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Sample records for large surface neutron

  1. Pocked surface neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  2. Neutron recognition in LAND detector for large neutron multiplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Pawłowski, P; Leifels, Y; Trautmann, W; Adrich, P; Aumann, T; Bacri, C O; Barczyk, T; Bassini, R; Bianchin, S; Boiano, C; Boretzky, K; Boudard, A; Chbihi, A; Cibor, J; Czech, B; De Napoli, M; Ducret, J -E; Emling, H; Frankland, J D; Gorbinet, T; Hellström, M; Henzlova, D; Hlavac, S; Immè, J; Iori, I; Johansson, H; Kezzar, K; Kupny, S; Lafriakh, A; Fèvre, A Le; Gentil, E Le; Leray, S; Łukasik, J; Lühning, J; Lynch, W G; Lynen, U; Majka, Z; Mocko, M; Müller, W F J; Mykulyak, A; Orth, H; Otte, A N; Palit, R; Panebianco, S; Pullia, A; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Rossi, D; Salsac, M -D; Sann, H; Schwarz, C; Simon, H; Sfienti, C; Sümmerer, K; Tsang, M B; Verde, G; Veselsky, M; Volant, C; Wallace, M; Weick, H; Wiechula, J; Wieloch, A; Zwiegliński, B

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the LAND neutron detector is studied. Using an event-mixing technique based on one-neutron data obtained in the S107 experiment at the GSI laboratory, we test the efficiency of various analytic tools used to determine the multiplicity and kinematic properties of detected neutrons. A new algorithm developed recently for recognizing neutron showers from spectator decays in the ALADIN experiment S254 is described in detail. Its performance is assessed in comparison with other methods. The properties of the observed neutron events are used to estimate the detection efficiency of LAND in this experiment.

  3. Large Curved Surface Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement principle of large curved surface through theodolite industry survey system is introduced. Two methods are suggested with respect to the distribution range of curved surface error. The experiments show that the measurement precision can be up to 0.15mm with relative precision of 3×10-5. Finally, something needed paying attention to and the application aspects on theodolite industry survey system are given.

  4. A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhehui; Callahan, N B; Adamek, E R; Bacon, J D; Blatnik, M; Brandt, A E; Broussard, L J; Clayton, S M; Cude-Woods, C; Currie, S; Dees, E B; Ding, X; Gao, J; Gray, F E; Hoffbauer, M A; Holley, A T; Ito, T M; Liu, C -Y; Makela, M; Ramsey, J C; Pattie,, R W; Salvat, D J; Saunders, A; Schmidt, D W; Schulze, R K; Seestrom, S J; Sharapov, E I; Sprow, A; Tang, Z; Wei, W; Wexler, J W; Womack, T L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

    2015-01-01

    A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is described. The top $^{10}$B layer is exposed to the vacuum chamber and directly captures UCNs. The ZnS:Ag layer beneath the $^{10}$B layer is a few microns thick, which is sufficient to detect the charged particles from the $^{10}$B(n,$\\alpha$)$^7$Li neutron-capture reaction, while thin enough so that ample light due to $\\alpha$ and $^7$Li escapes for detection by photomultiplier tubes. One-hundred-nm thick $^{10}$B layer gives high UCN detection efficiency, as determined by the mean UCN kinetic energy, detector materials and others. Low background, including negligible sensitivity to ambient neutrons, has also been verified through pulse-shape analysis and comparisons with other existing $^3$He and $^{10}$B detectors. This type of detector has been configured in different ways for UCN flux monitoring, development of UCN guides and neutron lifetime research.

  5. A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui, E-mail: zwang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hoffbauer, M.A.; Morris, C.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Callahan, N.B.; Adamek, E.R. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Bacon, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blatnik, M. [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115 (United States); Brandt, A.E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Broussard, L.J.; Clayton, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cude-Woods, C. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Currie, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dees, E.B. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ding, X. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gao, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gray, F.E. [Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Hickerson, K.P. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Holley, A.T. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Ito, T.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, C.-Y. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); and others

    2015-10-21

    A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is described. The top {sup 10}B layer is exposed to vacuum and directly captures UCNs. The ZnS:Ag layer beneath the {sup 10}B layer is a few microns thick, which is sufficient to detect the charged particles from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li neutron-capture reaction, while thin enough that ample light due to α and {sup 7}Li escapes for detection by photomultiplier tubes. A 100-nm thick {sup 10}B layer gives high UCN detection efficiency, as determined by the mean UCN kinetic energy, detector materials, and other parameters. Low background, including negligible sensitivity to ambient neutrons, has also been verified through pulse-shape analysis and comparison with other existing {sup 3}He and {sup 10}B detectors. This type of detector has been configured in different ways for UCN flux monitoring, development of UCN guides and neutron lifetime research.

  6. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Zimmer, O.; Grigoriev, A. D.; Ziman, T.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyze the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons, and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed 1 h, and rapidly increases with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the sequence of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved tests of short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron β -decay experiments. We also sketch new experimental propositions for level population and trapping of ultracold neutrons above a flat horizontal mirror.

  7. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, P D; Ziman, T; Grigoriev, A D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyse the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time constant of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed one hour, and rapidly increasing with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the scheme of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved access to short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron beta-decay experiments. We also sketch new ex...

  8. Thermal radiation from magnetic neutron star surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Azorin, J F; Pons, J A

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the thermal emission from magnetic neutron star surfaces in which the cohesive effects of the magnetic field have produced the condensation of the atmosphere and the external layers. This may happen for sufficiently cool atmospheres with moderately intense magnetic fields. The thermal emission from an isothermal bare surface of a neutron star shows no remarkable spectral features, but it is significantly depressed at energies below some threshold energy. However, since the thermal conductivity is very different in the normal and parallel directions to the magnetic field lines, the presence of the magnetic field is expected to produce a highly anisotropic temperature distribution, depending on the magnetic field geometry. In this case, the observed flux of such an object looks very similar to a BB spectrum, but depressed in a nearly constant factor at all energies. This results in a systematic underestimation of the area of the emitter (and therefore its size) by a factor 5-10 (2-3).

  9. Neutron Activation Analysis of Inhomogeneous Large Samples; An Explorative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, H.W.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is a powerful technique for the determination of trace-element concentrations. Since both neutrons that are used for activation and gamma rays that are detected have a high penetrating power, the technique can be applied for relatively large samples (up to 13 L), as demon

  10. A large-angle cold-neutron bender using sequential garland reflections

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, J; Tasaki, S; Ebisawa, T

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the principle and performance of a new cold-neutron bender using sequential garland reflections in order to bend a neutron beam with a large divergence to a large angle. Using this bender for a pulsed neutron source, we can distribute cold neutrons or polarized cold neutrons if necessary to plural spectrometers at a cold-neutron-guide tube to avoid the frame-overlap problem of cold neutrons. (orig.)

  11. Spot--like Structures of Neutron Star Surface Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U; Gil, J

    2003-01-01

    There is growing evidence, based on both X-ray and radio observations of isolated neutron stars, that besides the large--scale (dipolar) magnetic field, which determines the pulsar spin--down behaviour, small--scale poloidal field components are present, which have surface strengths one to two orders of magnitude larger than the dipolar component. We argue in this paper that the Hall--effect can be an efficient process in producing such small--scale field structures just above the neutron star surface. It is shown that due to a Hall--drift induced instability, poloidal magnetic field structures can be generated from strong subsurface toroidal fields, which are the result of either a dynamo or a thermoelectric instability acting at early times of a neutron star's life. The geometrical structure of these small--scale surface anomalies of the magnetic field resembles that of some types of ``star--spots''. The magnetic field strength and the length--scales are comparable with values that can be derived from vario...

  12. Measurements of Neutron-absorbing Elements on Mercury's Surface with the MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David J.; Feldman, William C.; Goldsten, John O.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Blewett, David T.; Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Nittler, Larry R.; Rhodes, Edgar A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2010-05-01

    The Neutron Spectrometer (NS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission has made measurements of cosmic-ray-generated thermal neutrons during each of MESSENGER's three Mercury flybys. These thermal neutron data have allowed us to make the first direct measurements of Mercury's surface elemental composition. Specifically, we show that Mercury's surface is enriched in neutron-absorbing elements and has a measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of (70-130) × 10^(-4) cm^2/g, which is similar to the neutron absorption of lunar basalts from Mare Fecunditatis. The expected neutron-absorbing elements are Fe and Ti, with possible trace amounts of Gd and Sm. Fe and Ti, in particular, are important for understanding Mercury's formation and how its surface may have changed over time through magmatic processes. With the neutron Doppler filter technique - a neutron energy separation technique based on spacecraft velocity - we demonstrate that Mercury's surface composition cannot be matched by prior models having characteristically low abundances of Fe, Ti, Gd, and Sm. While neutron spectroscopy alone cannot separate the relative contributions of individual neutron-absorbing elements, these results provide strong new constraints on the nature of Mercury's surface materials. For example, if all the measured neutron absorption were due to the presence of a Fe-Ti oxide and that oxide were ilmenite, then Mercury's surface would have an ilmenite content of 14 to 31 wt.%. This result is in agreement with the inference from color imaging and visible-near-infrared spectroscopy that Mercury's overall low reflectance is consistent with a surface composition that is enriched in Fe-Ti oxides. The incorporation of substantial Fe and Ti in oxides would imply that the oxygen fugacity of basalts on Mercury is at the upper range of oxygen fugacity inferred for basalts on the Moon.

  13. Measurement of the Surface and Underground Neutron Spectra with the UMD/NIST Fast Neutron Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Thomas J.

    The typical fast neutron detector falls into one of two categories, Bonner sphere spectrometers and liquid scintillator proton recoil detectors. These two detector types have traditionally been used to measure fast neutrons at the surface and in low background environments. The cosmogenic neutron spectrum and flux is an important parameter for a number of experimental efforts, including procurement of low background materials and the prediction of electronic device faults. Fast neutrons can also cause problems for underground low-background experiments, through material activation or signals that mimic rare events. Current detector technology is not sufficient to properly characterize these backgrounds. To this end, the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology designed, developed, and deployed two Fast Neutron Spectrometers (FaNS) comprised of plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. The detectors are based upon capture-gated spectroscopy, a technique that demands a delayed coincidence between a neutron scatter and the resulting neutron capture after thermalization. This technique provides both particle identification and knowledge that the detected neutron fully thermalized. This improves background rejection capabilities and energy resolution. Presented are the design, development, and deployment of FaNS-1 and FaNS-2. Both detectors were characterized using standard fields at NIST, including calibrated 252Cf neutron sources and two monoenergetic neutron generators. Measurements of the surface fast neutron spectrum and flux have been made with both detectors, which are compared with previous measurements by traditional detectors. Additionally, FaNS-1 was deployed at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Ripplemead, VA. A measurement of the fast neutron spectrum and flux at KURF is presented as well. FaNS-2 is currently installed in a shallow underground laboratory where it is measuring the muon

  14. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Kamenev, K. V. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D. [SUPA, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm{sup 3}. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe{sub 2}.

  15. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.; Kamenev, K. V.

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm3. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe2.

  16. Constraints on Mercury's surface composition from MESSENGER neutron spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; McCubbin, F. M.; Taylor, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    The composition of Mercury's surface is poorly known, but the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) mission has provided a wealth of new data from three flybys. In particular, MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer (NS) observations reveal a surface enriched in neutron absorbing elements, consistent with interpretations of color and albedo observations suggesting a surface composition enriched in Fe-Mg-Ti oxides. In this study, we have computed the neutron absorption cross sections for all of the available proposed surface compositions of Mercury and evaluated the plausibility of each surface composition based on the neutron absorption cross section observed by MESSENGER. For identified plausible compositions, the implications for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury are discussed. The measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of Mercury is inconsistent with a crust formed from partial melting of plausible bulk mantle compositions, flotation in a magma ocean or adiabatic melting of upwelling cumulates during magma ocean overturn. However, the observed neutron absorption is consistent with model compositions of late-stage magma-ocean cumulates and some proposed compositions from spectral modeling and equilibrium modeling. This suggests that the enrichment of neutron absorbing elements may be indicative of the processes that acted to form Mercury's crust. The enrichment in neutron absorbing elements, in combination with spectral observations that constrain FeO in silicates (neutron absorption cross section. High-Fe oxides are not required and more Mg-rich oxides may even be favored as the Ti-contents can sufficiently account for the observed neutron absorption.

  17. Polarization of neutron star surface emission: a systematic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    New-generation X-ray polarimeters currently under development promise to open a new window in the study of high-energy astrophysical sources. Among them, neutron stars (NSs) appear particularly suited for polarization measurements. Radiation from the (cooling) surface of an NS is expected to exhibit a large intrinsic polarization degree due to the star strong magnetic field (≈ 10 ^{12}-10 ^{15} G). We present an efficient method for computing the observed polarization fraction and polarization angle in the case of radiation coming from the entire surface of an NS, accounting for both vacuum polarization and geometrical effects due to the extended emitting region. Our approach is fairly general and is illustrated in the case of blackbody emission from an NS with either a dipolar or a (globally) twisted magnetic field.

  18. Creation of magnetic spots at the neutron star surface

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U

    2014-01-01

    According to the partially screened gap scenario, an efficient electron-positron pair creation, a general precondition of radio-pulsar activity, relies on the existence of magnetic spots, i.e., local concentrations of strong and small scale magnetic field structures at the surface of neutron stars. They have a strong impact on the surface temperature, which is potentially observable. Here we reinforce the idea that such magnetic spots can be formed by extracting magnetic energy from the toroidal field that resides in deep crustal layers, via Hall drift. We study and discuss the magneto-thermal evolution of qualitatively different neutron star models and initial magnetic field configurations that lead to the creation of magnetic spots. We find that magnetic spots can be created on a timescale of $10^4$ years with magnetic field strengths $\\gtrsim 5\\times 10^{13}$ G, provided almost the whole magnetic energy is stored in its toroidal component, and that the conductivity in the inner crust is not too large. The ...

  19. ROLE OF NUCLEONIC FERMI SURFACE DEPLETION IN NEUTRON STAR COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J. M.; Zuo, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lombardo, U. [Universita di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN), Catania I-95123 (Italy); Zhang, H. F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-01-20

    The Fermi surface depletion of beta-stable nuclear matter is calculated to study its effects on several physical properties that determine the neutron star (NS) thermal evolution. The neutron and proton Z factors measuring the corresponding Fermi surface depletions are calculated within the Brueckner–Hartree–Fock approach, employing the AV18 two-body force supplemented by a microscopic three-body force. Neutrino emissivity, heat capacity, and in particular neutron {sup 3}PF{sub 2} superfluidity, turn out to be reduced, especially at high baryonic density, to such an extent that the cooling rates of young NSs are significantly slowed.

  20. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Sperduti, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Pola, A.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a 241Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm-2 s-1 to 1000 cm-2 s-1 can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  1. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  2. Towards a methodology for large-sample prompt-gamma neutron-activation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degenaar, I.H.

    2004-01-01

    Large-sample prompt-gamma neutron-activation analysis, or shortly LS PGNAA, is a method by which mass fractions of elements can be determined in large samples with a mass over 1 kg. In this method the large sample is irradiated with neutrons. Directly (prompt) after absorption of the neutrons photon

  3. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  4. Grazing incidence neutron diffraction from large scale 2D structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toperverg, B. P.; Felcher, G. P.; Metlushko, V. V.; Leiner, V.; Siebrecht, R.; Nikonov, O.

    2000-01-13

    The distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) is applied to evaluate the diffraction pattern of neutrons (or X-rays) from a 2D array of dots deposited onto a dissimilar substrate. With the radiation impinging on the surface at a grazing incidence angle {alpha}, the intensities diffracted both in and out the plane of specular reflection are calculated as a function of the periodicity of the array, height and diameter of the dots. The results are presented in the form of diffracted intensity contours in a plane with coordinates {alpha} and {alpha}{prime}, the latter being the glancing angle of scattering. The optimization of the experimental conditions for polarized neutron experiments on submicron dots is discussed. The feasibility of such measurements is confirmed by a test experiment.

  5. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  6. Isolated Neutron Stars: From the Surface to the Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Zane, Silvia; Page, Dany

    2007-01-01

    This book collects the contributions presented at the conference Isolated Neutron Stars: From the Surface to the Interior, held in London in April 2006. Forty years after the discovery of radio pulsars it presents an up-to-date description of the new vision of isolated neutron stars that has emerged in recent years with the advance of multi-wavelength observations. The great variety of isolated neutron stars, from pulsars to magnetars, some of them discovered very recently and many of them not detectable in radio wavelengths, is amply covered by descriptions of recent observational results and presentations of the latest theoretical interpretation of these data.

  7. Gravitational waves from surface inhomogeneities of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Sushan; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Sarkar, Prakash

    2016-11-01

    Surface asymmetries of accreting neutron stars are investigated for their mass quadrupole moment content. Though the amplitude of the gravitational waves from such asymmetries seems to be beyond the limit of detectability of the present generation of detectors, it appears that rapidly rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic fields residing in high-mass x-ray binaries would be worth considering for a targeted search for continuous gravitational waves with the next generation of instruments.

  8. Land-surface studies with a directional neutron detector.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desilets, Darin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter

    2009-09-01

    Direct measurements of cosmic-ray neutron intensity were recorded with a neutron scatter camera developed at SNL. The instrument used in this work is a prototype originally designed for nuclear non-proliferation work, but in this project it was used to characterize the response of ambient neutrons in the 0.5-10 MeV range to water located on or above the land surface. Ambient neutron intensity near the land surface responds strongly to the presence of water, suggesting the possibility of an indirect method for monitoring soil water content, snow water equivalent depth, or canopy intercepted water. For environmental measurements the major advantage of measuring neutrons with the scatter camera is the limited (60{sup o}) field of view that can be obtained, which allows observations to be conducted at a previously unattainable spatial scales. This work is intended to provide new measurements of directional fluxes which can be used in the design of new instruments for passively and noninvasively observing land-surface water. Through measurements and neutron transport modeling we have demonstrated that such a technique is feasible.

  9. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Ruiz, R F; Blaum, K; Ekström, A; Frömmgen, N; Hagen, G; Hammen, M; Hebeler, K; Holt, J D; Jansen, G R; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Nazarewicz, W; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papenbrock, T; Papuga, J; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Wendt, K A; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-...

  10. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Ekström, A.; Frömmgen, N.; Hagen, G.; Hammen, M.; Hebeler, K.; Holt, J. D.; Jansen, G. R.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papenbrock, T.; Papuga, J.; Schwenk, A.; Simonis, J.; Wendt, K. A.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain `magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.

  11. Water-clay surface interaction: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, O., E-mail: sobolev38@gmail.com [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France); Favre Buivin, F. [HES-SO Fribourg, Bd de Perolles 80-CP 32, CH-1705 Fribourg (Switzerland); Kemner, E.; Russina, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Beuneu, B. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, C.E. Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin and Ikerbasque, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Charlet, L. [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2010-08-23

    Graphical abstract: Interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces was studied by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} was used to reduce hydration of interlayer cations. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} (NC{sub 4}H{sub 12}), was used to saturate the interlayer space of nontronite NAu-1 in order to reduce hydration of interlayer cations that could hinder the effects related to the clay-water interactions. The water content was low in order to reduce hydrogen bonding between water molecules. It was found that water molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with surface oxygen atoms of nontronite. The diffusion activation energy value E{sub a} = 29 {+-} 3 kJ/mol was obtained for water molecules hydrating the clay surface. These results confirm the assumption that surfaces of smectite clays with tetrahedral substitutions are hydrophilic.

  12. Inspection of CF188 composite flight control surfaces with neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W.J.; Bennett, L.G.I. [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Mullin, S.K. [Aerospace and Telecommunications Engineering Support Squadron, Astra, Ontario (Canada). Nondestructive Testing Center Development Section

    1996-12-31

    At the Royal Military College of Canada`s SLOWPOKE-2 Facility, a neutron radiography facility has been designed and installed using a small (20kWth), pool-type research reactor called the SLOWPOKE-2 (Safe Low Power c(K)ritical Experiment) as the neutron source. Since then, the research has continued along two fronts: developing applications and improving the quality of the neutron beam. The most interesting applications investigated to date has been the inspection of various metal ceramic composites and the inspection of the composite flight control surfaces of some of the CF188 Hornet aircraft. As part of the determination of the integrity of the aircraft, it was decided to inspect an aircraft with the highest flight house using both X- and neutron radiography. The neutron radiography and, to a lesser extent, X-radiography inspections completed at McClellan AFB revealed 93 anomalies. After returning to Canada, the component with the greatest structural significance, namely the right hand rudder from the vertical stabilizer, was removed from the aircraft and put through a rigorous program of numerous NDT inspections, including X-radiography (film and real-time), eddy current, ultrasonics (through transmission and pitch-catch), infrared thermography, and neutron radiography. Therefore, of all the techniques investigated, only through transmission ultrasonics and neutron radiography were able to identify large areas of hydration. However, only neutron radiography could identify the small areas of moisture and hydration. Given the structural significance of the flight control surfaces in modern fighter aircraft, even the smallest amounts of hydration could potentially lead to catastrophic results.

  13. Measuring surface temperature of isolated neutron stars and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Marcus Alton

    New and exciting results for measuring neutron star surface temperatures began with the successful launch of the Chandra X-ray observatory. Among these results are new detections of neutron star surface temperatures which have made it possible to seriously test neutron star thermal evolution theories. The important new temperature determination of the Vela pulsar (Pavlov, et al., 2001a) requires a non-standard cooling scenario to explain it. Apart from this result, we have measured PSR B1055-52's surface temperature in this thesis, determining that it can be explained by standard cooling with heating. Our spectral fit of the combined data from ROSAT and Chandra have shown that a three component model, two thermal blackbodies and an non-thermal power-law, is required to explain the data. Furthermore, our phase resolved spectroscopy has begun to shed light on the geometry of the hot spot on PSR B1055-52's surface as well as the structure of the magnetospheric radiation. Also, there is strong evidence for a thermal distribution over its surface. Most importantly, the fact that PSR B1055-52 does not have a hydrogen atmosphere has been firmly established. To reconcile these two key observations, on the Vela pulsar and PSR B1055-52, we tested neutron star cooling with neutrino processes including the Cooper pair neutrino emission process. Overall, it has been found that a phase change associated with pions being present in the cores of more massive neutron stars explains all current of the data. A transition from neutron matter to pion condensates in the central stellar core explains the difference between standard and non-standard cooling scenarios, because the superfluid suppression of pion cooling will reduce the emissivity of the pion direct URCA process substantially. A neutron star with a mass of [Special characters omitted.] with a medium stiffness equation of state and a T72 type neutron superfluid models the standard cooling case well. A neutron star of [Special

  14. Casimir-Polder interaction of neutrons with metal or dielectric surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gebhart, Valentin; Klatt, Juliane; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-01-01

    We predict a repulsive Casimir-Polder-type dispersion interaction between a single neutron and a metal or dielectric surface. Our model scenario assumes a single neutron subject to an external magnetic field. Due to its intrinsic magnetic moment, the neutron then forms a magnetisable two-level system which can exchange virtual photons with a nearby surface. The resulting dispersion interaction between a purely magnetic object (neutron) and a purely electric one (surface) is found to be repuls...

  15. BioDiff - a neutron diffractometer optimized for crystals with large unit cell dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Schrader, Tobias Erich; Ostermann, Andreas; Monkenbusch, Michael; Laatsch, Bernhard; Jüttner, Philipp; Petry, Winfried; Richter, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The research reactor Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) is a modern high flux neutron source which feeds some 30 state of the art neutron beam instruments. Currently 24 are operational, others in commissioning or under construction. The newly built neutron single crystal diffractometer BIODIFF is especially designed to collect data from crystals with large unit cells. The main field of application is the structural analysis of proteins, especially the determination of hydrogen atom positions. BIOD...

  16. Neutron detection by large NaI crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagno, A.; Gervino, G.

    2016-07-01

    In present days new neutron detection methods are under developed due to the global shortage of 3He and the toxicity of BF3. Neutrons can be indirectly detected by high-energy photons. The performance of a cylindrical NaI crystal, 4 in. diameter and 8 in. length as an indirect neutron detector has been investigated. Measurements were performed with 252Cf source with bare and shielded NaI detector. With a proper converter and moderator structure for the NaI detector, the detection efficiencies and the minimum detectable activities are improved, making the method very interesting for security applications. The indirect detection of neutrons by photons has several advantages. First, this method can in principle be suited by any gamma spectrometer with only slight modifications that do not compromise with its gamma spectrometry measurements. Second, fission neutron sources and neutron generators can be discriminated thanks to their different gamma energy spectra, a discrimination easily done by a NaI spectrometer.

  17. Neutron detection by large NaI crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavagno, A., E-mail: andrea.lavagno@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Torino (Italy); Gervino, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    In present days new neutron detection methods are under developed due to the global shortage of {sup 3}He and the toxicity of BF{sub 3}. Neutrons can be indirectly detected by high-energy photons. The performance of a cylindrical NaI crystal, 4 in. diameter and 8 in. length as an indirect neutron detector has been investigated. Measurements were performed with {sup 252}Cf source with bare and shielded NaI detector. With a proper converter and moderator structure for the NaI detector, the detection efficiencies and the minimum detectable activities are improved, making the method very interesting for security applications. The indirect detection of neutrons by photons has several advantages. First, this method can in principle be suited by any gamma spectrometer with only slight modifications that do not compromise with its gamma spectrometry measurements. Second, fission neutron sources and neutron generators can be discriminated thanks to their different gamma energy spectra, a discrimination easily done by a NaI spectrometer.

  18. On the surface tension of neutron star matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rueda, Jorge A; Wu, Yuan-Bin; Xue, She-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently shown that taking into account strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravitational interactions, and fulfilling the global charge neutrality of the system, a transition layer will happen between the core and crust of neutron stars, at the nuclear saturation density. We use relativistic mean field theory together with the Thomas-Fermi approximation to study the detailed structure of this transition layer and calculate its surface and Coulomb energy. We find that the surface tension is proportional to a power-law function of the baryon number density in the core bulk region. We also analyze the influence of the gravitational field and the electron component on the structure of the transition layer and the value of the surface tension to compare and contrast with known phenomenological results in nuclear physics. Based on the above results we study the instability against Bohr-Wheeler surface deformations in the case of neutron stars obeying global charge neutrality. Assuming the core-crust tra...

  19. Thin film cadmium telluride charged particle sensors for large area neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. W.; Smith, L.; Calkins, J.; Mejia, I.; Cantley, K. D.; Chapman, R. A.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B., E-mail: gnade@utdallas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Kunnen, G. R.; Allee, D. R. [Flexible Display Center, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona 85284 (United States); Sastré-Hernández, J.; Contreras-Puente, G. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City 07738 (Mexico); Mendoza-Pérez, R. [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Mexico City 09790 (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    Thin film semiconductor neutron detectors are an attractive candidate to replace {sup 3}He neutron detectors, due to the possibility of low cost manufacturing and the potential for large areas. Polycrystalline CdTe is found to be an excellent material for thin film charged particle detectors—an integral component of a thin film neutron detector. The devices presented here are characterized in terms of their response to alpha and gamma radiation. Individual alpha particles are detected with an intrinsic efficiency of >80%, while the devices are largely insensitive to gamma rays, which is desirable so that the detector does not give false positive counts from gamma rays. The capacitance-voltage behavior of the devices is studied and correlated to the response due to alpha radiation. When coupled with a boron-based neutron converting material, the CdTe detectors are capable of detecting thermal neutrons.

  20. One-dimensional neutron focusing with large beam divergence by 400mm-long elliptical supermirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, M.; Yamaga, F.; Yamazaki, D.; Maruyama, R.; Hayashida, H.; Soyama, K.; Yamamura, K.

    2012-02-01

    Reflective optics is one of the most useful techniques for focusing a neutron beam with a wide wavelength range since there is no chromatic aberration. Neutrons can be focused within a small area of less than 1 mm2 by high-performance aspherical supermirrors with high figure accuracy and a low smooth substrate surface and a multilayer interface. Increasing the mirror size is essential for increasing the focusing gain. We have developed a fabrication process that combines conventional precision grinding, HF dip etching, numerically controlled local wet etching (NC-LWE) figuring, low-pressure polishing and ion beam sputtering deposition of the supermirror coating to fabricate a large aspherical supermirror. We designed and fabricated an piano-elliptical mirror with large clear aperture size using the developed fabrication process. We obtained a figure error of 0.43 μm p-v and an rms roughness of less than 0.2 nm within an effective reflective length of 370 mm. A NiC/Ti supermirror with m = 4 was deposited on the substrate using ion beam sputtering equipment. The results of focusing experiments show that a focusing gain of 52 at the peak intensity was achieved compared with the case without focusing. Furthermore, the result of imaging plate measurements indicated that the FWHM focusing width of the fabricated mirror is 0.128 mm.

  1. Results of a large scale neutron spectrometry and dosimetry comparison exercise at the Cadarache moderator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D.J.; Naismith, O.F.; Taylor, G.C. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Chartier, J.-L.; Posny, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    Eurados Working Group 7 recently organised a large-scale comparison of neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurements at the IPSN/SDOS laboratory of the CEA Cadarache Research Centre in France. A large number of participants took part with a range of instruments including spectrometers, tissue-equivalent proportional counters, personal dosemeters, and survey instruments. The neutron field used for the exercise was a primarily low energy neutron spectrum similar to those which have been measured recently around nuclear facilities. This paper presents the results of the measurements and attempts to draw conclusions about the accuracy attainable with the various devices, their advantages and drawbacks, and potential problems. (author).

  2. ETHERNES: A new design of radionuclide source-based thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R; Sacco, D; Gómez-Ros, J M; Lorenzoli, M; Gentile, A; Buonomo, B; Pola, A; Introini, M V; Bortot, D; Domingo, C

    2016-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility based on an (241)Am-Be source embedded in a polyethylene moderator has been designed, and is called ETHERNES (Extended THERmal NEutron Source). The facility shows a large irradiation cavity (45 cm × 45 cm square section, 63 cm in height), which is separated from the source by means of a polyethylene sphere acting as shadowing object. Taking advantage of multiple scattering of neutrons with the walls of this cavity, the moderation process is especially effective and allows obtaining useful thermal fluence rates from 550 to 800 cm(-2) s(-1) with a source having nominal emission rate 5.7×10(6) s(-1). Irradiation planes parallel to the cavity bottom have been identified. The fluence rate across a given plane is as uniform as 3% (or better) in a disk with 30 cm (or higher) diameter. In practice, the value of thermal fluence rate simply depends on the height from the cavity bottom. The thermal neutron spectral fraction ranges from 77% up to 89%, depending on the irradiation plane. The angular distribution of thermal neutrons is roughly isotropic, with a slight prevalence of directions from bottom to top of the cavity. The mentioned characteristics are expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  3. Comparison and Validation of FLUKA and HZETRN as Tools for Investigating the Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals are focused on deep space travel and Mars surface operations. To accomplish these goals, large structures will be necessary to transport crew and logistics in the initial stages, and NASA will need to keep the crew and the vehicle safe during transport and any surface activities. One of the major challenges of deep space travel is the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, the electronics, and the vehicle materials. The primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle. These interactions lead to some of the primary radiation being absorbed, being modified, or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles that have large shielding masses, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, and this secondary radiation can be significant enough to cause concern. When considering surface operations, there is also a secondary radiation source from the surface of the planet, known as albedo, with neutrons being one of the most significant species. Given new vehicle designs for deep space and Mars missions, the secondary radiation environment and the implications of that environment is currently not well understood. Thus, several studies are necessary to fill the knowledge gaps of this secondary radiation environment. In this paper, we put forth the initial steps to increasing our understanding of neutron production from large vehicles by comparing the neutron production resulting from our radiation transport codes and providing a preliminary validation of our results against flight data. This paper will review the details of these results and discuss the finer points of the analysis.

  4. Surface effects on large deflection of nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆

    2015-01-01

    Surface effects play an important role in the mechanical behavior of nanosized structural elements owing to the increased ratio of surface area to volume. The surface effects on the large deflection of nanowires were considered. Both geometric nonlinearity in finite deformation and surface effects at nanoscale were taken into account to analyze the bending of nanowires subjected to a concentrated force. For simply supported beams and clamped-clamped beams, the influence of surface effects and geometric nonlinearity were discussed in detail. It is found that both surface effects and geometric nonlinearity tend to decrease the deflection of bending nanowires and thus increase the effective elastic modulus of nanowires. Surface effects yield the size dependent behavior of nanowires.

  5. Neutron streak camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  6. Detection efficiency evaluation for a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yiming; Liu, Ren

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the detection efficiency of a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector has been evaluated. A 6LiF/ZnS detector was employed as the benchmark detector, the TOF spectra of these two detectors were simultaneously measured and the energy spectra were then deduced to calculate the detection efficiency curve of the nMCP detector. Tests show the detection efficiency@25.3 meV thermal neutron is 34% for this nMCP detector.

  7. Casimir-Polder interaction of neutrons with metal or dielectric surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gebhart, Valentin; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-01-01

    We predict a repulsive Casimir-Polder-type dispersion interaction between a single neutron and a metal or dielectric surface. Our model scenario assumes a single neutron subject to an external magnetic field. Due to its intrinsic magnetic moment, the neutron then forms a magnetisable two-level system which can exchange virtual photons with a nearby surface. The resulting dispersion interaction between a purely magnetic object (neutron) and a purely electric one (surface) is found to be repulsive. Its magnitude is considerably smaller than than the standard atom-surface Casimir-Polder force due to the magnetic nature of the interaction and the smallness of the electron-to-neutron mass ratio. Nevertheless, we show that it can be comparable to the gravitational potential of the same surface.

  8. Global Distribution of Shallow Water on Mars: Neutron Mapping of Summer-Time Surface by HEND/Odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Boynton, W.; Hamara, D.; Shinohara, C.; Saunders, R. S.; Drake, D.

    2003-01-01

    Orbital mapping of induced neutrons and gamma-rays by Odyssey has recently successfully proven the applicability of nuclear methods for studying of the elementary composition of Martian upper-most subsurface. In particular, the suite of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has discovered the presence of large water-ice rich regions southward and northward on Mars. The data of neutron mapping of summer-time surface are presented below from the Russian High Energy Neutron Spectrometer (HEND), which is a part of GRS suite. These maps represent the content of water in the soil for summer season at Southern and Northern hemispheres, when the winter deposit of CO2 is absent on the surface. The seasonal evolution of CO2 coverage on Mars is the subject of the complementary paper.

  9. Particle Filter-Based Recursive Data Fusion With Sensor Indexing for Large Core Neutron Flux Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Prakash Kumar; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P.; Roy, Kallol

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a sequential importance sampling particle filter (PF)-based multisensor multivariate nonlinear estimator for estimating the in-core neutron flux distribution for pressurized heavy water reactor core. Many critical applications such as reactor protection and control rely upon neutron flux information, and thus their reliability is of utmost importance. The point kinetic model based on neutron transport conveniently explains the dynamics of nuclear reactor. The neutron flux in the large core loosely coupled reactor is sensed by multiple sensors measuring point fluxes located at various locations inside the reactor core. The flux values are coupled to each other through diffusion equation. The coupling facilitates redundancy in the information. It is shown that multiple independent data about the localized flux can be fused together to enhance the estimation accuracy to a great extent. We also propose the sensor anomaly handling feature in multisensor PF to maintain the estimation process even when the sensor is faulty or generates data anomaly.

  10. Neutron reflectometry of soft films supported on electrified surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, A.I. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Chemistry, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Vezvaie, M. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Burgess, I.J., E-mail: ian.burgess@usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Chemistry, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The specular reflection of neutrons is a non-destructive, nuclear-based technique, sensitive to low atomic number elements, has a high penetration depth, and can distinguish between isotopes of the same element. This makes neutron reflectometry (NR) especially effective for the study of biological membranes, soft films and buried interfaces. Furthermore, commonly used NR substrates such as silicon and quartz single-crystals can be modified with thin metallic layers to form conductive supports allowing for the precise control of the electrical state of the interface. The coupling of NR with in-situ electrochemical control provides a powerful tool to study the composition of soft and/or buried interfaces under conditions that mimic, for example, transmembrane potentials or corrosion potentials. Here we report our recent efforts to perform in situ electrochemical NR studies and the previous experimental framework from which they were developed. The talk will address technical and infrastructure challenges but emphasize scientific highlights from our work with biomimetic phospholipid membranes. 'Isotopic variation has been applied to quantify the electroporation and distribution of water as a function of surface charge density in lipid bilayers. These studies have more recently been extended to study the location of redox-active ubiquinone (coenzyme Q{sub 10}) in biomimetic lipid bilayers as a function of potential and temperature. To probe the location of ubiquinone, a phospholipid bilayer was prepared on a gold coated solid substrate using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett and vesicle fusion techniques. The combination of these two methods allowed for the composition of the inner and outer membrane leaflets to be varied. Preliminary results show sensitivity to the location of a small biologically relevant molecule. (author)

  11. Spectra of the spreading layers on the neutron star surface and constraints on the neutron star equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V; Suleimanov, Valery; Poutanen, Juri

    2006-01-01

    Spectra of the spreading layers on the neutron star surface are calculated on the basis of the Inogamov-Sunyaev model taking into account general relativity correction to the surface gravity and considering various chemical composition of the accreting matter. Local (at a given latitude) spectra are similar to the X-ray burst spectra and are described by a diluted black body. Total spreading layer spectra are integrated accounting for the light bending, gravitational redshift, and the relativistic Doppler effect and aberration. They depend slightly on the inclination angle of the neutron star and on the luminosity. These spectra also can be fitted by a diluted black body with the color temperature depending mainly on a neutron star compactness. Constraints on the neutron star compactness were obtained by comparing the theoretical spreading layer spectra with the observed boundary layer spectrum described by a black body of color temperature 2.4 +- 0.1 keV. We obtain the neutron star radius R=15+-1.5 km (for a...

  12. Large sample neutron activation analysis: a challenge in cultural heritage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelatos, Ion E; Tzika, Faidra

    2007-07-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis compliments and significantly extends the analytical tools available for cultural heritage and authentication studies providing unique applications of non-destructive, multi-element analysis of materials that are too precious to damage for sampling purposes, representative sampling of heterogeneous materials or even analysis of whole objects. In this work, correction factors for neutron self-shielding, gamma-ray attenuation and volume distribution of the activity in large volume samples composed of iron and ceramic material were derived. Moreover, the effect of inhomogeneity on the accuracy of the technique was examined.

  13. Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars with strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Potekhin, A Y; Chabrier, G

    2016-01-01

    We review the current status of the theory of thermal emission from the surface layers of neutron stars with strong magnetic fields $B\\sim 10^{10}-10^{15}$ G, including formation of the spectrum in a partially ionized atmosphere and at a condensed surface. In particular, we describe recent progress in modeling partially ionized atmospheres of central compact objects in supernova remnants, which may have moderately strong fields $B\\sim 10^{10}-10^{11}$ G. Special attention is given to polarization of thermal radiation emitted by a neutron star surface. Finally, we briefly describe applications of the theory to observations of thermally emitting isolated neutron stars.

  14. Swift J045106.8-694803; a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Klus, Helen; Bird, Antony J; Coe, Malcolm; Corbet, Robin; Udalski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    We report the analysis of a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The high mass X-ray binary pulsar Swift J045106.8-694803 has been observed with Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) in 2008, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 2011 and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission - Newton (XMM-Newton) in 2012. The change in spin period over these four years indicates a spin-up rate of -5.01+/-0.06 s/yr, amongst the highest observed for an accreting pulsar. This spin-up rate can be accounted for using Ghosh and Lamb's (1979) accretion theory assuming it has a magnetic field of (1.2 +0.2 -0.7)x10^14 Gauss. This is over the quantum critical field value. There are very few accreting pulsars with such high surface magnetic fields and this is the first of which to be discovered in the LMC. The large spin-up rate is consistent with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations which show that Swift J045106.8-694803 has had a consistently high X-ray luminosity for at least five years. Optical spectra h...

  15. Swift J045106.8-694803: A Highly Magnetised Neutron Star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klus, H.; Bartlett, E. S.; Bird, A. J.; Coe, M.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Udalski, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the analysis of a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The high mass X-ray binary pulsar Swift J045106.8-694803 has been observed with Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) in 2008, The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 2011 and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission - Newton (XMM-Newton) in 2012. The change in spin period over these four years indicates a spin-up rate of 5.010.06 s/yr, amongst the highest observed for an accreting pulsar. This spin-up rate can be accounted for using Ghosh and Lambs (1979) accretion theory assuming it has a magnetic field of (1.2 +/= 0.20/0.7) x 10(exp 14) Gauss. This is over the quantum critical field value. There are very few accreting pulsars with such high surface magnetic fields and this is the first of which to be discovered in the LMC. The large spin-up rate is consistent with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations which show that Swift J045106.8-694803 has had a consistently high X-ray luminosity for at least five years. Optical spectra have been used to classify the optical counterpart of Swift J045106.8-694803 as a B0-1 III-V star and a possible orbital period of 21.631 +/- 0.005 days has been found from MACHO optical photometry.

  16. Neutron-capture Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36, and Sm-150 in large chondrites: Evidence for high fluences of thermalized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Garrison, D. H.; Wiesmann, H.; Herzog, G. F.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Klein, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured significant concentrations of Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36 from decay of Cl-36, and Sm-150 produced from the capture of thermalized neutrons in the large Chico L6 chondrite. Activities of Cl-36 and Ca-41, corrected for a high-energy spallogenic component and a terrestrial age of approximately 50 ka, give average neutron-capture production rates of 208 atoms/min/g-Cl and 1525 atoms/min/kg-Ca, which correspond to thermal neutron (n) fluxes of 6.2 n/sq cm/s and 4.3 n/sq cm/s, respectively. If sustained for the approximately 65 Ma single-stage, cosmic ray exposure age of Chico, these values correspond to thermal neutron fluences of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp 16) and 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm for Cl-36 and Ca-41, respectively. Stepwise temperature extraction of Ar in Chico impact melt shows Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios as large as approximately 9. The correlation of high Ar-36/Ar-38 with high Cl/Ca phases in neutron-irradiated Chico indicates that the excess Ar-36 above that expected from spallation is due to decay of neutron-produced Cl-36. Excess Ar-36 in Chico requires a thermal neutron fluence of 0.9-1.7 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Decreases in Sm-149/Sm-152 due to neutron-capture by Sm-149 correlate with increases in Sm-150/Sm-152 for three samples of Chico, and one of the Torino H-chondrite. The 0.08% decrease in Sm-149 shown by Chico corresponds to a neutron fluence of 1.23 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. This fluence derived from Sm considers capture of epithermal neutrons and effects of chemical composition on the neutron energy distribution. Excess Ar-36 identified in the Arapahoe, Bruderheim, and Torino chondrites and the Shallowater aubrite suggest exposure to neutron fluences of approximately 0.2-0.2 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Depletion of Sm-149 in Torino and the LEW86010 angrite suggest neutron fluences of 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm and 0.25 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm, respectively. Neutron fluences of approximately 10(exp 16) n/sq cm in Chico are almost as large as those previously

  17. Surface temperature of a magnetized neutron star and interpretation of the ROSAT data. 1: Dipole fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Dany

    1995-01-01

    We model the temperature distribution at the surface of a magnetized neutron star and study the effects on the observed X-ray spectra and light curves. Generalrelativistic effects, i.e., redshift and lensing, are fully taken into account. Atmospheric effects on the emitted spectral flux are not included: we consider only blackbody emission at the local effective temperature. In this first paper we restrict ourselves to dipole fields. General features are studied and compared with the ROSAT data from the pulsars 0833 - 45 (Vela), 0656 + 14, 0630 + 178 (Geminga), and 1055 - 52, the four cases for which there is strong evidence that thermal radiation from the stellar surface is detected. The composite spectra we obtain are not very different from a blackbody spectrum at the star's effective temperature. We conclude that, as far as blackbody spectra are considered, temperature estimates using single-temperature models give results practically identical to our composite models. The change of the (composite blackbody) spectrum with the star's rotational phase is also not very large and may be unobservable inmost cases. Gravitational lensing strongly suppresses the light curve pulsations. If a dipole field is assumed, pulsed fractions comparable to the observed ones can be obtained only with stellar radii larger than those which are predicted by current models of neutron star struture, or with low stellar masses. Moreover, the shapes of the theoretical light curves with dipole fields do not correspond to the observations. The use of magnetic spectra may raise the pulsed fraction sufficiently but will certainly make the discrepancy with the light curve shapes worse: dipole fields are not sufficient to interpret the data. Many neutron star models with a meson condensate or hypersons predict very small radii, and hence very strong lensing, which will require highly nondipolar fields to be able to reproduce the observed pulsed fractions, if possible at all: this may be a new

  18. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  19. A large, high performance, curved 2D position-sensitive neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Fried, J W; Mahler, G J; Makowiecki, D S; Mead, J A; Radeka, V; Schaknowski, N A; Smith, G C; Yu, B

    2002-01-01

    A new position-sensitive neutron detector has been designed and constructed for a protein crystallography station at LANL's pulsed neutron source. This station will be one of the most advanced instruments at a major neutron user facility for protein crystallography, fiber and membrane diffraction. The detector, based on neutron absorption in sup 3 He, has a large sensitive area of 3000 cm sup 2 , angular coverage of 120 deg. , timing resolution of 1 mu s, rate capability in excess of 10 sup 6 s sup - sup 1 , position resolution of about 1.5 mm FWHM, and efficiency >50% for neutrons of interest in the range 1-10 A. Features that are key to these remarkable specifications are the utilization of eight independently operating segments within a single gas volume, fabrication of the detector vessel and internal segments with a radius of curvature of about 70 cm, optimized position readout based on charge division and signal shaping with gated baseline restoration, and engineering design with high-strength aluminum ...

  20. Penumbral imaging and numerical evaluation of large area source neutron imaging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The fusion neutron penumbral imaging system Monte Carlo model was established. The transfer functions of the two discrete units in the neutron source were obtained in two situations:Imaging in geometrical near-optical and real situation. The spatial resolutions of the imaging system in two situations were evaluated and compared. The penumbral images of four units in the source were obtained by means of 2-dimensional (2D) convolution and Monte Carlo simulation. The penumbral images were reconstructed with the same method of filter. The same results were confirmed. The encoding essence of penumbral imaging was revealed. With MCNP(Monte Carlo N-particle) simulation,the neutron penumbral images of the large area source (200 μm×200 μm) on scintillation fiber array were obtained. The improved Wiener filter method was used to reconstruct the penumbral image and the source image was obtained. The results agree with the preset neutron source image. The feasibility of the neutron imaging system was verified.

  1. Penumbral imaging and numerical evaluation of large area source neutron imaging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU YueLei; HU HuaSi; ZHANG BoPing; LI LinBo; CHEN Da; SHAN Qing; ZHU Jie

    2009-01-01

    The fusion neutron penumbral imaging system Monte Carlo model was established. The transfer func-tions of the two discrete units in the neutron source were obtained in two situations: Imaging in geo-metrical near-optical and real situation. The spatial resolutions of the imaging system in two situations were evaluated and compared. The penumbral images of four units in the source were obtained by means of 2-dimensional (2D) convolution and Monte Carlo simulation. The penumbral images were reconstructed with the same method of filter. The same results were confirmed. The encoding essence of penumbral imaging was revealed. With MCNP(Monte Carlo N-particle) simulation, the neutron pen-umbral images of the large area source (200 μm×200 μm) on scintillation fiber array were obtained. The improved Wiener filter method was used to reconstruct the penumbral image and the source image was obtained. The results agree with the preset neutron source image. The feasibility of the neutron imaging system was verified.

  2. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  3. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, V. I.; Averin, S. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Portnykh, I. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Giannuzzi, L. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ∼500-700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  4. Surface emission from neutron stars and implications for the physics of their interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Feryal

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars are associated with diverse physical phenomena that take place in conditions characterized by ultrahigh densities as well as intense gravitational, magnetic and radiation fields. Understanding the properties and interactions of matter in these regimes remains one of the challenges in compact object astrophysics. Photons emitted from the surfaces of neutron stars provide direct probes of their structure, composition and magnetic fields. In this review, I discuss in detail the physics that governs the properties of emission from the surfaces of neutron stars and their various observational manifestations. I present the constraints on neutron star radii, core and crust composition, and magnetic field strength and topology obtained from studies of their broadband spectra, evolution of thermal luminosity, and the profiles of pulsations that originate on their surfaces.

  5. Proton Radii of B12-17 Define a Thick Neutron Surface in B17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estradé, A.; Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    The first determination of radii of point proton distribution (proton radii) of B12-17 from charge-changing cross sections (σCC) measurements at the FRS, GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The proton radii are deduced from a finite-range Glauber model analysis of the σCC. The radii show an increase from B13 to B17 and are consistent with predictions from the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model for the neutron-rich nuclei. The measurements show the existence of a thick neutron surface with neutron-proton radius difference of 0.51(0.11) fm in B17.

  6. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-04-10

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

  7. Experimental Study of the Phenomenology of Spallation Neutrons in a Large Lead Block

    CERN Multimedia

    Galvez Altamirano, J; Lopez, C; Perlado, J M; Perez-Navarro, A

    2002-01-01

    %PS211 %title \\\\ \\\\The purpose of PS211 is to determine how neutrons, produced by spallation inside a large Lead volume are slowed down by undergoing a very large number of scatterings, losing each time a small fraction ($\\sim$ 1\\%) of their kinetic energy. The focus is in determining the probability for a spallation neutron produced at an energy of several MeV or more, to survive capture on Lead resonances and to reach resonance energies of materials to be transmuted, such as 5.6 eV for $^{99}$Tc. This process, of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing, involves a subtle interplay between the capture resonances of the Lead medium and of selected impurities. This phenomenology of spallation neutrons in a large Lead volume, is the physics foundation of the Fast Energy Amplifier proposed by C. Rubbia, and could open up new possibilities in the incineration of long-lived nuclear waste such as Actinides or Fission Fragments (e.g. $^{99}$Tc, $^{129}$I, etc.).\\\\ \\\\334 tons of high purity Lead, installed in t7, are exposed to...

  8. Small-angle neutron scattering study of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Ito, Y.; Kameyama, K.; Imai, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Takagi, T.

    1995-02-01

    The overall and internal structure of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particles was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering using the contrast variation method. The vaccine is a nearly spherical particle, and its contrast-matching point was determined to be at about 24% D 2O content, indicating that a large part of the vaccine particle is occupied by lipids and carbohydrates from the yeast. The Stuhrmann plot suggests that the surface antigens exist predominantly in the peripheral region of the particle, which is favorable to the induction of anti-virus antibodies.

  9. Epithermal Neutron Evidence for a Diurnal Surface Hydration Process in the Moon's High Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Parsons, A.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Livengood, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence from epithermal neutron flux observations that show that the Moon's high latitude surfaces are being actively hydrated, dehydrated and rehydrated in a diurnal cycle. The near-surface hydration is indicated by an enhanced suppression of the lunar epithermal neutron leakage flux on the dayside of the dawn terminator on poleward-facing slopes (PFS). At 0600 to 0800 local-time, hydrogen concentrations within the upper 1 meter of PFS are observed to be maximized relative to equivalent equator-facing slopes (EFS). During the lunar day surface hydrogen concentrations diminish towards dusk and then rebuild overnight. Surface hydration is determined by differential comparison of the averaged EFS to PFS epithermal neutron count rates above +/- 75 deg latitude. At dawn the contrast bias towards PFS is consistent with at least 15 to 25 parts-per-million (ppm) hydrogen that dissipates by dusk. We review several lines of evidence derived from temperature and epithermal neutron data by a correlated analysis of observations from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) that were mapped as a function of lunar local-time, Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography and Diviner (DLRE) surface temperature.

  10. On the use of surface neutron-gamma gauges to estimate soil water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaga, T.T.; Cassaro, F.A.M.; Reichardt, K. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Oliveira, J.C.M.; Timm, L.C

    2002-09-01

    Surface neutron-gamma gauges are handy instruments to measure soil water contents and bulk densities of surface layers. Although available for some decades, their optimal use is still not well established. This study is a contribution to improve their use, mainly in relation to calibration, and of the effect of soil dry bulk density on soil water content measurements.

  11. The effect of neutron skin on inclusive prompt photon production in Pb + Pb collisions at Large Hadron Collider energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Somnath

    2017-04-01

    Recent experiments on lead ({{{Pb}}}82208) nuclei have observed the celebrated phenomenon of the neutron skin thickness of low energy nuclear physics. Skin thickness provides a measure of the extension of the spatial distribution of neutrons inside the atomic nucleus than protons. We have studied the effect of neutron skin thickness on inclusive prompt photon production in Pb + Pb collisions at Large Hadron Collider energies. We have calculated the ‘central-to-peripheral ratio’ ({R}{cp}) of prompt photon production with and without accounting for the neutron skin effect. The neutron skin causes a characteristic enhancement of the ratio, in particular at forward rapidity, which is distinguishable in our calculation. However, a very precise direct photon measurement up to large transverse momenta would be necessary to constrain the feature in experiment.

  12. Neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering studies of films of intermediate-length alkanes adsorbed on a graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diama, Armand

    Over the past several years, we have conducted a variety of elastic neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments to study the structure and the dynamics of films of two intermediate-length alkane molecules (C nH2n+2), adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. The two molecules are the normal alkane n-tetracosane [n-CH 3(CH2)22CH3] and the branched alkane squalane (C30H62 or 2, 6, 10, 15, 19, 23-hexamethyltetracosane) whose carbon backbone is the same length as teteracosane. The temperature dependence of the monolayer structure of tetracosane and squalane was investigated using elastic neutron diffraction and evidence of two phase transitions was observed. Both the low-coverage tetracosane (C 24H50) and squalane (C30H62) monolayers have crystalline-to-"smectic" and "smectic"-to-isotropic fluid phase transitions upon heating. The diffusive motion in the tetracosane and squalane monolayers has been investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering. Two different quasielastic neutron scattering spectrometers at the Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been used. The spectrometers differ in both their dynamic range and energy resolution allowing molecular motions to be investigated on time scales in the range 10-13--10 -9 s. On these time scales, we observe evidence of translational, rotational, and intermolecular diffusive motions in the tetracosane and squalane monolayers. We conclude that the molecular diffusive motion in the two monolayers is qualitatively similar. Thus, despite the three methyl sidegroups at each end of the squalane molecule, its monolayer structure, phase transitions, and dynamics are qualitatively similar to that of a monolayer of the unbranched tetracosane molecules. With the higher resolution spectrometer at NIST, we have also investigated the molecular diffusive motion in multilayer tetracosane films. The analysis of our measurements indicates slower diffusive motion in

  13. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    KAUST Repository

    Haddon, E. K.

    2016-01-10

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from approximate to 1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.31.1 m (2 sigma). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between approximate to 0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.80.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is approximate to 6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.41.5 m, corresponding to a geologic M-w approximate to 7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.12.0 m, 12.8 +/- 1.5 m, and 16.6 +/- 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between approximate to 0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1 sigma) over the late Quaternary.

  14. Detection efficiency evaluation for a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-ming; Tian, Yang; Yang, Yi-gang; Liu, Ren; Pan, Jing-sheng; Wang, Xue-wu; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the detection efficiency of a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector has been evaluated. A 6LiF/ZnS scintillator detector 65 mm in diameter and 0.32 mm in thickness, with product code, EJ426HD2, produced by Eljen Technology, was employed as the benchmark detector. The TOF spectra of these two detectors were simultaneously measured and the energy spectra were then deduced to calculate the detection efficiency curve of the nMCP detector. Tests show the detection efficiency@25.3 meV thermal neutrons is 34% for this nMCP detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375095, 11175098)

  15. Neutron-skin thickness determines the surface tension of a compressible nuclear droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, W.; Ebata, S.; Iida, K.

    2017-09-01

    We systematically investigate the neutron-skin thickness of neutron-rich nuclei within a compressible droplet model, which includes several parameters characterizing the surface tension and the equation of state (EOS) of asymmetric nuclear matter as well as corrections due to the surface diffuseness. Such a systematic analysis helps towards constraining the EOS parameters of asymmetric nuclear matter and the poorly known density dependence of the surface tension; the latter is estimated with help of available experimental data for the neutron and proton density distributions and the nuclear masses. Validity of the present approach is confirmed by calculating realistic density distributions of Ca, Ni, Zr, Sn, Yb, and Pb isotopes within a microscopic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method for various sets of the effective nuclear force. Our macroscopic model accompanied by the diffuseness corrections works well in the sense that it well reproduces the evolution of the microscopically deduced neutron-skin thickness with respect to the neutron number for selected sets of the effective nuclear force. We find that the surface tension of the compressible nuclear droplet is a key to bridging a gap between microscopic and macroscopic approaches.

  16. Reactions on the surface and inside of neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehm K. E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from orbiting X-ray satellites during the last decades have provided us with a wealth of information about nuclear reactions thought to occur in the extreme, highdensity environment of neutron stars. With radioactive ion beams from first-generation facilities we have begun to study some of these processes in the laboratory. In this contribution I report on experiments performed with radioactive beams from the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne. I will discuss the nuclear physics of X-ray bursts and super-bursts, the production of in-flight radioactive beams, as well as novel detectors which are used in these experiments.

  17. A new method of measuring a large pulsed neutron fluence or dose exploiting the die-away of thermalized neutrons in a polyethylene moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, J. W.; Lowe, T.; Mason, R. S.; White, G.

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations of the response to very short pulses of neutron and gamma radiation of a spherical polyethylene moderator with a central thermal neutron counter and a new, fast, active restore amplifier system have been carried out. A large neutron burst produces count rates in the detector that are too high to measure initially but when the exponential decay of the count rate falls below about 50 k per sec then counting can start. If the counts are recorded in contiguous time intervals (of 60 μs in this case) and the time is measured at which the measured count in an interval falls to 1 or 2 then the size of the initial burst can be calculated. It is shown that it should be possible to measure pulsed neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) or dose equivalent rate from about 2 nSv up to about 100 μSv per burst, or 7.2 N μSv s h -1 to 360 N mSv s h -1, where N is the number of neutron bursts per second. The calculations show that a gamma burst of about 10 μGy can be tolerated without affecting the measurement of the largest neutron bursts. This extends our earlier estimate of the maximum dose that can be measured for pulsed neutrons by more than 10 k. This method could also be used to measure the neutron fluence or dose from a single unplanned event such as a beam dump on an accelerator or a criticality incident from fissile material. Although the method described is new it is based on a combination of proven techniques.

  18. Large Slip Length over a Nanopatterned Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ding; DI Qin-Feng; LI Jing-Yuan; QIAN Yue-Hong; FANG Hai-Ping

    2007-01-01

    A thermodynamic method is employed to analyse the slip length of hydrophobic nanopatterned surface.The maximal slip lengths with respect to the hydrophobicity of the nanopatterned surface are computed.It is found that the slip length reaches more than 50μm if the nanopatterned surfaces have a contact angle larger than 160°.Such results are expected to find extensive applications in micro-channels and helpful to understand recent experimental observations of the slippage of nanopatterned surfaces.

  19. Radiative properties of magnetic neutron stars with metallic surfaces and thin atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Potekhin, A Y; van Adelsberg, M; Werner, K

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a simple analytic description of the emission properties (spectrum and polarization) of the condensed, strongly magnetized surface of neutron stars. We have improved the method of van Adelsberg et al. (2005) (arXiv:astro-ph/0406001) for calculating the spectral properties of condensed magnetized surfaces. Using the improved method, we calculate the reflectivity of an iron surface at magnetic field strengths B \\sim (10^{12} - 10^{14}) G, with various inclinations of the magnetic field lines and radiation beam with respect to the surface and each other. We construct analytic expressions for the emissivity of this surface as functions of the photon energy, magnetic field strength, and the three angles that determine the geometry of the local problem. Using these expressions, we calculate X-ray spectra for neutron stars with condensed iron surfaces covered by thin partially ionized hydrogen atmospheres. We develop simple analytic descriptions of the intensity and polarization o...

  20. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillaud, T; Landoas, O; Briat, M; Kime, S; Rossé, B; Thfoin, I; Bourgade, J L; Disdier, L; Glebov, V Yu; Marshall, F J; Sangster, T C

    2012-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution (~10 μm) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MégaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a (60)Co γ-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 μm were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  1. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Kime, S.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MegaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 {mu}m were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  2. Constraints on Axions and Axionlike Particles from Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Berenji, Bijan; Meyer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We present constraints on the nature of axions and axionlike particles (ALPs) by analyzing gamma--ray data from neutron stars using the Fermi Large Area Telescope. In addition to axions solving the strong CP problem of particle physics, axions and ALPs are also possible dark matter candidates. We investigate axions and ALPs produced by nucleon--nucleon bremsstrahlung within neutron stars. We derive a phenomenological model for the gamma--ray spectrum arising from subsequent axion decays. By analyzing 5 years of gamma-ray data (between 60 MeV and 200 MeV) for a sample of 4 nearby neutron stars, we do not find evidence for an axion or ALP signal, thus we obtain a combined 95\\% confidence level upper limit on the axion mass of 7.9$\\times 10^{-2}$ eV, which corresponds to a lower limit for the Peccei-Quinn scale $f_a$ of 7.6$\\times 10^7$ GeV. Our constraints are more stringent than previous results probing the same physical process, and are competitive with results probing axions and ALPs by different mechanisms.

  3. PANDORA, a large volume low-energy neutron detector with real-time neutron-gamma discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, L.; Sasano, M.; Yako, K.; Yasuda, J.; Baba, H.; Ota, S.; Uesaka, T.

    2017-09-01

    The PANDORA (Particle Analyzer Neutron Detector Of Real-time Acquisition) system, which was developed for use in inverse kinematics experiments with unstable isotope beams, is a neutron detector based on a plastic scintillator coupled to a digital readout. PANDORA can be used for any reaction study involving the emission of low energy neutrons (100 keV-10 MeV) where background suppression and an increased signal-to-noise ratio are crucial. The digital readout system provides an opportunity for pulse shape discrimination (PSD) of the detected particles as well as intelligent triggering based on PSD. The figure of merit results of PANDORA are compared to the data in literature. Using PANDORA, 91 ± 1% of all detected neutrons can be separated, while 91 ± 1% of the detected gamma rays can be excluded, reducing the gamma ray background by one order of magnitude.

  4. Multilayers at the surface of solutions of exogenous lung surfactant: direct observation by neutron reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follows, D; Tiberg, F; Thomas, R K; Larsson, M

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacy-grade exogenous lung surfactant preparations of bovine and porcine origin, dispersed in physiological electrolyte solution have been studied. The organization and dynamics at the air/water interface at physiological temperature was analysed by neutron reflection. The results show that a well-defined surface phase is formed, consisting of a multilayer structure of lipid/protein bilayers alternating with aqueous layers, with a repetition period of about 70 A and correlation depths of 3 to >25 bilayers, depending on electrolyte composition and time. The experimental surfactant concentration of 0.15% (w/w) is far below that used in therapeutic application of exogenous surfactants and it is therefore likely that similar multilayer structures are also formed at the alveolar surface in the clinical situation during surfactant substitution therapy. Lung surfactant preparations in dry form swell in aqueous solution towards a limit of about 60% (w/w) of water, forming a lamellar liquid-crystalline phase above about 34 degrees C, which disperses into lamellar bodies at higher water concentrations. The lamellar spacings in the surface multilayers at the air/water interface are smaller than those in the saturated limit even though they are in contact with much greater water concentrations. The surface multilayers are laterally disordered in a way that is consistent with fragments of Lalpha-phase lamellae. The near surface layers of the multilayer structure have a significant protein content (only SP-B and SP-C are present in the preparations). The results demonstrate that a multilayer structure can be formed in exogenous surfactant even at very low concentrations and indicate that multilayers need to be incorporated into present interpretations of in vitro studies of similar lung surfactant preparations, which are largely based on monolayer models.

  5. Characterization of large area, thick, and segmented silicon detectors for neutron β-decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas-Bacci, A., E-mail: americo.salas.bacci.1@ohio.edu [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); McGaughey, P.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Baeßler, S. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Broussard, L. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Makela, M.F.; Mirabal, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pattie, R.W. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Počanić, D. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Sjue, S.K.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Penttila, S.I. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wilburn, W.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Young, A.R.; Zeck, B.A. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Wang, Z. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    The “Nab” and “UCNB” collaborations have proposed to measure the correlation parameters in neutron β-decay at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos National Laboratory, using a novel detector design. Two large area, thick, hexagonal-segmented silicon detectors containing 127 pixels per detector will be used to detect the proton and electron from neutron decay. Both silicon detectors are connected by magnetic field lines of a few Tesla field strength, and set on an electrostatic potential, such that protons can be accelerated up to 30 keV in order to be detected. Characteristics of the detector response to low energy conversion electrons and protons from 15 keV to 35 keV, including the evaluation of the dead layer thickness and other contributions to the pulse height defect for proton detection are presented for Si detectors of 0.5 mm and 1 mm of thickness. -- Highlights: • We characterized large area (108 cm{sup 2}), thick (0.5, 1 mm), and 127-segmented Si detectors. • We detected low energy protons from 15 to 35 keV with these large area Si detectors. • The recombination defect is insignificant at E{sub p}<35keV, for appropriate bias voltages. • Our computed nuclear pulse height defect agrees with available experimental data. • Our detector dead layer is ≲110nm, as probed by low energy protons.

  6. Solar neutron emissivity during the large flare on 1982 June 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Kanbach, G.; Flueckiger, E.; Golliez, F.

    1987-01-01

    For the solar neutron event on June 3, 1982, it is shown here that the combined SMM Gamma Ray Spectrometer and Jungfraujoch neutron monitor data require a time-extended emission of neutrons at the sun with energies of 100 MeV to about 2 GeV. The solar neutron emissivity spectrum is shown to have a strong downward curvature or truncation between 2 and 4 GeV. A Bessel function and truncated power law give acceptable fits to the observational data, but only the power law can explain the rapid rise of the neutron monitor count rate. The integrated emissivity of neutrons above E(n) of 100 MeV is strongly constrained at 8 x 10 to the 28th neutrons/sr and is essentially independent of neutron spectral shape. At neutron energies of about 100 MeV, good agreement is found for both spectral forms with observations of neutron decay protons.

  7. Underground low flux neutron background measurements in LSM using a large volume (1m3) spherical proportional counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidis, I.; Giomataris, I.; Bougamont, E.; Irastorza, I.; Aune, S.; Chapelier, M.; Charvin, P. H.; Colas, P.; Derre, J.; Ferrer, E.; Gerbier, G.; Gros, M.; Mangier, P.; Navick, X. F.; Salin, P.; Vergados, J. D.; Zampalo, M.

    2010-01-01

    A large volume (1m3) spherical proportional counter has been developed at CEA/Saclay, for low flux neutron measurements. The high voltage is applied to a small sphere 15mm in diameter, located in the center of the counter and the wall of the counter is grounded. Neutrons can be measured successfully, with high sensitivity, using 3He gas in the detector. The proton and tritium energy deposition in the drift gaseous volume, from the reaction 3He(n,p)3H, can provide the neutron spectra from thermal neutrons up to several MeV. The detector has been installed in the underground laboratory in Modane (LSM) to measure the neutron background. The sphere has been has been filled with gas mixture of Ar + 2% CH4 +3gr He-3, at 275 mbar. The thermal neutron peak is well separated from the cosmic ray and gamma background, permitting of neutron flux calculation. Other potential applications requiring large volume of about 10 m in radius are described in detail in reference

  8. The adsorption of fluorinated dopants at the surface of 5CB: a neutron reflection study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mears, Laura L.E.; Vos, de Wiebe M.; Prescott, Stuart W.; Magro, Germinal; Rogers, Sarah; Skoda, Maximilian W.A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Zimmerman, Herbert; Richardson, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of dopants at the surface of 5CB has been studied using neutron reflection. The dopants were versions of 11OCB with partly fluorinated chains, and the 5CB was interfaced with air or with silica treated with fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon coatings. At the air interface, the F17-11OCB adso

  9. Spectral features in isolated neutron stars induced by inhomogeneous surface temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, Daniele; Rea, Nanda; Pons, José A

    2014-01-01

    The thermal X-ray spectra of several isolated neutron stars display deviations from a pure blackbody. The accurate physical interpretation of these spectral features bears profound implications for our understanding of the atmospheric composition, magnetic field strength and topology, and equation of state of dense matter. With specific details varying from source to source, common explanations for the features have ranged from atomic transitions in the magnetized atmospheres or condensed surface, to cyclotron lines generated in a hot ionized layer near the surface. Here we quantitatively evaluate the X-ray spectral distortions induced by inhomogeneous temperature distributions of the neutron star surface. To this aim, we explore several surface temperature distributions, we simulate their corresponding general relativistic X-ray spectra (assuming an isotropic, blackbody emission), and fit the latter with a single blackbody model. We find that, in some cases, the presence of a spurious 'spectral line' is requ...

  10. Single-charge-exchange reactions and the neutron density at the surface of the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loc, Bui Minh; Auerbach, Naftali; Khoa, Dao T.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study the charge-exchange reaction to the isobaric analog state using two types of transition densities. One transition density is equal to the difference of the total neutron density minus the total proton density and the other one is the density of the excess neutrons only. We show that for projectiles that do not probe the interior of the nucleus but mostly the surface of this nucleus, distinct differences in the cross section arise when two types of transition densities are employed. We demonstrate this by considering the (3He,t ) reaction.

  11. Hydrogen Surface Contamination in the Storage of Ultra-Cold Neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marche, Paul Henry

    Neutrons will, for sufficiently low energy (10 -('7) eV), be reflected from many material surfaces with nearly unit probability at any angle of incidence. Such neutrons are called ultra-cold (UCN). Ultra-cold neutrons can, therefore, be stored in an enclosed container for some period of time; the observed storage time being disappointingly shorter than the neutron's beta decay lifetime (10('3) sec). One mechanism for ultra-cold neutron loss is their recoil to higher energy from scattering with hydrogen in thermal equilibrium with the walls. With this higher energy the neutrons can then penetrate the walls. We have measured the hydrogen surface concentration on several materials used in UCN containers and have found sufficient amounts of hydrogen (1-10 x 10('16) atoms/cm('2)) to account for the anomalously short confinement times which have been observed. In light of this result, we have studied the desorption and adsorption properties of hydrogen on surfaces in the context of extending the storage time of these neutrons. The technique we use to measure the hydrogen concentration employs a resonance in the nuclear cross section of ('1)H(('15)N,(alpha)(gamma))('12)C. In the course of this work, we have measured the width of the first resonance of this reaction to be 0.3 (+OR-) 0.1 keV in the rest frame of the ('15)N. We have found that at pressures of 10('-6) Torr it is possible to reduce the surface concentration to the level of several monolayers using either glow discharge sputtering in oxygen or heating to high temperatures (10('3)(DEGREES)C). Attempts to replace hydrogen with deuterium and to bury the hydrogen under evaporated layers were not as successful. We have completely desorbed hydrogen at these pressures by high temperature heating and measured the rate at which it re -adsorbs. We have found that if the heating is severe enough to evaporate the surface of the material, the apparent rate of re-adsorption is greatly reduced. This effect can be explained by

  12. Unexpectedly Large Surface Gravities for Acoustic Horizons?

    CERN Document Server

    Liberati, S; Visser, M; Liberati, Stefano; Sonego, Sebastiano; Visser, Matt

    2000-01-01

    Acoustic black holes are fluid dynamic analogs of general relativistic black holes, wherein the behaviour of sound waves in a moving fluid acts as an analog for scalar fields propagating in a gravitational background. Acoustic horizons possess many of the properties more normally associated with the event horizons of general relativity, up to and including Hawking radiation. They have received much attention because it would seem to be much easier to experimentally create an acoustic horizon than to create an event horizon. We wish to point out some potential difficulties (and opportunities) in actually setting up an experiment that possesses an acoustic horizon. We show that in zero-viscosity, stationary fluid flow with generic boundary conditions, the creation of an acoustic horizon is accompanied by a formally infinite ``surface gravity'', and a formally infinite Hawking flux. Only by applying a suitable non-constant external body force, and for very specific boundary conditions on the flow, can these quan...

  13. Large Survey of Neutron Spectrum Moments Due to ICF Drive Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J. E.; Munro, D.; Spears, B.; Peterson, J. L.; Brandon, S.; Gaffney, J. A.; Hammer, J.; Langer, S.; Nora, R. C.; Springer, P.; ICF Workflow Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We have recently completed the largest HYDRA simulation survey to date ( 60 , 000 runs) of drive asymmetry on the new Trinity computer at LANL. The 2D simulations covered a large space of credible perturbations to the drive of ICF implosions on the NIF. Cumulants of the produced birth energy spectrum for DD and DT reaction neutrons were tallied using new methods. Comparison of the experimental spectra with our map of predicted spectra from simulation should provide a wealth of information about the burning plasma region. We report on our results, highlighting areas of agreement (and disagreement) with experimental spectra. We also identify features in the predicted spectra that might be amenable to measurement with improved diagnostics. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. IM release #: LLNL-PROC-697321.

  14. Neutron techniques. [for study of high-energy particles produced in large solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Glenn M., Jr.; Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.; Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Three experimental methods are described which hold the most promise for improved energy resolution, time resolution and sensitivity in the detection of solar neutrons on satellites and/or long duration balloon flights: the neutron calorimeter, the solar neutron track chamber, and the solar neutron decay proton detector. The characteristics of the three methods as to energy range, energy resolution, time resolution, detection efficiency, and physical properties are delineated. Earlier techniques to measure the intensity of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and to search for solar neutrons are described. The past three decades of detector development has now reached the point where it is possible to make comprehensive and detailed measurements of solar neutrons on future space missions.

  15. Theoretical Standard Model Rates of Proton to Neutron Conversions Near Metallic Hydride Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A

    2006-01-01

    The process of radiation induced electron capture by protons or deuterons producing new ultra low momentum neutrons and neutrinos may be theoretically described within the standard field theoretical model of electroweak interactions. For protons or deuterons in the neighborhoods of surfaces of condensed matter metallic hydride cathodes, such conversions are determined in part by the collective plasma modes of the participating charged particles, e.g. electrons and protons. The radiation energy required for such low energy nuclear reactions may be supplied by the applied voltage required to push a strong charged current across a metallic hydride surface employed as a cathode within a chemical cell. The electroweak rates of the resulting ultra low momentum neutron production are computed from these considerations.

  16. Large solid-angle polarisation analysis at thermal neutron wavelengths using a sup 3 He spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Heil, W; Cywinski, R; Humblot, H; Ritter, C; Roberts, T W; Stewart, J R

    2002-01-01

    The strongly spin-dependent absorption of neutrons in nuclear spin-polarised sup 3 He opens up the possibility of polarising neutrons from reactors and spallation sources over the full kinematical range of cold, thermal and hot neutrons. In this paper we describe the first large solid-angle polarisation analysis measurement using a sup 3 He neutron spin filter at thermal neutron wavelengths (lambda=2.5 A). This experiment was performed on the two-axis diffractometer D1B at the Institut Laue-Langevin using a banana-shaped filter cell (530 cm sup 3 ) filled with sup 3 He gas with a polarisation of P=52% at a pressure of 2.7 bar. A comparison is made with a previous measurement on D7 using a cold neutron beam on the same sample, i.e. amorphous ErY sub 6 Ni sub 3. Using uniaxial polarisation analysis both the nuclear and magnetic cross-sections could be extracted over the range of scattering-vectors [0.5<=Q(A sup - sup 1)<=3.5]. The results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the D7-data, whe...

  17. A Large Neutrino Detector Facility at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremenko, Y.V.

    1999-02-14

    The ORLaND (Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector) collaboration proposes to construct a large neutrino detector in an underground experimental hall adjacent to the first target station of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The main mission of a large (2000 ton) Scintillation-Cherenkov detector is to measure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {bar {nu}}{sub e} neutrino oscillation parameters more accurately than they can be determined in other experiments, or significantly extending the covered parameter space below (sin'20 {le} 10{sup {minus}4}). In addition to the neutrino oscillation measurements, ORLaND would be capable of making precise measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}, search for the magnetic moment of the muon neutrino, and investigate the anomaly in the KARMEN time spectrum, which has been attributed to a new neutral particle. With the same facility an extensive program of measurements of neutrino nucleus cross sections is also planned to support nuclear astrophysics.

  18. Large displacement of a static bending nanowire with surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. L.; Mei, Y.; Xia, R.; Zhu, W. L.

    2012-07-01

    Nanowires are widely used as building blocks of micro/nano devices, such as micro-sensors, probes, transistors and actuators in micro/nano-electro-mechanical systems (M/NEMS) and biotechnology. In this study, we investigated the large deformation behavior of a nanowire in consideration of its surface effects (surface elasticity and residual surface stress). For nanowires of large displacements with different boundary conditions, we established the governing equation set in combination with the residual surface stress and surface elasticity. Then a computer program of shooting method by using the commercial software MathCAD was developed to solve the boundary value problem numerically. Furthermore, the influences of surface effects on the large and infinitesimal deformation of the nanowires were quantitatively compared. These findings are beneficial to understanding the mechanism of the surface effects, and can also provide some inspirations to characterize the mechanical properties of nano-materials, and engineer new micro/nano-scaled devices.

  19. The magnetic structure of neutron stars and their surface-to-core temperature relation

    CERN Document Server

    Potekhin, A Yu; Chabrier, G

    2005-01-01

    We study the relation between the mean effective surface temperature T_s and the internal temperature T_b for magnetic neutron stars, assuming that the magnetic field near the surface has a presumably small-scale structure. The heavy-element (iron) and light-element (accreted) heat-blanketing envelopes are considered, and the results are compared with the case of a dipole magnetic field. We argue that the difference in the T_b(T_s)-relation for different magnetic configurations is always much smaller than a possible difference caused by variations of the chemical composition in the envelope.

  20. Thermal neutrons' flux near the Earth's surface as an evidence of the crustal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaeva, Ekaterina; Nechayev, Oleg; Volodichev, Nikolay; Antonova, Valentina; Kryukov, Sergey; Chubenko, Alexander; Shchepetov, Alexander

    There are some ideas about the Earth’s global seismic activity appearance due to tidal forces. At the same time, the correlations between the big series of the earthquakes and the New and Full Moons and between the New and Full Moons and the increasings of the thermal neutrons’ flux from the Earth’s crust were observed. It is as though there are internal links between these three natural phenomena and the physical reasons for their appearance are the same. The paper presents the results of the ground-based thermal neutrons observations during different time periods characterized with phenomena in the near-Earth space (for instance, the New and Full Moon). Basing on the up-to-date conception of the tidal waves influence on the Earth's crust the authors confirm the role of the Moon in the production of the neutron flux near the Earth's surface.

  1. Limits on large extra dimensions based on observations of neutron stars with the Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Borgland, A.W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R.A. [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [INFN — Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [INFN — Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [INFN — Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C. [INFN — Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G.A. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P.A. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Casandjian, J.M., E-mail: bijanb@alumni.stanford.edu, E-mail: elliott@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: johann.cohen-tanugi@lupm.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Collaboration: Fermi-LAT collaboration; and others

    2012-02-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  2. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Caliandro, G.A.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Cameron, R.A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Caraveo, P.A.; /Brera Observ.; Casandjian, J.M.; /AIM, Saclay; Cecchi, C.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Charles, E.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Swedish Acad. Sci. /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /AIM, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville /INFN, Padua; /more authors..

    2012-08-17

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  3. Performance of Large Neutron Detectors Containing Lithium-Gadolinium-Borate Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, David M.; Stuart, Cory R.; Klaass, R. Fred; Merrill, David B. [MSI/Photogenics Division, Orem, Utah (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a neutron counter, spectrometer, and dosimeter that is compact, efficient, and accurate. A self-contained neutron detection instrument has wide applications in health physics, scientific research, and programs to detect, monitor, and control strategic nuclear materials (SNM). The 1.3 liter detector head for this instrument is a composite detector with an organic scintillator containing uniformly distributed {sup 6}Li{sub 6}{sup nat}Gd{sup 10}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}:Ce (LGB:Ce) microcrystals. The plastic scintillator acts to slow impinging neutrons and emits light proportional to the energy lost by the neutrons as they moderate in the detector body. Moderating neutrons that have slowed sufficiently capture in one of the Lithium-6, Boron-10, or Gadolinium-157 atoms in the LGB:Ce scintillator, which then releases the capture energy in a characteristic cerium emission pulse. The measured captured pulses indicate the presence of neutrons. When a scintillating fluor is present in the plastic, the light pulse resulting from the neutron moderating in the plastic is paired with the LGB:Ce capture pulse to identify the energy of the neutron. About 2% of the impinging neutrons lose all of their energy in a single collision with the detector. There is a linear relationship between the pulse areas of this group of neutrons and energy. The other 98% of neutrons have a wide range of collision histories within the detector body. When these neutrons are 'binned' into energy groups, each group contains a distribution of pulse areas. This data was used to assist in the unfolding of the neutron spectra. The unfolded spectra were then validated with known spectra, at both neutron emitting isotopes and fission/accelerator facilities. Having validated spectra, the dose equivalent and dose rate are determined by applying standard, regulatory damage coefficients to the measured neutron counts for each energy bin of the spectra. Testing

  4. Evaluation of a cosmic-ray neutron sensor network for improved land surface model prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatz, Roland; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Han, Xujun; Hoar, Tim; Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Land surface models describe biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes at the land surface, and represent the lower boundary condition of atmospheric circulation models. Their key role is the quantification of mass and energy fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. Predictions with land surface models are affected by many unknown parameters, uncertain meteorological forcings and incomplete process understanding. Measurement data (e.g., soil moisture) can help to improve land surface model predictions. However, soil moisture products obtained from satellite remote sensing are normally available at a very coarse resolution and give information on the upper few centimetres of the soil only. Therefore, the recently developed Cosmic Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) are of high interest for predictions by land surface models, because they measure neutron count intensity, which is related to integral soil moisture content at the field scale (about 20 hectares). High resolution land surface models are also able to provide solutions at the same scale. In this study, we investigated whether the assimilation of soil moisture retrievals from CRNS data measured by a network of nine CRNS located in the Rur catchment in Germany (2354 km2) can improve land surface model prediction. The assimilation of soil moisture retrievals from neutron count intensity data was used to update model states and parameters of the land surface model CLM 4.5 over a two year time period, followed by a one year evaluation period without updates. This updating was done with the local ensemble transform Kalman filter. The real world experiment tested the value of CRNS using jackknifing experiments and three different initial soil maps. During the assimilation period, soil moisture predictions generally improved, for a biased soil map from an RMSE of 0.11 cm3/cm3 in the open loop run to 0.03 cm3/cm3 while during the evaluation period soil moisture predictions improved from 0.12 cm3/cm3 to 0.06 cm3

  5. Studies of float glass surfaces by neutron and x-ray reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Dalgliesh, R

    2001-01-01

    applicability of current off-specular scattering models. A rich surface structure has been found which results in reflection effects that cannot be explained by these models. Model systems have also been developed in an attempt to combine x-ray fluorescence techniques with reflectivity. The surface of glass and glass coatings have been studied using x-ray and neutron scattering techniques. In particular, the effect of aqueous solutions and humid atmospheres on both the fire polished and the tin rich side of float glass have been investigated using neutron and x-ray reflection. Isotopic substitution has enabled the number density of water molecules within the float glass surface to be monitored with respect to immersion time, temperature and impurity content. A thin gel-like water-rich layer of thickness approx 30A is observed at the surface accompanied by a more deeply penetrating layer which increases in depth with time reaching approx 500A after 6 months. The rate of water ingression is higher than predicte...

  6. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenji, Bijan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  7. A Large-Scale Survey of Neutron-Capture Element Abundances in Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Sterling, N C; Kallman, T R

    2007-01-01

    We present results from the first large-scale survey of neutron(n)-capture element abundances in planetary nebulae (PNe). This survey was motivated by the fact that a PN may be enriched in n-capture elements if its progenitor star experienced s-process nucleosynthesis during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. [Kr III] 2.199 and/or [Se IV] 2.287 $\\mu$m were detected in 81 PNe out of 120 PNe, for a detection rate of nearly 70%. We derive Se and Kr abundances or upper limits using ionization correction factors derived from photoionization models. A significant range is found in the Se and Kr abundances, from near solar (no enrichment), to enriched by a factor of ten. Our survey has increased the number of PNe with known n-capture element abundances by an order of magnitude, enabling us to explore correlations between s-process enrichments and other nebular and central star properties. In particular, the Se and Kr enrichments display a positive correlation with nebular C/O ratios, as theoretically expected....

  8. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi2O6) to analcime (NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ mol-1. Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  9. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  10. Large-scale shell-model calculations for unnatural-parity high-spin states in neutron-rich Cr and Fe isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Togashi, Tomoaki; Utsuno, Yutaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate unnatural-parity high-spin states in neutron-rich Cr and Fe isotopes using large-scale shell-model calculations. These shell-model calculations are carried out within the model space of $fp$-shell + $0g_{9/2}$ + $1d_{5/2}$ orbits with the truncation allowing $1\\hbar\\omega$ excitation of a neutron. The effective Hamiltonian consists of GXPF1Br for $fp$-shell orbits and $V_{\\rm MU}$ with a modification for the other parts. The present shell-model calculations can describe and predict the energy levels of both natural- and unnatural-parity states up to the high-spin states in Cr and Fe isotopes with $N\\le35$. The total energy surfaces present the prolate deformations on the whole and indicate that the excitation of one neutron into the $0g_{9/2}$ orbit plays the role of enhancing the prolate deformation. For the positive(unnatural)-parity states in odd-mass Cr and Fe isotopes, their energy levels and prolate deformations indicate the decoupling limit of the particle-plus-rotor model. We have found...

  11. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    to hundreds of nanometers. Thickness resolution for flat surfaces is in the range of few Ǻngstrøm, and as a peculiar benefit, the presence and properties of buried interfaces are accessible. Focus here will be on neutron reflectometry, a technique that is unique in applications involving composite organic...... of desired information. In the course, an introduction into the method and an overview on selected instruments at large scale facilities will be presented. Examples will be given that illustrate the potential of the method, mostly based on organic films. Results from the investigation of layered films...... and the detection on nanoscopic roughnesses will be shown. The potential of neutron reflectometry is not only of academic origin. It may turn out to be useful in the design and development of new functional materials even though it will never develop into a standard method to be applied in the product control...

  12. Results of experimental tests and calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, W.T.; Bussell, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-13

    The surface neutron moisture probe has been tested both to demonstrate that is is able to operate in the expected in-tank temperature and gamma-ray fields and to provide detector responses to known moisture concentration materials. The probe will properly function in a simultaneous high temperature (80 degrees C) and high gamma radiation field (210 rad/hr)environment. Comparisons between computer model predicted and experimentally measured detector responses to changes in moisture provide a basis for the probe calibration to in-tank moisture concentrations.

  13. Development of hybrid gas detectors for monitoring neutrons induced from the large intensity proton linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, G. S.; Lee, G. S.; Ahn, S. H. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-05-15

    Design of a hybrid gaseous detector for slow neutrons. Construction of the hybrid gaseous detector and tests with a {sup 52}Cf isotope and the MC-50 cyclotron. Designs, constructions, and tests for hybrid scintillators using various neutron sensitive materials (2{sup nd} year). Application to development of detectors for high energy physics (2{sup nd} year). Practical R and Ds for applications to medical and industrial purposes (3{sup rd} year)

  14. Shape of a large drop on a rough hydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonsik; Park, Jaebum; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Ho-Young

    2013-02-01

    Large drops on solid surfaces tend to flatten due to gravitational effect. Their shapes can be predicted by solving the Young-Laplace equation when their apparent contact angles are precisely given. However, for large drops sitting on rough surfaces, the apparent contact angles are often unavailable a priori and hard to define. Here we develop a model to predict the shape of a given volume of large drop placed on a rough hydrophobic surface using an overlapping geometry of double spheroids and the free energy minimization principle. The drop shape depends on the wetting state, thus our model can be used not only to predict the shape of a drop but also to infer the wetting state of a large drop through the comparison of theory and experiment. The experimental measurements of the shape of large water drops on various micropillar arrays agree well with the model predictions. Our theoretical model is particularly useful in predicting and controlling shapes of large drops on surfaces artificially patterned in microscopic scales, which are frequently used in microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technology.

  15. Feasibility Study for Large Water-Based Neutron and Neutrino Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.Svoboda, R; Bernstein, A; Coleman, W; Dazeley, S A

    2007-03-13

    The possibility of neutron and neutrino detection using water Cerenkov detectors doped with gadolinium holds the promise of constructing very large high-efficiency detectors with wide-ranging application in basic science and national security. This study addressed two major concerns about the feasibility of such detectors: (1) the transparency of the doped water to the ultraviolet Cerenkov light, and (2) the effect of the doped water on detector materials. We report on the construction of a 19-meter water transparency measuring instrument and associated materials test tank. The first sensitive measurement of the transparency of doped water at 337nm has been made using this instrument (> 35 meters). This transparency is sufficient to proceed to the next stage of building a prototype detector. Materials testing is not yet complete, as materials must be soaked for a year or more to assess the effects. We have measured a 30% decrease in the attenuation length of 337 nm laser light after the addition of GdCl3 to pure water. The capability to measure at other wavelengths exists, and this will be done over the next few months by William Coleman, a student from LSU who will use this experiment as the topic for his Ph.D. thesis. This will provide crucial information needed to predict the behavior of gadolinium-doped water detectors vis-a-vis pure water ones. Final results will be also published in Nuclear Instrumentation and Methods (NIM) A after completion of his thesis. Our preliminary conclusion (assuming that longer wavelengths are no worse than the 337 nm measurement) is that small detectors of length scales 10 meters or less will not suffer significant light loss due to gadolinium chloride doping. Long-term effects, however, are still to be measured.

  16. Grow Large High-Quality Diamonds with Different Seed Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZANG Chuan-Yi; JIA Xiao-Peng; MA Hong-An; LI Shang-Sheng; TIAN Yu; XIAO Hong-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Large high-quality type Ib diamond crystals have been grown with different seed surfaces by temperature gradient method at 5.5GPa, 1500-1600K, with NiMnCo alloy as the metal solvent. Compared with {100} as the growth surface, the growth region of large high-quality diamond crystals with {111} as the growth surface at a higher growth rate shifts markedly from lower temperatures (suitable for {100}-facet growth) to higher temperatures (suitable for {lll}-facet growth). However, regardless of different growth surfaces, {100} or {111}, the grown crystals of sheet-shaped shape are most difficult for metal inclusions to be trapped into, and whether or not matched growth between the seed surfaces and the growth temperatures determines the crystal shapes. In view of the growth rates, large high-quality diamond crystals of sheet-shaped shapes can be grown at a growth rate of above 2.5mg/h, while the growth rate of large high-quality diamond crystals should not be beyond 1.5mg/h for tower-shaped crystals.

  17. Measurement of large aspheric surfaces by annular subaperture stitching interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaokun Wang; Lihui Wang; Longhai Yin; Binzhi Zhang; Di Fan; Xuejun Zhang

    2007-01-01

    A new method for testing aspheric surfaces by annular subaperture stitching interferometry is introduced.It can test large-aperture and large-relative-aperture aspheric surfaces at high resolution, low cost, and high efficiency without auxiliary null optics. The basic principle of the method is described, the synthetical optimization stitching model and effective algorithm are established based on simultaneous least-square fitting. A hyperboloid with an aperture of 350 mm is tested by this method. The obtained peak-to-valley (PV) and root-mean-square (RMS) values of the surface error after stitching are 0.433λ and 0.052λ (λis 632.8 nm), respectively. The reconstructed surface map is coincide with the entire surface map from null test, and the difference of PV and RMS errors between them are 0.031λ and 0.005λ, respectively.This stitching model provides another quantitive method for testing large aspheric surfaces besides null compensation.

  18. A 200 cm x 50 cm large multigap resistive plate chamber based neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakorev, Dmitry; Elekes, Zoltan; Bemmerer, Daniel; Kempe, Mathias; Sobiella, Manfred; Stach, Daniel; Wagner, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Roeder, Marko; Zuber, Kai [TU Dresden (Germany); Cowan, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A prototype for a multigap resistive plate chamber (MRPC) based detector of 200 cm x 50 cm size for 1 GeV neutrons has been developed, built and tested. The principle of operation is the conversion of the high-energy neutron to a charged particle in an iron converter, and the detection of the charged particle in the MRPC. Experiments using the single-electron mode of operation of the ELBE 40 MeV electron accelerator showed that a time resolution of {sigma}{sub t}<100 ps was reached for minimum-ionizing particles, at nearly full efficiency. Extensive simulations show that it is feasible to construct a time-of-flight detector for GeV neutrons based on such a principle.

  19. Observation of Large Enhancement of Charge Exchange Cross Sections with Neutron-Rich Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Tanihata, I; Kanungo, R; Ameil, F; Atkinson, J; Ayyad, Y; Cortina-Gil, D; Dillmann, I; Estradé, A; Evdokimov, A; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Guastalla, G; Janik, R; Knoebel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinov, Yu A; Marta, M; Mostazo, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Takechi, M; Tanaka, J; Toki, H; Vargas, J; Winfield, J S; Weick, H

    2015-01-01

    Production cross sections of nitrogen isotopes from high-energy carbon isotopes on hydrogen and carbon targets have been measured for the first time for a wide range of isotopes. The fragment separator FRS at GSI was used to deliver C isotope beams. The cross sections of the production of N isotopes were determined by charge measurements of forward going fragments. The cross sections show a rapid increase with the number of neutrons in the projectile. Since the production of nitrogen is mostly due to charge exchange reactions below the proton separation energies, the present data suggests a concentration of Gamow-Teller and Fermi transition strength at low excitation energies for neutron-rich isotopes. It was also observed that the cross sections were enhanced much more strongly for neutron rich isotopes in the C-target data.

  20. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, R. A.; Donahue, C.; Visscher, T.; Montcalm, C.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and performance of a 157 mm×157 mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1 mm3) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low values of the refinement parameter Rw(F).

  1. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M., E-mail: isobe@nifs.ac.jp; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Misawa, T. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori 590-0494 (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho 039-3212 (Japan); Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S. [Toshiba Corporation, Fuchu 183-8511 (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Toshiba Nuclear Engineering Services Corporation, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  2. Whispering gallery states of neutrons and anti-hydrogen atoms and their applications to fundamental and surface physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery

    2013-03-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It is intensively used and explored due to its numerous crucial applications. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for neutrons and (anti)atoms. For (anti)matter waves, it includes a new feature: a massive particle is settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. In this talk, we present the first observation of the quantum whispering-gallery effect for matter particles (cold neutrons) 1-2. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to recently discovered gravitational quantum states of neutrons3. These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a quantum state. Deeply bound long-living states are weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited short-living states are very sensitive to the wall nuclear potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. Analogous phenomena could be measured with atoms and anti-atoms 4-5.

  3. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E., E-mail: Alexander-Meyerovich@uri.edu [University of Rhode Island, Department of Physics (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  4. The Energy Dependence of Neutron Star Surface Modes and X-ray Burst Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Piro, A L; Piro, Anthony L.; Bildsten, Lars

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the photon energy dependence of the pulsed amplitude of neutron star (NS) surface modes. Simple approximations demonstrate that it depends most strongly on the bursting NS surface temperature. This result compares well with full integrations that include Doppler shifts from rotation and general relativistic corrections to photon propagation. We show that the energy dependence of type I X-ray burst oscillations agrees with that of a surface mode, lending further support to the hypothesis that they originate from surface waves. The energy dependence of the pulsed emission is rather insensitive to the NS inclination, mass and radius, or type of mode, thus hindering constraints on these parameters. We also show that, for this energy-amplitude relation, the majority of the signal (relative to the noise) comes in the 2-25 keV band, so that the current burst oscillation searches with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer are close to optimal. The critical test of the mode hypothesis for X-ray burst oscillatio...

  5. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  6. Geometric modeling and analysis of large latticed surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Hefzy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    The application of geometrical schemes, similar to geodesic domes, to large spherical antenna reflectors was investigated. The shape and size of flat segmented latticed surfaces which approximate general shells of revolution, and in particular spherical and paraboloidal reflective surfaces, were determined. The extensive mathematical and computational geometric analyses of the reflector resulted in the development of a general purpose computer program capable of generating the complete design parameters of the dish. The program also includes a graphical self contained subroutine for graphic display of the required design.

  7. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, R.A., E-mail: riedelra@ornl.gov; Donahue, C.; Visscher, T.; Montcalm, C.

    2015-09-11

    We describe the design and performance of a 157 mm×157 mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of <1.2 mm with distortion <0.5 mm on over 50 installed Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1 mm{sup 3}) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low values of the refinement parameter R{sub w}(F)

  8. Investigation of background in large-area neutron detectors due to alpha emission from impurities in aluminium

    CERN Document Server

    Birch, J; Clergeau, J -F; van Esch, P; Ferraton, M; Guerard, B; Hall-Wilton, R; Hultman, L; Höglund, C; Jensen, J; Khaplanov, A; Piscitelli, F

    2015-01-01

    Thermal neutron detector based on films of $^{10}$B$_4$C have been developed as an alternative to $^3$He detectors. In particular, The Multi-Grid detector concept is considered for future large area detectors for ESS and ILL instruments. An excellent signal-to-background ratio is essential to attain expected scientific results. Aluminium is the most natural material for the mechanical structure of of the Multi-Grid detector and other similar concepts due to its mechanical and neutronic properties. Due to natural concentration of $\\alpha$ emitters, however, the background from $\\alpha$ particles misidentified as neutrons can be unacceptably high. We present our experience operating a detector prototype affected by this issue. Monte Carlo simulations have been used to confirm the background as $\\alpha$ particles. The issues have been addressed in the more recent implementations of the Multi-Grid detector by the use of purified aluminium as well as Ni-plating of standard aluminium. The result is the reduction in...

  9. Surface and Downhole Prospecting Tools for Planetary Exploration: Tests of Neutron and Gamma Ray Probes - Research Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. Elphic; P. Chu; S. Hahn; M. R. James; D. J. Lawrence; T. H. Prettyman; J. B. Johnson; R. K. Podgorney

    2008-06-01

    The ability to locate and characterize icy deposits and other hydrogenous materials on the Moon and Mars will help us understand the distribution of water and, therefore, possible habitats at Mars, and may help us locate primitive prebiotic compounds at the Moon’s poles. We have developed a rover-borne neutron probe that localizes a near-surface icy deposit and provides information about its burial depth and abundance. We have also developed a borehole neutron probe to determine the stratigraphy of hydrogenous subsurface layers while operating within a drill string segment. In our field tests, we have used a neutron source to “illuminate” surrounding materials and gauge the instruments’ efficacy, and we can simulate accurately the observed instrument responses using a Monte Carlo nuclear transport code (MCNPX). An active neutron source would not be needed for lunar or martian near-surface exploration: cosmic-ray interactions provide sufficient neutron flux to depths of several meters and yield better depth and abundance sensitivity than an active source. However, for deep drilling (>10 m depth), a source is required. We also present initial tests of a borehole gamma ray lithodensity tool and demonstrate its utility in determining soil or rock densities and composition.

  10. Multi-Grid Boron-10 detector for large area applications in neutron scattering science

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Ken; Birch, Jens; Buffet, Jean-Claude; Correa, Jonathan; van Esch, Patrick; Guerard, Bruno; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Hultman, Lars; Höglund, Carina; Jensen, Jens; Khaplanov, Anton; Kirstein, Oliver; Piscitelli, Francesco; Vettier, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The present supply of 3He can no longer meet the detector demands of the upcoming ESS facility and continued detector upgrades at current neutron sources. Therefore viable alternative technologies are required to support the development of cutting-edge instrumentation for neutron scattering science. In this context, 10B-based detectors are being developed by collaboration between the ESS, ILL, and Link\\"{o}ping University. This paper reports on progress of this technology and the prospects applying it in modern neutron scattering experiments. The detector is made-up of multiple rectangular gas counter tubes coated with B4C, enriched in 10B. An anode wire reads out each tube, thereby giving position of conversion in one of the lateral co-ordinates as well as in depth of the detector. Position resolution in the remaining co-ordinate is obtained by segmenting the cathode tube itself. Boron carbide films have been produced at Link\\"{o}ping University and a detector built at ILL. The characterization study is pres...

  11. Large organized surface domains self-assembled from nonpolar amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2012-04-17

    For years, researchers had presumed that Langmuir monolayers of small C(n)F(2n+1)C(m)H(2m+1) (FnHm) diblock molecules (such as F8H16) consisted of continuous, featureless films. Recently we have discovered that they instead form ordered arrays of unusually large (~30-60 nm), discrete self-assembled surface domains or hemimicelles both at the surface of water and on solid substrates. These surface micelles differ in several essential ways from all previously reported or predicted molecular surface aggregates. They self-assemble spontaneously, even at zero surface pressure, depending solely on a critical surface concentration. They are very large (~100 times the length of the diblock) and involve thousands of molecules (orders of magnitude more than classical micelles). At the same time, the surface micelles are highly monodisperse and self-organize in close-packed hexagonal patterns (two-dimensional crystals). Their size is essentially independent from pressure, and they do not coalesce and are unexpectedly sturdy for soft matter (persisting even beyond surface film collapse). We and other researchers have observed large surface micelles for numerous diblocks, using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) transfer, spin-coating and dip-coating techniques, or expulsion from mixed monolayers, and on diverse supports, establishing that hemimicelle formation and ordering are intrinsic properties of (perfluoroalkyl)alkanes. Notably, they involve "incomplete" surfactants with limited amphiphilic character, which further illustrates the outstanding capacity for perfluoroalkyl chains to promote self-assembly and interfacial film structuring. Using X-ray reflectivity, we determined a perfluoroalkyl-chain-up orientation. Theoretical investigations assigned self-assembly and hemimicelle stability to electrostatic dipole-dipole interactions at the interface between Fn- and Hm-sublayers. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) data collected directly on the surface of water

  12. Correlations between neutrons and protons near Fermi surface and $Q_{\\alpha}$ of super-heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Wu, Xizhen; Meng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The shell corrections and shell gaps in nuclei are systematically studied with the latest Weizs\\"acker-Skyrme (WS4) mass model. We find that most of asymmetric nuclei with (sub)-shell closures locate along the shell stability line (SSL), $N=1.37Z+13.5$, which might be due to a strong correlation between neutrons and protons near Fermi surface. The double magicity of nuclei $^{46}$Si and $^{78}$Ni is predicted according to the corresponding shell gaps, shell corrections and nuclear deformations. The unmeasured super-heavy nuclei $^{296}$118 and $^{298}$120, with relatively large shell gaps and shell corrections, also locate along the SSL, whereas the traditional magic nucleus $^{298}$Fl evidently deviates from the line. The $\\alpha$-decay energies of super-heavy nuclei with $Z=113-126$ are simultaneously investigated by using the WS4 model together with the radial basis function corrections. For super-heavy nuclei with large shell corrections, the smallest $\\alpha$-decay energy for elements $Z=116$, 117 and 11...

  13. Multispectral Acquisition of Large-Sized Pictorial Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paviotti Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multispectral acquisition of artworks has recently received considerable attention in the image processing community. Quite understandably, so far this attention has mainly focused on paintings, given their predominant role in museum collections. It is worth pointing out that the instrumentation and procedures used for acquiring regular paintings are not suited for the multispectral acquisition of large-sized painted surfaces such as frescoed halls and great paintings. Given the relevance of such artifacts, and their widespread presence in churches or historical buildings due to their social function, the problem of finding suitable techniques for their acquisition is certainly worth addressing. This paper focuses on multispectral acquisition of large-sized pictorial surfaces, systematically addressing the practical issues related to the acquisition equipment and procedure. Given the crucial role played by the illumination in this application, special attention is given to this issue. The proposed approach is supported by experimental results.

  14. A modular large-area lithium foil multi-wire proportional counter neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kyle A.; Edwards, Nathaniel S.; Kusner, Michael R.; Mayhugh, Michael R.; Montag, Benjamin W.; Schmidt, Aaron J.; Wayant, Clayton D.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2015-11-01

    Several Li foil multi-wire proportional counters were constructed with five layers of 75 μm thick 6Li foils spaced 1.63 cm apart. Each detector had 1250 cm2 of active area and was backfilled with 1.0 atm of P-10 gas. Two of these detectors were positioned back-to-front with 5.0 cm of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) positioned between the two detectors and on the front and back. Additional 2.54 cm thick HDPE sheets were added to the remaining sides. The detectors were operated with a single electronics unit and were delivered to a test facility where multiple neutron and gamma-ray sensitivity experiments were completed. First, a 252Cf neutron source was positioned at various distances from the front of the detector and the absolute detection efficiency (cps ng-1) was recorded at each distance. Second, a transient test was completed by moving the neutron source in front of the detector at a constant rate while recording the change in count rate (cps). Third, the lateral sensitivity and symmetry of the detection system was investigated by positioning a 252Cf source up to 5.0 m away from the centerline of the arrayed detectors in 1.0 m increments in both outward directions. The angular response was investigated by positioning the 252Cf source 2.0 m from the center of the device and recording the count rate at each stationary position in 15° increments from 0° to 360°. The count rate varied 15% from minimum to maximum during the angular response test. Additionally, the arrayed system was modeled in MCNP6 and had an intrinsic neutron detection efficiency of 12.6% for a bare 252Cf source, less than the experimentally determined efficiency of 13.9±0.03%, as expected. The gamma-ray sensitivity of the detection system was also investigated and pulse-height spectra were collected and plotted against a neutron response spectrum for comparison.

  15. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleson, Timothy A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sahai, Nita [University of Akron; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Dura, Joseph A [ORNL; Majkrzak, Charles F [ORNL; Giuffre, Anthony J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  16. Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  17. The effect of surface texture on total reflection of neutrons and X-rays from modified interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Roser, S.J.; Hughes, A.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray and neutron scattering from macroscopically rough surfaces and interfaces is considered and a new method of analysis based on the variation of the shape of the total reflection edge in the reflectivity profile is proposed. It was shown that in the limit that the correlation length and the h......X-ray and neutron scattering from macroscopically rough surfaces and interfaces is considered and a new method of analysis based on the variation of the shape of the total reflection edge in the reflectivity profile is proposed. It was shown that in the limit that the correlation length...... and the height of the surface roughness are larger than the wavelength (at least 100 times bigger) of the incoming beam, the total reflection edge in the reflection profile becomes rounded. This technique allows direct analysis of the variation of the reflectivity pro le in terms of the structure of the surface...

  18. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    films or films with magnetic properties. The reason is the peculiar property of neutron light since the mass of a neutron is close to the one of a proton, and since it bears a magnetic moment. The optical properties of matter, when interacting with neutrons, are described by a refractive index......Neutron (and X-ray) reflectometry constitute complementary interfacially sensitive techniques that open access to studying the structure within thin films of both soft and hard condensed matter. Film thickness starts oxide surfaces on bulk substrates, proceeding to (pauci-)molecular layers and up...... to hundreds of nanometers. Thickness resolution for flat surfaces is in the range of few Ǻngstrøm, and as a peculiar benefit, the presence and properties of buried interfaces are accessible. Focus here will be on neutron reflectometry, a technique that is unique in applications involving composite organic...

  19. Revisiting the observed surface climate response to large volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Fabian; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the range in presently available observational, reanalysis and model data, we revisit the surface climate response to large tropical volcanic eruptions from the end of the 19th century until present. We focus on the dynamically driven response of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the radiative-driven tropical temperature response. Using 10 different reanalysis products and the Hadley Centre Sea Level Pressure observational dataset (HadSLP2) we confirm a positive tendency in the phase of the NAO during boreal winters following large volcanic eruptions, although we conclude that it is not as clear cut as the current literature suggests. While different reanalyses agree well on the sign of the surface volcanic NAO response for individual volcanoes, the spread in the response is often large (˜ 1/2 standard deviation). This inter-reanalysis spread is actually larger for the more recent volcanic eruptions, and in one case does not encompass observations (El Chichón). These are all in the satellite era and therefore assimilate more atmospheric data that may lead to a more complex interaction for the surface response. The phase of the NAO leads to a dynamically driven warm anomaly over northern Europe in winter, which is present in all datasets considered. The general cooling of the surface temperature due to reduced incoming shortwave radiation is therefore disturbed by dynamical impacts. In the tropics, where less dynamically driven influences are present, we confirm a predominant cooling after most but not all eruptions. All datasets agree well on the strength of the tropical response, with the observed and reanalysis response being statistically significant but the modelled response not being significant due to the high variability across models.

  20. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Torii, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Junzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Endo, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient. (author)

  1. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, K; Kishi, T; Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Nose, T; Torii, Y; Uchiyama, J; Yamamoto, T

    2002-01-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient.

  2. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  3. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  4. Lunar prospector epithermal neutrons from impact craters and landing sites: Implications for surface maturity and hydrogen distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Feldman, W.C.; Lawrence, D.J.; Maurice, S.; Swindle, T.D.; Lucey, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Initial studies of neutron spectrometer data returned by Lunar Prospector concentrated on the discovery of enhanced hydrogen abundances near both lunar poles. However, the nonpolar data exhibit intriguing patterns that appear spatially correlated with surface features such as young impact craters (e.g., Tycho). Such immature crater materials may have low hydrogen contents because of their relative lack of exposure to solar wind-implanted volatiles. We tested this hypothesis by comparing epithermal* neutron counts (i.e., epithermal -0.057 ?? thermal neutrons) for Copernican-age craters classified as relatively young, intermediate, and old (as determined by previous studies of Clementine optical maturity variations). The epithermal* counts of the crater and continuous ejecta regions suggest that the youngest impact materials are relatively devoid of hydrogen in the upper 1 m of regolith. We also show that the mean hydrogen contents measured in Apollo and Luna landing site samples are only moderately well correlated to the epithermal* neutron counts at the landing sites, likely owing to the effects of rare earth elements. These results suggest that further work is required to define better how hydrogen distribution can be revealed by epithermal neutrons in order to understand more fully the nature and sources (e.g., solar wind, meteorite impacts) of volatiles in the lunar regolith.

  5. Dichotomy Between Black Hole and Neutron Star Accretion: Effect of Hard Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhang, Prasun; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-07-01

    Estimates of accretion rate on to compact objects have been explored based on the well-known, spherically symmetric, inviscid, steady-state solution given by Bondi. This solution assumes that there is a sink of mass at the center -- which in case of a black hole (BH) corresponds to the advection of matter across the event horizon. Other stars, such as a neutron star (NS), have surfaces and hence the infalling matter has to come to rest at the surface. We study the initial value problem in which the matter distribution is uniform and at rest at time t=0 with different inner radial boundary conditions for BHs and NSs: inflow boundary condition valid for BHs; and reflective or settling boundary condition for NSs. We obtain a similarity solution for the flow with inner inflow and reflective boundary conditions (assuming a cold ambient medium) and compare with numerical simulations of the Euler equations. One-dimensional simulations show the formation of an outward propagating and a standing shock in NS system for reflective and settling boundary conditions respectively. Two-dimensional simulations show that both these flows are unstable (locally to convection and globally to a standing shock instability). Numerical simulations show that in steady state, spherical accretion rate on to a NS for reflective boundary condition is suppressed by orders of magnitude compared to that on to a BH.

  6. Mosaic diamond detectors for fast neutrons and large ionizing radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girolami, Marco; Calvani, Paolo; Trucchi, Daniele M. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Rome (Italy); Bellucci, Alessandro [Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Cazzaniga, Carlo; Rebai, Marica; Rigamonti, Davide [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dei Plasmi (IFP), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, Marco [Istituto di Fisica dei Plasmi (IFP), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Milano (Italy); Pillon, Mario [ENEA, Centro Ricerche di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    First neutron and X-ray beam tests on a novel 12-pixel single-crystal diamond mosaic detector are presented and discussed. Preliminary characterization of single-pixel electronic properties, performed with α particles, results in charge carrier mobilities >2000 cm{sup 2} Vs{sup -1} and saturation velocities of the order of 10{sup 7} cm s{sup -1}. Signal stability over time, measured with a {sup 241}Am source (37 kBq activity), is longer than 5 h. Tests under an intense X-ray beam (1 Gy h{sup -1} dose-rate) show a very good response uniformity (down to about 1% of relative standard deviation from mean value), suggesting a high level of pixel reproducibility at intermediate bias voltages (ranging from 20 to 100 V). Response uniformity reduces at voltages >200 V, due presumably to radiation-assisted detrapping effects. Preliminary results of 12-pixel simultaneous acquisitions of X-ray beam profiles and pulse height spectra under a fast neutron beam (14 MeV) are also presented. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Pulsar J0453+1559: A Double Neutron Star System with a Large Mass Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, J G; Freire, P C C; Deneva, J S; Jenet, F A; McLaughlin, M A; Bagchi, M; Bates, S D; Ridolfi, A

    2015-01-01

    To understand the nature of supernovae and neutron star (NS) formation, as well as binary stellar evolution and their interactions, it is important to probe the distribution of NS masses. Until now, all double NS (DNS) systems have been measured to have a mass ratio close to unity (q $\\geq$ 0.91). Here we report the measurement of the individual masses of the 4.07-day binary pulsar J0453+1559 from measurements of the rate of advance of periastron and Shapiro delay: The mass of the pulsar is 1.559(5) $M_{\\odot}$ and that of its companion is 1.174(4) $M_{\\odot}$; q = 0.75. If this companion is also a neutron star (NS), as indicated by the orbital eccentricity of the system (e=0.11), then its mass is the smallest precisely measured for any such object. The pulsar has a spin period of 45.7 ms and a spin derivative of 1.8616(7) x$10^-19$; from these we derive a characteristic age of ~ 4.1 x $10^9$ years and a magnetic field of ~ 2.9 x $10^9$ G,i.e, this pulsar was mildly recycled by accretion of matter from the pr...

  8. A Tailorable Structural Composite for GCR and Albedo Neutron Protection on the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A tailorable structural composite that will provide protection from the lunar radiation environment, including GCR and albedo neutrons will be developed. This...

  9. Specifics of surface runoff contents and treatment in large cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Chechevichkin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The degree of surface runoff pollution in large cities has been assessed in modern conditions in the case study of production sites of St. Petersburg. Increased content of petroleum derivatives and heavy metal ions both in rainwater runoff and especially in snowmelt runoff has been revealed. It has been established that the composition of infiltration runoff from the newly built-up sites within the city limits commonly depends on their background, especially in the places of former unauthorized dumps, which are usually buried under the building sites. The content of petroleum derivatives in such surface runoff can exceed significantly their content in the runoff of landfills. Most petroleum derivatives appear in the surface runoff as emulsified and associated with suspended matters forms, which are a source of secondary pollution of waste water as it is accumulated in settlers and traps of local waste water treatment plants. Filtrational-sorptive technologies of surface runoff treatment are the most effective and simple in terms of both treatment and waste disposal.

  10. Exposing earth surface process model simulations to a large audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Kettner, A. J.; Borkowski, L.; Russell, E. L.; Peddicord, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) represents a diverse group of >1300 scientists who develop and apply numerical models to better understand the Earth's surface. CSDMS has a mandate to make the public more aware of model capabilities and therefore started sharing state-of-the-art surface process modeling results with large audiences. One platform to reach audiences outside the science community is through museum displays on 'Science on a Sphere' (SOS). Developed by NOAA, SOS is a giant globe, linked with computers and multiple projectors and can display data and animations on a sphere. CSDMS has developed and contributed model simulation datasets for the SOS system since 2014, including hydrological processes, coastal processes, and human interactions with the environment. Model simulations of a hydrological and sediment transport model (WBM-SED) illustrate global river discharge patterns. WAVEWATCH III simulations have been specifically processed to show the impacts of hurricanes on ocean waves, with focus on hurricane Katrina and super storm Sandy. A large world dataset of dams built over the last two centuries gives an impression of the profound influence of humans on water management. Given the exposure of SOS, CSDMS aims to contribute at least 2 model datasets a year, and will soon provide displays of global river sediment fluxes and changes of the sea ice free season along the Arctic coast. Over 100 facilities worldwide show these numerical model displays to an estimated 33 million people every year. Datasets storyboards, and teacher follow-up materials associated with the simulations, are developed to address common core science K-12 standards. CSDMS dataset documentation aims to make people aware of the fact that they look at numerical model results, that underlying models have inherent assumptions and simplifications, and that limitations are known. CSDMS contributions aim to familiarize large audiences with the use of numerical

  11. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Belyaeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W6 + ions of 20 MeV energy. Ar+ ions with energy 600 eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  12. PREFACE: Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    This special issue is devoted to describing recent applications of x-ray and neutron scattering techniques to the exploration of surfaces and buried interfaces of various functional materials. Unlike many other surface-sensitive methods, these techniques do not require ultra high vacuum, and therefore, a variety of real and complicated surfaces fall within the scope of analysis. It must be particularly emphasized that the techniques are capable of seeing even buried function interfaces as well as the surface. Furthermore, the information, which ranges from the atomic to mesoscopic scale, is highly quantitative and reproducible. The non-destructive nature of the techniques is another important advantage of using x-rays and neutrons, when compared with other atomic-scale analyses. This ensures that the same specimen can be measured by other techniques. Such features are fairly attractive when exploring multilayered materials with nanostructures (dots, tubes, wires, etc), which are finding applications in electronic, magnetic, optical and other devices. The Japan Applied Physics Society has established a group to develop the research field of studying buried function interfaces with x-rays and neutrons. As the methods can be applied to almost all types of materials, from semiconductor and electronic devices to soft materials, participants have fairly different backgrounds but share a common interest in state-of-the-art x-ray and neutron techniques and sophisticated applications. A series of workshops has been organized almost every year since 2001. Some international interactions have been continued intensively, although the community is part of a Japanese society. This special issue does not report the proceedings of the recent workshop, although all the authors are in some way involved in the activities of the above society. Initially, we intended to collect quite long overview papers, including the authors' latest and most important original results, as well as

  13. The market for large rigid haul trucks in surface mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilewicz, P.

    2002-04-15

    Originally published in 2001 this updated report provides a definition of the market for large rigid haulers in surface mining. The analysis covers changes to the mining market segments buying these machines including the gains made by coal producers, retrenchment in copper mining, the consolidation taking place among gold mining companies, and the expansion of iron ore producers in Australia and Brazil. It includes a detailed accounting of 2001 truck shipments, and an analysis of trends in the Ultra-truck segment. It concludes with a revised forecast for shipments through 2006. 12 charts, 56 tabs., 2 apps.

  14. Measurement of neutron diffraction with compact neutron source RANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Y.; Takamura, M.; Taketani, A.; Sunaga, H.; Otake, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Kumagai, M.; Oba, Y.; Hama, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffraction is used as a measurement technique for crystal structure. X-rays or electron beam with wavelength that is close to the lattice constant of the crystal is often used for the measurement. They have sensitivity in surface (0.01mm) of heavy metals due to the mean free path for heavy ions. Neutron diffraction has the probe of the internal structure of the heavy metals because it has a longer mean free path than that of the X-rays or the electrons. However, the neutron diffraction measurement is not widely used because large facilities are required in the many neutron sources. RANS (Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source) is developed as a neutron source which is usable easily in laboratories and factories. In RANS, fast neutrons are generated by 7MeV protons colliding on a Be target. Some fast neutrons are moderated with polyethylene to thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons of 10meV which have wavelength of 10nm can be used for the diffraction measurement. In this study, the texture evolution in steels was measured with RANS and the validity of the compact neutron source was proved. The texture of IF steel sheets with the thickness of 1.0mm was measured with 10minutes run. The resolution is 2% and is enough to analyze a evolution in texture due to compression/tensile deformation or a volume fraction of two phases in the steel sample. These results have proven the possibility to use compact neutron source for the analysis of mesoscopic structure of metallic materials.

  15. Large piezoresistive effect in surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, S. D., E-mail: stoffel.d.janssens@gmail.com; Haenen, K., E-mail: ken.haenen@uhasselt.be [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Drijkoningen, S. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2014-09-08

    Surface conductivity in hydrogen-terminated single crystal diamond is an intriguing phenomenon for fundamental reasons as well as for application driven research. Surface conductivity is also observed in hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond although the electronic transport mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, the piezoresistive properties of intrinsic surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond are investigated. A gauge factor of 35 is calculated from bulging a diamond membrane of 350 nm thick, with a diameter of 656 μm and a sheet resistance of 1.45 MΩ/sq. The large piezoresistive effect is reasoned to originate directly from strain-induced changes in the resistivity of the grain boundaries. Additionally, we ascribe a small time-dependent fraction of the piezoresistive effect to charge trapping of charge carriers at grain boundaries. In conclusion, time-dependent piezoresistive effect measurements act as a tool for deeper understanding the complex electronic transport mechanisms induced by grain boundaries in a polycrystalline material or nanocomposite.

  16. Surface Chemistry and Growth of Large Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine; Aikawa, Yuri; Herbst, Eric; Millar, Tom; Widicus Weaver, Susanna; Nomura, Hideko

    Protoplanetary disks are vital objects in star and planet formation, possessing all the material - dust, gas, and ice - which may form a planetary system orbiting the new star. To date, a handful of small and relatively simple molecules have been observed in nearby disks reflecting the limitations of existing telescopes. However, in the era of ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, we expect the molecular inventory of protoplanetary disks to significantly increase. Of particular interest are so-called complex organic molecules (COMs) which are thought to be necessary precursors to molecules important for prebiotic chemistry, such as, amino acids. The formation of COMs remains one of the puzzles of astrochemistry. Under the physical conditions in interstellar and circumstellar environments, COMs do not have efficient gas-phase routes to formation. Instead, they are postulated to form via association reactions on and within ice mantles on the the surfaces of dust grains and released to the gas phase via either thermal desorption (sublimation) or desorpton triggered by the absorption of UV radiation (photodesorption). In this presentation, I will discuss the synthesis of COMs in protoplanetary disks to investigate the potential origin of complex molecules in planetary systems. I will present results from exploratory models of a protoplanetary disk around a low-mass star including a large grain-surface chemical network to model the formation of large complex organic molecules. I will compare the resulting abundances of COMs in the gas phase and in the solid phase with existing observations towards nearby low-mass star-disk systems and comets, respectively. I will also discuss how the formation of COMs is influenced by the birth environment of the young stellar system.

  17. Measurement of spin-flip probabilities for ultracold neutrons interacting with nickel phosphorus coated surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Z; Brandt, A; Callahan, N B; Clayton, S M; Currie, S A; Ito, T M; Makela, M; Masuda, Y; Morris, C L; Pattie, R; Ramsey, J C; Salvat, D J; Saunders, A; Young, A R

    2015-01-01

    We report a measurement of the spin-flip probabilities for ultracold neutrons interacting with surfaces coated with nickel phosphorus. For 50 $\\mu$m thick nickel phosphorus coated on stainless steel, the spin-flip probability per bounce was found to be $\\beta_{\\rm NiP\\;on\\;SS} = (3.3^{+1.8}_{-5.6}) \\times 10^{-6}$. For 50 $\\mu$m thick nickel phosphorus coated on aluminum, the spin-flip probability per bounce was found to be $\\beta_{\\rm NiP\\;on\\;Al} = (3.6^{+2.1}_{-5.9}) \\times 10^{-6}$. For the copper guide used as reference, the spin flip probability per bounce was found to be $\\beta_{\\rm Cu} = (6.7^{+5.0}_{-2.5}) \\times 10^{-6}$. Nickel phosphorus coated stainless steel or aluminum provides a solution when UCN guides that have a high Fermi potential and are low-cost, mechanically robust, and non-depolarizing are needed.

  18. Spread of Matter over a Neutron-Star Surface During Disk Accretion: Deceleration of Rapid Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Sunyaev, R A

    2011-01-01

    The problem of disk accretion onto the surface of a neutron star with a weak magnetic field at a luminosity exceeding several percent of Eddington is reduced to the problem of the braking of a hypersonic flow with a velocity that is 0.4-0.5 of the speed of light above the base of the spreading layer -- a dense atmosphere made up of previously fallen matter. We show that turbulent braking in the Prandtl-Karman model with universally accepted coefficients for terrestrial conditions and laboratory experiments and a ladder of interacting gravity waves in a stratified quasi-exponential atmosphere at standard Richardson numbers lead to a spin-up of the massive zone that extends to the ocean made up of a plasma with degenerate electrons. Turbulent braking in the ocean at the boundary with the outer solid crust reduces the rotation velocity to the solid-body rotation velocity of the star. This situation should lead to strong heating of deep atmospheric layers and to the switch-off of the explosive helium burning mech...

  19. QPO emission from moving hot spots on the surface of neutron stars: a model

    CERN Document Server

    Bachetti, Matteo; Kulkarni, Akshay; Burderi, Luciano; di Salvo, Tiziana

    2009-01-01

    We present recent results of 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of neutron stars with small misalignment angles, as regards the features in light curves produced by regular movements of the hot spots during accretion onto the star. In particular, we show that the variation of position of the hot spot created by the infalling matter, as observed in 3D simulations, can produce high frequency Quasi Periodic Oscillations with frequencies associated with the inner zone of the disk. Simulations show that the usual assumption of a fixed hot spot near the polar region is valid only for misalignment angles relatively large. Otherwise, two phenomena challenge the assumption: one is the presence of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the disk-magnetospheric boundary (e.g. Kulkarni & Romanova 2008), which produce tongues of accreting matter that can reach the star almost anywhere between the equator and the polar region; the other one is the motion of the hot spot around the magnetic pole during stable accretion (e.g. R...

  20. Neutron Reflection Study of Surface Adsorption of Fc, Fab, and the Whole mAb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyi; Li, Ruiheng; Smith, Charles; Pan, Fang; Campana, Mario; Webster, John R P; van der Walle, Christopher F; Uddin, Shahid; Bishop, Steve M; Narwal, Rojaramani; Warwicker, Jim; Lu, Jian Ren

    2017-07-12

    Characterizing the influence of fragment crystallization (Fc) and antigen-binding fragment (Fab) on monoclonal antibody (mAb) adsorption at the air/water interface is an important step to understanding liquid mAb drug product stability during manufacture, shipping, and storage. Here, neutron reflection is used to study the air/water adsorption of a mAb and its Fc and Fab fragments. By varying the isotopic contrast, the adsorbed amount, thickness, orientation, and immersion of the adsorbed layers could be determined unambiguously. While Fc adsorption reached saturation within the hour, its surface adsorbed amount showed little variation with bulk concentration. In contrast, Fab adsorption was slower and the adsorbed amount was concentration dependent. The much higher Fc adsorption, as compared to Fab, was linked to its lower surface charge. Time and concentration dependence of mAb adsorption was dominated by Fab behavior, although both Fab and Fc behaviors contributed to the amount of mAb adsorbed. Changing the pH from 5.5 to 8.8 did not much perturb the adsorbed amount of Fc, Fab, or mAb. However, a small decrease in adsorption was observed for the Fc over pH 8-8.8 and vice versa for the Fab and mAb, consistent with a dominant Fab behavior. As bulk concentration increased from 5 to 50 ppm, the thicknesses of the Fc layers were almost constant at 40 Å, while Fab and mAb layers increased from 45 to 50 Å. These results imply that the adsorbed mAb, Fc, and Fab all retained their globular structures and were oriented with their short axial lengths perpendicular to the interface.

  1. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  2. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of large amplitude motions in molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bee, M. [Univ. J. Fourier - Grenoble 1, Lab. de Spectrometrie Physique, Saint-Martin d`Heres (France)

    1996-12-31

    This lecture aims at giving some illustrations of the use of Incoherent Quasielastic Neutron Scattering in the investigation of motions of atoms or molecules in phases with dynamical disorder. The general incoherent scattering function is first recalled. Then the Elastic Incoherent Structure Factor is introduced. It is shown how its determination permits to deduce a particular dynamical model. Long-range translational diffusion is illustrated by some experiments carried out with liquids or with different chemical species intercalated in porous media. Examples of rotational motions are provided by solid phases where an orientational disorder of the molecules exists. The jump model is the most commonly used and yields simple scattering laws which can be easily handled. Highly disordered crystals require a description in terms of the isotropic rotational diffusion model. Many of the present studies are concerned with rather complicated systems. Considerable help is obtained either by using selectively deuterated samples or by carrying out measurements with semi-oriented samples. (author) 5 figs., 14 refs.

  3. In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Large Monotonic Deformations of Superelastic Nitinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebner, Aaron P.; Paranjape, Harshad M.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brinson, L. Catherine; Pelton, Alan R.

    2015-06-01

    Superelastic Nitinol micromechanics are studied well into plastic deformation regimes using neutron diffraction. Insights are made into the nature of initial transformation, bulk transformation, plastic deformation, and unloading. Schmid factor predictions based on habit plane variants are found to best describe the very first grains that transform, prior to the transformation plateaus. However, the bulk transformation behavior that gives rise to transformation plateaus violates single crystal Schmid factor analyses, indicating that in bulk polycrystals, it is the effect of grain neighborhoods, not the orientations of individual grains, that drives transformation behaviors. Beyond the plateaus, a sudden shift in micromechanical deformation mechanisms is observed at ~8.50 %/4.75 % tension/compression engineering strain. This mechanism results in reverse-phase transformation in both cases, indicating a strong relaxation in internal stresses of the samples. It is inferred that this mechanism is most likely initial bulk plastic flow, and postulated that it is the reason for a transition from fatigue life enhancement to detriment when pre-straining superelastic Nitinol. The data presented in this work provide critical datasets for development and verification of both phenomenological internal variable-driven and micromechanical theories of transformation-plasticity coupling in shape memory alloys.

  4. Development of Neutron Probes for Characterization of Hazardous Materials in the Sub-surface Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, Raymond Patrick; McGrath, Christopher Andrew; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2002-08-01

    Neutron probes are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the detection, identification and quantification of hazardous materials in the ground. Such materials include plutonium, uranium, americium, chlorine and fluorine. Both a Neutron Gamma (NG) probe and a Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) probe are being developed. The NG probe is used primarily for nuclide identification and quantification measurements. The PFN is used mostly for the detection and measurement of fissile material, but also for the determination of thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross sections of the various elements comprising the ground matrix. Calibration of these probes will be carried out at the INEEL using an indoor facility that has been designed for this activity.

  5. Development of Neutron Probes for Characterization of Hazardous Materials in the Sub-surface Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, R.P.; McGrath, C.A.; Lopez, J.C.

    2002-05-15

    Neutron probes are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the detection, identification and quantification of hazardous materials in the ground. Such materials include plutonium, uranium, americium, chlorine and fluorine. Both a Neutron Gamma (NG) probe and a Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) probe are being developed. The NG probe is used primarily for nuclide identification and quantification measurements. The PFN is used mostly for the detection and measurement of fissile material, but also for the determination of thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross sections of the various elements comprising the ground matrix. Calibration of these probes will be carried out at the INEEL using an indoor facility that has been designed for this activity.

  6. Abnormal changes in the density of thermal neutron flux in biocenoses near the earth surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, N V; Smirnov, A N; Kolesnikov, M V; Semenov, D S; Frolov, V A; Lapshin, V B; Syroeshkin, A V

    2007-04-01

    We revealed an increase in the density of thermal neutron flux in forest biocenoses, which was not associated with astrogeophysical events. The maximum spike of this parameter in the biocenosis reached 10,000 n/(sec x m2). Diurnal pattern of the density of thermal neutron flux depended only on the type of biocenosis. The effects of biomodulation of corpuscular radiation for balneology are discussed.

  7. Transport of ultracold neutrons through a mirror system with surface roughness as a velocity filter

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhova, L A; Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Geltenbort, P; Abele, H; Burgdörfer, J

    2012-01-01

    We perform classical Monte Carlo simulations of ultracold neutron transport through an absorbing-reflecting mirror system in the Earth's gravitational field. We show that the underlying mixed phase space of regular skipping motion and random motion due to disorder scattering can be exploited to realize a velocity filter for ultracold neutrons. The range of velocities selected is controlled by geometric parameters of the wave guide. Possible applications include investigations of transport and scattering dynamics in confined systems.

  8. Symmetry energy and surface properties of neutron-rich exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidarov, M. K.; Antonov, A. N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Sarriguren, P. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Moya de Guerra, E. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-23

    The symmetry energy, the neutron pressure and the asymmetric compressibility of spherical Ni, Sn, and Pb and deformed Kr and Sm neutron-rich even-even nuclei are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy-density functional. The correlation between the thickness of the neutron skin and the characteristics related with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is investigated for isotopic chains of these nuclei in the framework of the deformed self-consistent mean-field Skyrme HF+BCS method. The mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness are also studied together with the role of the neutron-proton asymmetry. The studied correlations reveal a smoother behavior in the case of spherical nuclei than for deformed ones. We also notice that the neutron skin thickness obtained for {sup 208}Pb with SLy4 force is found to be in a good agreement with the recent data. In addition to the interest that this study may have by itself, we give some numerical arguments in proof of the existence of peculiarities of the studied quantities in Ni and Sn isotopic chains that are not present in the Pb chain.

  9. Estimates of the neutron emission during large solar flares in the rising and maximum period of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, D.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Sako, T.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.

    2016-03-01

    We searched for solar neutrons using the data collected by six detectors from the International Network of Solar Neutron Telescopes and one Neutron Monitor between January 2010 and December 2014. We considered the peak time of the X-ray intensity of thirty five ≥ X1.0 class flares detected by GOES satellite as the most probable production time of solar neutrons. We prepared a light-curve of the solar neutron telescopes and the neutron monitor for each flare, spanning ± 3 h from the peak time of GOES. Based on these light curves, we performed a statistical analysis for each flare. Setting a significance level at greater than 3σ, we report that no statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found. Therefore, upper limits are determined by the background level and solar angle of these thirty five solar flares. Our calculation assumed a power-law neutron energy spectrum and an impulsive emission profile at the Sun. The estimated upper limits of the neutron emission are consistent within the order of magnitude of the successful detections of solar neutrons made in solar cycle 23.

  10. Structure of DNA-Cationic Surfactant Complexes at Hydrophobically Modified and Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces as Revealed by Neutron Reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna; Campbell, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the structure and composition of mixed DNA-cationic surfactant adsorption layers on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid surfaces. We have focused on the effects of the bulk concentrations, the surfactant chain length, and the type solid surface on the interfacial...... layer structure (the location, coverage, and conformation the e DNA and surfactant molecules). Neutron reflectometry is the technique of choice for revealing the surface layer structure by means of selective deuteration. We start by studying the interfacial complexation of DNA...... with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on hydrophobic surfaces, where we show that DNA molecules are located on top of a self-assembled surfactant monolayer, with the thickness of the DNA layer and the surfactant DNA ratio determined by the surface coverage of the underlying...

  11. Large Core Code Evaluation Working Group Benchmark Problem Four: neutronics and burnup analysis of a large heterogeneous fast reactor. Part 1. Analysis of benchmark results. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, C.L.; Protsik, R.; Lewellen, J.W. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The Large Core Code Evaluation Working Group Benchmark Problem Four was specified to provide a stringent test of the current methods which are used in the nuclear design and analyses process. The benchmark specifications provided a base for performing detailed burnup calculations over the first two irradiation cycles for a large heterogeneous fast reactor. Particular emphasis was placed on the techniques for modeling the three-dimensional benchmark geometry, and sensitivity studies were carried out to determine the performance parameter sensitivities to changes in the neutronics and burnup specifications. The results of the Benchmark Four calculations indicated that a linked RZ-XY (Hex) two-dimensional representation of the benchmark model geometry can be used to predict mass balance data, power distributions, regionwise fuel exposure data and burnup reactivities with good accuracy when compared with the results of direct three-dimensional computations. Most of the small differences in the results of the benchmark analyses by the different participants were attributed to ambiguities in carrying out the regionwise flux renormalization calculations throughout the burnup step.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of GCR neutron capture production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites and lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    KolláR, D.; Michel, R.; Masarik, J.

    2006-03-01

    A purely physical model based on a Monte Carlo simulation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particle interaction with meteoroids is used to investigate neutron interactions down to thermal energies. Experimental and/or evaluated excitation functions are used to calculate neutron capture production rates as a function of the size of the meteoroid and the depth below its surface. Presented are the depth profiles of cosmogenic radionuclides 36Cl, 41Ca, 60Co, 59Ni, and 129I for meteoroid radii from 10 cm up to 500 cm and a 2π irradiation. Effects of bulk chemical composition on n-capture processes are studied and discussed for various chondritic and lunar compositions. The mean GCR particle flux over the last 300 ka was determined from the comparison of simulations with measured 41Ca activities in the Apollo 15 drill core. The determined value significantly differs from that obtained using equivalent models of spallation residue production.

  13. A New Module for Large Scale Bayesian Evaluation in the Fast Neutron Energy Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, G., E-mail: gschnabel@ati.ac.at; Leeb, H.

    2015-01-15

    We present an improved update scheme for the Linearized Bayesian Update procedure (LBUP). The revised procedure extends the application of the LBUP to a large number of observables. The consistent update of dozens of millions of observables becomes manageable by circumventing the costly calculation of the prior covariance matrix. Nuclear data evaluations based on the revised scheme may exhaustively enclose all differential and angle-integrated channels, treating all correlations between them exactly in the update procedure.

  14. Large scale facilities for synchrotron radiation and neutrons. New possibilities for Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feidenhans' l, R

    2003-02-01

    New large-scale facilities for investigating the structure and dynamics of matter and biological systems are currently under construction or are being planned at many locations around Europe. These facilities are likely to have a large impact on the science landscape in Europe, and more locally, as some will be located in the immediate neighbourhood of Denmark. The facilities will enable new analytical capabilities of matter, which will push the frontiers of science and technology in many areas of research of importance for Denmark. This report provides an overview of the new facilities (including very rough funding estimates) of importance for Danish science, describes possible ways of engaging in the various projects and identifies potential user groups. The report also includes a summary of the status of the current use of existing facilities as a benchmark. This is done by showing different cross sections through this multiple parameter space of activities. The intention is that the report should serve as guideline for making a long-term national strategy for the exploitation of large-scale facilities in order to help to optimise their impact on science, education and industry within Denmark, and to safeguard the prominent internationally leading role that Denmark has in this area. (LN)

  15. Experimental characterization of micromilled surfaces by large range AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo; Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2004-01-01

    Surface generation by ball nose micromilling can be simulated based on technological parameters (ball nose radius, axial and radial depth of cut, feed rate, cutting speed). However, surface 3D topography of such surfaces often widely differs from the simulated one due to the distinctive behaviour...

  16. New model of relativistic slowly rotating neutron stars with surface layer crust: application to giant glitches of Vela Pulsar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Romero, L M; Blazquez-Salcedo, J L, E-mail: mgromero@fis.ucm.es, E-mail: joseluis.blazquez@fis.ucm.es [Depto. Fisica Teorica II, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040-Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    Introducing a surface layer of matter on the edge of a neutron star in slow rigid rotation, we analyze, from an intrinsic point of view, the junction conditions that must be satisfied between the interior and exterior solutions of the Einstein equations. In our model the core-crust transition pressure arise as an essential parameter in the description of a configuration. As an application of this formalism, we describe giant glitches of the Vela pulsar as a result of variations in the transition pressure, finding that these small changes are compatible with the expected temperature variations of the inner crust during glitch time

  17. Precision nanometrology of a large area microstructured metrology surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Gao; TAKESHI Araki; SATOSHI Kiyono

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction The authors have been working on a newsurface encoder for detecting multi-degree-of-freedom(MDOF) translational and tilt motionsof precision stages[1]. The surface encoder con-sists of two fundamental elements: a sinusoidalmicrostructured metrology surface, which is re-ferred to as the angle grid, and a two-dimension-al (2D) slope sensor[2-3].

  18. Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) for large break loss of coolant accidents (LBLOCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, A. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Cheng, L. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dimenna, R. A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Griffith, P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wilson, G. E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-06-01

    A team of experts in reactor analysis conducted a phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) exercise for a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) in the Advanced Neutron source Reactor (ANSR). The LBLOCA transient is broken into two separate parts for the PIR exercise. The first part considers the initial depressurization of the system that follows the opening of the break. The second part of the transient includes long-term decay heat removal after the reactor is shut down and the system is depressurized. A PIR is developed for each part of the LBLOCA. The ranking results are reviewed to establish if models in the RELAP5-MOD3 thermalhydraulic code are adequate for use in ANSR LBLOCA simulations. Deficiencies in the RELAP5-MOD3 code are identified and existing data or models are recommended to improve the code for this application. Experiments were also suggested to establish models for situations judged to be beyond current knowledge. The applicability of the ANSR PIR results is reviewed for the entire set of transients important to the ANSR safety analysis.

  19. Effect and suppression of parasitic surface damage in neutron irradiated CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Deveaux, M; Scharrer, P; Stroth, J

    2016-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) were chosen as sensor technology for the vertex detectors of STAR, CBM and the upgraded ALICE-ITS. They also constitute a valuable option for tracking devices at future e+e- colliders. Those applications require a substantial tolerance to both, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. To allow for a focused optimization of the radiation tolerance, prototypes are tested by irradiating the devices either with purely ionizing radiation (e.g. soft X-rays) or the most pure sources of non-ionizing radiation available (e.g. reactor neutrons). In the second case, it is typically assumed that the impact of the parasitic $\\gamma$-rays found in the neutron beams is negligible. We checked this assumption by irradiating MAPS with $\\gamma$-rays and comparing the radiation damage generated with the one in neutron irradiated sensors. We conclude that the parasitic radiation doses may cause non-negligible radiation damage. Based on the results we propose a procedure to recognize and to ...

  20. Gravimetric and density profiling using the combination of surface acoustic waves and neutron reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Barker, Robert; Gough, Tim; Topham, Paul D; Howse, Jonathan R; Glidle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    A new approach is described herein, where neutron reflectivity measurements that probe changes in the density profile of thin films as they absorb material from the gas phase have been combined with a Love wave based gravimetric assay that measures the mass of absorbed material. This combination of techniques not only determines the spatial distribution of absorbed molecules, but also reveals the amount of void space within the thin film (a quantity that can be difficult to assess using neutron reflectivity measurements alone). The uptake of organic solvent vapours into spun cast films of polystyrene has been used as a model system with a view to this method having the potential for extension to the study of other systems. These could include, for example, humidity sensors, hydrogel swelling, biomolecule adsorption or transformations of electroactive and chemically reactive thin films. This is the first ever demonstration of combined neutron reflectivity and Love wave-based gravimetry and the experimental caveats, limitations and scope of the method are explored and discussed in detail.

  1. {sup 99}Tc transmutation by spallation neutrons produced in a large lead block; Transmutation de {sup 99}Tc par des neutrons de spallation produits dans un grand massif de plomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamonje, S.; Arnould, H.; Bompas, C.A.; Del Moral, R.; Lacoste, V. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); TARC Collaboration under leadership of C. Rubbia

    1997-06-01

    In the search of hybrid system (the coupling of the particle accelerator to an under-critical reactor) for radioactive waste transmutation the TARC (Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing) program has been developed. One of the target of the TARC program is the study of the efficiency of a `Energy Amplifier` system for nuclear waste incineration. Among the radioactive wastes the most interesting is the fission product {sup 99}Tc from nuclear plants heaving a half-live of {approx} 10{sup 5} years. Using a fast rabbit technique and gamma ray spectroscopy, the transmutation rate of {sup 99}Tc by spallation neutrons inside a large lead block was measured. The data from each 9 s rabbit cycle were stocked by means of an acquisition system based on the CERN CASCADE code especially adapted for gamma spectroscopy and able to catch large amounts of coincidence events. The measurements technique is described and the preliminary results are given. Also, in progress are simulations using new technique for production and propagation of neutrons in lead. Due to the plenty of spallation neutrons the capability of burning certain nuclear wastes is already proved

  2. Characterization and simulation of fast neutron detectors based on surface-barrier VPE GaAs structures with polyethylene converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, A. V.; Chernykh, S. V.; Baryshnikov, F. M.; Didenko, S. I.; Burtebayev, N.; Britvich, G. I.; Kostin, M. Yu.; Chubenko, A. P.; Nassurlla, Marzhan; Nassurlla, Maulen; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Zholdybayev, T.; Glybin, Yu. N.; Sadykov, T. Kh.

    2016-12-01

    Fast neutron detectors with an active area of 80 mm2 based on surface-barrier VPE GaAs structures were fabricated and tested. Polyethylene with density of 0.90 g/cm3 was used as a converter layer. The recoil-proton surface-barrier sensor was fabricated on high purity VPE GaAs epilayers with a thickness of 50 μm. The neutron detection efficiency measured with a 241Am-Be source was 1.30 · 10-3 puls./neutr. for the PE converter thickness of 670 μm. The signal-to-gamma-background ratio was at the level of 50. Simulation of the detector characteristics with Geant4 toolkit has showed good correlation with the experimental data and allowed to estimate the maximal theoretical detection efficiency of the detector which is determined by the PE converter and equals to 1.37 · 10-3 puls./neutr. The difference between the measured and simulated values of the detection efficiency is due to the fact that the events with energies below 0.5 MeV were not taken into account during the measurements.

  3. Plasma Processing of Large Curved Surfaces for SRF Cavity Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The development of the technology based on Cl2/Ar plasma etching has to address several crucial parameters which influence the etching rate and surface roughness, and eventually, determine cavity performance. This includes dependence of the process on the frequency of the RF generator, gas pressure, power level, the driven (inner) electrode configuration, and the chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To demonstrate surface layer removal in the asymmetric non-planar geometry, we are using a simple cylindrical cavity with 8 ports symmetrically distributed over the cylinder. The ports are used for diagnosing the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (RF) circuit elements, chlorine concentration in the Cl2/Ar gas mixtures, residence...

  4. Multiview specular stereo reconstruction of large mirror surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Balzer, Jonathan

    2011-06-01

    In deflectometry, the shape of mirror objects is recovered from distorted images of a calibrated scene. While remarkably high accuracies are achievable, state-of-the-art methods suffer from two distinct weaknesses: First, for mainly constructive reasons, these can only capture a few square centimeters of surface area at once. Second, reconstructions are ambiguous i.e. infinitely many surfaces lead to the same visual impression. We resolve both of these problems by introducing the first multiview specular stereo approach, which jointly evaluates a series of overlapping deflectometric images. Two publicly available benchmarks accompany this paper, enabling us to numerically demonstrate viability and practicability of our approach. © 2011 IEEE.

  5. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  6. Characterization of large area nanostructured surfaces using AFM measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido;

    2012-01-01

    magnitude of the 3D surface amplitude parameters chosen for the analysis, when increasing the Al purity from 99,5% to 99,999%. AFM was then employed to evaluate the periodical arrangements of the nano structured cells. Image processing was used to estimate the average areas value, the height variation...

  7. High Voltage Test Apparatus for a Neutron EDM Experiment and Lower Limit on the Dielectric Strength of Liquid Helium at Large Volumes

    CERN Document Server

    Long, J C; Boissevain, J G; Clark, D J; Cooper, M D; Gómez, J J; Lamoreaux, S K; Mischke, R E; Penttila, S I

    2006-01-01

    A new search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron is underway using ultracold neutrons produced and held in a bath of superfluid helium. Attaining the target sensitivity requires maintaining an electric field of several tens of kilovolts per centimeter across the experimental cell, which is nominally 7.5 cm wide and will contain about 4 liters of superfluid. The electrical properties of liquid helium are expected to be sufficient to meet the design goals, but little is known about these properties for volumes and electrode spacings appropriate to the EDM experiment. Furthermore, direct application of the necessary voltages from an external source to the experimental test cell is impractical. An apparatus to amplify voltages in the liquid helium environment and to test the electrical properties of the liquid for large volumes and electrode spacings has been constructed. The device consists of a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter liquid helium dewar. Preliminary r...

  8. Large negative Goos Hanchen shift at metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, P. T.; Chen, C. W.; Chiang, H.-P.

    2007-08-01

    It has been previously established that for p-polarized light incident onto a semi-infinite absorbing medium, large negative Goos-Hanchen (GH) shifts can be expected in the case of weak absorption at incidence close to the Brewster angle. The effect has been demonstrated for certain semiconducting media at optical frequencies. Here we point out that similar phenomenon can take place for strongly reflecting and attenuating medium such as metal at IR frequencies, with large incident angles close to grazing incidence. Moreover, unlike the previously-studied case with semiconductors, the Brewster angle in the present case with metals plays an insignificant role in the possible hindrance of the observation of such large negative shifts.

  9. A closed form large deformation solution of plate bending with surface effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshu; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2017-01-04

    We study the effect of surface stress on the pure bending of a finite thickness plate under large deformation. The surface is assumed to be isotropic and its stress consists of a part that can be interpreted as a residual stress and a part that stiffens as the surface increases its area. Our results show that residual surface stress and surface stiffness can both increase the overall bending stiffness but through different mechanisms. For sufficiently large residual surface tension, we discover a new type of instability - the bending moment reaches a maximum at a critical curvature. Effects of surface stress on different stress components in the bulk of the plate are discussed and the possibility of self-bending due to asymmetry of the surface properties is also explored. The results of our calculations provide insights into surface stress effects in the large deformation regime and can be used as a test for implementation of finite element methods for surface elasticity.

  10. Large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces for practical applications: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Jia, Shun-Tian; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Jian-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the key topics in the field of large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces, concentrating on substrates that have been used in commercial applications. Practical approaches to superhydrophobic surface construction and hydrophobization are discussed. Applications of superhydrophobic surfaces are described and future trends in superhydrophobic surfaces are predicted. PMID:27877336

  11. Large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces for practical applications: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hua Xue, Shun-Tian Jia, Jing Zhang and Jian-Zhong Ma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the key topics in the field of large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces, concentrating on substrates that have been used in commercial applications. Practical approaches to superhydrophobic surface construction and hydrophobization are discussed. Applications of superhydrophobic surfaces are described and future trends in superhydrophobic surfaces are predicted.

  12. Large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces for practical applications: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Jia, Shun-Tian; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Jian-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the key topics in the field of large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces, concentrating on substrates that have been used in commercial applications. Practical approaches to superhydrophobic surface construction and hydrophobization are discussed. Applications of superhydrophobic surfaces are described and future trends in superhydrophobic surfaces are predicted.

  13. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  14. 3D MHD Simulations of accreting neutron stars: evidence of QPO emission from the surface

    CERN Document Server

    Bachetti, Matteo; Kulkarni, Akshay; Burderi, Luciano; di Salvo, Tiziana; .,

    2009-01-01

    3D Magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that when matter accretes onto neutron stars, in particular if the misalignment angle is small, it does not constantly fall at a fixed spot. Instead, the location at which matter reaches the star moves. These moving hot spots can be produced both during stable accretion, where matter falls near the magnetic poles of the star, and unstable accretion, characterized by the presence of several tongues of matter which fall on the star near the equator, due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Precise modeling with Monte Carlo simulations shows that those movements could be observed as high frequency Quasi Periodic Oscillations. We performed a number of new simulation runs with a much wider set of parameters, focusing on neutron stars with a small misalignment angle. In most cases we observe oscillations whose frequency is correlated with the mass accretion rate $\\dot{M}$. Moreover, in some cases double QPOs appear, each of them showing the same correlation with $\\dot{M}$.

  15. HYPERCRITICAL ACCRETION ONTO A MAGNETIZED NEUTRON STAR SURFACE: A NUMERICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Bernal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La acreción sobre una proto-estrella de neutrones en las horas que siguen al colapso del núcleo de la estrella masiva que le dio origen puede afectar sus propiedades observables. Este fenómeno se da en el régimen denominado hipercrítico (Chevalier 1989, donde el enfriamiento por neutrinos es crucial para la evolución termodin ámica. En este trabajo presentamos un estudio en este contexto en una dimensión con simetría esférica y llevamos a cabo simulaciones numéricas en dos dimensiones dentro de una columna de acreción sobre una estrella de neutrones. Consideramos procesos microfísicos detallados, enfriamiento por neutrinos y la presencia de campos magnéticos en la aproximación de magnetohidrodinámica ideal. Comparamos nuestros resultados numéricos con las soluciones analíticas e investigamos cómo las soluciones, tanto hidrodinámicas como magnetohidrodinámicas, difieren de éstas. Iniciamos también una exploración de cómo este proceso puede afectar la aparición del remanente como un pulsar típico en radio.

  16. Photoinduced surface voltage mapping study for large perovskite single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liu, Yucheng; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhou [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Liu, Shengzhong, E-mail: liusz@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, iChEM, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-05-02

    Using a series of illumination sources, including white light (tungsten-halogen lamp), 445-nm, 532-nm, 635-nm, and 730-nm lasers, the surface photovoltage (SPV) images were mapped for centimeter-sized CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbX{sub 3} (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite single crystals using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The significant SPV signals were observed to be wavelength-dependent. We attribute the appreciable SPV to the built-in electric field in the space charge region. This study shines light into the understanding of photoinduced charge generation and separation processes at nanoscale to help advance the development of perovskite solar cells, optoelectronics, laser, photodetector, and light-emitting diode (LED).

  17. Photoinduced surface voltage mapping study for large perovskite single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liu, Yucheng; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhou; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2016-05-01

    Using a series of illumination sources, including white light (tungsten-halogen lamp), 445-nm, 532-nm, 635-nm, and 730-nm lasers, the surface photovoltage (SPV) images were mapped for centimeter-sized CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite single crystals using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The significant SPV signals were observed to be wavelength-dependent. We attribute the appreciable SPV to the built-in electric field in the space charge region. This study shines light into the understanding of photoinduced charge generation and separation processes at nanoscale to help advance the development of perovskite solar cells, optoelectronics, laser, photodetector, and light-emitting diode (LED).

  18. Flame Propagation on the Surfaces of Rapidly Rotating Neutron Stars during Type I X-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Cavecchi, Yuri; Braithwaite, Jonathan; Levin, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    We present the first vertically resolved hydrodynamic simulations of a laterally propagating, deflagrating flame in the thin helium ocean of a rotating accreting neutron star. We use a new hydrodynamics solver tailored to deal with the large discrepancy in horizontal and vertical length scales typical of neutron star oceans, and which filters out sound waves that would otherwise limit our timesteps. We find that the flame moves horizontally with velocities of order $10^5$ cm s$^{-1}$, crossing the ocean in few seconds, broadly consistent with the rise times of Type I X-ray bursts. We address the open question of what drives flame propagation, and find that heat is transported from burning to unburnt fuel by a combination of top-to-bottom conduction and mixing driven by a baroclinic instability. The speed of the flame propagation is therefore a sensitive function of the ocean conductivity and spin: we explore this dependence for an astrophysically relevant range of parameters and find that in general flame pro...

  19. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  20. Geochemistry of sediments and surface soils from the Nile Delta and lower Nile valley studied by epithermal neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Wafaa M.; Badawy, Wael M.; Fahmi, Naglaa M.; Ali, Khaled; Gad, Mohamed S.; Duliu, Octavian G.; Frontasyeva, Marina V.; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2015-07-01

    The distributions of 36 major and trace elements in 40 surface soil and sediment samples collected from the Egyptian section of the river Nile were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis and compared with corresponding data for the Upper Continental Crust and North American Shale Composite. Their relative distributions indicate the presence of detrital material of igneous origin, most probably resulting from weathering on Ethiopian highlands and transported by the Blue Nile, the Nile main tributary. The distributions of the nickel, zinc, and arsenic contents suggest that the lower part of the Nile and its surroundings including the Nile Delta is not seriously polluted with metals from local human activity. The geographical distributions of Na, Cl, and I as well as results of principal component analysis suggest atmospheric supply of these elements from the ocean. In general the present data may contribute to a better understanding of the geochemistry of the Nile sediments.

  1. Large-scale single-crystal growth of (CH3)2NH2CuCl3 for neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Garam; Oh, In-Hwan; Park, J. M. Sungil; Park, Seong-Hun; Hong, Chang Seop; Lee, Kwang-Sei

    2016-05-01

    Neutron scattering studies on low-dimensional quantum spin systems require large-size single-crystals. Single-crystals of (CH3)2NH2CuCl3 showing low-dimensional magnetic behaviors were grown by a slow solvent evaporation method in a two-solvent system at different temperature settings. The best results were obtained for the bilayer solution of methanol and isopropanol with a molar ratio of 2:1 at 35 °C. The quality of the obtained single-crystals was tested by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction and single-crystal neutron diffraction. In addition, to confirm structural phase transitions (SPTs), thermal analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 300 K and 175 K, respectively, were conducted, confirming the presence of a SPT at Tup=288 K on heating and Tdown=285 K on cooling.

  2. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... with burning off piston surface material. In this work the peak heat load on the piston surface of large marine diesel engines during combustion was investigated. Measurements of the instantaneous surface temperature and surface heat flux on pistons in large marine engines are difficult due to expensive...... was calculated under different conditions in the numerical setup in order to obtain information of the actual peak heat flux experienced at the piston in large marine diesel engines during combustion. The variation of physical parameters influencing the heat transfer during combustion included a variation...

  3. Development and characterization of a high sensitivity segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, T. J.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Heimbach, C. R.; Ji, G.; Nico, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a 3He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated 252Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra are unfolded using a Singular Value Decomposition method, demonstrating a 5% energy resolution at 14 MeV. Finally, we discuss plans for measuring the surface and underground cosmogenic neutron spectra with FaNS-2.

  4. The Potential Well-Depth $U^{(N)}_{\\Sigma}$ Constraints on the Surface Gravitational Red-shift of a Proto Neutron Star

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xian-Feng Zhao

    2011-09-01

    The influence of the potential well depth $U^{(N)}_{\\Sigma}$ of in nuclear matter on the surface gravitational red-shift of a proto neutron star is examined within the framework of the relativistic mean field theory for the baryon octet system. It is found that as $U^{(N)}_{\\Sigma}$ increases from -35 MeV to +35 MeV, the surface gravitational red-shift increases and the influence of the negative $U^{(N)}_{\\Sigma}$ on the surface gravitational red-shift is larger than that of the positive ones. Furthermore, the max/ and the surface gravitational red-shift corresponding to the maximum mass all increase as the $U^{(N)}_{\\Sigma}$ increases, max and being the maximum mass of the proto neutron star and the corresponding radius respectively.

  5. Measurement of very forward neutron energy spectra for 7 TeV proton–proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Adriani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf experiment is designed to use the LHC to verify the hadronic-interaction models used in cosmic-ray physics. Forward baryon production is one of the crucial points to understand the development of cosmic-ray showers. We report the neutron-energy spectra for LHC s=7 TeV proton–proton collisions with the pseudo-rapidity η ranging from 8.81 to 8.99, from 8.99 to 9.22, and from 10.76 to infinity. The measured energy spectra obtained from the two independent calorimeters of Arm1 and Arm2 show the same characteristic feature before unfolding the detector responses. We unfolded the measured spectra by using the multidimensional unfolding method based on Bayesian theory, and the unfolded spectra were compared with current hadronic-interaction models. The QGSJET II-03 model predicts a high neutron production rate at the highest pseudo-rapidity range similar to our results, and the DPMJET 3.04 model describes our results well at the lower pseudo-rapidity ranges. However, no model perfectly explains the experimental results over the entire pseudo-rapidity range. The experimental data indicate a more abundant neutron production rate relative to the photon production than any model predictions studied here.

  6. Recent Re-Measurement of the Neutron and Gamma-Ray Fields at Large Distances from a Prompt Critical Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    PROMPT CRITICAL FACILITY (U) by T. Cousins and B.E. Hoffarth Nuclear Effects Section Electronics Division and H. Ing and K. Tremblay Bubble Technology...to define the neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra at various distance (up to - 1 km) from the critical facility at the Nuclear Efects Directorate...results good to within -12%. The above should prove categorically that in fision or degraded fission environments the bubble dosimeter (BD-IOOR) is

  7. The impact of surface temperature inhomogeneities on quiescent neutron star radius measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elshamouty, K; Morsink, S; Bogdanov, S; Stevens, A

    2016-01-01

    Fitting the thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars (NSs) in quiescent X-ray binaries can constrain the masses and radii of NSs. The effect of undetected hot spots on the spectrum, and thus on the inferred NS mass and radius, has not yet been explored for appropriate atmospheres and spectra. A hot spot would harden the observed spectrum, so that spectral modeling tends to infer radii that are too small. However, a hot spot may also produce detectable pulsations. We simulated the effects of a hot spot on the pulsed fraction and spectrum of the quiescent NSs X5 and X7 in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, using appropriate spectra and beaming for hydrogen atmosphere models, incorporating special and general relativistic effects, and sampling a range of system angles. We searched for pulsations in archival Chandra HRC-S observations of X5 and X7, placing 90\\% confidence upper limits on their pulsed fractions below 16\\%. We use these pulsation limits to constrain the temperature differential of any hot spots, and to...

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit.

  9. The Impact of Surface Temperature Inhomogeneities on Quiescent Neutron Star Radius Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshamouty, K. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Morsink, S. M.; Bogdanov, S.; Stevens, A. L.

    2016-08-01

    Fitting the thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars (NSs) in quiescent X-ray binaries can constrain the masses and radii of NSs. The effect of undetected hot spots on the spectrum, and thus on the inferred NS mass and radius, has not yet been explored for appropriate atmospheres and spectra. A hot spot would harden the observed spectrum, so that spectral modeling tends to infer radii that are too small. However, a hot spot may also produce detectable pulsations. We simulated the effects of a hot spot on the pulsed fraction and spectrum of the quiescent NSs X5 and X7 in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, using appropriate spectra and beaming for hydrogen atmosphere models, incorporating special and general relativistic effects, and sampling a range of system angles. We searched for pulsations in archival Chandra HRC-S observations of X5 and X7, placing 90% confidence upper limits on their pulsed fractions below 16%. We use these pulsation limits to constrain the temperature differential of any hot spots, and to then constrain the effects of possible hot spots on the X-ray spectrum and the inferred radius from spectral fitting. We find that hot spots below our pulsation limit could bias the spectroscopically inferred radius downward by up to 28%. For Cen X-4 (which has deeper published pulsation searches), an undetected hot spot could bias its inferred radius downward by up to 10%. Improving constraints on pulsations from quiescent LMXBs may be essential for progress in constraining their radii.

  10. Porous silicon Bloch surface and sub-surface wave structure for simultaneous detection of small and large molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gilberto A.; Lonai, John D.; Mernaugh, Raymond L.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2014-08-01

    A porous silicon (PSi) Bloch surface wave (BSW) and Bloch sub-surface wave (BSSW) composite biosensor is designed and used for the size-selective detection of both small and large molecules. The BSW/BSSW structure consists of a periodic stack of high and low refractive index PSi layers and a reduced optical thickness surface layer that gives rise to a BSW with an evanescent tail that extends above the surface to enable the detection of large surface-bound molecules. Small molecules were detected in the sensor by the BSSW, which is a large electric field intensity spatially localized to a desired region of the Bragg mirror and is generated by the implementation of a step or gradient refractive index profile within the Bragg mirror. The step and gradient BSW/BSSW sensors are designed to maximize both resonance reflectance intensity and sensitivity to large molecules. Size-selective detection of large molecules including latex nanospheres and the M13KO7 bacteriophage as well as small chemical linker molecules is reported.

  11. Measurements of Antenna Surface for a Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope II; Metal Mesh Surface for Large Deployable Reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Large deployable antennas with a mesh surface woven by fine metal wires are an important technology for communications satellites and space radio telescopes. However, it is difficult to make metal mesh surfaces with sufficient radio-frequency (RF) performance for frequencies higher than millimeter waves. In this paper, we present the RF performance of metal mesh surfaces at 43 GHz. For this purpose, we developed an apparatus to measure the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and radiative coefficient of the mesh surface. The reflection coefficient increases as a function of metal mesh surface tension, whereas the radiative coefficient decreases. The anisotropic aspects of the reflection coefficient and the radiative coefficient are also clearly seen. They depend on the front and back sides of the metal mesh surface and the rotation angle. The transmission coefficient was measured to be almost constant. The measured radiative coefficients and transmission coefficients would cause significant degr...

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Large Surface Area Yttrium Oxide by Precipitation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔大立; 龙志奇; 张顺利; 崔梅生; 黄小卫

    2004-01-01

    The method for preparing yttrium oxide with large specific surface area was introduced. By means of BET, SEM, TG and DTA analysis, the effects of precipitant, stirring velocity, non-RE impurity in solution, calcination temperature, on the surface area were studied respectively. The Y2O3 sample with specific surface area of more than 60 m2*g-1 and L.O.I less than 1% was prepared in the suitable precipitation condition and calcinations temperature when the ammonia used as precipitant. The SEM shows that the Y2O3 prepared with large surface area is the aggregation of about 50 nm particles.

  13. Decay rates of large-l Rydberg states of multiply charged ions approaching solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Mirkovic, M. A.; Bozanic, D. K.

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the ionization of large-l multiply charged Rydberg ions approaching solid surfaces within the framework of decay model and applying the etalon equation method. The radial coordinate rho of the active electron is treated as a variational parameter and therefore the parabolic symmetry is preserved in this procedure. The complex eigenenergies are calculated from which the energy terms and the ionization rates are derived. We find that the large-l Rydberg states decay at approximately the same ion-surface distances as the low-l states oriented toward the vacuum and considerably closer to the surface comparing to the low-l states oriented towards the surface.

  14. Low Energy Neutron Production by Inverse-beta decay in Metallic Hydride Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ciuchi, S; Polosa, A D; Riquer, V; Ruocco, G; Vignati, M

    2012-01-01

    It has been recently argued that inverse-beta nuclear transmutations might occur at an impressively high rate in a thin layer at the metallic hydride surface under specific conditions. In this note we present a calculation of the transmutation rate which shows that there is little room for such a remarkable effect.

  15. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation demonstrated a low-stress silicon cladding process for surface finishing large UVOIR mirrors. A polishable cladding is...

  16. Probing large area surface plasmon interference in thin metal films using photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passian, A.; Wig, A.; Lereu, A.L.; Evans, P.G.; Meriaudeau, F.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T.L

    2004-08-15

    The interference of surface plasmons can provide important information regarding the surface features of the hosting thin metal film. We present an investigation of the interference of optically excited surface plasmons in the Kretschmann configuration in the visible spectrum. Large area surface plasmon interference regions are generated at several wavelengths and imaged with the photon scanning tunneling microscope. Furthermore, we discuss the non-retarded dispersion relations for the surface plasmons in the probe-metal system modeled as confocal hyperboloids of revolution in the spheroidal coordinate systems.

  17. New results for two-neutrino double beta decay with large particle-particle two body proton-neutron interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, A A; Simkovic, F; Faessler, A; Faessler, Amand

    2001-01-01

    A model many-body Hamiltonian describing an heterogenous system of paired protons and paired neutrons and interacting among themselves through monopole particle-hole and monopole particle-particle interactions is used to study the double beta decay of Fermi type. The states are described by time dependent approaches choosing as trial functions coherent states of the symmetry groups underlying the model Hamiltonian. One formalism, VP1, is fully equivalent with the standard pnQRPA and therefore fails at a critical value of the particle-particle interaction strength while another one, VP2, corresponds to a two step BCS treatment, i.e. the proton quasiparticles are paired with the neutron quasiparticles. In this way a harmonic description for the double beta transition amplitude is provided for any strength of the particle-particle interaction. The approximation quality is judged by comparing the actual results with the exact result as well as with those corresponding to various truncations of the boson expanded ...

  18. Surface and Internal Waves due to a Moving Load on a Very Large Floating Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Kakinuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of surface/internal water waves with a floating platform is discussed with nonlinearity of fluid motion and flexibility of oscillating structure. The set of governing equations based on a variational principle is applied to a one- or two-layer fluid interacting with a horizontally very large and elastic thin plate floating on the water surface. Calculation results of surface displacements are compared with the existing experimental data, where a tsunami, in terms of a solitary wave, propagates across one-layer water with a floating thin plate. We also simulate surface and internal waves due to a point load, such as an airplane, moving on a very large floating structure in shallow water. The wave height of the surface or internal mode is amplified when the velocity of moving point load is equal to the surface- or internal-mode celerity, respectively.

  19. Can large scale surface circulation changes modulate the sea surface warming pattern in the Tropical Indian Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2016-06-01

    The increased rate of Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) surface warming has gained a lot of attention in the recent years mainly due to its regional climatic impacts. The processes associated with this increased surface warming is highly complex and none of the mechanisms in the past studies could comprehend the important features associated with this warming such as the negative trends in surface net heat fluxes and the decreasing temperature trends at thermocline level. In this work we studied a previously unexplored aspect, the changes in large scale surface circulation pattern modulating the surface warming pattern over TIO. We use ocean reanalysis datasets and a suit of Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) experiments to address this problem. Both reanalysis and OGCM reveal strengthening large scale surface circulation pattern in the recent years. The most striking feature is the intensification of cyclonic gyre circulation around the thermocline ridge in the southwestern TIO. The surface circulation change in TIO is mainly associated with the surface wind changes and the geostrophic response to sea surface height decrease in the western/southwestern TIO. The surface wind trends closely correspond to SST warming pattern. The strengthening mean westerlies over the equatorial region are conducive to convergence in the central and divergence in the western equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) resulting central warming and western cooling. The resulting east west SST gradient further enhances the equatorial westerlies. This positive feedback mechanism supports strengthening of the observed SST trends in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The cooling induced by the enhanced upwelling in the west is compensated to a large extent by warming due to reduction in mixed layer depth, thereby keeping the surface temperature trends in the west to weak positive values. The OGCM experiments showed that the wind induced circulation changes redistribute the excess heat received in the western

  20. Neutron die-away experiment for remote analysis of the surface of the moon and the planets, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, W. R.; Allen, L. S.

    1972-01-01

    Continuing work on the two die-away measurements proposed to be made in the combined pulsed neutron experiment (CPNE) for analysis of lunar and planetary surfaces is described. This report documents research done during Phase 3. A general exposition of data analysis by the least-squares method and the related problem of the prediction of variance is given. A data analysis procedure for epithermal die-away data has been formulated. In order to facilitate the analysis, the number of independent material variables has been reduced to two: the hydrogen density and an effective oxygen density, the latter being determined uniquely from the nonhydrogeneous elemental composition. Justification for this reduction in the number of variables is based on a set of 27 new theoretical calculations. Work is described related to experimental calibration of the epithermal die-away measurement. An interim data analysis technique based solely on theoretical calculations seems to be adequate and will be used for future CPNE field tests.

  1. Measurement of shape by ultrasonic waves and surface inspection of the cold neutron source vertical hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kook Nam; Choi, Chang Oong; Sim, Cheul Mu; Choi, Young Hyun; Koo, Kil Mo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    Considerations in design of CNS containment, which will be put into the CNS installation hole, should be taken into obtaining the maximum gain by minimizing thickness of water film existing between walls of CN hole and the inserted containment and easy maintenance of the in-pile structures including the containment. In this experiment, inside diameter and thickness of the CN hole were measured and the possibility of the surface degradation was inspected in Hanaro which has been operated for about 4 years since its criticality in Feb, 1995. The result will be used in the design of containment. The data were obtained by measuring inside diameter and thickness for 550 points of CN hole using 2 channels of ultrasonic sensor. The result showed that the thickness is in the range of 3.3 {approx} 6.7 mm and inside diameter is in the range of {phi} 156 {approx} {phi} 165 mm. And this result was analyzed using plots and tables for making the visual shape understood better. Status of surface treatment and corrosion during 4 years of operation in highly radiated water was investigated through the surface inspection and the result was recorded on video-tape. This report will be used in design of the CNS containment, and the experiment for inserting the containment model will be followed next year. The 4-axis measuring manipulator developed in this measurement will be used for measuring shape of other experimental holes of Hanaro reactor, and also for detecting some indications in the radiation zone. This device will be applied in the other useful inspections in pool water during Hanaro ISI(In-service Inspection) after introducing automatic system for acquisition of ultrasonic signals. The 4-axis measuring manipulator will be applied for a patent with ultrasonic measuring system. (author). 19 refs., 99 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Gold-film coating assisted femtosecond laser fabrication of large-area, uniform periodic surface structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pin; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Rong, Wenlong; Zhang, Kaihu; Cao, Qiang

    2015-02-20

    A simple, repeatable approach is proposed to fabricate large-area, uniform periodic surface structures by a femtosecond laser. 20 nm gold films are coated on semiconductor surfaces on which large-area, uniform structures are fabricated. In the case study of silicon, cross-links and broken structures of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) are significantly reduced on Au-coated silicon. The good consistency between the scanning lines facilitates the formation of large-area, uniform LIPSSs. The diffusion of hot electrons in the Au films increases the interfacial carrier densities, which significantly enhances interfacial electron-phonon coupling. High and uniform electron density suppresses the influence of defects on the silicon and further makes the coupling field more uniform and thus reduces the impact of laser energy fluctuations, which homogenizes and stabilizes large-area LIPSSs.

  3. Joule heating governing the cooling of magnetized neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilera, Deborah N; Miralles, Juan A

    2008-01-01

    We present two-dimensional simulations for the cooling of neutron stars with strong magnetic fields (B > 1e13 Gauss). We study how the cooling curves are influenced by magnetic field decay. We show that the Joule heating effects are very large and in some cases control the thermal evolution. We characterize the temperature anisotropy induced by the magnetic field and predict the surface temperature distribution for the early and late stages of the evolution of isolated neutron stars, comparing our results with available observational data of isolated neutron stars.

  4. Neutron multiplicity measurements with 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Wolff, Ronald [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Detwiler, Ryan [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Maurer, Richard [Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Joint Base Andrews, MD (United States); Mitchell, Stephen [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Guss, Paul [Remote Sensing Lab. - Nellis, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Lacy, Jeffrey L. [Proportional Technologies, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Sun, Liang [Proportional Technologies, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Athanasiades, Athanasios [Proportional Technologies, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-01-27

    Counting neutrons emitted by special nuclear material (SNM) and differentiating them from the background neutrons of various origins is the most effective passive means of detecting SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment are complex due to the presence of high-multiplicity spallation neutrons (commonly known as ‘‘ship effect ’’) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. A prototype neutron detector was built using 10B as the converter in a special form factor called ‘‘straws’’ that would address the above problems by looking into the details of multiplicity distributions of neutrons originating from a fissioning source. This paper describes the straw neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and assesses the performance with those of a commercially available fission meter. The prototype straw neutron detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular (than fission meter) neutron-responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to enhance the ease of application of fission meters. Presented here are the results of preliminary investigations, modeling, and engineering considerations leading to the construction of this prototype. This design is capable of multiplicity and Feynman variance measurements. This prototype may lead to a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to fission meters. This paper describes the work performed during a 2-year site-directed research and development (SDRD) project that incorporated straw detectors for neutron multiplicity counting. The NMC is a two-panel detector system. We used 10B (in the form of enriched boron carbide: 10B4C) for neutron detection instead of 3He. In the first year, the project worked with a panel of straw neutron detectors, investigated its characteristics, and

  5. Measurement of very forward neutron energy spectra for 7 TeV proton--proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Menjo, H.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Okuno, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A-L.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W.C.; Zhou, Q.D.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment is designed to use the LHC to verify the hadronic-interaction models used in cosmic-ray physics. Forward baryon production is one of the crucial points to understand the development of cosmic-ray showers. We report the neutron-energy spectra for LHC $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV proton--proton collisions with the pseudo-rapidity $\\eta$ ranging from 8.81 to 8.99, from 8.99 to 9.22, and from 10.76 to infinity. The measured energy spectra obtained from the two independent calorimeters of Arm1 and Arm2 show the same characteristic feature before unfolding the difference in the detector responses. We unfolded the measured spectra by using the multidimensional unfolding method based on Bayesian theory, and the unfolded spectra were compared with current hadronic-interaction models. The QGSJET II-03 model predicts a high neutron production rate at the highest pseudo-rapidity range similar to our results and the DPMJET 3.04 model describes our results well at the lower pseudo-...

  6. Neutron-induced reaction cross-section measurements using a small multi-detector array and description of a large array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J-P Meulders; I Slypen; S Benck; E Raeymackers; J Cabrera; Ch Dufauquez; T Keutgen; V Roberfroid; I Tilquin; Y El Masri; V Corcalciuc; N Nice

    2001-07-01

    The experimental setup of Louvain-la-Neuve (UCL-Belgium) used to perform lightcharged particle production experiment in fast neutron-induced reactions is presented. A short description of the neutron modular detector DEMON is also given. DEMON is a detector array for neutrons emitted in heavy ion induced reactions at low to intermediate energies.

  7. Surface error modeling of mounted large optics in high power laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Xiong, Zhao; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    The surface form of mounted large optics has a very important impact on the laser beam performance in high power laser system. To make the surface form to the minimized distortion and keep with the design specifications is always a difficult challenge in China's SG-III laser system which is made up of thousands meter-sized large optical units and requires to focus all 48 laser beams into nearly 600 μm-diameter spot better than 50 μm (RMS) within a few picoseconds. In this paper, a methodology integrated both 3D finite elements modeling method and nanometer-level precision metrology is proposed to evaluate the surface performance. According to various spatial frequencies, the wavefront characters of large aperture optical component are measured and provided to analyze its mounted surface characters. Assembly and mounting process will be adjusted to meet for the surface wavefront requirements both of with the data both of measured when pre-alignment and predicted for installation. By a case study of large transport mirror, the proposed approach has shown a good performance on obtaining precise surface features and guiding the optical mounting.

  8. Time-dependent pair cascades in magnetospheres of neutron stars I. Dynamics of the polar cap cascade with no particle supply from the neutron star surface

    CERN Document Server

    Timokhin, A N

    2010-01-01

    I argue that the problem of electromagnetically driven electron-positron cascades in magnetospheres of neutron stars must be addressed starting from first principles. I describe a general numerical algorithm for doing self-consistent kinetic simulations of electron-positron cascades -- wherein particle acceleration, pair creation and screening of the electric field are calculated simultaneously -- and apply it to model the Ruderman and Sutherland (1975) cascade in one dimension. I find that pair creation is quite regular and quasi-periodic. In each cycle a blob of ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma is generated, it propagates into the magnetosphere leaving a tail of less relativistic plasma behind, and the next discharge occurs when this mildly relativistic plasma leaves the polar cap. A short burst of pair formation is followed by a longer quiet phase when accelerating electric field is screened and no pairs are produced. Some of freshly injected electron-positrons pairs get trapped in plasma oscilla...

  9. Neutron/muon correlation functions to improve neutron detection capabilities outside nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinario, Donald Thomas

    The natural neutron background rate is largely due to cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and the subsequent neutron emission from the interaction products. The neutron background is part of a larger cosmic radiation shower that also includes electrons, gamma rays, and muons. Since neutrons interact much differently than muons in building materials, the muon and neutron fluence rates in the natural background can be compared to the measured muon and neutron fluence rate when shielded by common building materials. The simultaneous measurement of muon and neutron fluence rates might allow for an earlier identification of man-made neutron sources, such as hidden nuclear materials. This study compares natural background neutron rates to computer simulated neutron rates shielded by common structural and building materials. The characteristic differences between neutrons and muons resulted in different attenuation properties under the same shielded conditions. Correlation functions between cosmic ray generated neutrons and muons are then used to predict neutron fluence rates in different urban environments.

  10. Interface orbital engineering of large-gap topological states: Decorating gold on a Si(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Zhuang, Houlong L.; Zhang, Lizhi; Liu, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Intensive effort has recently been made in search of topological insulators (TIs) that have great potential in spintronics applications. In this paper, a novel concept of overlayer induced interfacial TI phase in conventional semiconductor surface is proposed. The first-principles calculations demonstrate that a p -band-element X (X =In , Bi, and Pb) decorated d -band surface, such as Au/Si(111) surface [X /Au/Si(111)] of an existing experimental system, offers a promising prototype for TIs. Specifically, Bi/Au/Si(111) and Pb/Au/Si(111) are identified to be large-gap TIs. A p -d band inversion mechanism induced by growth of X in the Au/Si(111) surface is revealed to function at different coverage of X with different lattice symmetries, suggesting a general approach of interface orbital engineering of large-gap TIs via tuning the interfacial atomic orbital position of X relative to Au.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of large specific surface area nanostructured amorphous silica materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Linares, Francisco; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando M A

    2006-04-01

    Large specific surface area materials attract wide attention because of their applications in adsorption, catalysis, and nanotechnology. In the present study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured amorphous silica materials. These materials were obtained by means of a modification of the Stobe-Fink-Bohn (SFB) method. The morphology and essential features of the synthesized materials have been studied using an automated surface area and pore size analyzer and scanning electron microscopy. The existence of a micro/mesoporous structure in the obtained materials has been established. It was also found that the obtained particle packing materials show large specific surface area up to 1,600 m2/g. (To our best knowledge, there is no any reported amorphous silica material with such a higher specific surface area.) The obtained materials could be useful in the manufacture of adsorbents, catalyst supports, and other nanotechnological applications.

  12. Surface modification of the patterned Al6061/SUS304 metal plates using the large electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Min; Kim, Jisu; Park, Sung Soo [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan Metropolitan City 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung Wook, E-mail: hwpark@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan Metropolitan City 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Ki, Hyungson [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan Metropolitan City 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed the large-electron-beam polishing of the patterned metal plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed its effect on surface hardness, surface roughness, and water repellency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contact angle for Al6061 and SUS304 increased after the electron-beam irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed the microstructure after the electron beam irradiation. - Abstract: Polishing is a finishing process used to improve surface integrity by reducing surface roughness and residual stress caused by other machining processes. The recently developed electron beam polishing method was used in this study to improve surface quality. In this process, an electron beam with a maximum diameter of 60 mm was applied for a few microseconds to melt and evaporate a metal surface. Al6061 and SUS304 metal plates were prepared with different geometric patterns and subjected to electron beam polishing. The surface roughness of the patterned SUS304 metal plate was significantly improved. However, the surface roughness of the patterned Al6061 metal plate became worse. Although the surface hardness decreased by approximately 10% on the re-solidified layers on both types of plates, the contact angle increased due to changes in surface morphology. The microstructure variation after the electron beam irradiation was also examined and compared with the thickness prediction of the re-solidified layer for Al6061 and SUS304 metal plates.

  13. Development and Characterization of a High Sensitivity Segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2)

    CERN Document Server

    Langford, T J; Breuer, H; Heimbach, C R; Ji, G; Nico, J S

    2015-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and $^3$He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a $^3$He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated $^{252}$Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra...

  14. New Variance-Reducing Methods for the PSD Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2010-01-01

    Edge data of a measured surface map of a circular optic result in large variance or "spectral leakage" behavior in the corresponding Power Spectral Density (PSD) data. In this paper we present two new, alternative methods for reducing such variance in the PSD data by replacing the zeros outside the circular area of a surface map by non-zero values either obtained from a PSD fit (method 1) or taken from the inside of the circular area (method 2).

  15. Corrigendum to "Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy

    2016-06-01

    A recent paper published in Life Sciences in Space Research (El-Jaby and Richardson, 2015) presented estimates of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates, in air, from surface altitudes up to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit. These estimates were based on MCNPX (LANL, 2011) (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) radiation transport simulations of galactic cosmic radiation passing through Earth's atmosphere. During a recent review of the input decks used for these simulations, a systematic error was discovered that is addressed here. After reassessment, the neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates estimated are found to be 10 to 15% different, though, the essence of the conclusions drawn remains unchanged.

  16. Centrifugal quantum states of neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petukhov, A. K.; Protasov, K. V.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a method for observation of the quasistationary states of neutrons localized near a curved mirror surface. The bounding effective well is formed by the centrifugal potential and the mirror Fermi potential. This phenomenon is an example of an exactly solvable “quantum bouncer” problem that can be studied experimentally. It could provide a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, as well as quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. We develop a formalism that describes quantitatively the neutron motion near the mirror surface. The effects of mirror roughness are taken into account.

  17. Transparent self-cleaning lubricant-infused surfaces made with large-area breath figure patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Liwen; Ran, Tong; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-11-01

    Nepenthes pitcher inspired slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces greatly impact the understanding of liquid-repellent surfaces construction and have attracted extensive attention in recent years due to their potential applications in self-cleaning, anti-fouling, anti-icing, etc. In this work, we have successfully fabricated transparent slippery lubricant-infused surfaces based on breath figure patterns (BFPs). Large-area BFPs with interconnected pores were initially formed on the glass substrate and then a suitable lubricant was added onto the surfaces. The interconnected pores in BFPs were able to hold the lubricant liquid in place and form a stable liquid/solid composite surface capable of repelling a variety of liquids. The liquid-repellent surfaces show extremely low critical sliding angles for various liquids, thus providing the surfaces with efficient self-cleaning property. It was also found that the liquid droplets' sliding behaviors on the surfaces were significantly influenced by the tilting angle of the substrate, liquid volume, liquid chemical properties, and pore sizes of the surfaces.

  18. Enhancing Neutron Beam Production with a Convoluted Moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, Erik B [ORNL; Baxter, David V [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University; Muhrer, Guenter [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ansell, Stuart [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Dalgliesh, Robert [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Lu, Wei [ORNL; Kaiser, Helmut [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University

    2014-10-01

    We describe a new concept for a neutron moderating assembly resulting in the more efficient production of slow neutron beams. The Convoluted Moderator, a heterogeneous stack of interleaved moderating material and nearly transparent single-crystal spacers, is a directionally-enhanced neutron beam source, improving beam effectiveness over an angular range comparable to the range accepted by neutron beam lines and guides. We have demonstrated gains of 50% in slow neutron intensity for a given fast neutron production rate while simultaneously reducing the wavelength-dependent emission time dispersion by 25%, both coming from a geometric effect in which the neutron beam lines view a large surface area of moderating material in a relatively small volume. Additionally, we have confirmed a Bragg-enhancement effect arising from coherent scattering within the single-crystal spacers. We have not observed hypothesized refractive effects leading to additional gains at long wavelength. In addition to confirmation of the validity of the Convoluted Moderator concept, our measurements provide a series of benchmark experiments suitable for developing simulation and analysis techniques for practical optimization and eventual implementation at slow neutron source facilities.

  19. Neutron stars - General review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  20. Nucleosynthesis in decompressing neutron star matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jaikumar, P; Otsuki, K; Ouyed, R; Jaikumar, Prashanth; Meyer, Bradley S.; Otsuki, Kaori; Ouyed, Rachid

    2006-01-01

    We explore heavy-element nucleosynthesis by rapid neutron capture (r-process) in the decompressing ejecta from the surface of a neutron star. The decompression is triggered by a violent phase transition to strange quark matter (quark-nova scenario). The presence of neutron-rich large Z nuclei (40,95)<(Z,A)<(70,177), the large neutron-to-seed ratio, and the low electron fraction Ye ~ 0.03 in the decompressing ejecta present favorable conditions for the r-process. We perform network calculations that are adapted to the quark-nova conditions, and which mimic usual (n-\\gamma) equilibrium r-process calculations during the initially cold decompression phase. They match to dynamical r-process calculations at densities below neutron drip (4x10^11 g/cc). We present results for the final element abundance distribution with and without heating from nuclear reactions, and compare to the solar abundance pattern of r-process elements. We highlight the distinguishing features of quark-novae by contrasting it with conv...

  1. Large spin splitting of metallic surface-state bands at adsorbate-modified gold/silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, L V; Gruznev, D V; Yakovlev, A A; Tupchaya, A Y; Usachov, D; Vilkov, O; Fedorov, A; Vyalikh, D V; Eremeev, S V; Chulkov, E V; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2013-01-01

    Finding appropriate systems with a large spin splitting of metallic surface-state band which can be fabricated on silicon using routine technique is an essential step in combining Rashba-effect based spintronics with silicon technology. We have found that originally poor structural and electronic properties of the Au/Si(111) √3 x √3 surface can be substantially improved by adsorbing small amounts of suitable species (e.g., Tl, In, Na, Cs). The resultant surfaces exhibit a highly-ordered atomic structure and spin-split metallic surface-state band with a momentum splitting of up to 0.052 Å(-1) and an energy splitting of up to 190 meV at the Fermi level. The family of adsorbate-modified Au/Si(111) √3 x √3 surfaces, on the one hand, is thought to be a fascinating playground for exploring spin-splitting effects in the metal monolayers on a semiconductor and, on the other hand, expands greatly the list of material systems prospective for spintronics applications.

  2. Evidence for a change in the nuclear mass surface with the discovery of the most neutron-rich nuclei with 17

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, O B; Amthor, A M; Baumann, T; Bazin, D; Gade, A; Ginter, T N; Hausmann, M; Inabe, N; Kubo, T; Nettleton, A; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Sherrill, B M; Stolz, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    The results of measurements of the production of neutron-rich nuclei by the fragmentation of a 76-Ge beam are presented. The cross sections were measured for a large range of nuclei including fifteen new isotopes that are the most neutron-rich nuclides of the elements chlorine to manganese (50-Cl, 53-Ar, 55,56-K, 57,58-Ca, 59,60,61-Sc, 62,63-Ti, 65,66-V, 68-Cr, 70-Mn). The enhanced cross sections of several new nuclei relative to a simple thermal evaporation framework, previously shown to describe similar production cross sections, indicates that nuclei in the region around 62-Ti might be more stable than predicted by current mass models and could be an indication of a new island of inversion similar to that centered on 31-Na.

  3. Numerical simulation of sloshing with large deforming free surface by MPS-LES method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xu-jie; Zhang, Huai-xin; Sun, Xue-yao

    2012-12-01

    Moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method is a fully Lagrangian particle method which can easily solve problems with violent free surface. Although it has demonstrated its advantage in ocean engineering applications, it still has some defects to be improved. In this paper, MPS method is extended to the large eddy simulation (LES) by coupling with a sub-particle-scale (SPS) turbulence model. The SPS turbulence model turns into the Reynolds stress terms in the filtered momentum equation, and the Smagorinsky model is introduced to describe the Reynolds stress terms. Although MPS method has the advantage in the simulation of the free surface flow, a lot of non-free surface particles are treated as free surface particles in the original MPS model. In this paper, we use a new free surface tracing method and the key point is "neighbor particle". In this new method, the zone around each particle is divided into eight parts, and the particle will be treated as a free surface particle as long as there are no "neighbor particles" in any two parts of the zone. As the number density parameter judging method has a high efficiency for the free surface particles tracing, we combine it with the neighbor detected method. First, we select out the particles which may be mistreated with high probabilities by using the number density parameter judging method. And then we deal with these particles with the neighbor detected method. By doing this, the new mixed free surface tracing method can reduce the mistreatment problem efficiently. The serious pressure fluctuation is an obvious defect in MPS method, and therefore an area-time average technique is used in this paper to remove the pressure fluctuation with a quite good result. With these improvements, the modified MPS-LES method is applied to simulate liquid sloshing problems with large deforming free surface. Results show that the modified MPS-LES method can simulate the large deforming free surface easily. It can not only capture

  4. Numerical Simulation of Sloshing with Large Deforming Free Surface by MPS-LES Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xu-jie; ZHANG Huai-xin; SUN Xue-yao

    2012-01-01

    Moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method is a fully Lagrangian particle method which can easily solve problems with violent free surface.Although it has demonstrated its advantage in ocean engineering applications,it still has some defects to be improved.In this paper,MPS method is extended to the large eddy simulation (LES) by coupling with a sub-particle-scale (SPS) turbulence model.The SPS turbulence model turns into the Reynolds stress terms in the filtered momentum equation,and the Smagorinsky model is introduced to describe the Reynolds stress terms.Although MPS method has the advantage in the simulation of the free surface flow,a lot of non-free surface particles are treated as free surface particles in the original MPS model.In this paper,we use a new free surface tracing method and the key point is “neighbor particle”.In this new method,the zone around each particle is divided into eight parts,and the particle will be treated as a free surface particle as long as there are no “neighbor particles” in any two parts of the zone.As the number density parameter judging method has a high efficiency for the free surface particles tracing,we combine it with the neighbor detected method.First,we select out the particles which may be mistreated with high probabilities by using the number density parameter judging method.And then we deal with these particles with the neighbor detected method.By doing this,the new mixed free surface tracing method can reduce the mistreatment problem efficiently.The serious pressure fluctuation is an obvious defect in MPS method,and therefore an area-time average technique is used in this paper to remove the pressure fluctuation with a quite good result.With these improvements,the modified MPS-LES method is applied to simulate liquid sloshing problems with large deforming free surface.Results show that the modified MPS-LES method can simulate the large deforming free surface easily.It can not only capture the large impact

  5. The LOFT perspective on neutron star thermonuclear bursts: White paper in support of the mission concept of the large observatory for X-ray timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    in' t Zand, J. J.M. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (The Netherlands); Malone, Christopher M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Altamirano, D. [Univ. of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Ballantyne, D. R. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Bhattacharyya, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Brown, E. F. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Cavecchi, Y. [Univ. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (The Netherlands); Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Chenevez, J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Cumming, A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Degenaar, N. [Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Falanga, M. [International Space Science Institute, Bern (Switzerland); Galloway, D. K. [Monash Univ., VIC (Australia); Heger, A. [Monash Univ., VIC (Australia); Jose, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Keek, L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Linares, M. [Univ. de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Mahmoodifar, S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Mendez, M. [Univ. of Groningen, Groningen (The Netherlands); Miller, M. C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Paerels, F. B. S. [Columbia Astrophysics Lab., New York, NY (United States); Poutanen, J. [Univ. of Turku, Piikkio (Finland); Rozanska, A. [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center PAS, Warsaw (Poland); Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University; Serino, M. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN); Strohmayer, T. E. [NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Suleimanov, V. F. [Univ. Tubingen, Tubingen (Germany); Thielemann, F. -K. [Univ. Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Watts, A. L. [Univ. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (The Netherlands); Weinberg, N. N. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Woosley, S. E. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Yu, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai (China); Zhang, S. [Institute of High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Zingale, M. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-01-14

    The Large Area Detector (LAD) on the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing ( LOFT ), with a 8.5 m 2 photon- collecting area in the 2–30 keV bandpass at CCD-class spectral resolving power (λ/Δλ = 10 – 100), is designed for optimum performance on bright X-ray sources. Thus, it is well-suited to study thermonuclear X-ray bursts from Galactic neutron stars. These bursts will typically yield 2 x 105 photon detections per second in the LAD, which is at least 15 times more than with any other instrument past, current or anticipated. The Wide Field Monitor (WFM) foreseen for LOFT uniquely combines 2–50 keV imaging with large (30%) prompt sky coverage. This will enable the detection of tens of thousands of thermonuclear X-ray bursts during a 3-yr mission, including tens of superbursts. Both numbers are similar or more than the current database gathered in 50 years of X-ray astronomy.

  6. Surface and Curve Skeletonization of Large 3D Models on the GPU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalba, Andrei C.; Kustra, Jacek; Telea, Alexandru C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a GPU-based framework for extracting surface and curve skeletons of 3D shapes represented as large polygonal meshes. We use an efficient parallel search strategy to compute point-cloud skeletons and their distance and feature transforms (FTs) with user-defined precision. We regularize ske

  7. Simple water balance modelling of surface reservoir systems in a large data-scarce semiarid region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güntner, Andreas; Krol, Martinus S.; de Araújo, José Carlos; Bronstert, Axel

    2004-01-01

    Water resources in dryland areas are often provided by numerous surface reservoirs. As a basis for securing future water supply, the dynamics of reservoir systems need to be simulated for large river basins, accounting for environmental change and an increasing water demand. For the State of Ceará i

  8. Simple water balance modelling of surface reservoir systems in a large data-scarce semiarid region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güntner, Andreas; Krol, Martinus S.; de Araújo, José Carlos; Bronstert, Axel

    2004-01-01

    Water resources in dryland areas are often provided by numerous surface reservoirs. As a basis for securing future water supply, the dynamics of reservoir systems need to be simulated for large river basins, accounting for environmental change and an increasing water demand. For the State of Ceará

  9. Uniform, large surface-area polarization by modifying corona-electrodes geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, T; Ener Rusen, S; Rusen, A

    2013-01-01

    We report on the uniform, large scale polarization of ferroelectric materials by a newly designed corona charging technique developing nonconventional electrodes geometry. The results of pyroelectric measurements represented the spatial homogeneity of the polarization attained through a surface area of ~25 cm(2).

  10. Evapotranspiration and runoff from large land areas: Land surface hydrology for atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    A land surface hydrology parameterization for use in atmospheric GCM's is presented. The parameterization incorporates subgrid scale variability in topography, soils, soil moisture and precipitation. The framework of the model is the statistical distribution of a topography-soils index, which controls the local water balance fluxes, and is therefore taken to represent the large land area. Spatially variable water balance fluxes are integrated with respect to the topography-soils index to yield our large topography-soils distribution, and interval responses are weighted by the probability of occurrence of the interval. Grid square averaged land surface fluxes result. The model functions independently as a macroscale water balance model. Runoff ratio and evapotranspiration efficiency parameterizations are derived and are shown to depend on the spatial variability of the above mentioned properties and processes, as well as the dynamics of land surface-atmosphere interactions.

  11. Large displacement bi-directional out-of-plane Lorentz actuator array for surface manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoungyoul; Afsharipour, Elnaz; Chrusch, Dwayne; Shafai, Cyrus; Andersen, David; Burley, Greg

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a large displacement out-of-plane Lorentz actuator array for surface manipulation. Actuators are formed from single crystal silicon flexible serpentine springs on either side of a rigid crossbar containing a narrow contact pillar. A rigid mounting rail system was employed to enable a 5  ×  5 array, which offers scalability of the array size. Analytical and finite element models were used to optimize actuator design. Individual actuators were tested to show linear deflection response of  ±150 µm motion, using a  ±14.7 mA current in the presence of a 0.48 T magnetic field. This actuator array is suitable for various 2D surface modification applications due to its large deformation with low current and temperature of operation, and narrow contact area to a target surface.

  12. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  13. Erosion of Ag surface by continuous irradiation with slow, large Ar clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzeznik, Lukasz, E-mail: lukasz.rzeznik@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Krakow (Poland); Paruch, Robert [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Krakow (Poland); Garrison, Barbara J. [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Postawa, Zbigniew, E-mail: zbigniew.postawa@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-07-15

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations are employed to probe processes taking place during continuous irradiation of Ag(1 1 1) surface by keV Ar{sub 872} projectiles. Surface modification, the total sputtering yield, and the angular distributions of ejected species are calculated at fluences ranging from 0 up to {approx}6 x 10{sup 13} impacts/cm{sup 2}. It has been shown that two trends can be identified in the development of surface roughness. At the beginning surface roughness increases fast. This fast increase terminates around 1 x 10{sup 13} impacts/cm{sup 2} and is followed by a slow increase that finally saturates. The effect of the surface roughness on the sputtering yield depends on the impact angle. At normal incidence the sputtering yield is rather insensitive to the development of the surface topography. Modification of the surface morphology has, however, a significant influence on the total sputtering yield at large impact angles. Both the shape of the sputtering yield dependence on the impact angle and the angular spectra of ejected particles are sensitive to the surface roughness.

  14. Investigation on large-area fabrication of vivid shark skin with superior surface functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Lingxi; Che, Da; Zhang, Deyuan; Sudarshan, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Shark skin has attracted worldwide attention because of its superior drag reduction, antifouling performance induced from its unique surface morphology. Although the vivid shark skin has been fabricated by a bio-replicated micro-imprinting approach in previous studies and superior drag reduction effect has been validated in water tunnel, continuous large-area fabrication is still an obstacle to wide apply. In this paper, one novel bio-replication coating technology is proposed for large-area transfer of shark skin based on rapid UV curable paint. Apart from design of coating system, bio-replication accuracy of surface morphology was validated about 97% by comparison between shark skin template and coating surface morphology. Finally, the drag reduction and anti-fouling function of coating surface were tested in water tunnel and open algae pond respectively. Drag reduction rate of coating surface was validated about 12% higher and anti-fouling was proved to about hundred times ameliorate, all of which are more excellent than simple 2D riblet surface.

  15. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Tak Pui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Neutron generators based on the 2H(d,n)3He and 3H(d,n)4He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >109 n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 1014 n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 105 n/cm2s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and

  16. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Tak Pui

    2003-05-01

    Neutron generators based on the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He and {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >10{sup 9} n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 10{sup 14} n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The

  17. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF FREE SURFACE TURBULENT CHANNEL FLOW WITH HEAT TRANSFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) was used to study the free-surface turbulent channel flow with passive heat transfer. The three-dimensional filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and energy equation were numerically solved with dynamic Subgrid Scale (SGS) models for modeling turbulent stresses and heat flux. To compare the turbulent behavior of the free-surface and two-walled channel flows, the LES of two-walled turbulent channel flow was performed. The statistical quantities and flow structures of the free-surface turbulence with heat transfer in the vicinity of the free-surface were investigated. The results are also in good agreement with theoretical analysis and available results by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS).

  18. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    limited. The numerical investigation focused on the simulation of a hot turbulent gas jet impinging on a wall under very high pressure, thus approximating the process of the actual impingement of hot combustion gasses on the piston surface during combustion. The surface heat flux at the wall......In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... instrumentation and high engine running costs compared to automotive engines. Therefore the investigation in this work was carried out numerically with the use of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. At the same time, numerical work on detailed in-cylinder wall heat transfer in engines has been quite...

  19. Methods for growth of relatively large step-free SiC crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for growing arrays of large-area device-size films of step-free (i.e., atomically flat) SiC surfaces for semiconductor electronic device applications is disclosed. This method utilizes a lateral growth process that better overcomes the effect of extended defects in the seed crystal substrate that limited the obtainable step-free area achievable by prior art processes. The step-free SiC surface is particularly suited for the heteroepitaxial growth of 3C (cubic) SiC, AlN, and GaN films used for the fabrication of both surface-sensitive devices (i.e., surface channel field effect transistors such as HEMT's and MOSFET's) as well as high-electric field devices (pn diodes and other solid-state power switching devices) that are sensitive to extended crystal defects.

  20. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  1. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF VERTICAL JET IMPINGEMENT WITH A FREE SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-ping; LI Chi-wai; ZHANG Chang-kuang

    2006-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a 2D slot jet vertically impinging on free surfaces are numerically investigated by the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with a dynamic Sub-Grid Scale (SGS) model. The σ-coordinate transformation is introduced to map the depth-variable physical domain to a depth-uniform computational domain. The split-operator scheme, which splits the solution procedure into advection, diffusion and pressure propagation steps, is employed to solve the instantaneous velocity and pressure field. A fully nonlinear Lagrange-Euler method is used to compute the free surface elevation. The numerical results show that the jet retains good self-similarity in the Zone of Eestablished Flow (ZEF), while the turbulence of jet shifts gradually from isotropic to anisotropic in the Zone of Surface Impingement (ZSI). When the jet approaches the free surface, the centerline velocity decreases rapidly and the flow is deflected by the free surface. Two symmetrical surface jets are formed in the Zone of Horizontal Jets (ZHJ). An approximate Guassian distribution of super-elevation is also formed on the free surface. The computed results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  2. Compound interferometer system for large-scale optical components surface measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwei; Sun, Tao; Han, Chengshun; Dong, Shen; Rodionov, A. Y.; Shirin, A. S.; Shekhtman, V. N.

    2010-10-01

    Large-scale optical components is being applied more and more widely in the astronomical optics, space optics, groundbased space target detection and identification, laser propagation in the atmosphere, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other fields, especially the large-scale aspherical optical component is one of key parts which play a supportive role in those fields. Large-scale optical components surface measurement instrument and technique has become a research focus of many scholars in recent years. In this paper introduced a compound interferometer system, which based on the principle of traditional Fizeau interferometer and lateral shear interferometer. In this system, produces two probe light beams by a He-Ne laser, one of probe light beams is used to measure flat optical surface by using comparison with the reference wavefront, and the other probe light beam is used to measure spherical and aspherical optical surface according to the principle of lateral shear interferometer and without using reference wavefront. Discussed in detail optical layout of the system as well as the principle of surface measurement, and the preliminary test results were given. The compound interferometer system has a compact, multi-function, and good anti-vibration performance can be used for large-scale optical plane (diameter less than 320mm), spherical and aspherical optical components surface measurement. Due to the information that lateral shear interferogram carries does not show directly the deviation between the wavefront under test and the ideal wavefront, but the wavefront difference, so the wavefront reconstruction method is more complex, and the wavefront reconstruction algorithm from lateral shearing interferograms is also analyzed and discussed.

  3. Nanotechnological Advances in Catalytic Thin Films for Green Large-Area Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Biran Ay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-area catalytic thin films offer great potential for green technology applications in order to save energy, combat pollution, and reduce global warming. These films, either embedded with nanoparticles, shaped with nanostructuring techniques, hybridized with other systems, or functionalized with bionanotechnological methods, can include many different surface properties including photocatalytic, antifouling, abrasion resistant and mechanically resistive, self-cleaning, antibacterial, hydrophobic, and oleophobic features. Thus, surface functionalization with such advanced structuring methods is of significance to increase the performance and wide usage of large-area thin film coatings specifically for environmental remediation. In this review, we focus on methods to increase the efficiency of catalytic reactions in thin film and hence improve the performance in relevant applications while eliminating high cost with the purpose of widespread usage. However, we also include the most recent hybrid architectures, which have potential to make a transformational change in surface applications as soon as high quality and large area production techniques are available. Hence, we present and discuss research studies regarding both organic and inorganic methods that are used to structure thin films that have potential for large-area and eco-friendly coatings.

  4. Spontaneous Formation of Surface Magnetic Structure from Large-scale Dynamo in Strongly-stratified Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Masada, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    We report the first successful simulation of spontaneous formation of surface magnetic structures from a large-scale dynamo by strongly-stratified thermal convection in Cartesian geometry. The large-scale dynamo observed in our strongly-stratified model has physical properties similar to those in earlier weakly-stratified convective dynamo simulations, indicating that the $\\alpha^2$-type mechanism is responsible for it. Additionally to the large-scale dynamo, we find that large-scale structures of the vertical magnetic field are spontaneously formed in the convection zone surface only for the case of strongly-stratified atmosphere. The organization of the vertical magnetic field proceeds in the upper convection zone within tens of convective turn-over time and band-like bipolar structures are recurrently-appeared in the dynamo-saturated stage. We examine possibilities of several candidates as the origin of the surface magnetic structure formation, and then suggest the existence of an as-yet-unknown mechanism ...

  5. Large area laser surface micro/nanopatterning by contact microsphere lens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, X.; Derrien, T. J.-Y.; Romer, G. R. B. E.; Pathiraj, B.; Huis in `t Veld, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Laser surface micro/nanopatterning by particle lens arrays is a well-known technique. Enhanced optical fields can be achieved on a substrate when a laser beam passes through a self-assembled monolayer of silica microspheres placed on the substrate. This enhanced optical field is responsible for ablative material removal from the substrate resulting in a patterned surface. Because of the laser ablation, the microspheres are often ejected from the substrate during laser irradiation. This is a major issue impeding this technique to be used for large area texturing. We explored the possibility to retain the spheres on the substrate surface during laser irradiation. A picosecond laser system (wavelength of 515 nm, pulse duration 6.7 ps, repetition rate 400 kHz) was employed to write patterns through the lens array on a silicon substrate. In this experimental study, the pulse energy was found to be a key factor to realize surface patterning and retain the spheres during the process. When the laser pulse energy is set within the process window, the microspheres stay on the substrate during and after laser irradiation. Periodic patterns of nanoholes can be textured on the substrate surface. The spacing between the nanoholes is determined by the diameter of the microspheres. The depth of the nanoholes varies, depending on the number of laser pulses applied and pulse energy. Large area texturing can be made using overlapping pulses obtained through laser beam scanning.

  6. Non-destructive elemental analysis of large meteorite samples by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis with the internal mono-standard method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Sk A; Oura, Y; Ebihara, M; Nakahara, H

    2013-11-01

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) using the internal mono-standard method was tested for its applicability to analyzing large solid samples including irregularly shaped meteorite samples. For evaluating the accuracy and precision of the method, large quantities of the Geological Survey of Japan standardized rock powders (JB-1a, JG-1a, and JP-1) were analyzed and 12 elements (B, Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Sm, and Gd) were determined by using Si as an internal standard element. Analytical results were mostly in agreement with literature values within 10 %. The precision of the method was also shown to be within 10 % (1σ) for most of these elements. The analytical procedure was then applied to four stony meteorites (Allende, Kimble County, Leedey, Lake Labyrinth) and four iron meteorites (Canyon Diablo, Toluca (Mexico), Toluca (Xiquipilco), Squaw Creek) consisting of large chunks or single slabs. For stony meteorites, major elements (Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and Ni), minor elements (Na and Mn) and trace element (B, Cl, K, Ti, Co, and Sm) were determined with adequate accuracy. For iron meteorites, results for the Co and Ni mass fractions determined are all consistent with corresponding literature values. After the analysis, it was confirmed that the residual radioactivity remaining in the sample after PGNAA was very low and decreased down to the background level. This study shows that PGNAA with the internal mono-standard method is highly practical for determining the elemental composition of large, irregularly shaped solid samples including meteorites.

  7. Adsorption configuration effects on the surface diffusion of large organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, F.; Legoas, S.B.; Hummelink, F.

    2010-01-01

    Violet Lander (C108H104) is a large organic molecule that when deposited on Cu(110) surface exhibits lock-and-key like behavior [Otero et al., Nature Mater. 3, 779 (2004)]. In this work, we report a detailed fully atomistic molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics study of this phenomenon. Our...... results show that it has its physical basis on the interplay of the molecular hydrogens and the Cu(110) atomic spacing, which is a direct consequence of the matching between molecule and surface dimensions. This information could be used to find new molecules capable of displaying lock-and-key behavior...

  8. Large molecules on surfaces: deposition and intramolecular STM manipulation by directional forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Leonhard

    2010-03-01

    Intramolecular manipulation of single molecules on a surface with a scanning tunnelling microscope enables the controlled modification of their structure and, consequently, their physical and chemical properties. This review presents examples of intramolecular manipulation experiments with rather large molecules, driven by directional, i.e. chemical or electrostatic, forces between tip and molecule. It is shown how various regimes of forces can be explored and characterized with one and the same manipulation of a single molecule by changing the tip-surface distance. Furthermore, different deposition techniques under ultrahigh vacuum conditions are discussed because the increasing functionality of such molecules can lead to fragmentation during the heating step, making their clean deposition difficult.

  9. Neutron Repulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel, Oliver K.

    2011-01-01

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch...

  10. Low-Energy X-ray Emission from Young Isolated Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ruderman, M

    2003-01-01

    A young neutron star with large spin-down power is expected to be closely surrounded by an e+/- pair plasma maintained by the conversion of gamma-rays associated with the star's polar-cap and/or outer-gap accelerators. Cyclotron-resonance scattering by the e- and e+ within several radii of such neutron stars prevents direct observations of thermal X-rays from the stellar surface. Estimates are presented for the parameters of the Planck-like X-radiation which ultimately diffuses out through this region. Comparisons with observations, especially of apparent blackbody emission areas as a function of neutron star age, support the proposition that we are learning about a neutron star's magnetosphere rather than about its surface from observations of young neutron star thermal X-rays.

  11. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  12. New developments in the manufacture of large freeform surfaces with micro-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblee, Jeff; Walter, Mark; Jacobs, Ben

    2015-10-01

    A new capability for simultaneously generating micro-structures and large freeform surfaces has been developed. Multiple axes of CNC coordinated motion have been integrated into an ultra precision machine platform, enabling a wide variety of optical mold masters to be created. Facilitated by a specially developed control system, freeform optical surfaces as large as 600 x 600 x 100 mm are possible. Some machine alignments are critical to the production of accurate parts and these will be discussed. A bridge construction reduces Abbe offsets, and oil hydrostatic linear slide ways provide sub-micron straightness. The linear axes are capable of accurate positioning by means of linear motors in combination with the non contact oil hydrostatic slide ways. Optical surface finishes are achieved with the stability of a large granite base supported by a high performance vibration isolation system. The machine includes a unique, self-compensating, patented oil bearing rotary axis. Critical machine errors are measured and corrected with integrated CNC machine compensation. The machine has accuracy and repeatability for the creation of precise, intersecting groove structures with multiple angles over large areas. Optical surfaces can be generated either by a ruling/shaping operation with a non-rotating tool, or by a flycutting tool rotating on a high speed air bearing spindle. The spindle can double as a positioning axis to generate variable angle grooves in ruling mode. A Fast Tool Servo can be utilized to create fine micro-structures. Work piece quality can be evaluated in-situ with metrology sensors.

  13. Analysis of Large Array Surface Myoelectric Potentials for the Low Back Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    ANALYSIS OF LARGE ARRAY SURFACE MYOELECTRIC POTENTIALS FOR THE LOW BACK MUSCLES Steven I Reger, Ph.D. Vinod Sahgal M.D. Department of Physical...fewer subjects. The results indicated a potential of the model for clinical patient classification. Keywords - Myoelectric potential distribution, Low...computer science have improved signal processing, sensitivity and simultaneous multiple site data collection methods essential to the clinical

  14. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  15. Novel Threadlike Structures May Be Present on the Large Animal Organ Surface: Evidence in Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Hee Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  16. Analysis of active surface reflector antenna for a large millimeter wave radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Medellin, G.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1994-02-01

    The authors analyze the effects of imperfect segment alignment on the aperture efficiency of a large millimeter telescope. A 50 meter diameter instrument of this type specified to operate to wavelengths as short as 1 mm is being designed with an actively controlled main surface. By simulating the performance of the control system, they generate samples of tilt and piston errors for the segments from which the antenna radiation patterns and aperture efficiencies are calculated. They make a comparison of these results with models of antenna tolerance theory developed by Ruze (1966), which relate the aperture efficiency to the RMS phase error. They find that Ruze's formulas have a different range of validity when the aperture RMS phase error, rather than the RMS surface error, is used as a parameter. When appreciable tilt errors are present in large segmented antennas, the aperture RMS phase error tends to a constant value, independent of the aperture illumination and of the shape of the segments. They conclude that the antenna RMS surface error is a better tracer of the aperture efficiency than is the aperture RMS phase error when Ruze's formula is used. They find that this well-known expression stands as a lower limit to the performance of large segmented reflector antennas.

  17. A Background-Free Direction-Sensitive Neutron Detector2 A Background-Free Direction-Sensitive Neutron Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Roccaro, Alvaro; Ahlen, S; Avery, D; Inglis, A; Battat, J; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P; Henderson, S; Kaboth, A; Kohse, G; Lanza, R; Monroe, J; Sciolla, G; Skvorodnev, N; Wellenstein, H; Yamamoto, R

    2009-01-01

    We show data from a new type of detector that can be used to determine neutron flux, energy distribution, and direction of neutron motion for both fast and thermal neutrons. Many neutron detectors are plagued by large backgrounds from x-rays and gamma rays, and most current neutron detectors lack single-event energy sensitivity or any information on neutron directionality. Even the best detectors are limited by cosmic ray neutron backgrounds. All applications (neutron scattering and radiography, measurements of solar and cosmic ray neutron flux, measurements of neutron interaction cross sections, monitoring of neutrons at nuclear facilities, oil exploration, and searches for fissile weapons of mass destruction) will benefit from the improved neutron detection sensitivity and improved measurements of neutron properties made possible by this detector. The detector is free of backgrounds from x-rays, gamma rays, beta particles, relativistic singely charged particles and cosmic ray neutrons. It is sensitive to th...

  18. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  19. Dynamics of phytoplankton pigments in water and surface sediments of a large shallow lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilmar Tõnno

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to find out to which extent fossil phytoplankton pigments in the large shallow and turbid Lake Võrtsjärv carry information on the history of phytoplankton communities. For this purpose we examined how the changes in the pigment composition of surface sediments follow their changes in the water column. Depth-integrated lake water and surface sediment samples were collected weekly in May–October 2007. Considering cyanobacterial and diatom dominance in phytoplankton, we analysed fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin as marker pigments for diatoms, zeaxanthin as a marker pigment for total cyanobacteria and canthaxanthin as a marker pigment for colonial cyanobacteria. Chlorophyll a and its derivative pheophytin a were applied as indicators for total phytoplankton. The dynamics of phytoplankton pigments in surface sediments generally did not follow their dynamics in the water column, possibly due to intensive resuspension and a high sedimentation rate in a large and shallow lake. It was noticed that the surface sediment carries information on pigment degradation intensity and on weight and size characteristics of phytoplankton cells, which affect their sinking and floating velocities. Higher pigment contents of sediment in spring were presumably caused by lower resuspension due to high water level and slower degradation in cold water. Pheophytin a and the marker pigments of cyanobacteria were found to be persistent against degradation in upper sediment layers, which makes them useful indicators for tracking the historical changes in phytoplankton communities also in a shallow lake. Sharp decrease in chemically unstable pigment contents between the sediment surface and deeper layers indicates that only the uppermost sediment surface is resuspended in Lake Võrtsjärv. The transformation of the diatom marker carotenoid diadinoxanthin to diatoxanthin was found to occur mainly in sediments and not in the water column, and the

  20. Forced synchronization of large-scale circulation to increase predictability of surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mao-Lin; Keenlyside, Noel; Selten, Frank; Wiegerinck, Wim; Duane, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models are key tools in the projection of the future climate change. The lack of perfect initial condition and perfect knowledge of the laws of physics, as well as inherent chaotic behavior limit predictions. Conceptually, the atmospheric variables can be decomposed into a predictable component (signal) and an unpredictable component (noise). In ensemble prediction the anomaly of ensemble mean is regarded as the signal and the ensemble spread the noise. Naturally the prediction skill will be higher if the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is larger in the initial conditions. We run two ensemble experiments in order to explore a way to reduce the SNR of surface winds and temperature. One ensemble experiment is AGCM with prescribing sea surface temperature (SST); the other is AGCM with both prescribing SST and nudging the high-level temperature and winds to ERA-Interim. Each ensemble has 30 members. Larger SNR is expected and found over the tropical ocean in the first experiment because the tropical circulation is associated with the convection and the associated surface wind convergence as these are to a large extent driven by the SST. However, small SNR is found over high latitude ocean and land surface due to the chaotic and non-synchronized atmosphere states. In the second experiment the higher level temperature and winds are forced to be synchronized (nudged to reanalysis) and hence a larger SNR of surface winds and temperature is expected. Furthermore, different nudging coefficients are also tested in order to understand the limitation of both synchronization of large-scale circulation and the surface states. These experiments will be useful for the developing strategies to synchronize the 3-D states of atmospheric models that can be later used to build a super model.

  1. On Self-Ignition and the Propagation of Flame Fronts on the Surfaces of Accreting Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, A.; Sandquist, E. L.; Taam, R. E.

    1998-12-01

    The behavior of nuclear burning in the accreted layer of a neutron star is investigated for helium and hydrogen-helium mixtures. Attention is focused on the propagation of a thermal wave due to electron conduction or radiative diffusion in the lateral direction. The fully time-dependent calculations reveal that a steady state flame front is not necessarily applicable at high mass accretion rates (dM/dt > (dM/dt)Edd). In particular, there are parameter regimes in which a steady state structure is never attained within physically relevant timescales because the gas ahead of a front self-ignites. Hence, a thermonuclear flash may take place on a timescale unrelated to the timescale for a steady state front to propagate over a homogeneous region. The existence of irregular burst activity in highly luminous neutron star X-ray binary systems may provide some observational support for this theoretical picture.

  2. Adaptive Hierarchical B-spline Surface Representation of Large-Scale Scattered Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The representation of large scale scattered data is a difficult problem, especially when various features of the representation, such as C2-continuity, are required. This paper describes a fast algorithm for large scale scattered data approximation and interpolation. The interpolation algorithm uses a coarse-to-fine hierarchical control lattice to fit the scattered data. The refinement process is only used in the regions where the error between the scattered data and the result in a surface is greater than a specified tolerance. A method to ensure C2-continuity is introduced to calculate the control lattice under constrained conditions. Experimental results show that this method can quickly represent large scale scattered data set.

  3. Large eddy simulation of LDL surface concentration in a subject specific human aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-02-02

    The development of atherosclerosis is correlated to the accumulation of lipids in the arterial wall, which, in turn, may be caused by the build-up of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on the arterial surface. The goal of this study was to model blood flow within a subject specific human aorta, and to study how the LDL surface concentration changed during a cardiac cycle. With measured velocity profiles as boundary conditions, a scale-resolving technique (large eddy simulation, LES) was used to compute the pulsatile blood flow that was in the transitional regime. The relationship between wall shear stress (WSS) and LDL surface concentration was investigated, and it was found that the accumulation of LDL correlated well with WSS. In general, regions of low WSS corresponded to regions of increased LDL concentration and vice versa. The instantaneous LDL values changed significantly during a cardiac cycle; during systole the surface concentration was low due to increased convective fluid transport, while in diastole there was an increased accumulation of LDL on the surface. Therefore, the near-wall velocity was investigated at four representative locations, and it was concluded that in regions with disturbed flow the LDL concentration had significant temporal changes, indicating that LDL accumulation is sensitive to not only the WSS but also near-wall flow.

  4. Surface-controlled contact printing for nanowire device fabrication on a large scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roßkopf, D.; Strehle, S.

    2016-05-01

    Assembly strategies for functional nanowire devices that merge bottom-up and top-down technologies have been debated for over a decade. Although several breakthroughs have been reported, nanowire device fabrication techniques remain generally incompatible with large-scale and high-yield top-down microelectronics manufacturing. Strategies enabling the controlled transfer of nanowires from the growth substrate to pre-defined locations on a target surface would help to address this challenge. Based on the promising concept of mechanical nanowire transfer, we developed the technique of surface-controlled contact printing, which is based purely on dry friction between a nanowire and a target surface. Surface features, so-called catchers, alter the local frictional force or deposition probability and allow the positioning of single nanowires. Surface-controlled contact printing extends the current scope of nanowire alignment strategies with the intention to facilitate efficient nanowire device fabrication. This is demonstrated by the simultaneous assembly of 36 nanowire resistors within a chip area of greater than 2 cm2 aided only by mask-assisted photolithography.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Surface Pressure Fluctuations on a Stalled Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Sanjiva; Kocheemoolayil, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The surface pressure fluctuations beneath the separated flow over a turbine blade are believed to be responsible for a phenomenon known as Other Amplitude Modulation (OAM) of wind turbine noise. Developing the capability to predict stall noise from first-principles is a pacing item within the context of critically evaluating this conjecture. We summarize the progress made towards using large eddy simulations to predict stall noise. Successful prediction of pressure fluctuations on the airfoil surface beneath the suction side boundary layer is demonstrated in the near-stall and post-stall regimes. Previously unavailable two-point statistics necessary for characterizing the surface pressure fluctuations more completely are documented. The simulation results indicate that the space-time characteristics of pressure fluctuations on the airfoil surface change drastically in the near-stall and post-stall regimes. The changes are not simple enough to be accounted for by straight-forward scaling laws. The eddies responsible for surface pressure fluctuations and hence far-field noise are significantly more coherent across the span of the airfoil in the post-stall regime relative to the more canonical attached configurations.

  6. Sub-surface damage issues for effective fabrication of large optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnellier, X.; Shore, P.; Morantz, P.; Baldwin, A.; Walker, D.; Yu, G.; Evans, R.

    2008-07-01

    A new ultra precision large optics grinding machine, BoX® has been developed at Cranfield University. BoX® is located at the UK's Ultra Precision Surfaces laboratory at the OpTIC Technium. This machine offers a rapid and economic solution for grinding large off-axis aspherical and free-form optical components. This paper presents an analysis of subsurface damage assessments of optical ground materials produced using diamond resin bonded grinding wheels. The specific materials used, Zerodur® and ULE® are currently under study for making extremely large telescope (ELT) segmented mirrors such as in the E-ELT project. The grinding experiments have been conducted on the BoX® grinding machine using wheels with grits sizes of 76 μm, 46 μm and 25 μm. Grinding process data was collected using a Kistler dynamometer platform. The highest material removal rate (187.5 mm3/s) used ensures that a 1 metre diameter optic can be ground in less than 10 hours. The surface roughness and surface profile were measured using a Form Talysurf. The subsurface damage was revealed using a sub aperture polishing process in combination with an etching technique. These results are compared with the targeted form accuracy of 1 μm p-v over a 1 metre part, surface roughness of 50-150 nm RMS and subsurface damage in the range of 2-5 μm. This process stage was validated on a 400 mm ULE® blank and a 1 metre hexagonal Zerodur® part.

  7. Large contribution of sea surface warming to recent increase in Atlantic hurricane activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mark A; Lea, Adam S

    2008-01-31

    Atlantic hurricane activity has increased significantly since 1995 (refs 1-4), but the underlying causes of this increase remain uncertain. It is widely thought that rising Atlantic sea surface temperatures have had a role in this, but the magnitude of this contribution is not known. Here we quantify this contribution for storms that formed in the tropical North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico; these regions together account for most of the hurricanes that make landfall in the United States. We show that a statistical model based on two environmental variables--local sea surface temperature and an atmospheric wind field--can replicate a large proportion of the variance in tropical Atlantic hurricane frequency and activity between 1965 and 2005. We then remove the influence of the atmospheric wind field to assess the contribution of sea surface temperature. Our results indicate that the sensitivity of tropical Atlantic hurricane activity to August-September sea surface temperature over the period we consider is such that a 0.5 degrees C increase in sea surface temperature is associated with a approximately 40% increase in hurricane frequency and activity. The results also indicate that local sea surface warming was responsible for approximately 40% of the increase in hurricane activity relative to the 1950-2000 average between 1996 and 2005. Our analysis does not identify whether warming induced by greenhouse gases contributed to the increase in hurricane activity, but the ability of climate models to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricanes and sea surface temperature will serve as a useful means of assessing whether they are likely to provide reliable projections of future changes in Atlantic hurricane activity.

  8. Why pinning by surface irregularities can explain the peak effect in transport properties and neutron diffraction results in NbSe2 and Bi-2212 crystals?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charles Simon; Alain Pautrat; Christophe Goupil; Joseph Scola; Patrice Mathieu; Annie Brûlet; Antoine Ruyter; M J Higgins; Shobo Bhattacharya; D Plessis

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a peak effect in transport properties (a maximum of the critical current as function of magnetic field) is a well-known but still intriguing feature of Type II superconductors such as NbSe2 and Bi-2212. Using a model of pinning by surface irregularities in anisotropic superconductors, we have developed a calculation of the critical current which allows estimating quantitatively the critical current in both the high critical current phase and the low critical current phase. The only adjustable parameter of this model is the angle of the vortices at the surface. The agreement between the measurements and the model is really very impressive. In this framework, the anomalous dynamical properties close to the peak effect is due to coexistence of two different vortex states with different critical currents. Recent neutron diffraction data in NbSe2 crystals in the presence of transport current support this point of view.

  9. Simulation of Surface Wave with Large Eddy Simulation in σ-Coordinate System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玲玲

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model in the σ-coordinate system is developed to study the problem of waves. Turbulence effects are modeled by a subgrid-scale (SGS) model with the concept of large eddy simulation (LES). The σ-coordinate transformation is introduced to map the irregular physical domain of the wavy free surface and uneven bottom onto the regular computational domain of the shape of rectangular prism. The operator splitting method, which splits the solution procedure into the advection, diffusion, and propagation steps, is used to solve the modified Navier-Stokes Equation.The model is used to simulate the propagation of solitary wave and wave passing over a submerged breakwater. Numerical results are compared with available analytical solutions and experimental data in terms of velocity profiles, free surface displacement, and energy conservation. Good agreement is obtained. The method is proved to be of high accuracy and efficiency in simulating surface wave propagation and wave-structure interaction. It is suitable for the large and irregular physical domain, and requiring the non-uniform grid system. The present work provides a foundation for further studies of random waves, wave-structure interaction, wave-discharge interaction,etc.

  10. A smart car for the surface shape measurement of large antenna based on laser tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yonggang; Hu, Jing; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    The geometric accuracy of the surface shape of large antenna is an important indicator of antenna’s quality. Currently, high-precision measurement of large antenna surface shape can be performed in two ways: photogrammetry and laser tracker. Photogrammetry is a rapid method, but its accuracy is not enough good. Laser tracker can achieve high precision, but it is very inconvenient to move the reflector (target mirror) on the surface of the antenna by hand during the measurement. So, a smart car is designed to carry the reflector in this paper. The car, controlled by wireless, has a small weight and a strong ability for climbing, and there is a holding bracket gripping the reflector and controlling reflector rise up and drop down on the car. During the measurement of laser tracker, the laser beam between laser tracker and the reflector must not be interrupted, so two high-precision three-dimensional miniature electronic compasses, which can real-time monitor the relative angle between the holding bracket and the laser tracker’s head, are both equipped on the car and the head of laser tracker to achieve automatic alignment between reflector and laser beam. With the aid of the smart car, the measurement of laser tracker has the advantages of high precision and rapidity.

  11. Puddle jumping: Spontaneous ejection of large liquid droplets from hydrophobic surfaces during drop tower tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, B.; Weislogel, M.; Wollman, A.; Chen, Y.; Snyder, T.

    2016-10-01

    Large droplets and puddles jump spontaneously from sufficiently hydrophobic surfaces during routine drop tower tests. The simple low-cost passive mechanism can in turn be used as an experimental device to investigate dynamic droplet phenomena for drops up to 104 times larger than their normal terrestrial counterparts. We provide and/or confirm quick and qualitative design guides for such "drop shooters" as employed in drop tower tests including relationships to predict droplet ejection durations and velocities as functions of drop volume, surface texture, surface contour, wettability pattern, and fluid properties including contact angle. The latter is determined via profile image comparisons with numerical equilibrium interface computations. Water drop volumes of 0.04-400 ml at ejection speeds of -0.007-0.12 m/s are demonstrated herein. A sample application of the drop jump method is made to the classic problem of low-gravity phase change heat transfer for large impinging drops. Many other candidate problems might be identified by the reader.

  12. Neutron beam design for low intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Two small neutron sources of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low intensity neutron and gamma ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter-shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3,900 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with neutron/gamma ratio of 7x10 sup 7 , and 25 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf(122 mu g) and a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(37GBq)radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  13. Image-based Exploration of Iso-surfaces for Large Multi- Variable Datasets using Parameter Space.

    KAUST Repository

    Binyahib, Roba S.

    2013-05-13

    With an increase in processing power, more complex simulations have resulted in larger data size, with higher resolution and more variables. Many techniques have been developed to help the user to visualize and analyze data from such simulations. However, dealing with a large amount of multivariate data is challenging, time- consuming and often requires high-end clusters. Consequently, novel visualization techniques are needed to explore such data. Many users would like to visually explore their data and change certain visual aspects without the need to use special clusters or having to load a large amount of data. This is the idea behind explorable images (EI). Explorable images are a novel approach that provides limited interactive visualization without the need to re-render from the original data [40]. In this work, the concept of EI has been used to create a workflow that deals with explorable iso-surfaces for scalar fields in a multivariate, time-varying dataset. As a pre-processing step, a set of iso-values for each scalar field is inferred and extracted from a user-assisted sampling technique in time-parameter space. These iso-values are then used to generate iso- surfaces that are then pre-rendered (from a fixed viewpoint) along with additional buffers (i.e. normals, depth, values of other fields, etc.) to provide a compressed representation of iso-surfaces in the dataset. We present a tool that at run-time allows the user to interactively browse and calculate a combination of iso-surfaces superimposed on each other. The result is the same as calculating multiple iso- surfaces from the original data but without the memory and processing overhead. Our tool also allows the user to change the (scalar) values superimposed on each of the surfaces, modify their color map, and interactively re-light the surfaces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach over a multi-terabyte combustion dataset. We also illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of our

  14. Fermi surface properties of paramagnetic NpCd{sub 11} with a large unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Yoshinori; Sakai, Hironori; Ikeda, Shugo; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nakamura, Akio; Onuki, Yoshichika [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Settai, Rikio [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Takeuchi, Tetsuya [Cryogenic Center, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamagami, Hiroshi, E-mail: yhomma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    We succeeded in growing a high-quality single crystal of NpCd{sub 11} with the cubic BaHg{sub 11}-type structure by the Cd-self flux method. The lattice parameter of a = 9.2968(2) A and crystallographic positions of the atoms were determined by x-ray single-crystal structure analysis. From the results of the magnetic susceptibility and specific heat experiments, this compound is found to be a 5f-localized paramagnet with the singlet ground state in the crystalline electric field (CEF) scheme. Fermi surface properties were measured using the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) technique. Long-period oscillations were observed in the dHvA frequency range of 9.1 x 10{sup 5} to 1.9 x 10{sup 7} Oe, indicating small cross-sectional areas of Fermi surfaces, which is consistent with a small Brillouin zone based on a large unit cell. From the results of dHvA and magnetoresistance experiments, the Fermi surface of NpCd{sub 11} is found to consist of many kinds of closed Fermi surfaces and a multiply-connected-like Fermi surface, although the result of energy band calculations based on the 5f-localized Np{sup 3+}(5f{sup 4}) configuration reveals the existence of only closed Fermi surfaces. The corresponding cyclotron effective mass is small, ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m{sub 0}, which is consistent with a small electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} {approx_equal} 10mJ/K{sup 2{center_dot}}mol, revealing no hybridization between the 5f electrons and conduction electrons.

  15. Precision Measurement of Neutron Spin Asymmetry A1n at Large x{sub bj} Using CEBAF at 5.7 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaochao Zheng

    2002-09-01

    This dissertation will first give an introduction to the theories and formalism of polarized deep inelastic scattering and a review of the theories of A1n. Next the experiment E99-117 at JLab Hall A will be described, followed by the data analysis. The data presented greatly improve the current world fit of neutron polarized structure functions and provide valuable insight in the understanding of the neutron spin structure.

  16. Precision Measurement of Neutron Spin Asymmetry A$n\\atop{1}$ at Large xbj Using CEBAF at 5.7 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xiaochao [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2002-12-01

    This dissertation will first give an introduction to the theories and formalism of polarized deep inelastic scattering and a review of the theories of A$n\\atop{1}$. Next the experiment E99-117 at JLab Hall A will be described, followed by the data analysis. The data presented greatly improve the current world fit of neutron polarized structure functions and provide valuable insight in the understanding of the neutron spin structure.

  17. Small angle neutron scattering on an absolute intensity scale and the internal surface of diatom frustules from three species of differing morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, C J; Strobl, M; Percot, A; Saroun, J; Haug, J; Vyverman, W; Chepurnov, V A; Ferris, J M

    2013-05-01

    The internal nanostructure of the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Seminavis robusta and Achnanthes subsessilis was investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to examine thin biosilica samples, consisting of isotropic (powder) from their isolated cell walls. The interpretation of SANS data was assisted by several other measurements. The N2 adsorption, interpreted within the Branuer-Emmet-Teller isotherm, yielded the specific surface area of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the isolated material is amorphous silica with small amounts of organic cell wall materials acting as a filling material between the silica particles. A two-phase (air and amorphous silica) model was used to interpret small angle neutron scattering data. After correction for instrumental resolution, the measurements on two SANS instruments covered an extended range of scattering vectors 0.0011 nm(-1) < q < 5.6 nm(-1), giving an almost continuous SANS curve over a range of scattering vectors, q, on an absolute scale of intensity for each sample. Each of the samples gave a characteristic scattering curve where log (intensity) versus log (q) has a -4 dependence, with other features superimposed. In the high-q regime, departure from this behaviour was observed at a length-scales equivalent to the proposed unitary silica particle. The limiting Porod scattering law was used to determine the specific area per unit of volume of each sample illuminated by the neutron beam. The Porod behaviour, and divergence from this behaviour, is discussed in terms of various structural features and the proposed mechanisms for the bio-assembly of unitary silica particles in frustules.

  18. Coordinate metrology of a primary surface composite panel from the Large Millimeter Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, David M.; Lucero Álvarez, Maribel; Cabrera Cuevas, Lizeth; Leon-Huerta, Andrea; Arizmendi Reyes, Edgar; Icasio Hernández, Octavio; Castro Santos, David; Hernández Ríos, Emilio; Tecuapetla Sosa, Esteban; Tzile Torres, Carlos; Viliesid Alonso, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) is a single-dish fully-steerable radio telescope presently operating with a 32.5 m parabolic primary reflector, in the process of extension to 50 m. The project is managed by the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) in México, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA. A laminated surface panel from the LMT primary reflector has been subjected to a surface measurement assay at Mexico's National Metrology Center (CENAM). Data obtained using a coordinate measuring machine and laser tracker owned by CENAM is compared with measurements using an identical model laser tracker and the photogrammetry technique, the latter systems owned and operated by the LMT. All measurements were performed within the controlled metrology environment at CENAM. The measurement exercise is intended to prepare the groundwork for converting this spare surface panel into a calibrated work-piece. The establishment of a calibrated work-piece provides quality assurance for metrology through measurement traceability. It also simplifies the evaluation of measurement uncertainty for coordinate metrology procedures used by the LMT project during reflector surface qualification.

  19. Luminosity and surface brightness distribution of K-band galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Anthony J; Cross, Nicholas J G

    2008-01-01

    We present luminosity and surface brightness distributions of 36,663 galaxies with K-band photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS), Data Release 3 and optical photometry from Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Various features and limitations of the new UKIDSS data are examined, such as a problem affecting Petrosian magnitudes of extended sources. Selection limits in K- and r-band magnitude, K-band surface brightness and K-band radius are included explicitly in the 1/Vmax estimation of the space density and luminosity function. The bivariate brightness distribution in K-band absolute magnitude and surface brightness is presented and found to display a clear luminosity-surface brightness correlation that flattens at high luminosity and broadens at low luminosity, consistent with similar analyses at optical wavelengths. Best fitting Schechter function parameters for the K-band luminosity function are found to be M*-5log h=-23.17 +/- 0.04, alpha=-0.8...

  20. Nanometer profile measurement of large aspheric optical surface by scanning deflectometry with rotatable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Muzheng; Jujo, Satomi; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi

    2011-09-01

    Large aspheric optical mirrors and lens are wildly used in high-tech industry such as huge telescopes and synchrotron radiation facilities. The measurement uncertainty of the surfaces is needed to be under several tens of nanometers. Current methods such as interferometry method are not available for measuring aspheric surface with departure over hundreds of wavelength. In this paper, we proposed a new method called improved 3D deflectometry method. Rotatable optical devices are applied to enlarge the measuring range of autocollimator with highly accuracy but small measuring range. Data processing methods are also proposed to improve the measurement uncertainty. Experimental setup is designed based on proposed method. Spherical concave mirror with curvature radius of 5000 mm is measured successfully. The repeatability (mean standard deviation) of 10 times measurement is less than 10 nanometers.

  1. Neutron Diffraction Studies of the Atomic Vibrations of Bulk and Surface Atoms of Nanocrystalline SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.; Palosz, B.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal atomic motions of nanocrystalline Sic were characterized by two temperature atomic factors B(sub core), and B(sub shell). With the use of wide angle neutron diffraction data it was shown that at the diffraction vector above 15A(exp -1) the Wilson plots gives directly the temperature factor of the grain interior (B(sub core)). At lower Q values the slope of the Wilson plot provides information on the relative amplitudes of vibrations of the core and shell atoms.

  2. Axion emission from neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, N.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that axion emission from neutron stars is the dominant energy-loss mechanism for a range of values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry-breaking scale (F) not excluded by previous constraints. This gives the possibility of obtaining a better bound on F from measurements of surface temperature of neutron stars.

  3. Surface-assisted large-scale ordering of DNA origami tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghebat Rafat, Ali; Pirzer, Tobias; Scheible, Max B; Kostina, Anna; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-07-14

    The arrangement of DNA-based nanostructures into extended higher order assemblies is an important step towards their utilization as functional molecular materials. We herein demonstrate that by electrostatically controlling the adhesion and mobility of DNA origami structures on mica surfaces by the simple addition of monovalent cations, large ordered 2D arrays of origami tiles can be generated. The lattices can be formed either by close-packing of symmetric, non-interacting DNA origami structures, or by utilizing blunt-end stacking interactions between the origami units. The resulting crystalline lattices can be readily utilized as templates for the ordered arrangement of proteins.

  4. A novel hybrid surface micromachined segmented mirror for large aperture laser applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Li; Haiqing Chen; Hongbin Yu

    2006-01-01

    @@ A novel hybrid surface micromachined segmented mirror array is described. This device is capable of scaling to large apertures for correcting time-varying aberrations in laser applications. Each mirror is composed of bottom electrode, support part, and mirror plate, in which a T-shaped beam structure is used to support the mirror plate. It can provide mirror with vertical movement and rotation around two horizontal axes. The test results show that the maximum deflection along the vertical direction of the mirror plate is 2μm, while the rotation angles around x and y axes are ±2.3° and ±1.45°, respectively.

  5. Body conformable 915 MHz microstrip array applicators for large surface area hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E.R.; Tarczy-Hornoch, P.; Kapp, S.; Fessenden, P.; Lohrbach, A.W.; Prionas, S.D. (Stanford University Medical Center, CA (United States)); Wilsey, T. (Carian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The optimal treatment with hyperthermia of superficially located tumors which involve large surface areas requires applicators which can physically conform to body contours, and locally alter their power deposition patterns to adjust for nonuniform temperature caused by tissue inhomogeneities and blood flow variations. A series of 915 MHz microstrip array applicators satisfying these criteria have been developed and clinically tested. Clinical and engineering design tradeoffs for practical devices are discussed. Measurements taken in tissue equivalent phantoms and a summary of clinical experiences with these microstrip arrays are presented.

  6. Compact Wideband and Low-Profile Antenna Mountable on Large Metallic Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a compact wideband and low-profile antenna mountable on large metallic surfaces. Six rows of coupled microstrip resonators with different lengths are printed on a Teflon block. The lengths of the microstrip resonators in different rows are gradually reduced along the end...... resonance at the lowest frequency. A trapezoid-shaped capacitive-feed (C-fed) strip is utilized and also printed on the Teflon block to globally optimize the wideband impedance matching. The proposed antenna covers a relative bandwidth of 109% for VSWR

  7. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  8. Relationship of surface O3 to large-scale circulation patterns during two recent winters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Huiting; Talbot, Robert

    2004-03-01

    We demonstrate a direct connection between large-scale circulation patterns and surface O3 using atmospheric observations obtained during winters 2002 and 2003. Measurements at two rural sites in the northeastern U.S. revealed that median mixing ratios of O3 in winter 2003 were increased by up to 80% compared to 2002, and greatly exceeded previous spring annual maximums. To explain this we propose that strong meridional flows in winter 2003 frequently transported O3-rich mid-tropospheric air masses from high latitudes to the northeastern U.S. while cooling regional climate 4.4°C below normal. Our measurements also show that an exceptionally elevated spring O3 maximum occurred in 2003. The impact from this winter enhancement on the levels of O3 and other species during the following months will be largely driven by actual climatic conditions.

  9. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  10. Surface States Effect on the Large Photoluminescence Redshift in GaN Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Slimane, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    We report on the large photoluminescence redshift observed in nanostructures fabricated using n-type GaN by ultraviolet (UV) metal-assisted electroless chemical-etching method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization showed nanostructures with size dispersion ranging from 10 to 100 nm. We observed the crystalline structure using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss (EELS) techniques. In contrast to 362 nm UV emission from the GaN epitaxy, the nanostructures emitted violet visible-light in photoluminescence (PL) characterization with increasing optical excitation. An energy band model was presented to shed light on the large PL redshift under the influence of surface states, which resulted in two competing photoluminescence mechanisms depending on excitation conditions.

  11. Neutron whispering gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.; Voronin, Alexei Yu.; Cubitt, Robert; Protasov, Konstantin V.

    2010-02-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for atoms and neutrons. For matter waves, it would include a new feature: a massive particle would be settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. Here, we present for the first time the quantum whispering-gallery effect for cold neutrons. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to the recently discovered gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons . These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a pure quantum state. Deeply bound whispering-gallery states are long-living and weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited states are short-living and very sensitive to the wall potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects.

  12. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-01

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 1014 G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 1018 G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  13. Surface accuracy analysis and mathematical modeling of deployable large aperture elastic antenna reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Michael J.

    One class of deployable large aperture antenna consists of thin light-weight parabolic reflectors. A reflector of this type is a deployable structure that consists of an inflatable elastic membrane that is supported about its perimeter by a set of elastic tendons and is subjected to a constant hydrostatic pressure. A design may not hold the parabolic shape to within a desired tolerance due to an elastic deformation of the surface, particularly near the rim. We can compute the equilibrium configuration of the reflector system using an optimization-based solution procedure that calculates the total system energy and determines a configuration of minimum energy. Analysis of the equilibrium configuration reveals the behavior of the reflector shape under various loading conditions. The pressure, film strain energy, tendon strain energy, and gravitational energy are all considered in this analysis. The surface accuracy of the antenna reflector is measured by an RMS calculation while the reflector phase error component of the efficiency is determined by computing the power density at boresight. Our error computation methods are tailored for the faceted surface of our model and they are more accurate for this particular problem than the commonly applied Ruze Equation. Previous analytical work on parabolic antennas focused on axisymmetric geometries and loads. Symmetric equilibria are not assumed in our analysis. In addition, this dissertation contains two principle original findings: (1) the typical supporting tendon system tends to flatten a parabolic reflector near its edge. We find that surface accuracy can be significantly improved by fixing the edge of the inflated reflector to a rigid structure; (2) for large membranes assembled from flat sheets of thin material, we demonstrate that the surface accuracy of the resulting inflated membrane reflector can be improved by altering the cutting pattern of the flat components. Our findings demonstrate that the proper choice

  14. Two-dimensional curvature of large angle interplanetary MHD discontinuity surfaces: IMP-8 and WIND observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; McClernan, K.

    2003-07-01

    This study examines the degree of two-dimensional curvature of solar wind directional discontinuity (DD) surfaces at 1 AU using magnetic field, density, and velocity data from the WIND and IMP-8 spacecraft for a large number (N = 134) of carefully selected events having large "discontinuity angles" of 90° or greater. The discontinuity angle (ω) is measured in the DD's current sheet, the normal (n) to which is estimated by field variance analysis. The fundamental analysis depends on estimates of these DD surface normals at the two spacecraft and the DD's center-times and positions. On average, the transit time from one DD sighting to the other was 36 minutes, and the associated distance along the normal direction was 137 RE. The transition-interval lengths across the DDs are translated into thicknesses and examined for the amount of change between the two spacecraft observing points. The average thickness is relatively large, 14 RE.; the most probable thickness is ≈6 RE. All relevant quantities are examined statistically to establish their distributions, average, and degree of change. A weighted average of the radius of curvature is estimated to be 380 RE, but its most probable value is 290 RE. The average ω is 140° with a relatively large spread (σ = 28°). The average direction of propagation is: longitude (ϕn) = 194° and latitude (θn) = 7° (but = 27°), where ϕn = 0° is sunward and θn = 0° is the ecliptic plane. Various parameters are studied with respect to DD type, i.e., rotational or tangential discontinuity (RD or TD), defined in terms of the "ratio" (in percent) of speed of propagation to net speed of the DD surface, where the net speed is the sum of the convection velocity (along n) plus the propagation speed. The RD %-ratio is moderately small, but the TD ratio is very small or zero. The results by this definition of type are favorably compared to those from the more conventional method, which depends on the absolute strength of the normal

  15. The 2-D Curvature of Large Angle Interplanetary MHD Discontinuity Surfaces: IMP-8 and WIND Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.; McClernan, K.

    2002-12-01

    This study examines the degree of 2-D curvature of solar wind directional discontinuity (DD) surfaces at 1 AU using magnetic field, density, and velocity data from the WIND and IMP-8 spacecraft for a large number (N = 134) of carefully selected events having large ``discontinuity angles" of 90° or greater. The discontinuity angle (ω ) is measured in the DDs current sheet, the normal to which is estimated by field variance analysis. The fundamental analysis depends on estimates of these DD surface normals at the two spacecraft, and the DDs center-times and positions. On average, the transit time from one DD sighting to the other was 36 minutes, and the associated distance along the normal direction was 137 RE. The transition-interval lengths across the DDs are translated into thicknesses and examined for the amount of change between the two spacecraft observing points; average thickness is relatively large, 14 RE. All relevant quantities are examined statistically to establish their distributions, average, and degree of change. A weighted average of the radius of curvature is estimated to be 380 RE, but its most probably value is 290 RE. The average ω is 140° with a relatively large spread (σ =28°). The average direction of propagation is: longitude = 194° and latitude = 7° (but = 27°). Various parameters are studied with respect to DD type, defined in terms the ratio of speed of propagation to net speed (``ratio") of the DD surface, (the RD ratio is high and the TD ratio is very low or zero). The results by this definition of type are favorably compared to those from the more conventional method, which depends on the absolute strength of the normal component of the magnetic field. There is little difference in any average parameter value according to type. However, the average ω appears to depend slightly on type with the for the RDs being smaller. A DDs type was shown to change in either direction between the two observation positions about 40% of the

  16. Neutron Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  17. Fabrication of a Horizontal and a Vertical Large Surface Area Nanogap Electrochemical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules L. Hammond

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanogap sensors have a wide range of applications as they can provide accurate direct detection of biomolecules through impedimetric or amperometric signals. Signal response from nanogap sensors is dependent on both the electrode spacing and surface area. However, creating large surface area nanogap sensors presents several challenges during fabrication. We show two different approaches to achieve both horizontal and vertical coplanar nanogap geometries. In the first method we use electron-beam lithography (EBL to pattern an 11 mm long serpentine nanogap (215 nm between two electrodes. For the second method we use inductively-coupled plasma (ICP reactive ion etching (RIE to create a channel in a silicon substrate, optically pattern a buried 1.0 mm × 1.5 mm electrode before anodically bonding a second identical electrode, patterned on glass, directly above. The devices have a wide range of applicability in different sensing techniques with the large area nanogaps presenting advantages over other devices of the same family. As a case study we explore the detection of peptide nucleic acid (PNA−DNA binding events using dielectric spectroscopy with the horizontal coplanar device.

  18. Fabrication of a Horizontal and a Vertical Large Surface Area Nanogap Electrochemical Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Jules L; Rosamond, Mark C; Sivaraya, Siva; Marken, Frank; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-12-14

    Nanogap sensors have a wide range of applications as they can provide accurate direct detection of biomolecules through impedimetric or amperometric signals. Signal response from nanogap sensors is dependent on both the electrode spacing and surface area. However, creating large surface area nanogap sensors presents several challenges during fabrication. We show two different approaches to achieve both horizontal and vertical coplanar nanogap geometries. In the first method we use electron-beam lithography (EBL) to pattern an 11 mm long serpentine nanogap (215 nm) between two electrodes. For the second method we use inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching (RIE) to create a channel in a silicon substrate, optically pattern a buried 1.0 mm × 1.5 mm electrode before anodically bonding a second identical electrode, patterned on glass, directly above. The devices have a wide range of applicability in different sensing techniques with the large area nanogaps presenting advantages over other devices of the same family. As a case study we explore the detection of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA binding events using dielectric spectroscopy with the horizontal coplanar device.

  19. Mass Spectrometry as a Preparative Tool for the Surface Science of Large Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, Stephan; Ternes, Markus; Harnau, Ludger; Kern, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Measuring and understanding the complexity that arises when nanostructures interact with their environment are one of the major current challenges of nanoscale science and technology. High-resolution microscopy methods such as scanning probe microscopy have the capacity to investigate nanoscale systems with ultimate precision, for which, however, atomic scale precise preparation methods of surface science are a necessity. Preparative mass spectrometry (pMS), defined as the controlled deposition of m/z filtered ion beams, with soft ionization sources links the world of large, biological molecules and surface science, enabling atomic scale chemical control of molecular deposition in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Here we explore the application of high-resolution scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy to the characterization of structure and properties of large molecules. We introduce the fundamental principles of the combined experiments electrospray ion beam deposition and scanning tunneling microscopy. Examples for the deposition and investigation of single particles, for layer and film growth, and for the investigation of electronic properties of individual nonvolatile molecules show that state-of-the-art pMS technology provides a platform analog to thermal evaporation in conventional molecular beam epitaxy. Additionally, it offers additional, unique features due to the use of charged polyatomic particles. This new field is an enormous sandbox for novel molecular materials research and demands the development of advanced molecular ion beam technology.

  20. Robust linear equation dwell time model compatible with large scale discrete surface error matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2015-04-01

    The linear equation dwell time model can translate the 2D convolution process of material removal during subaperture polishing into a more intuitional expression, and may provide relatively fast and reliable results. However, the accurate solution of this ill-posed equation is not so easy, and its practicability for a large scale surface error matrix is still limited. This study first solves this ill-posed equation by Tikhonov regularization and the least square QR decomposition (LSQR) method, and automatically determines an optional interval and a typical value for the damped factor of regularization, which are dependent on the peak removal rate of tool influence functions. Then, a constrained LSQR method is presented to increase the robustness of the damped factor, which can provide more consistent dwell time maps than traditional LSQR. Finally, a matrix segmentation and stitching method is used to cope with large scale surface error matrices. Using these proposed methods, the linear equation model becomes more reliable and efficient in practical engineering.

  1. Point contact tunneling spectroscopy apparatus for large scale mapping of surface superconducting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groll, Nickolas; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinksi, John F. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We describe the design and testing of a point contact tunneling spectroscopy device that can measure material surface superconducting properties (i.e., the superconducting gap Δ and the critical temperature T{sub C}) and density of states over large surface areas with size up to mm{sup 2}. The tip lateral (X,Y) motion, mounted on a (X,Y,Z) piezo-stage, was calibrated on a patterned substrate consisting of Nb lines sputtered on a gold film using both normal (Al) and superconducting (PbSn) tips at 1.5 K. The tip vertical (Z) motion control enables some adjustment of the tip-sample junction resistance that can be measured over 7 orders of magnitudes from a quasi-ohmic regime (few hundred Ω) to the tunnel regime (from tens of kΩ up to few GΩ). The low noise electronic and LabVIEW program interface are also presented. The point contact regime and the large-scale motion capabilities are of particular interest for mapping and testing the superconducting properties of macroscopic scale superconductor-based devices.

  2. Compilation of Existing Neutron Screen Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chrysanthopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactors is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials, nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials, and tritium breeding materials. Therefore, introduction of these reactors into operation will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Due to limited availability of fast reactors, testing of future reactor materials will mostly take place in water cooled material test reactors (MTRs by tailoring the neutron spectrum via neutron screens. The latter rely on the utilization of materials capable of absorbing neutrons at specific energy. A large but fragmented experience is available on that topic. In this work a comprehensive compilation of the existing neutron screen technology is attempted, focusing on neutron screens developed in order to locally enhance the fast over thermal neutron flux ratio in a reactor core.

  3. Neutrons for technology and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeppli, G.

    1995-10-01

    We reviewed recent work using neutrons generated at nuclear reactors an accelerator-based spallation sources. Provided that large new sources become available, neutron beams will continue to have as great an impact on technology and science as in the past.

  4. Aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale hybrid upper surface blown flap model having four engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carros, R. J.; Boissevain, A. G.; Aoyagi, K.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented from an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of large-scale wind tunnel aircraft model that utilized a hybrid-upper surface blown flap to augment lift. The hybrid concept of this investigation used a portion of the turbofan exhaust air for blowing over the trailing edge flap to provide boundary layer control. The model, tested in the Ames 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel, had a 27.5 deg swept wing of aspect ratio 8 and 4 turbofan engines mounted on the upper surface of the wing. The lift of the model was augmented by turbofan exhaust impingement on the wind upper-surface and flap system. Results were obtained for three flap deflections, for some variation of engine nozzle configuration and for jet thrust coefficients from 0 to 3.0. Six-component longitudinal and lateral data are presented with four engine operation and with the critical engine out. In addition, a limited number of cross-plots of the data are presented. All of the tests were made with a downwash rake installed instead of a horizontal tail. Some of these downwash data are also presented.

  5. Local Condensation Curve from Dropwise to Glacial Region on Large Vertical Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Tadao; Shimada, Ryohachi; Takeyama, Toshiro

    The existence of several regimes of condensation heat transfer is well known. Regimes are given academic names as dropwise, transition, film and glacial condensation along the condensation curve showing the relationship between heat flux and surface subcooling. In case of comparatively large vertical surface, the lower part on the gravitational direction is affected by condensate from the upper part, and will be covered by water stream like a rivulet. It has no longer an existence as dropwise condition, and it is absolutely impossible that heat transfer problems under constant temperature or constant heat flux take place. The reason is why as follows, heat transfer of film condensation is some orders of magnitude less than dropwise condensation, and various regimes exist together simultaneously. In the present paper we shall try to observe the coexisting appearance of regimes in steam condensation at atmospheric pressure and make researches in the local condensation curve from top to bottom on the same surface, that is divided into eight parts in the rear side. The main results are shown as follows (1) Enhancement of heat transfer by wiping of drops appears toward somewhat lower position from top. (2) Frazil ice is observed in the supercooled liquid film flowing down on glacial condensation. (3) The regime of glacial condensation describes a thermal hysteresis loop.

  6. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  7. A translation micromirror with large quasi-static displacement and high surface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; He, Siyuan

    2017-01-01

    A large displacement with high surface quality translation micromirror is presented. The micromirror consists of a magnetic actuator and a mirror plate. The actuator and the mirror plate are fabricated separately using two processes and then bonded together. The actuator consists of a moving film which is a 20 µm thick nickel film fabricated by MetalMUMPs and a solenoid located underneath the moving film. The moving film is designed to curve up through the residual stress gradient in the nickel film and a curve-up mechanism which includes four trapezoidal plates and anchoring springs. The mirror plate is simply diced from a polished silicon wafer and coated with a metal thin film. The mirror plate is bonded onto the central ring of the moving film. A solenoid attracts the moving film along with the mirror plate downwards to realize translation. A quasi-static displacement of 123 µm is achieved at a driving current of 400 mA. A high mirror surface quality is realized, e.g. 15.6 m of curvature radius and 2 nm surface roughness.

  8. Searching for X-ray Pulsations from Neutron Stars Using NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paul S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Bogdanov, Slavko; Bult, Peter; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Guillot, Sebastien; Kust Harding, Alice; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Miller, M. Coleman; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Wolff, Michael Thomas

    2017-08-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) presents an exciting new capability for discovering new modulation properties of X-ray emitting neutron stars, including large area, low background, extremely precise absolute time stamps, superb low-energy response and flexible scheduling. The Pulsation Searches and Multiwavelength Coordination working group has designed a 2.5 Ms observing program to search for pulsations and characterize the modulation properties of about 30 known or suspected neutron star sources across a number of source categories. A key early goal will be to search for pulsations from millisecond pulsars that might exhibit thermal pulsations from the surface suitable for pulse profile modeling to constrain the neutron star equation of state. In addition, we will search for pulsations from transitional millisecond pulsars, isolated neutron stars, LMXBs, accretion-powered millisecond pulsars, central compact objects and other sources. We will present our science plan and initial results from the first months of the NICER mission.

  9. Prime focus architectures for large space telescopes: reduce surfaces to save cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Lillie, C. F.

    2016-07-01

    Conceptual architectures are now being developed to identify future directions for post JWST large space telescope systems to operate in the UV Optical and near IR regions of the spectrum. Here we show that the cost of optical surfaces within large aperture telescope/instrument systems can exceed $100M/reflection when expressed in terms of the aperture increase needed to over come internal absorption loss. We recommend a program in innovative optical design to minimize the number of surfaces by considering multiple functions for mirrors. An example is given using the Rowland circle imaging spectrometer systems for UV space science. With few exceptions, current space telescope architectures are based on systems optimized for ground-based astronomy. Both HST and JWST are classical "Cassegrain" telescopes derived from the ground-based tradition to co-locate the massive primary mirror and the instruments at the same end of the metrology structure. This requirement derives from the dual need to minimize observatory dome size and cost in the presence of the Earth's 1-g gravitational field. Space telescopes, however function in the zero gravity of space and the 1- g constraint is relieved to the advantage of astronomers. Here we suggest that a prime focus large aperture telescope system in space may have potentially have higher transmittance, better pointing, improved thermal and structural control, less internal polarization and broader wavelength coverage than Cassegrain telescopes. An example is given showing how UV astronomy telescopes use single optical elements for multiple functions and therefore have a minimum number of reflections.

  10. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  11. Why neutron guides may end up breaking down? Some results on the macroscopic behaviour of alkali-borosilicate glass support plates under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffy, R.; Kreuz, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beaucour, J., E-mail: beaucour@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Köster, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, E-20886 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we report on a first part of a study on the mechanisms leading to brittle fracture in neutron guides made of glass as structural element. Such devices are widely used to deliver thermal and cold neutron beams to experimental lines in most large neutron research facilities. We present results on macroscopic properties of samples of guide glass substrates which are subjected to neutron irradiation at relatively large fluences. The results show a striking dependence of some of the macroscopic properties such as density, shape or surface curvature upon the specific chemical composition of a given glass. The relevance of the present findings for the installation of either replacement guides at the existing facilities or for the deployment of instruments for ongoing projects such as the European Spallation Source is briefly discussed.

  12. Fabrication of large-sized two-dimensional ordered surface array with well-controlled structure via colloidal particle lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinping; Ye, Lei; Qiu, Dong

    2014-06-17

    Epoxy resin coated glass slides were used for colloidal particle lithography, in order to prepare well-defined 2D surface arrays. Upon the assistance of a large-sized 2D colloidal single crystal as template, centimeter-sized ordered surface arrays of bowl-like units were obtained. Systematic studies revealed that the parameters of obtained surface arrays could be readily controlled by some operational factors, such as temperature, epoxy resin layer thickness, and template particle size. With epoxy resin substituting for normal linear polymer, the height/diameter ratio of bowls in the formed surface arrays can be largely increased. With further reactive plasma etching, the parameters of ordered surface arrays could be finely tuned through controlling etching time. This study provides a facile way to prepare large-sized 2D surface arrays with tunable parameters.

  13. Requirements for large-eddy simulation of surface wind gusts in a mountain valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Michael J.; Purnell, Don; Lauren, Michael K.

    1996-09-01

    During the passage of a front, data from a light-weight cup anemometer and wind vane, sited in a steep-walled glacial valley of the Mt Cook region of the Southern Alps of New Zealand, were analysed to derive a power spectrum of the wind velocity for periods between 0.5 and 16 min. The energy spectrum roughly followed a -5/3 power law over the range of periods from 0.5 4 min — as might be expected in the case of an inertial subrange of eddies. However, any inertial subrange clearly does not extend to periods longer than this. We suggest that the observed eddies were generated in a turbulent wake associated with flow separation at the ridge crests, and large eddies are shed at periods of 4 8 min or more. A compressible fluid-dynamic model, with a Smagorinsky turbulence closure scheme and a “law of the wall” at the surface, was used to calculate flow over a cross section through this area in neutrally stratified conditions. A range of parameters was explored to assess some of the requirements for simulating surface wind gusts in mountainous terrain in New Zealand. In order to approximate the observed wind spectrum at Tasman aerodrome, Mount Cook, we found the model must be three-dimensional, with a horizontal resolution better than 250 m and with a Reynolds-stress eddy viscosity of less than 5 m2 s-1. In two-dimensional simulations, the eddies were too big in size and in amplitude and at the surface this was associated with reversed flow extending too far downstream. In contrast the three-dimensional simulations gave a realistic gusting effect associated with large scale “cat's paws” (a bigger variety of those commonly seen over water downstream of moderate hills), with reversed flow only at the steep part of the lee slope. The simulations were uniformly improved by better resolution, at all tested resolutions down to 250 m mesh size. The spectra of large eddies simulated in steep terrain were not very sensitive to the details of the eddy stress formulation

  14. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  15. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  16. Focused study of thermonuclear bursts on neutron stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme

    X-ray bursters are a class of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries where accreted material from a donor star undergoes rapid thermonuclear burning in the surface layers of a neutron star. The flux released can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit and drive the photosphere to large radii. Such photospheric...... detection would thus probe the nuclear burning as well as the gravitational redshift from the neutron star. Moreover, likely observations of atomic X-ray spectral components reflected from the inner accretion disk have been reported. The high spectral resolution capabilities of Simbol X may therefore make...

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of complex sidearms subject to solar radiation and surface cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittko, Karl A; Kirkpatrick, Michael P; Armfield, Steven W

    2013-09-15

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used to model two lake sidearms subject to heating from solar radiation and cooling from a surface flux. The sidearms are part of Lake Audrey, NJ, USA and Lake Alexandrina, SA, Australia. The simulation domains are created using bathymetry data and the boundary is modelled with an Immersed Boundary Method. We investigate the cooling and heating phases with separate quasi-steady state simulations. Differential heating occurs in the cavity due to the changing depth. The resulting temperature gradients drive lateral flows. These flows are the dominant transport process in the absence of wind. Study in this area is important in water quality management as the lateral circulation can carry particles and various pollutants, transporting them to and mixing them with the main lake body.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on large size square-lattice photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Pibin; Li, Zhongyang; Yuan, Sheng; Yao, Jianquan; Lu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on large size square-lattice photonic crystal fiber has been designed and simulated by finite element method. The square-lattice airholes are first coated with a calcium fluoride layer to provide mode confinement, then a nanoscale gold layer is deposited to excite the plasmon mode, and finally, the sample is infiltrated into the holes. The numerical results reveal that the resonance properties are easily affected by many parameters. The refractive index resolution of corresponding sensor can reach 4.3 × 10-6 RIU when the optimum parameters are set as the radius of curvature of the airhole r = 2 μm, the thickness of the core struts c = 200 nm, the auxiliary dielectric layer s = 1 μm, and the gold film d = 40 nm. In addition, the effective area and nonlinear coefficient are calculated.

  19. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE RE- FLECTING SURFACE SYSTEM OF A LARGE ASTRONOMICAL TELESCOPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Dehua; Gu Bozhong; Cui Xiangqun

    2004-01-01

    The reflecting Schmidt plate system of the large sky area multi-object fiber spectroscopic telescope (LAMOST) serves active optical correction with a reflecting surface of segmented mirror. An azimuth-altitude mounting is adopted with two self-aligning ball bearings for altitude axis and hydrostatic bearings for azimuth. With static and modal analyses, finite element modeling of the full Schmidt plate system is discussed. Conventional seismic response spectrum has been adapted for particular application for telescope engineering before a seismic response spectrum analysis is performed, and results have confirmed that the design of the reflecting Schmidt plate manifests good performance and can survive the seismic intensity of up to 7 magnitude specified by technical requirements.

  20. Compact Wideband and Low-Profile Antenna Mountable on Large Metallic Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2017-01-01

    resonance at the lowest frequency. A trapezoid-shaped capacitive-feed (C-fed) strip is utilized and also printed on the Teflon block to globally optimize the wideband impedance matching. The proposed antenna covers a relative bandwidth of 109% for VSWR...This paper proposes a compact wideband and low-profile antenna mountable on large metallic surfaces. Six rows of coupled microstrip resonators with different lengths are printed on a Teflon block. The lengths of the microstrip resonators in different rows are gradually reduced along the end......-fire direction. The first four rows of resonators provide four resonances at different frequencies for bandwidth enhancement. The last two rows of resonators are used as two directors to suppress sidelobe levels at high frequencies. A trapezoidal launcher is applied to serve as a reflector and provide one...

  1. Localized surface plasmon resonance biosensing with large area of gold nanoholes fabricated by nanosphere lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Gansheng; Zhang, Nan; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2010-03-09

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has been extensively studied as potential chemical and biological sensing platform due to its high sensitivity to local refractive index change induced by molecule adsorbate. Previous experiments have demonstrated the LSPR generated by gold nanoholes and its biosensing. Here, we realize large uniform area of nanoholes on scale of cm2 on glass substrate by nanosphere lithography which is essential for mass production. The morphology of the nanoholes is characterized using scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The LSPR sensitivity of the nanoholes to local refractive index is measured to be 36 nm/RIU. However, the chip has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in biosensing: bovine serum albumin adsorption is detected with LSPR peak redshift of 27 nm, and biotin-streptavidin immunoassay renders a LSPR redshift of 11 nm. This work forms a foundation toward the cost-effective, high-throughput, reliable and robust chip-based LSPR biosensor.

  2. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing with Large Area of Gold Nanoholes Fabricated by Nanosphere Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Nan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR has been extensively studied as potential chemical and biological sensing platform due to its high sensitivity to local refractive index change induced by molecule adsorbate. Previous experiments have demonstrated the LSPR generated by gold nanoholes and its biosensing. Here, we realize large uniform area of nanoholes on scale of cm2 on glass substrate by nanosphere lithography which is essential for mass production. The morphology of the nanoholes is characterized using scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The LSPR sensitivity of the nanoholes to local refractive index is measured to be 36 nm/RIU. However, the chip has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in biosensing: bovine serum albumin adsorption is detected with LSPR peak redshift of 27 nm, and biotin-streptavidin immunoassay renders a LSPR redshift of 11 nm. This work forms a foundation toward the cost-effective, high-throughput, reliable and robust chip-based LSPR biosensor.

  3. Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil in a large-scale field simulated experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Mutai; Sun, Peiyan; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinping; Wang, Lina; Cao, Lixin; Li, Fujuan

    2014-08-01

    Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil with hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients was carried out by a large-scale field simulated experiment in this paper. After a 103 day experiment, for n-alkanes, the maximum biodegradation rate reached 71% and the results showed hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients have a comprehensive effect. It also showed that rhamnolipid biosurfactants could shorten the biodegradation time through an emulsifying function; the nutrients could greatly increase the biodegradation rate by promoting HDB production. For PAHs, the chrysene series had higher weathering resistance. For the same series, the weathering resistance ability is C1- biodegradation was found for different n-alkanes in two pools which only had added rhamnolipid biosurfactants or nutrients, respectively. Except for C14, C15 and C16 sesquiterpanes, most of the steranes and terpanes had high antibiodegradability.

  4. Thick and hard anodized aluminum film with large pores for surface composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; WANG Hao-wei

    2004-01-01

    Al-base surface self-lubricating composites need thick and hard alumina membranes with large pores to add lubricants easily. This kind of porous alumina layer was fabricated in additive-containing, phosphoric acid-based solution. The effects of additive containing organic carboxylic acid and Ce salt on the properties of the oxide film and mechanism were investigated in detail with SEM and EDAX analyses. The results show that the pore diameter is about 100 nm, the film thickness increases by 4 -5 times, and the Vickers hardness improves by about 50% through adding some amount of organic carboxylic acid and Ce salt. Such an improvement in properties is explained in terms of a lower film dissolving velocity and better film quality in compound solution.

  5. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-04

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~ 200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc.

  6. Estimation Source Parameters of Large-Scale Chemical Surface Explosions and Recent Underground Nuclear Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.; Kim, S.; Hofstetter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale surface explosions were conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR), Negev desert: 82 tons of strong HE explosives in August 2009, and 10&100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. The main goal was to provide strong controlled sources in different wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations. Numerous dense observations of blast waves were provided by high-pressure, acoustic and seismic sensors at near-source ( 2000 tons) ANFO surface shots at White Sands Military Range (WSMR) were analyzed for SS time delay. The Secondary Shocks were revealed on the records in the range 1.5-60 km and showed consistency with the SMR data, thus extending the charge and distance range for the developed SS delay relationship. Obtained results suggest that measured SS delays can provide important information about an explosion source character, and can be used as a new simple cost-effective yield estimator for explosions with known type of explosives. The new results are compared with analogous available data of surface nuclear explosions. Special distinctions in air-blast waves are revealed and analyzed, resulting from the different source phenomenology (energy release). Two underground nuclear explosions conducted by North Korea in 2009 and 2013 were recorded by several stations of Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth (relatively to an earthquake), this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave energy and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. A similar effect was observed before at ISN stations for the Pakistan explosion (28.05.98) at a different frequency 1.7 Hz indicating the source- and not site-effect. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of

  7. Large scale reactive transport of nitrate across the surface water divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortunov, E.; Lu, C.; Amos, R.; Grathwohl, P.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater pollution caused by agricultural and atmospheric inputs is a pressing issue in environmental management worldwide. Various researchers have studied different aspects of nitrate contamination since the substantial increase of the agriculture pollution in the second half of the 20th century. This study addresses large scale reactive solute transport in a typical Germany hilly landscapes in a transect crossing 2 valleys: River Neckar and Ammer. The numerical model was constructed compromising a 2-D cross-section accounting for typical fractured mudstones and unconsolidated sediments. Flow modelling showed that the groundwater divide significantly deviates from the surface water divide providing conditions for inter-valley flow and transport. Reactive transport modelling of redox-sensitive solutes (e.g. agriculture nitrate and natural sulfate, DOC, ammonium) with MIN3P was used to elucidate source of nitrate in aquifers and rivers. Since both floodplains, in the Ammer and Neckar valley contain Holocene sediments relatively high in organic carbon, agricultural nitrate is reduced therein and does not reach the groundwater. However, nitrate applied in the hillslopes underlain by fractured oxidized mudrock is transported to the high yield sand and gravel aquifer in the Neckar valley. Therefore, the model predicts that nitrate in the Neckar valley comes, to a large extent, from the neighboring Ammer valley. Moreover, nitrate observed in the rivers and drains in the Ammer valley is very likely geogenic since frequent peat layers there release ammonium which is oxidized as it enters the surface water. Such findings are relevant for land and water quality management.

  8. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) observations of rotational tunneling within partially deuterated methane monolayers adsorbed on MgO(1 0 0) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Andy S.; Larese, J. Z.

    2013-12-01

    High resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of the low temperature (T ∼ 2.0 K) rotational dynamics of isotopically substituted methane monolayers adsorbed on MgO(1 0 0) are presented. These spectra, obtained using BASIS at SNS, represent the most detailed measurements available for surface-adsorbed monolayer films of methane. Distinct excitations are readily observed at 15, 31, 45 and 127 μeV for the CH2D2 on MgO monolayer and at 40, 51, 95 and 138 μeV for CH3D/MgO. These features are attributed to tunneling transitions between sublevels within the ground librational state and are interpreted using the pocket state (PS) formalism first proposed by Hüller. This theoretical analysis employs the findings of earlier studies of CH4 on MgO(1 0 0) which suggest that molecules adsorb with their C2v axes normal to the surface plane. The comparison between theory and experiment provides direct insight into the impact of molecular versus surface symmetry on the observed tunneling spectra.

  9. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Susana C. M. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Leal, Ricardo M. F. [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Mitchell, Edward P. [EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Forsyth, V. Trevor, E-mail: tforsyth@ill.fr [ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory, Partnership for Structural Biology, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); EPSAM and ISTM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  10. The Sub-Surface Structure of a Large Sample of Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Baldner, Charles S; Basu, Sarbani

    2012-01-01

    We employ ring-diagram analysis to study the sub-surface thermal structure of active regions. We present results using a large number of active regions over the course of Solar Cycle 23. We present both traditional inversions of ring-diagram frequency differences, with a total sample size of 264, and a statistical study using Principal Component Analysis. We confirm earlier results on smaller samples that sound speed and adiabatic index are changed below regions of strong magnetic field. We find that sound speed is decreased in the region between approximately r=0.99R_sun and r=0.995R_sun (depths of 3Mm to 7Mm), and increased in the region between r=0.97R_sun and r=0.985R_sun (depths of 11Mm to 21Mm). The adiabatic index is enhanced in the same deeper layers that sound-speed enhancement is seen. A weak decrease in adiabatic index is seen in the shallower layers in many active regions. We find that the magnitudes of these perturbations depend on the strength of the surface magnetic field, but we find a great d...

  11. Large apparent electric size of solid-state nanopores due to spatially extended surface conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Joly, Laurent; Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-08-08

    Ion transport through nanopores drilled in thin membranes is central to numerous applications, including biosensing and ion selective membranes. This paper reports experiments, numerical calculations, and theoretical predictions demonstrating an unexpectedly large ionic conduction in solid-state nanopores, taking its origin in anomalous entrance effects. In contrast to naive expectations based on analogies with electric circuits, the surface conductance inside the nanopore is shown to perturb the three-dimensional electric current streamlines far outside the nanopore in order to meet charge conservation at the pore entrance. This unexpected contribution to the ionic conductance can be interpreted in terms of an apparent electric size of the solid-state nanopore, which is much larger than its geometric counterpart whenever the number of charges carried by the nanopore surface exceeds its bulk counterpart. This apparent electric size, which can reach hundreds of nanometers, can have a major impact on the electrical detection of translocation events through nanopores, as well as for ionic transport in biological nanopores.

  12. Large Scale Isosurface Bicubic Subdivision-Surface Wavelets for Representation and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, M.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Hamann, B.; Joy, K.I.

    2000-01-05

    We introduce a new subdivision-surface wavelet transform for arbitrary two-manifolds with boundary that is the first to use simple lifting-style filtering operations with bicubic precision. We also describe a conversion process for re-mapping large-scale isosurfaces to have subdivision connectivity and fair parameterizations so that the new wavelet transform can be used for compression and visualization. The main idea enabling our wavelet transform is the circular symmetrization of the filters in irregular neighborhoods, which replaces the traditional separation of filters into two 1-D passes. Our wavelet transform uses polygonal base meshes to represent surface topology, from which a Catmull-Clark-style subdivision hierarchy is generated. The details between these levels of resolution are quickly computed and compactly stored as wavelet coefficients. The isosurface conversion process begins with a contour triangulation computed using conventional techniques, which we subsequently simplify with a variant edge-collapse procedure, followed by an edge-removal process. This provides a coarse initial base mesh, which is subsequently refined, relaxed and attracted in phases to converge to the contour. The conversion is designed to produce smooth, untangled and minimally-skewed parameterizations, which improves the subsequent compression after applying the transform. We have demonstrated our conversion and transform for an isosurface obtained from a high-resolution turbulent-mixing hydrodynamics simulation, showing the potential for compression and level-of-detail visualization.

  13. Spatial length scales of large-scale structures in atmospheric surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, HongYou; Wang, GuoHua; Zheng, XiaoJing

    2017-06-01

    Synchronous multipoint measurements were performed in the atmospheric surface layer at the Qingtu Lake Observation Array site to obtain high-Reynolds-number [Reτ˜O (106) ] data. Based on the selected high-quality data in the near-neutral surface layer, the spatial length scales of the large-scale dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer are investigated. The characteristic length scales are extracted from the two-point streamwise velocity correlations. Results show that the spatial length scales are invariant over a three order of magnitude change in Reynolds number [Reτ˜O (103) -O (106) ] . However, they increase significantly with the wall-normal distance, showing reasonable collapses on outer-scaled axes. The variation of the spanwise width scale in the logarithmic region follows a linear increase, with the rate of increase much larger than that in the wake region. Moreover, the variation of the wall-normal length scale is also revealed, which displays a qualitative behavior similar to that of the spanwise width scale. The universal laws revealed in the present work contribute to a better understanding of the dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers.

  14. Equilibrium thickness of large liquid lenses spreading over another liquid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebilleau, Julien

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses the equilibrium states and more particularly the equilibrium thickness of large lenses of a liquid spread over the surface of a denser liquid. Both liquids are supposed to be nonvolatile and immiscible. Taking into account the effect of intermolecular forces in addition to the sign of the spreading parameters leads to four possible states. The three first are similar to the states of equilibrium of a liquid spread on a solid surface: total wetting where the floating liquid spreads until it reaches an equilibrium thickness on the order of the molecular size, partial wetting where the floating liquid forms a lens of macroscopic thickness in equilibrium with a "dry" bath, and pseudopartial wetting where the floating liquid spreads as a lens of macroscopic thickness in equilibrium with a thin film covering the bath. The last regime, called pseudototal wetting, consists of a macroscopic lens of the floating liquid covered with a thin film of the bath. These four regimes are described through a free-energy minimization, and their equilibrium thicknesses are predicted. A comparison of this model with experimental results available in the literature and dedicated experiments for the pseudototal wetting state are reported.

  15. Investigation of Low-Cost Surface Processing Techniques for Large-Size Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuang-Tung Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the present work is to develop a simple and effective method of enhancing conversion efficiency in large-size solar cells using multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si wafer. In this work, industrial-type mc-Si solar cells with area of 125×125 mm2 were acid etched to produce simultaneously POCl3 emitters and silicon nitride deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD. The study of surface morphology and reflectivity of different mc-Si etched surfaces has also been discussed in this research. Using our optimal acid etching solution ratio, we are able to fabricate mc-Si solar cells of 16.34% conversion efficiency with double layers silicon nitride (Si3N4 coating. From our experiment, we find that depositing double layers silicon nitride coating on mc-Si solar cells can get the optimal performance parameters. Open circuit (Voc is 616 mV, short circuit current (Jsc is 34.1 mA/cm2, and minority carrier diffusion length is 474.16 μm. The isotropic texturing and silicon nitride layers coating approach contribute to lowering cost and achieving high efficiency in mass production.

  16. Self-assembled large-area annular cavity arrays with tunable cylindrical surface plasmons for sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming; Shen, Tianyi; Zhou, Jing

    2015-02-24

    Surface plasmons that propagate along cylindrical metal/dielectric interfaces in annular apertures in metal films, called cylindrical surface plasmons (CSPs), exhibit attractive optical characteristics. However, it is challenging to fabricate these nanocoaxial structures. Here, we demonstrate a practical low-cost route to manufacture highly ordered, large-area annular cavity arrays (ACAs) that can support CSPs with great tunability. By employing a sol-gel coassembly method, reactive ion etching and metal sputtering techniques, regular, highly ordered ACAs in square-centimeter-scale with a gap width tunable in the range of several to hundreds of nanometers have been produced with good reproducibility. Ag ACAs with a gap width of 12 nm and a gap height of 635 nm are demonstrated. By finite-difference time-domain simulation, we confirm that the pronounced dips in the reflectance spectra of ACAs are attributable to CSP resonances excited in the annular gaps. By adjusting etching time and Ag film thickness, the CSP dips can be tuned to sweep the entire optical range of 360 to 1800 nm without changing sphere size, which makes them a promising candidate for forming integrated plasmonic sensing arrays. The high tunability of the CSP resonant frequencies together with strong electric field enhancement in the cavities make the ACAs promising candidates for surface plasmon sensors and SERS substrates, as, for example, they have been used in liquid refractive index (RI) sensing, demonstrating a sensitivity of 1505 nm/RIU and a figure of merit of 9. One of the CSP dips of ACAs with a certain geometry size is angle- (0-70 degrees) and polarization-independent and can be used as a narrow-band absorber. Furthermore, the nano annular cavity arrays can be used to construct solar cells, nanolasers and nanoparticle plasmonic tweezers.

  17. Resolving Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) on the Human Aortic Surface Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts

    2011-11-01

    The prediction and understanding of the genesis of vascular diseases is one of the grand challenges in biofluid engineering. The progression of atherosclerosis is correlated to the build- up of LDL on the arterial surface, which is affected by the blood flow. A multi-physics simulation of LDL mass transport in the blood and through the arterial wall of a subject specific human aorta was performed, employing a LES turbulence model to resolve the turbulent flow. Geometry and velocity measurements from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were incorporated to assure physiological relevance of the simulation. Due to the turbulent nature of the flow, consecutive cardiac cycles are not identical, neither in vivo nor in the simulations. A phase average based on a large number of cardiac cycles is therefore computed, which is the proper way to get reliable statistical results from a LES simulation. In total, 50 cardiac cycles were simulated, yielding over 2.5 Billion data points to be post-processed. An inverse relation between LDL and WSS was found; LDL accumulated on locations where WSS was low and vice-versa. Large temporal differences were present, with the concentration level decreasing during systolic acceleration and increasing during the deceleration phase. This method makes it possible to resolve the localization of LDL accumulation in the normal human aorta with its complex transitional flow.

  18. Large-scale synthesis and surface plasmon resonance properties of angled silver/silver homojunction nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xuandi; Feng, Xiumei; Zhang, Menghuan; Hong, Ruijin; Chen, Yongxiang; Li, Aiqing; Deng, Xiulong; Hu, Jianqiang

    2014-03-01

    Angled silver/silver (Ag/Ag) homojunction nanowires (HNWs) with an average diameter of about 72 nm have been prepared by a straightforward and effective solvothermal method. The synthesis involves a one-step, non-seed, and template-less process to large-scale Ag/Ag HNWs, which is low-cost and proceeds at moderate temperatures. Two neighboring Ag nanorods or nanowires were connected into obtuse angle by Ag/Ag homojunction. It was found that synthesizing Ag/Ag HNWs were very sensitive to reaction temperature and polyvinylpyrrolidone concentration. Only through finely controlling these reaction parameters, the high-quality Ag/Ag HNWs could be formed in large scale and their surface plasmon resonance properties could be effectively tailored. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction investigations showed that the Ag/Ag HNWs were generated with a twinned crystalline structure. We also proposed a primary experimental model to illustrate the growth mechanism of the angled Ag/Ag HNWs.

  19. Background neutron in the endcap and barrel regions of resistive plate chamber for compact muon solenoid/large hadron collider using GEANT4

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J T Rhee; M Jamil; Christopher Joen; Bingzhu Yin; Y J Jeon

    2007-09-01

    In this study the performance of double gap RPC has been tested by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code. The detector response calculations taken as a function of the neutron energy in the range of 0.01 eV–1 GeV have been simulated through RPC set-up. In order to evaluate the response of detector in the LHC background environment, the neutron spectrum expected in the CMS muon endcap and barrel region were taken into account. A hit rate of about 165.5 Hz cm-2, 34 Hz cm-2, 33.6 Hz cm-2, and 27.0 Hz cm-2 due to an isotropic neutron source is calculated using GEANT4 standard electromagnetic package for a 20 × 20 cm2 RPC in the ME1, ME2, ME3 and ME4, respectively. While for the same neutron source and using GEANT4 package a hit rate of about 0.42 Hz cm-2, 0.7182 Hz cm-2 was measured for the MB1 and MB4 stations respectively. Similar characteristics of hit rates have been observed for GEANT4 low electromagnetic package.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of flow past urban-like surfaces: A model validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wai Chi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow and its interaction with urban surfaces is critical for understanding the transport of momentum and scalars within and above cities. This, in turn, is essential for predicting the local climate and pollutant dispersion patterns in urban areas. Large-eddy simulation (LES) explicitly resolves the large-scale turbulent eddy motions and, therefore, can potentially provide improved understanding and prediction of flows inside and above urban canopies. This study focuses on developing and validating an LES framework to simulate flow past urban-like surfaces. In particular, large-eddy simulations were performed of flow past an infinite long two-dimensional (2D) building and an array of 3D cubic buildings. An immersed boundary (IB) method was employed to simulate both 2D and 3D buildings. Four subgrid-scale (SGS) models, including (i) the traditional Smagorinsky model, (ii) the Lagrangian dynamic model, (iii) the Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic model, and (iv) the modulated gradient model, were evaluated using the 2D building case. The simulated velocity streamlines and the vertical profiles of the mean velocities and variances were compared with experimental results. The modulated gradient model shows the best overall agreement with the experimental results among the four SGS models. In particular, the flow recirculation, the reattachment position and the vertical profiles are accurately reproduced with a grid resolution of (Nx)x(Ny)x(Nz) =160x40x160 ((nx)x(nz) =13x16 covering the block). After validating the LES framework with the 2D building case, it was further applied to simulate a boundary-layer flow past a 3D building array. A regular aligned building array with seven rows of cubic buildings was simulated. The building spacings in the streamwise and spanwise directions were both equal to the building height. A developed turbulent boundary-layer flow was used as the incoming flow. The results were

  1. How Venus surface conditions evolution can be affected by large impacts at long timescales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmann, Cedric; Golabek, Gregor; Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate how the evolution of Venus' atmosphere and mantle is modified by large impacts, during Late Veneer and Late Heavy Bombardment. We propose a coupled model of mantle/atmosphere feedback. We also focus on volatile fluxes in and out of the atmosphere: atmospheric escape and degassing. The solid part of the planet is simulated using the StagYY code (Armann and Tackley, 2012) and releases volatiles into the atmosphere through degassing. Physical properties are depth-dependent. The assumed rheology is Newtonian diffusion creep plus plastic yielding. Atmospheric escape modeling involves two different aspects: hydrodynamic escape (0-500 Myr) and non-thermal escape mechanisms (dominant post 4 Ga). Hydrodynamic escape is the massive outflow of volatiles occurring when the solar energy input is strong. Post 4 Ga escape from non-thermal processes is comparatively low. The evolution of surface temperature is calculated from the greenhouse effect dependent on CO2 and water concentrations in the atmosphere, using a one-dimensional gray radiative-convective atmosphere model. It allows us to complete the coupling of the model: feedback of the atmosphere on the mantle is obtained by using surface temperature as a boundary condition for the convection. Large impacts are capable of contributing to (i) atmospheric escape, (ii) volatile replenishment and (iii) energy transfer to the mantle of the solid planet. We test a wide range of impactor parameters (size, velocity, timing) and different assumptions related to impact erosion (Shuvalov, 2010). For energy transfer, 2D distribution of the thermal anomaly created by the impact is used, leading to melting and subjected to transport by the mantle convection. Small (0-50 km) meteorites have a negligible effect on the global scale: they only affect the impact point and do not have lasting consequences on surface conditions. Medium ones (50-150 km) have strong short term influence through volatile

  2. Adsorption of a water treatment protein from Moringa oleifera seeds to a silicon oxide surface studied by neutron reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaambwa, Habauka M; Hellsing, Maja; Rennie, Adrian R

    2010-03-16

    An extract from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree that is principally a low molecular mass protein is known to be efficient as a coagulating agent for water treatment. The present paper investigates the adsorption of the purified protein to silica interfaces in order to elucidate the mechanism of its function as a flocculent. Neutron reflection permits the determination of the structure and composition of interfacial layers at the solid/solution interface. Dense layers of protein with about 5.5 mg m(-2) were found at concentrations above 0.025% wt. The overall thickness with a dense layer in excess of 60 A at 0.05 wt % suggests strong co-operative binding rather than single isolated molecules. An ionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, was also seen to coadsorb. This strong adsorption of protein in combination with the tendency for the protein to associate suggests a mechanism for destabilizing particulate dispersions to provide filterable water. This can occur even for the protein that has previously been identified as being of low mass (about 7 kDaltons) and thus is unlikely to be efficient in bridging or depletion flocculation.

  3. Exploring Neutron-Rich Oxygen Isotopes with MoNA

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, N; Bazin, D; Brown, J; DeYoung, P A; Finck, J E; Gade, A; Hinnefeld, J; Howes, R; Lecouey, J -L; Luther, B; Peters, W A; Scheit, H; Schiller, A; Thoennessen, M

    2007-01-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) was used in conjunction with a large-gap dipole magnet (Sweeper) to measure neutron-unbound states in oxygen isotopes close to the neutron dripline. While no excited states were observed in 24O, a resonance at 45(2) keV above the neutron separation energy was observed in 23O.

  4. Spread of Staphylococcus aureus between medical staff and high-frequency contact surfaces in a large metropolitan hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-sha Shi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Cross-contamination of S. aureus or MRSA on medical workers' hands and contact surfaces was demonstrated within and between departments of a large metropolitan hospital. Improvements are needed in medical staff hygiene habits and in the cleaning of high-frequency contact surfaces to help prevent and control nosocomial infections.

  5. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  6. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine; Ocena zaleznosci pomiedzy sposobem frakcjonowania dawki fotonow i neutronow a nasileniem popromiennego odczynu jelita grubego myszy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasinska, A. [Oncology Center, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction {alpha}/{beta} for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method {alpha}/{beta} for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F{sub r}) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50

  7. Performance of an elliptically tapered neutron guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, Sebastian; Stadlbauer, Martin; Böni, Peter; Schanzer, Christan; Stahn, Jochen; Filges, Uwe

    2006-11-01

    Supermirror coated neutron guides are used at all modern neutron sources for transporting neutrons over large distances. In order to reduce the transmission losses due to multiple internal reflection of neutrons, ballistic neutron guides with linear tapering have been proposed and realized. However, these systems suffer from an inhomogeneous illumination of the sample. Moreover, the flux decreases significantly with increasing distance from the exit of the neutron guide. We propose using elliptically tapered guides that provide a more homogeneous phase space at the sample position as well as a focusing at the sample. Moreover, the design of the guide system is simplified because ellipses are simply defined by their long and short axes. In order to prove the concept we have manufactured a doubly focusing guide and investigated its properties with neutrons. The experiments show that the predicted gains using the program package McStas are realized. We discuss several applications of elliptic guides in various fields of neutron physics.

  8. Performance of an elliptically tapered neutron guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlbauer, Sebastian [Physik-Department E21, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: sebastian.muehlbauer@frm2.tum.de; Stadlbauer, Martin [Physik-Department E21, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Boeni, Peter [Physik-Department E21, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Schanzer, Christan [Labor fuer Neutronenstreuung, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villingen PSI (Switzerland); Stahn, Jochen [Labor fuer Neutronenstreuung, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villingen PSI (Switzerland); Filges, Uwe [Labor fuer Neutronenstreuung, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villingen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-11-15

    Supermirror coated neutron guides are used at all modern neutron sources for transporting neutrons over large distances. In order to reduce the transmission losses due to multiple internal reflection of neutrons, ballistic neutron guides with linear tapering have been proposed and realized. However, these systems suffer from an inhomogeneous illumination of the sample. Moreover, the flux decreases significantly with increasing distance from the exit of the neutron guide. We propose using elliptically tapered guides that provide a more homogeneous phase space at the sample position as well as a focusing at the sample. Moreover, the design of the guide system is simplified because ellipses are simply defined by their long and short axes. In order to prove the concept we have manufactured a doubly focusing guide and investigated its properties with neutrons. The experiments show that the predicted gains using the program package McStas are realized. We discuss several applications of elliptic guides in various fields of neutron physics.

  9. Neutron spectroscopy with the Spherical Proportional Counter

    CERN Document Server

    Bougamont, E; Derre, J; Galan, J; Gerbier, G; Giomataris, I; Gros, M; Katsioulas, I; Jourde, D; Magnier, P; Navick, X F; Papaevangelou, T; Savvidis, I; Tsiledakis, G

    2015-01-01

    A novel large volume spherical proportional counter, recently developed, is used for neutron measurements. Gas mixtures of $N_{2}$ with $C_{2}H_{6}$ and pure $N_{2}$ are studied for thermal and fast neutron detection, providing a new way for the neutron spectroscopy. The neutrons are detected via the ${}^{14}N(n, p)C^{14}$ and ${}^{14}N(n, \\alpha)B^{11}$ reactions. Here we provide studies of the optimum gas mixture, the gas pressure and the most appropriate high voltage supply on the sensor of the detector in order to achieve the maximum amplification and better resolution. The detector is tested for thermal and fast neutrons detection with a ${}^{252}Cf$ and a ${}^{241}Am-{}^{9}Be$ neutron source. The atmospheric neutrons are successfully measured from thermal up to several MeV, well separated from the cosmic ray background. A comparison of the spherical proportional counter with the current available neutron counters is also given.

  10. Epitaxial growth of largely mismatched crystals on H-terminated Si(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Hidehito

    2010-12-01

    A strontium or strontium oxide epitaxial layer was grown using a monoatomic buffer layer of hydrogen on silicon, in spite of a huge lattice mismatch. The onset of the initial growth stage of strontium crystals occur with only one atomic layer deposition. To investigate the growth mechanism in the highly mismatched system, combination analysis using neutron reflection, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectra, and stress measurements is employed. The interface structure has opened up a new way to fabricate novel heterostructures, consisting of various kinds of one-, two- or three-dimensional materials for future silicon-based technology.

  11. R&D Status for In-Situ Plasma Surface Cleaning of SRF Cavities at Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.-H. Kim, M.T. Crofford, M. Doleans, J.D. Mammosser, J. Saunders

    2011-03-01

    The SNS SCL is reliably operating at 0.93 GeV output energy with an energy reserve of 10MeV with high availability. Most of the cavities exhibit field emission, which directly or indirectly (through heating of end groups) limits the gradients achievable in the high beta cavities in normal operation with the beam. One of the field emission sources would be surface contaminations during surface processing for which mild surface cleaning, if any, will help in reducing field emission. An R&D effort is in progress to develop in-situ surface processing for the cryomodules in the tunnel without disassembly. As the first attempt, in-situ plasma processing has been applied to the CM12 in the SNS SRF facility after the repair work with a promising result. This paper will report the R&D status of plasma processing in the SNS.

  12. Nonlinear reflection from the surface of neutron stars and features of radio emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    There are no explanations for the high-frequency component of the emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula, but it may be a manifestation of instability in nonlinear reflection from the star's surface. Radiation from relativistic positrons flying from the magnetosphere to the star and accelerated by the electric field of the polar gap is reflected. The instability involves stimulated scattering on surface waves.

  13. Surface spin-glass, large surface anisotropy, and depression of magnetocaloric effect in La0.8Ca0.2MnO3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, S. B.; Lu, W. J.; Wu, H. Y.; Tong, P.; Sun, Y. P.

    2012-01-01

    The surface magnetic behavior of La0.8Ca0.2MnO3 nanoparticles was investigated. We observed irreversibility in high magnetic field. The surface spin-glass behavior as well as the high-field irreversibility is suppressed by increasing particle size while the freezing temperature TF does not change with particle size. The enhanced coercivity has been observed in the particles and we attributed it to the large surface anisotropy. We have disclosed a clear relationship between the particle size, the thickness of the shell, and the saturation magnetization of the particles. The large reduction of the saturation magnetization of the samples is found to be induced by the increase of nonmagnetic surface large since the thickness of the spin-disordered surface layer increases with a decrease in the particle size. Due to the reduction of the magnetization, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been reduced by the decreased particle size since the nonmagnetic surface contributes little to the MCE. Based on the core-shell structure, large relative cooling powers RCP(s) of 180 J/kg and 471 J/kg were predicted for a field change of 2.0 T and 4.5 T, respectively, in the small particles with thin spin-glass layer. PMID:23319829

  14. Surface spin-glass, large surface anisotropy, and depression of magnetocaloric effect in La(0.8)Ca(0.2)MnO(3) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, S B; Lu, W J; Wu, H Y; Tong, P; Sun, Y P

    2012-12-15

    The surface magnetic behavior of La(0.8)Ca(0.2)MnO(3) nanoparticles was investigated. We observed irreversibility in high magnetic field. The surface spin-glass behavior as well as the high-field irreversibility is suppressed by increasing particle size while the freezing temperature T(F) does not change with particle size. The enhanced coercivity has been observed in the particles and we attributed it to the large surface anisotropy. We have disclosed a clear relationship between the particle size, the thickness of the shell, and the saturation magnetization of the particles. The large reduction of the saturation magnetization of the samples is found to be induced by the increase of nonmagnetic surface large since the thickness of the spin-disordered surface layer increases with a decrease in the particle size. Due to the reduction of the magnetization, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been reduced by the decreased particle size since the nonmagnetic surface contributes little to the MCE. Based on the core-shell structure, large relative cooling powers RCP(s) of 180 J/kg and 471 J/kg were predicted for a field change of 2.0 T and 4.5 T, respectively, in the small particles with thin spin-glass layer.

  15. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  16. Uncertainty quantification of surface-water/groundwater exchange estimates in large wetland systems using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. D.; Metz, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most watershed studies include observation-based water budget analyses to develop first-order estimates of significant flow terms. Surface-water/groundwater (SWGW) exchange is typically assumed to be equal to the residual of the sum of inflows and outflows in a watershed. These estimates of SWGW exchange, however, are highly uncertain as a result of the propagation of uncertainty inherent in the calculation or processing of the other terms of the water budget, such as stage-area-volume relations, and uncertainties associated with land-cover based evapotranspiration (ET) rate estimates. Furthermore, the uncertainty of estimated SWGW exchanges can be magnified in large wetland systems that transition from dry to wet during wet periods. Although it is well understood that observation-based estimates of SWGW exchange are uncertain it is uncommon for the uncertainty of these estimates to be directly quantified. High-level programming languages like Python can greatly reduce the effort required to (1) quantify the uncertainty of estimated SWGW exchange in large wetland systems and (2) evaluate how different approaches for partitioning land-cover data in a watershed may affect the water-budget uncertainty. We have used Python with the Numpy, Scipy.stats, and pyDOE packages to implement an unconstrained Monte Carlo approach with Latin Hypercube sampling to quantify the uncertainty of monthly estimates of SWGW exchange in the Floral City watershed of the Tsala Apopka wetland system in west-central Florida, USA. Possible sources of uncertainty in the water budget analysis include rainfall, ET, canal discharge, and land/bathymetric surface elevations. Each of these input variables was assigned a probability distribution based on observation error or spanning the range of probable values. The Monte Carlo integration process exposes the uncertainties in land-cover based ET rate estimates as the dominant contributor to the uncertainty in SWGW exchange estimates. We will discuss

  17. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  18. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  19. Direction sensitive neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlen, Steven; Fisher, Peter; Dujmic, Denis; Wellenstein, Hermann F.; Inglis, Andrew

    2017-01-31

    A neutron detector includes a pressure vessel, an electrically conductive field cage assembly within the pressure vessel and an imaging subsystem. A pressurized gas mixture of CF.sub.4, .sup.3He and .sup.4He at respective partial pressures is used. The field cage establishes a relatively large drift region of low field strength, in which ionization electrons generated by neutron-He interactions are directed toward a substantially smaller amplification region of substantially higher field strength in which the ionization electrons undergo avalanche multiplication resulting in scintillation of the CF.sub.4 along scintillation tracks. The imaging system generates two-dimensional images of the scintillation patterns and employs track-finding to identify tracks and deduce the rate and direction of incident neutrons. One or more photo-multiplier tubes record the time-profile of the scintillation tracks permitting the determination of the third coordinate.

  20. Nuclear symmetry energy and neutron skin thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Warda, M; Viñas, X; Roca-Maza, X

    2012-01-01

    The relation between the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density and the neutron skin thickness is investigated. Constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy are deduced from the neutron skin data obtained in experiments with antiprotonic atoms. Two types of neutron skin are distinguished: the "surface" and the "bulk". A combination of both types forms neutron skin in most of nuclei. A prescription to calculate neutron skin thickness and the slope of symmetry energy parameter $L$ from the parity violating asymmetry measured in the PREX experiment is proposed.

  1. Fast numerical method for electromagnetic scattering from an object above a large-scale layered rough surface at large incident angle: vertical polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A-Q; Guo, L-X; Chai, C

    2011-02-01

    A fast numerical method has been proposed in this paper for calculating the electromagnetic scattering from a perfectly electric conducting object above a two-layered dielectric rough surface. The focus in this study is large incidence. The parallel fast multipole method is combined with the method of moments for fast implementation of the scattering from this composite model. The biconjugate gradient method is adopted to solve the unsymmetrical matrix equation and parallelized. The simulating time and parallel speedup ratio with different processors are provided. Several numerical results are shown and analyzed to discuss the influences of the parameters of the rough surface, the object, and the intermediate medium on the bistatic scattering.

  2. Curling probe measurement of a large-volume pulsed plasma with surface magnetic confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A.; Tashiro, H.; Sakakibara, W.; Nakamura, K.; Sugai, H.

    2016-12-01

    A curling probe (CP) based on microwave resonance is applied to the measurement of electron density in a pulsed DC glow discharge under surface magnetic confinement (SMC) provided by a number of permanent magnets on a chamber wall. Owing to the SMC effects, a 1 m scale large-volume plasma is generated by a relatively low voltage (~1 kV) at low pressure (~1 Pa) in various gases (Ar, CH4, and C2H2). Temporal variation of the electron density is measured for pulse frequency f  =  0.5-25 kHz for various discharge-on times (T ON) with a high resolution time (~0.2 µs), using the on-point mode. In general, the electron density starts to increase at time t  =  0 after turn-on of the discharge voltage, reaches peak density at t  =  T ON, and then decreases after turn-off. The peak electron density is observed to increase with the pulse frequency f for constant T ON owing to the residual plasma. This dependence is successfully formulated using a semi-empirical model. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cathode sheath in the pulsed discharge is revealed by a 1 m long movable CP. The measured thickness of the high-voltage cathode fall in a steady state coincides with the value of the so-called Child-Langmuir sheath.

  3. Research on auto-centering device in surface defects evaluation system of large spherical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Yongying; Wu, Fan; Chai, Huiting; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Lin; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing; Cao, Pin

    2016-09-01

    For the Spherical Surface Defects Evaluation System (SSDES), lens centering is essential to obtain the precise scanning trace and defect features without mismatch. Based on a combination of auto-collimating microscopy and Computer-Aided Alignment (CAA), an auto-centering system that can measure the deviation of large spherical center with respect to a reference rotation axis rapidly and accurately is established in this paper. The auto-centering system allows the closedloop feedback control of spherical center according to the different images of the crosshair reticle on CCD. Image entropy algorithm is employed to evaluate image clarity determined by the auto-focus experiment of 50μm step-length. Subsequently, an improved algorithm that can search the crosshair center automatically is proposed to make the trajectory of crosshair images and the position of rotation axis more reliable based on original circle fitting algorithm by the least square method (LSM). The comparison results indicates to show the high accuracy and efficiency of the proposed fitting method with LSM.

  4. Large-Scale Point-Cloud Visualization through Localized Textured Surface Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Murat; Preiner, Reinhold; Scheiblauer, Claus; Jeschke, Stefan; Wimmer, Michael

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel scene representation for the visualization of large-scale point clouds accompanied by a set of high-resolution photographs. Many real-world applications deal with very densely sampled point-cloud data, which are augmented with photographs that often reveal lighting variations and inaccuracies in registration. Consequently, the high-quality representation of the captured data, i.e., both point clouds and photographs together, is a challenging and time-consuming task. We propose a two-phase approach, in which the first (preprocessing) phase generates multiple overlapping surface patches and handles the problem of seamless texture generation locally for each patch. The second phase stitches these patches at render-time to produce a high-quality visualization of the data. As a result of the proposed localization of the global texturing problem, our algorithm is more than an order of magnitude faster than equivalent mesh-based texturing techniques. Furthermore, since our preprocessing phase requires only a minor fraction of the whole data set at once, we provide maximum flexibility when dealing with growing data sets.

  5. Solving very large scattering problems using a parallel PWTD-enhanced surface integral equation solver

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2013-07-01

    The computational complexity and memory requirements of multilevel plane wave time domain (PWTD)-accelerated marching-on-in-time (MOT)-based surface integral equation (SIE) solvers scale as O(NtNs(log 2)Ns) and O(Ns 1.5); here N t and Ns denote numbers of temporal and spatial basis functions discretizing the current [Shanker et al., IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., 51, 628-641, 2003]. In the past, serial versions of these solvers have been successfully applied to the analysis of scattering from perfect electrically conducting as well as homogeneous penetrable targets involving up to Ns ≈ 0.5 × 106 and Nt ≈ 10 3. To solve larger problems, parallel PWTD-enhanced MOT solvers are called for. Even though a simple parallelization strategy was demonstrated in the context of electromagnetic compatibility analysis [M. Lu et al., in Proc. IEEE Int. Symp. AP-S, 4, 4212-4215, 2004], by and large, progress in this area has been slow. The lack of progress can be attributed wholesale to difficulties associated with the construction of a scalable PWTD kernel. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, Aidan [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  7. Neutron protein crystallography in JAERI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Tanaka

    2004-07-01

    Neutron diffraction provides an experimental method of directly locating hydrogen atoms in proteins. After developing an original neutron detector (neutron imaging plate) and a novel practical neutron monochromator (elastically bent perfect Si monochromator), BIX-type diffractometers which were equipped with these tools were e±ciently constructed at JRR-3 in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Japan and they have finished many protein crystallographic measurements and interesting results have come one after another. At the same time a method of growing large protein single crystals and a database of hydrogen and hydration have also been developed. In the near future, a pulsed neutron diffractometer for biological macromolecules has been proposed at J-PARC in JAERI.

  8. Probing neutron star physics using accreting neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patruno A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We give an obervational overview of the accreting neutron stars systems as probes of neutron star physics. In particular we focus on the results obtained from the periodic timing of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars in outburst and from the measurement of X-ray spectra of accreting neutron stars during quiescence. In the first part of this overview we show that the X-ray pulses are contaminated by a large amount of noise of uncertain origin, and that all these neutron stars do not show evidence of spin variations during the outburst. We present also some recent developments on the presence of intermittency in three accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars and investigate the reason why only a small number of accreting neutron stars show X-ray pulsations and why none of these pulsars shows sub-millisecond spin periods. In the second part of the overview we introduce the observational technique that allows the study of neutron star cooling in accreting systems as probes of neutron star internal composition and equation of state. We explain the phenomenon of the deep crustal heating and present some recent developments on several quasi persistent X-ray sources where a cooling neutron star has been observed.

  9. Light Curves for Rapidly-Rotating Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cadeau, C; Leahy, D; Campbell, S S; Cadeau, Coire; Morsink, Sharon M.; Leahy, Denis; Campbell, Sheldon S.

    2006-01-01

    We present raytracing computations for light emitted from the surface of a rapidly-rotating neutron star in order to construct light curves for X-ray pulsars and bursters. These calculations are for realistic models of rapidly-rotating neutron stars which take into account both the correct exterior metric and the oblate shape of the star. We find that the most important effect arising from rotation comes from the oblate shape of the rotating star. We find that approximating a rotating neutron star as a sphere introduces serious errors in fitted values of the star's radius and mass if the rotation rate is very large. However, in most cases acceptable fits to the ratio M/R can be obtained with the spherical approximation.

  10. Multi-messenger observations of neutron rich matter

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J

    2011-01-01

    Neutron rich matter is central to many fundamental questions in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Moreover, this material is being studied with an extraordinary variety of new tools such as the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). We describe the Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) that uses parity violating electron scattering to measure the neutron radius in $^{208}$Pb. This has important implications for neutron stars and their crusts. We discuss X-ray observations of neutron star radii. These also have important implications for neutron rich matter. Gravitational waves (GW) open a new window on neutron rich matter. They come from sources such as neutron star mergers, rotating neutron star mountains, and collective r-mode oscillations. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations, we find neutron star crust to be very strong. It can support mountains on rotating neutron stars large enough to generate detectable gravitational waves. Finally...

  11. Modulation spectrometry of neutrons with diffractometry applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hiismäki, Pekka

    1997-01-01

    Modulation spectrometry of neutrons refers to a measuring principle, characterized by classification of neutron histories in a probabilistic way, not the usual deterministic way. In order to accomplish this, neutron beams entering the sample are modulated by high-transmission, white-beam selectors of the multislit type, such as Fourier or statistical choppers or high-frequency-modulated spin-flippers. In this scheme it is impossible to decide in a unique way through which particular slit any single neutron passed, but the distribution of histories for a large population of neutrons can neverth

  12. Large-n approach to thermodynamic Casimir effects in slabs with free surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, H W; Grüneberg, Daniel; Hasenbusch, Martin; Hucht, Alfred; Rutkevich, Sergei B; Schmidt, Felix M

    2014-06-01

    The classical n-vector ϕ{4} model with O(n) symmetrical Hamiltonian H is considered in a ∞{2}×L slab geometry bounded by a pair of parallel free surface planes at separation L. Standard quadratic boundary terms implying Robin boundary conditions are included in H. The temperature-dependent scaling functions of the excess free energy and the thermodynamic Casimir force are computed in the large-n limit for temperatures T at, above, and below the bulk critical temperature T_{c}. Their n=∞ limits can be expressed exactly in terms of the spectrum and eigenfunctions of a self-consistent one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. This equation is solved by numerical means for two distinct discretized versions of the model: in the first ("model A"), only the coordinate z across the slab is discretized and the integrations over momenta conjugate to the lateral coordinates are regularized dimensionally; in the second ("model B"), a simple cubic lattice with periodic boundary conditions along the lateral directions is used. Renormalization-group ideas are invoked to show that, in addition to corrections to scaling ∝L{-1}, anomalous ones ∝L{-1}lnL should occur. They can be considerably decreased by taking an appropriate g→∞ (T_{c}→∞) limit of the ϕ{4} interaction constant g. Depending on the model A or B, they can be absorbed completely or to a large extent in an effective thickness L_{eff}=L+δL. Excellent data collapses and consistent high-precision results for both models are obtained. The approach to the low-temperature Goldstone values of the scaling functions is shown to involve logarithmic anomalies. The scaling functions exhibit all qualitative features seen in experiments on the thinning of wetting layers of {4}He and Monte Carlo simulations of XY models, including a pronounced minimum of the Casimir force below T_{c}. The results are in conformity with various analytically known exact properties of the scaling functions.

  13. Neutron Repulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2011-01-01

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding...

  14. The Fate of Merging Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    A rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron star is one possible outcome when two smaller neutron stars merge. [Casey Reed/Penn State University]When two neutron stars collide, the new object that they make can reveal information about the interior physics of neutron stars. New theoretical work explores what we should be seeing, and what it can teach us.Neutron Star or Black Hole?So far, the only systems from which weve detected gravitational waves are merging black holes. But other compact-object binaries exist and are expected to merge on observable timescales in particular, binary neutron stars. When two neutron stars merge, the resulting object falls into one of three categories:a stable neutron star,a black hole, ora supramassive neutron star, a large neutron star thats supported by its rotation but will eventually collapse to a black hole after it loses angular momentum.Histograms of the initial (left) and final (right) distributions of objects in the authors simulations, for five different equations of state. Most cases resulted primarily in the formation of neutron stars (NSs) or supramassive neutron stars (sNSs), not black holes (BHs). [Piro et al. 2017]Whether a binary-neutron-star merger results in another neutron star, a black hole, or a supramassive neutron star depends on the final mass of the remnant and what the correct equation of state is that describes the interiors of neutron stars a longstanding astrophysical puzzle.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Anthony Piro (Carnegie Observatories) estimated which of these outcomes we should expect for mergers of binary neutron stars. The teams results along with future observations of binary neutron stars may help us to eventually pin down the equation of state for neutron stars.Merger OutcomesPiro and collaborators used relativistic calculations of spinning and non-spinning neutron stars to estimate the mass range that neutron stars would have for several different realistic equations of

  15. Adsorption of Polyanion onto Large Alpha Alumina Beads with Variably Charged Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Duc Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of strong polyelectrolyte, poly(styrenesulfonate, PSS, of different molecular weights onto large α-Al2O3 beads was systematically investigated as functions of pH and NaCl concentrations. The ultraviolet (UV absorption spectra of PSS at different pH and salt concentrations confirmed that the structure of PSS is independent of pH. With the change of molecular weight from 70 kg/mol (PSS 70 to 1000 kg/mol (PSS 1000, adsorption amount of PSS increases and proton coadsorption on the surface of α-Al2O3 decreases at given pH and salt concentration. It suggests that higher molecular weight of PSS was less flat conformation than lower one. The adsorption density of PSS 70 and PSS 1000 decreases with decreasing salt concentrations, indicating that both electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions are involved. Experimental results of both PSS 70 and PSS 1000 adsorption isotherms onto α-Al2O3 at different pH and salt concentrations can be represented well by two-step adsorption model. The effects of molecular weight and salt concentration are explained by structure of adsorbed PSS onto α-Al2O3. The influence of added SDS on the isotherms is evaluated from the sequential adsorption. The SDS uptake onto α-Al2O3 in the presence of hemimicelles can prevent the adsorption of PSS at low concentration so that adsorption of PSS reduces with preadsorbed SDS.

  16. Status of ITER neutron diagnostic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Sasao, M.; Kaschuck, Yu. A.; Nishitani, T.; Batistoni, P.; Zaveryaev, V. S.; Popovichev, S.; Iguchi, T.; Jarvis, O. N.; Källne, J.; Fiore, C. L.; Roquemore, A. L.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Fisher, R.; Gorini, G.; Prosvirin, D. V.; Tsutskikh, A. Yu.; Donné, A. J. H.; Costley, A. E.; Walker, C. I.

    2005-12-01

    Due to the high neutron yield and the large plasma size many ITER plasma parameters such as fusion power, power density, ion temperature, fast ion energy and their spatial distributions in the plasma core can be measured well by various neutron diagnostics. Neutron diagnostic systems under consideration and development for ITER include radial and vertical neutron cameras (RNC and VNC), internal and external neutron flux monitors (NFMs), neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The two-dimensional neutron source strength and spectral measurements can be provided by the combined RNC and VNC. The NFMs need to meet the ITER requirement of time-resolved measurements of the neutron source strength and can provide the signals necessary for real-time control of the ITER fusion power. Compact and high throughput neutron spectrometers are under development. A concept for the absolute calibration of neutron diagnostic systems is proposed. The development, testing in existing experiments and the engineering integration of all neutron diagnostic systems into ITER are in progress and the main results are presented.

  17. Study of Near-Surface Models in Large-Eddy Simulations of a Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, I.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Mansour, N. N.

    2004-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a widely used technique in armospheric modeling research. In LES, large, unsteady, three dimensional structures are resolved and small structures that are not resolved on the computational grid are modeled. A filtering operation is applied to distinguish between resolved and unresolved scales. We present two near-surface models that have found use in atmospheric modeling. We also suggest a simpler eddy viscosity model that adopts Prandtl's mixing length model (Prandtl 1925) in the vicinity of the surface and blends with the dynamic Smagotinsky model (Germano et al, 1991) away from the surface. We evaluate the performance of these surface models by simulating a neutraly stratified atmospheric boundary layer.

  18. The effect of craters on the lunar neutron flux

    CERN Document Server

    Eke, V R; Diserens, S; Ryder, M; Yeomans, P E L; Teodoro, L F A; Elphic, R C; Feldman, W C; Hermalyn, B; Lavelle, C M; Lawrence, D J

    2015-01-01

    The variation of remotely sensed neutron count rates is measured as a function of cratercentric distance using data from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. The count rate, stacked over many craters, peaks over the crater centre, has a minimum near the crater rim and at larger distances it increases to a mean value that is up to 1% lower than the mean count rate observed over the crater. A simple model is presented, based upon an analytical topographical profile for the stacked craters fitted to data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA). The effect of topography coupled with neutron beaming from the surface largely reproduces the observed count rate profiles. However, a model that better fits the observations can be found by including the additional freedom to increase the neutron emissivity of the crater area by ~0.35% relative to the unperturbed surface. It is unclear what might give rise to this effect, but it may relate to additional surface roughness in the vicinities of craters. The ampl...

  19. Scalable and Detail-Preserving Ground Surface Reconstruction from Large 3D Point Clouds Acquired by Mobile Mapping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, D.; Serna Morales, A.; Deschaud, J.-E.; Marcotegui, B.; Goulette, F.

    2014-08-01

    The currently existing mobile mapping systems equipped with active 3D sensors allow to acquire the environment with high sampling rates at high vehicle velocities. While providing an effective solution for environment sensing over large scale distances, such acquisition provides only a discrete representation of the geometry. Thus, a continuous map of the underlying surface must be built. Mobile acquisition introduces several constraints for the state-of-the-art surface reconstruction algorithms. Smoothing becomes a difficult task for recovering sharp depth features while avoiding mesh shrinkage. In addition, interpolation-based techniques are not suitable for noisy datasets acquired by Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) systems. Furthermore, scalability is a major concern for enabling real-time rendering over large scale distances while preserving geometric details. This paper presents a fully automatic ground surface reconstruction framework capable to deal with the aforementioned constraints. The proposed method exploits the quasi-flat geometry of the ground throughout a morphological segmentation algorithm. Then, a planar Delaunay triangulation is applied in order to reconstruct the ground surface. A smoothing procedure eliminates high frequency peaks, while preserving geometric details in order to provide a regular ground surface. Finally, a decimation step is applied in order to cope with scalability constraints over large scale distances. Experimental results on real data acquired in large urban environments are presented and a performance evaluation with respect to ground truth measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  20. Neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heger, G. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Inst. fuer Kristallographie, Aachen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  1. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, N

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, po...

  2. Survival Of Large-l Rydberg States Of Highly Charged Ions In The Vicinity Of Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, M. A.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Božanic, D. K.

    2010-07-01

    The probabilities for ionization of large-l multiply charged Rydberg ions approaching metallic surfaces at thermal velocities in the normal incidence geometry were calculated. The ionization process was treated within the framework of decay model using the appropriate etalon equation method for solving the complex energy eigenvalue problem. It is shown that, in contrast to corresponding low-l states, the large-l Rydberg states exhibit non-zero survival probabilities.

  3. Properties of Rotating Neutron Star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh K. Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using the nuclear equation of states for a large variety of relativistic and non-relativistic force parameters, we calculate the static and rotating masses and radii of neutron stars. From these equation of states, we evaluate the properties of rotating neutron stars, such as rotational frequencies, moment of inertia, quadrupole deformation parameter, rotational ellipticity and gravitational wave strain amplitude. The estimated gravitational wave strain amplitude of the star is found to be~sim 10-23.

  4. Neutron spectrometer for improved SNM search.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Aigeldinger, Georg

    2007-03-01

    With the exception of large laboratory devices with very low sensitivities, a neutron spectrometer have not been built for fission neutrons such as those emitted by special nuclear materials (SNM). The goal of this work was to use a technique known as Capture Gated Neutron Spectrometry to develop a solid-state device with this functionality. This required modifications to trans-stilbene, a known solid-state scintillator. To provide a neutron capture signal we added lithium to this material. This unique triggering signal allowed identification of neutrons that lose all of their energy in the detector, eliminating uncertainties that arise due to partial energy depositions. We successfully implemented a capture gated neutron spectrometer and were able to distinguish an SNM like fission spectrum from a spectrum stemming from a benign neutron source.

  5. Development of fast neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Chia Jia, E-mail: gei-i-kani@hotmail.com; Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai, E-mail: sunchai.n@chula.ac.th [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok, THAILAND 10330 (Thailand)

    2016-01-22

    Due to the high installation cost, the safety concern and the immobility of the research reactors, the neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator is proposed. Since the neutrons generated from a portable neutron generator are mostly the fast neutrons, the system is emphasized on using the fast neutrons for the purpose of conducting the radiography. In order to suppress the influence of X-ray produced by the neutron generator, a combination of a shielding material sandwiched between two identical imaging plates is used. A binary XOR operation is then applied for combining the information from the imaging plates. The raw images obtained confirm that the X-ray really has a large effect and that XOR operation can help enhance the effect of the neutrons.

  6. Development of fast neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chia Jia; Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high installation cost, the safety concern and the immobility of the research reactors, the neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator is proposed. Since the neutrons generated from a portable neutron generator are mostly the fast neutrons, the system is emphasized on using the fast neutrons for the purpose of conducting the radiography. In order to suppress the influence of X-ray produced by the neutron generator, a combination of a shielding material sandwiched between two identical imaging plates is used. A binary XOR operation is then applied for combining the information from the imaging plates. The raw images obtained confirm that the X-ray really has a large effect and that XOR operation can help enhance the effect of the neutrons.

  7. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R., E-mail: ricardo.serra@dem.uc.pt [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [ICEMS-Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, J.C. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Kubart, T. [The Ångström Laboratory, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm{sup 2}. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under

  8. Large surface radiative forcing from surface-based ice crystal events measured in the High Arctic at Eureka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lesins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice crystals, also known as diamond dust, are suspended in the boundary layer air under clear sky conditions during most of the Arctic winter in Northern Canada. Occasionally ice crystal events can produce significantly thick layers with optical depths in excess of 2.0 even in the absence of liquid water clouds. Four case studies of high optical depth ice crystal events at Eureka in the Nunavut Territory of Canada during the winter of 2006–2007 are presented. They show that the measured ice crystal surface infrared downward radiative forcing ranged from 8 to 36 W m−2 in the wavelength band from 5.6 to 20 μm for visible optical depths ranging from 0.2 to 1.7. MODIS infrared and visible images and the operational radiosonde wind profile were used to show that these high optical depth events were caused by surface snow being blown off 600 to 800 m high mountain ridges about 20 to 30 km North-West of Eureka and advected by the winds towards Eureka as they settled towards the ground within the highly stable boundary layer. This work presents the first study that demonstrates the important role that surrounding topography plays in determining the occurrence of high optical depth ice crystal events and points to a new source of boundary layer ice crystal events distinct from the classical diamond dust phenomenon.

  9. Obstacles, an Energy-Efficient Method to Reduce Downdraught from Large Glazed Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Heiselberg, Per

    Thermal discomfort due to downdraught from glazed surfaces are often met by convectors placed close to the surface, but this may lead to increased energy consumption. The objective of this research is to investigate the effect of a horizontal obstacle on the boundary layer flow at a high cold ver...

  10. Large-scale Generation of Patterned Bubble Arrays on Printed Bi-functional Boiling Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Ho; David, Michele; Gao, Zhongwei; Chang, Alvin; Allen, Marshall; Wang, Hailei; Chang, Chih-hung

    2016-04-01

    Bubble nucleation control, growth and departure dynamics is important in understanding boiling phenomena and enhancing nucleate boiling heat transfer performance. We report a novel bi-functional heterogeneous surface structure that is capable of tuning bubble nucleation, growth and departure dynamics. For the fabrication of the surface, hydrophobic polymer dot arrays are first printed on a substrate, followed by hydrophilic ZnO nanostructure deposition via microreactor-assisted nanomaterial deposition (MAND) processing. Wettability contrast between the hydrophobic polymer dot arrays and aqueous ZnO solution allows for the fabrication of heterogeneous surfaces with distinct wettability regions. Heterogeneous surfaces with various configurations were fabricated and their bubble dynamics were examined at elevated heat flux, revealing various nucleate boiling phenomena. In particular, aligned and patterned bubbles with a tunable departure frequency and diameter were demonstrated in a boiling experiment for the first time. Taking advantage of our fabrication method, a 6 inch wafer size heterogeneous surface was prepared. Pool boiling experiments were also performed to demonstrate a heat flux enhancement up to 3X at the same surface superheat using bi-functional surfaces, compared to a bare stainless steel surface.

  11. Spatial validation of large scale land surface models against monthly land surface temperature patterns using innovative performance metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Julian; Siemann, Amanda; Stisen, Simon; Sheffield, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are a key tool to enhance process understanding and to provide predictions of the terrestrial hydrosphere and its atmospheric coupling. Distributed LSMs predict hydrological states and fluxes, such as land surface temperature (LST) or actual evapotranspiration (aET), at each grid cell. LST observations are widely available through satellite remote sensing platforms that enable comprehensive spatial validations of LSMs. In spite of the availability of LST data, most validation studies rely on simple cell to cell comparisons and thus do not regard true spatial pattern information. This study features two innovative spatial performance metrics, namely EOF- and connectivity-analysis, to validate predicted LST patterns by three LSMs (Mosaic, Noah, VIC) over the contiguous USA. The LST validation dataset is derived from global High-Resolution-Infrared-Radiometric-Sounder (HIRS) retrievals for a 30 year period. The metrics are bias insensitive, which is an important feature in order to truly validate spatial patterns. The EOF analysis evaluates the spatial variability and pattern seasonality, and attests better performance to VIC in the warm months and to Mosaic and Noah in the cold months. Further, more than 75% of the LST variability can be captured by a single pattern that is strongly driven by air temperature. The connectivity analysis assesses the homogeneity and smoothness of patterns. The LSMs are most reliable at predicting cold LST patterns in the warm months and vice versa. Lastly, the coupling between aET and LST is investigated at flux tower sites and compared against LSMs to explain the identified LST shortcomings.

  12. Neutron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, James C., III; Richards, Wade J.; Shields, Kevin C.

    1995-07-01

    The McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center's (MNRC) staff in conjunction with a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) with the U.C. Santa Barbara facility has developed a system that can be used for aircraft inspection of jet engine blades. The problem was to develop an inspection system that can detect very low concentrations of hydrogen (i.e., greater than 100 ppm) in metal matricies. Specifically in Titanium alloy jet engine blades. Entrapment and precipitation of hydrogen in metals is an undesirable phenomenon which occurs in many alloys of steel and titanium. In general, metals suffer a loss of mechanical properties after long exposures to hydrogen, especially at high temperatures and pressures, thereby becoming embrittled. Neutron radiography has been used as a nondestructive testing technique for many years. Neutrons, because of their unique interactions with materials, are especially useful in the detection of hydrogen. They have an extremely high interaction cross section for low atomic number nuclei (i.e., hydrogen). Thus hydrogen in a metal matrix can be visualized using neutrons. Traditional radiography is sensitive to the total attenuation integrated over the path of radiation through the material. Increased sensitivity and quantitative cross section resolution can be obtained using three-dimensional volumetric imaging techniques such as tomography. The solution used to solve the problem was to develop a neutron tomography system. The neutron source is the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center's 1 MW TRIGA reactor. This paper describes the hardware used in the system as well as some of the preliminary results.

  13. Results from one-year continuous operation of a large aperture scintillometer over a heterogeneous land surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyrich, F.; DeBruin, H.A.R.; Meijninger, W.M.L.; Schipper, J.W.; Lohse, H.

    2002-01-01

    A large-aperture scintillometer (LAS) was operated continuously during a period of more than one year over a heterogeneous land surface in Central Europe at the transition between marine and continental climates. The LAS measurements of the refractive index structure parameter, C N2, were used to es

  14. Calibrating a large-extent high-resolution coupled groundwater-land surface model using soil moisture and discharge data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanudjaja, E.H.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Jong, S.M. de; Geer, F.C. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using remotely sensed soil moisture data and in situ discharge observations to calibrate a large-extent hydrological model. The model used is PCR-GLOBWB-MOD, which is a physically based and fully coupled groundwater-land surface model operating at a daily basis and havi

  15. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  16. A spherical shell target scheme for laser-driven neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Min-Qing, E-mail: he-minqing@iapcm.ac.cn; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Si-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Mo [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Cai, Hong-Bo, E-mail: cai-hongbo@iapcm.ac.cn; Zhou, Cang-Tao; Cao, Li-Hua; Zheng, Chun-Yang; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Dong, Quan-Li [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 260405 (China); Sheng, Zheng-Ming [Department of Physics, Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Pei, Wen-Bing [Shanghai Institute of Laser Plasma, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-12-15

    A scheme for neutron production is investigated in which an ultra-intense laser is irradiated into a two-layer (deuterium and aurum) spherical shell target through the cone shaped entrance hole. It is found that the energy conversion efficiency from laser to target can reach as high as 71%, and deuterium ions are heated to a maximum energy of several MeV from the inner layer surface. These ions are accelerated towards the center of the cavity and accumulated finally with a high density up to tens of critical density in several picoseconds. Two different mechanisms account for the efficient yield of the neutrons in the cavity: (1) At the early stage, the neutrons are generated by the high energy deuterium ions based on the “beam-target” approach. (2) At the later stage, the neutrons are generated by the thermonuclear fusion when the most of the deuterium ions reach equilibrium in the cavity. It is also found that a large number of deuterium ions accelerated inward can pass through the target center and the outer Au layer and finally stopped in the CD{sub 2} layer. This also causes efficient yield of neutrons inside the CD{sub 2} layer due to “beam-target” approach. A postprocessor has been designed to evaluate the neutron yield and the neutron spectrum is obtained.

  17. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0-1.1 M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of non-rotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  18. Large scale production of carbon nanotube arrays on the sphere surface from liquefied petroleum gas at low cost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), a cheap industrial material, is used as carbon source to produce carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on ceramic spherical surface on a large scale in the floating catalyst process. The ceramic spheres provide huge surface area and good mobility, leading to the mass production of CNT arrays continuously. The arrays obtained from the surface are of good alignment, and the purity is as high as 97.5%. With the decrease of the growth temperature, CNTs in the array form with small-diameter of about 13 nm can be obtained. Therefore, with the industrial fuel as carbon source and the ceramic sphere as substrate, CNT arrays can easily be produced on large scale at low cost.

  19. Reconstruction of micron resolution mouse brain surface from large-scale imaging dataset using resampling-based variational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingwei; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Hang; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-08-06

    Brain surface profile is essential for brain studies, including registration, segmentation of brain structure and drawing neuronal circuits. Recent advances in high-throughput imaging techniques enable imaging whole mouse brain at micron spatial resolution and provide a basis for more fine quantitative studies in neuroscience. However, reconstructing micron resolution brain surface from newly produced neuronal dataset still faces challenges. Most current methods apply global analysis, which are neither applicable to a large imaging dataset nor to a brain surface with an inhomogeneous signal intensity. Here, we proposed a resampling-based variational model for this purpose. In this model, the movement directions of the initial boundary elements are fixed, the final positions of the initial boundary elements that form the brain surface are determined by the local signal intensity. These features assure an effective reconstruction of the brain surface from a new brain dataset. Compared with conventional typical methods, such as level set based method and active contour method, our method significantly increases the recall and precision rates above 97% and is approximately hundreds-fold faster. We demonstrated a fast reconstruction at micron level of the whole brain surface from a large dataset of hundreds of GB in size within 6 hours.

  20. Acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterial with large surface area: Preparation, characterization, and adsorption properties for cationic and anionic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kai; Ma, Chun–Fang; Ling, Yuan; Li, Meng [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Qiang, E-mail: gaoqiang@cug.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nano-Geo Materials of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Luo, Wen–Jun, E-mail: heartnohome@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Nanostructured carbonaceous materials are extremely important in the nano field, yet developing simple, mild, and “green” methods that can make such materials possess large surface area and rich functional groups on their surfaces still remains a considerable challenge. Herein, a one-pot and environment-friendly method, i.e., thermal treatment (180 °C; 18 h) of water mixed with glucose and chitosan (CTS), has been proposed. The resultant carbonaceous nanomaterials were characterized by field emitting scanning electron microscope, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. It was found that, in contrast to the conventional hydrothermally carbonized product from pure glucose, with low surface area (9.3 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and pore volume (0.016 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}), the CTS-added carbonaceous products showed satisfactory textural parameters (surface area and pore volume up to 254 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 0.701 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively). Moreover, it was also interestingly found that these CTS-added carbonaceous products possessed both acidic (–COOH) and basic (–NH{sub 2}) groups on their surfaces. Taking the advantages of large surface area and –COOH/–NH{sub 2} bifunctional surface, the carbonaceous nanomaterials exhibited excellent performance for adsorptions of cationic compound (i.e., methylene blue) at pH 10 and anionic compound (i.e., acid red 18) at pH 2, respectively. This work not only provides a simple and green route to prepare acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterials with large surface area but also well demonstrates their potential for application in adsorption. - Highlights: • A simple and green method was proposed to prepare carbon nanomaterials. • The carbon product showed acid/base bifunctional surface with large surface area. • The carbon material could efficiently adsorb both cationic and anionic compounds.

  1. Slip-stick wetting and large contact angle hysteresis on wrinkled surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowsky, Colton; Torres, Jessica M; Vogt, Bryan D

    2011-02-15

    Wetting on a corrugated surface that is formed via wrinkling of a hard skin layer formed by UV oxidation (UVO) of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) slab is studied using advancing and receding water contact angle measurements. The amplitude of the wrinkled pattern can be tuned through the pre-strain of the PDMS prior to surface oxidation. These valleys and peaks in the surface topography lead to anisotropic wetting by water droplets. As the droplet advances, the fluid is free to move along the direction parallel to the wrinkles, but the droplet moving orthogonal to the wrinkles encounters energy barriers due to the topography and slip-stick behavior is observed. As the wrinkle amplitude increases, anisotropy in the sessile droplet increases between parallel and perpendicular directions. For the drops receding perpendicular to the wrinkles formed at high strains, the contact angle tends to decrease steadily towards zero as the drop volume decreases, which can result in apparent hysteresis in the contact angle of over 100°. The wrinkled surfaces can exhibit high sessile and advancing contact angles (>115°), but the receding angle in these cases is generally vanishing as the drop is removed. This effect results in micrometer sized drops remaining in the grooves for these highly wrinkled surfaces, while the flat analogous UVO-treated PDMS shows complete removal of all macroscopic water drops under similar conditions. These wetting characteristics should be considered if these wrinkled surfaces are to be utilized in or as microfluidic devices.

  2. Measurement of the High Energy Neutron Flux on the Surface of the Natural Uranium Target Assembly QUINTA Irradiated by Deuterons of 4 and 8 GeV Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Chilap, V.; Furman, W.; Katovsky, K.; Khushvaktov, J.; Kumar, V.; Pronskikh, V.; Mar'in, I.; Solnyshkin, A.; Suchopar, M.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Vrzalova, J.; Wagner, V.; Zavorka, L.

    Experiments with the natural uranium target assembly "QUINTA" exposed to 4 and 8 GeV deuteron beams of the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna) are analyzed. The reaction rates of 27Al(n,y1)24Na, 27Al(n,y2)22Na and 27Al(n,y3)7Be reactions with effective threshold energies of 5, 27, and 119 MeV were measured at both 4 GeV and 8 GeV deuteron beam energies. The average neutron fluxes between the effective threshold energies and the effective ends of the neutron spectra (which are 800 or 1000 MeV for 4 or 8 GeV deuterons) were determined. The evidence for the intensity shift of the neutron spectra to higher neutron energies with the increase of the deuteron energy from 4 GeV to 8 GeV was found from the ratios of the average neutron fluxes. The reaction rates and the average neutron fluxes were calculated with the MCNPX 2.7 code.

  3. Large area substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using glass-drawing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.

    2012-06-26

    A method of making a large area substrate comprises drawing a plurality of tubes to form a plurality of drawn tubes, and cutting the plurality of drawn tubes into cut drawn tubes. Each cut drawn tube has a first end and a second end along the longitudinal direction of the respective cut drawn tube. The cut drawn tubes collectively have a predetermined periodicity. The method of making a large area substrate also comprises forming a metal layer on the first ends of the cut drawn tubes to provide a large area substrate.

  4. The architecture of the active surface control system of the Large Millimeter Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souccar, Kamal; Wallace, Gary; Grosslein, Ron; Schloerb, F. Peter

    2014-07-01

    One of the fundamental design principles of the LMT is that its segmented primary surface must be active: the position and orientation of each of the segments must be moved in order to maintain the precise parabolic surface that is required by the specifications. Consequently, a system of actuators, one at the corner of each segment, is used to move the segments to counteract surface deformations attributed to gravity or thermal effects. A new control system was designed and built within the project to implement an active surface at the LMT. The technical concept for the active surface control system is to provide a set of bus boxes with built-in control and I/O capabilities to run four actuators each. Bus boxes read the LVDT sensor position and limit switch status for each actuator and use this information to drive the actuator's DC motor, closing the position loop. Each bus box contains a DC power supply for the electronics, a second DC power supply for the motors, an embedded controller with I/O to close the position loop, and a custom printed circuit board to condition the LVDT signals and drive the motors. An interface printed circuit board resides in each actuator providing a single connector access to the LVDT, the motor, and the limit switches. During the fall of 2013, 84 bus boxes were commissioned to control the 336 actuators of the inner three rings of the telescope. The surface correction model was determined using holography measurements and the active surface system has been in regular use during the scientific observation at the LMT.

  5. Facile fabrication of large-scale stable superhydrophobic surfaces with carbon sphere films by burning rapeseed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengnan; He, Jinmei; Cao, Biyun

    2010-10-01

    Stable anti-corrosive superhydrophobic surfaces were successfully prepared with the carbon nanosphere films by means of depositing the soot of burning rapeseed oil. The method is extremely cheap, facile, time-saving and avoided any of the special equipments, special reagents and complex process control. The method is suitable for the large-scale preparation of superhydrophobic surface and the substrate can be easily changed. The as-prepared surfaces showed stable superhydrophobicity and anti-corrosive property even in many corrosive solutions, such as acidic or basic solutions over a wide pH range. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surface was carefully characterized by the field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope to confirm the synergistic binary geometric structures at micro- and nanometer scale. This result will open a new avenue in the superhydrophobic paint research with these easily obtained carbon nanospheres in the near future.

  6. A conserved hydrophobic surface of the LARG pleckstrin homology domain is critical for RhoA activation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aittaleb, Mohamed; Gao, Guang; Evelyn, Chris R; Neubig, Richard R; Tesmer, John J G

    2009-11-01

    Leukemia associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) activates RhoA in response to signals received by specific classes of cell surface receptors. The catalytic core of LARG is a Dbl homology (DH) domain whose activity is modulated by an adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In this study, we used a transcriptional assay and confocal microscopy to examine the roles of several novel structural features of the LARG DH/PH domains, including a conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the PH domain that mediates protein-protein interactions in crystal structures of LARG and its close homolog PDZ-RhoGEF. Mutation of the hydrophobic patch has no effect on nucleotide exchange activity in vitro, but abolished the ability of LARG to activate RhoA and to induce stress fiber formation in cultured cells. The activity of these mutants could be rescued by fusion with exogenous membrane-targeting domains. However, because membrane recruitment by activated G alpha(13) subunits was not sufficient to rescue activity of a hydrophobic patch mutant, the LARG PH domain cannot solely contribute to membrane targeting. Instead, it seems likely that the domain is involved in regulatory interactions with other proteins near the membrane surface. We also show that the hydrophobic patch of the PH domain is likely important for the activity of all Lbc subfamily RhoGEFs.

  7. Surface modes of ultra-cold atomic clouds with very large number of vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Cazalilla, M A

    2003-01-01

    We study the surface modes of some of the vortex liquids recently found by means of exact diagonalizations in systems of rapidly rotating bosons. In contrast to the surface modes of Bose condensates, we find that the surface waves have a frequency linear in the excitation angular momentum, h-bar l > 0. Furthermore, in analogy with the edge waves of electronic quantum Hall states, these excitations are chiral, that is, they can be excited only for values of l that increase the total angular momentum of the vortex liquid. However, differently from the quantum Hall phenomena for electrons, we also find other excitations that are approximately degenerate in the laboratory frame with the surface modes, and which decrease the total angular momentum by l quanta. The surface modes of the Laughlin, as well as other scalar and vector boson states are analyzed, and their observable properties characterized. We argue that measurement of the response of a vortex liquid to a weak time-dependent potential that imparts angul...

  8. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation will develop an affordable, low-stress silicon cladding process which is super-polishable for large UVOIR mirrors. The...

  9. Developing an in-situ Detector of Neutron-Induced Fission for Actinide Sputtering Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellers, Deion

    2016-09-01

    The physical mechanism describing the transfer of large amounts of energy due to fission in a material is not well understood and represents one of the modern challenges facing nuclear scientists, with applications including nuclear energy and national defense. Fission fragments cause damage to the material from sputtering of matter as they pass through or near the material's surface. We have developed a new technique at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for characterizing the ejecta by using ultracold neutrons (neutrons with kinetic energy less than 300 neV) to induce fission at finely controlled depths in an actinide. This program will ultimately provide a detailed description of the properties of the sputtered particles as a function of the depth of the fission in the material. A key component of this project is accurately quantifying the number of neutron induced fissions in the sample. This poster depicts the development of an in-situ detector of neutron-induced fission for the AShES (Actinide Sputtering from ultracold neutron Exposure at the Surface) experiment.

  10. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  11. An Efficient Large-Area Grating Coupler for Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Koev, Stephan T; Lezec, Henri J; Aksyuk, Vladimir A

    2011-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a periodic grating of shallow rectangular grooves in a metallic film with the goal of maximizing the coupling efficiency of an extended plane wave (PW) of visible or near-infrared light into a single surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode on a flat metal surface. A PW-to-SPP power conversion factor > 45 % is demonstrated at a wavelength of 780 nm, which exceeds by an order of magnitude the experimental performance of SPP grating couplers reported to date at any wavelength. Conversion efficiency is maximized by matching the dissipative SPP losses along the grating surface to the local coupling strength. This critical coupling condition is experimentally achieved by tailoring the groove depth and width using a focused ion beam.

  12. Downscaling the Impacts of Large-Scale LUCC on Surface Temperature along with IPCC RCPs: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzheng Deng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the potential impacts of large-scale land use and land cover changes (LUCC on surface temperature from a global perspective. As important types of LUCC, urbanization, deforestation, cultivated land reclamation, and grassland degradation have effects on the climate, the potential changes of the surface temperature caused by these four types of large-scale LUCC from 2010 to 2050 are downscaled, and this issue analyzed worldwide along with Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. The first case study presents some evidence of the effects of future urbanization on surface temperature in the Northeast megalopolis of the United States of America (USA. In order to understand the potential climatological variability caused by future forest deforestation and vulnerability, we chose Brazilian Amazon region as the second case study. The third selected region in India as a typical region of cultivated land reclamation where the possible climatic impacts are explored. In the fourth case study, we simulate the surface temperature changes caused by future grassland degradation in Mongolia. Results show that the temperature in built-up area would increase obviously throughout the four land types. In addition, the effects of all four large-scale LUCC on monthly average temperature change would vary from month to month with obviously spatial heterogeneity.

  13. A model for simulating the influence of a spatial distribution of large circular macropores on surface runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, J.; Perrier, E.; de Marsily, G.

    2001-12-01

    This paper reports the development and test, at the scale of 1 m2, of an event- based model that aims at simulating the influence of a spatial distribution of large circular macropores on surface runoff. The main originality of this model is that it focuses on the way macropores are supplied with water at the soil surface, by coupling an original model for water interception by individual macropores to a high-resolution spatialized overland flow model. A three-step evaluation of the model was carried out, involving (1) an experimental test of the model for water interception by macropores; (2) a sensitivity analysis of the model to time and space discretization; and (3) a comparison between numerical and field results in the case of runoff on a crusted soil surface with a population of large macropores made by termites in the Sahel. The model was found to accurately simulate the effect of a spatial distribution of large macropores on runoff, and it showed that small heterogeneities, like macropores or areas where a crust has been destroyed, which cover a very limited proportion of the soil surface, can have a high impact on runoff.

  14. Interannual variability in the surface energy budget and evaporation over a large southern inland water in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianyu; Liu, Heping

    2013-05-01

    Understanding how the surface energy budget and evaporation over inland waters respond to climate change and variability remains limited. Here we report 2 year measurements of the surface energy budget using the eddy covariance method over Ross Barnett Reservoir, Mississippi, USA, for 2008 and 2009. Annual mean sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat fluxes in 2008 were 9.5%, and 10.0% greater than in 2009, respectively. Most of the interannual variations in the surface energy fluxes and meteorological variables primarily occurred in the cool seasons from October to March, which was enhanced by frequent large wind events associated with cold front passages. These large wind events greatly promoted H and LE exchange and produced H and LE pulses that increased variations in H and LE between these two cool seasons. In the warm seasons from April to September, H and LE pulses were also present, which largely increased variations in LE and dampened those in H between the two warm seasons. The H and LE pulses contributed to approximately 50% of the annual H and 28% of the annual LE, although they only covered about 16% of the entire year. The interannual variations in H and LE pulses contributed to about 78% of the interannual variations in H and 40% of those in LE. Our results imply that the increased interannual variability in cold front activities as a result of climate change would amplify interannual variations in the evaporation and the surface energy exchange over inland waters in this region.

  15. Surface nano-patterning in realizing large-scale ordered arrays of metallic nanoshells with controllable structures and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shikuan; Xu, Feng; Winkler, Nina; Zhao, Huaping; Lei, Yong [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Muenster (Germany); Center for Nanotechnology (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Surface patterns of metallic nanostructure arrays play an important role in many application areas such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors, lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and optical devices. Here we present an innovative surface nano-patterning technique in our group for realizing large-scale ordered arrays of metallic spherical nanoshells with well-defined structures. Silver nanoshell arrays are synthesized using polystyrene sphere templates by an electrophoretic process. The fabricated Ag nanoshell arrays have a high controllability of the structural parameters, including the diameter, the surface roughness, and the inter-shell spacing. And the properties of the synthesized nanoshell arrays can be controlled based on the adjustment of the structural parameters. As an example, tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering and localized surface plasmon resonance of the nanoshell arrays are demonstrated by controlling the structural parameters. The presented surface nano-patterning technique is a general fabrication process in achieving not only metallic nanoshell arrays, but also nanoshell arrays of other materials, such as semiconductors and metallic oxides.

  16. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of mineralization on BSA coated citrate capped gold nanoparticles used as a model surface for membrane scaling in RO wastewater desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdal, Y N; Pipich, V; Rapaport, H; Oren, Y; Kasher, R; Schwahn, D

    2014-12-23

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) coated on citrate capped gold nanoparticles (BSA-GNPs) was exposed to a simulated wastewater effluent (SSE) in order to study the mineralization and thereby mimic scaling at biofouled membranes of reverse osmosis (RO) wastewater desalination plants. RO is a leading technology of achieving freshwater quality as it has the capability of removing both dissolved inorganic salts and organic contaminants from tertiary wastewater effluents. The aim was to better understand one of the major problems facing this technology which is fouling of the membranes, mainly biofouling and scaling by calcium phosphate. The experiments were performed using the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique. The nanoparticles, GNPs, stabilized by the citrate groups showed 30 Å large particles having a homogeneous distribution of gold and citrate with a gold volume fraction of the order of 1%. On the average two BSA monomers are grafted at 2.4 GNPs. The exposed BSA-GNPs to SSE solution led to immediate mineralization of stable composite particles of the order of 0.2 μm diameter and a mineral volume fraction between 50% and 80%. The volume fraction of the mineral was of the order of 10(-5), which is roughly 3 times larger but an order of magnitude smaller than the maximum possible contents of respectively calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate in the SSE solution. Considering the extreme low solubility product of calcium phosphate, we suggest total calcium phosphate and partially (5-10%) calcium carbonate formation in the presence of BSA-GNPs.

  17. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-09-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  18. Future Probes of the Neutron Star Equation of State Using X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    Observations with NASA s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have resulted in the discovery of fast (200 - 600 Hz), coherent X-ray intensity oscillations (hereafter, %urstoscillations ) during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from 12 low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Although many of their detailed properties remain to be fully understood, it is now beyond doubt that these oscillations result from spin modulation of the thermonuclear burst flux from the neutron star surface. Among the new timing phenomena revealed by RXTE the burst oscillations are perhaps the best understood, in the sense that many of their properties can be explained in the framework of this relatively simple model. Because of this, detailed modelling of burst oscillations can be an extremely powerful probe of neutron star structure, and thus the equation of state (EOS) of supra-nuclear density matter. Both the compactness parameter beta = GM/c(sup 2)R, and the surface velocity, nu(sub rot) = Omega(sub spin)R, are encoded in the energy-dependent amplitude and shape of the modulation pulses. The new discoveries have spurred much new theoretical work on thermonuclear burning and propagation on neutron stars, so that in the near future it is not unreasonable to think that detailed physical models of the time dependent flux from burning neutron stars will be available for comparison with the observed pulse profiles from a future, large collecting area X-ray timing observatory. In addition, recent high resolution burst spectroscopy with XMM/Newton suggests the presence of redshifted absorption lines from the neutron star surface during bursts. This leads to the possibility of using large area, high spectral resolution measurements of X-ray bursts as a precise probe of neutron star structure. In this work I will explore the precision with which constraints on neutron star structure, and hence the dense matter EOS, can be made with the implementation of such programs.

  19. Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

  20. Large Optical Nonlinearity of Surface Plasmon Modes on Thin Gold Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Witthaut, Dirk; Kumar, Shailesh

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the optical nonlinear effects of a long-range surface plasmon polariton mode propagating on a thin gold film. These effects may play a key role in the design of future nanophotonic circuits as they allow for the realization of active plasmonic elements. We demonstrate a significant...

  1. Surface water sanitation and biomass production in a large constructed wetland in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Vereijken, P.H.; Visser, de W.; Verhagen, A.; Korevaar, H.; Querner, E.P.; Blaeij, de A.T.; Werf, van der A.K.

    2010-01-01

    In Western-Europe, agricultural practices have contributed to environmental problems such as eutrophication of surface and ground water, flooding, drought and desiccation of surrounding natural habitats. Solutions that reduce the impact of these problems are urgently needed. Common reed (Phragmites

  2. Large area laser surface micro/nanopatterning by contact microsphere lens arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedao, X.; Derrien, T.J.Y.; Romer, G.R.B.E.; Pathiraj, B.; Huis in 't veld, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Laser surface micro/nanopatterning by particle lens arrays is a well-known technique. Enhanced optical fields can be achieved on a substrate when a laser beam passes through a self-assembled monolayer of silica microspheres placed on the substrate. This enhanced optical field is responsible for abla

  3. Large area laser surface micro/nanopatterning by contact microsphere lens arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedao, X.; Derrien, T.J.Y.; Romer, G.R.B.E.; Pathiraj, B.; Huis in 't veld, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Laser surface micro/nanopatterning by particle lens arrays is a well-known technique. Enhanced optical fields can be achieved on a substrate when a laser beam passes through a self-assembled monolayer of silica microspheres placed on the substrate. This enhanced optical field is responsible for

  4. Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, Tonya L.; Smith, Gregory S.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Hamilton, William

    2001-03-01

    We describe an apparatus for measuring the molecular density and orientation of confined, ultrathin complex fluids under static and dynamic flow conditions. The device essentially couples the utility of the surface forces apparatus -- ability to control surface separation and alignment under applied loads -- with in situ structural characterization of the intervening material utilizing neutron reflectivity measurements. The apparatus is designed such that single crystal substrates of quartz or sapphire with areas up to tens of square centimeters can be kept parallel at controlled and well-defined separations from millimeters to less than 100 nm. The large substrate surface area enables direct structural measurements of the density profile of ''soft'' material placed between the aligned substrates. In addition, the cell is also designed to enable steady shear rates from 0.001 to 20 Hz to be applied in order to follow the dynamic structural response of the confined material, especially at the solid-solution interface. Faster shear rates of order 10{sup 4} can be obtained using oscillatory motion. Current design specifications focus on the use of neutron reflectivity to characterize the structure of end-grafted polymer brush layers, but the device can be employed to probe the structure of any complex fluid of interest and is amenable to other characterization techniques.

  5. Results of a Measurement of Solar Neutrons Emitted on March 5, 2012 using a Fiber-type neutron monitor onboard the SEDA-AP attached to the ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Koga, K; Okudaira, O; Goka, T; Obara, T; Masuda, S; Muraki, Y; Shibata, S; Yamamoto, T

    2015-01-01

    The solar neutron detector SEDA-FIB onboard the International Space Station (ISS) has detected several events from the solar direction associated with three large solar flares observed on March 5th (X1.1), 7th (X5.4), and 9th (M6.3) of 2012. In this study, we present the time profiles of those neutrons and discuss the physics that may be related to a possible acceleration scenario for ions over the solar surface. We compare our data with the dynamical pictures of the flares obtained by the ultra-violet telescope of the space-based Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  6. Probing thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keek, L.

    2008-12-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact stars that can be directly observed, which makes them ideal laboratories to study physics at extreme densities. Neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries accrete hydrogen and helium from a lower-mass companion star through Roche lobe overflow. This matter undergoes thermonuclear burning in the neutron star envelope, creating carbon and heavier elements. The fusion process may proceed in an unstable manner, resulting in a thermonuclear runaway. Within one second the entire surface is burned, which is observable as a sharp rise in the emitted X-ray flux: a type I X-ray burst. Afterwards the neutron star surface cools down on a timescale of ten to one hundred seconds. During these bursts the surface of an accreting neutron star can be observed directly, which makes them instrumental for studying this type of stars. We have studied rare kinds of X-ray bursts. One such rare burst is the superburst, which lasts a thousand times longer than an ordinary burst. Superbursts are thought to result from the explosive burning of a thick carbon layer, which lies deeper inside the neutron star, close to a layer known as the crust. A prerequisite for the occurrence of a superburst is a high enough temperature, which is set by the temperature of the crust and the heat conductivity of the envelope. The latter is lowered by the presence of heavy elements that are produced during normal X-ray bursts. Using a large set of observations from the Wide Field Camera's onboard the BeppoSAX satellite, we find that, at high accretion rate, sources which do not exhibit normal bursts likely have a longer superburst recurrence time, than the observed superburst recurrence time of one burster. We analyze in detail the first superburst from a transient source, which went into outburst only 55 days before the superburst. Recent models of the neutron star crust predict that this is too small a time to heat the crust sufficiently for superburst ignition, indicating

  7. Layered magnets: polarized neutron reflection studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel, H.; Schreyer, A. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik/Festkoerperphysik, Bochum (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectivity measurements from extended surfaces, thin films and superlattices provide information on the chemical profile parallel to the film normal, including film thicknesses, average composition and interfacial roughness parameters. Reflectivity measurements with polarized neutrons are particularly powerful for analyzing the magnetic density profiles in thin films and superlattices in addition to chemical profiles. The basic theory of polarized neutron reflectivity is provided, followed by some examples and more recent applications concerning polarized neutron reflectivity studies from exchange coupled Fe/Cr superlattices. (author) 5 figs., 13 refs.

  8. A scanning Auger electron spectrometer for internal surface analysis of Large Electron Positron 2 superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Cosso, R.; Genest, J.; Hauer, M.; Lacarrere, D.; Rijllart, A.; Saban, R. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    A computer-controlled surface analysis instrument, incorporating static Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning Auger mapping, and secondary electron imaging, has been designed and built at CERN to study and characterize the inner surface of superconducting radio-frequency cavities to be installed in the Large Electron Positron collider. A detailed description of the instrument, including the analytical head, the control system, and the vacuum system is presented. Some recent results obtained from the cavities provide examples of the instrument{close_quote}s capabilities. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Detailed documentation of dynamic changes in flow depth and surface velocity during a large flood in a steep mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yuko; Uchida, Taro

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the discharge capacity of channels and changes in hydraulic properties during large storms is essential for prediction of flash floods. However, such information is limited for steep mountain channels because of their complex nature and the lack of measured data. Thus, we obtained detailed water-level and surface-velocity data during large floods of a steep mountain channel, and documented how complex channel morphology affected water flow during large storms. We installed water-level and surface-velocity sensors at a cascade and at a pool that was 10 m downstream at the Aono Research Forest of the Arboricultural Research Institute of the University of Tokyo Forests in Japan. We successfully obtained 1-min interval data for a major storm with total precipitation of 288 mm that fell over 59 h and a maximum rainfall intensity of 25 mm/h. During the storm, height of the water surface from the deepest point of each cross section ranged from 0.35 to 1.57 m and surface velocity ranged from 0.35 to 4.15 m/s. As expected, the changes in flow depth, surface velocity, and velocity profiles were complex and differed even between the cascade and adjacent pool cross sections. Dramatic changes in flow conditions first occurred at the cascade when discharge increased to a certain point, when water suddenly stagnated at the foot of the cascade and submerged flow might have occurred. Thereafter, the water level increased remarkably but surface velocity and the velocity profile stayed almost constant at the cascade cross section. At the downstream pool, where most rocks were submerged at a mean water depth of 0.7 m, surface velocity suddenly increased dramatically and the velocity profile changed as very slow flow developed in the lower portion of the profile, while water levels increased only slightly. When the rainfall diminished, first, the surface velocity markedly declined, then the velocity profile returned to its original state at the pool, and then submerged

  10. Thermalization of monoenergetic neutrons in a concrete room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Mercado, G.A. [UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Iniguez, M.P.; Martin M, A. [Universidad de Valladolid, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The thermalization of neutrons from monoenergetic neutron sources in a concrete room has been studied. During calibration of neutron detectors it is mandatory to make corrections due to neutron scattering produced by the room walls, therefore this factor must be known in advance. The scattered neutrons are thermalized and produce a neutron field that is directly proportional to source strength and inversely proportional to room total wall-surfaces, the proportional coefficient has been calculated for neutrons whose energy goes from 1 eV to 20 MeV. This coefficient was calculated using Monte Carlo methods for 150, 200 and 300 cm-radius spherical cavity, where monoenergetic neutrons were located at the center, along the spherical cavity radius neutron spectra were calculated at several source-to-detector distances inside the cavity. The obtained coefficient is almost three times larger than the factor normally utilized. (Author)

  11. Development of Stokes flow solver against a large contrast in viscosity: toward plate-mantle simulation with free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, M.

    2009-12-01

    We are interested in solving a large-scale plate-mantle simulation enables capture of the large and complex deformation of a subducting plate. In our earlier study (Furuichi, et al 2008), we developed a numerical method toward plate-mantle simulation especially for the highly parallel vector supercomputer system (e.g. Earth Simulator). Our scheme is based on the finite volume method combines (i) the multigrid technique together with ACuTE smoother algorithm (Kameyama et al., 2005), and (ii) the low diffusive CIP-CSLR advection. The validity test of our simulation code by using a fluid rope coiling event (Furuichi, et al 2009) showed that our method enable us to reproduce large non-linear deformation problems of a rigid plate surrounded by soft material without serious quantitative errors. Then as a next step, I am trying to create a Stokes flow solver scalable against a large jump in a viscosity profile, for moving surface (geometrically free boundary) problems. It is for solving the Stokes flow motion under the same condition as real earth. In this presentation, I propose to apply BFBt preconditioner and AMG techniques for the problems of large viscosity contrast and moving free surface boundary condition respectively. I would like to show some numerical experiments for a self-gravitating motion of the layered Stokes flow.

  12. Capture-Gated Fast Neutron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, H. P.; Abdurashitov, J. N.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Gavrin, V. N.; Heimbach, C. R.; Langford, T. J.; Mendenhall, M.; Nico, J. S.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    We present recent developments in fast neutron detection using segmented spectrometers based on the principle of capture-gating. Our approach employs an organic scintillator to detect fast neutrons through their recoil interaction with protons in the scintillator. The neutrons that thermalize and are captured produce a signal indicating that the event was due to a neutron recoil and that the full energy of the neutron was deposited. The delayed neutron capture also serves to discriminate against uncorrelated background events. The segmentation permits reconstruction of the initial neutron energy despite the nonlinear response of the scintillator. We have constructed spectrometers using both He-3 proportional counters and Li-6 doping as capture agents in plastic and liquid organic scintillators. We discuss the operation of the spectrometers for the measurement of low levels of fast neutrons for several applications, including the detection of very low-activity neutron sources and the characterization of the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons at the Earth's surface and in the underground environment.

  13. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  14. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  15. A Fermi surface model for large supersymmetric AdS{sub 5} black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkooz, Micha [Department of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Reichmann, Dori [Department of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Simon, Joan [David Rittenhouse Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    We identify a large family of 1/16 BPS operators in N = 4 SYM that qualitatively reproduce the relations between charge, angular momentum and entropy in regular supersymmetric AdS{sub 5} black holes when the main contribution to their masses is given by their angular momentum.

  16. Mathematical modelling of stability of closing slopes in large-scale surface coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloss, K. (Stavebni Geologie, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1990-05-01

    Describes methods of modelling stability of slopes of the Krusne Hory mountains in North Bohemian brown coal mines using the finite element method and a large IBM computer, with output on a Digigraph plotter. Briefly discusses results for the Merkur, Jansky and Jiretin mines, illustrating their geological profiles with diagrams of finite element networks. 4 refs.

  17. Process variations in surface nano geometries manufacture on large area substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The need of transporting, treating and measuring increasingly smaller biomedical samples has pushed the integration of a far reaching number of nanofeatures over large substrates size in respect to the conventional processes working area windows. Dimensional stability of nano fabrication processes...

  18. The Mystery of the Lonely Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The VLT Reveals Bowshock Nebula around RX J1856.5-3754 Deep inside the Milky Way, an old and lonely neutron star plows its way through interstellar space. Known as RX J1856.5-3754 , it measures only ~ 20 km across. Although it is unusually hot for its age, about 700,000 °C, earlier observations did not reveal any activity at all, contrary to all other neutron stars known so far. In order to better understand this extreme type of object, a detailed study of RX J1856.5-3754 was undertaken by Marten van Kerkwijk (Institute of Astronomy of the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands) and Shri Kulkarni (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA). To the astronomers' delight and surprise, images and spectra obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) now show a small nearby cone-shaped ("bowshock") nebula. It shines in the light from hydrogen atoms and is obviously a product of some kind of interaction with this strange star. Neutron stars - remnants of supernova explosions Neutron stars are among the most extreme objects in the Universe. They are formed when a massive star dies in a "supernova explosion" . During this dramatic event, the core of the star suddenly collapses under its own weight and the outer parts are violently ejected into surrounding space. One of the best known examples is the Crab Nebula in the constellation Taurus (The Bull). It is the gaseous remnant of a star that exploded in the year 1054 and also left behind a pulsar , i.e., a rotating neutron star [1]. A supernova explosion is a very complex event that is still not well understood. Nor is the structure of a neutron star known in any detail. It depends on the extreme properties of matter that has been compressed to incredibly high densities, far beyond the reach of physics experiments on Earth [2]. The ultimate fate of a neutron star is also unclear. From the observed rates of supernova explosions in other galaxies, it appears that several hundred million neutron stars

  19. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  20. Liquid film condensation along a vertical surface in a thin porous medium with large anisotropic permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Sanya, Arthur S O; Akowanou, Christian; Sanya, Emile A; Degan, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The problems of steady film condensation on a vertical surface embedded in a thin porous medium with anisotropic permeability filled with pure saturated vapour are studied analytically by using the Brinkman-Darcy flow model. The principal axes of anisotropic permeability are oriented in a direction that non-coincident with the gravity force. On the basis of the flow permeability tensor due to the anisotropic properties and the Brinkman-Darcy flow model adopted by considering negligible macros...

  1. Liquid film condensation along a vertical surface in a thin porous medium with large anisotropic permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanya, Arthur S O; Akowanou, Christian; Sanya, Emile A; Degan, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The problems of steady film condensation on a vertical surface embedded in a thin porous medium with anisotropic permeability filled with pure saturated vapour are studied analytically by using the Brinkman-Darcy flow model. The principal axes of anisotropic permeability are oriented in a direction that non-coincident with the gravity force. On the basis of the flow permeability tensor due to the anisotropic properties and the Brinkman-Darcy flow model adopted by considering negligible macroscopic and microscopic inertial terms, boundary-layer approximations in the porous liquid film momentum equation is solved analytically. Scale analysis is applied to predict the order-of-magnitudes involved in the boundary layer regime. The first novel contribution in the mathematics consists in the use of the anisotropic permeability tensor inside the expression of the mathematical formulation of the film condensation problem along a vertical surface embedded in a porous medium. The present analytical study reveals that the anisotropic permeability properties have a strong influence on the liquid film thickness, condensate mass flow rate and surface heat transfer rate. The comparison between thin and thick porous media is also presented.

  2. Mobility of large clusters on a semiconductor surface: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Esen; A, T. Tüzemen; M, Ozdemir

    2016-01-01

    The mobility of clusters on a semiconductor surface for various values of cluster size is studied as a function of temperature by kinetic Monte Carlo method. The cluster resides on the surface of a square grid. Kinetic processes such as the diffusion of single particles on the surface, their attachment and detachment to/from clusters, diffusion of particles along cluster edges are considered. The clusters considered in this study consist of 150-6000 atoms per cluster on average. A statistical probability of motion to each direction is assigned to each particle where a particle with four nearest neighbors is assumed to be immobile. The mobility of a cluster is found from the root mean square displacement of the center of mass of the cluster as a function of time. It is found that the diffusion coefficient of clusters goes as D = A(T)Nα where N is the average number of particles in the cluster, A(T) is a temperature-dependent constant and α is a parameter with a value of about -0.64 a value of -0.5. The diffusion coefficient is found to change by one order of magnitude as a function of cluster size.

  3. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, R.; Oliveira, V.; Oliveira, J. C.; Kubart, T.; Vilar, R.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm2. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under different circumstances. Processing of the amorphous films at low fluence (72 μJ) results in LIPSS formation only on localized spots on the film surface. LIPSS formation was also observed on the top of the undulations formed after laser processing with 78 μJ of the amorphous film deposited at 800 °C. Finally, large-area homogeneous LIPSS coverage of the boron carbide crystalline films surface was achieved within a large range

  4. Neutron resonance parameters of dysprosium isotopes using neutron capture yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U.; Cho, M. H. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, W. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M. W.; Kang, Y. R. [Dongnam Inst. Of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dysprosium is used in the field of nuclear reactor system because it has a very large thermal neutron absorption cross-section. The dysprosium alloyed with special stainless steels is attractive for control in nuclear reactor because of the ability to absorb neutrons readily without swelling or contracting over time and its high melting point. Dysprosium is also one of fission products from the thermal fission of {sup 234}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 239}Pu. The fission products are accumulated in the reactor core by the burn-up of the nuclear fuel and the poison effect is increased. Therefore, it is required to understand how Dysprosium as both a poison and an absorbing material in the control rod has an effect on the neutron population in a nuclear reactor system over all energy regions. Neutron Capture experiments on Dy isotopes were performed at the electron linear accelerator (LINAC) facility of the Rensselear Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in the neutron energy region from 10 eV to 1 keV. Resonance parameters were extracted by fitting the neutron capture data using the SAMMY multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code.

  5. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-06-15

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  6. Tips for expert projecting of large-surface solar systems; Tipps fuer die fachgerechte Planung. Grosse Solaranlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlmann, Carsten [Viessmann Werke GmbH, Allendorf (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Solar energy is available for free in unlimited supply. Large-surface solar systems can be installed on high-rise apartment buildings, hospital buildings or hotels where they will help to reduce CO2 emissions, reduce the cost of conventional heating systems, and enhance the value and attractivity of the building for prospective buyers. The contribution outlines the experience gained in many projects and presents information for projecting and installation. (orig.)

  7. Properties of Neutron Star Critical Collapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mew-Bing

    2010-01-01

    Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in observations. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and neutron star phases, understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution and clarify the implication of these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the study of the phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

  8. German neutron scattering conference. Programme and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The German Neutron Scattering Conference 2012 - Deutsche Neutronenstreutagung DN 2012 offers a forum for the presentation and critical discussion of recent results obtained with neutron scattering and complementary techniques. The meeting is organized on behalf of the German Committee for Research with Neutrons - Komitee Forschung mit Neutronen KFN - by the Juelich Centre for Neutron Science JCNS of Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH. In between the large European and international neutron scattering conferences ECNS (2011 in Prague) and ICNS (2013 in Edinburgh), it offers the vibrant German and international neutron community an opportunity to debate topical issues in a stimulating atmosphere. Originating from ''BMBF Verbundtreffen'' - meetings for projects funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research - this conference series has a strong tradition of providing a forum for the discussion of collaborative research projects and future developments in the field of research with neutrons in general. Neutron scattering, by its very nature, is used as a powerful probe in many different disciplines and areas, from particle and condensed matter physics through to chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering sciences, right up to geology and cultural heritage; the German Neutron Scattering Conference thus provides a unique chance for exploring interdisciplinary research opportunities. It also serves as a showcase for recent method and instrument developments and to inform users of new advances at neutron facilities.

  9. Bio-replicated forming of the biomimetic drag-reducing surfaces in large area based on shark skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xin; ZHANG DeYuan; LI Xiang; LI YuanYue

    2008-01-01

    On the investigation of biomimetic drag-reducing surface, direct replication of the firm scarfskins on low-resistance creatures to form biomimetic drag-reducing surfaces with relatively vivid morphology relative to the living prototype is a new attempt of the bio-replicated forming technology. Taking shark skin as the bio-replication template, the hot embossing method was applied to the micro-replication of its outward morphology. Furthermore, the skins were jointed together to form the drag-reducing sur-face in large area. The results of the resistance measurements in a water tunnel according to the flat-plate sample pieces have shown that the biomimetic shark-skin coating fabricated by the bio-replicated forming method has significant drag reduction effect, and that the drag reduction effi-ciency reached 8.25% in the test conditions.

  10. The concentration of the large-scale solar magnetic field by a meridional surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, C. R.; Boris, J. P.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the magnetic flux transport equation in the absence of new bipolar sources of flux are calculated for several meridional flow profiles and a range of peak flow speeds. It is found that a poleward flow with a broad profile and a nominal 10 m/s maximum speed concentrates the large-scale field into very small caps of less than 15 deg half-angle, with average field strengths of several tens of gauss, contrary to observations. A flow which reaches its peak speed at a relatively low latitude and then decreases rapidly to zero at higher latitudes leads to a large-scale field pattern which is consistent with observations. For such a flow, only lower latitude sunspot groups can contribute to interhemispheric flux annihilation and the resulting decay and reversal of the polar magnetic fields.

  11. Turbulent Flow and Large Surface Wave Events in the Marine Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Belcher, S. E., A. A. L. M. Grant, K. E. Hanley, B. Fox- Kemper , L. Van Roekel, P. P. Sullivan, W. G. Large, A. Brown, A. Hines, D. Calvert, A...Meteorological Society, [in press]. Van Roekel, L. P., B. Fox- Kemper , P. P. Sullivan, P. E. Hamlington, & S. R. Haney, 2012: The form and orientation of...Fox- Kemper , B., P. E. Hamlington, L. Van Roekel & P.P. Sullivan, 2012: Parameterization of submesoscale and Langmuir-scale processes and

  12. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  13. Surface passivity largely governs the bioaccessibility of nickel-based powder particles at human exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Herting, Gunilla; Latvala, Siiri; Elihn, Karine; Karlsson, Hanna L; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-11-01

    The European chemical framework REACH requires that hazards and risks posed by chemicals, including alloys and metals, are identified and proven safe for humans and the environment. Therefore, differences in bioaccessibility in terms of released metals in synthetic biological fluids (different pH (1.5-7.4) and composition) that are relevant for different human exposure routes (inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact) have been assessed for powder particles of an alloy containing high levels of nickel (Inconel 718, 57 wt% nickel). This powder is compared with the bioaccessibility of two nickel-containing stainless steel powders (AISI 316L, 10-12% nickel) and with powders representing their main pure alloy constituents: two nickel metal powders (100% nickel), two iron metal powders and two chromium metal powders. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, microscopy, light scattering, and nitrogen absorption were employed for the particle and surface oxide characterization. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to quantify released amounts of metals in solution. Cytotoxicity (Alamar blue assay) and DNA damage (comet assay) of the Inconel powder were assessed following exposure of the human lung cell line A549, as well as its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (DCFH-DA assay). Despite its high nickel content, the Inconel alloy powder did not release any significant amounts of metals and did not induce any toxic response. It is concluded, that this is related to the high surface passivity of the Inconel powder governed by its chromium-rich surface oxide. Read-across from the pure metal constituents is hence not recommended either for this or any other passive alloy.

  14. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James, Jr.; Christl, Mark; Norwood, Joseph; Watts, John

    2014-01-01

    Develop a compact low-power neutron spectrometer that uniquely identifies neutrons in the mixed radiation field expected on crewed deep-space missions. Secondary neutrons are generated by cosmic rays striking heavy crewed spacecraft as well as lunar and planetary surfaces1,2. It has been shown that secondary neutrons can account for up to 50% if the total dose-equivalent received by the crew.

  15. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography for Geotechnical Monitoring Using "Large N" Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Lindsey, N.; Martin, E. R.; Wagner, A. M.; Robertson, M.; Bjella, K.; Gelvin, A.; Ulrich, C.; Wu, Y.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.; Dou, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface wave tomography using ambient noise sources has found broad application at the regional scale but has not been adopted fully for geotechnical applications despite the abundance of noise sources in this context. The recent development of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) provides a clear path for inexpensively recording high spatial resolution (survey as well as direct-push data on ice content. We also compare vintages of ambient noise DAS data to evaluate the short-term repeatability of the technique in the face of changing noise environments. The resulting dataset demonstrates the utility of using DAS for real-time shear-modulus monitoring in support of critical infrastructure.

  16. High-Accuracy Near-Surface Large-Eddy Simulation with Planar Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    humidity. Error in humidity predictions will likely enter cloud cover predictions and produce error in solar radiative heating at the earth’s surface...are density and viscosity, and the angle brackets denote ensemble averaging. Integrating Eq. (2) in z and replacing ( )T z with * ( )m u z z...ReLES parameter space;  and ReLES progressively increase in each panel from left to right. Top panel : LES with 96zN  . Bottom panel : LES with

  17. Mathematical model for biomolecular quantification using large-area surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palla, Mirkó; Bosco, Filippo; Yang, Jaeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on nanostructured platforms is a promising technique for quantitative and highly sensitive detection of biomolecules in the field of analytical biochemistry. Here, we report a mathematical model to predict experimental SERS signal (or hotspot...... in the picomolar concentration regimes. This developed model may be generally used for biomolecular quantification using Raman mapping on SERS substrates with planar geometries, in which the hotspots are approximated as electromagnetic enhancement fields generated by closely spaced dimers. Lastly, we also show...

  18. Cosmic-Ray Neutron Probe: Non-Invasive Measurement of Soil Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreda, M.; Desilets, D.; Ferre, T. P.

    2005-12-01

    Water content measurement methods have been designed primarily for either highly accurate, small scale applications (time domain reflectometry, neutron probe) or for rapid estimation over very large areas (satellite imagery), but no established technique exists for the scale intermediate to point measurement and satellite images. We are developing a novel technique for soil water determination that operates on the horizontal scale of dekameters. This scale of operation makes the method an appealing tool for both direct measurement at relevant scales and for calibration of satellite remote sensors. The method is based on the same principle that underlies conventional neutron probes: thermalization of neutrons by hydrogen atoms. The standard neutron probe works by emitting fast neutrons from a source in the instrument, and measuring the flux of neutrons that are scattered back. Our new probe uses a similar detector, but has cosmic-ray neutrons as a source. Results from a series of laboratory and field experiments show that our cosmic-ray probe is capable of measuring changes of water content resulting from irrigation or infiltration after a storm event. Our sensitivity experiments indicate that that 1% change in volumetric water content corresponds to approximately 1% change in neutron flux. Neutron intensities are sensitive to water in the upper 10-50 cm of soil and over a footprint of 10-100 m in diameter. Both the depth and the footprint decrease with increasing soil water content. Coupling neutron detectors with various shielding materials (we used cadmium and polyethylene) changes the energy sensitivity of the instrument, and thereby also the sensitivity to water content. The maximum sensitivity of the instrument to water (or hydrogen) content is achieved by placing the instrument about 20 cm below the surface or about 100-200 m above the surface (in a balloon or an aircraft). Our new method has several useful features: it is non-invasive and non

  19. Neutron Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, William Riley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Neutron imaging is an incredibly powerful tool for non-destructive sample characterization and materials science. Neutron tomography is one technique that results in a three-dimensional model of the sample, representing the interaction of the neutrons with the sample. This relies both on reliable data acquisition and on image processing after acquisition. Over the course of the project, the focus has changed from the former to the latter, culminating in a large-scale reconstruction of a meter-long fossilized skull. The full reconstruction is not yet complete, though tools have been developed to improve the speed and accuracy of the reconstruction. This project helps to improve the capabilities of LANSCE and LANL with regards to imaging large or unwieldy objects.

  20. Large surface radiative forcing from topographic blowing snow residuals measured in the High Arctic at Eureka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lesins

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ice crystals, also known as diamond dust, are suspended in the boundary layer air under clear sky conditions during most of the Arctic winter in Northern Canada. Occasionally ice crystal events can produce significantly thick layers with optical depths in excess of 2.0 even in the absence of liquid water clouds. Four case studies of high optical depth ice crystal events at Eureka in the Nunavut Territory of Canada during the winter of 2006/07 are presented. They show that the measured ice crystal surface infrared downward radiative forcing ranged from 8 to 36 W m−2 in the wavelength band from 5.6 to 20 μm for 532 nm optical depths ranging from 0.2 to 1.7. MODIS infrared and visible images and the operational radiosonde wind profile were used to show that these high optical depth events were caused by surface snow being blown off 600 to 800 m high mountain ridges about 20 to 30 km North-West of Eureka and advected by the winds towards Eureka as they settled towards the ground within the highly stable boundary layer. This work presents the first study that demonstrates the important role that surrounding topography plays in determining the occurrence of high optical depth ice crystal events from residual blowing snow that becomes a source of boundary layer ice crystals distinct from the classical diamond dust phenomenon.

  1. Large-aperture ground glass surface profile measurement using coherence scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eundeok; Kim, Yunseok; Park, Sanguk; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2017-01-23

    We present a coherence scanning interferometer configured to deal with rough glass surfaces exhibiting very low reflectance due to severe sub-surface light scattering. A compound light source is prepared by combining a superluminescent light-emitting diode with an ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier. The light source is attuned to offer a short temporal coherence length of 15 μm but with high spatial coherence to secure an adequate correlogram contrast by delivering strongly unbalanced optical power to the low reflectance target. In addition, the infrared spectral range of the light source is shifted close to the visible side at a 1,038 nm center wavelength, so a digital camera of multi-mega pixels available for industrial machine vision can be used to improve the correlogram contrast further with better lateral image resolutions. Experimental results obtained from a ground Zerodur mirror of 200 mm aperture size and 0.9 μm rms roughness are discussed to validate the proposed interferometer system.

  2. Plasma Processing of Large Surfaces with Application to SRF Cavity Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposova; Im, Do; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H

    2013-09-01

    Plasma based surface modifications of SRF cavities present promising alternatives to the wet etching technology currently applied. To understand and characterize the plasma properties and chemical kinetics of plasma etching processes inside a single cell cavity, we have built a specially-designed cylindrical cavity with 8 observation ports. These ports can be used for holding niobium samples and diagnostic purposes simultaneously. Two frequencies (13.56 MHz and 2.45 GHz) of power source are used for different pressure, power and gas compositions. The plasma parameters were evaluated by a Langmuir probe and by an optical emission spectroscopy technique based on the relative intensity of two Ar 5p-4s lines at 419.8 and 420.07 nm. Argon 5p-4s transition is chosen to determine electron temperature in order to optimize parameters for plasma processing. Chemical kinetics of the process was observed using real-time mass spectroscopy. The effect of these parameters on niobium surface would be measured, presented at this conference, and used as guidelines for optimal design of SRF etching process.

  3. A system of materials composition and geometry arrangement for fast neutron beam thermalization: An MCNP study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlář, Radim; Alexa, Petr; Pištora, Jaromír

    2013-03-01

    Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generators emit fast neutrons (14.2 MeV) that have to be thermalized for neutron activation analysis experiments. To maximize thermal neutron flux and minimize epithermal and fast neutron fluxes across the output surface of the neutron generator facility, Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) for different moderator types and widths and collimator and reflector designs have been performed. A thin lead layer close to the neutron generator as neutron multiplier followed by polyethylene moderator and surrounded by a massive lead and nickel collimator and reflector was obtained as the optimum setup.

  4. Surface modified MXene Ti3C2 multilayers by aryl diazonium salts leading to large-scale delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbing; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Huajie; Li, Gaiye; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhuyin

    2016-10-01

    Herein we report a simple and facile method to delaminate MXene Ti3C2 multilayers by the assistance of surface modification using aryl diazonium salts. The basic strategy involved the preparation of layered MAX Ti3AlC2 and the exfoliation of Ti3AlC2 into Ti3C2 multilayers, followed by Na+ intercalation and surface modification using sulfanilic acid diazonium salts. The resulting chemically grafted Ti3C2 flakes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the presence of the surface organic species. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy revealed that surface-modified MXene Ti3C2 sheets disperse well in water and the solutions obey Lambert-Beer's law. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to demonstrate the morphology and structure of delaminating MXene Ti3C2 flakes. The results indicated that chemical modification for MXene multilayers by aryl diazonium salts induced swelling that conversely weakened the bonds between MX layers, hence leading to large-scale delamination of multilayered MXene Ti3C2via mild sonication. Advantages of the present approach rely not only on the simplicity and efficiency of the delamination procedure but also on the grafting of aryl groups to MXene surfaces, highly suitable for further applications of the newly discovered two-dimensional materials.

  5. Microporous La-metal-organic framework (MOF) with large surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Souvik; Bhunia, Asamanjoy; Jana, Partha P; Dey, Subarna; Möllmer, Jens; Janiak, Christoph; Nayek, Hari Pada

    2015-02-09

    A microporous La-metal-organic framework (MOF) has been synthesized by the reaction of La(NO3 )3 ⋅6 H2 O with a ligand 4,4',4''-s-triazine-1,3,5-triyltri-p-aminobenzoate (TATAB) featuring three carboxylate groups. Crystal structure analysis confirms the formation of 3D MOF with hexagonal micropores, a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 1074 m(2)  g(-1) and high thermal and chemical stability. The CO2 adsorption capacities are 76.8 cm(3)  g(-1) at 273 K and 34.6 cm(3)  g(-1) at 293 K, a highest measured CO2 uptake for a Ln-MOFs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, S.A. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  7. Solar neutron decay proton observations in cycle 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Paul; Kroeger, Richard; Meyer, Peter; Reames, Donald

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of the protons resulting from the decay of solar flare neutrons gives unique information on the spectrum of neutrons from 5 to 200 MeV. Neutrons from three flares have been observed in this manner during solar cycle 21. The use of the decay protons to determine neutron energy spectra is reviewed, and new and definitive energy spectra are presented for the two large flares on June 3, 1982 and April 25, 1984.

  8. Femtosecond laser fabrication of large-area periodic surface ripple structure on Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, L. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, X.C., E-mail: xcwang@SIMTech.a-star.edu.sg [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Zheng, H.Y. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Wang, H. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Yu, H.Y. [South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of a large area uniformly distributed periodic nano-ripple structure on silicon substrate through the proper scanning of a line-shaped femtosecond laser beam. The fabricated nano-ripple structure has a periodicity of ∼600 nm and a ripple depth of ∼300 nm. The modulation depth is much deeper than the one previously reported. The developed structure is demonstrated to be able to substantially reduce light reflection due to the effective optical coupling between the incident sunlight with the nano-ripple structure and exhibit an absorption enhancement of ∼41% compared with planar silicon wafer. The physics underlying the formation of the nano-ripple structure is also discussed.

  9. Electromagnetic Delineation and Confirmation of Areas of Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction in a Large River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, J.; Dawe, M. R.; Butler, K. E.; Macquarrie, K. T.

    2004-05-01

    Riverbank filtration systems are typically located in heterogeneous alluvial river valley deposits. Delineation of riverbed areas where there is downward river water infiltration is important for determining the fluxes, quality, and travel time of water supplied to production wells. Efficient methods of delineation are especially required in large rivers that may also have relatively large water depths. A portion of the City of Fredericton well field recharge zone lies beneath the adjacent Saint John River, where a discontinuity in the clay/silt aquitard may allow hydraulic connection between the esker-like aquifer and the river. In this project we have investigated the potential for using electromagnetic methods to delineate zones of low electrical conductivity. Such zones, in a fresh water environment, suggest the absence of clay/silt materials. During the summers of 2001 and 2002, a total of 120 km of electromagnetic data were acquired using the Geonics EM31 and EM34 ground conductivity meters. The survey was carried out using an outboard-motor-powered canoe and raft with onboard DGPS system. Both electromagnetic instruments were operated in the vertical dipole mode, thereby providing maximum depths of exploration of approximately 30 meters. The water depths in the survey area fall in the range where the EM31 and EM34 results are very sensitive to the conductivity structure. We applied a novel bathymetry correction approach to compensate for water depth effects. Contouring of the apparent conductivity data revealed a conductivity low with an approximate area of 6 hectares. The absence of the clay/silt aquitard was confirmed by high resolution seismic profiling and drilling and sampling of riverbed sediments. Further confirmation of river water infiltration has been provided by hydraulic data from mini-piezometers and temperature time series collected beneath the riverbed. Apparent conductivity mapping proved to be a sensitive and efficient method for delineating

  10. Forecasting surface-layer atmospheric parameters at the Large Binocular Telescope site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Alessio; Masciadri, Elena; Fini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we quantify the performance of an automated weather forecast system implemented on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site at Mt Graham (Arizona) in forecasting the main atmospheric parameters close to the ground. The system employs a mesoscale non-hydrostatic numerical model (Meso-Nh). To validate the model, we compare the forecasts of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and relative humidity close to the ground with the respective values measured by instrumentation installed on the telescope dome. The study is performed over a large sample of nights uniformly distributed over 2 yr. The quantitative analysis is done using classical statistical operators [bias, root-mean-square error (RMSE) and σ] and contingency tables, which allows us to extract complementary key information, such as the percentage of correct detections (PC) and the probability of obtaining a correct detection within a defined interval of values (POD). The results of our study indicate that the model performance in forecasting the atmospheric parameters we have just cited are very good, in some cases excellent: RMSE for temperature is below 1°C, for relative humidity it is 14 per cent and for the wind speed it is around 2.5 m s-1. The relative error of the RMSE for wind direction varies from 9 to 17 per cent depending on the wind speed conditions. This work is performed in the context of the ALTA (Advanced LBT Turbulence and Atmosphere) Center project, whose final goal is to provide forecasts of all the atmospheric parameters and the optical turbulence to support LBT observations, adaptive optics facilities and interferometric facilities.

  11. Sky surface brightness at Mount Graham II. First JHKs science observations with the Large Binocular Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedani, M.

    2014-04-01

    We studied the near-infrared sky-brightness at J, H and Ks-bands as derived from the data taken during the first year and a half of routine science operations of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). This is the first comprehensive study of the near-infrared night sky-brightness ever conducted at the Mount Graham International Observatory (MGIO), based on a large dataset comprising 4699 near-infrared images taken in 52 nights. We analyzed the dependency of the near-infrared night sky-brightness with the airmass, the season and the moon phase and distance. The average night sky-brightnesses (dispersion) in the J, H and Ks bands scaled to the zenith is 15.82 mag/arcsec2 (0.21), 14.29 mag/arcsec2 (0.26) and 13.42 mag/arcsec2 (0.32) respectively. Those values were derived for the first time at this observatory. At the J-band we found a tendency of the sky background to get darker by ˜0.35 mag at the end of the night with respect to the evening twilight. Also in the J-band we found that the sky background can be up to ˜0.11 mag brighter when observing at 10° distance from the full moon. A correlation was also found between the night sky-brightness in the Ks-band and the air temperature with a gradient of -0.06 mag per 1°C of temperature increase. If we compare the average sky brightness of the major observing sites we find that, at J-band, Mt. Graham is quite similar to the major sites but it quickly becomes the second darkest place at the H-band and definitely the darkest observing site at the Ks-band together with Mauna Kea.

  12. Neutron spectroscopy with the Spherical Proportional Counter based on nitrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougamont, E.; Dastgheibi, A.; Derre, J.; Galan, J.; Gerbier, G.; Giomataris, I.; Gros, M.; Katsioulas, I.; Jourde, D.; Magnier, P.; Navick, X. F.; Papaevangelou, T.; Savvidis, I.; Tsiledakis, G.

    2017-03-01

    A novel large volume spherical proportional counter, recently developed, is used for neutron measurements. The pure N2 gas is studied for thermal and fast neutron detection, providing a new way for neutron spectroscopy. The neutrons are detected via the 14N (n , p)C14 and 14N (n , α)B11 reactions. The detector is tested for thermal and fast neutrons detection with 252Cf and 241Am -9Be neutron sources. The atmospheric neutrons are successfully measured from thermal up to several MeV, well separated from the cosmic ray background. A comparison of the spherical proportional counter with the current available neutron counters is also presented.

  13. Improved safety fast reactor with “reservoir” for delayed neutrons generating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Apse, V. A.; Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the possibility to improve safety of fast reactors by using weak neutron absorber with large atomic weight as a material for external neutron reflector and for internal cavity in the reactor core (the neutron “reservoir”) where generation of some additional “delayed” neutron takes place. The effects produced by the external neutron reflector and the internal neutron “reservoir” on kinetic behavior of fast reactors are inter-compared. It is demonstrated that neutron kinetics of fast reactors with such external and internal zones becomes the quieter as compared with neutron kinetics of thermal reactors.

  14. Neutron-based sterilization of anthrax contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Qingfei

    2006-05-01

    With the anthrax threat becoming a reality, it is very important to have an effective way to sterilize areas contaminated by anthrax. Anthrax spores are the dormant form of the anthrax bacteria. They can germinate in tissues, producing new bacteria that release lethal toxins. Neutrons can be a powerful tool in our defense against anthrax contamination. Neutrons are elementary particles that have no charge, which allows them to be very penetrating, killing the anthrax spores on the surface and inside the containers. So neutrons have an advantage over other forms of radiation if deep penetration is required to kill biological organisms. A Cf neutron source allows for a low cost method of decontamination. It emits most neutrons in the 100 keV to 2 MeV energy regions, and a neutron in this energy region is 20 times more deadly than electrons or gamma rays in killing anthrax spores. If we just consider the first neutron collision with anthrax spores and that all the anthrax spores will not survive at the dose level above 2.0 x 10 Gy, our calculations show that a 0.5-g Cf neutron source within 20 min can generate 1.11 x 10 m fluence neutrons, which is good enough to kill the anthrax spores on the sample. An experimental confirmation of the above results may prove that to achieve 1.11 x 10 m fluence neutrons on the anthrax spore sample, the neutron irradiation time may be reduced dramatically or the Cf neutron source reduced to 0.1 g level or even less. The aim of this paper is to evaluate a feasible way to sterilize the anthrax contamination by using a Cf neutron source. Presently, we are mainly concentrating on the theoretical estimation of neutron fluence to see if the Cf neutron source can deliver enough neutron irradiation dose to kill the anthrax spores. Our future work will focus on experimental confirmation and Monte Carlo simulation by using Geant4 or MCNP codes. At that time, we will consider the effects of the real experimental setup, the shielding materials

  15. Surface stress and large-scale self-organization at organic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollinger, Florian

    2009-01-22

    The role of elastic interactions, particularly for the self-organized formation of periodically faceted interfaces, was investigated in this thesis for archetype organic-metal interfaces. The cantilever bending technique was applied to study the change of surface stress upon formation of the interface between 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and Ag(111). The main focus of this work was on the investigation of the formation of the long-range ordered, self-organized faceted PTCDA/Ag(10 8 7) interface. Reciprocal space maps of this interface were recorded both by spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) in selected area LEED mode. Complementary to the reciprocal data, also microscopic real-space LEEM data were used to characterize the morphology of this interface. Six different facet faces ((111), (532), (743), (954), (13 9 5), and (542)) were observed for the preparation path of molecular adsorption on the substrate kept at 550 K. Facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM localized these facets to grow in homogeneous areas of microscopic extensions. The temperature-dependence of the interface formation was studied in a range between 418 K and 612 K in order to learn more about the kinetics of the process. Additional steeper facets of 27 inclination with respect to the (111) surface were observed in the low temperature regime. Furthermore, using facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM, spatial and size distributions of specific facets were studied for the different temperatures. Moreover, the facet dimensions were statistically analyzed. The total island size of the facets follows an exponential distribution, indicating a random growth mode in absence of any mutual facet interactions. While the length distribution of the facets also follows an exponential distribution, the width distribution is peaked, reflecting the high degree of lateral order. This anisotropy is temperature-dependent and occurs

  16. Light curves from rapidly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Numata, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate light curves produced by a hot spot of a rapidly rotating neutron star, assuming that the spot is perturbed by a core $r$-mode, which is destabilized by emitting gravitational waves. To calculate light curves, we take account of relativistic effects such as the Doppler boost due to the rapid rotation and light bending assuming the Schwarzschild metric around the neutron star. We assume that the core $r$-modes penetrate to the surface fluid ocean to have sufficiently large amplitudes to disturb the spot. For a $l'=m$ core $r$-mode, the oscillation frequency $\\omega\\approx2m\\Omega/[l'(l'+1)]$ defined in the co-rotating frame of the star will be detected by a distant observer, where $l'$ and $m$ are respectively the spherical harmonic degree and the azimuthal wave number of the mode, and $\\Omega$ is the spin frequency of the star. In a linear theory of oscillation, using a parameter $A$ we parametrize the mode amplitudes such that ${\\rm max}\\left(|\\xi_\\theta|,|\\xi_\\phi|\\right)/R=A$ at the surface, w...

  17. The Role of Large-Coherent-Eddy Transport in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Based on CASES-99 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald H.; LeMone, Margaret A.; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of momentum and heat fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment is extended throughout the diurnal cycle following the investigation of nighttime turbulence by Sun et al. (J Atmos Sci 69:338-351, 2012). Based on the observations, limitations of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) are examined in detail. The analysis suggests that strong turbulent mixing is dominated by relatively large coherent eddies that are not related to local vertical gradients as assumed in MOST. The HOckey-Stick Transition (HOST) hypothesis is developed to explain the generation of observed large coherent eddies over a finite depth and the contribution of these eddies to vertical variations of turbulence intensity and atmospheric stratification throughout the diurnal cycle. The HOST hypothesis emphasizes the connection between dominant turbulent eddies and turbulence generation scales, and the coupling between the turbulence kinetic energy and the turbulence potential energy within the turbulence generation layer in determining turbulence intensity. For turbulence generation directly influenced by the surface, the HOST hypothesis recognizes the role of the surface both in the vertical variation of momentum and heat fluxes and its boundary effect on the size of the dominant turbulence eddies.

  18. Surface river plume in a large lake under wind forcing: Observations and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Natalia; He, Cheng; Rao, Yerubandi R.; Valipour, Reza

    2017-10-01

    Observations of a small riverine plume (Grand River, ON) in the nearshore zones of Lake Erie were analyzed to describe its spatial variability and its thickness under different wind forcing conditions during late spring of 2012. Observational results reveal a well-marked frontal region in the vicinity of the river mouth, causing the plume to discharge into the lake in the surface layers (positive buoyant). Wind driven alongshore currents at the mid-depth had speeds of 2-9 cm/s, in comparison to those in the cross-shore 3-6 cm/s, which transported the plume along the shore during the measurement period. Series of laboratory experiments were conducted to obtain the propagation speed (U) of the buoyant plume in terms of buoyancy anomaly (Ba), Richardson number (Ri), dimensionless time (t‧), and aspect ratio (A). Based on our experiments, we developed two non-dimensional relationships describing the speed of propagation (U) as U/Ba1/2 = 8 Ri-1/2t‧1/3A and the plume thickness (h) as h/H = 0.8 Ri-1/4t‧1/2A in the water depth (H), which are in agreement with field observations.

  19. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Hector O; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range $1.0-1.1~M_\\odot$, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass $M/M_{\\odot} = 1.174 \\pm 0.004$ by Martinez et al [Astrophys.J. 812, 143 (2015)] in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al [PTEP 2014, 051E01 (2014)] recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of nonrotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter $\\eta\\equiv (K_0 L^2)^{1/3}$, where $K_0$ is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and $L$ is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotationa...

  20. From the similarities between neutrons and radon to advanced radon-detection and improved cold fusion neutron-measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, L.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Neutrons and radon are both ubiquitous in the earth's crust. The neutrons of terrestrial origin are strongly related to radon since they originate mainly from the interactions between the alpha particles from the decays of radioactive-gas (namely Radon and Thoron) and the light nuclei. Since the early studies in the field of neutrons, the radon gas was used to produce neutrons by (α, n) reactions in beryllium. Another important similarity between radon and neutrons is that they can be detected only through the radiations produced respectively by decays or by nuclear reactions. These charged particles from the two distinct nuclear processes are often the same (namely alpha-particles). A typical neutron detector is based on a radiator facing a alpha-particle detector, such as in the case of a neutron film badge. Based on the similarity between neutrons and radon, a film badge for radon has been recently proposed. The radon film badge, in addition to be similar, may be even identical to the neutron film badge. For these reasons, neutron measurements can be easily affected by the presence of unpredictable large radon concentration. In several cold fusion experiments, the CR-39 plastic films (typically used in radon and neutron film-badges), have been the detectors of choice for measuring neutrons. In this paper, attempts will be made to prove that most of these neutron-measurements might have been affected by the presence of large radon concentrations.