and conditioning operation was not compatible with the flow of standard packages that were delivered in the vaults. Therefore a specific type of vault was designed, including handling and conditioning equipment. The first pressure vessel head was delivered on the 29 of July 2004, 6 heads have been

  1. Feasibility of laser pumping with neutron fluxes from present-day large tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-08-01

    The minimum fusion-neutron flux needed to observe nuclear-pumped lasing with tokamaks can be reduced substantially by optimizing neutron scattering into the laser cell, located between adjacent toroidal-field coils. The laser lines most readily pumped are probably the /sup 3/He-Ne lines at 0.633 ..mu.. and in the infrared, where the /sup 3/He-Ne gas is excited by energetic ions produced in the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction. These lines are expected to lase at the levels of D-T neutron flux foreseen for the TFTR in 1989 (>>10/sup 12/ n/cm/sup 2//s), while amplification should be observable at the existing levels of D-D neutron flux (greater than or equal to 5 x 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2//s). Lasing on the 1.73 ..mu.. and 2.63 ..mu.. transitions of Xe may be observable at the maximum expected levels of D-T neutron flux in TFTR enhanced by scattering.

  2. Feasibility of laser pumping with neutron fluxes from present-day large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-08-01

    The minimum fusion-neutron flux needed to observe nuclear-pumped lasing with tokamaks can be reduced substantially by optimizing neutron scattering into the laser cell, located between adjacent toroidal-field coils. The laser lines most readily pumped are probably the 3 He-Ne lines at 0.633 μ and in the infrared, where the 3 He-Ne gas is excited by energetic ions produced in the 3 He(n,p)T reaction. These lines are expected to lase at the levels of D-T neutron flux foreseen for the TFTR in 1989 (>>10 12 n/cm 2 /s), while amplification should be observable at the existing levels of D-D neutron flux (≥ 5 x 10 9 n/cm 2 /s). Lasing on the 1.73 μ and 2.63 μ transitions of Xe may be observable at the maximum expected levels of D-T neutron flux in TFTR enhanced by scattering

  3. Polycapillary neutron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildner, D.F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The principle of multiple mirror reflection from smooth surfaces at small grazing angles enables the transport and guiding of high intensity slow neutron beams to locations of low background for neutron scattering and absorption experiments and to provide facilities for multiple instruments. Curved guides have been widely used at cold neutron facilities to remove the unwanted radiation (fast neutrons and gamma rays) from the beam without the use of filters. A typical guide has transverse dimensions of 50 mm and, with a radius of curvature of 1 km, transmits wavelengths longer than 5 A. Much tighter curves requires narrower transverse dimensions, otherwise there is little transmission. Typical neutron benders have a number of slots with transverse dimensions of ∼5 mm. Based on the same principle but using a different technology, recent developments in glass polycapillary fibers have produced miniature versions of neutron guides. Fibers with many thousands of channels having sizes of ∼ 10 μm enable beams of long wavelength neutrons (λ > 4 A) to be transmitted efficiently in a radius of curvature as small as a fraction of 1 m. A large collection of these miniature versions of neutron guides can be used to bend the neutron trajectories such that the incident beam can be focused. (author)

  4. A study of Venus surface elemental composition from 14 MeV neutron induced gamma ray spectroscopy: Activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, I.; Kim, W.; Smith, M.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.

    2011-01-01

    The surface elemental composition of Venus can be determined using an artificially pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator (PNG) combined with a gamma ray spectrometer (GRS). The 14 MeV neutrons will interact with the surface materials and generate gamma rays, characteristic of specific elements, whose energy spectrum will be measured by GRS. These characteristic gamma rays are produced mainly through 3 different neutron interaction mechanisms: capture, inelastic, and activation reactions. Each reaction type has a different neutron energy dependency and different time scale for gamma ray production and transport. Certain elements are more easily identified through one reaction type over the others. Thus, careful analysis of the gamma ray spectra during and after the neutron pulse provides a comprehensive understanding of the surface elemental composition. In this paper, we use a well-tested neutron/gamma transport code, called Monte Carlo N-Particles (MCNP), to investigate the measurement capability of a PNG-GRS detection system through the neutron activation reactions. An activation analysis was performed for a representative soil composition of Venus with a notional operational scenario of PNG and GRS. The analysis shows that the proposed instrument concept can identify most of the modeled surface elements at Venus with sufficient accuracy through the activation mode. Specifically, U, Th, K, Si can be measured to within 1%, Fe within 2%, Al within 10%, Ca within 5%, Mg with 15%, Mn with 20%, and Cl within 6%. Although modeled in the analysis, it is shown that the activation mode alone cannot distinguish the S and Ti peaks.

  5. Investigation of benzene and toluene layers on 0001 surface of graphite by means of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monkenbusch, M.

    1981-01-01

    The structures of benzene (C 6 H 6 , C 6 D 6 ) and toluene (C 6 H 5 -CH 3 , C 6 D 5 -CD 3 ) monolayers on the basal planes of graphite have been investigated by neutron diffraction. The dynamics of the benzene layer has been studied by observing the incoherently, inelastically scattered neutrons using the time-of-flight method. The main results are: Above a phase transition temperature Tsub(c)approx.=145 K benzene on the basal planes of graphite forms a quasi 2D-fluid with high compressibility. For toluene a fluid phase exists above 140 K, between 70 K and 140 K it forms an incommensurate layer and below 70 K a 3x3 structure has been observed. The fluid phase of adsorbed benzene shows a broad quasielastic scattering indicating an effective surface diffusion coefficient of 10 -4 cm 2 /s at 200 K. The inelastic spectrum has been compared with an appropriate lattice dynamical model. The comparison with the data reveals, can be considered as a fairly anharmonic 2D-solid with a static external potential due to the substrate. (orig./HK)

  6. Large contribution to the neutron electric dipole moment from a dimension six four quark operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiaogang; McKellar, B.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the contribution of a dimension six four quark operator (Q q ) to the neutron electric dipole moment was studied. It was found that this contribution dominates over other contributions by at least one order of magnitude in Left-Right symmetric models and two orders of magnitude in di-quark scalar models. 10 refs., 1 fig

  7. Determination of average fission fraction produced by 14 MeV neutrons in assemblies with large volume of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dalun; Li Benci; Wang Xiuchun; Li Yijun; Zhang Shaohua; He Yongwu

    1991-07-01

    The average fission fraction of 238 U caused by 14 MeV neutrons in assemblies with large volume depleted uranium has been determined. The measured value of p f 238U (R ∞ depleted ) 14 was 0.897 ± 0.036. Measurements were also completed for neutron flux distribution and average fission fraction of 235 U isotope in depleted uranium sphere. Values of p f 238U (R depleted ) have been obtained by using a series of uranium spheres. For a sphere with Φ 600 the p f 23 '8 U (R 300 depleted ) is 0.823 ± 0.041, the density of depleted uranium assembly is 18.8g/cm 3 and total weight of assembly is about 2.8t

  8. Improved analytical formulas for x-ray and neutron reflection from surface films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Chen, S.; Felcher, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    A general and exact expression for x-ray and neutron reflectance and transmittance is given in terms of an integral of the real-space scattering-length-density profile fluctuation of the film, with respect to an arbitrary constant reference density level, over the wave function inside the film. Various special cases and approximations are then derived from this exact form by suitable approximations of the wave function. In particular, two practical approximate formulas are derived which are improvement over the corresponding distorted-wave Born approximations. One is for an arbitrary film deposited on a known substrate and the other for a free liquid surface. Numerical results are used to illustrate the accuracy of these formulas

  9. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleson, Timothy A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sahai, Nita [University of Akron; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Dura, Joseph A [ORNL; Majkrzak, Charles F [ORNL; Giuffre, Anthony J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  10. Neutron scattering study of the freezing of water near a cupric oxide surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J.; Buck, Z. N.; Zhang, F. Z.; Chen, T.; Winholtz, R. A.; Kaiser, H.; Ma, H. B.; Taub, H.; Tyagi, M.

    Oscillating heat pipes (OHP) offer promising two-phase heat transfer for a variety of applications, including cooling of electronic devices.2 Recently, it has been shown that a hydrophilic CuO coating on either the evaporator or condenser sections of a flat-plate OHP can significantly enhance its thermal performance.3 This finding has motivated us to assess the strength of the CuO/H2O interaction by investigating the freezing behavior of H2O in proximity to a CuO surface. Using the High-Flux Backscattering Spectrometer at NIST, we have measured the intensity of neutrons scattered elastically from a well-hydrated sample of CuO-coated Cu foils that mimic the oxide surfaces in a flat-plate OHP. We observe abrupt freezing of bulk-like H2O above the CuO surface at 270 K followed by continuous freezing of the interfacial H2O down to 265 K. This freezing behavior is qualitatively similar to that found for water near a zwitterionic single-supported bilayer lipid membrane.3 Further studies are planned to compare the diffusion coefficients of the interfacial water for the coated and uncoated OHPs.22F.Z. Zhang et al., submitted to J. Heat Transfer. 3M. Bai et al., Europhys. Lett. 98, 48006 (2012); Miskowiec et al., Europhys. Lett. 107, 28008 (2014). Supported by NSF Grant Nos. DMR-0944772 and DGE-1069091.

  11. Application of the rigorous method to x-ray and neutron beam scattering on rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goray, Leonid I.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a comprehensive numerical analysis of x-ray and neutron scattering from finite-conducting rough surfaces which is performed in the frame of the boundary integral equation method in a rigorous formulation for high ratios of characteristic dimension to wavelength. The single integral equation obtained involves boundary integrals of the single and double layer potentials. A more general treatment of the energy conservation law applicable to absorption gratings and rough mirrors is considered. In order to compute the scattering intensity of rough surfaces using the forward electromagnetic solver, Monte Carlo simulation is employed to average the deterministic diffraction grating efficiency due to individual surfaces over an ensemble of realizations. Some rules appropriate for numerical implementation of the theory at small wavelength-to-period ratios are presented. The difference between the rigorous approach and approximations can be clearly seen in specular reflectances of Au mirrors with different roughness parameters at wavelengths where grazing incidence occurs at close to or larger than the critical angle. This difference may give rise to wrong estimates of rms roughness and correlation length if they are obtained by comparing experimental data with calculations. Besides, the rigorous approach permits taking into account any known roughness statistics and allows exact computation of diffuse scattering.

  12. A large data base on a small computer. Neutron Physics data and bibliography under IDMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, A.; Pellegrino, L.; Tubbs, N.

    1978-01-01

    The transfer of three associated files to an IDMS data base is reported: the CINDA bibliographic index to neutron physics publications, the cumulated EXFOR exchange tapes used for maintaining parallel data collections at all four centres and the CCDN's internal data storage and retrieval system NEUDADA. With associated dictionaries and inter-file conversion tables the corresponding IDMS data base will be about 160 Mbytes. The main characteristics of the three files are shown

  13. The effect of surface texture on total reflection of neutrons and X-rays from modified interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Roser, S.J.; Hughes, A.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray and neutron scattering from macroscopically rough surfaces and interfaces is considered and a new method of analysis based on the variation of the shape of the total reflection edge in the reflectivity profile is proposed. It was shown that in the limit that the correlation length and the h......X-ray and neutron scattering from macroscopically rough surfaces and interfaces is considered and a new method of analysis based on the variation of the shape of the total reflection edge in the reflectivity profile is proposed. It was shown that in the limit that the correlation length...... and the height of the surface roughness are larger than the wavelength (at least 100 times bigger) of the incoming beam, the total reflection edge in the reflection profile becomes rounded. This technique allows direct analysis of the variation of the reflectivity pro le in terms of the structure of the surface...

  14. Determination of residual oil saturation from time-lapse pulsed neutron capture logs in a large sandstone reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, E.V.; Salaita, G.N.; McCaffery, F.G.

    1991-01-01

    Cased hole logging with pulsed neutron tools finds extensive use for identifying zones of water breakthrough and monitoring oil-water contacts in oil reservoirs being depleted by waterflooding or natural water drive. Results of such surveys then find direct use for planning recompletions and water shutoff treatments. Pulsed neutron capture (PNC) logs are useful for estimating water saturation changes behind casing in the presence of a constant, high-salinity environment. PNC log surveys run at different times, i.e., in a time-lapse mode, are particularly amenable to quantitative analysis. The combined use of the original open hole and PNC time-lapse log information can then provide information on remaining or residual oil saturations in a reservoir. This paper reports analyses of historical pulsed neutron capture log data to assess residual oil saturation in naturally water-swept zones for selected wells from a large sandstone reservoir in the Middle East. Quantitative determination of oil saturations was aided by PNC log information obtained from a series of tests conducted in a new well in the same field

  15. Multiview specular stereo reconstruction of large mirror surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Balzer, Jonathan

    2011-06-01

    In deflectometry, the shape of mirror objects is recovered from distorted images of a calibrated scene. While remarkably high accuracies are achievable, state-of-the-art methods suffer from two distinct weaknesses: First, for mainly constructive reasons, these can only capture a few square centimeters of surface area at once. Second, reconstructions are ambiguous i.e. infinitely many surfaces lead to the same visual impression. We resolve both of these problems by introducing the first multiview specular stereo approach, which jointly evaluates a series of overlapping deflectometric images. Two publicly available benchmarks accompany this paper, enabling us to numerically demonstrate viability and practicability of our approach. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. Effectiveness of hearing conservation program at a large surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study conducted to determine the effectiveness of a Hearing Conservation Programme (HcP) was conducted in a surface gold mining Company in Ghana. The procedure adopted included a retrospective review and comparison of individual Audiograms from 1999-2003. The analysis of data was based on 200 workers at ...

  17. Effectiveness of hearing conservation program at a large surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    African Journal of Health Sciences, Volume 14, Numbers 1-2, January-June 2007. 49. Effectiveness ... Programme (HcP) was conducted in a surface gold mining Company in Ghana. The ... The analysis of data was based on 200 workers at ..... Industry. New York Raven Press 1982. 9. Franks JR, Davis RR and Kreig EF jr.

  18. Surface harmonics method for two-dimensional time-dependent neutron transport problems of square-lattice nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Time-dependent equations of the Surface Harmonics Method (SHM) have been derived from the time-dependent neutron transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons for solving the two-dimensional time-dependent problems. These equations have been realized in the SUHAM-TD code. The TWIGL benchmark problem has been used for verification of the SUHAM-TD code. The results of the study showed that computational costs required to achieve necessary accuracy of the solution can be an order of magnitude less than with the use of the conventional finite difference method (FDM). (authors)

  19. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Paul, M., E-mail: paul@vms.huji.ac.il; Tessler, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (∼2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ∼27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  20. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Torii, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Junzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Endo, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient. (author)

  1. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, K; Kishi, T; Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Nose, T; Torii, Y; Uchiyama, J; Yamamoto, T

    2002-01-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient.

  2. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A. I., E-mail: aibelyaeva@mail.ru; Savchenko, A. A. [National Technical University “Kharkov Politechnical Institute”, Kharkov, 61002 (Ukraine); Galuza, A. A.; Kolenov, I. V. [Institute of Electrophysics and Radiation Technologies, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kharkov, 61024 (Ukraine)

    2014-07-15

    Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20 MeV energy. Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600 eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  3. A fast large-area position-sensitive time-of-flight neutron detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A new position-sensitive time-of-flight neutron detection and histograming system has been developed for use at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Spatial resolution of roughly 1 cm x 1 cm and time-of-flight resolution of ∼1 μsec are combined in a detection system which can ultimately be expanded to cover several square meters of active detector area. This system is based on the use of arrays of cylindrical one-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counters, and is capable of collecting the x-y-t data and sorting them into histograms at time-averaged data rates up to ∼300,000 events/sec over the full detector area and with instantaneous data rates up to more than fifty times that. Numerous hardware features have been incorporated to facilitate initial tuning of the position encoding, absolute calibration of the encoded positions, and automatic testing for drifts. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tabs

  4. Large Area Diamond Tribological Surfaces with Negligible Wear in Extreme Environments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I we propose to demonstrate the processing of very large area diamond sliding bearings and tribological surfaces. The bearings and surfaces will experience...

  5. Large area optical mapping of surface contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Guilherme; Canning, John; Padden, Whayne; Martelli, Cicero; Dligatch, Svetlana

    2017-09-04

    Top-down contact angle measurements have been validated and confirmed to be as good if not more reliable than side-based measurements. A range of samples, including industrially relevant materials for roofing and printing, has been compared. Using the top-down approach, mapping in both 1-D and 2-D has been demonstrated. The method was applied to study the change in contact angle as a function of change in silver (Ag) nanoparticle size controlled by thermal evaporation. Large area mapping reveals good uniformity for commercial Aspen paper coated with black laser printer ink. A demonstration of the forensic and chemical analysis potential in 2-D is shown by uncovering the hidden CsF initials made with mineral oil on the coated Aspen paper. The method promises to revolutionize nanoscale characterization and industrial monitoring as well as chemical analyses by allowing rapid contact angle measurements over large areas or large numbers of samples in ways and times that have not been possible before.

  6. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  7. Dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation and stable performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hang; Qu, Shao-Bo; Peng, Wei-Dong; Lin, Bao-Qin; Wang, Jia-Fu; Ma, Hua; Zhang, Jie-Qiu; Bai, Peng; Wang, Xu-Hua; Xu, Zhuo

    2012-05-01

    A new technique of designing a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is presented. This technique is based on a delicately designed topology of L- and Ku-band microwave filters. The two band-pass responses are generated by a capacitively-loaded square-loop frequency selective surface and an aperture-coupled frequency selective surface, respectively. A Faraday cage is located between the two frequency selective surface structures to eliminate undesired couplings. Based on this technique, a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is designed, which possesses large band separation, high selectivity, and stable performance under various incident angles and different polarizations.

  8. Photoinduced surface voltage mapping study for large perovskite single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liu, Yucheng; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhou [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Liu, Shengzhong, E-mail: liusz@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, iChEM, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-05-02

    Using a series of illumination sources, including white light (tungsten-halogen lamp), 445-nm, 532-nm, 635-nm, and 730-nm lasers, the surface photovoltage (SPV) images were mapped for centimeter-sized CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbX{sub 3} (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite single crystals using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The significant SPV signals were observed to be wavelength-dependent. We attribute the appreciable SPV to the built-in electric field in the space charge region. This study shines light into the understanding of photoinduced charge generation and separation processes at nanoscale to help advance the development of perovskite solar cells, optoelectronics, laser, photodetector, and light-emitting diode (LED).

  9. Data acquisition and experiment control system for a large area neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberi, J.L.

    1978-10-01

    The system consists of a data input subsystem, a display subsystem and a spectrometer control subsystem. The data input subsystem consists of a two-dimensional analog-to-digital converter with the analog section remote from the rest of the system. The analog-to-digital converter clock runs at 100 MHz. There can be up to 1024 channels in each dimension for a maximum array size of approx. 1 million words. Arrays of this size may be easily handled by a multiport memory with 6.71 x 10 7 words of address space. The read/increment/write time for data in this array is 2.5 μsec per event. The display and neutron spectrometer subsystem are also briefly described

  10. Advances in Neutron Activation Analysis of Large Objects with Emphasis on Archaeological Examples. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-03-01

    This publication is a compilation of the main results and findings of an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP). In particular, it discusses an innovative variation of neutron activation analysis (NAA) known as large sample NAA (LSNAA). There is no other way to measure the bulk mass fractions of the elements present in a large sample (up to kilograms in mass) non-destructively. Examples amenable to LSNAA include irregularly shaped archaeological artefacts, excavated rock samples, large samples of assorted ore, and finished products, such as nuclear reactor components. The CRP focused primarily on the application of LSNAA in the areas of archaeology and geology; however it was also open for further exploration in other areas such as industry and life sciences as well as in basic research. The CRP contributed to establish the validation of the methodology, and, in particular, it provided an opportunity for developing trained manpower. The specific objectives of this CRP were to: i) Validate and optimize the experimental procedures for LSNAA applications in archaeology and geology; ii) Identify the needs for development or upgrade of the neutron irradiation facility for irradiation of large samples; iii) Develop and standardize data acquisition and data analysis systems; iv) Harmonize and standardize data collection from facilities with similar kind of instrumentation for further analysis and benchmarking. Advantages of LSNAA applications, limitations and scientific and technological requirements are described in this publication, which serves as a reference of interest not only to the NAA experts, research reactor personnel, and those considering this technique, but also to various stakeholders and users such as researchers, industrialists, environmental and legal experts, and administrators.

  11. Neutron Reflection Study of Surface Adsorption of Fc, Fab, and the Whole mAb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyi; Li, Ruiheng; Smith, Charles; Pan, Fang; Campana, Mario; Webster, John R P; van der Walle, Christopher F; Uddin, Shahid; Bishop, Steve M; Narwal, Rojaramani; Warwicker, Jim; Lu, Jian Ren

    2017-07-12

    Characterizing the influence of fragment crystallization (Fc) and antigen-binding fragment (Fab) on monoclonal antibody (mAb) adsorption at the air/water interface is an important step to understanding liquid mAb drug product stability during manufacture, shipping, and storage. Here, neutron reflection is used to study the air/water adsorption of a mAb and its Fc and Fab fragments. By varying the isotopic contrast, the adsorbed amount, thickness, orientation, and immersion of the adsorbed layers could be determined unambiguously. While Fc adsorption reached saturation within the hour, its surface adsorbed amount showed little variation with bulk concentration. In contrast, Fab adsorption was slower and the adsorbed amount was concentration dependent. The much higher Fc adsorption, as compared to Fab, was linked to its lower surface charge. Time and concentration dependence of mAb adsorption was dominated by Fab behavior, although both Fab and Fc behaviors contributed to the amount of mAb adsorbed. Changing the pH from 5.5 to 8.8 did not much perturb the adsorbed amount of Fc, Fab, or mAb. However, a small decrease in adsorption was observed for the Fc over pH 8-8.8 and vice versa for the Fab and mAb, consistent with a dominant Fab behavior. As bulk concentration increased from 5 to 50 ppm, the thicknesses of the Fc layers were almost constant at 40 Å, while Fab and mAb layers increased from 45 to 50 Å. These results imply that the adsorbed mAb, Fc, and Fab all retained their globular structures and were oriented with their short axial lengths perpendicular to the interface.

  12. A comparison of different neutron probes calibration method for the soil surface and their radiation effect on the users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, A; Razzouk, A K; Al-Ain, F [Atomic Energy commission , Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic). Dept of Radiation Agriculture

    1996-08-01

    In situ calibration curves were installed for the soil surface using different models of depth neutron probes and different adaptors. depth beutron probe readings increased with increasing the number of teflon plastic blocks deposited on the soil surface. The intercept of the straight line regression analysis decreased with increasing of teflon plastics blocks deposited on the soil surface in all sites. The least exposure was with depth probe with surface reflectors. This study proves the possibility of measuring the moisture content of the soil surface by using a depth probe with a block laid on the surface, without a danger of receiving the thresgold of radiation dose. (author). 10 Refs., 2 Figs., 8 Tabs.

  13. Neutron-induced Backgrounds in 134Xe for Large-Scale Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Nina; Kidd, Mary; Tornow, Werner

    2016-09-01

    136Xe is used in large neutrinoless double-beta (0 νββ) decay experiments, such as KamLAND- Zen and EXO 200. Though highly purified, 136Xe still contains a significant amount of 134Xe. Recently, a new nuclear energy level was found in 134Xe. If 134Xe decays from this proposed excited state, it will emit a 2485.7 keV gamma ray. Because this energy lies near the region of interest of 136Xe νββ decay experiments (Q value 2457.8 keV), it could make a significant contribution to the background. A purified gaseous sample of 134Xe will be irradiated with neutrons of an incident energy of 4.0 MeV at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory and monitored with high-purity germanium detectors. The spectra obtained from these detectors will be analyzed for the presence of the 2581 keV gamma ray. We will report on the status of this experiment. Future plans include expanding this measurement to higher initial neutron energies. Tennesse Tech University CISE Grant program.

  14. Radiation safety of soil moisture neutron probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oresegun, M.O.

    2000-01-01

    The neutron probe measures sub-surface moisture in soil and other materials by means of high energy neutrons and a slow (thermal) neutron detector. Exposure to radiation, including neutrons, especially at high doses, can cause detrimental health effects. In order to achieve operational radiation safety, there must be compliance with protection and safety standards. The design and manufacture of commercially available neutron moisture gauges are such that risks to the health of the user have been greatly reduced. The major concern is radiation escape from the soil during measurement, especially under dry conditions and when the radius of influence is large. With appropriate work practices as well as good design and manufacture of gauges, recorded occupational doses have been well below recommended annual limits. It can be concluded that the use of neutron gauges poses not only acceptable health and safety risks but, in fact, the risks are negligible. Neutron gauges should not be classified as posing high potential health hazards. (author)

  15. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of large amplitude motions in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee, M.

    1996-01-01

    This lecture aims at giving some illustrations of the use of Incoherent Quasielastic Neutron Scattering in the investigation of motions of atoms or molecules in phases with dynamical disorder. The general incoherent scattering function is first recalled. Then the Elastic Incoherent Structure Factor is introduced. It is shown how its determination permits to deduce a particular dynamical model. Long-range translational diffusion is illustrated by some experiments carried out with liquids or with different chemical species intercalated in porous media. Examples of rotational motions are provided by solid phases where an orientational disorder of the molecules exists. The jump model is the most commonly used and yields simple scattering laws which can be easily handled. Highly disordered crystals require a description in terms of the isotropic rotational diffusion model. Many of the present studies are concerned with rather complicated systems. Considerable help is obtained either by using selectively deuterated samples or by carrying out measurements with semi-oriented samples. (author) 5 figs., 14 refs

  16. Neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beynon, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    the paper concerns neutron holography, which allows an image to be constructed of the surfaces, as well as the interiors, of objects. The technique of neutron holography and its applications are described. Present and future use of the method is briefly outlined. (U.K.)

  17. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... heat load is only present for a short time of the total engine cycle, it is a severe thermal load on the piston surface. At the same time, cooling of the piston crown is generally more complicated than cooling of the other components of the combustion chamber. This can occasionally cause problems...... with burning off piston surface material. In this work the peak heat load on the piston surface of large marine diesel engines during combustion was investigated. Measurements of the instantaneous surface temperature and surface heat flux on pistons in large marine engines are difficult due to expensive...

  18. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  19. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  20. Determination of the neutron energy and spatial distributions of the neutron beam from the TSR-II in the large beam shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, C.E.; Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The TSR-II reactor of the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility has recently been relocated within a new, fixed shield. A principal feature of the new shield is a beam port of considerably larger area than that of its predecessor. The usable neutron flux has thereby been increased by a factor of approximately 200. The bare beam neutron spectrum behind the new shield has been experimentally determined over the energy range from 0.8 to 16 MeV. A high level of fission product gamma ray background prevented measurement of bare beam spectra below 0.8 MeV, however neutron spectra in the energy range from 8 keV to 1.4 MeV were obtained for two simple, calculable shielding configurations. Also measured in the present work were weighted integral flux distributions and fast neutron dose rates

  1. Development of Neutron Probes for Characterization of Hazardous Materials in the Sub-surface Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keegan, R.P.; McGrath, C.A.; Lopez, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron probes are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the detection, identification and quantification of hazardous materials in the ground. Such materials include plutonium, uranium, americium, chlorine and fluorine. Both a Neutron Gamma (NG) probe and a Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) probe are being developed. The NG probe is used primarily for nuclide identification and quantification measurements. The PFN is used mostly for the detection and measurement of fissile material, but also for the determination of thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross sections of the various elements comprising the ground matrix. Calibration of these probes will be carried out at the INEEL using an indoor facility that has been designed for this activity

  2. Can a large neutron excess help solve the baryon loading problem in gamma-Ray burst fireballs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller; Pruet; Abazajian

    2000-09-25

    We point out that the baryon loading problem in gamma-ray burst (GRB) models can be ameliorated if a significant fraction of the baryons which inertially confine the fireball is converted to neutrons. A high neutron fraction can result in a reduced transfer of energy from relativistic light particles in the fireball to baryons. The energy needed to produce the required relativistic flow in the GRB is consequently reduced, in some cases by orders of magnitude. A high neutron-to-proton ratio has been calculated in neutron star-merger fireball environments. Significant neutron excess also could occur near compact objects with high neutrino fluxes.

  3. Neutron reflectometry: A probe for materials surfaces. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Research reactors play an important role in delivering the benefits of nuclear science and technology. The IAEA, through its project on the effective utilization of research reactors, has been providing technical support to Member States and promotes activities related to specific applications. Neutron beam research is one of the main components in materials science studies. Neutron reflectometry is extremely useful for characterizing thin films and layered structures, polymers, oxide coatings on metals and biological membranes. The neutron has been a major probe for investigating magnetic materials. Development of magnetic multilayers is important for diverse applications in sensors, memory devices, etc. The special nature of the interaction of the neutron with matter makes it an important tool to locate low z elements in the presence of high z elements, which is useful in biology and polymer science. The role of neutron reflectometry in research and development in materials science and technology was discussed in a consultants meeting held in 2003. Following this, a technical meeting was organized from 16 to 20 August 2004 in Vienna to discuss the current status of neutron reflectometry, including the instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis and applications. Experts in the field of neutron reflectometry presented their contributions, after which there was a brainstorming session on various aspects of the technique and its applications. This publication is the outcome of deliberations during the meeting and the presentations by the participants. This publication will be of use to scientists planning to develop a neutron reflectometer at research reactors. It will also help disseminate knowledge and information to material scientists, biologists and chemists working towards characterizing and developing new materials

  4. Symmetry energy and surface properties of neutron-rich exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidarov, M. K.; Antonov, A. N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Sarriguren, P. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Moya de Guerra, E. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-23

    The symmetry energy, the neutron pressure and the asymmetric compressibility of spherical Ni, Sn, and Pb and deformed Kr and Sm neutron-rich even-even nuclei are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy-density functional. The correlation between the thickness of the neutron skin and the characteristics related with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is investigated for isotopic chains of these nuclei in the framework of the deformed self-consistent mean-field Skyrme HF+BCS method. The mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness are also studied together with the role of the neutron-proton asymmetry. The studied correlations reveal a smoother behavior in the case of spherical nuclei than for deformed ones. We also notice that the neutron skin thickness obtained for {sup 208}Pb with SLy4 force is found to be in a good agreement with the recent data. In addition to the interest that this study may have by itself, we give some numerical arguments in proof of the existence of peculiarities of the studied quantities in Ni and Sn isotopic chains that are not present in the Pb chain.

  5. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  6. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  7. Large scale facilities for synchrotron radiation and neutrons. New possibilities for Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feidenhans'l, R.

    2003-02-01

    New large-scale facilities for investigating the structure and dynamics of matter and biological systems are currently under construction or are being planned at many locations around Europe. These facilities are likely to have a large impact on the science landscape in Europe, and more locally, as some will be located in the immediate neighbourhood of Denmark. The facilities will enable new analytical capabilities of matter, which will push the frontiers of science and technology in many areas of research of importance for Denmark. This report provides an overview of the new facilities (including very rough funding estimates) of importance for Danish science, describes possible ways of engaging in the various projects and identifies potential user groups. The report also includes a summary of the status of the current use of existing facilities as a benchmark. This is done by showing different cross sections through this multiple parameter space of activities. The intention is that the report should serve as guideline for making a long-term national strategy for the exploitation of large-scale facilities in order to help to optimise their impact on science, education and industry within Denmark, and to safeguard the prominent internationally leading role that Denmark has in this area. (LN)

  8. Do neutron stars disprove multiplicative creation in Dirac's large number hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.; Mufti, A.A.

    1980-07-01

    Dirac's cosmology, based on his large number hypothesis, took the gravitational coupling to be decreasing with time and matter to be created as the square of time. Since the effects predicted by Dirac's theory are very small, it is difficult to find a ''clean'' test for it. Here we show that the observed radiation from pulsars is inconsistent with Dirac's multiplicative creation model, in which the matter created is proportional to the density of matter already present. Of course, this discussion makes no comment on the ''additive creation'' model, or on the revised version of Dirac's theory. (author)

  9. Possibilities of using neutron activation analysis to discovery antimony aureoles at near-surface deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voin, M.I.; Kuligin, V.M.; Rakovskij, Eh.E.

    1978-01-01

    Described is the technique for determining antimony in rock and ore samples by instrumental neutron activation method with the sensitivity of 0.5 g/t from the 0.3-0.5 g weighed amount. Antimony was determined using the photopeak of antimony-124 isotope with the energy of 1692 keV. For analysis, 0.1 g samples were packed in aluminium foil and irradiated for 22 hours by reactor neutron fluence of 1.2x10 13 neutron/cm 2 xs. After cooling for 7 days induced activity of samples was measured using multichannel analizer with semiconductor detector with sensitive zone volume of 40 cm 3 . Real sensitivity while determining antimony was 1g/t, mean square error in the content range of 1-10 g/t is 14%

  10. Dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation and stable performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hang; Qu Shao-Bo; Lin Bao-Qin; Wang Jia-Fu; Ma Hua; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Peng Wei-Dong; Bai Peng; Wang Xu-Hua; Xu Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    A new technique of designing a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is presented. This technique is based on a delicately designed topology of L- and Ku-band microwave filters. The two band-pass responses are generated by a capacitively-loaded square-loop frequency selective surface and an aperture-coupled frequency selective surface, respectively. A Faraday cage is located between the two frequency selective surface structures to eliminate undesired couplings. Based on this technique, a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is designed, which possesses large band separation, high selectivity, and stable performance under various incident angles and different polarizations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Surface and Internal Waves due to a Moving Load on a Very Large Floating Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Kakinuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of surface/internal water waves with a floating platform is discussed with nonlinearity of fluid motion and flexibility of oscillating structure. The set of governing equations based on a variational principle is applied to a one- or two-layer fluid interacting with a horizontally very large and elastic thin plate floating on the water surface. Calculation results of surface displacements are compared with the existing experimental data, where a tsunami, in terms of a solitary wave, propagates across one-layer water with a floating thin plate. We also simulate surface and internal waves due to a point load, such as an airplane, moving on a very large floating structure in shallow water. The wave height of the surface or internal mode is amplified when the velocity of moving point load is equal to the surface- or internal-mode celerity, respectively.

  12. Enhanced Dynamics of Hydrated tRNA on Nanodiamond Surfaces: A Combined Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; O'Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby G; Hong, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on ND surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. Our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.

  13. Analytical model for neutron diffraction peak shifts due to the surface effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šaroun, Jan; Kornmeier, J. R.; Hofmann, M.; Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 6 (2013), s. 628-638 ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0654 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : residual-stress * neutron diffraction * Monte Carlo simulation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.950, year: 2013

  14. Effect of surface roughness on the heating rates of large-angled hypersonic blunt cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimpan, Kiran Joy; Menezes, Viren

    2018-03-01

    Surface-roughness caused by the residue of an ablative Thermal Protection System (TPS) can alter the turbulence level and surface heating rates on a hypersonic re-entry capsule. Large-scale surface-roughness that could represent an ablated TPS, was introduced over the forebody of a 120° apex angle blunt cone, in order to test for its influence on surface heating rates in a hypersonic freestream of Mach 8.8. The surface heat transfer rates measured on smooth and roughened models under the same freestream conditions were compared. The hypersonic flow-fields of the smooth and rough-surfaced models were visualized to analyse the flow physics. Qualitative numerical simulations and pressure measurements were carried out to have an insight into the high-speed flow physics. Experimental observations under moderate Reynolds numbers indicated a delayed transition and an overall reduction of 17-46% in surface heating rates on the roughened model.

  15. Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) for large break loss of coolant accidents (LBLOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, A.E.; Cheng, L.Y.; Dimenna, R.A.; Griffith, P.; Wilson, G.E.

    1994-06-01

    A team of experts in reactor analysis conducted a phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) exercise for a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) in the Advanced Neutron source Reactor (ANSR). The LBLOCA transient is broken into two separate parts for the PIR exercise. The first part considers the initial depressurization of the system that follows the opening of the break. The second part of the transient includes long-term decay heat removal after the reactor is shut down and the system is depressurized. A PIR is developed for each part of the LBLOCA. The ranking results are reviewed to establish if models in the RELAP5-MOD3 thermalhydraulic code are adequate for use in ANSR LBLOCA simulations. Deficiencies in the RELAP5-MOD3 code are identified and existing data or models are recommended to improve the code for this application. Experiments were also suggested to establish models for situations judged to be beyond current knowledge. The applicability of the ANSR PIR results is reviewed for the entire set of transients important to the ANSR safety analysis

  16. Application of Conventional and K0-Based Internal Monostandard NAA Using Reactor Neutrons for Compositional Analysis of Large Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.V.R.; Acharya, R.; Swain, K. K.; Pujari, P.K.

    2018-01-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis (LSNAA) work was carried out for samples of coal, uranium ore, stainless steel, ancient and new clay potteries, dross and clay pottery replica from Peru using low flux high thermalized irradiation sites. Large as well as non-standard geometry samples (1 g - 0.5 kg) were irradiated using thermal column (TC) facility of Apsara reactor as well as graphite reflector position of critical facility (CF) at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. Small size (10 - 500 mg) samples were also irradiated at core position of Apsara reactor, pneumatic carrier facility (PCF) of Dhruva reactor and pneumatic fast transfer facility (PFTS) of KAMINI reactor. Irradiation positions were characterized using indium flux monitor for TC and CF whereas multi monitors were used at other positions. Radioactive assay was carried out using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The k0-based internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) method was used to determine elemental concentration ratios with respect to Na in coal and uranium ore samples, Sc in pottery samples and Fe in stainless steel. Insitu relative detection efficiency for each irradiated sample was obtained using γ rays of activation products in the required energy range. Representative sample sizes were arrived at for coal and uranium ore from the plots of La/Na ratios as a function of the mass of the sample. For stainless steel sample of SS 304L, the absolute concentrations were calculated from concentration ratios by mass balance approach since all the major elements (Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn) were amenable to NAA. Concentration ratios obtained by IM-NAA were used for provenance study of 30 clay potteries, obtained from excavated Buddhist sites of AP, India. The La to Ce concentration ratios were used for preliminary grouping and concentration ratios of 15 elements with respect to Sc were used by statistical cluster analysis for confirmation of grouping. Concentrations of Au and Ag were determined in not so

  17. Large sample NAA of a pottery replica utilizing thermal neutron flux at AHWR critical facility and X-Z rotary scanning unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Dasari, K.B.; Pujari, P.K.; Swain, K.K.; Shinde, A.D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2013-01-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis (LSNAA) of a clay pottery replica from Peru was carried out using low neutron flux graphite reflector position of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) critical facility. This work was taken up as a part of inter-comparison exercise under IAEA CRP on LSNAA of archaeological objects. Irradiated large size sample, placed on an X-Z rotary scanning unit, was assayed using a 40% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The k 0 -based internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) in conjunction with insitu relative detection efficiency was used to calculate concentration ratios of 12 elements with respect to Na. Analyses of both small and large size samples were carried out to check homogeneity and to arrive at absolute concentrations. (author)

  18. Large area smoothing of surfaces by ion bombardment: fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, F; Fechner, R; Ziberi, B; Voellner, J; Flamm, D; Schindler, A

    2009-01-01

    Ion beam erosion can be used as a process for achieving surface smoothing at microscopic length scales and for the preparation of ultrasmooth surfaces, as an alternative to nanostructuring of various surfaces via self-organization. This requires that in the evolution of the surface topography different relaxation mechanisms dominate over the roughening, and smoothing of initially rough surfaces can occur. This contribution focuses on the basic mechanisms as well as potential applications of surface smoothing using low energy ion beams. In the first part, the fundamentals for the smoothing of III/V semiconductors, Si and quartz glass surfaces using low energy ion beams (ion energy: ≤2000 eV) are reviewed using examples. The topography evolution of these surfaces with respect to different process parameters (ion energy, ion incidence angle, erosion time, sample rotation) has been investigated. On the basis of the time evolution of different roughness parameters, the relevant surface relaxation mechanisms responsible for surface smoothing are discussed. In this context, physical constraints as regards the effectiveness of surface smoothing by direct ion bombardment will also be addressed and furthermore ion beam assisted smoothing techniques are introduced. In the second application-orientated part, recent technological developments related to ion beam assisted smoothing of optically relevant surfaces are summarized. It will be demonstrated that smoothing by direct ion bombardment in combination with the use of sacrificial smoothing layers and the utilization of appropriate broad beam ion sources enables the polishing of various technologically important surfaces down to 0.1 nm root mean square roughness level, showing great promise for large area surface processing. Specific examples are given for ion beam smoothing of different optical surfaces, especially for substrates used for advanced optical applications (e.g., in x-ray optics and components for extreme

  19. Long-Range Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Stromswold, D.C.; Hansen, R.R.; Reeder, P.L.; Barnett, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m 2 ) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the 3 He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10 5 n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10 5 n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph

  20. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance

  1. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith

    2002-01-18

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

  2. Experimental study of angular neutron flux spectra on a slab surface to assess nuclear data and calculational methods for a fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    1988-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to interpret the results of integral experiments for fusion neutronics research. The measurement is described of the angular neutron flux on a restricted area of slab assemblies with D-T neutron bombardment by using the time-of-flight (TOF) method with an NE213 neutron detector over an energy range from 0.05 to 15 MeV. A two bias scheme was developed to obtain an accurate detection efficiency over a wide energy range. The detector-collimator response function was introduced to define the restricted surface area and to determine the effective measured area. A series of measurements of the angular neutron flux on slabs of fusion blanket materials, i.e., Be, C, and Li 2 O, as functions of neutron leaking angle and slab thickness have been performed to examine neutron transport characteristics in bulk materials. The calculational analyses of the experimental results have been also carried out by using Monte Carlo neutron transport codes, i.e., MORSE-DD and MCNP. The existing nuclear data files, i.e., JENDL-3PR1, -3PR2, ENDF/B-IV and -V were tested by comparing with the experimental results. From the comparisons, the data on C and 7 Li in the present files are fairly sufficient. Those on beryllium, however, is insufficient for the estimation of high threshold reactions such as tritium production in a fusion reactor blanket design. It is also found that the total and elastic cross sections are more important for accurate predictions of neutronic parameters at deep position. The comparisons between the measured and calculated results provide information to understand the results of the previous integral experiments for confirmation of accuracy of fusion reactor designs. (author)

  3. Neutron multicounter detector for investigation of content and spatial distribution of fission materials in large volume samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiderska-Kowalczyk, M.; Starosta, W.; Zoltowski, T.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental device is a neutron coincidence well counter. It can be applied for passive assay of fissile - especially for plutonium bearing - materials. It consist of a set of 3 He tubes placed inside a polyethylene moderator; outputs from the tubes, first processed by preamplifier/amplifier/discriminator circuits, are then analysed using neutron correlator connected with a PC, and correlation techniques implemented in software. Such a neutron counter allows for determination of plutonium mass ( 240 Pu effective mass) in nonmultiplying samples having fairly big volume (up to 0.14 m 3 ). For determination of neutron sources distribution inside the sample, the heuristic methods based on hierarchical cluster analysis are applied. As an input parameters, amplitudes and phases of two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the count profiles matrices for known point sources distributions and for the examined samples, are taken. Such matrices are collected by means of sample scanning by detection head. During clustering process, counts profiles for unknown samples fitted into dendrograms using the 'proximity' criterion of the examined sample profile to standard samples profiles. Distribution of neutron sources in an examined sample is then evaluated on the basis of comparison with standard sources distributions. (author)

  4. Use of Large Surface MicroChannel Plates for the Tagging of Intermediate Energy Exotic Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, I., E-mail: ilombardo@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Amorini, F. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cardella, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Cavallaro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); De Filippo, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Geraci, E.; Grassi, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); La Guidara, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Libera Universita Kore, Enna (Italy); Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Politi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Verde, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Vigilante, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Federico II di Napoli (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    We show the properties of the tagging system for exotic beams coupled to the CHIMERA detector. In particular, the characteristics of a newly developed large surface MicroChannel Plate will be discussed. Timing and efficiency of this instrument have been investigated. Preliminary results of tests performed with radioactive beams and alpha sources are presented.

  5. Compact Wideband and Low-Profile Antenna Mountable on Large Metallic Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a compact wideband and low-profile antenna mountable on large metallic surfaces. Six rows of coupled microstrip resonators with different lengths are printed on a Teflon block. The lengths of the microstrip resonators in different rows are gradually reduced along the end-fire...

  6. Large displacement bi-directional out-of-plane Lorentz actuator array for surface manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byoungyoul; Afsharipour, Elnaz; Chrusch, Dwayne; Shafai, Cyrus; Andersen, David; Burley, Greg

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a large displacement out-of-plane Lorentz actuator array for surface manipulation. Actuators are formed from single crystal silicon flexible serpentine springs on either side of a rigid crossbar containing a narrow contact pillar. A rigid mounting rail system was employed to enable a 5  ×  5 array, which offers scalability of the array size. Analytical and finite element models were used to optimize actuator design. Individual actuators were tested to show linear deflection response of  ±150 µ m motion, using a  ±14.7 mA current in the presence of a 0.48 T magnetic field. This actuator array is suitable for various 2D surface modification applications due to its large deformation with low current and temperature of operation, and narrow contact area to a target surface. (paper)

  7. Investigation on large-area fabrication of vivid shark skin with superior surface functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Lingxi; Che, Da; Zhang, Deyuan; Sudarshan, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Shark skin has attracted worldwide attention because of its superior drag reduction, antifouling performance induced from its unique surface morphology. Although the vivid shark skin has been fabricated by a bio-replicated micro-imprinting approach in previous studies and superior drag reduction effect has been validated in water tunnel, continuous large-area fabrication is still an obstacle to wide apply. In this paper, one novel bio-replication coating technology is proposed for large-area transfer of shark skin based on rapid UV curable paint. Apart from design of coating system, bio-replication accuracy of surface morphology was validated about 97% by comparison between shark skin template and coating surface morphology. Finally, the drag reduction and anti-fouling function of coating surface were tested in water tunnel and open algae pond respectively. Drag reduction rate of coating surface was validated about 12% higher and anti-fouling was proved to about hundred times ameliorate, all of which are more excellent than simple 2D riblet surface.

  8. Modifying a dynamic global vegetation model for simulating large spatial scale land surface water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Water balance models of simple structure are easier to grasp and more clearly connect cause and effect than models of complex structure. Such models are essential for studying large spatial scale land surface water balance in the context of climate and land cover change, both natural and anthropogenic. This study aims to (i) develop a large spatial scale water balance model by modifying a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), and (ii) test the model's performance in simulating actual evapotranspiration (ET), soil moisture and surface runoff for the coterminous United States (US). Toward these ends, we first introduced development of the "LPJ-Hydrology" (LH) model by incorporating satellite-based land covers into the Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ) DGVM instead of dynamically simulating them. We then ran LH using historical (1982-2006) climate data and satellite-based land covers at 2.5 arc-min grid cells. The simulated ET, soil moisture and surface runoff were compared to existing sets of observed or simulated data for the US. The results indicated that LH captures well the variation of monthly actual ET (R2 = 0.61, p 0.46, p 0.52) with observed values over the years 1982-2006, respectively. The modeled spatial patterns of annual ET and surface runoff are in accordance with previously published data. Compared to its predecessor, LH simulates better monthly stream flow in winter and early spring by incorporating effects of solar radiation on snowmelt. Overall, this study proves the feasibility of incorporating satellite-based land-covers into a DGVM for simulating large spatial scale land surface water balance. LH developed in this study should be a useful tool for studying effects of climate and land cover change on land surface hydrology at large spatial scales.

  9. Characterization of neutron leakage probability, k /SUB eff/ , and critical core surface mass density of small reactor assemblies through the Trombay criticality formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Rao, K.S.; Srinivasan, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Trombay criticality formula (TCF) has been derived by incorporating a number of well-known concepts of criticality physics to enable prediction of changes in critical size or k /SUB eff/ following alterations in geometrical and physical parameters of uniformly reflected small reactor assemblies characterized by large neutron leakage from the core. The variant parameters considered are size, shape, density and diluent concentration of the core, and density and thickness of the reflector. The effect of these changes (except core size) manifests, through sigma /SUB c/ the critical surface mass density of the ''corresponding critical core,'' that sigma, the massto-surface-area ratio of the core,'' is essentially a measure of the product /rho/ extended to nonspherical systems and plays a dominant role in the TCF. The functional dependence of k /SUB eff/ on sigma/sigma /SUB c/ , the system size relative to critical, is expressed in the TCF through two alternative representations, namely the modified Wigner rational form and, an exponential form, which is given

  10. Mitigation technologies for damage induced by pressure waves in high-power mercury spallation neutron sources (1). Material surface improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Wakui, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Shoubu, Takahisa; Takeuchi, Hirotsugu; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed in the world. Proton beams will be used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by microjets and/or shock waves that are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. Bubble collapse behavior was observed by using a high-speed video camera, as well as simulated numerically. Localized impact due to cavitation bubble collapse was quantitatively estimated through comparison between numerical simulation and experiment. A novel surface treatment technique that consists of carburizing and nitriding processes was developed and the treatment condition was optimized to mitigate the pitting damage due to localized impacts. (author)

  11. Neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irvine, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: introduction (resume of stellar evolution, gross characteristics of neutron stars); pulsars (pulsar characteristics, pulsars as neutron stars); neutron star temperatures (neutron star cooling, superfluidity and superconductivity in neutron stars); the exterior of neutron stars (the magnetosphere, the neutron star 'atmosphere', pulses); neutron star structure; neutron star equations of state. (U.K.)

  12. Plasma processing of large curved surfaces for superconducting rf cavity modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities. We have demonstrated surface layer removal in an asymmetric nonplanar geometry, using a simple cylindrical cavity. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (rf circuit elements, gas pressure, rf power, chlorine concentration in the Cl_{2}/Ar gas mixtures, residence time of reactive species, and temperature of the cavity. Using variable radius cylindrical electrodes, large-surface ring-shaped samples, and dc bias in the external circuit, we have measured substantial average etching rates and outlined the possibility of optimizing plasma properties with respect to maximum surface processing effect.

  13. Methods for growth of relatively large step-free SiC crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for growing arrays of large-area device-size films of step-free (i.e., atomically flat) SiC surfaces for semiconductor electronic device applications is disclosed. This method utilizes a lateral growth process that better overcomes the effect of extended defects in the seed crystal substrate that limited the obtainable step-free area achievable by prior art processes. The step-free SiC surface is particularly suited for the heteroepitaxial growth of 3C (cubic) SiC, AlN, and GaN films used for the fabrication of both surface-sensitive devices (i.e., surface channel field effect transistors such as HEMT's and MOSFET's) as well as high-electric field devices (pn diodes and other solid-state power switching devices) that are sensitive to extended crystal defects.

  14. Rapid fabrication of large-area, corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic Mg alloy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenji; Song, Jinlong; Sun, Jing; Lu, Yao; Yu, Ziyuan

    2011-11-01

    A superhydrophobic magnesium (Mg) alloy surface was successfully fabricated via a facile electrochemical machining process, and subsequently covered with a fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) film. The surface morphologies and chemical compositions were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR). The results show hierarchal rough structures and an FAS film with a low surface energy on the Mg alloy surfaces, which confers good superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 165.2° and a water tilting angle of approximately 2°. The processing conditions, such as the processing time and removal rate per unit area at a constant removal mass per unit area, were investigated to determine their effects on the superhydrophobicity. Interestingly, when the removal mass per unit area is constant at approximately 11.10 mg/cm(2), the superhydrophobicity does not change with the removal rate per unit area. Therefore, a superhydrophobic Mg alloy surface can be rapidly fabricated based on this property. A large-area superhydrophobic Mg alloy surface was also fabricated for the first time using a small-area moving cathode. The corrosion resistance and durability of the superhydrophobic surfaces were also examined.

  15. Directional epithermal neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.; Mills, W.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A borehole tool for epithermal neutron die-away logging of subterranean formations surrounding a borehole is described which consists of: (a) a pulsed source of fast neutrons for irradiating the formations surrounding a borehole, (b) at least one neutron counter for counting epithermal neutrons returning to the borehole from the irradiated formations, (c) a neutron moderating material, (d) an outer thermal neutron shield providing a housing for the counter and the moderating material, (e) an inner thermal neutron shield dividing the housing so as to provide a first compartment bounded by the inner thermal neutron shield and a first portion of the outer thermal neutron shield and a second compartment bounded by the inner thermal neutron shield and a second portion of the outer thermal neutron shield, the counter being positioned within the first compartment and the moderating material being positioned within the second compartment, and (f) means for positioning the borehole tool against one side of the borehole wall and azimuthally orienting the borehole tool such that the first chamber is in juxtaposition with the borehole wall, the formation epithermal neutrons penetrating into the first chamber through the first portion of the outer thermal neutron shield are detected by the neutron counter for die-away measurement, thereby maximizing the directional sensitivty of the neutron counter to formation epithermal neutrons, the borehole fluid epithermal neutrons penetrating into the second chamber through the second chamber through the second portion of the outer thermal neutron shield are largely slowed down and lowered in energy by the moderating material and absorbed by the inner thermal neutron shield before penetrating into the first chamber, thereby minimizing the directional sensitivity of the neutron counter to borehole fluid epithermal neutrons

  16. Neutron measurements in search of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Goulding, C.A.; Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.; Gottesfeld, S.; Baker, D.A.; Springer, T.E.; Garzon, F.H.; Bolton, R.D.; Leonard, E.M.; Chancellor, T.

    1990-01-01

    We have conducted a research for neutron emission from cold fusion systems of the electrochemical type and, to a lesser extent, the high-pressure gas cell type. Using a high-efficiency well counter and an NE 213 scintillator, the experiments were conducted on the earth's surface and in a shielded cave approximately 50 ft underground. After approximately 6500 h of counting time, we have obtained no evidence for cold fusion processes leading to neutron production. However, we have observed all three types of neutron data that have been presented as evidence for cold fusion: large positive fluctuations in the neutron counting rate, weak peaks near 2.5 MeV in the neutron energy spectrum, and bursts of up to 145 neutrons in 500-μs intervals. The data were obtained under circumstances that clearly show our results to be data encountered as a part of naturally occurring neutron background, which is due primarily to cosmic rays. Thus, observing these types of data does not, of itself, provide evidence for the existence of cold fusion processes. Artifacts in the data that were due to counter misbehavior were also to lead to long-term ''neutron bursts'' whose time duration varied from several hours to several days. We conclude that any experiments which attempt to observe neutron emission must include strong steps to ensure that the experiments deal adequately with both cosmic-ray processes and counter misbehavior. 13 refs., 14 figs

  17. Nanotechnological Advances in Catalytic Thin Films for Green Large-Area Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Biran Ay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-area catalytic thin films offer great potential for green technology applications in order to save energy, combat pollution, and reduce global warming. These films, either embedded with nanoparticles, shaped with nanostructuring techniques, hybridized with other systems, or functionalized with bionanotechnological methods, can include many different surface properties including photocatalytic, antifouling, abrasion resistant and mechanically resistive, self-cleaning, antibacterial, hydrophobic, and oleophobic features. Thus, surface functionalization with such advanced structuring methods is of significance to increase the performance and wide usage of large-area thin film coatings specifically for environmental remediation. In this review, we focus on methods to increase the efficiency of catalytic reactions in thin film and hence improve the performance in relevant applications while eliminating high cost with the purpose of widespread usage. However, we also include the most recent hybrid architectures, which have potential to make a transformational change in surface applications as soon as high quality and large area production techniques are available. Hence, we present and discuss research studies regarding both organic and inorganic methods that are used to structure thin films that have potential for large-area and eco-friendly coatings.

  18. Kinematic behaviour of a large earthflow defined by surface displacement monitoring, DEM differencing, and ERT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokešová, Roberta; Kardoš, Miroslav; Tábořík, Petr; Medveďová, Alžbeta; Stacke, Václav; Chudý, František

    2014-11-01

    Large earthflow-type landslides are destructive mass movement phenomena with highly unpredictable behaviour. Knowledge of earthflow kinematics is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control its movements. The present paper characterises the kinematic behaviour of a large earthflow near the village of Ľubietová in Central Slovakia over a period of 35 years following its most recent reactivation in 1977. For this purpose, multi-temporal spatial data acquired by point-based in-situ monitoring and optical remote sensing methods have been used. Quantitative data analyses including strain modelling and DEM differencing techniques have enabled us to: (i) calculate the annual landslide movement rates; (ii) detect the trend of surface displacements; (iii) characterise spatial variability of movement rates; (iv) measure changes in the surface topography on a decadal scale; and (v) define areas with distinct kinematic behaviour. The results also integrate the qualitative characteristics of surface topography, in particular the distribution of surface structures as defined by a high-resolution DEM, and the landslide subsurface structure, as revealed by 2D resistivity imaging. Then, the ground surface kinematics of the landslide is evaluated with respect to the specific conditions encountered in the study area including slope morphology, landslide subsurface structure, and local geological and hydrometeorological conditions. Finally, the broader implications of the presented research are discussed with particular focus on the role that strain-related structures play in landslide kinematic behaviour.

  19. Verification of surface source's characteristics using large-area 2π gas flow counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Naser Waheed, M.M.; Mikami, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Noda, K.

    1998-09-01

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has large-area 2π gas flow counter for the purpose of measuring activity of surface sources of alpha or beta ray emitter. Surface sources are used for the calibration of radiation measuring equipment for radiation control. Due to sequent use of sources, the surface of these sources are inclined to go in bad condition because of unwanted accidental incidents. For the better calibration achievement of radiation measuring instruments the rate of emission of these sources are to be checked periodically by the large-area 2π gas flow counter. In this paper described that eight U 3 O 8 surface sources were selected from many sources of PNC Tokai Works and activity of these sources was measured by the 2π gas flow counter. The results were compared with the values certified by Japan Radio Isotope Association (JRIA). It is evident from the result of comparison that the surface sources are in good condition, i.e., the sources are reliable to calibrate the radiation control instruments. (author)

  20. Neutron moisture gaging of agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, S.; Janout, Z.; Kovacik, M.

    1987-01-01

    The design is described of a neutron moisture gage which consists of a measuring probe, neutron detector, small electronic recording device and a 241 Am-Be radionuclide source. The neutron detector consists of a surface barrier semiconductor silicon detector and a conversion layer of lithium fluoride. The detection of triton which is the reaction product of lithium with neutrons by the silicon detector is manifested as a voltage pulse. The detector has low sensitivity for fast neutrons and for gamma radiation and is suitable for determining moisture values in large volume samples. Verification and calibration measurements were carried out of chernozem, brown soil and podzolic soils in four series. The results are tabulated. Errors of measurement range between 0.8 to 1.0%. The precision of measurement could be improved by the calibration of the device for any type of soil. (E.S.). 4 tabs., 6 refs., 5 figs

  1. Investigation of Low-Cost Surface Processing Techniques for Large-Size Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Yuang-Tung; Ho, Jyh-Jier; Lee, William J.; Tsai, Song-Yeu; Lu, Yung-An; Liou, Jia-Jhe; Chang, Shun-Hsyung; Wang, Kang L.

    2010-01-01

    The subject of the present work is to develop a simple and effective method of enhancing conversion efficiency in large-size solar cells using multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafer. In this work, industrial-type mc-Si solar cells with area of 125×125 mm2 were acid etched to produce simultaneously POCl3 emitters and silicon nitride deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD). The study of surface morphology and reflectivity of different mc-Si etched surfaces has also been d...

  2. Pulsed neutron intensity from rectangular shaped light water moderator with fast-neutron reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Iwasa, Hirokatsu

    1982-01-01

    With a view to enhancing the thermal-neutron intensity obtained from a pulsed neutron source, an experimental study has been made to determine the optimum size of a rectangular shaped light water moderator provided with fast neutron reflector of beryllium oxide or graphite, and decoupled thermal-neutronically by means of Cd sheet. The optimum dimensions for the moderator are derived for the neutron emission surface and the thickn ess, for the cases in which the neutron-producing target is placed beneath the moderator (''wing geometry'') or immediately behind the moderator (''slab geometry''). The major conclusions drawn from the experimental results are as follows. The presence of the Cd decoupler inserted between the moderator and reflector prevent the enhancement of thermal-neutron emission time gained by the provision of reflector. With a graphite reflector about 14 cm thick, (a) the optimum area of emission surface would be 25 x 25 cm 2 for wing geometry and still larger for slab geometry, and (b) the optimum moderator thickness would be 5.5 cm for slab geometry and 8.5 cm for wing geometry. It is thus concluded that a higher neutron emission intensity can be obtained with slab than with wing geometry provided that a large emission surface can be adopted for the moderator. (author)

  3. Large-scale single-crystal growth of (CH3)2NH2CuCl3 for neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Garam; Oh, In-Hwan; Park, J. M. Sungil; Park, Seong-Hun; Hong, Chang Seop; Lee, Kwang-Sei

    2016-05-01

    Neutron scattering studies on low-dimensional quantum spin systems require large-size single-crystals. Single-crystals of (CH3)2NH2CuCl3 showing low-dimensional magnetic behaviors were grown by a slow solvent evaporation method in a two-solvent system at different temperature settings. The best results were obtained for the bilayer solution of methanol and isopropanol with a molar ratio of 2:1 at 35 °C. The quality of the obtained single-crystals was tested by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction and single-crystal neutron diffraction. In addition, to confirm structural phase transitions (SPTs), thermal analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 300 K and 175 K, respectively, were conducted, confirming the presence of a SPT at Tup=288 K on heating and Tdown=285 K on cooling.

  4. Beyond Massive MIMO: The Potential of Data Transmission With Large Intelligent Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sha; Rusek, Fredrik; Edfors, Ove

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the potential of data-transmission in a system with a massive number of radiating and sensing elements, thought of as a contiguous surface of electromagnetically active material. We refer to this as a large intelligent surface (LIS). The "LIS" is a newly proposed concept, which conceptually goes beyond contemporary massive MIMO technology, that arises from our vision of a future where man-made structures are electronically active with integrated electronics and wireless communication making the entire environment "intelligent". We consider capacities of single-antenna autonomous terminals communicating to the LIS where the entire surface is used as a receiving antenna array. Under the condition that the surface-area is sufficiently large, the received signal after a matched-filtering (MF) operation can be closely approximated by a sinc-function-like intersymbol interference (ISI) channel. We analyze the capacity per square meter (m^2) deployed surface, \\hat{C}, that is achievable for a fixed transmit power per volume-unit, \\hat{P}. Moreover, we also show that the number of independent signal dimensions per m deployed surface is 2/\\lambda for one-dimensional terminal-deployment, and \\pi/\\lambda^2 per m^2 for two and three dimensional terminal-deployments. Lastly, we consider implementations of the LIS in the form of a grid of conventional antenna elements and show that, the sampling lattice that minimizes the surface-area of the LIS and simultaneously obtains one signal space dimension for every spent antenna is the hexagonal lattice. We extensively discuss the design of the state-of-the-art low-complexity channel shortening (CS) demodulator for data-transmission with the LIS.

  5. Optimized preparation for large surface area activated carbon from date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) stone biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danish, Mohammed; Hashim, Rokiah; Ibrahim, M.N. Mohamad; Sulaiman, Othman

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of activated carbon from date stone treated with phosphoric acid was optimized using rotatable central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM). The chemical activating agent concentration and temperature of activation plays a crucial role in preparation of large surface area activated carbons. The optimized activated carbon was characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the larger surface area of activated carbon from date stone can be achieved under optimum activating agent (phosphoric acid) concentration, 50.0% (8.674 mol L −1 ) and activation temperature, 900 °C. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of optimized activated carbon was found to be 1225 m 2  g −1 , and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that 55.2% mass of optimized activated carbon was found thermally stable till 900 °C. The leading chemical functional groups found in the date stone activated carbon were aliphatic carboxylic acid salt ν(C=O) 1561.22 cm −1 and 1384.52 cm −1 , aliphatic hydrocarbons ν(C–H) 2922.99 cm −1 (C–H sym./asym. stretch frequency), aliphatic phosphates ν(P–O–C) 1054.09 cm −1 , and secondary aliphatic alcohols ν(O–H) 3419.81 cm −1 and 1159.83 cm −1 . - Highlights: • RSM optimization was done for the production of large surface area activated carbon. • Two independent variables with two responses were selected for optimization. • Characterization was done for surface area, morphology and chemical constituents. • Optimized date stone activated carbon achieved surface area 1225 m 2  g −1

  6. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Growth Modifiers on Hydrate Crystal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Thomas; Hutter, Jeffrey L.; Lin, M.; King, H. E., Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Hydrates are crystals consisting of small molecules enclathrated within an ice-like water cage. Suppression of their growth is important in the oil industry. The presence of small quantities of specific polymers during hydrate crystallization can induce a transition from an octahedral to planar growth habit. This symmetry breaking is surprising because of the suppression of two 111 planes relative to the other six crystallographically equivalent faces. To better understand the surface effects leading to this behavior, we have studied the surface adsorption of these growth-modifing polymers onto the hydrate crytals using SANS. The total hydrate surface area, as measured by Porod scattering, increases in the presence of the growth modifier, but, no significant increase in polymer concentration on the crystal surfaces is found. Implications for possible growth mechanisms will be discussed.

  7. Stress distribution in mechanically surface treated Ti-2.5Cu determined by combining energy-dispersive synchrotron and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maawad, E.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Hofmann, M.; Genzel, Ch.; Wagner, L.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical surface treatments such as shot peening (SP) or ball-burnishing (BB) induce plastic deformation close to the surface resulting in work-hardening and compressive residual stresses. It enhances the fatigue performance by retarding or even suppressing micro-crack growth from the surface into the interior. SP and BB were carried out on a solution heat treated (SHT) Ti-2.5Cu. The investigations of compressive and balancing tensile residual stresses need a combination of energy-dispersive synchrotron (ED) and neutron diffraction. Essential for the stress distribution is the stress state before surface treatments which was determined by neutron diffraction. Results show that the maximum compressive stress and its depth play an important role to improve the fatigue performance.

  8. Integrating weather and geotechnical monitoring data for assessing the stability of large scale surface mining operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiakakis Chrysanthos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The geotechnical challenges for safe slope design in large scale surface mining operations are enormous. Sometimes one degree of slope inclination can significantly reduce the overburden to ore ratio and therefore dramatically improve the economics of the operation, while large scale slope failures may have a significant impact on human lives. Furthermore, adverse weather conditions, such as high precipitation rates, may unfavorably affect the already delicate balance between operations and safety. Geotechnical, weather and production parameters should be systematically monitored and evaluated in order to safely operate such pits. Appropriate data management, processing and storage are critical to ensure timely and informed decisions.

  9. Replication fidelity assessment of large area sub-μm structured polymer surfaces using scatterometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calaon, M; Hansen, H N; Tosello, G; Madsen, M H; Weirich, J; Hansen, P E; Garnaes, J; Tang, P T

    2015-01-01

    The present study addresses one of the key challenges in the product quality control of transparent structured polymer substrates, the replication fidelity of sub-μm structures over a large area. Additionally the work contributes to the development of new techniques focused on in-line characterization of large nanostructured surfaces using scatterometry. In particular an approach to quantify the replication fidelity of high volume manufacturing processes such as polymer injection moulding is presented. Both periodic channels and semi-spherical structures were fabricated on nickel shims used for later injection moulding of Cyclic-olefin-copolymer (COC) substrate were the sub-μm features where ultimately transferred. The scatterometry system was validated using calibrated atomic force microscopy measurements and a model based on scalar diffraction theory employed to calculate the expected angular distribution of the reflected and the transmitted intensity for the nickel surfaces and structured COC and, respectively. (paper)

  10. Large-scale Validation of AMIP II Land-surface Simulations: Preliminary Results for Ten Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T J; Henderson-Sellers, A; Irannejad, P; McGuffie, K; Zhang, H

    2005-12-01

    This report summarizes initial findings of a large-scale validation of the land-surface simulations of ten atmospheric general circulation models that are entries in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II). This validation is conducted by AMIP Diagnostic Subproject 12 on Land-surface Processes and Parameterizations, which is focusing on putative relationships between the continental climate simulations and the associated models' land-surface schemes. The selected models typify the diversity of representations of land-surface climate that are currently implemented by the global modeling community. The current dearth of global-scale terrestrial observations makes exacting validation of AMIP II continental simulations impractical. Thus, selected land-surface processes of the models are compared with several alternative validation data sets, which include merged in-situ/satellite products, climate reanalyses, and off-line simulations of land-surface schemes that are driven by observed forcings. The aggregated spatio-temporal differences between each simulated process and a chosen reference data set then are quantified by means of root-mean-square error statistics; the differences among alternative validation data sets are similarly quantified as an estimate of the current observational uncertainty in the selected land-surface process. Examples of these metrics are displayed for land-surface air temperature, precipitation, and the latent and sensible heat fluxes. It is found that the simulations of surface air temperature, when aggregated over all land and seasons, agree most closely with the chosen reference data, while the simulations of precipitation agree least. In the latter case, there also is considerable inter-model scatter in the error statistics, with the reanalyses estimates of precipitation resembling the AMIP II simulations more than to the chosen reference data. In aggregate, the simulations of land-surface latent and

  11. Destruction of magnetic surfaces in the edge of a large aspect ratio Tokamak with ergodic limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, R.L.; Caldas, I.L.

    1990-01-01

    The model of Martin and Taylor for a large aspect-ratio Tokamak with an ergodic limiter is considered. In order to study the onset of chaotic behaviour for the magnetic field lines in the edge of the vessel, a Hamiltonian formulation is constructed for the system and the overlap of two peripheral magnetic islands is considered. So, it is possible to determine a threshold for the ergodic limiter current to cause destruction of rational magnetic surfaces in this region. (Author)

  12. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  13. Measurement of planetary surface composition by gamma-ray and neutron spectrometry - Preparatory studies for Mars and for the Moon by numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasnault, O.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray and neutron spectrometry sets up a powerful tool of geological and geochemical characterization of planetary surfaces. This method allows to tackle some critical planet science questions: crustal and mantle compositions; ices; volcanism; alteration processes... Most of the neutrons and gamma photons result from the interactions of galactic cosmic rays with matter. The first chapter introduces the physics of these nuclear interactions in planetary soils and in detectors. Our work aims at optimizing the observations by specifying instrumental performances, and by highlighting relations between soil composition and neutron fluxes. Numerical simulations using the GEANT code from CERN support our analysis. The second chapter estimates the performances of the Germanium gamma-ray spectrometer for MARS SURVEYOR 2001. The result of simulations is compared to calibration measurements; then performances are calculated in flight configuration. The background at Mars is estimated to about 160 c/s. The instrument offers a fine sensitivity to: Fe, Mg, K, Si, Th, Cl and O. It will also be possible to measure U, Ti, H, C, S, Ca and Al. The emission lobes at the surface are calculated too. These measurements shall permit a better understanding of the Martian surface. The last chapter deals with fast neutrons [500 keV; 10 MeV] emitted by the Moon. The strong influence of oxygen is underlined. As observed by LUNAR PROSPECTOR, the integrated flux shows a pronounced dependence with regolith content in iron and titanium, allowing the mapping. The influence of the other chemical elements is quantified. A simple mathematical formula is suggested to estimate the integrated neutron flux according to soil composition. At last, a study of hydrogen effects on fast neutron flux is carried out; we examine the possibilities to quantify its abundance in the soil by this method. (author)

  14. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  15. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasinska, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. α/β coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction α/β for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). α/β coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method α/β for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of α/β coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F r ) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50% for early and 63% for late effects. In case of

  16. Jump rates for surface diffusion of large molecules from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.shea@dal.ca; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2015-04-21

    We apply a recently developed stochastic model for the surface diffusion of large molecules to calculate jump rates for 9,10-dithioanthracene on a Cu(111) surface. The necessary input parameters for the stochastic model are calculated from first principles using density functional theory (DFT). We find that the inclusion of van der Waals corrections to the DFT energies is critical to obtain good agreement with experimental results for the adsorption geometry and energy barrier for diffusion. The predictions for jump rates in our model are in excellent agreement with measured values and show a marked improvement over transition state theory (TST). We find that the jump rate prefactor is reduced by an order of magnitude from the TST estimate due to frictional damping resulting from energy exchange with surface phonons, as well as a rotational mode of the diffusing molecule.

  17. Effect of air gap on uniformity of large-scale surface-wave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Chaohui; Hu Xiwei; Jiang Zhonghe; Liu Minghai

    2009-01-01

    The effect of air gap on the uniformity of large-scale surface-wave plasma (SWP) in a rectangular chamber device is studied by using three-dimensional numerical analyses based on the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) approximation to Maxwell's equations and plasma fluid model. The spatial distributions of surface wave excited by slot-antenna array and the plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature are presented. For different air gap thicknesses, the results show that the existence of air gap would severely weaken the excitations of the surface wave and thereby the SWP. Thus the air gap should be eliminated completely in the design of the SWP source, which is opposite to the former research results. (authors)

  18. Visualization and measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with large density difference using thermal neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Y.; Hibiki, T.; Mishima, K.; Nishihara, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Kanda, K.; Tobita, Y.; Konishi, K.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1998-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor there is a possibility of boiling of fuel-steel mixture in the containment pool. In relation to safety evaluation on severe accident, it is indispensable to evaluate the recriticality of melted core. Gas-liquid two-phase flow with a large density difference is formed due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture. Although the large density difference may affect the basic characteristics of two-phase flow, little work has been performed so far on two-phase flow with large density difference has not been performed well. In this study, visualization and void fraction measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow were performed by using neutron radiography. The effect of the large density difference between gas and liquid phases on the basic flow characteristics of two-phase flow was clarified. (author)

  19. Novel Threadlike Structures May Be Present on the Large Animal Organ Surface: Evidence in Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Hee Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  20. Forced synchronization of large-scale circulation to increase predictability of surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mao-Lin; Keenlyside, Noel; Selten, Frank; Wiegerinck, Wim; Duane, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models are key tools in the projection of the future climate change. The lack of perfect initial condition and perfect knowledge of the laws of physics, as well as inherent chaotic behavior limit predictions. Conceptually, the atmospheric variables can be decomposed into a predictable component (signal) and an unpredictable component (noise). In ensemble prediction the anomaly of ensemble mean is regarded as the signal and the ensemble spread the noise. Naturally the prediction skill will be higher if the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is larger in the initial conditions. We run two ensemble experiments in order to explore a way to reduce the SNR of surface winds and temperature. One ensemble experiment is AGCM with prescribing sea surface temperature (SST); the other is AGCM with both prescribing SST and nudging the high-level temperature and winds to ERA-Interim. Each ensemble has 30 members. Larger SNR is expected and found over the tropical ocean in the first experiment because the tropical circulation is associated with the convection and the associated surface wind convergence as these are to a large extent driven by the SST. However, small SNR is found over high latitude ocean and land surface due to the chaotic and non-synchronized atmosphere states. In the second experiment the higher level temperature and winds are forced to be synchronized (nudged to reanalysis) and hence a larger SNR of surface winds and temperature is expected. Furthermore, different nudging coefficients are also tested in order to understand the limitation of both synchronization of large-scale circulation and the surface states. These experiments will be useful for the developing strategies to synchronize the 3-D states of atmospheric models that can be later used to build a super model.

  1. High frequency time modulation of neutrons by LiNbO3 crystals with surface acoustic waves excited under the diffraction condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Granzer, E.; Kikuta, Seishi; Tomimitsu, Hiroshi; Doi, Kenji.

    1985-01-01

    High frequency time modulation of neutrons was investigated by using Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals with surface acoustic waves excited. A double crystal arrangement of (+, -) parallel setting was used for 030 symmetric Bragg-case reflections. Synchronized standing waves with a resonance frequency of 14.26 MHz were excited on the both crystals. Variation of the diffracted intensity with phase difference between two standing waves was studied. The result showed an intensity change of diffracted neutrons with twice the resonance frequency. (author)

  2. On the group approximation errors in description of neutron slowing-down at large distances from a source. Diffusion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakovskij, M.Ya.; Savitskij, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    The errors of multigroup calculating the neutron flux spatial and energy distribution in the fast reactor shield caused by using group and age approximations are considered. It is shown that at small distances from a source the age theory rather well describes the distribution of the slowing-down density. With the distance increase the age approximation leads to underestimating the neutron fluxes, and the error quickly increases at that. At small distances from the source (up to 15 lengths of free path in graphite) the multigroup diffusion approximation describes the distribution of slowing down density quite satisfactorily and at that the results almost do not depend on the number of groups. With the distance increase the multigroup diffusion calculations lead to considerable overestimating of the slowing-down density. The conclusion is drawn that the group approximation proper errors are opposite in sign to the error introduced by the age approximation and to some extent compensate each other

  3. MSLB coupled 3D neutronics-thermalhydraulic analysis of a large PWR using RELAP5-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Nigro, A.; Spadoni, A.; D'Auria, F.; Saiu, G.

    2001-01-01

    A RELAP5-3D model of the Westinghouse AP1000 NSSS has been set up and it has been used to analyze the MSLB accident. Main results (both spatial distributions and time trends) have been represented with 3D plots and graphical movies. The method applied allows accounting for the coupled 3D neutronics and thermalyhdraulics effects, suggesting to consider its applicability in Safety Analysis.(author)

  4. Large contribution to the neutron electric dipole moment from a dimension-six four-quark operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.; McKellar, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the contribution of a dimension-six four-quark operator to the neutron electric dipole moment. We find that this contribution dominates over the one-loop contributions due to W L- WR mixing by at least one order of magnitude in left-right-symmetric models, and in diquark scalar models this contribution is two orders of magnitude larger than other contributions

  5. THE IMPACT OF SURFACE TEMPERATURE INHOMOGENEITIES ON QUIESCENT NEUTRON STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshamouty, K. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Morsink, S. M.; Stevens, A. L. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bogdanov, S., E-mail: alshamou@ualberta.ca [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, NY 10027 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Fitting the thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars (NSs) in quiescent X-ray binaries can constrain the masses and radii of NSs. The effect of undetected hot spots on the spectrum, and thus on the inferred NS mass and radius, has not yet been explored for appropriate atmospheres and spectra. A hot spot would harden the observed spectrum, so that spectral modeling tends to infer radii that are too small. However, a hot spot may also produce detectable pulsations. We simulated the effects of a hot spot on the pulsed fraction and spectrum of the quiescent NSs X5 and X7 in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, using appropriate spectra and beaming for hydrogen atmosphere models, incorporating special and general relativistic effects, and sampling a range of system angles. We searched for pulsations in archival Chandra HRC-S observations of X5 and X7, placing 90% confidence upper limits on their pulsed fractions below 16%. We use these pulsation limits to constrain the temperature differential of any hot spots, and to then constrain the effects of possible hot spots on the X-ray spectrum and the inferred radius from spectral fitting. We find that hot spots below our pulsation limit could bias the spectroscopically inferred radius downward by up to 28%. For Cen X-4 (which has deeper published pulsation searches), an undetected hot spot could bias its inferred radius downward by up to 10%. Improving constraints on pulsations from quiescent LMXBs may be essential for progress in constraining their radii.

  6. THE IMPACT OF SURFACE TEMPERATURE INHOMOGENEITIES ON QUIESCENT NEUTRON STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshamouty, K. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Morsink, S. M.; Stevens, A. L.; Bogdanov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Fitting the thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars (NSs) in quiescent X-ray binaries can constrain the masses and radii of NSs. The effect of undetected hot spots on the spectrum, and thus on the inferred NS mass and radius, has not yet been explored for appropriate atmospheres and spectra. A hot spot would harden the observed spectrum, so that spectral modeling tends to infer radii that are too small. However, a hot spot may also produce detectable pulsations. We simulated the effects of a hot spot on the pulsed fraction and spectrum of the quiescent NSs X5 and X7 in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, using appropriate spectra and beaming for hydrogen atmosphere models, incorporating special and general relativistic effects, and sampling a range of system angles. We searched for pulsations in archival Chandra HRC-S observations of X5 and X7, placing 90% confidence upper limits on their pulsed fractions below 16%. We use these pulsation limits to constrain the temperature differential of any hot spots, and to then constrain the effects of possible hot spots on the X-ray spectrum and the inferred radius from spectral fitting. We find that hot spots below our pulsation limit could bias the spectroscopically inferred radius downward by up to 28%. For Cen X-4 (which has deeper published pulsation searches), an undetected hot spot could bias its inferred radius downward by up to 10%. Improving constraints on pulsations from quiescent LMXBs may be essential for progress in constraining their radii.

  7. Development of a large area, curved two-dimensional detector for single-crystal neutron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Myung-Kook; Lee, Chang-Hee; Kim, Shin-Ae; Noda, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    A new type of two-dimensional curved position-sensitive neutron detector has been developed for a high-throughput single-crystal neutron diffractometer, which was designed to cover 110° horizontally and 56° vertically. The prototype curved detector covering 70° horizontally and 45° vertically was first developed to test the technical feasibility of the detector parameters, the internal anode and cathode structures for the curved shape, technical difficulties in the assembly procedure, and so on. Then, based on this experience, a full-scale curved detector with twice the active area of the prototype was fabricated with newly modified anode and cathode planes and optimized design parameters in terms of mechanical and electric properties. The detector was installed in a dedicated diffractometer at the ST3 beam port of the research reactor HANARO. In this paper, the fabrication and application of the prototype and a new larger-area curved position-sensitive neutron detector for single crystal diffraction is presented

  8. Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayer, Michael J.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron probe is a standard tool for measuring soil water content. This article provides an overview of the underlying theory, describes the methodology for its calibration and use, discusses example applications, and identifies the safety issues. Soil water makes land-based life possible by satisfying plant water requirements, serving as a medium for nutrient movement to plant roots and nutrient cycling, and controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the soil environment. Therefore, a successful understanding of the dynamics of plant growth, nutrient cycling, and contaminant behavior in the soil requires knowledge of the soil water content as well as its spatial and temporal variability. After more than 50 years, neutron probes remain the most reliable tool available for field monitoring of soil water content. Neutron probes provide integrated measurements over relatively large volumes of soil and, with proper access, allow for repeated sampling of the subsurface at the same locations. The limitations of neutron probes include costly and time-consuming manual operation, lack of data automation, and costly regulatory requirements. As more non-radioactive systems for soil water monitoring are developed to provide automated profiling capabilities, neutron-probe usage will likely decrease. Until then, neutron probes will continue to be a standard for reliable measurements of field water contents in soils around the globe

  9. Turbulent mixed convection from a large, high temperature, vertical flat surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.; Siebers, D.; Tieszen, S.

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent mixed convection heat transfer at high temperatures and large length scales is an important and seldom studied phenomenon that can represent a significant part of the overall heat transfer in applications ranging from solar central receivers to objects in fires. This work is part of a study to validate turbulence models for predicting heat transfer to or from surfaces at large temperature differences and large length scales. Here, turbulent, three-dimensional, mixed convection heat transfer in air from a large (3m square) vertical flat surface at high temperatures is studied using two RANS turbulence models: a standard k-ε model and the v2-bar -f model. Predictions for three cases spanning the range of the experiment (Siebers, D.L., Schwind, R.G., Moffat, R.F., 1982. Experimental mixed convection from a large, vertical plate in a horizontal flow. Paper MC13, vol. 3, Proc. 7th Int. Heat Transfer Conf., Munich; Siebers, D.L., 1983. Experimental mixed convection heat transfer from a large, vertical surface in a horizontal flow. PhD thesis, Stanford University) from forced (GrH/ReL2=0.18) to mixed (GrH/ReL2=3.06) to natural (GrH/ReL2=∼) convection are compared with data. The results show a decrease in the heat transfer coefficient as GrH/ReL2 is increased from 0.18 to 3.06, for a free-stream velocity of 4.4m/s. In the natural convection case, the experimental heat transfer coefficient is approximately constant in the fully turbulent region, whereas the calculated heat transfer coefficients show a slight increase with height. For the three cases studied, the calculated and experimental heat transfer coefficients agree to within 5-35% over most of the surface with the v2-bar -f model results showing better agreement with the data. Calculated temperature and velocity profiles show good agreement with the data

  10. Investigation on the growth of DAST crystals of large surface area for THz applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay, R. Jerald; Melikechi, N.; Thomas, Tina; Gunaseelan, R.; Arockiaraj, M. Antony; Sagayaraj, P.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: It is evident from the photographs that the crystal tend to grow as a needle (Fig. 1a) in the lower concentration region (2–3 g/200 mL); whereas, in the high concentration region (5 g/200 mL) though there is a marked enlargement in the size of the crystal, the morphology of the resulting DAST crystal is slightly irregular (Fig. 1d) in nature. Among the four concentrations employed, best result was obtained with the DAST–methanol solution of concentration 4 g/200 mL; which resulted in the DAST crystal of large surface area (270 mm 2 ) with high transparency and nearly square shape (Fig. 1c) in a growth period of 20–25 days. Highlights: ► DAST crystals of different sizes are obtained for different concentrations. ► The main focus is to grow DAST crystals with large surface area. ► Structural, optical, thermal and mechanical properties are investigated. - Abstract: The growth of high quality 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4-N-methyl-stilbazoliumtosylate (DAST) crystal with large surface area is reported by adopting the slope nucleation coupled slow evaporation method (SNM-SE). The structure and composition of the crystal are studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction and CHN analyses. The linear optical properties are investigated by UV–vis absorption. The melting point and thermal behavior of DAST are investigated using differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). The Vickers microhardness number (VHN) and work hardening coefficient of the grown crystal have been determined. The surface features of the DAST crystal are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and it confirmed the presence of narrow line defects (NLDs) in the sample.

  11. The use of large surface area for particle and power deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneur, A.; Guilhem, D.; Hogan, J.

    1993-01-01

    Since the parallel heat flux passing through the LCFS has increased dramatically with the size of machines one has to cope with very large particle and power fluxes on the limiters. Thus the size of the limiters has been increased by the use of inner bumper limiters (for example in JET, TFTR, TORE-SUPRA and JT60). The 'exponential-sine' model is widely used to estimate the heat flux (Q) to a wall for a plasma flux surface with incident angle θ. The model predict Q = q || (0) sinθ e -ρ/λ q + q(0) cosθ e -ρ/λ q , (where θ=0 o when the flux surface is exactly tangential to the limiting surface), ρ is the minor radius measured from the last closed flux surface (LCFS), λ q is the SOL decay length of the heat flux density and q(0) is the heat flux density at the last closed surface. If we approximate the heat flux as Q = q || (0) e -ρ/λ q sin(θ+α), with α ≡ tan -1 [q(0)/q || (0)], then α can be interpreted as an effective 'minimum angle of incidence'. Under conditions where the geometric angle θ has been made almost grazing (below 5 o ) the predictions of the simplest model (with α=0 o ) is not adequate to represent the observation made in TORE-SUPRA; a similar result is found in TFTR. Experimental observations of heat and particle deposition on the large area limiter on the inner wall of TORE-SUPRA are presented. These results have been analyzed with a Monte Carlo code (THOR) describing the diffusion of hydrogenic particles across the LCFS to the limiting objects in the Scrape Off Layer (SOL), and by impurity generation calculations using the full 'exponential-sine' model (α ≠ 0) used as input to an impurity (carbon) Monte Carlo code (BBQ). (author) 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A smart car for the surface shape measurement of large antenna based on laser tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yonggang; Hu, Jing; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    The geometric accuracy of the surface shape of large antenna is an important indicator of antenna’s quality. Currently, high-precision measurement of large antenna surface shape can be performed in two ways: photogrammetry and laser tracker. Photogrammetry is a rapid method, but its accuracy is not enough good. Laser tracker can achieve high precision, but it is very inconvenient to move the reflector (target mirror) on the surface of the antenna by hand during the measurement. So, a smart car is designed to carry the reflector in this paper. The car, controlled by wireless, has a small weight and a strong ability for climbing, and there is a holding bracket gripping the reflector and controlling reflector rise up and drop down on the car. During the measurement of laser tracker, the laser beam between laser tracker and the reflector must not be interrupted, so two high-precision three-dimensional miniature electronic compasses, which can real-time monitor the relative angle between the holding bracket and the laser tracker’s head, are both equipped on the car and the head of laser tracker to achieve automatic alignment between reflector and laser beam. With the aid of the smart car, the measurement of laser tracker has the advantages of high precision and rapidity.

  14. Neutron energy spectrum determination near the surface on the JET vacuum vessel using the multifoil activation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, M.; Jarvis, O.N.; Conroy, S. (Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy) JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdonm Oxon (U.K.) Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (U.K.))

    1990-03-01

    The activation of foils of zinc, indium, aluminium, copper and magnesium has been used as a means of examining the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by discharges in the Joint European Torus (JET). Several threshold reactions have been used together with a least-squares unfolding code to determine the 2.5 and 14 MeV neutron yields produced by the JET plasma. The analysis shows that the energy spectrum produced by downscattered neutrons is satisfactorily calculated with the MCNP neutron transport code.

  15. Stability of surface plastic flow in large strain deformation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Udapa, Anirduh; Sagapuram, Dinakar; Mann, James; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    We examine large-strain unconstrained simple shear deformation in metals using a model two-dimensional cutting system and high-speed in situ imaging. The nature of the deformation mode is shown to be a function of the initial microstructure state of the metal and the deformation geometry. For annealed metals, which exhibit large ductility and strain hardening capacity, the commonly assumed laminar flow mode is inherently unstable. Instead, the imposed shear is accommodated by a highly rotational flow-sinuous flow-with vortex-like components and large-amplitude folding on the mesoscale. Sinuous flow is triggered by a plastic instability on the material surface ahead of the primary region of shear. On the other hand, when the material is extensively strain-hardened prior to shear, laminar flow again becomes unstable giving way to shear banding. The existence of these flow modes is established by stability analysis of laminar flow. The role of the initial microstructure state in determining the change in stability from laminar to sinuous / shear-banded flows in metals is elucidated. The implications for cutting, forming and wear processes for metals, and to surface plasticity phenomena such as mechanochemical Rehbinder effects are discussed.

  16. Image-based Exploration of Iso-surfaces for Large Multi- Variable Datasets using Parameter Space.

    KAUST Repository

    Binyahib, Roba S.

    2013-05-13

    With an increase in processing power, more complex simulations have resulted in larger data size, with higher resolution and more variables. Many techniques have been developed to help the user to visualize and analyze data from such simulations. However, dealing with a large amount of multivariate data is challenging, time- consuming and often requires high-end clusters. Consequently, novel visualization techniques are needed to explore such data. Many users would like to visually explore their data and change certain visual aspects without the need to use special clusters or having to load a large amount of data. This is the idea behind explorable images (EI). Explorable images are a novel approach that provides limited interactive visualization without the need to re-render from the original data [40]. In this work, the concept of EI has been used to create a workflow that deals with explorable iso-surfaces for scalar fields in a multivariate, time-varying dataset. As a pre-processing step, a set of iso-values for each scalar field is inferred and extracted from a user-assisted sampling technique in time-parameter space. These iso-values are then used to generate iso- surfaces that are then pre-rendered (from a fixed viewpoint) along with additional buffers (i.e. normals, depth, values of other fields, etc.) to provide a compressed representation of iso-surfaces in the dataset. We present a tool that at run-time allows the user to interactively browse and calculate a combination of iso-surfaces superimposed on each other. The result is the same as calculating multiple iso- surfaces from the original data but without the memory and processing overhead. Our tool also allows the user to change the (scalar) values superimposed on each of the surfaces, modify their color map, and interactively re-light the surfaces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach over a multi-terabyte combustion dataset. We also illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of our

  17. Large-eddy simulation of open channel flow with surface cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.; Tejada-Martínez, A.E.; Martinat, G.; Grosch, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Open channel flow comparable to a shallow tidal ocean flow is simulated using LES. • Unstable stratification is imposed by a constant surface cooling flux. • Full-depth, convection-driven, rotating supercells develop when cooling is applied. • Strengthening of cells occurs corresponding to an increasing of the Rayleigh number. - Abstract: Results are presented from large-eddy simulations of an unstably stratified open channel flow, driven by a uniform pressure gradient and with zero surface shear stress and a no-slip lower boundary. The unstable stratification is applied by a constant cooling flux at the surface and an adiabatic bottom wall, with a constant source term present to ensure the temperature reaches a statistically steady state. The structure of the turbulence and the turbulence statistics are analyzed with respect to the Rayleigh number (Ra τ ) representative of the surface buoyancy relative to shear. The impact of the surface cooling-induced buoyancy on mean and root mean square of velocity and temperature, budgets of turbulent kinetic energy (and components), Reynolds shear stress and vertical turbulent heat flux will be investigated. Additionally, colormaps of velocity fluctuations will aid the visualization of turbulent structures on both vertical and horizontal planes in the flow. Under neutrally stratified conditions the flow is characterized by weak, full-depth, streamwise cells similar to but less coherent than Couette cells in plane Couette flow. Increased Ra τ and thus increased buoyancy effects due to surface cooling lead to full-depth convection cells of significantly greater spanwise size and coherence, thus termed convective supercells. Full-depth convective cell structures of this magnitude are seen for the first time in this open channel domain, and may have important implications for turbulence analysis in a comparable tidally-driven ocean boundary layer. As such, these results motivate further study of the

  18. Fermi surface properties of paramagnetic NpCd11 with a large unit cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai; Haga, Yoshinori; Settai, Rikio; Sakai, Hironori; Ikeda, Shugo; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nakamura, Akio; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2010-03-01

    We succeeded in growing a high-quality single crystal of NpCd11 with the cubic BaHg11-type structure by the Cd-self flux method. The lattice parameter of a = 9.2968(2) Å and crystallographic positions of the atoms were determined by x-ray single-crystal structure analysis. From the results of the magnetic susceptibility and specific heat experiments, this compound is found to be a 5f-localized paramagnet with the singlet ground state in the crystalline electric field (CEF) scheme. Fermi surface properties were measured using the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) technique. Long-period oscillations were observed in the dHvA frequency range of 9.1 x 105 to 1.9 x 107 Oe, indicating small cross-sectional areas of Fermi surfaces, which is consistent with a small Brillouin zone based on a large unit cell. From the results of dHvA and magnetoresistance experiments, the Fermi surface of NpCd11 is found to consist of many kinds of closed Fermi surfaces and a multiply-connected-like Fermi surface, although the result of energy band calculations based on the 5f-localized Np3+(5f4) configuration reveals the existence of only closed Fermi surfaces. The corresponding cyclotron effective mass is small, ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m0, which is consistent with a small electronic specific heat coefficient γ ≅ 10mJ/K2·mol, revealing no hybridization between the 5f electrons and conduction electrons.

  19. Fast and accurate: high-speed metrological large-range AFM for surface and nanometrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Koenders, Ludger; Fluegge, Jens; Hemmleb, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Low measurement speed remains a major shortcoming of the scanning probe microscopic technique. It not only leads to a low measurement throughput, but a significant measurement drift over the long measurement time needed (up to hours or even days). To overcome this challenge, PTB, the national metrology institute of Germany, has developed a high-speed metrological large-range atomic force microscope (HS Met. LR-AFM) capable of measuring speeds up to 1 mm s‑1. This paper has introduced the design concept in detail. After modelling scanning probe microscopic measurements, our results suggest that the signal spectrum of the surface to be measured is the spatial spectrum of the surface scaled by the scanning speed. The higher the scanning speed , the broader the spectrum to be measured. To realise an accurate HS Met. LR-AFM, our solution is to combine different stages/sensors synchronously in measurements, which provide a much larger spectrum area for high-speed measurement capability. Two application examples have been demonstrated. The first is a new concept called reference areal surface metrology. Using the developed HS Met. LR-AFM, surfaces are measured accurately and traceably at a speed of 500 µm s‑1 and the results are applied as a reference 3D data map of the surfaces. By correlating the reference 3D data sets and 3D data sets of tools under calibration, which are measured at the same surface, it has the potential to comprehensively characterise the tools, for instance, the spectrum properties of the tools. The investigation results of two commercial confocal microscopes are demonstrated, indicating very promising results. The second example is the calibration of a kind of 3D nano standard, which has spatially distributed landmarks, i.e. special unique features defined by 3D-coordinates. Experimental investigations confirmed that the calibration accuracy is maintained at a measurement speed of 100 µm s‑1, which improves the calibration efficiency by a

  20. Modifying a dynamic global vegetation model for simulating large spatial scale land surface water balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2012-08-01

    Satellite-based data, such as vegetation type and fractional vegetation cover, are widely used in hydrologic models to prescribe the vegetation state in a study region. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) simulate land surface hydrology. Incorporation of satellite-based data into a DGVM may enhance a model's ability to simulate land surface hydrology by reducing the task of model parameterization and providing distributed information on land characteristics. The objectives of this study are to (i) modify a DGVM for simulating land surface water balances; (ii) evaluate the modified model in simulating actual evapotranspiration (ET), soil moisture, and surface runoff at regional or watershed scales; and (iii) gain insight into the ability of both the original and modified model to simulate large spatial scale land surface hydrology. To achieve these objectives, we introduce the "LPJ-hydrology" (LH) model which incorporates satellite-based data into the Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ) DGVM. To evaluate the model we ran LH using historical (1981-2006) climate data and satellite-based land covers at 2.5 arc-min grid cells for the conterminous US and for the entire world using coarser climate and land cover data. We evaluated the simulated ET, soil moisture, and surface runoff using a set of observed or simulated data at different spatial scales. Our results demonstrate that spatial patterns of LH-simulated annual ET and surface runoff are in accordance with previously published data for the US; LH-modeled monthly stream flow for 12 major rivers in the US was consistent with observed values respectively during the years 1981-2006 (R2 > 0.46, p 0.52). The modeled mean annual discharges for 10 major rivers worldwide also agreed well (differences day method for snowmelt computation, the addition of the solar radiation effect on snowmelt enabled LH to better simulate monthly stream flow in winter and early spring for rivers located at mid-to-high latitudes. In addition, LH

  1. Wipe-rinse technique for quantitating microbial contamination on large surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, L. E.; Puleo, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation of an improved wipe-rinse technique for the bioassay of large areas was undertaken due to inherent inadequacies in the cotton swab-rinse technique to which assay of spacecraft is currently restricted. Four types of contamination control cloths were initially tested. A polyester-bonded cloth (PBC) was selected for further evaluation because of its superior efficiency and handling characteristics. Results from comparative tests with PBC and cotton swabs on simulated spacecraft surfaces indicated a significantly higher recovery efficiency for the PBC than for the cotton (90.4 versus 75.2%). Of the sampling area sites studied, PBC was found to be most effective on surface areas not exceeding 0.74 sq m (8.0 sq ft).

  2. Which potentials have to be surface peaked to reproduce large angle proton scattering at high energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynal, J.

    1990-01-01

    Corrections to the usual form factors of the optical potential are studied with a view to getting a better fit for proton elastic scattering at large angles on 40 Ca at 497 and 800 MeV. When a real surface form factor is added to the central potential in the Schrodinger formalism, the experimental data are as well reproduced as in the standard Dirac formalism. Coupling to the strong 3 - collective state gives a better fit. The use of surface corrections to the imaginary Dirac potential also gives improved results. A slightly better fit is obtained by coupling to the 3 - state with, at the same time, a weakening of these corrections. Further corrections to the potential do not give significant improvements

  3. Monte carlo calculation of the neutron effective dose rate at the outer surface of the biological shield of HTR-10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remetti, Romolo; Andreoli, Giulio; Keshishian, Silvina

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We deal with HTR-10, that is a helium-cooled graphite-moderated pebble bed reactor. ► We carried out Monte Carlo simulation of the core by MCNP5. ► Extensive use of MCNP5 variance reduction methods has been done. ► We calculated the trend of neutron flux within the biological shield. ► We calculated neutron effective dose at the outer surface of biological shield. - Abstract: Research on experimental reactors, such as HTR-10, provide useful data about potentialities of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). The latter is today rated as one of the six nuclear reactor types involved in the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) Initiative. In this study, the MCNP5 code has been employed to evaluate the neutron radiation trend vs. the biological shield's thickness and to calculate the neutron effective dose rate at the outer surface. The reactor's geometry has been completely modeled by means of lattices and universes provided by MCNP, even though some approximations were required. Monte Carlo calculations have been performed by means of a simple PC and, as a consequence, in order to obtain acceptable run times, it was made an extensive recourse to variance reduction methods.

  4. Digital detection system of surface defects for large aperture optical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yong; Chen Niannian; Gao Lingling; Jia Yuan; Wang Junbo; Cheng Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Based on the light defect images against the dark background in a scattering imaging system, a digital detection system of surface defects for large aperture optical elements has been presented. In the system, the image is segmented by a multi-area self-adaptive threshold segmentation method, then a pixel labeling method based on replacing arrays is adopted to extract defect features quickly, and at last the defects are classified through back-propagation neural networks. Experiment results show that the system can achieve real-time detection and classification. (authors)

  5. A novel hybrid surface micromachined segmented mirror for large aperture laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Haiqing; Yu, Hongbin

    2006-07-01

    A novel hybrid surface micromachined segmented mirror array is described. This device is capable of scaling to large apertures for correcting time-varying aberrations in laser applications. Each mirror is composed of bottom electrode, support part, and mirror plate, in which a T-shaped beam structure is used to support the mirror plate. It can provide mirror with vertical movement and rotation around two horizontal axes. The test results show that the maximum deflection along the vertical direction of the mirror plate is 2 microns, while the rotation angles around x and y axes are +-2.3 deg. and +-1.45 deg., respectively.

  6. Observation of near-infrared surface brightness of the large Magellanic cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Satio; Koizumi, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Uyama, Kiichiro.

    1981-01-01

    The near-infrared surface brightness of the large Magellanic cloud was observed by an infrared telescope carried by a balloon. The balloon flight was made at Australian Balloon Launching Station. The brightness distribution of 2.4 Mu m radiation was obtained. A part of Bar was bright, and the expansion of the contour at the east end of Bar corresponded to the 30 Dor region. Many near-infrared sources distribute in this region. Discussions on the color and brightness of the center of Bar and the 30 Dor region are presented. (Kato, T.)

  7. Residual stress measurement of large scaled welded pipe using neutron diffraction method. Effect of SCC crack propagation and repair weld on residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Tobita, Tohru; Morii, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The RESA-1 neutron engineering diffractometer in the JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which is used for stress measurements, was upgraded to realize residual stress measurements of large scaled mechanical components. A series of residual stress measurements was made to obtain through-thickness residual stress distributions in a Type 304 stainless steel butt-welded pipe of 500A-sch.80 using the upgraded RESA-1 diffractometer. We evaluated effects of crack propagation such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and a part-circumference repair weld on the residual stress distributions induced by girth welding. Measured residual stress distributions near original girth weld revealed good agreement with typical results shown in some previous works using finite element method, deep hole drilling as well as neutron diffraction. After introducing a mock crack with 10 mm depth in the heat affected zone on the inside wall of the pipe by electro discharge machining, the axial residual stresses were found to be released in the part of the mock crack. However, changes in the through-wall bending stress component and the self-equilibrated stress component were negligible and hence the axial residual stress distribution in the ligament was remained in the original residual stresses near girth weld without the mock crack. Furthermore, changes in hoop and radial residual stress were also small. The residual stress distributions after a part repair welding on the outer circumference of the girth weld were significantly different from residual stress distributions near the original girth weld. The through-thickness average axial residual stress was increased due to increase of the tensile membrane stress and mitigation of the bending stress after repair welding. Throughout above studies, we evidenced that the neutron diffraction technique is useful and powerful tool for measuring residual stress distributions in large as well as thick mechanical

  8. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  9. Large scale mass redistribution and surface displacement from GRACE and SLR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M.; Ries, J. C.; Tapley, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Mass transport between the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth results in the temporal variations in the Earth gravity field and loading induced deformation of the Earth. Recent space-borne observations, such as GRACE mission, are providing extremely high precision temporal variations of gravity field. The results from 10-yr GRACE data has shown a significant annual variations of large scale vertical and horizontal displacements occurring over the Amazon, Himalayan region and South Asia, African, and Russian with a few mm amplitude. Improving understanding from monitoring and modeling of the large scale mass redistribution and the Earth's response are a critical for all studies in the geosciences, in particular for determination of Terrestrial Reference System (TRS), including geocenter motion. This paper will report results for the observed seasonal variations in the 3-dimentional surface displacements of SLR and GPS tracking stations and compare with the prediction from time series of GRACE monthly gravity solution.

  10. Parallel Computation of RCS of Electrically Large Platform with Coatings Modeled with NURBS Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The significance of Radar Cross Section (RCS in the military applications makes its prediction an important problem. This paper uses large-scale parallel Physical Optics (PO to realize the fast computation of RCS to electrically large targets, which are modeled by Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS surfaces and coated with dielectric materials. Some numerical examples are presented to validate this paper’s method. In addition, 1024 CPUs are used in Shanghai Supercomputer Center (SSC to perform the simulation of a model with the maximum electrical size 1966.7 λ for the first time in China. From which, it can be found that this paper’s method can greatly speed the calculation and is capable of solving the real-life problem of RCS prediction.

  11. Surface States Effect on the Large Photoluminescence Redshift in GaN Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Slimane, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    We report on the large photoluminescence redshift observed in nanostructures fabricated using n-type GaN by ultraviolet (UV) metal-assisted electroless chemical-etching method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization showed nanostructures with size dispersion ranging from 10 to 100 nm. We observed the crystalline structure using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss (EELS) techniques. In contrast to 362 nm UV emission from the GaN epitaxy, the nanostructures emitted violet visible-light in photoluminescence (PL) characterization with increasing optical excitation. An energy band model was presented to shed light on the large PL redshift under the influence of surface states, which resulted in two competing photoluminescence mechanisms depending on excitation conditions.

  12. The desing study of high voltage plasma focus for a large fluence neutron source by using a water capacitor bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Isao; Kobata, Tadasuke

    1983-01-01

    A new possibility for high intensity neutron source (HINS) would be opened by the plasma focus device if we have a high voltage capacitor bank. A scaling law of neutron yield for D-T gas discharge in plasma focus device is obtained after Imshennik, Filippov and Filippova. The resulting scaling law shows the realizability of the D-T HINS by the use of plasma focus, provided that the device is operated under a high voltage condition. Until now, it has been difficult to construct the high voltage capacitor bank of long life, for example with V 0 =300kV, C 0 =200μF and L 0 --5nH necessary in the level of HINS. It becomes possible to design this capacitor bank by using the coaxial water capacitor which has been developed for the electron and ion beam accelerator. The size of a capacitor designed for V 0 =300kV, C 0 =1μF is phi5m x 22m. Two hundred capacitors are used in parallel in order to get the 200μF. (author)

  13. Development of neutron detector using sensor type surface barrier with (n,p) and (n,α) converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madi Filho, Tufic

    1999-01-01

    A Si semiconductor detector, surface barrier type, with a slim film of a converter material capable to produce charged particles was used as a sensor of neutrons in an environment of a zero power reactor. Two types of converters were used to improve the detection efficiency: (1) the polyethylene, n(CH 2 ), which produces recoil protons from the (n,p) interaction and, (2) the 10 B which generates a particle from the (n,alpha) reaction. The optimal thickness of those converters was determined experimentally and specifically for the polyethylene a mathematical model R(ips) = ε p · N 0 ·(1-e -Σ·Χ ) ·e -μ ·Χ + ε n · N 0 · -Σ · Χ was used to fit to the experimental data. For the polyethylene converter the thickness was of 0.058 cm (62.64 mg.cm -2 ) while for the 10 B it was equal to 6.55 [μm (1.54 mg.cm -2 ). The converter of polyethylene or 10 B improved the detection efficiency to a factor of 4.7 and 3.0 respectively. The comparison of the spectrum of the background radiation with the spectra of the recoil protons and the a radiation from the 10 B it was concluded that the polyethylene presented better performance than the 10 B converter. (author)

  14. Surface accuracy analysis and mathematical modeling of deployable large aperture elastic antenna reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Michael J.

    One class of deployable large aperture antenna consists of thin light-weight parabolic reflectors. A reflector of this type is a deployable structure that consists of an inflatable elastic membrane that is supported about its perimeter by a set of elastic tendons and is subjected to a constant hydrostatic pressure. A design may not hold the parabolic shape to within a desired tolerance due to an elastic deformation of the surface, particularly near the rim. We can compute the equilibrium configuration of the reflector system using an optimization-based solution procedure that calculates the total system energy and determines a configuration of minimum energy. Analysis of the equilibrium configuration reveals the behavior of the reflector shape under various loading conditions. The pressure, film strain energy, tendon strain energy, and gravitational energy are all considered in this analysis. The surface accuracy of the antenna reflector is measured by an RMS calculation while the reflector phase error component of the efficiency is determined by computing the power density at boresight. Our error computation methods are tailored for the faceted surface of our model and they are more accurate for this particular problem than the commonly applied Ruze Equation. Previous analytical work on parabolic antennas focused on axisymmetric geometries and loads. Symmetric equilibria are not assumed in our analysis. In addition, this dissertation contains two principle original findings: (1) the typical supporting tendon system tends to flatten a parabolic reflector near its edge. We find that surface accuracy can be significantly improved by fixing the edge of the inflated reflector to a rigid structure; (2) for large membranes assembled from flat sheets of thin material, we demonstrate that the surface accuracy of the resulting inflated membrane reflector can be improved by altering the cutting pattern of the flat components. Our findings demonstrate that the proper choice

  15. Neutron Beam Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of filters is to transmit neutrons with selected energy, while remove unwanted ones from the incident neutron beam. This reduces the background, and the number of spurious. The types of commonly used now-a-day neutron filters and their properties are discussed in the present work. There are three major types of neutron filters. The first type is filter of selective thermal neutron. It transmits the main reflected neutrons from a crystal monochromate, while reject the higher order contaminations accompanying the main one. Beams coming from the moderator always contain unwanted radiation like fast neutrons and gamma-rays which contribute to experimental background and to the biological hazard potential. Such filter type is called filter of whole thermal neutron spectrum. The third filter type is it transmits neutrons with energies in the resonance energy range (En . 1 KeV). The main idea of such neutron filter technique is the use of large quantities of a certain material which have the deep interference minima in its total neutron cross-section. By transmitting reactor neutrons through bulk layer of such material, one can obtain the quasimonochromatic neutron lines instead of white reactor spectrum.

  16. Fabrication of a Horizontal and a Vertical Large Surface Area Nanogap Electrochemical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules L. Hammond

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanogap sensors have a wide range of applications as they can provide accurate direct detection of biomolecules through impedimetric or amperometric signals. Signal response from nanogap sensors is dependent on both the electrode spacing and surface area. However, creating large surface area nanogap sensors presents several challenges during fabrication. We show two different approaches to achieve both horizontal and vertical coplanar nanogap geometries. In the first method we use electron-beam lithography (EBL to pattern an 11 mm long serpentine nanogap (215 nm between two electrodes. For the second method we use inductively-coupled plasma (ICP reactive ion etching (RIE to create a channel in a silicon substrate, optically pattern a buried 1.0 mm × 1.5 mm electrode before anodically bonding a second identical electrode, patterned on glass, directly above. The devices have a wide range of applicability in different sensing techniques with the large area nanogaps presenting advantages over other devices of the same family. As a case study we explore the detection of peptide nucleic acid (PNA−DNA binding events using dielectric spectroscopy with the horizontal coplanar device.

  17. Point contact tunneling spectroscopy apparatus for large scale mapping of surface superconducting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groll, Nickolas; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinksi, John F. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We describe the design and testing of a point contact tunneling spectroscopy device that can measure material surface superconducting properties (i.e., the superconducting gap Δ and the critical temperature T{sub C}) and density of states over large surface areas with size up to mm{sup 2}. The tip lateral (X,Y) motion, mounted on a (X,Y,Z) piezo-stage, was calibrated on a patterned substrate consisting of Nb lines sputtered on a gold film using both normal (Al) and superconducting (PbSn) tips at 1.5 K. The tip vertical (Z) motion control enables some adjustment of the tip-sample junction resistance that can be measured over 7 orders of magnitudes from a quasi-ohmic regime (few hundred Ω) to the tunnel regime (from tens of kΩ up to few GΩ). The low noise electronic and LabVIEW program interface are also presented. The point contact regime and the large-scale motion capabilities are of particular interest for mapping and testing the superconducting properties of macroscopic scale superconductor-based devices.

  18. Test-retest reliability of trunk motor variability measured by large-array surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Nougarou, François; Loranger, Michel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the trunk muscle activity distribution in asymptomatic participants during muscle fatigue using large-array surface electromyography (EMG). Trunk muscle activity distribution was evaluated twice, with 3 to 4 days between them, in 27 asymptomatic volunteers using large-array surface EMG. Motor variability, assessed with 2 different variables (the centroid coordinates of the root mean square map and the dispersion variable), was evaluated during a low back muscle fatigue task. Test-retest reliability of muscle activity distribution was obtained using Pearson correlation coefficients. A shift in the distribution of EMG amplitude toward the lateral-caudal region of the lumbar erector spinae induced by muscle fatigue was observed. Moderate to very strong correlations were found between both sessions in the last 3 phases of the fatigue task for both motor variability variables, whereas weak to moderate correlations were found in the first phases of the fatigue task only for the dispersion variable. These findings show that, in asymptomatic participants, patterns of EMG activity are less reliable in initial stages of muscle fatigue, whereas later stages are characterized by highly reliable patterns of EMG activity. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling large-scale human alteration of land surface hydrology and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Yadu N.; Felfelani, Farshid; Shin, Sanghoon; Yamada, Tomohito J.; Satoh, Yusuke

    2017-12-01

    Rapidly expanding human activities have profoundly affected various biophysical and biogeochemical processes of the Earth system over a broad range of scales, and freshwater systems are now amongst the most extensively altered ecosystems. In this study, we examine the human-induced changes in land surface water and energy balances and the associated climate impacts using a coupled hydrological-climate model framework which also simulates the impacts of human activities on the water cycle. We present three sets of analyses using the results from two model versions—one with and the other without considering human activities; both versions are run in offline and coupled mode resulting in a series of four experiments in total. First, we examine climate and human-induced changes in regional water balance focusing on the widely debated issue of the desiccation of the Aral Sea in central Asia. Then, we discuss the changes in surface temperature as a result of changes in land surface energy balance due to irrigation over global and regional scales. Finally, we examine the global and regional climate impacts of increased atmospheric water vapor content due to irrigation. Results indicate that the direct anthropogenic alteration of river flow in the Aral Sea basin resulted in the loss of 510 km3 of water during the latter half of the twentieth century which explains about half of the total loss of water from the sea. Results of irrigation-induced changes in surface energy balance suggest a significant surface cooling of up to 3.3 K over 1° grids in highly irrigated areas but a negligible change in land surface temperature when averaged over sufficiently large global regions. Results from the coupled model indicate a substantial change in 2 m air temperature and outgoing longwave radiation due to irrigation, highlighting the non-local (regional and global) implications of irrigation. These results provide important insights on the direct human alteration of land surface

  20. Neutron reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  1. Role of low-order rational surfaces in transport barrier formation on the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, F.

    2010-11-01

    In the Large Helical Device, edge transport barrier (ETB) was formed by H-mode transition near the low-order rational surfaces, that is, at the ι/2π=1 resonant layer (ι/2π: the rotational transform) in outward-shifted plasmas of R ax =3.9m (R ax : the magnetic axis position in the vacuum field), and the ι/2π=2 resonant layer in inward-shifted plasmas of R ax =3.6m. The ι/2π=1 and 2 resonant layers reside in the stochastic field region existing just outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCFS). In the outward-shifted plasmas, H-modes without edge localized modes (ELM-free H-modes) followed by giant ELMs were obtained, while H-modes with high frequency and low amplitude ELMs were obtained in the inward-shifted plasmas. A new type of barrier formation induced by TAE bursts was observed in the plasmas of R ax =3.6m, where the transport barrier is formed near the ι/2π=1 surface locates inside LCFS. (author)

  2. Beyond Massive MIMO: The Potential of Positioning With Large Intelligent Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sha; Rusek, Fredrik; Edfors, Ove

    2018-04-01

    We consider the potential for positioning with a system where antenna arrays are deployed as a large intelligent surface (LIS), which is a newly proposed concept beyond massive-MIMO where future man-made structures are electronically active with integrated electronics and wireless communication making the entire environment \\lq\\lq{}intelligent\\rq\\rq{}. In a first step, we derive Fisher-information and Cram\\'{e}r-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) in closed-form for positioning a terminal located perpendicular to the center of the LIS, whose location we refer to as being on the central perpendicular line (CPL) of the LIS. For a terminal that is not on the CPL, closed-form expressions of the Fisher-information and CRLB seem out of reach, and we alternatively find approximations of them which are shown to be accurate. Under mild conditions, we show that the CRLB for all three Cartesian dimensions ($x$, $y$ and $z$) decreases quadratically in the surface-area of the LIS, except for a terminal exactly on the CPL where the CRLB for the $z$-dimension (distance from the LIS) decreases linearly in the same. In a second step, we analyze the CRLB for positioning when there is an unknown phase $\\varphi$ presented in the analog circuits of the LIS. We then show that the CRLBs are dramatically increased for all three dimensions but decrease in the third-order of the surface-area. Moreover, with an infinitely large LIS the CRLB for the $z$-dimension with an unknown $\\varphi$ is 6 dB higher than the case without phase uncertainty, and the CRLB for estimating $\\varphi$ converges to a constant that is independent of the wavelength $\\lambda$. At last, we extensively discuss the impact of centralized and distributed deployments of LIS, and show that a distributed deployment of LIS can enlarge the coverage for terminal-positioning and improve the overall positioning performance.

  3. Neutron slowing down and transport in an infinite medium: 2, The scalar flux at large distances/small lethargies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    A companion paper has presented a Generalized Age-Theory expression for the scalar flux PSI 0 /sup G/(x,u) due to a plane isotropic source emitting neutrons in an infinite medium with cross sections that are constant in energy. The range of validity for this Generalized Age-Theory expression has also been determined as p = x/(2u) ≤ R(A), where R(A), the range of validity, is a function of the scatterer's mass. The purpose of this paper is to present the expression for the scalar flux Psi 0 /sup G/(x,u) in the complementary region in phase-space, i.e., where p > R(A)

  4. Prime focus architectures for large space telescopes: reduce surfaces to save cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Lillie, C. F.

    2016-07-01

    Conceptual architectures are now being developed to identify future directions for post JWST large space telescope systems to operate in the UV Optical and near IR regions of the spectrum. Here we show that the cost of optical surfaces within large aperture telescope/instrument systems can exceed $100M/reflection when expressed in terms of the aperture increase needed to over come internal absorption loss. We recommend a program in innovative optical design to minimize the number of surfaces by considering multiple functions for mirrors. An example is given using the Rowland circle imaging spectrometer systems for UV space science. With few exceptions, current space telescope architectures are based on systems optimized for ground-based astronomy. Both HST and JWST are classical "Cassegrain" telescopes derived from the ground-based tradition to co-locate the massive primary mirror and the instruments at the same end of the metrology structure. This requirement derives from the dual need to minimize observatory dome size and cost in the presence of the Earth's 1-g gravitational field. Space telescopes, however function in the zero gravity of space and the 1- g constraint is relieved to the advantage of astronomers. Here we suggest that a prime focus large aperture telescope system in space may have potentially have higher transmittance, better pointing, improved thermal and structural control, less internal polarization and broader wavelength coverage than Cassegrain telescopes. An example is given showing how UV astronomy telescopes use single optical elements for multiple functions and therefore have a minimum number of reflections.

  5. Development and Characterization of a High Sensitivity Segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, T J; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Heimbach, C R; Ji, G; Nico, J S

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and 3 He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a 3 He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated 252 Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra are unfolded using a Singular Value Decomposition method, demonstrating a 5% energy resolution at 14 MeV. Finally, we discuss plans for measuring the surface and underground cosmogenic neutron spectra with FaNS-2.

  6. Modifying a dynamic global vegetation model for simulating large spatial scale land surface water balances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based data, such as vegetation type and fractional vegetation cover, are widely used in hydrologic models to prescribe the vegetation state in a study region. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM simulate land surface hydrology. Incorporation of satellite-based data into a DGVM may enhance a model's ability to simulate land surface hydrology by reducing the task of model parameterization and providing distributed information on land characteristics. The objectives of this study are to (i modify a DGVM for simulating land surface water balances; (ii evaluate the modified model in simulating actual evapotranspiration (ET, soil moisture, and surface runoff at regional or watershed scales; and (iii gain insight into the ability of both the original and modified model to simulate large spatial scale land surface hydrology. To achieve these objectives, we introduce the "LPJ-hydrology" (LH model which incorporates satellite-based data into the Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ DGVM. To evaluate the model we ran LH using historical (1981–2006 climate data and satellite-based land covers at 2.5 arc-min grid cells for the conterminous US and for the entire world using coarser climate and land cover data. We evaluated the simulated ET, soil moisture, and surface runoff using a set of observed or simulated data at different spatial scales. Our results demonstrate that spatial patterns of LH-simulated annual ET and surface runoff are in accordance with previously published data for the US; LH-modeled monthly stream flow for 12 major rivers in the US was consistent with observed values respectively during the years 1981–2006 (R2 > 0.46, p < 0.01; Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient > 0.52. The modeled mean annual discharges for 10 major rivers worldwide also agreed well (differences < 15% with observed values for these rivers. Compared to a degree-day method for snowmelt computation, the addition of the solar radiation effect on snowmelt

  7. Cloud-enabled large-scale land surface model simulations with the NASA Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, D.; Vaughan, G.; Clark, M. P.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Nijssen, B.; Nearing, G. S.; Rheingrover, S.; Kumar, S.; Geiger, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    Developed by the Hydrological Sciences Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the Land Information System (LIS) is a high-performance software framework for terrestrial hydrology modeling and data assimilation. LIS provides the ability to integrate satellite and ground-based observational products and advanced modeling algorithms to extract land surface states and fluxes. Through a partnership with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Washington, the LIS model is currently being extended to include the Structure for Unifying Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA). With the addition of SUMMA in LIS, meaningful simulations containing a large multi-model ensemble will be enabled and can provide advanced probabilistic continental-domain modeling capabilities at spatial scales relevant for water managers. The resulting LIS/SUMMA application framework is difficult for non-experts to install due to the large amount of dependencies on specific versions of operating systems, libraries, and compilers. This has created a significant barrier to entry for domain scientists that are interested in using the software on their own systems or in the cloud. In addition, the requirement to support multiple run time environments across the LIS community has created a significant burden on the NASA team. To overcome these challenges, LIS/SUMMA has been deployed using Linux containers, which allows for an entire software package along with all dependences to be installed within a working runtime environment, and Kubernetes, which orchestrates the deployment of a cluster of containers. Within a cloud environment, users can now easily create a cluster of virtual machines and run large-scale LIS/SUMMA simulations. Installations that have taken weeks and months can now be performed in minutes of time. This presentation will discuss the steps required to create a cloud-enabled large-scale simulation, present examples of its use, and

  8. A measurement of the efficiency for the detection of neutrons in the momentum range 200 to 3200 MeV/c, in large volume liquid scintillation counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.; Clark, A.G.; Duke, P.J.

    1976-04-01

    A description is given of a system of 194 large volume liquid scintillation counters designed to detect neutrons in an experiment on the reaction π - p → π 0 n in the resonance region. The detection efficiency of the system has been determined, as a function of neutron momentum, in three separate measurements, covering the range 200 to 3200 MeV/c. Below 400 MeV/c the efficiency shows the expected momentum dependence near threshold, rising to a maximum of 50% near 300 MeV/c and then falling to 43% near 400 MeV/c. In the region 400 to 700 MeV/c the efficiency rises to 47% near 600 MeV/c and falls again to 43%, an effect not seen before; the efficiency was expected to be almost momentum independent in this region. Above the threshold for inelastic processes in nucleon-nucleon collision (approximately 800 MeV/c) the efficiency rises significantly reaching a maximum value of 65% above 1700 MeV/c. (author)

  9. Measurement of very forward neutron energy spectra for 7 TeV proton--proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Menjo, H.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Okuno, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A-L.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W.C.; Zhou, Q.D.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment is designed to use the LHC to verify the hadronic-interaction models used in cosmic-ray physics. Forward baryon production is one of the crucial points to understand the development of cosmic-ray showers. We report the neutron-energy spectra for LHC $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV proton--proton collisions with the pseudo-rapidity $\\eta$ ranging from 8.81 to 8.99, from 8.99 to 9.22, and from 10.76 to infinity. The measured energy spectra obtained from the two independent calorimeters of Arm1 and Arm2 show the same characteristic feature before unfolding the difference in the detector responses. We unfolded the measured spectra by using the multidimensional unfolding method based on Bayesian theory, and the unfolded spectra were compared with current hadronic-interaction models. The QGSJET II-03 model predicts a high neutron production rate at the highest pseudo-rapidity range similar to our results and the DPMJET 3.04 model describes our results well at the lower pseudo-...

  10. Particularities of surface plasmon-exciton strong coupling with large Rabi splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symonds, C; Bonnand, C; Plenet, J C; Brehier, A; Parashkov, R; Lauret, J S; Deleporte, E; Bellessa, J

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents some of the particularities of the strong coupling regime occurring between surface plasmon (SP) modes and excitons. Two different active materials were deposited on a silver film: a cyanine dye J-aggregate, and a two-dimensional layered perovskite-type semiconductor. The dispersion relations, which are deduced from angular resolved reflectometry spectra, present an anticrossing characteristic of the strong coupling regime. The wavevector is a good parameter to determine the Rabi splitting. Due to the large interaction energies (several hundreds of milli-electron-volts), the calculations at constant angle can induce an overestimation of the Rabi splitting of more than a factor of two. Another property of polaritons based on SP is their nonradiative character. In order to observe the polaritonic emission, it is thus necessary to use particular extraction setups, such as gratings or prisms. Otherwise only the incoherent emission can be detected, very similar to the bare exciton emission

  11. Dai Omega, a large solid angle axial focusing superconducting surface muon channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyadera, H.; Nagamine, K.; Shimomura, K.; Nishiyama, K.; Tanaka, H.; Fukuchi, K.; Makimura, S.; Ishida, K.

    2003-01-01

    An axial focusing surface muon channel, Dai Omega, was installed at KEK-MSL in the summer of 2001. Large aperture superconducting coils are utilized instead of quadrupole magnets. Dai Omega adopts an axial focusing beam path using symmetric magnetic fields from four coils. Computer simulations were performed on constructing Dai Omega, and the calculated solid angle acceptance of Dai Omega was larger than 1 sr at the optimum momentum. The momentum acceptance of Dai Omega was 6% FWHM. Dai Omega improved the solid angle acceptance by almost 20 times, in comparison with conventional muon channels. Beam tuning tests of Dai Omega have been carried out, and a beam intensity of 10 6 μ + /s was achieved at KEK-NML (500 MeV, 5 μA), which was almost comparable with that of RAL (800 MeV, 200 μA)

  12. Bonding and vibrational dynamics of a large π-conjugated molecule on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temirov, R; Soubatch, S; Lassise, A; Tautz, F S

    2008-01-01

    The interplay between the substrate bonding of a large π-conjugated semiconductor molecule and the dynamical properties of the metal-organic interface is studied, employing the prototypical PTCDA/Ag(111) monolayer as an example. Both the coupling of molecular vibrations to the electron-hole-pair continuum of the metal surface and the inelastic scattering of tunnelling electrons by the molecular vibrations on their passage through the molecule are considered. The results of both types of experiment are consistent with the findings of measurements which probe the geometric and electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex directly; generally speaking, they can be understood in the framework of standard theories for the electron-vibron coupling. While the experiments reported here in fact provide additional qualitative insights into the substrate bonding of our π-conjugated model molecule, their detailed quantitative understanding would require a full calculation of the dynamical interface properties, which is currently not available

  13. Heritability analysis of surface-based cortical thickness estimation on a large twin cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kaikai; Doré, Vincent; Rose, Stephen; Fripp, Jurgen; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Thompson, Paul M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Salvado, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the heritability of cerebral cortex, based on measurements of grey matter (GM) thickness derived from structural MR images (sMRI). With data acquired from a large twin cohort (328 subjects), an automated method was used to estimate the cortical thickness, and EM-ICP surface registration algorithm was used to establish the correspondence of cortex across the population. An ACE model was then employed to compute the heritability of cortical thickness. Heritable cortical thickness measures various cortical regions, especially in frontal and parietal lobes, such as bilateral postcentral gyri, superior occipital gyri, superior parietal gyri, precuneus, the orbital part of the right frontal gyrus, right medial superior frontal gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, right paracentral lobule, left precentral gyrus, and left dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus.

  14. Strong orientation dependence of surface mass density profiles of dark haloes at large scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osato, Ken; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Oguri, Masamune; Takada, Masahiro; Okumura, Teppei

    2018-06-01

    We study the dependence of surface mass density profiles, which can be directly measured by weak gravitational lensing, on the orientation of haloes with respect to the line-of-sight direction, using a suite of N-body simulations. We find that, when major axes of haloes are aligned with the line-of-sight direction, surface mass density profiles have higher amplitudes than those averaged over all halo orientations, over all scales from 0.1 to 100 Mpc h-1 we studied. While the orientation dependence at small scales is ascribed to the halo triaxiality, our results indicate even stronger orientation dependence in the so-called two-halo regime, up to 100 Mpc h-1. The orientation dependence for the two-halo term is well approximated by a multiplicative shift of the amplitude and therefore a shift in the halo bias parameter value. The halo bias from the two-halo term can be overestimated or underestimated by up to {˜ } 30 per cent depending on the viewing angle, which translates into the bias in estimated halo masses by up to a factor of 2 from halo bias measurements. The orientation dependence at large scales originates from the anisotropic halo-matter correlation function, which has an elliptical shape with the axis ratio of ˜0.55 up to 100 Mpc h-1. We discuss potential impacts of halo orientation bias on other observables such as optically selected cluster samples and a clustering analysis of large-scale structure tracers such as quasars.

  15. Large magnetoresistance and Fermi surface study of Sb2Se2Te single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, K.; Marinova, V.; Graf, D.; Lorenz, B.; Chu, C. W.

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the magnetotransport properties of a Sb2Se2Te single crystal. Magnetoresistance (MR) is maximum when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the sample surface and reaches a value of 1100% at B = 31 T with no sign of saturation. MR shows Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations above B = 15 T. The frequency spectrum of SdH oscillations consists of three distinct peaks at α = 32 T, β = 80 T, and γ = 117 T indicating the presence of three Fermi surface pockets. Among these frequencies, β is the prominent peak in the frequency spectrum of SdH oscillations measured at different tilt angles of the sample with respect to the magnetic field. From the angle dependence β and Berry phase calculations, we have confirmed the trivial topology of the β-pocket. The cyclotron masses of charge carriers, obtained by using the Lifshitz-Kosevich formula, are found to be mβ*=0.16mo and m γ*=0.63 mo for the β and γ bands, respectively. The Large MR of Sb2Se2Te is suitable for utilization in electronic instruments such as computer hard discs, high field magnetic sensors, and memory devices.

  16. Investigation of Low-Cost Surface Processing Techniques for Large-Size Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuang-Tung Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the present work is to develop a simple and effective method of enhancing conversion efficiency in large-size solar cells using multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si wafer. In this work, industrial-type mc-Si solar cells with area of 125×125 mm2 were acid etched to produce simultaneously POCl3 emitters and silicon nitride deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD. The study of surface morphology and reflectivity of different mc-Si etched surfaces has also been discussed in this research. Using our optimal acid etching solution ratio, we are able to fabricate mc-Si solar cells of 16.34% conversion efficiency with double layers silicon nitride (Si3N4 coating. From our experiment, we find that depositing double layers silicon nitride coating on mc-Si solar cells can get the optimal performance parameters. Open circuit (Voc is 616 mV, short circuit current (Jsc is 34.1 mA/cm2, and minority carrier diffusion length is 474.16 μm. The isotropic texturing and silicon nitride layers coating approach contribute to lowering cost and achieving high efficiency in mass production.

  17. The hepatitis B virus large surface protein (LHBs) is a transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildt, E; Saher, G; Bruss, V; Hofschneider, P H

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown that a C-terminally truncated form of the middle-sized hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface protein (MHBst) functions as a transcriptional activator. This function is dependent on the cytosolic orientation of the N-terminal PreS2 domain of MHBst, but in the case of wild-type MHBs, the PreS2 domain is contranslationally translocated into the ER lumen. Recent reports demonstrated that the PreS2 domain of the large HBV surface protein (LHBs) initially remains on the cytosolic side of the ER membrane after translation. Therefore, the question arose as to whether the LHBs protein exhibits the same transcriptional activator function as MHBst. We show that LHBs, like MHBst, is indeed able to activate a variety of promoter elements. There is evidence for a PKC-dependent activation of AP-1 and NF-kappa B by LHBs. Downstream of the PKC the functionality of c-Raf-1 kinase is a prerequisite for LHBs-dependent activation of AP-1 and NF-kappa B since inhibition of c-Raf-1 kinase abolishes LHBs-dependent transcriptional activation of AP-1 and NF-kappa B.

  18. Polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The book on 'polarized neutrons' is intended to inform researchers in condensed matter physics and chemistry of the diversity of scientific problems that can be investigated using polarized neutron beams. The contents include chapters on:- neutron polarizers and instrumentation, polarized neutron scattering, neutron polarization analysis experiments and precessing neutron polarization. (U.K.)

  19. Neutron--neutron logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.

    1977-01-01

    A borehole logging tool includes a steady-state source of fast neutrons, two epithermal neutron detectors, and two thermal neutron detectors. A count rate meter is connected to each neutron detector. A first ratio detector provides an indication of the porosity of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two epithermal neutron detectors. A second ratio detector provides an indication of both porosity and macroscopic absorption cross section of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two thermal neutron detectors. By comparing the signals of the two ratio detectors, oil bearing zones and salt water bearing zones within the formation being logged can be distinguished and the amount of oil saturation can be determined. 6 claims, 2 figures

  20. Integrating weather and geotechnical monitoring data for assessing the stability of large scale surface mining operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiakakis, Chrysanthos; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Apostolou, Evangelia; Papavgeri, Georgia; Tripolitsiotis, Achilles

    2016-01-01

    The geotechnical challenges for safe slope design in large scale surface mining operations are enormous. Sometimes one degree of slope inclination can significantly reduce the overburden to ore ratio and therefore dramatically improve the economics of the operation, while large scale slope failures may have a significant impact on human lives. Furthermore, adverse weather conditions, such as high precipitation rates, may unfavorably affect the already delicate balance between operations and safety. Geotechnical, weather and production parameters should be systematically monitored and evaluated in order to safely operate such pits. Appropriate data management, processing and storage are critical to ensure timely and informed decisions. This paper presents an integrated data management system which was developed over a number of years as well as the advantages through a specific application. The presented case study illustrates how the high production slopes of a mine that exceed depths of 100-120 m were successfully mined with an average displacement rate of 10- 20 mm/day, approaching an almost slow to moderate landslide velocity. Monitoring data of the past four years are included in the database and can be analyzed to produce valuable results. Time-series data correlations of movements, precipitation records, etc. are evaluated and presented in this case study. The results can be used to successfully manage mine operations and ensure the safety of the mine and the workforce.

  1. Visualization and measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with large density difference using thermal neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hibiki, T.; Saito, Y.; Nishihara, H.; Tobita, Y.; Konishi, K.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1999-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor, there is a possibility of boiling of the fuel-steel mixture in the containment pool. In relation to safety evaluation on severe accident, it is indispensable to evaluate the possibility of re-criticality of melted core. Gas-liquid two-phase flow with a large liquid-to-gas density ratio is formed due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture. Although it is anticipated that the large density ratio may affect the basic characteristics of two-phase flow, little work has been performed so far on two-phase flow with a large liquid-to-gas density ratio. In this study, visualization and void fraction measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow were performed by using neutron radiography and image processing techniques. Then, the effect of large density difference between gas and liquid phases on the basic flow characteristics of two-phase flow was clarified

  2. A Novel Yeast Surface Display Method for Large-Scale Screen Inhibitors of Sortase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Li, Huijun; Tang, Tianle

    2017-01-24

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates of sortase A are too expensive to be used to roughly screen high-throughput sortase A inhibitors. This makes therapeutic strategies difficult to realize in a clinical therapeutic use. Instead, we design here an LPETG-EGFP (leucine, proline, glutamic, threonine and glycine-enhanced green fluorescence) protein displayed on a yeast surface as a substrate by adaptively reducing the cost. We do this by optimizing the induction conditions of sortase A expression in Escherichia coli DE3(BL21) and catalyzing LPETG proteins, which are displayed on surface of Pichia pastoris . Different expression conditions of sortase A include: induction temperature (22 °C, 28 °C, 37 °C and 40 °C), induction time (4 h, 5 h, 6 h and 7 h) and induction concentration of isopropyl β-d-thiogalactoside IPTG (0.25 mmol/L, 0.5 mmol/L, 1 mmol/L, and 2 mmol/L). The fluorescence change of the LPETG-EGFP protein on the surface of P. pastoris over time was detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence spectrophotometry, and then the sensitivities of the two methods were compared. Using berberine chloride as an inhibitor, the activity of sortase A was investigated with the substrates of LPETG-EGFP protein, and compared to Dabcyl-QALPETGEE-Edans. A high yield of sortase A was achieved by inducing 1.0 mmol/L IPTG at 28 °C for 6 h. The intensity of green fluorescence of substrates displayed on the yeast surface was increased over time, while the stability was decreased slightly. Both fluorescence spectrophotometery and flow cytometry were fit for detection because of their high sensitivity. We utilized two different substrates of sortase A to investigate sortase A activity, which resulted in the increase of fluorescence intensity with respect to the increased time of growth. However, the method with Dabcyl-QALPETGEE-Edans as its substrate was more robust. Thus, the method described in this paper is a simple and cheap method which is very suitable for

  3. A Novel Yeast Surface Display Method for Large-Scale Screen Inhibitors of Sortase A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates of sortase A are too expensive to be used to roughly screen high-throughput sortase A inhibitors. This makes therapeutic strategies difficult to realize in a clinical therapeutic use. Instead, we design here an LPETG-EGFP (leucine, proline, glutamic, threonine and glycine-enhanced green fluorescence protein displayed on a yeast surface as a substrate by adaptively reducing the cost. We do this by optimizing the induction conditions of sortase A expression in Escherichia coli DE3(BL21 and catalyzing LPETG proteins, which are displayed on surface of Pichia pastoris. Different expression conditions of sortase A include: induction temperature (22 °C, 28 °C, 37 °C and 40 °C, induction time (4 h, 5 h, 6 h and 7 h and induction concentration of isopropyl β-d-thiogalactoside IPTG (0.25 mmol/L, 0.5 mmol/L, 1 mmol/L, and 2 mmol/L. The fluorescence change of the LPETG-EGFP protein on the surface of P. pastoris over time was detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence spectrophotometry, and then the sensitivities of the two methods were compared. Using berberine chloride as an inhibitor, the activity of sortase A was investigated with the substrates of LPETG-EGFP protein, and compared to Dabcyl-QALPETGEE-Edans. A high yield of sortase A was achieved by inducing 1.0 mmol/L IPTG at 28 °C for 6 h. The intensity of green fluorescence of substrates displayed on the yeast surface was increased over time, while the stability was decreased slightly. Both fluorescence spectrophotometery and flow cytometry were fit for detection because of their high sensitivity. We utilized two different substrates of sortase A to investigate sortase A activity, which resulted in the increase of fluorescence intensity with respect to the increased time of growth. However, the method with Dabcyl-QALPETGEE-Edans as its substrate was more robust. Thus, the method described in this paper is a simple and cheap method which is very

  4. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Highly Water-dispersible Anatase Nanoparticles with Large Specific Surface Area and Their Adsorptive Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Hu Xueting; Zhang Dongyun; Zhao Siqin; Asuha Sin

    2016-01-01

    Highly water-dispersible and very small TiO2 nanoparticles (~3 nm anatase) with large specific surface area have been synthesized by hydrolysis and hydrothermal reactions of titanium butoxide and used for the removal of three azo dyes (Congo red, orange II, and methyl orange) with different molecular structure from simulated wastewaters. The synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersed in water with large specific surface area up to 417 m2 g−1. Adsorption experiments demonstrated that th...

  5. Neutron Optics: Towards Applications for Hot Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanzer, C; Schneider, M; Böni, P

    2016-01-01

    Supermirrors with large critical angles of reflection, i.e. large index m are an essential ingredient to transport, focus and polarise neutrons over a wide range of energy. Here we summarise the recent developments of supermirror with very large critical angles of reflection and high reflectivity that were conducted at SwissNeutronics as well as their implementation in devices. Approaching critical angles m = 8 times the critical angle of natural nickel makes new applications possible and extends the use of reflection optics towards the regime of hot and epithermal neutrons. Based on comparisons of simulations with experiment we demonstrate future possibilities of applications of large-m supermirrors towards devices for neutrons with short wavelength. (paper)

  6. Spread of Staphylococcus aureus between medical staff and high-frequency contact surfaces in a large metropolitan hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-sha Shi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Cross-contamination of S. aureus or MRSA on medical workers' hands and contact surfaces was demonstrated within and between departments of a large metropolitan hospital. Improvements are needed in medical staff hygiene habits and in the cleaning of high-frequency contact surfaces to help prevent and control nosocomial infections.

  7. Electrochemical machining of internal built-up surfaces of large-sized vessels for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabchenko, N N; Pulin, V Ya [Vsesoyuznyj Proektno-Tekhnologicheskij Inst. Atomnogo Mashinostroeniya i Kotlostroeniya, Rostov-na-Donu (USSR)

    1977-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) has been employed for finishing of mechanically processed inner surfaces of large lateral parts of construction bodies with welded 0Kh18N10T steel overlayer. The finishing technology developed reduces the surface roughness from 10 mcm to the standard 2.5 mcm at the efficiency of machining of 2-4 m/sup 2/ per hour.

  8. Nuclear reactions of neutron-rich Sn isotopes investigated at relativistic energies at R{sup 3}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Fabia; Aumann, Thomas; Horvat, Andrea [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Boretzky, Konstanze [GSI Helmholtzzentrum (Germany); Schrock, Philipp [CNS, University of Tokyo (Japan); Johansen, Jacob [Aarhus University (Denmark); Collaboration: R3B-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Nuclei with a large neutron excess are expected to form a neutron-rich surface layer which is often referred to as the neutron skin. The investigation of this phenomenon is of great interest in nuclear-structure physics and offers a possibility to constrain the equation-of-state of neutron-rich matter. Assuming a geometrical description of reaction processes as in the eikonal approximation, nuclear-induced reactions are a good tool to probe the neutron skin. Measured reaction cross sections can be used to constrain the density distributions of protons and neutrons in the nucleus and therefore the neutron-skin thickness. For this purpose, reactions of neutron-rich tin isotopes in the A=124-134 mass range have been measured on a carbon target at the R{sup 3}B-setup at GSI in inverse kinematics in a kinematically complete manner. Preliminary results for the reaction cross sections of {sup 124}Sn are presented.

  9. Minimization of spurious strains by using a Si bent-perfect-crystal monochromator: neutron surface strain scanning of a shot-peened sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo Kornmeier, Joana; Gibmeier, Jens; Hofmann, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Neutron strain measurements are critical at the surface. When scanning close to a sample surface, aberration peak shifts arise due to geometrical and divergence effects. These aberration peak shifts can be of the same order as the peak shifts related to residual strains. In this study it will be demonstrated that by optimizing the horizontal bending radius of a Si (4 0 0) monochromator, the aberration peak shifts from surface effects can be strongly reduced. A stress-free sample of fine-grained construction steel, S690QL, was used to find the optimal instrumental conditions to minimize aberration peak shifts. The optimized Si (4 0 0) monochromator and instrument settings were then applied to measure the residual stress depth gradient of a shot-peened SAE 4140 steel sample to validate the effectiveness of the approach. The residual stress depth profile is in good agreement with results obtained by x-ray diffraction measurements from an international round robin test (BRITE-EURAM-project ENSPED). The results open very promising possibilities to bridge the gap between x-ray diffraction and conventional neutron diffraction for non-destructive residual stress analysis close to surfaces.

  10. Minimization of spurious strains by using a Si bent-perfect-crystal monochromator: neutron surface strain scanning of a shot-peened sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo Kornmeier, Joana; Hofmann, Michael; Gibmeier, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Neutron strain measurements are critical at the surface. When scanning close to a sample surface, aberration peak shifts arise due to geometrical and divergence effects. These aberration peak shifts can be of the same order as the peak shifts related to residual strains. In this study it will be demonstrated that by optimizing the horizontal bending radius of a Si (4 0 0) monochromator, the aberration peak shifts from surface effects can be strongly reduced. A stress-free sample of fine-grained construction steel, S690QL, was used to find the optimal instrumental conditions to minimize aberration peak shifts. The optimized Si (4 0 0) monochromator and instrument settings were then applied to measure the residual stress depth gradient of a shot-peened SAE 4140 steel sample to validate the effectiveness of the approach. The residual stress depth profile is in good agreement with results obtained by x-ray diffraction measurements from an international round robin test (BRITE-EURAM-project ENSPED). The results open very promising possibilities to bridge the gap between x-ray diffraction and conventional neutron diffraction for non-destructive residual stress analysis close to surfaces

  11. Advances in Neutron Activation Analysis of Large Objects with Emphasis on Archaeological Examples. Results of a Coordinated Research Project. Annex II. Companion CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-03-01

    This publication is a compilation of the main results and findings of an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP). In particular, it discusses an innovative variation of neutron activation analysis (NAA) known as large sample NAA (LSNAA). There is no other way to measure the bulk mass fractions of the elements present in a large sample (up to kilograms in mass) non-destructively. Examples amenable to LSNAA include irregularly shaped archaeological artefacts, excavated rock samples, large samples of assorted ore, and finished products, such as nuclear reactor components. Advantages of LSNAA applications, limitations and scientific and technological requirements are described in this publication, which serves as a reference of interest not only to the NAA experts, research reactor personnel, and those considering this technique, but also to various stakeholders and users such as researchers, industrialists, environmental and legal experts, and administrators. The county reports given in this companion CD-ROM (Annex II) give a global overview of all the accomplishments achieved by the participants during the CRP. However, in several cases common procedures were employed by several participating laboratories, constituting one general approach.

  12. The LOFT perspective on neutron star thermonuclear bursts: White paper in support of the mission concept of the large observatory for X-ray timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    in' t Zand, J. J.M. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (The Netherlands); Malone, Christopher M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Altamirano, D. [Univ. of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Ballantyne, D. R. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Bhattacharyya, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Brown, E. F. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Cavecchi, Y. [Univ. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (The Netherlands); Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Chenevez, J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Cumming, A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Degenaar, N. [Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Falanga, M. [International Space Science Institute, Bern (Switzerland); Galloway, D. K. [Monash Univ., VIC (Australia); Heger, A. [Monash Univ., VIC (Australia); Jose, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Keek, L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Linares, M. [Univ. de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Mahmoodifar, S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Mendez, M. [Univ. of Groningen, Groningen (The Netherlands); Miller, M. C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Paerels, F. B. S. [Columbia Astrophysics Lab., New York, NY (United States); Poutanen, J. [Univ. of Turku, Piikkio (Finland); Rozanska, A. [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center PAS, Warsaw (Poland); Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University; Serino, M. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN); Strohmayer, T. E. [NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Suleimanov, V. F. [Univ. Tubingen, Tubingen (Germany); Thielemann, F. -K. [Univ. Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Watts, A. L. [Univ. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (The Netherlands); Weinberg, N. N. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Woosley, S. E. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Yu, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai (China); Zhang, S. [Institute of High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Zingale, M. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-01-14

    The Large Area Detector (LAD) on the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing ( LOFT ), with a 8.5 m 2 photon- collecting area in the 2–30 keV bandpass at CCD-class spectral resolving power (λ/Δλ = 10 – 100), is designed for optimum performance on bright X-ray sources. Thus, it is well-suited to study thermonuclear X-ray bursts from Galactic neutron stars. These bursts will typically yield 2 x 105 photon detections per second in the LAD, which is at least 15 times more than with any other instrument past, current or anticipated. The Wide Field Monitor (WFM) foreseen for LOFT uniquely combines 2–50 keV imaging with large (30%) prompt sky coverage. This will enable the detection of tens of thousands of thermonuclear X-ray bursts during a 3-yr mission, including tens of superbursts. Both numbers are similar or more than the current database gathered in 50 years of X-ray astronomy.

  13. Uncertainty quantification of surface-water/groundwater exchange estimates in large wetland systems using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. D.; Metz, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most watershed studies include observation-based water budget analyses to develop first-order estimates of significant flow terms. Surface-water/groundwater (SWGW) exchange is typically assumed to be equal to the residual of the sum of inflows and outflows in a watershed. These estimates of SWGW exchange, however, are highly uncertain as a result of the propagation of uncertainty inherent in the calculation or processing of the other terms of the water budget, such as stage-area-volume relations, and uncertainties associated with land-cover based evapotranspiration (ET) rate estimates. Furthermore, the uncertainty of estimated SWGW exchanges can be magnified in large wetland systems that transition from dry to wet during wet periods. Although it is well understood that observation-based estimates of SWGW exchange are uncertain it is uncommon for the uncertainty of these estimates to be directly quantified. High-level programming languages like Python can greatly reduce the effort required to (1) quantify the uncertainty of estimated SWGW exchange in large wetland systems and (2) evaluate how different approaches for partitioning land-cover data in a watershed may affect the water-budget uncertainty. We have used Python with the Numpy, Scipy.stats, and pyDOE packages to implement an unconstrained Monte Carlo approach with Latin Hypercube sampling to quantify the uncertainty of monthly estimates of SWGW exchange in the Floral City watershed of the Tsala Apopka wetland system in west-central Florida, USA. Possible sources of uncertainty in the water budget analysis include rainfall, ET, canal discharge, and land/bathymetric surface elevations. Each of these input variables was assigned a probability distribution based on observation error or spanning the range of probable values. The Monte Carlo integration process exposes the uncertainties in land-cover based ET rate estimates as the dominant contributor to the uncertainty in SWGW exchange estimates. We will discuss

  14. Sodium-cutting: a new top-down approach to cut open nanostructures on nonplanar surfaces on a large scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Deng, Da

    2014-11-11

    We report a new, low-cost and simple top-down approach, "sodium-cutting", to cut and open nanostructures deposited on a nonplanar surface on a large scale. The feasibility of sodium-cutting was demonstrated with the successfully cutting open of ∼100% carbon nanospheres into nanobowls on a large scale from Sn@C nanospheres for the first time.

  15. Instrumentation with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeni, P.; Muenzer, W.; Ostermann, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering with polarization analysis is an indispensable tool for the investigation of novel materials exhibiting electronic, magnetic, and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition, polarized neutrons are necessary for neutron spin precession techniques that path the way to obtain extremely high resolution in space and time. Last but not least, polarized neutrons are being used for fundamental studies as well as very recently for neutron imaging. Many years ago, neutron beam lines were simply adapted for polarized beam applications by adding polarizing elements leading usually to unacceptable losses in neutron intensity. Recently, an increasing number of beam lines are designed such that an optimum use of polarized neutrons is facilitated. In addition, marked progress has been obtained in the technology of 3 He polarizers and the reflectivity of large-m supermirrors. Therefore, if properly designed, only factors of approximately 2-3 in neutron intensity are lost. It is shown that S-benders provide neutron beams with an almost wavelength independent polarization. Using twin cavities, polarized beams with a homogeneous phase space and P>0.99 can be produced without significantly sacrificing intensity. It is argued that elliptic guides, which are coated with large m polarizing supermirrors, provide the highest flux.

  16. [Study on plasma temperature of a large area surface discharge by optical emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-Fang; Tong, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Bin

    2014-04-01

    A large area surface discharge was realized in air/argon gas mixture by designing a discharge device with water electrodes. By using optical emission spectrum, the variations of the molecular vibrational temperature, the mean energy of electron, and the electronic excitation temperature as a function of the gas pressure were studied. The nitrogen molecular vibrational temperature was calculated according to the emission line of the second positive band system of the nitrogen molecule (C3 pi(u) --> B 3 pi(g)). The electronic excitation temperature was obtained by using the intensity ratio of Ar I 763.51 nm (2P(6) --> 1S(5)) to Ar I 772.42 nm (2P(2) --> 1S(3)). The changes in the mean energy of electron were studied by the relative intensity ratio of the nitrogen molecular ion 391.4 nm to nitrogen 337.1 nm. It was found that the intensity of emission spectral line increases with the increase in the gas pressure, meanwhile, the outline and the ratios of different spectral lines intensity also change. The molecular vibrational temperature, the mean energy of electron, and the electronic excitation temperature decrease as the gas pressure increases from 0.75 x 10(5) Pa to 1 x 10(5) Pa.

  17. Solving very large scattering problems using a parallel PWTD-enhanced surface integral equation solver

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2013-07-01

    The computational complexity and memory requirements of multilevel plane wave time domain (PWTD)-accelerated marching-on-in-time (MOT)-based surface integral equation (SIE) solvers scale as O(NtNs(log 2)Ns) and O(Ns 1.5); here N t and Ns denote numbers of temporal and spatial basis functions discretizing the current [Shanker et al., IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., 51, 628-641, 2003]. In the past, serial versions of these solvers have been successfully applied to the analysis of scattering from perfect electrically conducting as well as homogeneous penetrable targets involving up to Ns ≈ 0.5 × 106 and Nt ≈ 10 3. To solve larger problems, parallel PWTD-enhanced MOT solvers are called for. Even though a simple parallelization strategy was demonstrated in the context of electromagnetic compatibility analysis [M. Lu et al., in Proc. IEEE Int. Symp. AP-S, 4, 4212-4215, 2004], by and large, progress in this area has been slow. The lack of progress can be attributed wholesale to difficulties associated with the construction of a scalable PWTD kernel. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Study of electronic field emission from large surfaces under static operating conditions and hyper-frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, M.

    1997-09-01

    The enhanced electronic field emission from large area metallic surfaces lowers performances of industrial devices that have to sustain high electric field under vacuum. Despite of numerous investigations in the past, the mechanisms of such an emission have never been well clarified. Recently, research in our laboratory has pointed out the importance played by conducting sites (particles and protrusions). A refined geometrical model, called superposed protrusions model has been proposed to explain the enhanced emission by local field enhancement. As a logical continuation, the present work aims at testing this model and, in the same time, investigating the means to suppress the emission where it is undesirable. Thus, we have showed: the cause of current fluctuations in a continuous field regime (DC), the identity of emission characteristics (β, A e ) in both radiofrequency (RF) and DC regimes, the effectiveness of a thermal treatment by extern high density electronic bombardment, the effectiveness of a mechanical treatment by high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water, the mechanisms and limits of an in situ RF processing. Furthermore, the electronic emission from insulating particles has also been studied concurrently with a spectral analysis of the associated luminous emission. Finally, the refined geometrical model for conducting sites is reinforced while another model is proposed for some insulating sites. Several emission suppressing treatments has been explored and validated. At last, the characteristic of a RF pulsed field emitted electron beam has been checked for the first time as a possible application of such a field emission. (author)

  19. Introductory theory of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.

    1986-12-01

    The paper comprises a set of six lecture notes which were delivered to the summer school on 'Neutron Scattering at a pulsed source', Rutherford Laboratory, United Kingdom, 1986. The lectures concern the physical principles of neutron scattering. The topics of the lectures include: diffraction, incoherent inelastic scattering, connection with the Schroedinger equation, magnetic scattering, coherent inelastic scattering, and surfaces and neutron optics. (UK)

  20. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system to include provision for the existence of a neutron skin is studied. The model gives excellent fit to masses and fission barriers and improves predictions of isotopic trends in charge radii

  1. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-03-01

    We study the possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system, to describe compressibility effects and the existence of a neutron skin. 9 references

  2. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-03-01

    We study the possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system, to describe compressibility effects and the existence of a neutron skin. 9 references. (WHK)

  3. Image-based Exploration of Iso-surfaces for Large Multi- Variable Datasets using Parameter Space.

    KAUST Repository

    Binyahib, Roba S.

    2013-01-01

    -surfaces superimposed on each other. The result is the same as calculating multiple iso- surfaces from the original data but without the memory and processing overhead. Our tool also allows the user to change the (scalar) values superimposed on each of the surfaces

  4. Evaluation of neutron cross-sections of {sup 127}I important for radiation transport calculations in large NaI detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronayaev, V G [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-06-01

    Evaluations were made of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections with excitation of discrete levels of the residual nucleus, the (n,2n) reaction, secondary neutron emission spectra and secondary photons for reactions which contribute substantially to production of photons for {sup 127}I with the use of the theoretical model for neutrons with an initial energy of 60 keV-20 MeV. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs.

  5. Hardness and stability of a carburized surface layer on AISI 316L stainless steel after irradiation in a spallation neutron environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClintock, David A.; Hyres, James W.; Vevera, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    The inner surfaces of mercury target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) experience material erosion caused by proton-beam induced cavitation of the liquid mercury. One approach developed and deployed to inhibit erosion of the target vessel material was surface hardening via a proprietary low-temperature carburization treatment, called Kolsterising®, to the target surfaces most susceptible to cavitation-induced erosion. Previous testing has shown that the hardened surface produced by the Kolsterising® treatment can delay the onset of erosion and inhibit erosion once initiated. But the stability of the carbon atmosphere in the treated surface layer after radiation to doses prototypic to the SNS target was unknown. Therefore, as part of the target Post Irradiation Examination program at the SNS, optical microscopy and microhardness testing were performed on material sampled from the first and second operational SNS target vessels. Optical micrographs contained no noticeable precipitation in the super-saturated carbon layer extending into the base material and several micrographs contained evidence of a proposed mechanism for mass wastage from the vessel surface. The hardened layer was characterized using Vickers microhardness testing and results show that the shape of hardness profile of the treated layer corresponded well with known pre-irradiation hardness values, though the microhardness results show some hardening occurred during irradiation. The results suggest that the hardened surface layer produced by the Kolsterising® treatment is stable at the operational temperatures and dose levels experienced by the first and second operational SNS target modules

  6. Entrainment coefficient and effective mass for conduction neutrons in neutron star crust: simple microscopic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Brandon; Chamel, Nicolas; Haensel, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    In the inner crust of a neutron star, at densities above the 'drip' threshold, unbound 'conduction' neutrons can move freely past through the ionic lattice formed by the nuclei. The relative current density ni=nv-bar i of such conduction neutrons will be related to the corresponding mean particle momentum pi by a proportionality relation of the form ni=Kpi in terms of a physically well defined mobility coefficient K whose value in this context has not been calculated before. Using methods from ordinary solid state and nuclear physics, a simple quantum mechanical treatment based on the independent particle approximation, is used here to formulate K as the phase space integral of the relevant group velocity over the neutron Fermi surface. The result can be described as an 'entrainment' that changes the ordinary neutron mass m to a macroscopic effective mass per neutron that will be given-subject to adoption of a convention specifying the precise number density n of the neutrons that are considered to be 'free'-by m-bar =n/K. The numerical evaluation of the mobility coefficient is carried out for nuclear configurations of the 'lasagna' and 'spaghetti' type that may be relevant at the base of the crust. Extrapolation to the middle layers of the inner crust leads to the unexpected prediction that m-bar will become very large compared with m

  7. Measurement of the high-energy neutron flux on the surface of the natural uranium target assembly QUINTA irradiated by deuterons of 4- and 8-GeV energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Baldin, A.A.; Chilap, V.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with a natural uranium target assembly QUINTA exposed to 4- and 8 GeV deuteron beams of the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna) are analyzed. The 129 I, 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, nat U, 237 Np, 238 Pu, 239 Pu and 241 Am radioactive samples were installed on the surface of the QUINTA set-up and irradiated with secondary neutrons. The neutron flux through the RA samples was monitored by Al foils. The reaction rates of 27 Al(n, y 1 ) 24 Na, 27 Al(n, y 2 ) 22 Na and 27 Al(n, y 3 ) 7 Be reactions with the effective threshold energies of 5, 27 and 119 MeV were measured at both 4- and 8-GeV deuteron beam energies. The average neutron fluxes between the effective threshold energies and the effective ends of the neutron spectra (which are 800 or 1000 MeV for energy of 4- or 8-GeV deuterons) were determined. The evidence for the intensity shift of the neutron spectra to higher neutron energies with the increase of the deuteron energy from 4 to 8 GeV was found from the ratios of the average neutron fluxes. The reaction rates and the average neutron fluxes were calculated with MCNPX2.7 and MARS15 codes.

  8. Segmentation, surface rendering, and surface simplification of 3-D skull images for the repair of a large skull defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weibing; Shi, Pengfei; Li, Shuguang

    2009-10-01

    Given the potential demonstrated by research into bone-tissue engineering, the use of medical image data for the rapid prototyping (RP) of scaffolds is a subject worthy of research. Computer-aided design and manufacture and medical imaging have created new possibilities for RP. Accurate and efficient design and fabrication of anatomic models is critical to these applications. We explore the application of RP computational methods to the repair of a pediatric skull defect. The focus of this study is the segmentation of the defect region seen in computerized tomography (CT) slice images of this patient's skull and the three-dimensional (3-D) surface rendering of the patient's CT-scan data. We see if our segmentation and surface rendering software can improve the generation of an implant model to fill a skull defect.

  9. Adsorption of Polyanion onto Large Alpha Alumina Beads with Variably Charged Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Duc Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of strong polyelectrolyte, poly(styrenesulfonate, PSS, of different molecular weights onto large α-Al2O3 beads was systematically investigated as functions of pH and NaCl concentrations. The ultraviolet (UV absorption spectra of PSS at different pH and salt concentrations confirmed that the structure of PSS is independent of pH. With the change of molecular weight from 70 kg/mol (PSS 70 to 1000 kg/mol (PSS 1000, adsorption amount of PSS increases and proton coadsorption on the surface of α-Al2O3 decreases at given pH and salt concentration. It suggests that higher molecular weight of PSS was less flat conformation than lower one. The adsorption density of PSS 70 and PSS 1000 decreases with decreasing salt concentrations, indicating that both electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions are involved. Experimental results of both PSS 70 and PSS 1000 adsorption isotherms onto α-Al2O3 at different pH and salt concentrations can be represented well by two-step adsorption model. The effects of molecular weight and salt concentration are explained by structure of adsorbed PSS onto α-Al2O3. The influence of added SDS on the isotherms is evaluated from the sequential adsorption. The SDS uptake onto α-Al2O3 in the presence of hemimicelles can prevent the adsorption of PSS at low concentration so that adsorption of PSS reduces with preadsorbed SDS.

  10. Neutron transportation simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenohara, Yuzo.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, problems in an existent parallelized monte carlo method is solved, and behaviors of neutrons in a large scaled system are accurately simulated at a high speed. Namely, a neutron transportation simulator according to the monte carlo method simulates movement of each of neutrons by using a parallel computer. In this case, the system to be processed is divided based on a space region and an energy region to which neutrons belong. Simulation of neutrons in the divided regions is allotted to each of performing devices of the parallel computer. Tarry data and nuclear data of the neutrons in each of the regions are memorized dispersedly to memories of each of the performing devices. A transmission means for simulating the behaviors of the neutrons in the region by each of the performing devices, as well as transmitting the information of the neutrons, when the neutrons are moved to other region, to the performing device in a transported portion are disposed to each of the performing devices. With such procedures, simulation for the neutrons in the allotted region can be conducted with small capacity of memories. (I.S.)

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Highly Water-dispersible Anatase Nanoparticles with Large Specific Surface Area and Their Adsorptive Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xueting

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly water-dispersible and very small TiO2 nanoparticles (~3 nm anatase with large specific surface area have been synthesized by hydrolysis and hydrothermal reactions of titanium butoxide and used for the removal of three azo dyes (Congo red, orange II, and methyl orange with different molecular structure from simulated wastewaters. The synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersed in water with large specific surface area up to 417 m2 g−1. Adsorption experiments demonstrated that the water-dispersible TiO2 nanoparticles possess excellent adsorption capacities for Congo red, orange II, and methyl orange, which could be attributed to their good water-dispersibility and large specific surface area.

  12. Neutron Research in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hark Rho

    2005-01-01

    HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor), which was designed and constructed by indigenous technology, is a world-class multi-purpose research reactor with a design thermal power of 30 MW, providing high neutron flux for various applications in Korea. HANARO has been operated since its first criticality in February 1995, and is now successfully utilized in such areas as neutron beam research, fuel and materials tests, radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals production, neutron activation analysis, and neutron transmutation doping, etc. A number of experimental facilities have been developed and installed since the beginning of reactor operation, and R and D activities for installing more facilities are actively under progress. Three flux traps in the core (CT, IR1, IR2), providing a high fast neutron flux, can be used for materials and fuel irradiation tests. They are also proper for production of high specific activity radioisotopes. Four vertical holes in the outer core region, abundant in epithermal neutrons, are used for fuel or material tests and radioisotope production. In the heavy water reflector region, 25 vertical holes with high quality thermal neutrons are located for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron transmutation doping and cold neutron source installation. The two largest holes named NTD1 and NTD2 are for neutron transmutation doping, CNS for the cold neutron source installation, and LH for the irradiation of large targets. The high resolution powder diffractometer (HRPD) became operational in 1998, followed by the four circle diffractometer (FCD) in 1999, the residual stress instrument (RSI) in 2000, and the small angle neutron spectrometer (SANS) in 2001, respectively. HRPD and SANS became the most popular instruments these days, attracting wide range of users from academia, institutes and industries. We have made a lot of efforts during the last 10 years to develop some key components such as

  13. Neutron multiplicity measurements with 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Wolff, Ronald [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Detwiler, Ryan [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Maurer, Richard [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Mitchell, Stephen [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Guss, Paul [Remote Sensing Lab. - Nellis, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Lacy, Jeffrey L. [Proportional Technologies, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Sun, Liang [Proportional Technologies, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Athanasiades, Athanasios [Proportional Technologies, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-01-27

    Counting neutrons emitted by special nuclear material (SNM) and differentiating them from the background neutrons of various origins is the most effective passive means of detecting SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment are complex due to the presence of high-multiplicity spallation neutrons (commonly known as ‘‘ship effect ’’) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. A prototype neutron detector was built using 10B as the converter in a special form factor called ‘‘straws’’ that would address the above problems by looking into the details of multiplicity distributions of neutrons originating from a fissioning source. This paper describes the straw neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and assesses the performance with those of a commercially available fission meter. The prototype straw neutron detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular (than fission meter) neutron-responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to enhance the ease of application of fission meters. Presented here are the results of preliminary investigations, modeling, and engineering considerations leading to the construction of this prototype. This design is capable of multiplicity and Feynman variance measurements. This prototype may lead to a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to fission meters. This paper describes the work performed during a 2-year site-directed research and development (SDRD) project that incorporated straw detectors for neutron multiplicity counting. The NMC is a two-panel detector system. We used 10B (in the form of enriched boron carbide: 10B4C) for neutron detection instead of 3He. In the first year, the project worked with a panel of straw neutron detectors, investigated its characteristics, and

  14. A scanning Auger electron spectrometer for internal surface analysis of Large Electron Positron 2 superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, C.; Cosso, R.; Genest, J.; Hauer, M.; Lacarrère, D.; Rijllart, A.; Saban, R.

    1996-08-01

    A computer-controlled surface analysis instrument, incorporating static Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning Auger mapping, and secondary electron imaging, has been designed and built at CERN to study and characterize the inner surface of superconducting radio-frequency cavities to be installed in the Large Electron Positron collider. A detailed description of the instrument, including the analytical head, the control system, and the vacuum system is presented. Some recent results obtained from the cavities provide examples of the instrument's capabilities.

  15. Surface growth mechanisms and structural faulting in the growth of large single and spherulitic titanosilicate ETS-4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, Peter Q.; Yilmaz, Bilge; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Sacco, Albert

    2004-10-01

    Morphological, surface and crystallographic analyses of titanosilicate ETS-4 products, with diverse habits ranging from spherulitic particles composed of submicron crystallites to large single crystals, are presented. Pole figures revealed that crystal surfaces with a-, b- and c- axes corresponded to , and directions, respectively. Thus, technologically important 8-membered ring pores and titania chains in ETS-4 run along the b-axis of single crystals and terminate at the smallest crystal face. Height of the spiral growth steps observed on {1 0 0} and {0 0 1} surfaces corresponded to the interplanar spacings associated with their crystallographic orientation, and is equivalent to the thickness of building units that form the ETS-4 framework. Data suggest that the more viscous synthesis mixtures, with a large driving force for growth, increased the two- and three-dimensional nucleation, while limiting the transport of nutrients to the growth surface. These conditions increase the tendency for stacking fault formation on {1 0 0} surfaces and small angle branching, which eventually results in spherulitic growth. The growth of high quality ETS-4 single crystals (from less viscous synthesis mixtures) occurred at lower surface nucleation rates. Data suggest that these high quality, large crystals grew due to one-dimensional nucleation at spiral hillocks, and indicate that under these conditions un-faulted growth is preferred.

  16. Fast neutron dosimetry for radioprotection near large accelerators. Application to the proton synchrotron Saturne; Dosimetrie des neutrons rapides en vue de la radioprotection aupres des grands accelerateurs. Application au synchrotron a protons Saturne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardy-Joubert, P

    1963-07-01

    Methods are described that are used for the measurement of a neutron flux, and of the corresponding energy flux and dose absorbed. The methods are checked experimentally by the use of neutron sources of known energy distribution. The conditions of use of a proportional counter for recoil protons are described. The experimental results obtained with the synchrotron SATURNE at Saclay are described. (author) [French] L'auteur presente les methodes utilisables pour la mesure d'un flux de neutrons, du flux d'energie et de la dose absorbee correspondants. Les methodes sont verifiees experimentalement au moyen de sources de neutrons de spectre connu. Les conditions d'emploi d'un compteur proportionnel a protons de recul sont definies. Les resultats experimentaux obtenus aupres du synchrotron Saturne de Saclay sont presentes. (auteur)

  17. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R., E-mail: ricardo.serra@dem.uc.pt [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [ICEMS-Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, J.C. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Kubart, T. [The Ångström Laboratory, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm{sup 2}. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under

  18. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, R.; Oliveira, V.; Oliveira, J.C.; Kubart, T.; Vilar, R.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm 2 . Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under different

  19. High-Performance, Large Format Surfaces for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Increasing the Accessibility of an Analytical Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanipe, Katherine Nicole

    Although surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a spectroscopic technique with unusually high sensitivity and molecular specificity, few practical analytical applications have been implemented that take advantage of its power. Based on what is understood about SERS from the experimental and theoretical research of the past forty years, we developed a few well-defined design principles on the basis of which a reliable and reproducibly manufacturable SERS-active substrate could be fabricated that is highly enhancing, highly uniform, stable, and based on a broad range of metals so that various chemical processes could be probed. Finally, we restricted ourselves to using only readily scalable fabrication techniques. The resulting SERS-active device was a metal over silica, two-dimensional nano-grating that was shown to produce enhancements of ˜107 when compared to a smooth surface of the same metal. This SERS substrate also shows unprecedented signal uniformity over square centimeters, and is fabricated using commonly-available foundry-based approaches exclusively. Initially, we explored the properties of a gold-coated substrates in which a first-order grating resonance due to long-range symmetry is augmented by a local resonance due to the individual core-shell grating elements. The SERS properties of such grating systems were systematically studied as a function of various structural parameters such as the grating pitch, the inter-element gap and the thickness of the metal layer. The most enhancing substrates were found to have a grating parameter with a radiative, rather than evanescent, first-order resonance; a sufficiently small gap between nearest neighbor grating elements to produce near-field interactions; and a gold layer whose thickness was larger than the electronic mean-free-path of the conduction electrons, so as to ensure a high conductivity for the metal layer to sustain strong surface plasmons. We applied these same architectural principles to

  20. Lunar neutron source function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    The search for a quantitative neutron source function for the lunar surface region is justified because it contributes to our understanding of the history of the lunar surface and of nuclear process occurring on the moon since its formation. A knowledge of the neutron source function and neutron flux distribution is important for the interpretation of many experimental measurements. This dissertation uses the available pertinent experimental measurements together with theoretical calculations to obtain an estimate of the lunar neutron source function below 15 MeV. Based upon reasonable assumptions a lunar neutron source function having adjustable parameters is assumed for neutrons below 15 MeV. The lunar neutron source function is composed of several components resulting from the action of cosmic rays with lunar material. A comparison with previous neutron calculations is made and significant differences are discussed. Application of the results to the problem of lunar soil histories is examined using the statistical model for soil development proposed by Fireman. The conclusion is drawn that the moon is losing mass

  1. Compact neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  2. Use of 198 Au, with surface labelling, in the study of solid transport by bed load in large natural channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, S.

    1987-01-01

    The present study aims to present a method of measuring the bed load transport using a radioisotope technique in large natural channels. This study describes the basic principles of radioisotope application in this field, emphasizing the use of 198 Au for surface labelling of a natural sediment. Moreover, it presents the theoretical aspects, critical analysis, recommendations and comments on the methodology proposed. (author)

  3. Hexagonal boron nitride neutron detectors with high detection efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, A.; Grenadier, S. J.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron detectors fabricated from 10B enriched hexagonal boron nitride (h-10BN or h-BN) epilayers have demonstrated the highest thermal neutron detection efficiency among solid-state neutron detectors to date at about 53%. In this work, photoconductive-like vertical detectors with a detection area of 1 × 1 mm2 were fabricated from 50 μm thick free-standing h-BN epilayers using Ni/Au and Ti/Al bilayers as ohmic contacts. Leakage currents, mobility-lifetime (μτ) products under UV photoexcitation, and neutron detection efficiencies have been measured for a total of 16 different device configurations. The results have unambiguously identified that detectors incorporating the Ni/Au bilayer on both surfaces as ohmic contacts and using the negatively biased top surface for neutron irradiation are the most desired device configurations. It was noted that high growth temperatures of h-10BN epilayers on sapphire substrates tend to yield a higher concentration of oxygen impurities near the bottom surface, leading to a better device performance by the chosen top surface for irradiation than by the bottom. Preferential scattering of oxygen donors tends to reduce the mobility of holes more than that of electrons, making the biasing scheme with the ability of rapidly extracting holes at the irradiated surface while leaving the electrons to travel a large average distance inside the detector at a preferred choice. When measured against a calibrated 6LiF filled micro-structured semiconductor neutron detector, it was shown that the optimized configuration has pushed the detection efficiency of h-BN neutron detectors to 58%. These detailed studies also provided a better understanding of growth-mediated impurities in h-BN epilayers and their effects on the charge collection and neutron detection efficiencies.

  4. Analysis of Large Array Surface Myoelectric Potentials for the Low Back Muscles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reger, Steven

    2001-01-01

    .... The surface EMC distribution from the low back of 161 healthy and 44 acute LBP subjects were collected in three minimum stress postural positions including standing, 20 degrees of lumbar flexion...

  5. Enhancing neutron beam production with a convoluted moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, E.B., E-mail: iversoneb@ornl.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Baxter, D.V. [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Muhrer, G. [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ansell, S.; Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Gallmeier, F.X. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kaiser, H. [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Lu, W. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-10-21

    We describe a new concept for a neutron moderating assembly resulting in the more efficient production of slow neutron beams. The Convoluted Moderator, a heterogeneous stack of interleaved moderating material and nearly transparent single-crystal spacers, is a directionally enhanced neutron beam source, improving beam emission over an angular range comparable to the range accepted by neutron beam lines and guides. We have demonstrated gains of 50% in slow neutron intensity for a given fast neutron production rate while simultaneously reducing the wavelength-dependent emission time dispersion by 25%, both coming from a geometric effect in which the neutron beam lines view a large surface area of moderating material in a relatively small volume. Additionally, we have confirmed a Bragg-enhancement effect arising from coherent scattering within the single-crystal spacers. We have not observed hypothesized refractive effects leading to additional gains at long wavelength. In addition to confirmation of the validity of the Convoluted Moderator concept, our measurements provide a series of benchmark experiments suitable for developing simulation and analysis techniques for practical optimization and eventual implementation at slow neutron source facilities.

  6. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus......We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering...

  7. Neutron reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Well, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron research where reflection, refraction, and interference play an essential role is generally referred to as 'neutron optics'. The neutron wavelength, the scattering length density and the magnetic properties of the material determine the critical angle for total reflection. The theoretical background of neutron reflection, experimental methods and the interpretation of reflection data are presented. (K.A.)

  8. Acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterial with large surface area: Preparation, characterization, and adsorption properties for cationic and anionic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kai; Ma, Chun–Fang; Ling, Yuan; Li, Meng [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Qiang, E-mail: gaoqiang@cug.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nano-Geo Materials of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Luo, Wen–Jun, E-mail: heartnohome@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Nanostructured carbonaceous materials are extremely important in the nano field, yet developing simple, mild, and “green” methods that can make such materials possess large surface area and rich functional groups on their surfaces still remains a considerable challenge. Herein, a one-pot and environment-friendly method, i.e., thermal treatment (180 °C; 18 h) of water mixed with glucose and chitosan (CTS), has been proposed. The resultant carbonaceous nanomaterials were characterized by field emitting scanning electron microscope, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. It was found that, in contrast to the conventional hydrothermally carbonized product from pure glucose, with low surface area (9.3 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and pore volume (0.016 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}), the CTS-added carbonaceous products showed satisfactory textural parameters (surface area and pore volume up to 254 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 0.701 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively). Moreover, it was also interestingly found that these CTS-added carbonaceous products possessed both acidic (–COOH) and basic (–NH{sub 2}) groups on their surfaces. Taking the advantages of large surface area and –COOH/–NH{sub 2} bifunctional surface, the carbonaceous nanomaterials exhibited excellent performance for adsorptions of cationic compound (i.e., methylene blue) at pH 10 and anionic compound (i.e., acid red 18) at pH 2, respectively. This work not only provides a simple and green route to prepare acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterials with large surface area but also well demonstrates their potential for application in adsorption. - Highlights: • A simple and green method was proposed to prepare carbon nanomaterials. • The carbon product showed acid/base bifunctional surface with large surface area. • The carbon material could efficiently adsorb both cationic and anionic compounds.

  9. Benchmark experiments on neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall penetrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Lilley, S.; Naish, J.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Stamatelatos, I.; Syme, B.; Vasilopoulou, T.; contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    Neutronics experiments are performed at JET for validating in a real fusion environment the neutronics codes and nuclear data applied in ITER nuclear analyses. In particular, the neutron fluence through the penetrations of the JET torus hall is measured and compared with calculations to assess the capability of state-of-art numerical tools to correctly predict the radiation streaming in the ITER biological shield penetrations up to large distances from the neutron source, in large and complex geometries. Neutron streaming experiments started in 2012 when several hundreds of very sensitive thermo-luminescence detectors (TLDs), enriched to different levels in 6LiF/7LiF, were used to measure the neutron and gamma dose separately. Lessons learnt from this first experiment led to significant improvements in the experimental arrangements to reduce the effects due to directional neutron source and self-shielding of TLDs. Here we report the results of measurements performed during the 2013-2014 JET campaign. Data from new positions, at further locations in the South West labyrinth and down to the Torus Hall basement through the air duct chimney, were obtained up to about a 40 m distance from the plasma neutron source. In order to avoid interference between TLDs due to self-shielding effects, only TLDs containing natural Lithium and 99.97% 7Li were used. All TLDs were located in the centre of large polyethylene (PE) moderators, with natLi and 7Li crystals evenly arranged within two PE containers, one in horizontal and the other in vertical orientation, to investigate the shadowing effect in the directional neutron field. All TLDs were calibrated in the quantities of air kerma and neutron fluence. This improved experimental arrangement led to reduced statistical spread in the experimental data. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to calculate the air kerma due to neutrons and the neutron fluence at detector positions, using a JET model validated up to the

  10. Band gaps and localization of surface water waves over large-scale sand waves with random fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Yan; Shao, Hao; Zhong, Yaozhao; Zhang, Sai; Zhao, Zongxi

    2012-06-01

    Band structure and wave localization are investigated for sea surface water waves over large-scale sand wave topography. Sand wave height, sand wave width, water depth, and water width between adjacent sand waves have significant impact on band gaps. Random fluctuations of sand wave height, sand wave width, and water depth induce water wave localization. However, random water width produces a perfect transmission tunnel of water waves at a certain frequency so that localization does not occur no matter how large a disorder level is applied. Together with theoretical results, the field experimental observations in the Taiwan Bank suggest band gap and wave localization as the physical mechanism of sea surface water wave propagating over natural large-scale sand waves.

  11. Surface modes of ultra-cold atomic clouds with very large number of vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazalilla, M A [Donostia International Physics Center, Donostia (Spain); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    We study the surface modes of some of the vortex liquids recently found by means of exact diagonalizations in systems of rapidly rotating bosons. In contrast to the surface modes of Bose condensates, we find that the surface waves have a frequency linear in the excitation angular momentum, h-bar l > 0. Furthermore, in analogy with the edge waves of electronic quantum Hall states, these excitations are chiral, that is, they can be excited only for values of l that increase the total angular momentum of the vortex liquid. However, differently from the quantum Hall phenomena for electrons, we also find other excitations that are approximately degenerate in the laboratory frame with the surface modes, and which decrease the total angular momentum by l quanta. The surface modes of the Laughlin, as well as other scalar and vector boson states are analyzed, and their observable properties characterized. We argue that measurement of the response of a vortex liquid to a weak time-dependent potential that imparts angular momentum to the system should provide valuable information to characterize the vortex liquid. In particular, the intensity of the signal of the surface waves in the dynamic structure factor has been studied and found to depend on the type of vortex liquid. We point out that the existence of surface modes has observable consequences on the density profile of the Laughlin state. These features are due to the strongly correlated behavior of atoms in the vortex liquids. We point out that these correlations should be responsible for a remarkable stability of some vortex liquids with respect to three-body losses. (author)

  12. Charged-particle magnetic-quadrupole spectrometer for neutron induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Grimes, S.M.; Tuckey, B.J.; Anderson, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrometer has been developed for measuring the charged particle production cross sections and spectra in neutron-induced reactions. The spectrometer consists of a magnetic quadrupole doublet which focuses the charged particles onto a silicon surface barrier detector telescope which is 2 meters or more from the irradiated sample. Collimators, shielding, and the large source-to-detector distance reduce the background enough to use the spectrometer with a 14-MeV neutron source producing 4 . 10 12 n/s. The spectrometer has been used in investigations of proton, deuteron, and alpha particle production by 14-MeV neutrons incident on various materials. Protons with energies as low as 1.1 MeV have been measured. The good resolution of the detectors has also made possible an improved measurement of the neutron- neutron scattering length from the 0 0 proton spectrum from deuteron breakup by 14-MeV neutrons

  13. Large area substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using glass-drawing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T

    2012-06-26

    A method of making a large area substrate comprises drawing a plurality of tubes to form a plurality of drawn tubes, and cutting the plurality of drawn tubes into cut drawn tubes. Each cut drawn tube has a first end and a second end along the longitudinal direction of the respective cut drawn tube. The cut drawn tubes collectively have a predetermined periodicity. The method of making a large area substrate also comprises forming a metal layer on the first ends of the cut drawn tubes to provide a large area substrate.

  14. Surface States Effect on the Large Photoluminescence Redshift in GaN Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Slimane, Ahmed; Najar, Adel; Ooi, Boon S.; Shen, Chao; Anjum, Dalaver H.; San-Romá n-Alerigi, Damiá n P.; Ng, Tien Khee

    2013-01-01

    We report on the large photoluminescence redshift observed in nanostructures fabricated using n-type GaN by ultraviolet (UV) metal-assisted electroless chemical-etching method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization showed

  15. Neutron Activation Analysis of Archaeological Pottery Samples of Large Size, Including Pieces of Low Symmetry Shape: How to Get Accurate Analytical Results in a Practical Way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedregal, P.S.; Montoya, E.H.; Mendoza, P.; Ubillús, M.; Baltuano, O.; Hernández, Y.; Gago, J.; Cohen, I.M.

    2018-01-01

    The feasibility of the instrumental neutron activation analysis of entire pieces of archaeological pottery, using low thermal neutron fluxes, is examined and a new approach for the non-destructive analysis of entire pottery objects by INAA, using the conventional relative method, is described. The proposed method relies in the preparation of a comparison standard, which is a nominally identical replicate of the original object to be studied. INAA of small samples taken from that replicate allows determining its composition for the elements to be analyzed. Then the intact sample and intact standard are irradiated together with the neutrons from a nuclear reactor neutron beam, using a suitable turntable facility and monitored by neutron flux monitors. Finally, after proper decay times, the induced activities in sample, standard and flux monitors, are successively measured, by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, using a high-efficiency germanium detector. In this way, several complicating effects such geometrical efficiency, neutron self-shielding and gamma ray attenuation are avoided and the need of complicated mathematical corrections is not needed. A potential advantage of the method is that it can be fully validated. Quantitative experiments using 7 - 13 hours of irradiation of pairs of 750 grams replicates, at low neutron fluxes of 3.9 x10 6 n cm -2 s -1 , followed by 100000 to 200000 seconds of counting in front of a 70% relative efficiency HPGe detector, led to recoveries between 90% and 110% for Sc and La. Another experiment, using pairs of replicates of small solid mud anthropomorphic objects, (weighing about 100 grams each), irradiated by 8 hours at a neutron flux of 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 , led to recoveries better than 90% and 110% for As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Yb and U, showing that the proposed method is suitable for LSNAA of entire pottery or mud archaeological objects. (author)

  16. Neutron radiography with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The neutron transmission factor of very thin films may be low if the neutron energy is comparable to the pseudo-potential of the film material. Surprisingly, perhaps, it is relatively easy to obtain neutrons with such low energies in sufficient numbers to produce neutron radiographs. (orig.)

  17. Downscaling the Impacts of Large-Scale LUCC on Surface Temperature along with IPCC RCPs: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzheng Deng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the potential impacts of large-scale land use and land cover changes (LUCC on surface temperature from a global perspective. As important types of LUCC, urbanization, deforestation, cultivated land reclamation, and grassland degradation have effects on the climate, the potential changes of the surface temperature caused by these four types of large-scale LUCC from 2010 to 2050 are downscaled, and this issue analyzed worldwide along with Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. The first case study presents some evidence of the effects of future urbanization on surface temperature in the Northeast megalopolis of the United States of America (USA. In order to understand the potential climatological variability caused by future forest deforestation and vulnerability, we chose Brazilian Amazon region as the second case study. The third selected region in India as a typical region of cultivated land reclamation where the possible climatic impacts are explored. In the fourth case study, we simulate the surface temperature changes caused by future grassland degradation in Mongolia. Results show that the temperature in built-up area would increase obviously throughout the four land types. In addition, the effects of all four large-scale LUCC on monthly average temperature change would vary from month to month with obviously spatial heterogeneity.

  18. Shallow to Deep Convection Transition over a Heterogeneous Land Surface Using the Land Model Coupled Large-Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Zhang, Y.; Klein, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    The triggering of the land breeze, and hence the development of deep convection over heterogeneous land should be understood as a consequence of the complex processes involving various factors from land surface and atmosphere simultaneously. That is a sub-grid scale process that many large-scale models have difficulty incorporating it into the parameterization scheme partly due to lack of our understanding. Thus, it is imperative that we approach the problem using a high-resolution modeling framework. In this study, we use SAM-SLM (Lee and Khairoutdinov, 2015), a large-eddy simulation model coupled to a land model, to explore the cloud effect such as cold pool, the cloud shading and the soil moisture memory on the land breeze structure and the further development of cloud and precipitation over a heterogeneous land surface. The atmospheric large scale forcing and the initial sounding are taken from the new composite case study of the fair-weather, non-precipitating shallow cumuli at ARM SGP (Zhang et al., 2017). We model the land surface as a chess board pattern with alternating leaf area index (LAI). The patch contrast of the LAI is adjusted to encompass the weak to strong heterogeneity amplitude. The surface sensible- and latent heat fluxes are computed according to the given LAI representing the differential surface heating over a heterogeneous land surface. Separate from the surface forcing imposed from the originally modeled surface, the cases that transition into the moist convection can induce another layer of the surface heterogeneity from the 1) radiation shading by clouds, 2) adjusted soil moisture pattern by the rain, 3) spreading cold pool. First, we assess and quantifies the individual cloud effect on the land breeze and the moist convection under the weak wind to simplify the feedback processes. And then, the same set of experiments is repeated under sheared background wind with low level jet, a typical summer time wind pattern at ARM SGP site, to

  19. Insights into the interactions among Surfactin, betaines, and PAM: surface tension, small-angle neutron scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jingwen; Liu, Fang; Garamus, Vasil M; Almásy, László; Handge, Ulrich A; Willumeit, Regine; Mu, Bozhong; Zou, Aihua

    2014-04-01

    The interactions among neutral polymer polyacrylamide (PAM) and the biosurfactant Surfactin and four betaines, N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (SDDAB), N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (STDAB), N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (SHDAB), and N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-ammonio-acetate (C12BE), in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) have been studied by surface tension measurements, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and rheological experiments. It has been confirmed that the length of alkyl chain is a key parameter of interaction between betaines and PAM. Differences in scattering contrast between X-ray and neutrons for surfactants and PAM molecules provide the opportunity to separately follow the changes of structure of PAM and surfactant aggregates. At concentrations of betaines higher than CMC (critical micelle concentration) and C2 (CMC of surfactant with the presence of polymer), spherical micelles are formed in betaines and betaines/PAM solutions. Transition from spherical to rod-like aggregates (micelles) has been observed in solutions of Surfactin and Surfactin/SDDAB (αSurfactin = 0.67 (molar fraction)) with addition of 0.8 wt % of PAM. The conformation change of PAM molecules only can be observed for Surfactin/SDDAB/PAM system. Viscosity values follow the structural changes suggested from scattering measurements i.e., gradually increases for mixtures PAM → Surfactin/PAM → Surfactin/SDDAB/PAM in PBS.

  20. Mathematical model for biomolecular quantification using large-area surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palla, Mirkó; Bosco, Filippo; Yang, Jaeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on nanostructured platforms is a promising technique for quantitative and highly sensitive detection of biomolecules in the field of analytical biochemistry. Here, we report a mathematical model to predict experimental SERS signal (or hotspot) inte...

  1. Surface water sanitation and biomass production in a large constructed wetland in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Vereijken, P.H.; Visser, de W.; Verhagen, A.; Korevaar, H.; Querner, E.P.; Blaeij, de A.T.; Werf, van der A.K.

    2010-01-01

    In Western-Europe, agricultural practices have contributed to environmental problems such as eutrophication of surface and ground water, flooding, drought and desiccation of surrounding natural habitats. Solutions that reduce the impact of these problems are urgently needed. Common reed (Phragmites

  2. Kinematic behaviour of a large earthflow defined by surface displacement monitoring, DEM differencing, and ERT imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokešová, R.; Kardoš, M.; Tábořík, Petr; Medveďová, A.; Stacke, V.; Chudý, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 224, NOV 1 (2014), s. 86-101 ISSN 0169-555X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : earthflow * surface displacement * strain modelling * DEM differencing * kinematic behaviour Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2013

  3. GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER EXCHANGE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR LARGE RIVER RESTORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movement of river water into and out of high-porosity alluvial deposits can have an important influence on surface water quality and aquatic habitat. In our study of a 60-km reach of the Willamette River in Oregon, USA, we: 1) used tracers to estimate the rate of exchange betw...

  4. Theoretical treatment of high-frequency, large-amplitude ac voltammetry applied to ideal surface-confined redox systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Christopher G.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; O’Hare, Danny; Parker, Kim H.; Siggers, Jennifer H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Theory of ac voltammetry on ideal surface-confined redox systems. ► Analytical description of the harmonics and transient of the current response. ► Solution valid for high frequency, large-amplitude sinusoidal input voltage. ► Protocol for determining system parameters from experimental current responses. - Abstract: Large-amplitude ac voltammetry, where the applied voltage is a large-amplitude sinusoidal waveform superimposed onto a dc ramp, is a powerful method for investigating the reaction kinetics of surface-confined redox species. Here we consider the large-amplitude ac voltammetric current response of a quasi-reversible, ideal, surface-confined redox system, for which the redox reaction is described by Butler–Volmer theory. We derive an approximate analytical solution, which is valid whenever the angular frequency of the sine-wave is much larger than the rate of the dc ramp and the standard kinetic rate constant of the redox reaction. We demonstrate how the third harmonic and the initial transient of the current response can be used to estimate parameters of the electrochemical system, namely the kinetic rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient, the adsorption formal potential, the initial proportion of oxidised molecules and the linear double-layer capacitance.

  5. Neutron Skins and Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ("PREX") at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in 208Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron be...

  6. Comparison of laser-induced surface damage density measurements with small and large beams: toward representativeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamaignere, Laurent; Dupuy, Gabriel; Donval, Thierry; Grua, Pierre; Bercegol, Herve

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed laser damage density measurements obtained with diverse facilities are difficult to compare, due to the interplay of numerous parameters, such as beam area and pulse geometry, which, in operational large beam conditions, are very different from laboratory measurements. This discrepancy could have a significant impact; if so, one could not even pretend that laser damage density control is a real measurement process. In this paper, this concern is addressed. Tests with large beams of centimeter size on a high-power laser facility have beam performed according to a parametric study and are compared to small beam laboratory tests. It is shown that laser damage densities obtained with large and small beams are equal, within calculated error bars.

  7. Liquid lens with double tunable surfaces for large power tunability and improved optical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a liquid lens with two tunable interfaces formed by two kinds of immiscible liquids. The proposed liquid lens uses liquid pressure to change the shape of the interfaces. It can provide a large tunable range of optical power and improved optical performance. By applying suitable liquids the gravity effect can also be negligible. To prove the principles, a liquid lens with 7 mm aperture was fabricated. The optical performance indicates that the proposed liquid lens can provide a large tunable range of both positive and negative powers even using liquids with small differences in refractive indices. The resolution is better than 50 lp mm −1 under white light environment. The spherical aberration and coma are also largely reduced. The proposed liquid lens can also provide the optical designer with the freedom to choose the combination of liquids to reduce or even correct aberrations

  8. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Tak Pui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Neutron generators based on the 2H(d,n)3He and 3H(d,n)4He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >109 n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 1014 n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 105 n/cm2s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and

  9. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Tak Pui

    2003-01-01

    Neutron generators based on the 2 H(d,n) 3 He and 3 H(d,n) 4 He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >10 9 n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 10 14 n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 10 5 n/cm 2 s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The neutron flux required for positron

  10. Surface hydrophobic co-modification of hollow silica nanoparticles toward large-area transparent superhydrophobic coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liangjuan; He, Junhui

    2013-04-15

    The present paper reports a novel, simple, and efficient approach to fabricate transparent superhydrophobic coatings on glass substrates by spray-coating stearic acid (STA) and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perflurooctyltriethoxysilane (POTS) co-modified hollow silica nanoparticles (SPHSNs), the surfaces of which were hydrophobic. The surface wettability of coatings was dependent on the conditions of post-treatment: the water contact angle of coating increased and then leveled off with increase in either the drying temperature or the drying time. When the coating was treated at 150°C for 5h, the water contact angle was as high as 160° and the sliding angle was lower than 1°, reaching excellent superhydrophobicity. They remained 159° and ≤1°, respectively, even after 3months storage under indoor conditions (20°C, 20%RH), demonstrating the long time stability of coating superhydrophobicity. The coating was robust both to the impact of water droplets (297 cm/s) and to acidic (pH=1) and basic (pH=14) droplets. It showed good transparency in the visible-near infrared spectral range, and the maximum transmittance reached as high as 89%. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis were used to investigate the interactions among STA, POTS, and hollow silica nanoparticles (HSNs). Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe and estimate the morphology and surface roughness of coatings. Optical properties were characterized by a UV-visible-near infrared spectrophotometer. Surface wettability was studied by a contact angle/interface system. The enhancement of hydrophobicity to superhydrophobicity by post-treatment was discussed based on the transition from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Turbulent Flow and Large Surface Wave Events in the Marine Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    Nether-784 lands Academy of Arts and Sciences.785 35 Wyngaard, J. C., 2004: Toward numerical modeling in the Terra Incognita. J. Atmos. Sci.,786 61...surface roughness, vegetative canopies, wind waves and local orography all influence wind turbine performance to varying degrees. For exam- ple, the...teor crater, Bull. Amer. Meteorol. Soc., 89, 127–150. Wyngaard, J. C., 2004: Toward numerical modeling in the Terra Incognita, J. Atmos. Sci., 61

  12. Evaluation for activities of component of Cyclotron-Based Epithermal Neutron Source (C-BENS) and the surface of concrete wall in irradiation room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imoto, M., E-mail: masayuki.imoto@gmail.com [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Fujita, K.; Mitsumoto, T. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo 141-6025 (Japan); Ono, K.; Maruhashi, A.; Sakurai, Y. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The workers employed in BNCT must enter the irradiation room just after an irradiation under the condition of remaining activities. To reduce the radiation exposure for the workers, it is important to identify the origins of the activities. In this research, the activities induced on the concrete wall surface were evaluated using MCNP-5 and the measurement results of thermal neutron distribution. Furthermore, the radioisotopes produced in the moderator were identified with a High Purity Germanium detector. It was found that the activities of the wall were mainly caused by {sup 46}Sc, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu, and that {sup 24}Na and {sup 56}Mn were mainly produced in the moderator.

  13. Replication fidelity assessment of polymer large area sub-μm structured surfaces using fast angular intensity distribution measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, M.; Hansen, H. N.; Tosello, G.

    The present investigation addresses one of the key challenges in the product quality control of transparent polymer substrates, identified in the replication fidelity of sub-μm structures over large area. Additionally the work contributes to the development of new techniques focused on in......-line characterization of large nanostructured surfaces. In particular the aim of the present paper is to introduce initial development of a metrology approach to quantify the replication fidelity of produced 500 nm diameter semi-spheres via anodizing of aluminum (Al) and subsequent nickel electroforming to COC...

  14. Process for producing curved surface of membrane rings for large containers, particulary for prestressed concrete pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpf, H.

    1977-01-01

    Membrane rings for large pressure vessels, particularly for prestressed-concrete pressure vessels, often have curved surfaces. The invention describes a process of producing these at site, which is particularly advantageous as the forming and installation of the vessel component coincide. According to the invention, the originally flat membrane ring is set in a predetermined position, is then pressed in sections by a forming tool (with a preformed support ring as opposite tool), and shaped. After this, the shaped parts are welded to the ring-shaped wall parts of the large vessel. The manufacture of single and double membrane rings arrangements is described. (HP) [de

  15. Process variations in surface nano geometries manufacture on large area substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The need of transporting, treating and measuring increasingly smaller biomedical samples has pushed the integration of a far reaching number of nanofeatures over large substrates size in respect to the conventional processes working area windows. Dimensional stability of nano fabrication processe...

  16. Analysis and optimization of surface profile correcting mechanism of the pitch lap in large-aperture annular polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huifang; Yang, Minghong; Xu, Xueke; Wu, Lunzhe; Yang, Weiguang; Shao, Jianda

    2017-10-01

    The surface figure control of the conventional annular polishing system is realized ordinarily by the interaction between the conditioner and the lap. The surface profile of the pitch lap corrected by the marble conditioner has been measured and analyzed as a function of kinematics, loading conditions, and polishing time. The surface profile measuring equipment of the large lap based on laser alignment was developed with the accuracy of about 1μm. The conditioning mechanism of the conditioner is simply determined by the kinematics and fully fitting principle, but the unexpected surface profile deviation of the lap emerged frequently due to numerous influencing factors including the geometrical relationship, the pressure distribution at the conditioner/lap interface. Both factors are quantitatively evaluated and described, and have been combined to develop a spatial and temporal model to simulate the surface profile evolution of pitch lap. The simulations are consistent with the experiments. This study is an important step toward deterministic full-aperture annular polishing, providing a beneficial guidance for the surface profile correction of the pitch lap.

  17. Unperturbed moderator brightness in pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batkov, K.; Takibayev, A.; Zanini, L.; Mezei, F.

    2013-01-01

    The unperturbed neutron brightness of a moderator can be defined from the number of neutrons leaving the surface of a moderator completely surrounded by a reflector. Without openings for beam extraction, it is the maximum brightness that can be theoretically achieved in a moderator. The unperturbed brightness of a cylindrical cold moderator filled with pure para-H 2 was calculated using MCNPX; the moderator dimensions were optimised, for a fixed target and reflector geometry corresponding to the present concept for the ESS spallation source. This quantity does not depend on openings for beam extraction and therefore can be used for a first-round optimisation of a moderator, before effects due to beam openings are considered. We find that such an optimisation yields to a factor of 2 increase with respect to a conventional volume moderator, large enough to accommodate a viewed surface of 12×12 cm 2 : the unperturbed neutron brightness is maximum for a disc-shaped moderator of 15 cm diameter, 1.4 cm height. The reasons for this increase can be related to the properties of the scattering cross-section of para-H 2 , to the added reflector around the exit surface in the case of a compact moderator, and to a directionality effect. This large optimisation gain in the unperturbed brightness hints towards similar potentials for the perturbed neutron brightness, in particular in conjunction with advancing the optical quality of neutron delivery from the moderator to the sample, where by Liouville theorem the brightness is conserved over the beam trajectory, except for absorption and similar type losses

  18. Neutron Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding

  19. Neutron Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhavere, F

    2001-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding.

  20. Determination of elemental impurities in polymer materials of electrical cables for use in safety systems of nuclear power plants and for data transfer in the Large Hadron Collider by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Cabalka, M.; Ferencei, Jozef; Kubešová, Marie; Strunga, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 309, č. 3 (2016), s. 1341-1348 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010218; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : instrumental neutron activation analysis * polymer materials * undesired elements * nuclear power plant * Large Hadron Collider Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  1. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunsing, F.

    2005-06-01

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  2. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-06-15

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  4. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-06-01

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  5. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label

  6. Water surface assisted synthesis of large-scale carbon nanotube film for high-performance and stretchable supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Zhang, Yangfan; Zeng, Yinxiang; Balogun, Muhammad-Sadeeq; Mai, Kancheng; Zhang, Zishou; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang

    2014-07-16

    A kind of multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film with excellent conductivity and mechanical properties is developed using a facile and large-scale water surface assisted synthesis method. The film can act as a conductive support for electrochemically active PANI nano fibers. A device based on these PANI/MWCNT/PDMS electrodes shows good and stable capacitive behavior, even under static and dynamic stretching conditions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Structure of DNA-Cationic Surfactant Complexes at Hydrophobically Modified and Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces as Revealed by Neutron Reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna; Campbell, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on hydrophobic surfaces, where we show that DNA molecules are located on top of a self-assembled surfactant monolayer, with the thickness of the DNA layer and the surfactant DNA ratio determined by the surface coverage of the underlying...... interfacial structures, a higher concentration in relation to its cmc is required for the more soluble DTAB surfactant with a shorter alkyl chain than for CTAB. Our results suggest that the DNA Molecules Will spontaneously form a relatively dense, thin layer on top of a surfactant monolayer (hydrophobic...... surface) or a layer of admicelles (hydrophilic surface) as long as the surface concentration of surfactant is great enough to ensure a high interfacial-charge density. These findings have implications for bioanalytical and nanotechnology applications, which require the deposition of DNA layers with well...

  8. Integrating anti-reflection and superhydrophobicity of moth-eye-like surface morphology on a large-area flexible substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chia-Hsing; Niu, Pei-Lun; Sung, Cheng-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) roll-to-roll (R2R) process with argon and oxygen (Ar–O 2 ) plasma ashing and coating of a dilute perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS) layer to fabricate the large-area moth-eye-like surface morphology on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate. By using Maxwell-Garnett's effective medium theory, the optimal dimensions of the moth-eye-like surface morphology was designed and fabricated with UV-NIL R2R process to obtain maximum transmittance ratio. In addition, the base angle (θ = 30.1°) of the moth-eye-like surface morphology was modified with Ar–O 2 plasma ashing and coated with a dilute FDTS layer to possess both superhydrophobic and air-retention properties. This increases both the transmittance ratio of 4% and contact angle to 153°. (paper)

  9. Surface passivity largely governs the bioaccessibility of nickel-based powder particles at human exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Herting, Gunilla; Latvala, Siiri; Elihn, Karine; Karlsson, Hanna L; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-11-01

    The European chemical framework REACH requires that hazards and risks posed by chemicals, including alloys and metals, are identified and proven safe for humans and the environment. Therefore, differences in bioaccessibility in terms of released metals in synthetic biological fluids (different pH (1.5-7.4) and composition) that are relevant for different human exposure routes (inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact) have been assessed for powder particles of an alloy containing high levels of nickel (Inconel 718, 57 wt% nickel). This powder is compared with the bioaccessibility of two nickel-containing stainless steel powders (AISI 316L, 10-12% nickel) and with powders representing their main pure alloy constituents: two nickel metal powders (100% nickel), two iron metal powders and two chromium metal powders. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, microscopy, light scattering, and nitrogen absorption were employed for the particle and surface oxide characterization. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to quantify released amounts of metals in solution. Cytotoxicity (Alamar blue assay) and DNA damage (comet assay) of the Inconel powder were assessed following exposure of the human lung cell line A549, as well as its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (DCFH-DA assay). Despite its high nickel content, the Inconel alloy powder did not release any significant amounts of metals and did not induce any toxic response. It is concluded, that this is related to the high surface passivity of the Inconel powder governed by its chromium-rich surface oxide. Read-across from the pure metal constituents is hence not recommended either for this or any other passive alloy. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sediment size of surface floodplain sediments along a large lowland river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, K. M.; Day, G.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    Data on size distribution of surface sediment across a floodplain should place important constraints of modeling of floodplain deposition. Diffusive or advective models would predict that, generally, grain size should decrease away from channel banks. Variations in grain size downstream along floodplains may depend on downstream fining of river bed material, exchange rate with river banks and net deposition onto the floodplain. Here we report detailed grain size analyses taken from 17 floodplain transects along 450 km (along channel distance) reach of the middle Fly River, Papua New Guinea. Field studies have documented a systematic change in floodplain characteristics downstream from forested, more topographically elevated and topography bounded by an actively shifting mainstem channel to a downstream swamp grass, low elevation topography along which the river meanders are currently stagnant. Frequency and duration of flooding increase downstream. Flooding occurs both by overbank flows and by injections of floodwaters up tributary and tie channels connected to the mainstem. Previous studies show that about 40% of the total discharge of water passes across the floodplain, and, correspondingly, about 40% of the total load is deposited on the plain - decreasing exponentially from channel bank. We find that floodplain sediment is most sandy at the channel bank. Grain size rapidly declines away from the bank, but surprisingly two trends were also observed. A relatively short distance from the bank the surface material is finest, but with further distance from the bank (out to greater than 1 km from the 250 m wide channel) clay content decreases and silt content increases. The changes are small but repeated at most of the transects. The second trend is that bank material fines downstream, corresponding to a downstream finding bed material, but once away from the bank, there is a weak tendency for a given distance away from the bank the floodplain surface deposits to

  11. Neutrons at COSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filges, D.; Freiesleben, H.

    1988-05-01

    For many years neutrons were considered important both as a useful probe in nuclear physics research and as an initiator and catalyst for fission, fusion and other applications. As a result knowledge about neutrons, especially below 20 MeV, received organized world-wide attention. Research with neutrons at medium energies, say 50 MeV to several GeV, has not consistently received attention and no systematic evaluations exist. But there is a large and considerable interest today because medium energy neutrons are very important in basic science and technology. The aim of this workshop was to provide an overview of the present status and the research which should be carried out in this field in future and which kind of experiments should be performed at the COSY facility: State-of-the-art about medium energy neutron experiments and existing facilities; planned experiments; needs for experiments doing research with neutrons at COSY (detectors, accelerator requirements, time structure etc.); what will be a first experiment to measure neutrons at COSY. The interest in this workshop is documented by a large number of participants. Copies of the viewgraphs of the talks are provided. (orig./HP)

  12. Fabrication of large area nanoprism arrays and their application for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, B; Clime, L; Li, K; Veres, T

    2008-01-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of metallic nanoprism (triangular nanostructure) arrays using a low-cost and high-throughput process. In the method, the triangular structure is defined by the shadow of a pyramid during angle evaporation of a metal etching mask. The pyramids were created by nanoimprint lithography in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) using a mould having an inverse-pyramid-shaped hole array formed by KOH wet etching of silicon. Silver and gold nanoprism arrays with a period of 200 nm and an edge length of 100 nm have been fabricated and used as effective substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules. Numerical calculations confirmed the great enhancement of electric field near the sharp nanoprism corners, as well as the detrimental effect of the chromium adhesion layer on localized surface plasmon resonance. The current method can also be used to fabricate non-equilateral nanoprism and three-dimensional (3D) nanopyramid arrays, and it can be readily extended to other metals

  13. Quantifying topographic differences between premining and reclaimed landscapes at a large surface coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlander, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Premining and reclaimed landscapes on 2,300 acres were compared quantitatively at a surface coal mine in western North Dakota. Weighted average slopes were determined by calculating acres in each slope class (0% to 3%, 3% to 6%, 6% to 9%, 9% to 15%, and > 15%) and dividing by the total number of acres. Weighted average slopes were 3.8% and 3.0% for all premining and reclaimed lands respectively. Weighted average slopes were 2.7% and 2.1% for premining and reclaimed croplands respectively. Reclaimed native rangeland slopes are 5.5% compared to 7.0% premining. The acreage of native rangeland with >9% slopes decreased more than 50% during reclamation. For all mined lands there is 25% more reclaimed land with 0% to 3% slopes and 25% less reclaimed land with >6% slopes than before mining. Topographic changes caused by surface mining and reclamation enhance soil conservation, moisture retention, and agricultural productivity. A cross-sectional profile had 26.8 and 15.5 premining and reclaimed land up-down gradient changes per mile respectively, indicating reclaimed land is less diverse than it was prior to mining. Slope class map units average 3.5 and 4.4 acres respectively on premining and reclaimed lands, further indicating reduced diversity. Landscape improvements conflict with regulatory diversity requirements to determine reclamation success

  14. Thermal neutron source study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, T.M.

    1983-05-01

    The value of intense neutron beams for condensed matter research is discussed with emphasis on the complementary nature of steady state and pulsed neutron sources. A large body of information on neutron sources, both existing and planned, is then summarized under four major headings: fission reactors, electron accelerators with heavy metal targets, pulsed spallation sources and 'steady state' spallation sources. Although the cost of a spallation source is expected to exceed that of a fission reactor of the same flux by a factor of two, there are significant advantages for a spallation device such as the proposed Electronuclear Materials Test Facility (EMTF)

  15. Estimation of mutation rates induced by large doses of gamma, proton and neutron irradiation of the X-chromosome of the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denich, K.T.R.; Samoiloff, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-resistant free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus was used to study mutation rates in oocytes, following gamma, proton and neutron irradiation in the dose range 45-225 grays. γ-Radiation produced approximately 0.001 lethal X-chromosomes per gray over the range tested. Proton or neutron irradiation produced approximately 0.003 lethal X-chromosomes per gray at lower doses, with the mutation rate dropping to 0.001 lethal X-chromosome per gray at the higher doses. These results suggest a dose-dependent mutation-repair system. Cell lethality was also examined. γ-Radiation produced the greatest amount of cell lethality at all doses, while neutron irradiation had no cell lethal effect at any of the doses examined. (orig.)

  16. High-pressure {sup 3}He-Xe gas scintillators for simultaneous detection of neutrons and gamma rays over a large energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornow, W., E-mail: tornow@tunl.duke.edu [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Esterline, J.H. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Leckey, C.A. [Department of Physics, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Weisel, G.J. [Department of Physics, Penn State Altoona, Altoona, PA 16601 (United States)

    2011-08-11

    We report on features of high-pressure {sup 3}He-Xe gas scintillators which have not been sufficiently addressed in the past. Such gas scintillators can be used not only for the efficient detection of low-energy neutrons but at the same time for the detection and identification of {gamma}-rays as well. Furthermore, {sup 3}He-Xe gas scintillators are also very convenient detectors for fast neutrons in the 1-10 MeV energy range and for high-energy {gamma}-rays in the 7-15 MeV energy range. Due to their linear pulse-height response and self calibration via the {sup 3}He(n,p){sup 3}H reaction, neutron and {gamma}-ray energies can easily be determined in this high-energy regime.

  17. High-pressure 3He-Xe gas scintillators for simultaneous detection of neutrons and gamma rays over a large energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, W.; Esterline, J.H.; Leckey, C.A.; Weisel, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on features of high-pressure 3 He-Xe gas scintillators which have not been sufficiently addressed in the past. Such gas scintillators can be used not only for the efficient detection of low-energy neutrons but at the same time for the detection and identification of γ-rays as well. Furthermore, 3 He-Xe gas scintillators are also very convenient detectors for fast neutrons in the 1-10 MeV energy range and for high-energy γ-rays in the 7-15 MeV energy range. Due to their linear pulse-height response and self calibration via the 3 He(n,p) 3 H reaction, neutron and γ-ray energies can easily be determined in this high-energy regime.

  18. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrdlicka, Z.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a radiographic method using a neutron beam of a defined geometry. The neutron source usually consists of a research reactor, a specialized neutron radiography reactor or the 252 Cf radioisotope source. There are two types of the neutron radiography display system, viz., a system producing neutron radiography images by a photographic process or a system allowing a visual display, eg., using a television monitor. The method can be used wherever X-ray radiography is used except applications in the radiography of humans. The neutron radiography unit at UJV uses the WWR-S reactor as the neutron source and both types of the above mentioned display system. (J.P.)

  19. Big Jump of Record Warm Global Mean Surface Temperature in 2014-2016 Related to Unusually Large Oceanic Heat Releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianjun; Overpeck, Jonathan; Peyser, Cheryl; Stouffer, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    A 0.24°C jump of record warm global mean surface temperature (GMST) over the past three consecutive record-breaking years (2014-2016) was highly unusual and largely a consequence of an El Niño that released unusually large amounts of ocean heat from the subsurface layer of the northwestern tropical Pacific. This heat had built up since the 1990s mainly due to greenhouse-gas (GHG) forcing and possible remote oceanic effects. Model simulations and projections suggest that the fundamental cause, and robust predictor of large record-breaking events of GMST in the 21st century, is GHG forcing rather than internal climate variability alone. Such events will increase in frequency, magnitude, and duration, as well as impact, in the future unless GHG forcing is reduced.

  20. Surface modified MXene Ti3C2 multilayers by aryl diazonium salts leading to large-scale delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbing; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Huajie; Li, Gaiye; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhuyin

    2016-10-01

    Herein we report a simple and facile method to delaminate MXene Ti3C2 multilayers by the assistance of surface modification using aryl diazonium salts. The basic strategy involved the preparation of layered MAX Ti3AlC2 and the exfoliation of Ti3AlC2 into Ti3C2 multilayers, followed by Na+ intercalation and surface modification using sulfanilic acid diazonium salts. The resulting chemically grafted Ti3C2 flakes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the presence of the surface organic species. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy revealed that surface-modified MXene Ti3C2 sheets disperse well in water and the solutions obey Lambert-Beer's law. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to demonstrate the morphology and structure of delaminating MXene Ti3C2 flakes. The results indicated that chemical modification for MXene multilayers by aryl diazonium salts induced swelling that conversely weakened the bonds between MX layers, hence leading to large-scale delamination of multilayered MXene Ti3C2via mild sonication. Advantages of the present approach rely not only on the simplicity and efficiency of the delamination procedure but also on the grafting of aryl groups to MXene surfaces, highly suitable for further applications of the newly discovered two-dimensional materials.

  1. Large-area uniform periodic microstructures on fused silica induced by surface phonon polaritons and incident laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanchao; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Lijuan; Jiang, Xiaolong; Chen, Jing; Wang, Haijun; Luan, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2018-06-01

    A simple and convenient means to self-organize large-area uniform periodic microstructures on fused silica by using multiple raster scans of microsecond CO2 laser pulses with beam spot overlapping at normal incidence is presented, which is based on laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) attributed to the interference between surface phonon polaritons and incident CO2 laser. The evolution of fused silica surface morphologies with increasing raster scans indicates that the period of microstructures changed from 10.6 μm to 9 μm and the profiles of microstructures changed from a sinusoidal curve to a half-sinusoidal shape. Numerical simulation results suggest that the formation of the half-sinusoidal profile is due to the exponential relationship between evaporation rate and surface temperature inducing by the intensive interference between surface phonon polaritons and incident laser. The fabricated uniform periodic microstructures show excellent structural color effect in both forward-diffraction and back-diffraction.

  2. Large size self-assembled quantum rings: quantum size effect and modulation on the surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Cunzhu; Yoon, Soon Fatt; Wang, Lijun

    2012-09-24

    We demonstrate experimentally the submicron size self-assembled (SA) GaAs quantum rings (QRs) by quantum size effect (QSE). An ultrathin In0.1 Ga0.9As layer with different thickness is deposited on the GaAs to modulate the surface nucleus diffusion barrier, and then the SA QRs are grown. It is found that the density of QRs is affected significantly by the thickness of inserted In0.1 Ga0.9As, and the diffusion barrier modulation reflects mainly on the first five monolayer . The physical mechanism behind is discussed. The further analysis shows that about 160 meV decrease in diffusion barrier can be achieved, which allows the SA QRs with density of as low as one QR per 6 μm2. Finally, the QRs with diameters of 438 nm and outer diameters of 736 nm are fabricated using QSE.

  3. Minimizing stress in large-area surface micromachined perforated membranes with slits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaderi, M; Ayerden, N P; De Graaf, G; Wolffenbuttel, R F

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the effectiveness of both design and fabrication techniques for avoiding the rupturing or excessive bending of perforated membranes after release in surface micromachining. Special lateral designs of arrays of slits in the membrane were investigated for a maximum yield at a given level of residual stress. Process parameters were investigated and optimized for minimum residual stress in multilayer thin-film membranes. A 2 µm thick sacrificial TEOS layer and a structural membrane that is composed of silicon nitride and polysilicon layers in the stack is the basis of this study. The effect of sharp corners on the local stress in membranes was investigated, and structures are proposed that reduce these effects, maximizing the yield at a given level of residual stress. The effects of perforation and slits were studied both theoretically and using finite element analysis. While the overall effect of perforation is negligible in typical MEMS structures, an optimum design for the slits reduces the von Mises stress considerably as compared to sharp corners. The fabrication process was also investigated and optimized for the minimum residual stress of both the layers within the stack and the complete layer stack. The main emphasis of this work is on placing a stress-compensating layer on the wafer backside and simultaneously removing it during the surface micromachining, as this has been found to be the most effective method to reduce the overall stress in a stack of layers after sacrificial etching. Implementation of a stress compensating layer reduced the total residual stress from 200 MPa compressive into almost 60 MPa, tensile. Even though a particular structure was studied here, the employed methods are expected to be applicable to similar MEMS design problems. (paper)

  4. THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF LARGE KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2007 OR10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C.; Burgasser, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present photometry and spectra of the large Kuiper belt object 2007 OR10. The data show significant near-infrared absorption features due to water ice. While most objects in the Kuiper belt with water ice absorption this prominent have the optically neutral colors of water ice, 2007 OR10 is among the reddest Kuiper belt objects known. One other large Kuiper belt object-Quaoar-has similar red coloring and water ice absorption, and it is hypothesized that the red coloration of this object is due to irradiation of the small amounts of methane able to be retained on Quaoar. 2007 OR10, though warmer than Quaoar, is in a similar volatile retention regime because it is sufficiently larger that its stronger gravity can still retain methane. We propose, therefore, that the red coloration on 2007 OR10 is also caused by the retention of small amounts of methane. Positive detection of methane on 2007 OR10 will require spectra with higher signal to noise. Models for volatile retention on Kuiper belt objects appear to continue to do an excellent job reproducing all of the available observations.

  5. Surface modified MXene Ti_3C_2 multilayers by aryl diazonium salts leading to large-scale delamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hongbing; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Huajie; Li, Gaiye; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhuyin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel and simple method to delaminate MXene Ti_3C_2 multilayers. • Surface modification using aryl diazonium salts induced swelling that conversely weakened the bonds between MXene layers. • The grafting of phenylsulfonic acid groups on MXene surfaces resulted in excellent water dispersibility. - Abstract: Herein we report a simple and facile method to delaminate MXene Ti_3C_2 multilayers by the assistance of surface modification using aryl diazonium salts. The basic strategy involved the preparation of layered MAX Ti_3AlC_2 and the exfoliation of Ti_3AlC_2 into Ti_3C_2 multilayers, followed by Na"+ intercalation and surface modification using sulfanilic acid diazonium salts. The resulting chemically grafted Ti_3C_2 flakes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the presence of the surface organic species. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy revealed that surface-modified MXene Ti_3C_2 sheets disperse well in water and the solutions obey Lambert–Beer’s law. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to demonstrate the morphology and structure of delaminating MXene Ti_3C_2 flakes. The results indicated that chemical modification for MXene multilayers by aryl diazonium salts induced swelling that conversely weakened the bonds between MX layers, hence leading to large-scale delamination of multilayered MXene Ti_3C_2via mild sonication. Advantages of the present approach rely not only on the simplicity and efficiency of the delamination procedure but also on the grafting of aryl groups to MXene surfaces, highly suitable for further applications of the newly discovered two-dimensional materials.

  6. The neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kredov, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    The history of the neutron is displayed on the basis of contributions by scientists who produced outstanding results in neutron research (part 1), of summarizing discoveries and theories which led to the discovery of the neutron and the resulting development of nuclear physics (part 2), and of fundamental papers written by Rutherford, Chadwick, Iwanenko, and others (appendix). Of interest to physicists, historians, and students

  7. Neutron techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The way in which neutrons interact with matter such as slowing-down, diffusion, neutron absorption and moderation are described. The use of neutron techniques in industry, in moisture gages, level and interface measurements, the detection of blockages, boron analysis in ore feedstock and industrial radiography are discussed. (author)

  8. Evaluation of surface contamination due to alpha using large area contamination monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavayya, M.

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive contamination at work places is evaluated routinely using either the swipe sampling technique or a contamination monitor. Commercially available alpha probes used for the purpose are usually circular and have a face diameter of 50 or 100 mm. Square faced probes are also available. A thin aluminized mylar membrane of thickness 0.45 to 0.9 mg.cm -2 is used to screen the phosphor in the alpha probe to protect it from external light. The membrane cuts off more alphas from low energy emitters than from higher energy alpha emitters. Moreover the response of the detector for alphas originating at all points under the detector face is not uniform, especially when the large area alpha monitors are used. These factors can introduce errors as high as 40% into the measurements. This paper aims to quantify these errors and describe a procedure to overcome the limitations. (author)

  9. Surface stress and large-scale self-organization at organic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollinger, Florian

    2009-01-22

    The role of elastic interactions, particularly for the self-organized formation of periodically faceted interfaces, was investigated in this thesis for archetype organic-metal interfaces. The cantilever bending technique was applied to study the change of surface stress upon formation of the interface between 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and Ag(111). The main focus of this work was on the investigation of the formation of the long-range ordered, self-organized faceted PTCDA/Ag(10 8 7) interface. Reciprocal space maps of this interface were recorded both by spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) in selected area LEED mode. Complementary to the reciprocal data, also microscopic real-space LEEM data were used to characterize the morphology of this interface. Six different facet faces ((111), (532), (743), (954), (13 9 5), and (542)) were observed for the preparation path of molecular adsorption on the substrate kept at 550 K. Facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM localized these facets to grow in homogeneous areas of microscopic extensions. The temperature-dependence of the interface formation was studied in a range between 418 K and 612 K in order to learn more about the kinetics of the process. Additional steeper facets of 27 inclination with respect to the (111) surface were observed in the low temperature regime. Furthermore, using facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM, spatial and size distributions of specific facets were studied for the different temperatures. Moreover, the facet dimensions were statistically analyzed. The total island size of the facets follows an exponential distribution, indicating a random growth mode in absence of any mutual facet interactions. While the length distribution of the facets also follows an exponential distribution, the width distribution is peaked, reflecting the high degree of lateral order. This anisotropy is temperature-dependent and occurs

  10. Prediction of the number of 14 MeV neutron elastically scattered from large sample of aluminium using Monte Carlo simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husin Wagiran; Wan Mohd Nasir Wan Kadir

    1997-01-01

    In neutron scattering processes, the effect of multiple scattering is to cause an effective increase in the measured cross-sections due to increase on the probability of neutron scattering interactions in the sample. Analysis of how the effective cross-section varies with thickness is very complicated due to complicated sample geometries and the variations of scattering cross-section with energy. Monte Carlo method is one of the possible method for treating the multiple scattering processes in the extended sample. In this method a lot of approximations have to be made and the accurate data of microscopic cross-sections are needed at various angles. In the present work, a Monte Carlo simulation programme suitable for a small computer was developed. The programme was capable to predict the number of neutrons scattered from various thickness of aluminium samples at all possible angles between 00 to 36011 with 100 increments. In order to make the the programme not too complicated and capable of being run on microcomputer with reasonable time, the calculations was done in two dimension coordinate system. The number of neutrons predicted from this model show in good agreement with previous experimental results

  11. Helicon plasma generator-assisted surface conversion ion source for the production of H(-) ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvainen, O; Rouleau, G; Keller, R; Geros, E; Stelzer, J; Ferris, J

    2008-02-01

    The converter-type negative ion source currently employed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H(-) ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. In this kind of an ion source the extracted H(-) beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which deposits on the H(-) converter surface and degrades its performance. Therefore, we have started an ion source development project focused on replacing these thermionic cathodes (filaments) of the converter source by a helicon plasma generator capable of producing high-density hydrogen plasmas with low electron energy. In our studies which have so far shown that the plasma density of the surface conversion source can be increased significantly by exciting a helicon wave in the plasma, and we expect to improve the performance of the surface converter H(-) ion source in terms of beam brightness and time between services. The design of this new source and preliminary results are presented, along with a discussion of physical processes relevant for H(-) ion beam production with this novel design. Ultimately, we perceive this approach as an interim step towards our long-term goal, combining a helicon plasma generator with an SNS-type main discharge chamber, which will allow us to individually optimize the plasma properties of the plasma cathode (helicon) and H(-) production (main discharge) in order to further improve the brightness of extracted H(-) ion beams.

  12. Helicon plasma generator-assisted surface conversion ion source for the production of H- ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvainen, O.; Rouleau, G.; Keller, R.; Geros, E.; Stelzer, J.; Ferris, J.

    2008-02-01

    The converter-type negative ion source currently employed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H- ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. In this kind of an ion source the extracted H- beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which deposits on the H- converter surface and degrades its performance. Therefore, we have started an ion source development project focused on replacing these thermionic cathodes (filaments) of the converter source by a helicon plasma generator capable of producing high-density hydrogen plasmas with low electron energy. In our studies which have so far shown that the plasma density of the surface conversion source can be increased significantly by exciting a helicon wave in the plasma, and we expect to improve the performance of the surface converter H- ion source in terms of beam brightness and time between services. The design of this new source and preliminary results are presented, along with a discussion of physical processes relevant for H- ion beam production with this novel design. Ultimately, we perceive this approach as an interim step towards our long-term goal, combining a helicon plasma generator with an SNS-type main discharge chamber, which will allow us to individually optimize the plasma properties of the plasma cathode (helicon) and H- production (main discharge) in order to further improve the brightness of extracted H- ion beams.

  13. Helicon plasma generator-assisted surface conversion ion source for the production of H- ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Rouleau, G.; Keller, R.; Geros, E.; Stelzer, J.; Ferris, J.

    2008-01-01

    The converter-type negative ion source currently employed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H - ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. In this kind of an ion source the extracted H - beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which deposits on the H - converter surface and degrades its performance. Therefore, we have started an ion source development project focused on replacing these thermionic cathodes (filaments) of the converter source by a helicon plasma generator capable of producing high-density hydrogen plasmas with low electron energy. In our studies which have so far shown that the plasma density of the surface conversion source can be increased significantly by exciting a helicon wave in the plasma, and we expect to improve the performance of the surface converter H - ion source in terms of beam brightness and time between services. The design of this new source and preliminary results are presented, along with a discussion of physical processes relevant for H - ion beam production with this novel design. Ultimately, we perceive this approach as an interim step towards our long-term goal, combining a helicon plasma generator with an SNS-type main discharge chamber, which will allow us to individually optimize the plasma properties of the plasma cathode (helicon) and H - production (main discharge) in order to further improve the brightness of extracted H - ion beams

  14. Modeling detailed hydro-meteorological surfaces and runoff response in large diverse watersheds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, J.; Kienzle, S.W.; MacDonald, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of local variability in climatic conditions over complex terrain is imperative to making accurate assessments of impacts from climate change on fresh water ecosystems (Daly, 2006). The derivation of representative spatial data in diverse environments poses a significant challenge to the modelling community. This presentation describes the current status of a long term ongoing hydro-climate model development program. We are developing a gridded hydroclimate dataset for diverse watersheds using SimGrid (Larson, 2008; Lapp et al., 2005; Sheppard, 1996), a model that applies the Mountain Climate Model (MTCLIM; Hungerford et al., 1989) to simulate hydro-climatic conditions over diverse terrain. The model uses GIS based terrain categories (TC) classified by slope, aspect, elevation, and soil water storage. SimGrid provides daily estimates of solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, snowpack and soil water storage over space. Earlier versions of the model have been applied in the St. Mary (Larson, 2008) and upper Oldman basins (Lapp et al., 2005), giving realistic estimates of hydro-climatic variables. The current study demonstrates improvements to the estimation of temperature, precipitation, snowpack, soil water storage and runoff from the basin. Soil water storage data for the upper drainage were derived with GIS and included in SimGrid to estimate soil water flux over the time period. These changes help improve the estimation of spatial climatic variability over the basin while accounting for topographical influence. In further work we will apply spatial hydro-climatic surfaces from the SimGrid model to assess the hydrologic response to environmental change for watersheds in Canada and beyond. (author)

  15. Titanium condenser tubes. Problems and their solution for wider application to large surface condensers. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S; Sugiyama, S; Nagata, K; Nanba, K; Shimono, M [Sumitomo Light Metal Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    The corrosion resistance of titanium in sea water is extremely excellent, but titanium tubes are expensive, and the copper alloy tubes resistant in polluted sea water were developed, therefore they were not used practically. In 1970, ammonia attack was found on the copper alloy tubes in the air-cooled portion of condensers, and titanium tubes have been used as the countermeasure. As the result of the use, the galvanic attack on copper alloy tube plates with titanium tubes as cathode and the hydrogen absorption at titanium tube ends owing to excess electrolytic protection was observed, but the corrosion resistance of titanium tubes was perfect. These problems can be controlled by the application of proper electrolytic protection. The condensers with all titanium tubes adopted recently in USA are intended to realize perfectly no-leak condensers as the countermeasure to the corrosion in steam generators of PWR plants. Regarding large condensers of nowadays, three problems are pointed out, namely the vibration of condenser tubes, the method of joining tubes and tube plates, and the tubes of no coolant leak. These three problems in case of titanium tubes were studied, and the problem of the fouling of tubes was also examined. The intervals of supporting plates for titanium tubes should be narrowed. The joining of titanium tubes and titanium tube plates by welding is feasible and promising. The cleaning with sponge balls is effective to control fouling.

  16. Neutron dosimetry in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurbjoernsson, B.; Smith, H.H.; Gustafsson, A.

    1965-01-01

    To study adequately the biological effects of different energy neutrons it is necessary to have high-intensity sources which are not contaminated by other radiations, the most serious of which are gamma rays. An effective dosimetry must provide an accurate measure of the absorbed dose, in biological materials, of each type of radiation at any reactor facility involved in radiobiological research. A standardized biological dosimetry, in addition to physical and chemical methods, may be desirable. The ideal data needed to achieve a fully documented dosimetry has been compiled by H. Glubrecht: (1) Energy spectrum and intensity of neutrons; (2) Angular distribution of neutrons on the whole surface of the irradiated object; (3) Additional undesired radiation accompanying the neutrons; (4) Physical state and chemical composition of the irradiated object. It is not sufficient to note only an integral dose value (e.g. in 'rad') as the biological effect depends on the above data

  17. Particle physics with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubbers, D.

    1991-01-01

    Slow neutrons are used in a large number of experiments to study the physics of particles and their fundamental interactions. Some of these experiments search for manifestations of ''new physics'' like baryon- or lepton-number nonconservation, time reversal nonconservation, new particles, right-handed currents, nonzero neutron charge, nonlinear terms in the Schrodinger equation, exotic e + e - states, and others. Other slow neutron experiments test the present Standard Model. The parity nonconserving weak neutron-nucleon interaction is studied in a variety of experiments. Free neutron beta decay gives precise values for the weak vector and axialvector coupling constants, which allow precise tests of basic symmetries like the conservation of the weak vector current, the unitarity of the weak quark mixing matrix, SU(3) flavour symmetry, and right-handed currents. Neutron beta decay data are further needed to calculate weak cross-sections, for applications, in big bang cosmology, in astrophysics, in solar physics and the solar neutrino problem, and in such mundane things as neutrino detection efficiencies in neutrino oscillation or proton decay experiments. Neutron-nucleon, neutron-nucleus and neutron-electron scattering lengths are determined in high precision experiments, which use methods like neutron interferometry or neutron gravity spectrometry. The experiments give information on quantities like the neutron charge radius or the neutron electric polarizability. Precision measurements of other fundamental constants lead to a better, model-independent value of the fine structure constant. Finally, the fundamental experiments on quantum mechanics, like spinor 4π -rotation, Berry's phase, dressed neutrons, Aharanov - Casher effect, or gravitational effects on the neutron's phase will be briefly discussed. (author)

  18. Surface-Treated versus Untreated Large-Bore Catheters as Vascular Access in Hemodialysis and Apheresis Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Bambauer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Catheter-related infections, thrombosis, and stenosis are among the most frequent complications associated with catheters, which are inserted in vessels. Surface treatment processes of the outer surface, such as ion-beam-assisted deposition, can be used to mitigate such complications. Methods. This retrospective study (1992–2007 evaluated silver-coated (54 patients and noncoated (105 patients implanted large-bore catheters used for extracorporeal detoxification. The catheters were inserted into the internal jugular or subclavian veins. After removal, the catheters were cultured for bacterial colonization using standard microbiologic assays. They also were examined using scanning electron microscope. Results. The silver coated catheters showed a tendency towards longer in situ time. The microbiologic examinations of the catheter tips were in both catheter types high positive, but not significant. Conclusion. The silver-coated catheters showed no significantly reduction in infection rate by evaluation of all collected data in this retrospective study. There was no association between both catheters in significantly reducing savings in treatment costs and in reducing patient discomfort. Other new developed catheter materials such as the microdomain-structured inner and outer surface are considered more biocompatible because they mimic the structure of natural biological surface.

  19. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  20. Predictability of the recent slowdown and subsequent recovery of large-scale surface warming using statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael E.; Steinman, Byron A.; Miller, Sonya K.; Frankcombe, Leela M.; England, Matthew H.; Cheung, Anson H.

    2016-04-01

    The temporary slowdown in large-scale surface warming during the early 2000s has been attributed to both external and internal sources of climate variability. Using semiempirical estimates of the internal low-frequency variability component in Northern Hemisphere, Atlantic, and Pacific surface temperatures in concert with statistical hindcast experiments, we investigate whether the slowdown and its recent recovery were predictable. We conclude that the internal variability of the North Pacific, which played a critical role in the slowdown, does not appear to have been predictable using statistical forecast methods. An additional minor contribution from the North Atlantic, by contrast, appears to exhibit some predictability. While our analyses focus on combining semiempirical estimates of internal climatic variability with statistical hindcast experiments, possible implications for initialized model predictions are also discussed.

  1. Recent Successes and Remaining Challenges in Predicting Phosphorus Loading to Surface Waters at Large Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J.; Metson, G.; Beusen, A.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past century humans have greatly accelerated phosphorus (P) flows from land to aquatic ecosystems, causing eutrophication and associated effects such as harmful algal blooms and hypoxia. Effectively addressing this challenge requires understanding geographic and temporal distribution of aquatic P loading, knowledge of major controls on P loading, and the relative importance of various potential P sources. The Global (N)utrient (E)xport from (W)ater(S)heds) NEWS model and recent improvements and extensions of this modeling system can be used to generate this understanding. This presentation will focus on insights global NEWS models grant into past, present, and potential future P sources and sinks, with a focus on the world's large rivers. Early results suggest: 1) that while aquatic P loading is globally dominated by particulate forms, dissolved P can be locally dominant; 2) that P loading has increased substantially at the global scale, but unevenly between world regions, with hotspots in South and East Asia; 3) that P loading is likely to continue to increase globally, but decrease in certain regions that are actively pursuing proactive P management; and 4) that point sources, especially in urban centers, play an important (even dominant) role in determining loads of dissolved inorganic P. Despite these insights, substantial unexplained variance remains when model predictions and measurements are compared at global and regional scales, for example within the U.S. Disagreements between model predictions and measurements suggest opportunities for model improvement. In particular, explicit inclusion of soil characteristics and the concept of temporal P legacies in future iterations of NEWS (and other) models may help improve correspondence between models and measurements.

  2. The Response of African Land Surface Phenology to Large Scale Climate Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; de Beurs, Kirsten; Vrieling, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Variations in agricultural production due to rainfall and temperature fluctuations are a primary cause of food insecurity on the African continent. Analysis of changes in phenology can provide quantitative information on the effect of climate variability on growing seasons in agricultural regions. Using a robust statistical methodology, we describe the relationship between phenology metrics derived from the 26 year AVHRR NDVI record and the North Atlantic Oscillation index (NAO), the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI). We map the most significant positive and negative correlation for the four climate indices in Eastern, Western and Southern Africa between two phenological metrics and the climate indices. Our objective is to provide evidence of whether climate variability captured in the four indices has had a significant impact on the vegetative productivity of Africa during the past quarter century. We found that the start of season and cumulative NDVI were significantly affected by large scale variations in climate. The particular climate index and the timing showing highest correlation depended heavily on the region examined. In Western Africa the cumulative NDVI correlates with PDO in September-November. In Eastern Africa the start of the June-October season strongly correlates with PDO in March-May, while the PDO in December-February correlates with the start of the February-June season. The cumulative NDVI over this last season relates to the MEI of March-May. For Southern Africa, high correlations exist between SOS and NAO of September-November, and cumulative NDVI and MEI of March-May. The research shows that climate indices can be used to anticipate late start and variable vigor in the growing season of sensitive agricultural regions in Africa.

  3. The role of reservoir storage in large-scale surface water availability analysis for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, L. M.; Granados, A.; Martin-Carrasco, F.; Iglesias, A.

    2017-12-01

    A regional assessment of current and future water availability in Europe is presented in this study. The assessment was made using the Water Availability and Adaptation Policy Analysis (WAAPA) model. The model was built on the river network derived from the Hydro1K digital elevation maps, including all major river basins of Europe. Reservoir storage volume was taken from the World Register of Dams of ICOLD, including all dams with storage capacity over 5 hm3. Potential Water Availability is defined as the maximum amount of water that could be supplied at a certain point of the river network to satisfy a regular demand under pre-specified reliability requirements. Water availability is the combined result of hydrological processes, which determine streamflow in natural conditions, and human intervention, which determines the available hydraulic infrastructure to manage water and establishes water supply conditions through operating rules. The WAAPA algorithm estimates the maximum demand that can be supplied at every node of the river network accounting for the regulation capacity of reservoirs under different management scenarios. The model was run for a set of hydrologic scenarios taken from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP), where the PCRGLOBWB hydrological model was forced with results from five global climate models. Model results allow the estimation of potential water stress by comparing water availability to projections of water abstractions along the river network under different management alternatives. The set of sensitivity analyses performed showed the effect of policy alternatives on water availability and highlighted the large uncertainties linked to hydrological and anthropological processes.

  4. Derivation of preliminary specifications for transmitted wavefront and surface roughness for large optics used in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikens, D.; Roussel, A.; Bray, M.

    1995-01-01

    In preparation for beginning the design of the Nation Ignition Facility (NIF) in the United States and the Laser Mega-Joule (LMJ) in France, the authors are in the process of deriving new specifications for the large optics required for these facilities. Traditionally, specifications for transmitted wavefront and surface roughness of large ICF optics have been based on parameters which were easily measured during the early 1980's, such as peak-to-valley wavefront error (PV) and root-mean-square (RMS) surface roughness, as well as wavefront gradients in terms of waves per cm. While this was convenient from a fabrication perspective, since the specifications could be easily interpreted by fabricators in terms which were understood and conventionally measurable, it did not accurately reflect the requirements of the laser system. For the NIF and LMJ laser systems, the authors use advances in metrology and interferometry and an enhanced understanding of laser system performance to derive specifications which are based on power spectral densities (PSD's.) Such requirements can more accurately reflect the requirements of the laser system for minimizing the amplitude of mid- and high-spatial frequency surface and transmitted wavefront errors, while not over constraining the fabrication in terms of low spatial frequencies, such as residual coma or astigmatism, which are typically of a very large amplitude compared to periodic errors. In order to study the effect of changes in individual component tolerances, it is most useful to have a model capable of simulating real behavior. The basis of this model is discussed in this paper, outlining the general approach to the open-quotes theoreticalclose quotes study of ICF optics specifications, and an indication of the type of specification to be expected will be shown, based upon existing ICF laser optics

  5. Simulation of reflecting surface deviations of centimeter-band parabolic space radiotelescope (SRT) with the large-size mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotik, A.; Usyukin, V.; Vinogradov, I.; Arkhipov, M.

    2017-11-01

    he realization of astrophysical researches requires the development of high-sensitive centimeterband parabolic space radiotelescopes (SRT) with the large-size mirrors. Constructively such SRT with the mirror size more than 10 m can be realized as deployable rigid structures. Mesh-structures of such size do not provide the reflector reflecting surface accuracy which is necessary for the centimeter band observations. Now such telescope with the 10 m diameter mirror is developed in Russia in the frame of "SPECTR - R" program. External dimensions of the telescope is more than the size of existing thermo-vacuum chambers used to prove SRT reflecting surface accuracy parameters under the action of space environment factors. That's why the numerical simulation turns out to be the basis required to accept the taken designs. Such modeling should be based on experimental working of the basic constructive materials and elements of the future reflector. In the article computational modeling of reflecting surface deviations of a centimeter-band of a large-sized deployable space reflector at a stage of his orbital functioning is considered. The analysis of the factors that determines the deviations - both determined (temperatures fields) and not-determined (telescope manufacturing and installation faults; the deformations caused by features of composite materials behavior in space) is carried out. The finite-element model and complex of methods are developed. They allow to carry out computational modeling of reflecting surface deviations caused by influence of all factors and to take into account the deviations correction by space vehicle orientation system. The results of modeling for two modes of functioning (orientation at the Sun) SRT are presented.

  6. Large scale, highly dense nanoholes on metal surfaces by underwater laser assisted hydrogen etching near nanocrystalline boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Dong; Zhang, Martin Yi; Ye Chang; Liu Zhikun; Liu, C. Richard [School of Industrial Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Cheng, Gary J., E-mail: gjcheng@purdue.edu [School of Industrial Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    A new method to generate large scale and highly dense nanoholes is presented in this paper. By the pulsed laser irradiation under water, the hydrogen etching is introduced to form high density nanoholes on the surfaces of AISI 4140 steel and Ti. In order to achieve higher nanohole density, laser shock peening (LSP) followed by recrystallization is used for grain refinement. It is found that the nanohole density does not increase until recrystallization of the substructures after laser shock peening. The mechanism of nanohole generation is studied in detail. This method can be also applied to generate nanoholes on other materials with hydrogen etching effect.

  7. Large scale, highly dense nanoholes on metal surfaces by underwater laser assisted hydrogen etching near nanocrystalline boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Dong; Zhang, Martin Yi; Ye Chang; Liu Zhikun; Liu, C. Richard; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    A new method to generate large scale and highly dense nanoholes is presented in this paper. By the pulsed laser irradiation under water, the hydrogen etching is introduced to form high density nanoholes on the surfaces of AISI 4140 steel and Ti. In order to achieve higher nanohole density, laser shock peening (LSP) followed by recrystallization is used for grain refinement. It is found that the nanohole density does not increase until recrystallization of the substructures after laser shock peening. The mechanism of nanohole generation is studied in detail. This method can be also applied to generate nanoholes on other materials with hydrogen etching effect.

  8. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine; Ocena zaleznosci pomiedzy sposobem frakcjonowania dawki fotonow i neutronow a nasileniem popromiennego odczynu jelita grubego myszy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasinska, A. [Oncology Center, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction {alpha}/{beta} for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method {alpha}/{beta} for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F{sub r}) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50

  9. Large- to submesoscale surface circulation and its implications on biogeochemical/biological horizontal distributions during the OUTPACE cruise (southwest Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousselet, Louise; de Verneil, Alain; Doglioli, Andrea M.; Petrenko, Anne A.; Duhamel, Solange; Maes, Christophe; Blanke, Bruno

    2018-04-01

    The patterns of the large-scale, meso- and submesoscale surface circulation on biogeochemical and biological distributions are examined in the western tropical South Pacific (WTSP) in the context of the OUTPACE cruise (February-April 2015). Multi-disciplinary original in situ observations were achieved along a zonal transect through the WTSP and their analysis was coupled with satellite data. The use of Lagrangian diagnostics allows for the identification of water mass pathways, mesoscale structures, and submesoscale features such as fronts. In particular, we confirmed the existence of a global wind-driven southward circulation of surface waters in the entire WTSP, using a new high-resolution altimetry-derived product, validated by in situ drifters, that includes cyclogeostrophy and Ekman components with geostrophy. The mesoscale activity is shown to be responsible for counter-intuitive water mass trajectories in two subregions: (i) the Coral Sea, with surface exchanges between the North Vanuatu Jet and the North Caledonian Jet, and (ii) around 170° W, with an eastward pathway, whereas a westward general direction dominates. Fronts and small-scale features, detected with finite-size Lyapunov exponents (FSLEs), are correlated with 25 % of surface tracer gradients, which reveals the significance of such structures in the generation of submesoscale surface gradients. Additionally, two high-frequency sampling transects of biogeochemical parameters and microorganism abundances demonstrate the influence of fronts in controlling the spatial distribution of bacteria and phytoplankton, and as a consequence the microbial community structure. All circulation scales play an important role that has to be taken into account not only when analysing the data from OUTPACE but also, more generally, for understanding the global distribution of biogeochemical components.

  10. Advances in neutron scattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Some aspects of the application of neutron scattering to problems in polymer science, surface chemistry, and adsorption phenomena, as well as molecular biology, are reviewed. In all these areas, very significant work has been carried out using the medium flux reactors at Harwell, Juelich and Risoe, even without the use of advanced multidetector techniques or of a neutron cold source. A general tendency can also be distinguished in that, for each of these new fields, a distinct preference for colder neutrons rather than thermal neutron beams can be seen. (author)

  11. Neutron beam design for low intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Two small neutron sources of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low intensity neutron and gamma ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter-shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3,900 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with neutron/gamma ratio of 7x10 sup 7 , and 25 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf(122 mu g) and a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(37GBq)radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  12. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi

    1988-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption coefficient is essentially different from the X-ray absorption coefficient. Each substance has a characteristic absorption coefficient regardless of its density. Neutron deams have the following features: (1) neutrons are not transmitted efficiently by low molecular weight substances, (2) they are transmitted efficiently by heavy metals, and (3) the transmittance differs among isotopes. Thus, neutron beams are suitable for cheking for foreign matters in heavy metals and testing of composites consisting of both heavy and light materials. A neutron source generates fast neutrons, which should be converted into thermal neutrons by reducing their energy. Major neutron souces include nuclear reactors, radioisotopes and particle accelerators. Photographic films and television systems are mainly used to observe neutron transmission images. Computers are employed for image processing, computerized tomography and three-dimensional analysis. The major applications of neutron radiography include inspection of neclear fuel; evaluation of material for airplane; observation of fuel in the engine and oil in the hydraulic systems in airplanes; testing of composite materials; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Searching for X-ray Pulsations from Neutron Stars Using NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paul S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith C.; Bogdanov, Slavko; Bult, Peter; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Guillot, Sebastien; Harding, Alice; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Lamb, Frederick; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Miller, Cole; Strohmayer, Tod; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Wolff, Michael T.; NICER Science Team Working Group on Pulsation Searches and Multiwavelength Coordination

    2018-01-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) presents an exciting new capability for discovering new modulation properties of X-ray emitting neutron stars, including large area, low background, extremely precise absolute time stamps, superb low-energy response and flexible scheduling. The Pulsation Searches and Multiwavelength Coordination working group has designed a 2.5 Ms observing program to search for pulsations and characterize the modulation properties of about 30 known or suspected neutron star sources across a number of source categories. A key early goal will be to search for pulsations from millisecond pulsars that might exhibit thermal pulsations from the surface suitable for pulse profile modeling to constrain the neutron star equation of state. In addition, we will search for pulsations from transitional millisecond pulsars, isolated neutron stars, LMXBs, accretion-powered millisecond pulsars, central compact objects and other sources. We present our science plan and initial results from the first months of the NICER mission.

  14. Polarized neutron powder diffraction studies of antiferromagnetic order in bulk and nanoparticle NiO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P.

    2015-01-01

    surface contribution to the magnetic anisotropy. Here we explore the potential use of polarized neutron diffraction to reveal the magnetic structure in NiO bulk and nanoparticle powders by applying the XYZ-polarization analysis method. Our investigations address in particular the spin orientation in bulk....... The results show that polarization analyzed neutron powder diffraction is a viable method to investigate magnetic order in powders of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles.......In many materials it remains a challenge to reveal the nature of magnetic correlations, including antiferromagnetism and spin disorder. Revealing the spin structure in magnetic nanoparticles is further complicated by the large incoherent neutron scattering cross section from water adsorbed...

  15. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, Aidan [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  16. Multi-Annual Climate Predictions for Fisheries: An Assessment of Skill of Sea Surface Temperature Forecasts for Large Marine Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiree Tommasi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Decisions made by fishers and fisheries managers are informed by climate and fisheries observations that now often span more than 50 years. Multi-annual climate forecasts could further inform such decisions if they were skillful in predicting future conditions relative to the 50-year scope of past variability. We demonstrate that an existing multi-annual prediction system skillfully forecasts the probability of next year, the next 1–3 years, and the next 1–10 years being warmer or cooler than the 50-year average at the surface in coastal ecosystems. Probabilistic forecasts of upper and lower seas surface temperature (SST terciles over the next 3 or 10 years from the GFDL CM 2.1 10-member ensemble global prediction system showed significant improvements in skill over the use of a 50-year climatology for most Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs in the North Atlantic, the western Pacific, and Indian oceans. Through a comparison of the forecast skill of initialized and uninitialized hindcasts, we demonstrate that this skill is largely due to the predictable signature of radiative forcing changes over the 50-year timescale rather than prediction of evolving modes of climate variability. North Atlantic LMEs stood out as the only coastal regions where initialization significantly contributed to SST prediction skill at the 1 to 10 year scale.

  17. Low-cost and large-scale flexible SERS-cotton fabric as a wipe substrate for surface trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmin; Ge, Fengyan; Guang, Shanyi; Cai, Zaisheng

    2018-04-01

    The large-scale surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) cotton fabrics were fabricated based on traditional woven ones using a dyeing-like method of vat dyes, where silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were in-situ synthesized by 'dipping-reducing-drying' process. By controlling the concentration of AgNO3 solution, the optimal SERS cotton fabric was obtained, which had a homogeneous close packing of Ag NPs. The SERS cotton fabric was employed to detect p-Aminothiophenol (PATP). It was found that the new fabric possessed excellent reproducibility (about 20%), long-term stability (about 57 days) and high SERS sensitivity with a detected concentration as low as 10-12 M. Furthermore, owing to the excellent mechanical flexibility and good absorption ability, the SERS cotton fabric was employed to detect carbaryl on the surface of an apple by simply swabbing, which showed great potential in fast trace analysis. More importantly, this study may realize large-scale production with low cost by a traditional cotton fabric.

  18. Comparison calculation of a large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor using the cell code MICROX-2 in connection with ENDF/B-VI and JEF-1.1 neutron data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloni, S.

    1992-02-01

    We have obtained results for a large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor benchmark using data from the ENDF/B-VI and from Revision 1 of the JEF-1 (JEF-1.1) evaluation. The required cross sections were processed with the NJOY code system (Version 89.62) and homogenized with the spectrum cell code MICROX-2. Multigroup transport-theory calculations in 33 neutron groups (forward and adjoint) were performed using the two-dimensional code TWODANT and kinetic parameters were determined using the first-order perturbation-theory code PERT-V. We calculated eigenvalues, neutron balance data, global and regional breeding and conversion ratios, central rate ratios and reactivity worths with and without sodium, effective delayed neutron fraction and inhour reactivity, regional sodium void reactivity, and isothermal core fuel Doppler-reactivities. In particular, it is shown that good agreement (generally within one standard deviation) is achieved between these results and the average values over sixteen benchmark solutions obtained in the past. The eigenvalues predicted with ENDF/B-VI are up to 0.7% larger than those calculated with JEF-1.1 cross sections. This discrepancy is mainly due to different inelastic scattering cross sections for 23 Na and 238 U, and to different fast fission and nubar data for 239 Pu. (author) 5 figs., 30 tabs., 24 refs

  19. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  20. Neutron spectometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortmans, F.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental work in the field of low-energy neutron physics can be subdivided into two classes: 1)Study of the decay process of the compound-nucleus state as for example the study of the capture gamma rays and of the neutron induced fission process; 2)Study of the reaction mechanism, mainly by measuring the reaction cross-sections and resonance parameters. These neutron cross-sections and resonance parameters are also important data required for many technological applications especially for reactor development programmes. In general, the second class of experiments impose other requirements on the neutron spectrometer than the first class. In most cases, a better neutron energy resolution and a broader neutron energy range are required for the study of the reaction mechanism than for the study of various aspects of the decay process. (author)

  1. Leaching behavior of gamma-emitting fission products and Np from neutron-irradiated UO_2-ZrO_2 solid solutions in non-filtered surface seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Takeno, Yuu; Kobayashi, Taishi; Kirishima, Akira; Sato, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    The gamma ray radionuclides Cs-137, Ba-140, I-131, Ce-141, Ru-103, Zr-95, and Np-239 were produced by neutron irradiation of UO_2-ZrO_2 solid solutions that were synthesized as simulated fuel debris under reducing and oxidizing conditions. The leaching ratio of radionuclides was investigated under atmospheric conditions at 25°C for non-filtered natural surface seawater, as well as deionized water after filtration with a membrane of 0.45-μm pore size or that of nominal molecular weight limit of 3 kDa. The uranium molar concentration was affected by the oxidation state in the solid solution samples. The congruent dissolution of Cs, I, and Ba with the hexavalent uranium of U_3O_8 was facilitated in the seawater samples, whereas a lower leaching ratio of nuclides was observed in the deionized water samples. Neptunium-239, originally produced from uranium-238 in U_3O_8, showed behavior that was similar to that of Cs, I, and Ba. However, the dissolution of Np (as a parent nuclide of Pu-239) in the debris of UO_2 and UO_2-ZrO_2 was suppressed in the same manner as Zr(IV) and Ce(IV). The concentration exhibited no filtration dependence after 15 d, which shows that most of the leached nuclides can exist in their ionic form in seawater. (author)

  2. Neutron exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prillinger, G.; Konynenburg, R.A. van

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 6, LWR-PV neutron transport calculations and dosimetry methods and how they are combined to evaluate the neutron exposure of the steel of pressure vessels are discussed. An effort to correlate neutron exposure parameters with damage is made

  3. Atmospheric neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preszler, A.M.; Moon, S.; White, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron and additional analysis corrections lead to the slightly changed neutron fluxes reported here. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with our experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current J 2 /sub pi/ (Merker, 1972; Armstrong et al., 1973) is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. Our experimental fluxes agree with those of the Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV

  4. Neutron Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  5. Uncertainties of Large-Scale Forcing Caused by Surface Turbulence Flux Measurements and the Impacts on Cloud Simulations at the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S.; Xie, S.; Tang, Q.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Two types of instruments, the eddy correlation flux measurement system (ECOR) and the energy balance Bowen ratio system (EBBR), are used at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site to measure surface latent and sensible fluxes. ECOR and EBBR typically sample different land surface types, and the domain-mean surface fluxes derived from ECOR and EBBR are not always consistent. The uncertainties of the surface fluxes will have impacts on the derived large-scale forcing data and further affect the simulations of single-column models (SCM), cloud-resolving models (CRM) and large-eddy simulation models (LES), especially for the shallow-cumulus clouds which are mainly driven by surface forcing. This study aims to quantify the uncertainties of the large-scale forcing caused by surface turbulence flux measurements and investigate the impacts on cloud simulations using long-term observations from the ARM SGP site.

  6. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE, LARGE-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION, AND CONVECTION OVER THE TROPICAL INDIAN AND PACIFIC OCEANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orbita Roswintiarti

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the quantitative estimates of the effect of large-scale circulations on the sea surface temperature (SST-tropical convection relationship and the effect of SST on the large-scale circulation-convection relationship over the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans are presented. Although convection tends to maximize at warm SSTs, increased deep convection is also determined by the divergence (DIV associated with large-scale circulation. An analysis of the relationship between SST and deep convection shows that under subsidence and clear conditions, there is a decrease in convection or increase in Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR at a maximum rate of 3.4 Wm-2 °C-1. In the SST range of 25°C to 29.5°C, a large increase in deep convection (decrease in OLR occurs in the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. The OLR reduction is found to be a strong function of the large-scale circulation in the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. Under a weak large-scale circulation, the rate of OLR reduction is about    -3.5 Wm-2 °C-1 to -8.1 Wm-2 °C-1. Under the influence of strong rising motions, the rate can increase to about -12.5 Wm-2 °C-1 for the same SST range. The overall relationship between large-scale circulation and deep convection is nearly linear. A maximum rate of OLR reduction with respect to DIV is -6.1 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1 in the western Pacific Ocean. It is also found that the DIV-OLR relationship is less dependent on SST. For example, the rate of OLR reduction over the western Pacific Ocean for 26°C < SST £ 27°C is -4.2 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1, while that for 28°C < SST £ 29°C is  -5.1 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1. These results are expected to have a great importance for climate feedback mechanisms associated with clouds and SST and for climate predictability.

  7. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC Stromswold; AJ Peurrung; RR Hansen; PL Reeder

    2000-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron detection is the detection of fast neutrons before they are moderated to thermal energy. We have investigated two approaches for using proton-recoil in plastic scintillators to detect fast neutrons and distinguish them from gamma-ray interactions. Both approaches use the difference in travel speed between neutrons and gamma rays as the basis for separating the types of events. In the first method, we examined the pulses generated during scattering in a plastic scintillator to see if they provide a means for distinguishing fast-neutron events from gamma-ray events. The slower speed of neutrons compared to gamma rays results in the production of broader pulses when neutrons scatter several times within a plastic scintillator. In contrast, gamma-ray interactions should produce narrow pulses, even if multiple scattering takes place, because the time between successive scattering is small. Experiments using a fast scintillator confirmed the presence of broader pulses from neutrons than from gamma rays. However, the difference in pulse widths between neutrons and gamma rays using the best commercially available scintillators was not sufficiently large to provide a practical means for distinguishing fast neutrons and gamma rays on a pulse-by-pulse basis. A faster scintillator is needed, and that scintillator might become available in the literature. Results of the pulse-width studies were presented in a previous report (peurrung et al. 1998), and they are only summarized here

  8. Compilation of Existing Neutron Screen Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chrysanthopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactors is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials, nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials, and tritium breeding materials. Therefore, introduction of these reactors into operation will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Due to limited availability of fast reactors, testing of future reactor materials will mostly take place in water cooled material test reactors (MTRs by tailoring the neutron spectrum via neutron screens. The latter rely on the utilization of materials capable of absorbing neutrons at specific energy. A large but fragmented experience is available on that topic. In this work a comprehensive compilation of the existing neutron screen technology is attempted, focusing on neutron screens developed in order to locally enhance the fast over thermal neutron flux ratio in a reactor core.

  9. Neutron rich matter, neutron stars, and their crusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, C J

    2011-01-01

    Neutron rich matter is at the heart of many fundamental questions in Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. What are the high density phases of QCD? Where did the chemical elements come from? What is the structure of many compact and energetic objects in the heavens, and what determines their electromagnetic, neutrino, and gravitational-wave radiations? Moreover, neutron rich matter is being studied with an extraordinary variety of new tools such as Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). We describe the Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) that is using parity violation to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. This has important implications for neutron stars and their crusts. Using large scale molecular dynamics, we model the formation of solids in both white dwarfs and neutron stars. We find neutron star crust to be the strongest material known, some 10 billion times stronger than steel. It can support mountains on rotating neutron stars large enough to generate detectable gravitational waves. Finally, we describe a new equation of state for supernova and neutron star merger simulations based on the Virial expansion at low densities, and large scale relativistic mean field calculations.

  10. New fabrication method for an ellipsoidal neutron focusing mirror with a metal substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang; Takeda, Shin; Morita, Shin-ya; Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kato, Jun-ichi; Yamagata, Yutaka; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2014-10-06

    We propose an ellipsoidal neutron focusing mirror using a metal substrate made with electroless nickel-phosphorus (NiP) plated material for the first time. Electroless NiP has great advantages for realizing an ellipsoidal neutron mirror because of its amorphous structure, good machinability and relatively large critical angle of total reflection for neutrons. We manufactured the mirror by combining ultrahigh precision cutting and fine polishing to generate high form accuracy and low surface roughness. The form accuracy of the mirror was estimated to be 5.3 μm P-V and 0.8 μm P-V for the minor-axis and major-axis direction respectively, while the surface roughness was reduced to 0.2 nm rms. The effect of form error on focusing spot size was evaluated by using a laser beam and the focusing performance of the mirror was verified by neutron experiments.

  11. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Susana C. M. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Leal, Ricardo M. F. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Mitchell, Edward P. [EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Forsyth, V. Trevor, E-mail: tforsyth@ill.fr [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  12. LHD neutron diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Kobuchi, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) project will step into a next stage, i.e. experiment by using deuterium gases after two years of preparation. A comprehensive set of neutron and γ-ray diagnostics is going to be installed on the LHD towards extension of energetic-particle (EP) physics research in heliotron plasmas. Conceptual design of fusion products diagnostics for the LHD was made in late 1990s. After conclusion of agreements for the LHD deuterium experiment with local government bodies, development of FPs diagnostics has begun lately. Because there are a lot of tasks to do, all Japan fusion neutron and γ-ray diagnostics team has been organized in the collaboration framework of National Institute for Fusion Science. FPs diagnostics system on the LHD will consist of 1) wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor (NFM), 2) neutron activation system (NAS), 3) vertical neutron camera (VNC). In addition to these, we are developing a directional scintillating fiber detector, an artificial diamond detector and a γ-ray scintillation detector for confinement study of MeV ions. A neutron energy spectrometer prototype is also being developed and tested in KSTAR. In this paper, roles of NFM, NAS and VNC and current status of implementation onto the LHD are briefly described. (author)

  13. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  14. Large-area gold nanohole arrays fabricated by one-step method for surface plasmon resonance biochemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huijie; Niu, Lihong; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jian; Wang, Shujie; Yang, Jingjing; Guo, Siyi; Lawson, Tom; Shi, Bingyang; Song, Chunpeng

    2018-04-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensors based on metallic nanohole arrays have been widely reported to detect binding interactions in biological specimens. A simple and effective method for constructing nanoscale arrays is essential for the development of SPR nanosensors. In this work, we report a one-step method to fabricate nanohole arrays by thermal nanoimprinting in the matrix of IPS (Intermediate Polymer Stamp). No additional etching process or supporting substrate is required. The preparation process is simple, time-saving and compatible for roll-to-roll process, potentially allowing mass production. Moreover, the nanohole arrays were integrated into detection platform as SPR sensors to investigate different types of biological binding interactions. The results demonstrate that our one-step method can be used to efficiently fabricate large-area and uniform nanohole arrays for biochemical sensing.

  15. Plasma immersion ion implantation of the interior surface of a large cylindrical bore using an auxiliary electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, X.C.; Kwok, T.K.; Liu, A.G.; Chu, P.K.; Tang, B.Y.

    1998-01-01

    A model utilizing cold, unmagnetized, and collisionless fluid ions as well as Boltzmann electrons is used to comprehensively investigate the sheath expansion into a translationally invariant large bore in the presence of an auxiliary electrode during plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of a cylindrical bore sample. The governing equation of ion continuity, ion motion, and Poisson close-quote s equation are solved by using a numerical finite difference method for different cylindrical bore radii, auxiliary electrode radii, and voltage rise times. The ion density and ion impact energy at the cylindrical inner surface, as well as the ion energy distribution, maximum ion impact energy, and average ion impact energy for the various cases are obtained. Our results show a dramatic improvement in the impact energy when an auxiliary electrode is used and the recommended normalized auxiliary electrode radius is in the range of 0.1 endash 0.3. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  16. Large enhancement of Faraday rotation by localized surface plasmon resonance in Au nanoparticles embedded in Bi:YIG film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, H.; Masuda, Y.; Fujikawa, R.; Baryshev, A.V.; Inoue, M.

    2009-01-01

    A large enhancement of the Faraday rotation, which is associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), was obtained in a sample with Au nanoparticles embedded in a Bi-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG) film. On a quartz substrate, Au nanoparticles were formed by heating an Au thin film, and a Bi:YIG film was then deposited on them. A sample containing the Au nanoparticles produced by 1000 deg. C heating showed a resonant attenuation with narrower bandwidth in the transmission spectrum than nanoparticles of other samples formed by low-temperature heating. The sharp resonant Faraday rotation angle was 4.4 times larger than the estimated intrinsic Bi:YIG film at the LSPR wavelength; the angular difference was 0.14 deg. A discrepancy in the bandwidth between the transmission attenuation and the resonant Faraday rotation is discussed

  17. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  18. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1994-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  19. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 10 20 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  20. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield