WorldWideScience

Sample records for large linear colliders

  1. The International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barish, Barry

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe the key features of the recently completed technical design for the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 200-500 GeV linear electron-positron collider (expandable to 1 TeV) that is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) technology. The machine parameters and detector characteristics have been chosen to complement the Large Hadron Collider physics, including the discovery of the Higgs boson, and to further exploit this new particle physics energy frontier with a precision instrument. The linear collider design is the result of nearly twenty years of R&D, resulting in a mature conceptual design for the ILC project that reflects an international consensus. We summarize the physics goals and capability of the ILC, the enabling R&D and resulting accelerator design, as well as the concepts for two complementary detectors. The ILC is technically ready to be proposed and built as a next generation lepton collider, perhaps to be built in stages beginning as a Hig...

  2. Detector for a linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mnich, J

    2003-01-01

    The proposals under discussion for a new e^{+}e^{-} linear collider with centre-of-mass energies around 1 TeV include designs for large detectors with unprecedented performances in energy, momentum and position resolution. These very stringent requirements are dictated by the precision measurements aimed at this collider to complement the exploratory experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Here a status report on detector R&D projects for the liner collider is given focused on the technologies under study for the vertex detector, the large tracking chamber and the calorimeters.

  3. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  4. Associated Productions of HZZ and HHZ at Linear Colliders in Large Extra Dimension Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of the large extra dimensions on the two processes e+ e → H0 Z0 Z0 and e+e- → H0H0Z0 at linear colliders in both unpolarized and polarized collision modes. We find that the virtual Kaluza-Klein graviton exchange can significantly enhance the cross section from their standard model expectations for these two processes. The results show that the LED effect on the process e+ e- → H0 Z0 Z0 allows the observation limits on the effective scale Ms to be probed up to 9.75 TeVand 10.1 TeV in the unpolarized and +-(λe+ = 1/2, λe- = -1/2) polarized beam collision modes (with Pe+ = 0.6, Pe- = 0.8), respectively. For the process e+ e- → H0 H0 Z0, these limits on Ms can be probed up to 6.06 TeV and 6.38 TeV in the unpolarized and polarized collision modes separately. We find that the λe+ = 1/2, λe- = -1/2 polarization collision mode in both process e+e- → H0Z0Z0 and e+e- → H0H0Z0 may provide a possibility to improve the sensitivity in probing the LED effects.

  5. Linear collider development at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.

    1993-08-01

    Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

  6. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  7. Whither colliders after the Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rolf-Dieter Heuer

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy as well as upgrades to the LHC (luminosity and energy) and to its injectors. This may be complemented by a linear electron–positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and by the International Linear Collider, by a high-energy electron– proton machine, the LHeC, and/or by a muon collider. This contribution describes the various future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining the key messages for the way forward.

  8. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  9. [New technology for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  10. Challenges in future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2002-01-01

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e/sup -/e /sup +/ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e/sup -/e/sup + / linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the "Future Linear Collider " (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomi...

  11. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Clendenin, J E; Garwin, E L; Kirby, R E; Luh, D A; Maruyama, T; Prescott, C Y; Sheppard, J C; Turner, J; Prepost, R

    2005-01-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  12. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  13. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  14. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  15. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  16. Exotic leptons at future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Biondini, S

    2014-01-01

    Doubly charged excited leptons determine a possible signature for physics beyond the standard model at the present Large Hadron Collider. These exotic states are introduced in extended isospin multiplets and they can be treated either within gauge or contact effective interactions or a mixture of those. In this paper we study the production and the corresponding signatures of doubly charged leptons at the forthcoming linear colliders and we focus on the electron-electron beam setting. In the framework of gauge interactions, the interference between the $t$ and $u$ channel is evaluated that has been neglected so far. A pure leptonic final state is considered ($e^{-} \\, e^{-} \\rightarrow e^{-} \\, e^{-} \\, \

  17. Precision Physics at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuer, R.-D. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg University, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Despite the great success of the Standard Model, many key questions in particle physics and cosmology are unanswered today. Together with the Large Hadron Collider LHC, starting in 2007, the International Linear Collider ILC as the next project planned at the high energy frontier, will play a crucial role in tackling many of these most exciting questions. The high precision achievable with experiments at the ILC will be indispensable in order to reach definite conclusions about many features of new physics expected at the TeV scale. This contribution presents prominent physics examples and describes detector challenges and the project status.

  18. Radiative corrections for the LHC and linear collider era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Laenen; D. Wackeroth

    2009-01-01

    We emphasize the importance of including radiative corrections when extracting physics from colliders such as the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and a future linear collider (LC). We review both well-tested methods and recent advances for calculating these corr

  19. Track distortion in the Large prototype of a Time Projection Chamber for the International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar Bhattacharya, Deb; Bhattacharya, Purba; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Majumdar, Nayana; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Sarkar, Sandip; Colas, Paul; Attie, David; Ganjour, Serguei; Bhattacharya, Aparajita

    2016-10-01

    A Micromegas (MM) based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) can meet the ILC requirements of continuous 3-D tracking, excellent spatial resolution and efficient pattern recognition. Seven MM modules which are commissioned on the end-plate of a Large Prototype TPC (LPTPC) at DESY, have been tested with a 5 GeV electron beam, under a 1 T magnetic field. Due to the grounded peripheral frame of the MM modules, at short drift, the electric field near the detector edge remain no longer parallel to the TPC axis. This causes signal loss along the boundaries of the MM modules as well as distortion in the reconstructed track. In presence of magnetic field, the distorted electric field introduces E×B effect. A detailed numerical study has been accomplished to understand the features of this distortion. Four Micromegas modules have been simulated resembling the experimental setup. The field lines, drift line of electrons considering diffusion in gas, nature of track distortion, residuals are numerically calculated in presence and in absence of magnetic field. The E×B effect has been simulated as well. Simulated results follow the experimental observations.

  20. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2010-01-01

    "New physics from the Large Hadron Collider can best be explored with a large lepton collider; realizing one will require mobilizing accelerator and particle physicists, funding agencies, and politicians" (3 pages)

  1. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  2. International linear collider reference design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  3. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Roy

    2011-05-01

    I discuss LHC physics in the historical perspective of the progress in particle physics. After a recap of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, I discuss the high energy colliders leading up to LHC and their role in the discovery of these SM particles. Then I discuss the two main physics issues of LHC, i.e. Higgs mechanism and supersymmetry. I briefly touch upon Higgs and SUSY searches at LHC along with their cosmological implications.

  4. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  5. Linear collider IR and final focus introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.; Burke, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Linear Collider subgroup of the Accelerator Physics working group concerned itself with all aspects of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) design from the end of the accelerating structure to and through the interaction region. Within this region are: (1) a collimation section, (2) muon protection (of the detector from the collimator), (3) final focus system, (4) interaction point physics, and (5) detector masking from synchrotron radiation and beam-beam pair production. These areas of study are indicated schematically in Fig. 1. The parameters for the Next Linear Collider are still in motion, but attention has settled on a handful of parameter sets. Energies under consideration vary from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV in the center of mass, and luminosities vary from 10{sup 33} to 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. To be concrete we chose as a guide for our studies the parameter sets labeled F and G, Table 1 from Palmer. These cover large and small crossing angle cases and 0.4 m to 1.8 m of free length at the interaction point.

  6. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pivi, M T F; Le Pimpec, Frederic; Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2005-01-01

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper presents the various effects of the electron cloud and evaluates their significance. It also discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing international R&D program to study potential remedies to reduce the secondary electron yield to acceptably low levels.

  7. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  8. Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, M.; Ruchti, R.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided.

  9. Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, M.; Ruchti, R.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided.

  10. The Higgs Physics Programme at the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sefkow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The talk summarises the case for Higgs physics in $e^+e^-$ collisions and explains how Higgs parameters can be extracted in a model-independent way at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The expected precision will be discussed in the context of projections for the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  11. Possible limits of plasma linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, F.

    2017-07-01

    Plasma linear colliders have been proposed as next or next-next generation energy-frontier machines for high-energy physics. I investigate possible fundamental limits on energy and luminosity of such type of colliders, considering acceleration, multiple scattering off plasma ions, intrabeam scattering, bremsstrahlung, and betatron radiation. The question of energy efficiency is also addressed.

  12. Physics prospects at a linear + - collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurabh D Rindani

    2006-10-01

    The talk described the prospects of studying standard model parameters as well as scenarios beyond the standard model, like the minimal supersymmetric standard model, theories with extra dimensions and theories with extra neutral gauge bosons, at a future linear + - collider.

  13. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs. (LEW)

  14. Photon Linear Collider Gamma-Gamma Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J

    2012-02-27

    High energy photon - photon collisions can be achieved by adding high average power short-pulse lasers to the Linear Collider, enabling an expanded physics program for the facility. The technology required to realize a photon linear collider continues to mature. Compton back-scattering technology is being developed around the world for low energy light source applications and high average power lasers are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  15. 2009 Linear Collider Workshop of the Americas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Sally [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2009-09-29

    The 2009 Linear Collider Workshop of the Americas was held on the campus of the University of New Mexico from 29 September to 3 October, 2009. This was a joint meeting of the American Linear Collider Physics Group and the ILC Global Design Effort. Two hundred fifty people attended. The number of scientific contributions was 333. The complete agenda, with links to all of the presentations, is available at physics.unm.edu/LCWA09/. The meeting brought together international experts as well as junior scientists, to discuss the physics potential of the linear collider and advances in detector technology. The validation of detector designs was announced, and the detector design groups planned the next phase of the effort. Detector R&D teams reported on progress on many topics including calorimetry and tracking. Recent accelerator design considerations were discussed in a special session for experimentalists and theorists.

  16. Physics with $e^{+} e^{-}$ linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Zerwas, Peter M

    2002-01-01

    The physics programme is summarized for future e**+e**- linear colliders. These machines will allow us to perform precision studies of the top quark and the electroweak gauge bosons in a complementary way to the proton collider LHC. The Higgs boson can be discovered at the LHC within the entire range of canonical mass values. Lepton colliders are ideal instruments to investigate the properties of the Higgs boson and to establish essential elements of the Higgs mechanism as the fundamental mechanism for breaking the electroweak symmetries. In the area beyond the Standard Model, new particles and their interactions can be discovered and explored comprehensively. Supersymmetric particles can be searched for at the LHC with masses up to 2-3 TeV. Their properties can be determined at lepton colliders with very high precision so that the mechanism of supersymmetry breaking can be investigated experimentally and the underlying unified theory can be reconstructed. Stable extrapolations are possible up to scales near ...

  17. The Higgs boson and the International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eBorzumati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Higgs boson will be subject of intense experimental searches in future high-energy experiments. In addition to the e□ort made at the Large Hadron Collider, where it was discovered, it will be the major subject of study at the International Linear Collider. We review here the reasons for that and some of the issues to be tackled at this future accelerator.

  18. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  19. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  20. Plans for 40 km linear collider unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Particle physicists have released their first tentative design for the International Linear Collider (ILC), a multibillin dollar accelerator that could switch on by the middle of the next decade. The plans also state that the machine should be built in two underground tunnels even though it would be much cheaper to use just one (1 page)

  1. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Keisuke; Peskin, Michael E; Barklow, Tim; Gao, Yuanning; Kanemura, Shinya; Kim, Hyungdo; List, Jenny; Nojiri, Mihoko; Perelstein, Maxim; Poeschl, Roman; Reuter, Juergen; Simon, Frank; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Yu, Jaehoon; Wells, James D; Murayama, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  2. Linear Collider partners woo newly opened India

    CERN Multimedia

    Bagla, Pallava

    2006-01-01

    "With the wheels of Air Force One barely off the tarmac following U.S. President George W. Bush's visit, which ended India's 3 decades as a nuclear pariah state, a delegation of U.S. and European physicists arrived here last week to discuss India's involvement in the International Linear Collider."

  3. Testing supersymmetry at the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    If new particles are discovered, it will be important to determine if they are the supersymmetric partners of standard model bosons and fermions. Supersymmetry predicts relations among the couplings and masses of these particles. The authors discuss the prospects for testing these relations at a future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider with measurements that exploit the availability of polarized beams.

  4. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  5. QCD Interconnection Studies at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Khoze, V A; Khoze, Valery A.; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    1999-01-01

    Heavy objects like the W, Z and t are short-lived compared with typical hadronization times. When pairs of such particles are produced, the subsequent hadronic decay systems may therefore become interconnected. We study such potential effects at Linear Collider energies.

  6. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Grojean, Christophe; /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; /SLAC; Gao, Yuanning; /Tsinghua U., Beijing, CHEP; Kanemura, Shinya; /Toyama U.; Kim, Hyungdo; /Seoul Natl U.; List, Jenny; /DESY; Nojiri, Mihoko; /KEK, Tsukuba; Perelstein, Maxim; /Cornell U., LEPP; Poeschl, Roman; /LAL, Orsay; Reuter, Juergen; /DESY; Simon, Frank; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Tanabe, Tomohiko; /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Yu, Jaehoon; /Texas U., Arlington; Wells, James D.; /Michigan U., MCTP; Murayama, Hitoshi; /UC, Berkeley /LBNL /Tokyo U., IPMU; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  7. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, Junji [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.).

  8. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  9. Supersymmetry status and phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexander Belyaev

    2009-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a great chance to finally reveal supersymmetry which remains a compelling theory for over 30 years in spite of lack of its discovery. It might be around the corner the present LHC era with sensitive dark matter search experiments and international linear collider hopefully coming up in the near future.

  10. Nonlinear Energy Collimation System for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The post-linac energy collimation system of multi-TeV linear colliders is designed to fulfil an important function of protection of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) against miss-steered beams likely generated by failure modes in the main linac. For the case of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), the energy collimators are required to withstand the impact of a full bunch train in case of failure. This is a very challenging task, assuming the nominal CLIC beam parameters at 1.5 TeV beam energy. The increase of the transverse spot size at the collimators using nonlinear magnets is a potential solution to guarantee the survival of the collimators. In this paper we present an alternative nonlinear optics based on a skew sextupole pair for energy collimation. Performance simulation results are also presented.

  11. Slepton Flavor Physics at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Dine, Michael; Thomas, S; Dine, Michael; Grossman, Yuval; Thomas, Scott

    2001-01-01

    If low energy supersymmetry is realized in nature it is possible that a first generation linear collider will only have access to some of the superpartners with electroweak quantum numbers. Among these, sleptons can provide sensitive probes for lepton flavor violation through potentially dramatic lepton violating signals. Theoretical proposals to understand the absence of low energy quark and lepton flavor changing neutral currents are surveyed and many are found to predict observable slepton flavor violating signals at linear colliders. The observation or absence of such sflavor violation will thus provide important indirect clues to very high energy physics. Previous analyses of slepton flavor oscillations are also extended to include the effects of finite width and mass differences.

  12. Two-Beam Linear Colliders - Special Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The path towards a multi-TeV e+e- linear collider proposed by the CLIC study is based on the Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) scheme. Such a scheme is promising in term of efficiency, reliability and cost. The rationale behind the two-beam scheme is discussed in the paper, together with the special issues related to this technology and the R&D needed to demonstrate its feasibility.

  13. German lab wins linear collider contest

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Particle physicists have chosen to base the proposed International Linear Collider on superconducting technology developed by an international collaboration centred on the DESY lab in Germany. The superconducting approach was chosen by an internatinal panel ahead of a rival technology developed at Stanford in the US and the KEK lab in Japan. The eagerly-awaited decision was announced at the International Conference on High Energy Physics in Beijing today (½ page)

  14. Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Organizers of the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    2012-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. This school is a continuation of the series of schools which began six years ago.  The first school was held in 2006 in Sokendai, Japan, the second in 2007 in Erice, Italy, the third in 2008 in Oakbrook Hills, USA, the fourth in 2009 in Huairou, China, the fifth in 2010 in Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, and the sixth in 2011 in Pacific Grove, USA.   The school is organized by the International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE), the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) Beam Dynamics Panel. The school this year will take place at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Indore, India from November 27 to December 8, 2012. It is hosted by the Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) and sponsored by a number of funding agencies and institutions around the world including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. National Science...

  15. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  16. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron–positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron–proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  17. The next linear collider damping ring lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolski, Andrzej; Corlett, John N.

    2001-06-20

    We report on the lattice design of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) damping rings. The damping rings are required to provide low emittance electron and positron bunch trains to the NLC linacs, at a rate of 120 Hz. We present an optical design, based on a theoretical minimum emittance (TME) lattice, to produce the required normalized extracted beam emittances gex = 3 mm-mrad and gey = 0.02 mm mrad. An assessment of dynamic aperture and non-linear effects is given. The positron pre-damping ring, required to reduce the emittance of the positron beam such that it may be accepted by a main damping ring, is also described.

  18. 2001 Report on the Next Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronnberg, J; Breidenbach; Burke, D; Corlett, J; Dombeck, T; Markiewicz, T

    2001-08-28

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  19. Anomalous interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhansu S Biswal; Debajyoti Choudhury; Rohini M Godbole; Ritesh K Singh

    2007-11-01

    We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider operating at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV and with an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 is shown to be able to constrain the vertex at the few per cent level, with even higher sensitivity for some of the couplings. However, lack of sufficient number of observables as well as contamination from the vertex limits the precision to which anomalous part of the coupling can be probed.

  20. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  1. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency

  2. The International Linear Collider - Physics and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    With the discovery of a Higgs boson at LHC, all particles of the Standard Model seem to have been observed experimentally, yet many questions are left unanswered. The discovery has intensified the planning for future high-energy colliders, which aim to probe the Standard Model and the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking with higher precision and to extend and complement the search for new particles currently under way at the LHC. The most mature option for such a future facility is the International Linear Collider ILC, an electron-positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, and the potential for upgrades into the TeV region. The ILC will fully explore the Higgs sector, including model-independent coupling and width measurements, direct measurements of the coupling to the top quark and the Higgs self-coupling, enable precision measurements of top quark properties and couplings as well as other electroweak precision measurements and provide extensive discovery potential for new physics co...

  3. Progress on the CLIC Linear Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Guignard, Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    The CLIC study aims at a multi-TeV, high luminosity e+e- linear collider design. Beam acceleration uses high frequency (30 GHz), normal conducting structures operating at high accelerating gradients, in order to reduce the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. The cost-effective RF power production scheme, based on the so-called Two-beam Acceleration method, enables electrons and positrons to be collided at energies ranging from ~ 0.1 TeV up to a maximum of 5 TeV, in stages. A road map has been drawn up to indicate the research and development necessary to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a 3 TeV centre-of-mass collider with a luminosity of 1035 cm-2s-1. Considerable progress has been made in meeting the challenges associated with the CLIC technology and the present paper briefly reviews some of them. In particular, the status is given of the studies on the CLIC high-gradient structures, the dynamic time-dependent effects, the stabilisation of the vibration and the beam delivery system. T...

  4. SUSY Without Prejudice at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    We explore the physics of the general CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation, the pMSSM. The 19 soft SUSY breaking parameters are chosen so to satisfy all existing experimental and theoretical constraints assuming that the WIMP is the lightest neutralino. We scan this parameter space twice using both flat and log priors and compare the results which yield similar conclusions. Constraints from both LEP and the Tevatron play an important role in obtaining our final model samples. Implications for future TeV-scale $e^+e^-$ linear colliders(LC) are discussed.

  5. Rf power sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Nelson, E.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Boyd, J.K.; Houk, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Live

    1990-06-01

    The next generation of linear colliders requires peak power sources of over 200 MW per meter at frequencies above 10 GHz at pulse widths of less than 100 nsec. Several power sources are under active development, including a conventional klystron with rf pulse compression, a relativistic klystron (RK) and a crossed-field amplifier. Power from one of these has energized a 0.5 meter two- section High Gradient Accelerator (HGA) and accelerated a beam at over 80 MeV meter. Results of tests with these experimental devices are presented here.

  6. Scaling Laws for $e^+ e^-$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e+e- Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency structures becomes very adv...

  7. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper.

  8. Intense beams at the micron level for the Next Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    High brightness beams with sub-micron dimensions are needed to produce a high luminosity for electron-positron collisions in the Next Linear Collider (NLC). To generate these small beam sizes, a large number of issues dealing with intense beams have to be resolved. Over the past few years many have been successfully addressed but most need experimental verification. Some of these issues are beam dynamics, emittance control, instrumentation, collimation, and beam-beam interactions. Recently, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has proven the viability of linear collider technology and is an excellent test facility for future linear collider studies.

  9. Alignment Challenges for a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, H; Stern, G

    2013-01-01

    The preservation of ultra-low emittances in the main linac and Beam Delivery System area is one of the main challenges for linear colliders. This requires alignment tolerances never achieved before at that scale, down to the micrometre level. As a matter of fact, in the LHC, the goal for the smoothing of the components was to obtain a 1σ deviation with respect to a smooth curve of 0.15 mm over a 150 m long sliding window, while for the CLIC project for example, it corresponds to 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m in the Beam Delivery System area. Two complementary strategies are being studied to fulfil these requirements: the development and validation of long range alignment systems over a few hundreds of metres and short range alignment systems over a few metres. The studies undertaken, with associated tests setups and the latest results will be detailed, as well as their application for the alignment of both CLIC and ILC colliders.

  10. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures.

  11. Effect of CSR shielding in the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, J; Apsimon, R; Schulte, D

    2014-01-01

    The Drive Beam complex of the Compact Linear Collider must use short bunches with a large charge making beam transport susceptible to unwanted effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation emitted in the dipole magnets. We present the effects of transporting the beam within a limited aperture which decreases the magnitude of the CSR wake. The effect, known as CSR shielding, eases the design of key components of the facility.

  12. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  13. Linear Collider Flavour Identification status report: Sensors for the International Linear Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Stefanov; for the Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration is continuing the work to develop column-parallel CCDs (CPCCD) and CMOS readout chips to be used in the vertex detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The CPCCD achieves several orders of magnitude faster readout than conventional CCDs because every column is equipped with amplifier and ADC, enabling efficient data taking with low occupancy. Already two generations of CPCCDs and readout chips have been manufactured and the first chips have been fully tested. The second generation devices are now being evaluated. A new CCD-based device, the in-situ storage image sensor (ISIS) has also been developed. The ISIS offers numerous advantages in terms of relaxed readout, increased radiation hardness and great immunity to EMI. In this paper we present the results from the tests of the CPCCDs, readout chips and ISIS, as well as the plans for future developments.

  14. The next linear collider damping ring complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett,J.; Atkinson,D.; De Santis,S.; Hartman, N.; Kennedy, K.; Li, D.; Marks, S.; Minamihara, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Pivi, M.; Reavill, D.; Rimmer, R.; Schlueter, R.; Wolski, A.; Anderson,S.; McKee,B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, J.C.

    2001-06-12

    We report progress on the design of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) Damping Rings complexes. The purpose of the damping rings is to provide low emittance electron and positron bunch trains to the NLC linacs, at a rate of 120 Hz. As an option to operate at the higher rate of 180 Hz, two 1.98 GeV main damping rings per beam are proposed, and one positron pre-damping ring. The main damping rings store up to 0.8 amp in 3 trains of 190 bunches each and have normalized extracted beam emittances {gamma}{var_epsilon}x = 3 mm-mrad and {gamma}{var_epsilon}y = 0.02 mm-mrad. The optical designs, based on a theoretical minimum emittance lattice (TME), are described, with an analysis of dynamic aperture and non-linear effects. Key subsystems and components are described, including the wiggler, the vacuum systems and photon stop design, and the higher-order-mode damped RF cavities. Impedance and instabilities are discussed.

  15. Luminosity Limitations in Linear Colliders Based on Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Particle acceleration in plasma creates a possibility of exceptionally high accelerating gradients and appears as a very attractive option for future linear electron-positron and/or photon-photon colliders. These high accelerating gradients were already demonstrated in a number of experiments. However, a linear collider requires exceptionally high beam brightness which still needs to be demonstrated. In this article we discuss major phenomena which limit the beam brightness of accelerated beam and, consequently, the collider luminosity.

  16. Strong Higgs Interactions at a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Contino, Roberto; Pappadopulo, Duccio; Rattazzi, Riccardo; Thamm, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of Higgs precision measurements at a high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron collider, such as CLIC or the ILC, on the parameter space of a strongly interacting Higgs boson. Some combination of anomalous couplings are already tightly constrained by current fits to electroweak observables. However, even small deviations in the cross sections of single and double Higgs production, or the mere detection of a triple Higgs final state, can help establish whether it is a composite state and whether or not it emerges as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson from an underlying broken symmetry. We obtain an estimate of the ILC and CLIC sensitivities on the anomalous Higgs couplings from a study of WW scattering and hh production which can be translated into a sensitivity on the compositeness scale 4\\pi f, or equivalently on the degree of compositeness \\xi=v^2/f^2. We summarize the current experimental constraints, from electroweak data and direct resonance searches, and the expected reach...

  17. Comparing Tsallis and Boltzmann temperatures from relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider heavy-ion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.-Q.; Liu, F.-H.

    2016-03-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of charged particles produced in Au + Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider and in Pb + Pb collisions at the large hadron collider with different centrality intervals are described by the multisource thermal model which is based on different statistic distributions for a singular source. Each source in the present work is described by the Tsallis distribution and the Boltzmann distribution, respectively. Then, the interacting system is described by the (two-component) Tsallis distribution and the (two-component) Boltzmann distribution, respectively. The results calculated by the two distributions are in agreement with the experimental data of the Solenoidal Tracker At Relativistic heavy ion collider, Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, and A Large Ion Collider Experiment Collaborations. The effective temperature parameters extracted from the two distributions on the descriptions of heavy-ion data at the relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider are obtained to show a linear correlation.

  18. Run scenarios for the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Battaglia et al.

    2002-12-23

    We have examined how a Linear Collider program of 1000 fb{sup -1} could be constructed in the case that a very rich program of new physics is accessible at {radical}s {le} 500 GeV. We have examined possible run plans that would allow the measurement of the parameters of a 120 GeV Higgs boson, the top quark, and could give information on the sparticle masses in SUSY scenarios in which many states are accessible. We find that the construction of the run plan (the specific energies for collider operation, the mix of initial state electron polarization states, and the use of special e{sup -}e{sup -} runs) will depend quite sensitively on the specifics of the supersymmetry model, as the decay channels open to particular sparticles vary drastically and discontinuously as the underlying SUSY model parameters are varied. We have explored this dependence somewhat by considering two rather closely related SUSY model points. We have called for operation at a high energy to study kinematic end points, followed by runs in the vicinity of several two body production thresholds once their location is determined by the end point studies. For our benchmarks, the end point runs are capable of disentangling most sparticle states through the use of specific final states and beam polarizations. The estimated sparticle mass precisions, combined from end point and scan data, are given in Table VIII and the corresponding estimates for the mSUGRA parameters are in Table IX. The precision for the Higgs boson mass, width, cross-sections, branching ratios and couplings are given in Table X. The errors on the top quark mass and width are expected to be dominated by the systematic limits imposed by QCD non-perturbative effects. The run plan devotes at least two thirds of the accumulated luminosity near the maximum LC energy, so that the program would be sensitive to unexpected new phenomena at high mass scales. We conclude that with a 1 ab{sup -1} program, expected to take the first 6-7 years

  19. Run scenarios for the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Battaglia et al.

    2002-12-23

    We have examined how a Linear Collider program of 1000 fb{sup -1} could be constructed in the case that a very rich program of new physics is accessible at {radical}s {le} 500 GeV. We have examined possible run plans that would allow the measurement of the parameters of a 120 GeV Higgs boson, the top quark, and could give information on the sparticle masses in SUSY scenarios in which many states are accessible. We find that the construction of the run plan (the specific energies for collider operation, the mix of initial state electron polarization states, and the use of special e{sup -}e{sup -} runs) will depend quite sensitively on the specifics of the supersymmetry model, as the decay channels open to particular sparticles vary drastically and discontinuously as the underlying SUSY model parameters are varied. We have explored this dependence somewhat by considering two rather closely related SUSY model points. We have called for operation at a high energy to study kinematic end points, followed by runs in the vicinity of several two body production thresholds once their location is determined by the end point studies. For our benchmarks, the end point runs are capable of disentangling most sparticle states through the use of specific final states and beam polarizations. The estimated sparticle mass precisions, combined from end point and scan data, are given in Table VIII and the corresponding estimates for the mSUGRA parameters are in Table IX. The precision for the Higgs boson mass, width, cross-sections, branching ratios and couplings are given in Table X. The errors on the top quark mass and width are expected to be dominated by the systematic limits imposed by QCD non-perturbative effects. The run plan devotes at least two thirds of the accumulated luminosity near the maximum LC energy, so that the program would be sensitive to unexpected new phenomena at high mass scales. We conclude that with a 1 ab{sup -1} program, expected to take the first 6-7 years

  20. News from CERN, LHC Status and Strategy for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the latest development at CERN, concentrating on the status of the LHC and the strategy for future linear colliders. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy as well as upgrades to the LHC (luminosity and energy) and to its injectors. This may be complemented by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and by the International Linear Collider and/or by a high-energy electron-proton collider. This contribution describes the various future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  1. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  2. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  3. Probing LINEAR Collider Final Focus Systems in SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Thrane, Paul Conrad Vaagen

    2017-01-01

    A challenge for future linear collider final focus systems is the large chromaticity produced by the final quadrupoles. SuperKEKB will be correcting high levels of chromaticity using the traditional scheme which has been also proposed for the CLIC FFS. We present early simulation results indicating that lowering β*у in the SuperKEKB Low Energy Ring might be possible given on-axis injection and low bunch current, opening the possibility of testing chromaticity correction beyond FFTB level, similar to ILC and approaching that of CLIC. CLIC – Note – 1077

  4. International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee: Second Report, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Gregory

    2003-02-21

    As this report is being published, the international high energy physics (HEP) community finds itself confronting a set of fascinating discoveries and new questions regarding the nature of matter and its fundamental particles and forces. The observation of neutrino oscillations that indicates that neutrinos have mass, measurements of the accelerating expansion of the universe that may be due to dark energy, and evidence for a period of rapid inflation at the beginning of the Big Bang are stimulating the entire field. Looming on the horizon are the potential discoveries of a Higgs particle that may reveal the origin of mass and of a whole family of supersymmetric particles that may be part of the cosmic dark matter. For the HEP community to elucidate these mysteries, new accelerators are indispensable. At this time, after careful deliberations, all three regional organizations of the HEP community (ACFA in Asia, HEPAP in North America, and ECFA in Europe) have reached the common conclusion that the next accelerator should be an electron-positron linear collider with an initial center-of-mass energy of 500 Giga-electronvolts (GeV), later upgradable to higher energies, and that it should be built and operated in parallel with the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN. Hence, this second report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC) comes at a very timely moment. The report was requested by the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) in February 2001 to assess the current technical status of electron-positron linear collider designs in the various regions. Note that the ILC-TRC was not asked to concern itself with either cost studies or the ultimate selection process of a machine. This Executive Summary gives a short outline of the genesis of the report, the charge given to the committee, and its organization. It then presents a brief description of four electron-positron linear collider designs at hand. The

  5. The signatures of doubly charged leptons in future linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Chen; Yue, Chong-Xing; Liu, Zhi-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    We discuss the production of the doubly charged leptons in future linear electron positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider. Such states are introduced in extended weak-isospin multiplets by composite models. We discuss the production cross section of {e}-γ \\to {L}--{W}+ and carry out analyses for hadronic, semi-leptonic and pure leptonic channels based on the full simulation performance of the silicon detector. The 3- and 5-sigma statistical significance exclusion curves are provided in the model parameter space. It is found that the hadronic channel could offer the most possible detectable signature.

  6. The signatures of doubly charged leptons in future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yu-Chen; Liu, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the production of the doubly charged leptons in future linear electron positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider. Such states are introduced in extended weak-isospin multiplets by composite models. We discuss the production cross section of $e^-\\gamma\\rightarrow L^{--}W^{+}$ and carry out analyses for hadronic, semi-leptonic and pure leptonic channels based on the full simulation performance of the Silicon Detector. The 3- and 5-sigma statistical significance exclusion curves are provided in the model parameter space. It is found that the hadronic channel could offer the most possible detectable signature.

  7. Overview of Linear Collider Test Facilities and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, H

    2004-01-01

    Linear Collider technology will be recommended by the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) to the International Linear Collider Steering Committee (ILCSC), soon. Towards this recommendation, many efforts of the developments and the output results of each technology have been made to satisfy the requirements of the technical review committee report (TRC). The test facilities of each linear collider design are the place of the key technology demonstration and realization. The overview of the LC test facilities activities and outputs of TTF, NLCTA, ATF/GLCTA and CTF are summarized and reviewed.

  8. Phenomenology of non-minimal supersymmetric models at linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Stefano

    2015-06-15

    The focus of this thesis is on the phenomenology of several non-minimal supersymmetric models in the context of future linear colliders (LCs). Extensions of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) may accommodate the observed Higgs boson mass at about 125 GeV in a more natural way than the MSSM, with a richer phenomenology. We consider both F-term extensions of the MSSM, as for instance the non-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), as well as D-terms extensions arising at low energies from gauge extended supersymmetric models. The NMSSM offers a solution to the μ-problem with an additional gauge singlet supermultiplet. The enlarged neutralino sector of the NMSSM can be accurately studied at a LC and used to distinguish the model from the MSSM. We show that exploiting the power of the polarised beams of a LC can be used to reconstruct the neutralino and chargino sector and eventually distinguish the NMSSM even considering challenging scenarios that resemble the MSSM. Non-decoupling D-terms extensions of the MSSM can raise the tree-level Higgs mass with respect to the MSSM. This is done through additional contributions to the Higgs quartic potential, effectively generated by an extended gauge group. We study how this can happen and we show how these additional non-decoupling D-terms affect the SM-like Higgs boson couplings to fermions and gauge bosons. We estimate how the deviations from the SM couplings can be spotted at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and at the International Linear Collider (ILC), showing how the ILC would be suitable for the model identication. Since our results prove that a linear collider is a fundamental machine for studying supersymmetry phenomenology at a high level of precision, we argue that also a thorough comprehension of the physics at the interaction point (IP) of a LC is needed. Therefore, we finally consider the possibility of observing intense electromagnetic field effects and nonlinear quantum electrodynamics

  9. The lay-out of the photon collider at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V I Telnov

    2007-12-01

    One of the interaction regions at the linear colliders should be compatible both with + - and , modes of operation. In this paper, the differences in requirements and possible design solutions are discussed.

  10. NICADD scientists develop detector technology for International Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Scientist at the Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) are celebrating the successful run of a prototype subdetector for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC)." (1 page)

  11. New physics with the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the 'strong' interactions between particles would be best investigated using a lepton-antilepton collider of energy 2 TeV or more. Plans for an accelerator of this type, called CLIC, have been underway at CERN for many years in collaboration with other accelerator laboratories (5 pages).

  12. Linear polarization of gluons and photons in unpolarized collider experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, Cristian; Boer, Daniël; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Buffing, Maarten G. A.; Mulders, Piet J.

    2013-10-01

    We study azimuthal asymmetries in heavy quark pair production in unpolarized electron-proton and proton-proton collisions, where the asymmetries originate from the linear polarization of gluons inside unpolarized hadrons. We provide cross section expressions and study the maximal asymmetries allowed by positivity, for both charm and bottom quark pair production. The upper bounds on the asymmetries are shown to be very large depending on the transverse momentum of the heavy quarks, which is promising especially for their measurements at a possible future Electron-Ion Collider or a Large Hadron electron Collider. We also study the analogous processes and asymmetries in muon pair production as a means to probe linearly polarized photons inside unpolarized protons. For increasing invariant mass of the muon pair the asymmetries become very similar to the heavy quark pair ones. Finally, we discuss the process dependence of the results that arises due to differences in color flow and address the problem with factorization in case of proton-proton collisions.

  13. The Large Hadron Collider Pop Up Book

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Discover the ATLAS experiment in full 3D pop-up in this promotional video for the Large Hadron Collider pop-up book. The book contains 16 pop-ups telling the story of how the experiment works and its quest to understand what the universe is made of. It is now available in English, French and German. Paper engineer Anton Radevsky, texts Emma Sanders.

  14. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  15. 1st Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A; Martínez, M; Riu, I; Sorin, V

    2013-01-01

    The conference is the result of merging two series of international conferences, "Physics at Large Hadron Collider" (PLHC2012) and "Hadron Collider Physics Symposium" (HCP2012). With a program devoted to topics such as the Standard Model and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Beauty and Heavy Ion Physics, the conference aims at providing a lively forum for discussion between experimenters and theorists of the latest results and of new ideas. LHCP 2013 will be hosted by IFAE (Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies) in Barcelona (Spain), and will take place from May 13 to 18, 2013. The venue will be the Hotel Catalonia Plaza, Plaza España (Barcelona). More information will be posted soon. For questions, please contact lhcp2013@ifae.es.

  16. The CLIC study of a multi-TeV linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P

    2011-01-01

    The article reviews the status of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study towards feasibility demonstration of a novel and challenging technology which has been specially developed to extend Linear Colliders energy reach into the multi-TeV range in order to be complementary to LHC (Large Hadron Collider). A Conceptual Design Report is being published summarizing the performance of a High Energy facility based on such a technology as well as the results of the R&D performed to address its feasibility.

  17. Laser cooling of electron beams for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telnov, V.

    1996-10-01

    A novel method of electron beam cooling is considered which can be used for linear colliders. The electron beam is cooled during collision with focused powerful laser pulse. With reasonable laser parameters (laser flash energy about 10 J) one can decrease transverse beam emittances by a factor about 10 per one stage. The ultimate transverse emittances are much below that given by other methods. Depolarization of a beam during the cooling is about 5--15% for one stage. This method is especially useful for photon colliders and open new possibilities for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders and x-ray FEL based on high energy linacs.

  18. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B., E-mail: CBSchroeder@lbl.gov; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron–positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  19. Alternate approaches to future electron-positron linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, G.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this article is two-fold: to review the current international status of various design approaches to the next generation of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders, and on the occasion of his 80th birthday, to celebrate Richard B. Neal`s many contributions to the field of linear accelerators. As it turns out, combining these two tasks is a rather natural enterprise because of Neal`s long professional involvement and insight into many of the problems and options which the international e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider community is currently studying to achieve a practical design for a future machine.

  20. Measuring supersymmetry at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B C Allanach

    2003-02-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) should have the ability to detect supersymmetric particles if low-energy supersymmetry solves the hierarchy problem. Studies of the LHC detection reach, and the ability to measure properties of supersymmetric particles are currently underway. We highlight some of these, such as the reach in minimal supergravity space and correlation with a fine-tuning parameter, precision measurements of edge variables, anomaly- or gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. Supersymmetry with baryon-number violation seems at first glance more difficult to detect, but proves to be possible by using leptons from cascade decays.

  1. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohini M Godbole

    2011-05-01

    In this talk I shall begin by summarizing the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with prospects in the near future at the LHC. I have added to the writeup, recent experimental results from the LHC which have become available since the time of the workshop.

  2. LHC - Large Hadon Collider Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will accelerate two proton beams to an energy corresponding to about 7,000 times their mass (7000 GeV). The collision of the two beams reproduces the conditions in the Universe when it was about 10 -1 2 sec old. Many innovative techniques - such as cooling with superfluid helium, the extensive use of high temperature superconducting cables, the two-in-one design for super-conducting dipole magnets, and new ultra-high vacuum technologies - had to be developed to make its construc-tion possible.

  3. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V I Telnov

    2007-12-01

    At linear colliders, the + - luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In collisions at the photon collider, these effects are absent, and so smaller emittances are desirable. In the present damping ring designs, nominal DR parameters correspond to those required for + - collisions. In this note, I would like to stress once again that as soon as we plan the photon collider mode of ILC operation, the damping ring emittances are dictated by the photon collider requirements - namely, they should be as small as possible. This can be achieved by adding more wigglers to the DRs; the incremental cost is easily justified by a considerable potential improvement of the luminosity. No expert analysis exists as of now, but it seems realistic to obtain a factor five increase of the luminosity compared to the `nominal' DR design.

  4. The Large Hadron Collider, a personal recollection

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, L

    2014-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavor spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing LEP tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of an idea first proposed by Bob Palmer at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1978, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact 2-in-1 structure was essential for the LHC due to both the limited space available in the existing Large Electron-Positron collider tunnel and the cost. The second innovation was the bold move to use superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor. In this article, no attempt is made to give a comprehensive review of the machine design. This can be found in the LHC Design Report {[}1], w...

  5. Physics and technology of the Next Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlman, S; Aiello, R; Akemoto, M; Alley, R; Assmann, R W; Baer, Howard W; Baltay, C; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Barakat, B; Barker, A; Barklow, Timothy L; Barletta, W A; Bauer, D A; Bertolini, L R; Bharadwaj, V K; Bogart, J R; Bowden, G B; Bower, G; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Brown, K L; Burke, D L; Burrows, P N; Byrd, J M; Cai, Y; Caryotakis, G; Cassel, R L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, P; Clark, S L; Cleaver, G B; Clem, D; Clendenin, J E; Corlett, J N; Corvin, C; Couture, G; Cuypers, F; Danielson, M; Deadrick, F J; Decker, Franz Josef; Donaldson, A R; Dragt, A J; Dubois, R; Early, R A; Ecklund, S D; Eichner, J; Einhorn, Martin B; Emma, P; Eppley, K R; Eriksson, L; Fahey, S; Farkas, Z D; Fawley, W M; Feng, J L; Fero, M J; Fisher, A S; Foundoulis, C; Fowkes, W R; Frey, R E; Frisch, J; Fuller, R W; Furman, M A; Genova, L F; Gintner, M; Giordano, G; Gluckstern, R L; Godfrey, S; Gold, S; Goluboff, M; Gross, G; Gunion, J F; Haber, Howard E; Han, T; Hanna, S; Hartman, S; Heifets, S A; Helm, R H; Hendrickson, L; Henestroza, E; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hewett, J L; Higashi, K; Higo, T; Hoag, H A; Hodgson, J; Hollebeek, R J; Holt, J A; Houck, T L; Humphrey, J W; Humphrey, R; Irwin, J; Jackson, A; Jacobsen, R A; Jaros, J A; Jobe, R Keith; Jones, R M; Kalyniak, P A; Kane, G L; Keller, L P; Kim, K J; Klem, D E; Ko, K; Koontz, R F; Kraft, E; Krejcik, P; Kroll, N M; Kubo, K; Kulikov, A; Lavine, T L; Li, H; Li, Z; Lidia, S M; Linebarger, W A; Loew, G A; Loewen, R J; Maeshima, K; Manly, S L; Marciano, W J; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Mattison, T S; McDonald, K F; McKee, B; Messner, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Miller, R H; Minkowski, Peter; Minty, Michiko G; Moshammer, W; Munro, M H; Munroe, R; Murayama, H; Nantista, C D; Nauenberg, U; Nelson, E M; Nelson, H; Nelson, W R; Ng, C K; Nosochkov, Yu M; Ohgaki, T; Oide, K; Paige, Frank E; Palmer, D; Palmer, R B; Paterson, J M; Pearson, C; Perry, M; Peskin, Michael E; Phillips, R M; Phinney, N; Pope, R S; Raja, R; Raubenheimer, T O; Reginato, L; Rifkin, J; Riles, K; Rimmer, R A; Rinolfi, Louis; Rizzo, T; Robin, D; Rokni, S H; Ronan, Michael T; Rosenzweig, J; Ross, M C; Rowson, P C; Ruland, R E; Ruth, Ronald D; Saab, A; Sawyer, L; Schumm, B; Schwarz, H; Scott, B; Sessler, Andrew M; Sheppard, J C; Shoaee, H; Smith, S; Spence, W L; Spencer, C M; Spencer, J E; Sprehn, D; Strom, D; Stupakov, G; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, K; Tang, H; Tantawi, S G; Tata, Xerxes; Telnov, V I; Tenenbaum, P G; Thomas, S; Thompson, K A; Tian, F; Turner, J; Usher, T; Van Bibber, K; Van Kooten, R; Vanecek, D L; Vlieks, A E; Wagner, D L; Walz, D R; Wang, J W; Ward, B F L; Weidemann, A W; Westenskow, G A; White, T; Whittum, D H; Wilson, P B; Wilson, Z; Woodley, M; Woods, M; Wudka, J; Wurtele, J S; Xie, M; Yan, Y T; Yeremian, A D; Yokoya, K; Yu, S S; Zholents, A A; Zimmermann, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We present the current expectations for the design and physics program of an e+e- linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV -- 1 TeV. We review the experiments that would be carried out at this facility and demonstrate its key role in exploring physics beyond the Standard Model over the full range of theoretical possibilities. We then show the feasibility of constructing this machine, by reviewing the current status of linear collider technology and by presenting a precis of our `zeroth- order' design.

  6. Novel final focus design for future linear colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, P; Seryi, A

    2001-04-23

    The length, complexity, and cost of the present final focus designs for linear colliders grow very quickly with the beam energy. In this Letter, a novel final focus system is presented and compared with the one proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC Zeroth-Order Design Report, edited by T. O. Raubenheimer, SLAC Report No. 474, 1996). This new design has fewer optical elements and is much shorter, nonetheless achieving better chromatic properties. Moreover, the new system is more suitable for operation over a larger energy range.

  7. Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the scientific, technical and political genesis of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It begins with an outline of the early history of the LHC, from first thoughts and accelerator and detector developments that underwrote the project, through the first studies of the LHC and its scientific potential and the genesis of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to build the LHC to the CERN Council in December 1993. The events that led to the proposal to build the LHC in two stages, which was approved in December 1994, are then described. Next, the role of non-Member State contributions and of the agreement that CERN could take loans, which allowed single stage construction to be approved in December 1996, despite a cut in the Members' contributions, are explained. The paper concludes by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large particle physics projects.

  8. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Raychaudhari, Amitava

    2009-01-01

    In an epoch when particle physics is awaiting a major step forward, the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva will soon be operational. It will collide a beam of high energy protons with another similar beam circulation in the same 27 km tunnel but in the opposite direction, resulting in the production of many elementary particles some never created in the laboratory before. It is widely expected that the LHC will discover the Higgs boson, the particle which supposedly lends masses to all other fundamental particles. In addition, the question as to whether there is some new law of physics at such high energy is likely to be answered through this experiment. The present volume contains a collection of articles written by international experts, both theoreticians and experimentalists, from India and abroad, which aims to acquaint a non-specialist with some basic issues related to the LHC. At the same time, it is expected to be a useful, rudimentary companion of introductory exposition and technical expert...

  9. Power Saving Optimization for Linear Collider Interaction Region Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Optimization of Interaction Region parameters of a TeV energy scale linear collider has to take into account constraints defined by phenomena such as beam-beam focusing forces, beamstrahlung radiation, and hour-glass effect. With those constraints, achieving a desired luminosity of about 2E34 would require use of e{sup +}e{sup -} beams with about 10 MW average power. Application of the 'travelling focus' regime may allow the required beam power to be reduced by at least a factor of two, helping reduce the cost of the collider, while keeping the beamstrahlung energy loss reasonably low. The technique is illustrated for the 500 GeV CM parameters of the International Linear Collider. This technique may also in principle allow recycling the e{sup +}e{sup -} beams and/or recuperation of their energy.

  10. Where do we stand on the SLC (SLAC Linear Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozanecki, W.

    1989-02-01

    This paper reviews the current performance of the SLAC Linear Collider, as well as the issues, problems and prospects facing the project. A few of the original accelerator physics results achieved in the last year are described in detail. 36 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING Progress on e+e- Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    27, 28, 29, 30, 31 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Progress on e+e- Linear Colliders by P. Zerwas / Desy, D and R. Siemann / Slac, USA Physics issues (P. Zerwas - 27, 28 May)The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Sta...

  12. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed. (GHT)

  13. Considerations about an improved superconducting cable for Linear Collider Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2009-01-01

    This note puts together arguments, discussed within the Linear Collider Detector community in the last months, about setting up an R&D program aiming to demonstrate the industrial feasibility and build a significant prototype length (tbd) of superconducting cable for next HEP detector magnets.

  14. Teilchenphysik: Auf dem Weg zum International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsen, Eckhard

    2006-07-01

    Führende Beschleuniger- und Teilchenphysiker in Amerika, Asien und Europa arbeiten gemeinsam an der Planung des International Linear Collider (ILC). In dieser etwa 30 Kilometer langen Maschine werden Elektronen und Positronen beschleunigt und mit bisher unerreicht hohen Energien aufeinander prallen. Die Wissenschaftler erwarten davon Einblicke in die Welt jenseits des Standardmodells.

  15. Academic Training: Physics at e+e- linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics at e+e- linear collider K. DESCH / Desy, Hamburg, D Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale to very high precision. The lecture series introduces the possibilities of a TeV linear collider (the International Linear Collider, ILC) in the fields of Higgs physics, alternative Electro-weak Symmetry Breaking scenarios, Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions, and more exotic models. Also the prospects for highly improved measurements of SM parameters such as the top quark mass and electro-weak gauge boson properties are discussed. The implications for the design of an appropriate detector are outlined and current R&D developments are explained. Particular emphasis will be given to the complementarity and intimate interplay of physics at the LHC and the ILC. The additional benefit of multi-TeV e+e- collisions as envisaged i...

  16. Academic Training: Physics at e+e- linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics at e+e- linear collider K. DESCH / Desy, Hamburg, D Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale to very high precision. The lecture series introduces the possibilities of a TeV linear collider (the International Linear Collider, ILC) in the fields of Higgs physics, alternative Electro-weak Symmetry Breaking scenarios, Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions, and more exotic models. Also the prospects for highly improved measurements of SM parameters such as the top quark mass and electro-weak gauge boson properties are discussed. The implications for the design of an appropriate detector are outlined and current R&D developments are explained. Particular emphasis will be given to the complementarity and intimate interplay of physics at the LHC and the ILC. The additional benefit of multi-TeV e+e- collisions as envisaged i...

  17. Signals of universal extra dimension at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplob Bhattacherjee

    2007-11-01

    In the minimal universal extra dimension model, single production of = 2 gauge bosons provides a unique discriminating feature from supersymmetry. We discuss how the proposed international linear collider can act as a = 2 factory, much in the same vein as LEP.

  18. Meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Provisional Agenda for the 111th meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee to be held on Wednesday and Thursday, 26-27 September 2012. Open Session: Wednesday, 26 September at 9 a.m. in the Main Auditorium (Bldg. 500-1-001)  09.00 - 09.20    LHC Machine Status Report  09.30 - 10.00    ATLAS Status Report  10.10 - 10.40    CMS Status Report  10.50 - 11.10    COFFEE BREAK 11.10 - 11.40    LHCb Status Report 11.50 - 12.20   ALICE Status Report 12.30 - 12.50   TOTEM Status Report 13.00 - 13.20   LHCf Status Report

  19. Large Hadron Collider momentum calibration and accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051266; Todesco, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the excellent quality of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experimental detectors and the accurate calibration of the luminosity at the LHC, uncertainties on the LHC beam energy may contribute significantly to the measurement errors on certain observables unless the relative uncertainty is well below 1%. Direct measurements of the beam energy using the revolution frequency difference of proton and lead beams combined with the magnetic model errors are used to provide the energy uncertainty of the LHC beams. Above injection energy the relative uncertainty on the beam energy is determined to be ±0.1%. The energy values as reconstructed and distributed online to the LHC experiments do not require any correction above injection energy. At injection a correction of +0.31 GeV/c must be applied to the online energy values.

  20. Large Hadron Collider momentum calibration and accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todesco, E.; Wenninger, J.

    2017-08-01

    As a result of the excellent quality of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experimental detectors and the accurate calibration of the luminosity at the LHC, uncertainties on the LHC beam energy may contribute significantly to the measurement errors on certain observables unless the relative uncertainty is well below 1%. Direct measurements of the beam energy using the revolution frequency difference of proton and lead beams combined with the magnetic model errors are used to provide the energy uncertainty of the LHC beams. Above injection energy the relative uncertainty on the beam energy is determined to be ±0.1 %. The energy values as reconstructed and distributed online to the LHC experiments do not require any correction above injection energy. At injection a correction of +0.31 GeV /c must be applied to the online energy values.

  1. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  2. On-line control models for the Stanford Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Woodley, M.D.

    1983-03-01

    Models for computer control of the SLAC three-kilometer linear accelerator and damping rings have been developed as part of the control system for the Stanford Linear Collider. Some of these models have been tested experimentally and implemented in the control program for routine linac operations. This paper will describe the development and implementation of these models, as well as some of the operational results.

  3. Physics with $e^{+}e^{-}$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gerdes, D W

    2000-01-01

    I discuss the motivation and physics potential of an electron-positron linearcollider with a center-of-mass energy at the 1 TeV scale, in light of what wemay expect to learn with the LHC. The comparison is illustrated with examplesdrawn from Higgs physics, top quark physics, and the search for large extraspacetime dimensions.

  4. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Philipp Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future $e^+e^-$ collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, $\\sqrt{s} =$ 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung ($e^+e^-\\to ZH$) and $WW$-fusion ($e^+e^-\\to H\

  5. International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, Eckhard; /DESY; Harrison, Mike; /Brookhaven; Hesla, Leah; /Fermilab; Ross, Marc; /Fermilab; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; /Paris, IN2P3; Takahashi, Rika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Walker, Nicholas; /DESY; Warmbein, Barbara; /DESY; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Yokoya, Kaoru; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhang, Min; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2011-11-04

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  6. Tune variations in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilina, N. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Giovannozzi, M.; Lamont, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Sammut, N. [University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Steinhagen, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Todesco, E., E-mail: ezio.todesco@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Wenninger, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The horizontal and vertical betatron tunes of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly depend on the strength of the quadrupole magnets, but are also affected by the quadrupole component in the main dipoles. In case of systematic misalignments, the sextupole component from the main dipoles and sextupole corrector magnets also affect the tunes due to the feed down effect. During the first years of operation of the LHC, the tunes have been routinely measured and corrected through either a feedback or a feed forward system. In this paper, the evolution of the tunes during injection, ramp and flat top are reconstructed from the beam measurements and the settings of the tune feedback loop and of the feed forward corrections. This gives the obtained precision of the magnetic model of the machine with respect to quadrupole and sextupole components. Measurements at the injection plateau show an unexpected large decay whose origin is not understood. This data is discussed together with the time constants and the dependence on previous cycles. We present results of dedicated experiments that show that this effect does not originate from the decay of the main dipole component. During the ramp, the tunes drift by about 0.022. It is shown that this is related to the precision of tracking the quadrupole field in the machine and this effect is reduced to about 0.01 tune units during flat top.

  7. Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36'000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m3 static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for non-isothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressors. T...

  8. Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m/sup 3/ static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for nonisothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressor...

  9. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  10. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  11. Design of a dependable Interlock System for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Nouvel, Patrice

    For high energy accelerators, the interlock system is a key part of the machine protection. The interlock principle is to inhibit the beam either on failure of critical equipment and/or on low beam quality evaluation. The dependability of such a system is the most critical parameter. This thesis presents the design of an dependable interlock system for linear collider with an application to the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project. This design process is based on the IEEE 1220 standard and is is divided in four steps. First, the specifications are established, with a focus on the dependability, more precisely the reliability and the availability of the system. The second step is the design proposal based on a functional analysis, the CLIC and interfaced systems architecture. Third, the feasibility study is performed, applying the concepts in an accelerator facility. Finally, the last step is the hardware verification. Its aim is to prove that the proposed design is able to reach the requirements.

  12. Design Issues of TeV Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P

    1996-01-01

    Within the frame work of a world-wide collabora-tion, various possible approaches for Linear Colliders in the TeV energy range (TLC) and high luminosity (~ 1034 cm-2 sec-1) are explored in different laboratories and periodically compared in international workshops. The main accelerator physics issues required to meet the requested performance improvement by three orders of magnitude in luminosity and by a factor 10 in beam energy with respect to the unique linear collider presently operational, the SLC at SLAC, are reviewed, pointing out the main challenges common to all designs as well as the possible technological choices. Corresponding designs based on the improve-ment of present standard or the development of new tech-nologies are presented, emphasizing their main issues and specific challenges. The main goals of ambitious test facilities presently set-up to study the feasibility and cost of the various schemes in the next few years are introduced.

  13. LCIO - A persistency framework for linear collider simulation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Norman

    2003-06-17

    Almost all groups involved in linear collider detector studies have their own simulation software framework. Using a common persistency scheme would allow to easily share results and compare reconstruction algorithms. We present such a persistency framework, called LCIO (Linear Collider I/O). The framework has to fulfill the requirements of the different groups today and be flexible enough to be adapted to future needs. To that end we define an ''abstract object persistency layer'' that will be used by the applications. A first implementation, based on a sequential file format (SIO) is completely separated from the interface, thus allowing support to additional formats if necessary. The interface is defined with the AID (Abstract Interface Definition) tool from freehep.org that allows creation of Java and C++ code synchronously. In order to make use of legacy software a Fortran interface is also provided. We present the design and implementation of LCIO.

  14. Il Collisore LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

    CERN Multimedia

    Brianti, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    In 2007, in a new Collider in the tunnel of 27km, collisions will be made between very powerful beams of protons and ions. The energies will be very high to try to catch the most tiny particle (1 page)

  15. Luminosity Measurement at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, B L; Pinfold, J L

    2006-01-01

    Two novel methods of measuring the luminosity delivered to the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiments are presented. The production of $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pair via two photon interactions and single $W^{\\pm}/Z^{0}$ boson production are evaluated as methods for the measurement and monitoring of the proton-proton luminosity at the LHC. The characteristics of the $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pairs from coherent $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions are examined for both matrix element and equivalent photon based monte carlo generators with subsequent simulation of the ATLAS detector effects. The application of specific kinematic and vertex fit requirements is shown to offer a strong method of isolating signal from background and in turn yield an accurate offline measurement of the delivered luminosity via the pure QED process. The choice of kinematic cuts is shown to reduce the overall uncertainty in the method by limiting the size of corrections to the two photon interaction cross section to the level of 1\\%. B...

  16. Luminosity Measurement at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, B L; Pinfold, J L

    2006-01-01

    Two novel methods of measuring the luminosity delivered to the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiments are presented. The production of $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pair via two photon interactions and single $W^{\\pm}/Z^{0}$ boson production are evaluated as methods for the measurement and monitoring of the proton-proton luminosity at the LHC. The characteristics of the $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pairs from coherent $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions are examined for both matrix element and equivalent photon based monte carlo generators with subsequent simulation of the ATLAS detector effects. The application of specific kinematic and vertex fit requirements is shown to offer a strong method of isolating signal from background and in turn yield an accurate offline measurement of the delivered luminosity via the pure QED process. The choice of kinematic cuts is shown to reduce the overall uncertainty in the method by limiting the size of corrections to the two photon interaction cross section to the level of 1\\%. B...

  17. Active quadrupole stabilization for future linear particle colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, Christophe; Kuzmin, Andrey; Janssens, Stef; Sylte, Magnus; Guinchard, Michael; Hauviller, Claude

    2010-01-01

    The future Compact LInear particle Collider (CLIC) under study at CERN will require to stabilize heavy electromagnets, and also to provide them some positioning capabilities. Firstly, this paper presents the concept adopted to address both requirements. Secondly, the control strategy adopted for the stabilization is studied numerically, showing that the quadrupole can be stabilized in both lateral and vertical direction. Finally, the strategy is validated experimentally on a single degree of freedom scaled test bench.

  18. High Momentum Resolution tracking In a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ljunggren, M; Oskarsson, A

    2011-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been made within the LCTPC-collaboration, an international collaboration for studying the technical aspects af a possible tracking detector at a linear collider. The collaboration has built a prototype Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for testing the properties of dierent readout structures. A TPC is a tracking detector consisting of a gas lled drift volume placed in a solenoidal magnetic eld where the readout is made using a segmented plane of so called pads. When a char...

  19. Beam trajectory control of the future Compact Linear Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Balik, G.; Badel, A.; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L.; Caron, B.; Deleglise, G.; Jérémie, A.; Le Breton, R.; Lottin, J.; Pacquet, L.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under design at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) would create high-energy particle collisions between electrons and positrons, and provide a tool for scientists to address many of the most compelling questions about the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space and time. In accelerating structure, it is well-established that vibrations generated by the ground motion constitute the main limiting fact...

  20. Aspects of W Physics at the Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Boudjema, F

    1997-01-01

    It is argued that the next linear colliders can serve as W factories that may be exploited for precision tests on the properties of the massive gauge bosons. The connection between the probing of the symmetry breaking sector and precise measurement of the self-couplings of the weak vector bosons is stressed. The discussion relies much on the impact of the present low-energy data, especially LEP1. These have restricted some paths that lead to the exploration of the scalar sector through the investigation of the so-called anomalous couplings of the W's and suggest a hierarchy in the classification of these parameters. The limits we expect to set on these couplings at the different modes of the linear colliders are reviewed and compared with those one obtains at the LHC. The conclusion is that the first phase of a linear collider running at 500 GeV and the LHC are complementary. Some important issues concerning radiative corrections and backgrounds that need further studies in order that one conducts high precis...

  1. 9th International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This school is a continuation of the series of schools that began nine years ago: Japan 2006, Italy 2007, United States 2008, China 2009, Switzerland 2010, United States 2011, India 2012 and Turkey 2013. Based on needs from the accelerator community, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC) and ICFA Beam Dynamics Panel are organising the Ninth International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. The school will present instruction in TeV-scale linear colliders including the ILC, CLIC and other advanced accelerators. An important change of this year’s school from previous LC schools is that it will also include the free electron laser (FEL), a natural extension for applications of the ILC/CLIC technology. The school is offered to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and junior researchers from around the world. We welcome applications from physicists who are considering changing to a career in accelerator physics and technology. This school adopts an in depth approach. A selective course on the FEL has b...

  2. International linear collider physics and detectors. 2011 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Oregon Univ., OR (United States); Fuster, Juan [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Hesla, Leah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center; Illenseer, Monika; Warmbein, Barbara [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Royole-Degieux, Perrine [CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Takahashi, Rika [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamada, Sakue [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Gakuin Univ., Sendai (Japan); Min, Zhang (eds.) [IHEP, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    The studies of physics and detectors for the International Linear Collider are an important parallel element to the effort for the ILC Technical Design Report. The studies comprise the physics opportunities, detector requirements, and detector development to achieve the challenging high performance demanded by the physics, as well as integration of detectors into the accelerator. The current phase of this effort began with a call for Letters of Intent (LOIs) in 2007 and will lead to the submission of Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) report together with the ILC Technical Design Report at the end of 2012. Here we summarise the current status of this process, review what it has accomplished and identify the work that still needs to be completed. This report, titled International Linear Collider Physics and Detectors: 2011 Status Report, does just this. This report begins with a discussion of the outstanding issues in physics that motivate the construction of the ILC. It describes the organisation of the LOI process, the validation of the LOIs by the International Detector Advisory Group, and the results of R and D carried out to support the detector designs. The details of the concept detectors have already been published in the LOIs, which were completed in 2009. This report will, in a complementary way, describe the status of the detector R and D for each individual detector component and the status of the physics simulation infrastructure that has been built for the detector design process. Much of this work is carried out in cooperation between the two detector concept groups. This report describes the five common task groups and two working groups that have organised these cooperative activities. Many members of the detector concept groups and the common task groups have contributed to this report. Many more people have carried out the actual work that is reviewed. The complete list of members of each detector concept group can be found from the author lists of

  3. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  4. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E

    2001-06-05

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide.

  5. Design of main linac emittance tuning bumps for the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peder Eliasson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The installation of elements in the main linac of future linear colliders can only be done with a limited precision. The inevitable misalignments lead to unacceptable emittance growth. Beam-based alignment, e.g., one-to-one correction, dispersion free steering, or ballistic alignment, is necessary to reduce the emittance growth. In some cases, this is, however, not sufficient. For further reduction of the emittance growth, so-called emittance tuning bumps have to be used. A general strategy for the design of emittance tuning bumps has been developed and tested. Simulations suggest that the method can be conveniently used to understand the weaknesses of existing emittance tuning bumps and to significantly improve their performance in terms of, e.g., emittance reduction capability and convergence speed. An example of an application is the design of ten orthogonal knobs that, according to simulations, can reduce the normalized emittance growth in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC main linac from 23.8 to 0.34 nm with convergence within two iterations. Four orthogonal knobs have also been designed for the International Linear Collider (ILC. Simulations show that these knobs converge within a single iteration and reduce normalized emittance growth from 3.8 to 0.05 nm.

  6. Updated baseline for a staged Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Boland, M J; Giansiracusa, P J; Lucas, T G; Rassool, R P; Balazs, C; Charles, T K; Afanaciev, K; Emeliantchik, I; Ignatenko, A; Makarenko, V; Shumeiko, N; Patapenka, A; Zhuk, I; Abusleme Hoffman, A C; Diaz Gutierrez, M A; Gonzalez, M Vogel; Chi, Y; He, X; Pei, G; Pei, S; Shu, G; Wang, X; Zhang, J; Zhao, F; Zhou, Z; Chen, H; Gao, Y; Huang, W; Kuang, Y P; Li, B; Li, Y; Shao, J; Shi, J; Tang, C; Wu, X; Ma, L; Han, Y; Fang, W; Gu, Q; Huang, D; Huang, X; Tan, J; Wang, Z; Zhao, Z; Laštovička, T; Uggerhoj, U; Wistisen, T N; Aabloo, A; Eimre, K; Kuppart, K; Vigonski, S; Zadin, V; Aicheler, M; Baibuz, E; Brücken, E; Djurabekova, F; Eerola, P; Garcia, F; Haeggström, E; Huitu, K; Jansson, V; Karimaki, V; Kassamakov, I; Kyritsakis, A; Lehti, S; Meriläinen, A; Montonen, R; Niinikoski, T; Nordlund, K; Österberg, K; Parekh, M; Törnqvist, N A; Väinölä, J; Veske, M; Farabolini, W; Mollard, A; Napoly, O; Peauger, F; Plouin, J; Bambade, P; Chaikovska, I; Chehab, R; Davier, M; Kaabi, W; Kou, E; LeDiberder, F; Pöschl, R; Zerwas, D; Aimard, B; Balik, G; Baud, J-P; Blaising, J-J; Brunetti, L; Chefdeville, M; Drancourt, C; Geoffroy, N; Jacquemier, J; Jeremie, A; Karyotakis, Y; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Vouters, G; Bernard, A; Peric, I; Gabriel, M; Simon, F; Szalay, M; van der Kolk, N; Alexopoulos, T; Gazis, E N; Gazis, N; Ikarios, E; Kostopoulos, V; Kourkoulis, S; Gupta, P D; Shrivastava, P; Arfaei, H; Dayyani, M K; Ghasem, H; Hajari, S S; Shaker, H; Ashkenazy, Y; Abramowicz, H; Benhammou, Y; Borysov, O; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Levy, I; Rosenblat, O; D'Auria, G; Di Mitri, S; Abe, T; Aryshev, A; Higo, T; Makida, Y; Matsumoto, S; Shidara, T; Takatomi, T; Takubo, Y; Tauchi, T; Toge, N; Ueno, K; Urakawa, J; Yamamoto, A; Yamanaka, M; Raboanary, R; Hart, R; van der Graaf, H; Eigen, G; Zalieckas, J; Adli, E; Lillestøl, R; Malina, L; Pfingstner, J; Sjobak, K N; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Hoorani, H; Bugiel, S; Dasgupta, R; Firlej, M; Fiutowski, T A; Idzik, M; Kopec, M; Kuczynska, M; Moron, J; Swientek, K P; Daniluk, W; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Lesiak, T; Moszczynski, A; Pawlik, B; Sopicki, P; Wojtoń, T; Zawiejski, L; Kalinowski, J; Krawczyk, M; Żarnecki, A F; Firu, E; Ghenescu, V; Neagu, A T; Preda, T; Zgura, I-S; Aloev, A; Azaryan, N; Budagov, J; Chizhov, M; Filippova, M; Glagolev, V; Gongadze, A; Grigoryan, S; Gudkov, D; Karjavine, V; Lyablin, M; Olyunin, A; Samochkine, A; Sapronov, A; Shirkov, G; Soldatov, V; Solodko, A; Solodko, E; Trubnikov, G; Tyapkin, I; Uzhinsky, V; Vorozhtov, A; Levichev, E; Mezentsev, N; Piminov, P; Shatilov, D; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Kacarevic, G; Lukic, S; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G; Pandurovic, M; Iriso, U; Perez, F; Pont, M; Trenado, J; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Calero, J; Garcia-Tabares, L; Gavela, D; Gutierrez, J L; Lopez, D; Toral, F; Moya, D; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Vila, I; Argyropoulos, T; Blanch Gutierrez, C; Boronat, M; Esperante, D; Faus-Golfe, A; Fuster, J; Fuster Martinez, N; Galindo Muñoz, N; García, I; Giner Navarro, J; Ros, E; Vos, M; Brenner, R; Ekelöf, T; Jacewicz, M; Ögren, J; Olvegård, M; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V; Aguglia, D; Alipour Tehrani, N; Aloev, A; Andersson, A; Andrianala, F; Antoniou, F; Artoos, K; Atieh, S; Ballabriga Sune, R; Barnes, M J; Barranco Garcia, J; Bartosik, H; Belver-Aguilar, C; Benot Morell, A; Bett, D R; Bettoni, S; Blanchot, G; Blanco Garcia, O; Bonnin, X A; Brunner, O; Burkhardt, H; Calatroni, S; Campbell, M; Catalan Lasheras, N; Cerqueira Bastos, M; Cherif, A; Chevallay, E; Constance, B; Corsini, R; Cure, B; Curt, S; Dalena, B; Dannheim, D; De Michele, G; De Oliveira, L; Deelen, N; Delahaye, J P; Dobers, T; Doebert, S; Draper, M; Duarte Ramos, F; Dubrovskiy, A; Elsener, K; Esberg, J; Esposito, M; Fedosseev, V; Ferracin, P; Fiergolski, A; Foraz, K; Fowler, A; Friebel, F; Fuchs, J-F; Fuentes Rojas, C A; Gaddi, A; Garcia Fajardo, L; Garcia Morales, H; Garion, C; Gatignon, L; Gayde, J-C; Gerwig, H; Goldblatt, A N; Grefe, C; Grudiev, A; Guillot-Vignot, F G; Gutt-Mostowy, M L; Hauschild, M; Hessler, C; Holma, J K; Holzer, E; Hourican, M; Hynds, D; Inntjore Levinsen, Y; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jonker, M; Kastriotou, M; Kemppinen, J M K; Kieffer, R B; Klempt, W; Kononenko, O; Korsback, A; Koukovini Platia, E; Kovermann, J W; Kozsar, C-I; Kremastiotis, I; Kulis, S; Latina, A; Leaux, F; Lebrun, P; Lefevre, T; Linssen, L; Llopart Cudie, X; Maier, A A; Mainaud Durand, H; Manosperti, E; Marelli, C; Marin Lacoma, E; Martin, R; Mazzoni, S; Mcmonagle, G; Mete, O; Mether, L M; Modena, M; Münker, R M; Muranaka, T; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nikiforou, N; Nisbet, D; Nonglaton, J-M; Nuiry, F X; Nürnberg, A; Olvegard, M; Osborne, J; Papadopoulou, S; Papaphilippou, Y; Passarelli, A; Patecki, M; Pazdera, L; Pellegrini, D; Pepitone, K; Perez, F; Perez Codina, E; Perez Fontenla, A; Persson, T H B; Petrič, M; Pitters, F; Pittet, S; Plassard, F; Rajamak, R; Redford, S; Renier, Y; Rey, S F; Riddone, G; Rinolfi, L; Rodriguez Castro, E; Roloff, P; Rossi, C; Rude, V; Rumolo, G; Sailer, A; Santin, E; Schlatter, D; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Shipman, N; Sicking, E; Simoniello, R; Skowronski, P K; Sobrino Mompean, P; Soby, L; Sosin, M P; Sroka, S; Stapnes, S; Sterbini, G; Ström, R; Syratchev, I; Tecker, F; Thonet, P A; Timeo, L; Timko, H; Tomas Garcia, R; Valerio, P; Vamvakas, A L; Vivoli, A; Weber, M A; Wegner, R; Wendt, M; Woolley, B; Wuensch, W; Uythoven, J; Zha, H; Zisopoulos, P; Benoit, M; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M; Bopp, M; Braun, H H; Csatari Divall, M; Dehler, M; Garvey, T; Raguin, J Y; Rivkin, L; Zennaro, R; Aksoy, A; Nergiz, Z; Pilicer, E; Tapan, I; Yavas, O; Baturin, V; Kholodov, R; Lebedynskyi, S; Miroshnichenko, V; Mordyk, S; Profatilova, I; Storizhko, V; Watson, N; Winter, A; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Marshall, J S; Thomson, M A; Xu, B; Gillespie, W A; Pan, R; Tyrk, M A; Protopopescu, D; Robson, A; Apsimon, R; Bailey, I; Burt, G; Constable, D; Dexter, A; Karimian, S; Lingwood, C; Buckland, M D; Casse, G; Vossebeld, J; Bosco, A; Karataev, P; Kruchinin, K; Lekomtsev, K; Nevay, L; Snuverink, J; Yamakawa, E; Boisvert, V; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Gibson, S; Lyapin, A; Shields, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; West, S; Jones, R; Joshi, N; Bodenstein, R; Burrows, P N; Christian, G B; Gamba, D; Perry, C; Roberts, J; Clarke, J A; Collomb, N A; Jamison, S P; Shepherd, B J A; Walsh, D; Demarteau, M; Repond, J; Weerts, H; Xia, L; Wells, J D; Adolphsen, C; Barklow, T; Breidenbach, M; Graf, N; Hewett, J; Markiewicz, T; McCormick, D; Moffeit, K; Nosochkov, Y; Oriunno, M; Phinney, N; Rizzo, T; Tantawi, S; Wang, F; Wang, J; White, G; Woodley, M

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a multi-TeV high-luminosity linear e+e- collider under development. For an optimal exploitation of its physics potential, CLIC is foreseen to be built and operated in a staged approach with three centre-of-mass energy stages ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The first stage will focus on precision Standard Model physics, in particular Higgs and top-quark measurements. Subsequent stages will focus on measurements of rare Higgs processes, as well as searches for new physics processes and precision measurements of new states, e.g. states previously discovered at LHC or at CLIC itself. In the 2012 CLIC Conceptual Design Report, a fully optimised 3 TeV collider was presented, while the proposed lower energy stages were not studied to the same level of detail. This report presents an updated baseline staging scenario for CLIC. The scenario is the result of a comprehensive study addressing the performance, cost and power of the CLIC accelerator complex as a function of...

  7. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  8. Colliding. gamma. e- and. gamma gamma. -beams on the basis of electron-positron linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F.; Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G.; Tel' nov, V.I.

    1983-08-01

    Main properties of the ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. collisions are discussed in some detail with application to the generation of colliding ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams basing on the designed linear accelerators with colliding e/sup +/e/sup -/ beams, VLEEP and SLC, as it was proposed in a previous work. Intensive ..gamma.. beams with the energy 50 GeV would be produced from scattering of the laser light focused to the electron beams of the accelerators. Laser radiation is focused to the electron beam in the conversion region at a distance of about 10 cm from the place of collision. After scattering on electrons high-energy photons move practically along the electron primary trajectories and are focused in the collision region. The electrons are deflected from the collision region by means of approximately 1 T magnetic field. Then the produced ..gamma..-beam collides with an electron beam or a similar ..gamma..-beam. In the case when the maximum luminosity (L) is attained, the luminosity distribution in the invariant mass of the ..gamma..e or ..gamma gamma.. systems is wide. A monochromatization of the collisions up to the level of 5-10% is possible. That will entail a decrease in the luminosity, the procedure is most effective if one uses the electrons and the laser photons with opposite helicities. Examples of physically interesting problems to be investigated with the proposed ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams are suggested.

  9. Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

  10. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Tracking studies of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I.; Burkhardt, H.; Schulte, D.; /CERN; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Blair, G.A.; Malton, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Resta-Lopez, J.; /Oxford U., JAI

    2009-08-01

    A collimation system performance study includes several types of computations performed by different codes. Optics calculations are performed with codes such as MADX, tracking studies including additional effects such as wakefields, halo and tail generation, and dynamical machine alignment are done with codes such as PLACET, and energy deposition can be studied with BDSIM. More detailed studies of hadron production in the beam halo interaction with collimators are better performed with GEANT4 and FLUKA. A procedure has been developed that allows one to perform a single tracking study using several codes simultaneously. In this paper we study the performance of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system using such a procedure.

  12. Staging optics considerations for a plasma wakefield acceleration linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrøm, C.A., E-mail: c.a.lindstrom@fys.uio.no [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Adli, E. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Allen, J.M.; Delahaye, J.P.; Hogan, M.J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Joshi, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Muggli, P. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); Raubenheimer, T.O.; Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration offers acceleration gradients of several GeV/m, ideal for a next-generation linear collider. The beam optics requirements between plasma cells include injection and extraction of drive beams, matching the main beam beta functions into the next cell, canceling dispersion as well as constraining bunch lengthening and chromaticity. To maintain a high effective acceleration gradient, this must be accomplished in the shortest distance possible. A working example is presented, using novel methods to correct chromaticity, as well as scaling laws for a high energy regime.

  13. The International Linear Collider: An R&D Progress Report

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Mike; Ross, Marc; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; Takahashi, Rika; Walker, Nicholas; Warmbein, Barbara; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru; Zhang, Min; Elsen, Eckhard

    2011-01-01

    The International Linear Collider: An R&D Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk.

  14. Dielectric Collimators for Linear Collider Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Kanareykin, A; Baturin, S; Tomás, R

    2011-01-01

    The current status of ILC and CLIC concepts require additional research on wakefield reduction in the collimator sections. New materials and new geometries have been considered recently*. Dielectric collimators for the CLIC Beam Delivery System have been discussed with a view to minimize the BDS collimation wakefields**. Dielectric collimator concepts for the linear collider are presented in this paper; cylindrical and planar collimators for the CLIC parameters have been considered, and simulations to minimize the beam impedance have been performed. The prototype collimator system is planned to be fabricated and experimentally tested at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams (FACET) at SLAC.

  15. Tuning of the Compact Linear Collider Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Inntjore Levinsen, Y; Latina, A; Tomas, R; Snuverink, J

    2014-01-01

    Tuning the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) BeamDelivery System (BDS), and in particular the Final Focus (FF), is a challenging task. In simulations without misalignments, the goal is to reach 120%o f the nominal luminosity target, in order to allow for 10% loss due to static imperfections, and another 10% loss from dynamic imperfections. Various approaches have been considered to correct the magnet misalignments, including 1-1 correction, Dispersion Free Steering (DFS), and several minimization methods utilizing multipole movers. In this paper we report on the recent advancements towards a feasible tuning approach that reaches the required luminosity target.

  16. New ideas on SUSY searches at future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselbach, S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kittel, O. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - C.S.I.C., Universitat de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Moortgat-Pick, G. [IPPP, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Oeller, W. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Several results obtained within the SUSY group of the ECFA/DESY linear collider study are presented: (i) a possibility to determine tan {beta} and the trilinear couplings A{sub f} via polarisation in sfermion decays, (ii) the impact of complex MSSM parameters on the third generation sfermion decays, (iii) determination of CP violation in the complex MSSM via T-odd asymmetries in neutralino production and decay, and (iv) an analysis of the chargino and neutralino mass parameters at one-loop level. (orig.)

  17. GARLIC: GAmma Reconstruction at a LInear Collider experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jeans, Daniel; Reinhard, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    The precise measurement of hadronic jet energy is crucial to maximise the physics reach of a future Linear Collider. An important ingredient required to achieve this is the efficient identification of photons within hadronic showers. One configuration of the ILD detector concept employs a highly granular silicon-tungsten sampling calorimeter to identify and measure photons, and the GARLIC algorithm described in this paper has been developed to identify photons in such a calorimeter. We describe the algorithm and characterise its performance using events fully simulated in a model of the ILD detector.

  18. GARLIC: GAmma Reconstruction at a LInear Collider experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, D.; Brient, J.-C.; Reinhard, M.

    2012-06-01

    The precise measurement of hadronic jet energy is crucial to maximise the physics reach of a future Linear Collider. An important ingredient required to achieve this is the efficient identification of photons within hadronic showers. One configuration of the ILD detector concept employs a highly granular silicon-tungsten sampling calorimeter to identify and measure photons, and the GARLIC algorithm described in this paper has been developed to identify photons in such a calorimeter. We describe the algorithm and characterise its performance using events fully simulated in a model of the ILD detector.

  19. Approaches to Beam Stabilization in X-Band Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Josef; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Raubenheimer, Tor; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Burrow, Philip; Molloy, Stephen; White, Glen; /Queen Mary U.

    2006-09-05

    In order to stabilize the beams at the interaction point, the X-band linear collider proposes to use a combination of techniques: inter-train and intra-train beam-beam feedback, passive vibration isolation, and active vibration stabilization based on either accelerometers or laser interferometers. These systems operate in a technologically redundant fashion: simulations indicate that if one technique proves unusable in the final machine, the others will still support adequate luminosity. Experiments underway for all of these technologies have already demonstrated adequate performance.

  20. Large Hadron Collider The Discovery Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The mammoth machine, after a nine-year construction period, is scheduled (touch wood) to begin producing its beams of particles later this year. The commissioning process is planned to proceed from one beam to two beams to colliding beams; from lower energies to the terascale; from weaker test intensities to stronger ones suitable for producing data at useful rates but more difficult to control.

  1. Large Hadron Collider slideshow shows future of physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Kramer, S E

    2007-01-01

    "The European organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has been building the Large Hadron Collider for many years, but it's finally taking shape and prepping to operate at full power in 2008." (1/2 page)

  2. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, S.; Bergsma, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernardet, K.; Berriaud, C.; Berry, T.; Bertelsen, H.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besson, N.; Beteille, A.; Bethke, S.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Binet, S.; Bingefors, N.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzell, J. P.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blaising, J. J.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bonino, R.; Bonis, J.; Bonivento, W.; Bonneau, P.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P. S. L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. A.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borjanovic, I.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosi, F.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Botchev, B.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouzakis, K.; Boyd, G. R.; Boyd, J.; Boyer, B. H.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Braccini, S.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Braun, H. M.; Bravo, S.; Brawn, I. P.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Breugnon, P.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Broklova, Z.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brouwer, G.; Broz, J.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Budagov, I. A.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bujor, F.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burckhart-Chromek, D.; Burdin, S.; Burns, R.; Busato, E.; Buskop, J. J. F.; Buszello, K. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Cabruja Casas, E.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calderón Terol, D.; Callahan, J.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camard, A.; Camarena, F.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Canale, V.; Cantero, J.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Carcagno, Y.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardeira, C.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Cardini, A.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carr, F. S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castelo, J.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Castrovillari, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cernoch, C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chalifour, M.; Chamizo llatas, M.; Chan, A.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Charron, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheng, T. L.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chevalley, J. L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chren, D.; Christiansen, T.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuguev, A. G.; Ciapetti, G.; Cicalini, E.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Civera, J. V.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B. C.; Clément, C.; Clements, D.; Clifft, R. W.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coco, R.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F. A.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corso-Radu, A.; Coss, J.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cox, J.; Cragg, D. A.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuneo, S.; Cunha, A.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Silva, R.; Dabrowski, W.; Dael, A.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Dalmau, J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Damazio, D.; Dameri, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Dargent, P.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; David, M.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Boer, R.; DeCastro, S.; DeGroot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Broise, X.; DeLa Cruz-Burelo, E.; DeLa Taille, C.; DeLotto, B.; DeOliveira Branco, M.; DePedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; DeSalvo, A.; DeSanctis, U.; DeSanto, A.; DeVivie DeRegie, J. B.; DeZorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D. V.; Defay, P. O.; Degele, R.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; DelPapa, C.; DelPeso, J.; DelPrete, T.; Delagnes, E.; Delebecque, P.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca Silberberg, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demierre, P.; Demirköz, B.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Dennis, C.; Densham, C. J.; Dentan, M.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K. K.; Dewhurst, A.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Simone, A.; Diaz Gomez, M. M.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietsche, W.; Diglio, S.; Dima, M.; Dindar, K.; Dinkespiler, B.; Dionisi, C.; Dipanjan, R.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, S. D.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O. B.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Domingo, E.; Donega, M.; Dopke, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Dorholt, O.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drake, G.; Drakoulakos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Drohan, J. G.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dührssen, M.; Dür, H.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duffin, S.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dumont Dayot, N.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Durand, D.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Díez Cornell, S.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egede, U.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; Eklund, L. M.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engström, M.; Ennes, P.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Epshteyn, V. S.; Ereditato, A.; Eremin, V.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Esteves, F.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Eyring, A.; Fabbri, L.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabre, C.; Faccioli, P.; Facius, K.; Fadeyev, V.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falleau, I.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farrell, J.; Farthouat, P.; Fasching, D.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fawzi, F.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Feld, L.; Feldman, G.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fent, J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferguson, D.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferro, F.; Fiascaris, M.; Fichet, S.; Fiedler, F.; Filimonov, V.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, S. M.; Flaminio, V.; Flammer, J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Flegel, W.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fleta Corral, C. M.; Fleuret, F.; Flick, T.; Flix, J.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Föhlisch, F.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T. M.; Fopma, J.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Franz, S.; Fraser, J. T.; Fraternali, M.; Fratianni, S.; Freestone, J.; French, R. S.; Fritsch, K.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fulachier, J.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallas, M. V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gan, K. K.; Gannaway, F. C.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garciá, C.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcìa Navarro, J. E.; Garde, V.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V. G.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gautard, V.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Gazo, E.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M. A.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gernizky, Y.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghete, V. M.; Ghez, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, M. D.; Gibson, S. M.; Gieraltowski, G. F.; Gil Botella, I.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gildemeister, O.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Girard, C. G.; Giraud, P. F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Gnanvo, K. G.; Godlewski, J.; Göpfert, T.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N. P.; Golonka, P. J.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Gomes, J.; Gonçalo, R.; Gongadze, A.; Gonidec, A.; Gonzalez, S.; González de la Hoz, S.; González Millán, V.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; González-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordeev, A.; Gordon, H.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Gorski, B. T.; Goryachev, S. V.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouanère, M.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.; Gousakov, I.; Gouveia, J.; Gowdy, S.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grabski, V.; Grafström, P.; Grah, C.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassmann, H.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenall, A.; Greenfield, D.; Greenwood, D.; Gregor, I. M.; Grewal, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grigson, C.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimaldi, F.; Grimm, K.; Gris, P. L. Y.; Grishkevich, Y.; Groenstege, H.; Groer, L. S.; Grognuz, J.; Groh, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grothe, M. E. M.; Grudzinski, J.; Gruse, C.; Gruwe, M.; Grybel, K.; Grybos, P.; Gschwendtner, E. M.; Guarino, V. J.; Guicheney, C. J.; Guilhem, G.; Guillemin, T.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gupta, A.; Gurriana, L.; Gushchin, V. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Guy, L.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Haboubi, G.; Hackenburg, R.; Hadash, E.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haeberli, C.; Härtel, R.; Haggerty, R.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakimi, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hallgren, B.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Han, H.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, C. J.; Hansen, F. H.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hanson, G.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Harder, S.; Harel, A.; Harenberg, T.; Harper, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hart, R. G. G.; Hartjes, F.; Hartman, N.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Hatch, M.; Hatley, R. W.; Haubold, T. G.; Hauff, D.; Haug, F.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Hauviller, C.; Havranek, M.; Hawes, B. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, D.; Hayler, T.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Hazen, E.; He, M.; He, Y. P.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Heldmann, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hendriks, P. J.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Henß, T.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hess, M.; Hessey, N. P.; Hicheur, A.; Hidvegi, A.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, D.; Hill, J.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, N.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hindson, D.; Hinkelbein, C.; Hodges, T. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, A. E.; Hoffmann, D.; Hoffmann, H. F.; Holder, M.; Hollins, T. I.; Hollyman, G.; Holmes, A.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holt, R.; Holtom, E.; Holy, T.; Homer, R. J.; Homma, Y.; Homola, P.; Honerbach, W.; Honma, A.; Hooton, I.; Horazdovsky, T.; Horn, C.; Horvat, S.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hott, T.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M. A.; Hoummada, A.; Hover, J.; Howell, D. 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N.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Rabbers, J. J.; Radeka, V.; Rafi, J. M.; Ragusa, F.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Raine, C.; Raith, B.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rajek, S.; Rammer, H.; Ramstedt, M.; Rangod, S.; Ratoff, P. N.; Raufer, T.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Reads, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D.; Redlinger, G. R.; Reeves, K.; Rehak, M.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.; Renaudin-Crepe, S. R. C.; Renkel, P.; Rensch, B.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Rewiersma, P.; Rey, J.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Rezaie, E.; Reznicek, P.; Richards, R. A.; Richer, J.-P.; Richter, R. H.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Riegler, W.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rios, R. R.; Riu Dachs, I.; Rivline, M.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robins, S.; Robinson, D.; Robson, A.; Rochford, J. H.; Roda, C.; Rodier, S.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rohrbach, F.; Roldán, J.; Rolli, S.; Romance, J. B.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, F.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossi, L. P.; Rossi, L.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruber, R.; Ruckert, B.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruggiero, G.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkine, G.; da Costa, J. Sá; Saavedra, A. F.; Saboumazrag, S.; F-W Sadrozinski, H.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Sala, P.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salt, J.; Saltó Bauza, O.; Salvachúa Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sánchez Sánchez, C. A.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sanchis Peris, E.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansone, S.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santander, J.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Sapinski, M.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, D.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Savva, P.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrissa, E.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schaller, M.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schick, H.; Schieck, J.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schioppa, M.; Schlager, G.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, K.; Schmitz, M.; Schmücker, H.; Schoerner, T.; Scholte, R. C.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schram, M.; Schricker, A.; Schroff, D.; Schuh, S.; Schuijlenburg, H. W.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A.; Schweiger, D.; Schwemling, Ph; Schwick, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Secker, H.; Sedykh, E.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Selldén, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sexton, K. A.; Sfyrla, A.; Shah, T. P.; Shan, L.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shears, T. G.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shield, P.; Shilov, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoa, M.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siebel, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, D.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S.; Sjölin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slattery, P.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Small, A.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D. S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, B.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Soares, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Söderberg, M.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Sole, D.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solov'yanov, O. V.; Soloviev, I.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Soret Medel, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Soukup, J.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spegel, M.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Sprachmann, G.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Staley, R. J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stefanidis, E.; Steffens, J. L.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T. D.; Stiller, W.; Stockmanns, T.; Stodulski, M.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strickland, V.; Striegel, D.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultanov, S.; Sun, Z.; Sundal, B.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutcliffe, P.; Sutton, M. R.; Sviridov, Yu M.; Sykora, I.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Szeless, B.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taboada Gameiro, S.; Tadel, M.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tarrant, J.; Tartarelli, G.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Tcherniatine, V.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Terada, S.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thion, J.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, A.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timm, S.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Titov, M.; Tobias, J.; Tocut, V. M.; Toczek, B.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres Pais, J. G.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Towndrow, E. F.; Trefzger, T.; Treichel, M.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tribanek, W.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trilling, G.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trka, Z.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; C-L Tseng, J.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzamarioudaki, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Ullán Comes, M.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Usai, G.; Usov, Y.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Van Berg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Varanda, M.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vaz, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vedrine, P.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Vigeolas, E.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villate, J.; Villella, I.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincent, P.; Vincke, H.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Vollmer, C. F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  3. Scaling laws for e sup + /e sup - linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e sup + e sup - Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake fields with frequency, the single-bunch emittance blow-up during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high-frequency structures becomes ve...

  4. Scaling Laws for Normal Conducting $e^{\\pm}$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1998-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e± Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enabl es an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac paramet ers are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation durin g acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency struct ures becomes very ...

  5. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Burrows, Philip N.; Fuster, Juan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Sakue; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  6. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather E; Nomerotski, Andrei; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael E; Pöschl, Roman; Reuter, Jürgen; Riemann, Sabine; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Servant, Geraldine; Tait, Tim M P

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  7. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  8. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Barklow, Tim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fujii, Keisuke [National Lab. for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tokai (Japan); Gao, Yuanning [Unlisted; Hoang, Andre [Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kanemura, Shinya [Univ. of Toyama (Japan); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Logan, Heather E. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Nomerotski, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Perelstein, Maxim [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Peskin, Michael E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pöschl, Roman [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL); Reuter, Jürgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Savoy-Navarro, Aurore [CNRS/IN2P3. Univ. Paris (France). Observatoire de Paris. AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC); Servant, Geraldine [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tait, Tim P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  9. Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This document presents the scientific justification and the conceptual design for the {open_quotes}Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator{close_quotes} (NLCTA) at SLAC. The goals of the NLCTA are to integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and rf systems being developed for the Next Linear Collider, to measure the growth of the {open_quotes}dark current{close_quotes} generated by rf field emission in the accelerator, to demonstrate multi-bunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, and to measure any transverse components of the accelerating field. The NLCTA will be a 42-meter-long beam line consisting, consecutively, of a thermionic-cathode gun, an X-band buncher, a magnetic chicane, six 1.8-meter-long sections of 11.4-GHz accelerator structure, and a magnetic spectrometer. Initially, the unloaded accelerating gradient will be 50 MV/m. A higher-gradient upgrade option eventually would increase the unloaded gradient to 100 MV/m.

  10. International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee Report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This 1995 report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee is the first attempt to gather in one document the current status of all major e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider projects in the world. The report is the result of a collaborative effort of scientists from many laboratories working together over a period of about one year. A short description of the organization, origins and history of the report is given below. To get an idea of the organization, the reader should first refer to the Table of Contents. Chapter 1 is an introduction and general overview of the respective 500 GeV c.m. energy machines. In contrast, Chapter 2, cutting across individual machine boundaries, gives a comparative description and discussion of all the major machine sub-systems as well as particle physics experimentation, showing where these subjects stand today and what additional work needs to be done in the next few years to reach the point where complete design reports can be prepared. Chapter 3 describes the various paths to energy upgrades, and other experimental options ({gamma}{gamma}, e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, etc.). Chapter 4 gives a short status report of the machine experiments and test facilities being built in the world. Chapter 5 outlines current and other possible areas of collaboration and finally., Chapter 6 summarizes our principal conclusions.

  11. Design of main linac emittance tuning bumps for the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Eliasson, Peder

    2008-01-01

    The installation of elements in the main linac of future linear colliders can only be done with a limited precision. The inevitable misalignments lead to unacceptable emittance growth. Beam-based alignment, e.g., one-to-one correction, dispersion free steering, or ballistic alignment, is necessary to reduce the emittance growth. In some cases, this is, however, not sufficient. For further reduction of the emittance growth, so-called emittance tuning bumps have to be used. A general strategy for the design of emittance tuning bumps has been developed and tested. Simulations suggest that the method can be conveniently used to understand the weaknesses of existing emittance tuning bumps and to significantly improve their performance in terms of, e.g., emittance reduction capability and convergence speed. An example of an application is the design of ten orthogonal knobs that, according to simulations, can reduce the normalized emittance growth in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) main linac from 23.8 to 0.34 nm...

  12. Top pair threshold production at a linear collider with WHIZARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Fabian; Stahlhofen, Maximilian

    2014-12-15

    We briefly describe how the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD 2.2 can be employed to study large QCD effects enhancing the top-antitop production threshold at a next-generation lepton collider. While present state-of-the-art predictions at NNLL order are confined to inclusive total cross sections, our tool can be used to simulate differential distributions including NLL threshold resummation in the production, and with off-shell decaying tops. The new model will be shipped with WHIZARD from version 2.2.3 onwards, to be released along with this article.

  13. Top pair threshold production at a linear collider with WHIZARD

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We briefly describe how the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD 2.2 can be employed to study large QCD effects enhancing the top-antitop production threshold at a next-generation lepton collider. While present state-of-the-art predictions at NNLL order are confined to inclusive total cross sections, our tool can be used to simulate differential distributions including NLL threshold resummation in the production, and with off-shell decaying tops. The new model will be shipped with WHIZARD from version 2.2.3 onwards, to be released along with this article.

  14. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Afanaciev, K; Tehrani, N Alipour; Balázs, C; Benhammou, Y; Benoit, M; Bilki, B; Blaising, J -J; Boland, M J; Boronat, M; Borysov, O; Božović-Jelisavčić, I; Buckland, M; Bugiel, S; Burrows, P N; Charles, T K; Daniluk, W; Dannheim, D; Dasgupta, R; Demarteau, M; Gutierrez, M A Díaz; Eigen, G; Elsener, K; Felzmann, U; Firlej, M; Firu, E; Fiutowski, T; Fuster, J; Gabriel, M; Gaede, F; García, I; Ghenescu, V; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Grefe, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Kačarević, G; Kalinowski, J; Kananov, S; Klempt, W; Kopec, M; Krawczyk, M; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Kulis, S; Laštovička, T; Lesiak, T; Levy, A; Levy, I; Linssen, L; Lukić, S; Maier, A A; Makarenko, V; Marshall, J S; Mei, K; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G; Moroń, J; Moszczyński, A; Moya, D; Münker, R M; Münnich, A; Neagu, A T; Nikiforou, N; Nikolopoulos, K; Nürnberg, A; Pandurović, M; Pawlik, B; Codina, E Perez; Peric, I; Petric, M; Pitters, F; Poss, S G; Preda, T; Protopopescu, D; Rassool, R; Redford, S; Repond, J; Robson, A; Roloff, P; Ros, E; Rosenblat, O; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Sailer, A; Schlatter, D; Schulte, D; Shumeiko, N; Sicking, E; Simon, F; Simoniello, R; Sopicki, P; Stapnes, S; Ström, R; Strube, J; Świentek, K P; Szalay, M; Tesař, M; Thomson, M A; Trenado, J; Uggerhøj, U I; van der Kolk, N; van der Kraaij, E; Pinto, M Vicente Barreto; Vila, I; Gonzalez, M Vogel; Vos, M; Vossebeld, J; Watson, M; Watson, N; Weber, M A; Weerts, H; Wells, J D; Weuste, L; Winter, A; Wojtoń, T; Xia, L; Xu, B; Żarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zgura, I -S

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e+e- collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, sqrt(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e+e- -> ZH) and WW-fusion (e+e- -> Hnunu), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Gamma_H, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at sqrt(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e+e- -> ttH and e+e- -> HHnunu would allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of...

  15. Probing space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Ananthanarayan

    2007-11-01

    At the international linear collider large beam polarization of both the electron and positron beams will enhance the signature of physics due to interactions that are beyond the standard model. Here we review our recently obtained results on a general model-independent method of determining for an arbitary one-particle inclusive state the space-time structure of such new physics through the beam polarization dependence and angular distribution of the final state particle.

  16. Report on the international workshop on next generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1989-05-01

    Many laboratories around the world have begun vigorous research programs on a next generation linear collider (NLC). However, it has been recognized that the research towards NLC is beyond the capabilities of any one laboratory presently. This workshop was organized to begin a series of workshops that address this problem. Specifically, the main goals of the workshop were to discuss research programs of the various laboratories around the world, to identify common areas of interest in the various NLC designs, and finally to advance these programs by collaboration. The particular topics discussed briefly in this paper are: parameters, rf power, structures, final focus, beam dynamics, damping rings, and instrumentation. 2 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. A conventional positron source for International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gai, Wei; Kawada, Shin-ichi; Liu, Wanming; Okuda, Natsuki; Omori, Tsunehiko; Pei, Guoxi; Riemann, Sabine; Takahashi, Tohru; Urakawa, Junji; Ushakov, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    A possible solution to realize a conventional positron source driven by a several-GeV electron beam for the International Linear Collider is proposed. A 300 Hz electron linac is employed to create positrons with stretching pulse length in order to cure target thermal load. ILC requires about 2600 bunches in a train which pulse length is 1 ms. Each pulse of the 300 Hz linac creates about 130 bunches, then 2600 bunches are created in 63 ms. Optimized parameters such as drive beam energy, beam size, and target thickness, are discussed assuming a L-band capture system to maximize the capture efficiency and to mitigate the target thermal load. A slow rotating tungsten disk is employed as positron generation target.

  18. Double vector meson production in the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, V.P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Caixa Postal 354, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, B.D.; Navarra, F.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, C.P. 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper we study double vector meson production in γγ interactions at high energies and estimate, using the color dipole picture, the main observables which can be probed at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The total γ(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}) + γ(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}) → V{sub 1} + V{sub 2} cross sections for V{sub i} = ρ, J/ψ, and Υ are computed and the energy and virtuality dependencies are studied in detail. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analysis of this process is feasible at the ILC and it can be useful to constrain the QCD dynamics at high energies. (orig.)

  19. ILCDIRAC, a DIRAC extension for the Linear Collider community

    CERN Document Server

    Grefe, C; Sailer, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2014-01-01

    ILCDIRAC is a complete distributed computing solution for the Linear Collider community. It's an extension of the Dirac system and now used by all detector concepts of the LC community. ILCDIRAC provides a unified interface to the distributed resources for the ILC Virtual Organization and provides common interfaces to all ILC applications via a simplified API. It supports the overlay of beam-induced backgrounds with minimal impact on the Storage Elements by properly scheduling the jobs attempting to access the files. ILCDIRAC has been successfully used for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report and the ILC SiD Detailed Baseline Design, and is now adopted by the LC community as the official grid production tool. Members of the CALICE collaboration also use ILCDIRAC within their own Virtual Organization.

  20. Characterization of the International Linear Collider damping ring optics

    CERN Document Server

    Shanks, James; Sagan, David

    2013-01-01

    A method is presented for characterizing the emittance dilution and dynamic aperture for an arbitrary closed lattice that includes guide field magnet errors, multipole errors and misalignments. This method, developed and tested at CesrTA, has been applied to the damping ring lattice for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The effectiveness of beam based emittance tuning is limited by beam position monitor (BPM) measurement errors, disposition of corrector magnets, and tuning algorithm. The specifications for damping ring magnet alignment, multipoles, and number and precision of the BPMs are shown to be consistent with the required emittances and dynamic aperture. Further analysis of the ILC damping ring lattice demonstrates the implications of reducing the number of BPMs and relaxing the constraints on guide field multipoles.

  1. The SiD Detector for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The SiD Detector is one of two validated detector designs for the future International Linear Collider. SiD features a compact, cost-constrained design for precision Higgs couplings determination, and other measurements, and sensitivity to a wide range of possible new phenomena. A robust silicon vertex and tracking system, combined with a 5 Tesla central solenoidal field, provides excellent momentum resolution. The highly granular calorimeter system is optimized for Particle Flow application to achieve very good jet energy resolution over a wide range of energies. Details of the proposed implementation of the SiD subsystems, as driven by the physics requirements, will be given. The shared interaction point, push-pull mechanism, will be described, together with the estimated timeline for construction.

  2. Simulations of the Static Tuning for the TESLA Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    At the heart of the TESLA linear collider are the two 10 km long superconducting linacs. A linac is constructed from 858 cryomodules each containing 12 nine-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting cavities. 355 quadrupoles provide the necessary beam focusing. The advantages of low-frequency superconducting RF in terms of wakefield behaviour are well known, and the TESLA alignment tolerances are relatively loose. However, the effects of cavity tilts and their impact of the linac beam-based alignment algorithms have until recently not been fully investigated. In addition, the strong sensitivity to correlated emittance growth due to the high beam-beam disruption parameter makes it desirable to control the linac emittance down to a few percent. In this report we discuss various static tuning algorithms and present new simulation results. Discussions of the relative merits and applicability of the methods is also discussed.

  3. Beam Trajectory control of the future Compact LInear Collider beam

    CERN Document Server

    Balik, G; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Caron, B; Deleglise, G; Jeremie, A; Le Breton, R; Lottin, J; Pacquet, L

    2011-01-01

    The future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under design at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) would create high-energy particle collisions between electrons and positrons, and provide a tool for scientists to address many of the most compelling questions about the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space and time. In accelerating structure, it is well-established that vibrations generated by the ground motion constitute the main limiting factors for reaching the luminosity of 10^34 cm-2s-1. Several methods have been proposed to counteract this phenomena and active vibration controls based on the integration of mechatronic systems into the machine structure is probably one of the most promising. This paper studies the strategy of the vibration suppression. Active vibration control methods, such as optimized parameter of a numerical compensator, adaptive algorithm with real time control are investigated and implemented in the simulation layout. The requirement couldn’t be achieved w...

  4. Simulation of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohgaki

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for Japan Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider at E_{0}=2 GeV is considered.

  5. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab; Bruce, Roderik [CERN; Redaelli, Stefano [CERN; Rossi, Adriana [CERN; Salvachua, Belen [CERN

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  6. Electron lenses for the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari†, G; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beamswhose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-bybunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beamcompensation, and for the demonstration of halo scrapingwith hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014–2015 for construction in 2015–2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of the...

  7. Transverse beams stability studies at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Pieloni, Tatiana

    2015-01-30

    A charged particle beam travelling at the speed of light produces large electromagnetic wake fields which, through interactions with its surroundings, act back on the particles in the beam. This coupled system may become unstable, resulting in a deterioration of the beam quality. Such effects play a major role in most existing storage rings, as they limit the maximum performance achievable. In a collider, the presence of a second beam significantly changes the dynamics, as the electromagnetic interactions of the two beams on each other are usually very strong and may, also, limit the collider performances. This thesis treats the coherent stability of the two beams in a circular collider, including the effects of the electromagnetic wake fields and of the beam-beam interactions, with particular emphasis on CERN's Large Hadron Collider. As opposed to other colliders, this machine features a large number of bunches per beam each experiencing multiple long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions. Existing models...

  8. COLLIDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Howie Day, Collide, Based on the original parody "Collide" by USLHC, inspired by the original song "Collide" written by Howie Day and Kevin Griffin. Re-record Produced by Mike Denneen Engineered by Patrick DiCenso -Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards- Howie Day -Guitar Patrick DiCenso -Bass- Ed Valuskas -Drums- Dave Brophy

  9. The Higgs boson discovery at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the field of Higgs boson physics. It offers the first in-depth review of the complete results in connection with the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and based on the full dataset for the years 2011 to 2012. The fundamental concepts and principles of Higgs physics are introduced and the important searches prior to the advent of the Large Hadron Collider are briefly summarized. Lastly, the discovery and first mensuration of the observed particle in the course of the CMS experiment are discussed in detail and compared to the results obtained in the ATLAS experiment.

  10. The standard model Higgs search at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satyaki Bhattacharya; on behalf of the CMS and the ATLAS Collaborations

    2007-11-01

    The experiments at the large hadron collider (LHC) will probe for Higgs boson in the mass range between the lower bound on the Higgs mass set by the experiments at the large electron positron collider (LEP) and the unitarity bound (∼ 1 TeV). Strategies are being developed to look for signatures of Higgs boson and measure its properties. In this paper results from full detector simulation-based studies on Higgs discovery from both ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC will be presented. Results of simulation studies on Higgs coupling measurement at LHC will be discussed.

  11. Beyond the Large Hadron Collider: a first look at cryogenics for CERN future circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Following the first experimental discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. The study, conducted with the collaborative participation of interested institutes world-wide, considers several options for very high energy hadron-hadron, electron-positron and hadron-electron colliders to be installed in a quasi-circular underground tunnel in the Geneva basin, with a circumference of 80 km to 100 km. All these machines would make intensive use of advanced superconducting devices, i.e. high-field bending and focusing magnets and/or accelerating RF cavities, thus requiring large helium cryogenic systems operating at 4.5 K or below. Based on preliminary sets of parameters and layouts for the particle colliders under study, we discuss the main challenges of their cryogenic systems and present first estimates of the cryogenic refrigeration capacities req...

  12. Strategies for using GAPDs as tracker detectors in future linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Eva; Alonso, Oscar; Vilà, Anna; Diéguez, Angel

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the development of a Geiger-mode Avalanche PhotoDiode pixel detector in standard CMOS technologies aimed at the vertex and tracker regions of future linear colliders, i.e. the International Linear Collider and the Compact LInear Collider. In spite of all the advantages that characterize this technology, GAPD detectors suffer from noise pulses that cannot be distinguished from real events and low fill-factors that reduce the detection efficiency. To comply with the specifications imposed by the next generation of particle colliders, solutions to minimize the intrinsic noise pulses and increase the fill-factor have been thoroughly investigated.

  13. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 2 Higgs and Supersymmetry Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, David Mark; Baer, H.; Bagger, Jonathan A.; Balazs, Csaba; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, Ulrich J.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, Ikaros I.Y.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, James E.; Breidenbach, Martin; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Burke, David L.; Burrows, Philip N.; Butler, Joel N.; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Choi, Seong-Youl; Cinabro, David; Corcella, Gennaro; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dawson, S.; Denner, Ansgar; Derwent, P.; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, Stefan; Dixit, M.; Dixon, Lance J.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, Jens; Feng, Jonathan L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.Eugene; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, David W.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Graf, N.; Grannis, Paul D.; Gronberg, Jeffrey Baton; Gunion, John F.; Haber, Howard E.; Han, Tao; Hawkings, Richard; Hearty, Christopher; Heinemeyer, Sven; Hertzbach, Stanley S.; Heusch, Clemens A.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, Andre H.; Hollebeek, Robert; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, Robert Gibbs; Jaros, John Alan; Juste, A.; Kadyk, John A.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, Teruki; Karlen, Dean; Keller, L; Koltick, D.; Kribs, Graham D.; Kronfeld, Andreas Samuel; Leike, A.; Logan, Heather E.; Lykken, Joseph D.; Macesanu, Cosmin; Magill, Stephen R.; Marciano, William Joseph; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, Konstantin Tzvetanov; Monig, Klaus; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, Stephen; Murakami, Brandon; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nauenberg, Uriel; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Orr, Lynne H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, Michael E.; Plehn, Tilman; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, David Landry; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Repond, J.; Riles, Keith; Rizzo, Thomas Gerard; Ronan, Michael T.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Roth, M.; Rowson, Peter C.; Schumm, Bruce Andrew; Seppala, L.; Seryi, Andrei; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, Xerxes Ramyar; Telnov, Valery I.; Teubner, Thomas; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, Andre S.; van Bibber, Karl A.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Wagner, D.; Waite, Anthony P.; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Weiglein, Georg; Wells, James Daniel; Wester, William Carl, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, Oleg I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, Hai Jun

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 2 reviews the possible experiments on Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles that can be done at a linear collider.

  14. Members of the global linear-collider community who attended IWLC2010 in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC2010) recently brought together many experts involved in research and development for an electron–positron linear collider – the favoured future facility to complement the LHC. Organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) and hosted by CERN, the meeting took place on 18–22 October and attracted 479 registered participants.

  15. Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Ghosh; A Nyffeler; V Ravindran

    2011-05-01

    This is a summary of the activities of the Physics at the LHC working group in the XIth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-XI) held at the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India in January 2010. We discuss the activities of each sub-working group on physics issues at colliders such as Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main issues discussed involve (1) results on W mass measurement and associated QCD uncertainties, (2) an attempt to understand the asymmetry measured at Tevatron in the top quark production, and (3) phenomenology of warped space dimension model.

  16. CERN completes magnet set for Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN, the European Oganization for Nuclear Research, took delivery of the last superconducting main magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on Monday, completint the full set of 1624 main magnets required to build the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator."

  17. CERN to start Large Hadron Collider november 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to provide its first collisions in November 2007, CERN has announced. A two-month run at 0.9 TeV is planned for 2007 to test the accelerating and detecting equipment, and a full power run at 14 TeV is expected in the spring of 2008."

  18. Large Hadron Collider project to study the origins of matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Scientific Information Port (PIC), a technological centre located on the campus of the UAB, recently started work on the first stage of the European project Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator in the world, which has the aim of reproducing conditions similar to those produced during the Big Bang in order to study the origins of matter." (1/2 page)

  19. Prospects for Precision Higgs Physics at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A linear e+e- collider provides excellent possibilities for precision measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson. At energies close to the Z-Higgs threshold, the Higgs boson can be studied in recoil against a Z boson, to obtain not only a precision mass measurement but also direct measurements of the branching ratios for most decay modes, including possible decay to invisible species. At higher energies, the Higgs boson coupling to top quarks and the Higgs boson self-coupling can also be measured. At energies approaching 1 TeV and above, the rising cross section for Higgs production in WW fusion allows the measurement of very small branching ratios, including the branching ratio to muon pairs. These experiments make it possible to determine the complete profile of the Higgs boson in a model-independent way. The prospects for these measurements are summarized, based on the results of detailed simulation studies performed within the frameworks of the CLIC conceptual design report and the ILC technical de...

  20. Beam parametr measurements for the SLAC linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Blocker, C.; Breidenbach, M.

    1981-01-01

    A stable, closely-controlled, high-intensity, single-bunch beam will be required for the SLAC Linear Collider. The characteristics of short-pulse, low-intensity beams in the SLAC linac have been studied. A new, high-intensity thermionic gun, subharmonic buncher and S-band buncher/accelerator section were installed recently at SLAC. With these components, up to 10/sup 11/ electrons in a single S-band bunch are available for injection into the linac. the first 100-m accelerator sector has been modified to allow control of short-pulse beams by a model-driven computer program. Additional instrumentation, including a computerized energy analyzer and emittance monitor have been added at the end of the 100-m sector. The beam intensity, energy spectrum, emittance, charge distribution and the effect of wake fields in the first accelerator sector have been measured. The new source and beam control system are described and the most recent results of the beam parameter measurements are discussed.

  1. Dark Matter Searches at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Siew Yan; Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Bin Wan

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter is a hypothetical particle proposed to explain the missing matter expected from the cosmological observation. The motivation of Dark Matter is overwhelming however as it is mainly deduced from its gravitational interaction, for it does little to pinpoint what Dark Matter really is. In WIMPs Miracle, weakly interactive massive particle being the Dark Matter candidate is correctly producing the current thermal relic density at weak scale, implying the possibility of producing and detecting it in Large Hadron Collider. Assuming WIMPs being the maverick particle within collider, it is expected to be pair produced in association with a Standard Model particle. The presence of the WIMPs pair is inferred from the Missing Transverse Energy (MET) which is the vector sum of the imbalance in the transverse momentum plane recoils a Standard Model Particle. The collider is able to produce light mass Dark Matter which the traditional detection fail to detect due to the small momentum transfer involved in the in...

  2. A Novel Collimation Method for Large Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Ye; Tang, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel collimation method for large hadron colliders by arranging betatron and momentum collimation systems in the same insertion to improve the overall cleaning efficiency. The method has the potential of avoiding beam losses at the downstream dispersion suppression section following the conventional betatron collimation section, which is caused by those particles with single diffractive scattering at the collimators. Evident beam loss in arc sections should be avoided to protect the superconducting magnets from quenching, especially when the stored beam energy is up to hundreds of MJ level or even higher in modern proton-proton collider. Our studies show that it is beneficial to arrange the momentum collimation system just after the betatron collimation system so that it can clean the particles with lower momentum due to the single diffractive scattering in the betatron collimators. This method is being applied to the future proton-proton collider SPPC. Preliminary multi-particle simula...

  3. LEP : the Large Electron Positron Collider Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    LEP was CERN's flagship research facility from 1989 until 2000 when it stepped aside to make way for installation of the Laboratory's next major accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider, LHC. With a circumference of 27 kilometres, LEP was the largest circular particle collider in the world. Inside its beam pipe, about 100 metres underground, bunches of electrons and positrons raced around in opposite directions as they were accelerated to almost the speed of light. In its first phase of operation, LEP was designed to collide electrons and positrons at an energy of around 100 GeV. After some seven years of accumulating data at this energy to study the Z particle - electrically neutral carrier of the weak interaction - everything was done to boost the energy of LEP's beams as high as possible.

  4. Calorimetry at the international linear collider. From simulation to reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattimena, Nanda

    2010-02-15

    Calorimetry plays a crucial role in ongoing and upcoming high-energy physics experiments. To build a powerful calorimetric system with a performance tailored to the expected physics signatures, demands dedicated research and development of new readout technologies as well as dedicated reconstruction algorithms. The presented design of a calorimetric system which meets the high demands of precision physics at the future linear collider ILC, follows the paradigm of particle ow. Particle ow is a reconstruction principle that relies on a calorimetric system with high spatial granularity. In the detector optimisation process, the development of hardware and software are interlinked and cannot be judged independently. This thesis addresses two different aspects of detector optimisation, a test of the detector design against one example physics scenario and the development of a stable calibration procedure. In the rst part, a gauge-mediated Supersymmetry breaking scenario is used to test the design of the electromagnetic calorimeter in a full detector simulation study. The reconstruction of the neutralino properties, each decaying into a photon and a gravitino, requires a good energy resolution, as well as excellent position and angular resolution. The error bounds on the neutralino mass is strongly linked to the energy resolution, while the position and angular reconstruction of neutral particles is essential for the determination of the neutralino lifetime. The second part of this thesis focuses on the calibration procedure for a prototype of the hadron calorimeter. 7608 novel photodetectors are operated and tested in this prototype. They are exposed to beams of well de ned particle type and energy. The calibration is tested with a detailed study of electromagnetic showers inside the cubic-metre-sized prototype, with special attention paid towards the non-linearity correction. (orig.)

  5. Precise and fast beam energy measurement at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viti, Michele

    2010-02-15

    The international Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy between 200 and 500 GeV and a peak luminosity of 2 . 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. For the physics program at this machine, an excellent bunch-by-bunch control of the beam energy is mandatory. Several techniques are foreseen to be implemented at the ILC in order to achieve this request. Energy spectrometers upstream and downstream of the electron/positron interaction point were proposed and the present default option for the upstream spectrometer is a beam position monitor based (BPM-based) spectrometer. In 2006/2007, a prototype of such a device was commissioned at the End Station A beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in order to study performance and reliability. In addition, a novel method based on laser Compton backscattering has been proposed, since as proved at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), complementary methods are necessary to cross-check the results of the BPM-based spectrometer. In this thesis, an overview of the experiment at End Station A is given, with emphasis on the performance of the magnets in the chicane and first energy resolution estimations. Also, the novel Compton backscattering method is discussed in details and found to be very promising. It has the potential to bring the beam energy resolution well below the requirement of {delta}E{sub b}/E{sub b}=10{sup -4}. (orig.)

  6. ALICE A Large Ion Collider Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Hristov, P Z; Caffarri, D; Mager, M; Rohr, D M; Kucera, V; Miskowiec, D C; Selyuzhenkov, I; Mercado-perez, J; Lohner, D; Bertelsen, H; Kox, S; Cheynis, B; Hamar, G; Choudhury, S; Sambyal, S S; Agnello, M; Miake, Y; Inaba, M; Maldonado cervantes, I A; Fernandez tellez, A; Kulibaba, V; Zinovjev, G; Martynov, Y; Usenko, E; Pshenichnov, I; Nikolaev, S; Vasiliev, A; Vinogradov, A; Moukhanova, T; Vasilyev, A; Kozlov, Y; Voloshin, K; Kiselev, S; Kirilko, Y; Lyublev, E; Kondratyeva, N; Gameiro munhoz, M; Alarcon do passo suaide, A; Lagana fernandes, C; Carlin filho, N; Yin, Z; Zhu, J; Luo, J; Pikna, M; Bombara, M; Pastircak, B; Donigus, B; Rascanu, B T; Scott, H; Hanratty, L D; Marangio, G; Gianotti, P; Muccifora, V; Morando, M; Bartke, J G; Sputowska, I A; Ilkiv, I; Christiansen, P; Dodokhov, V; Yurevich, V; Fedunov, A; Malakhov, A; Efremov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Asryan, A; Kovalenko, V; Piyarathna, D; Myers, C J; Martashvili, I; Scott, R M; Oh, H; Cherney, M G; Malagalage, K J; D'erasmo, G; Wagner, V; Smakal, R; Lopez, X B; Sartorelli, G; Mlynarz, J; Garishvili, I; Murray, C J; Oh, S; Srivastava, B K; Becker, B; Usai, G; Razazi, V; Zbroszczyk, H P; Feldkamp, L; Pappalardo, G; Khlebnikov, A; Basmanov, V; Punin, V; Demanov, V; Gotovac, S; Irfan, M; Felea, D; Zgura, S I; Yang, H; Vernet, R; Son, C; Shtejer diaz, K; Hwang, S; Alfaro molina, J R; Jahnke, C; Richter, M R; Garcia-solis, E J; Hitchcock, T M; Utrobicic, A; Brun, R; Divia, R; Schukraft, J; Riedler, P; Floris, M; Eulisse, G; Von haller, B; Haake, R; Kushpil, V; Ivanov, M; Malzacher, P; Schweda, K O; Reygers, K J; Pachmayer, Y C; Gaardhoeje, J J; Bearden, I G; Borel, H; Pereira da costa, H D A; Faivre, J; Germain, M; Schutz, Y R; Delagrange, H; Batigne, G; Stocco, D; Estienne, M D; Bergognon, A A E; Zoccarato, Y D; Levai, P; Bencedi, G; Mahapatra, D P; Ghosh, P; Das, T K; Mazzoni, A M; Alessandro, B; Cerello, P; De marco, N; Paic, G; Ovchynnyk, V; Karavicheva, T; Kucheryaeva, M; Skuratovskiy, O; Mal kevich, D; Bogdanov, A; Pereira, L G; Cai, X; Zhu, X; Wang, M; Zhou, F; Fan, F; Sitar, B; Cerny, V; Renfordt, R A E; Gonzalez zamora, P; Loo, K K; Jones, P G; Bianchi, N; Dainese, A; Giubilato, P; Festanti, A; Torii, H; Hori, Y; Tsuji, T; Herrera corral, G A; Kowalski, M; Rybicki, A; Kielbowicz, M M; Deloff, A; Petrovici, A; Nomokonov, P; Parfenov, A; Koshurnikov, E; Shahaliyev, E; Rogochaya, E; Kondratev, V; Oreshkina, N; Tarasov, A; Norenberg, M; Bodnya, E; Bogolyubskiy, M; Symons, T; Blanco, F; Madagodahettige don, D M; Umaka, E N; Rana, D B; Schaefer, B; De pasquale, S; Fusco girard, M; Song, M; Kim, T; Jeon, H; Porteboeuf, S J; Nandi, B K; Sarkar - sinha, T; Aggarwal, M M; Arcelli, S; Scapparone, E; Shevel, A; Nikulin, V; Komkov, B; Voloshin, S; Hille, P T; Kannan, S; Cicalo, C; De falco, A; Graczykowski, L K; Matynia, R M; Zimmermann, M B; Vinogradov, Y; Vikhlyantsev, O; Telnov, A; Tumkin, A; Khan, M M; Erdal, H A; Keidel, R; Rui, R; Yeo, I; Vilakazi, Z; Klay, J L; Boswell, B D; Lindenstruth, V; Tveter, T S; Batzing, P C; Goel, A; Breitner, T G; Sahoo, R; Roy, A; Musa, L; Perini, D; Vande vyvre, P; Fuchs, U; Aglieri rinella, G; Salgueiro domingues da silva, R M; Kalweit, A P; Greco, V; Francescon, A; Bond, P M; Marin, A M; Glassel, P; Schicker, R M; Staley, F M; Castillo castellanos, J E; Furget, C; Real, J; Martino, J F; Cheshkov, C V; Sahu, P K; Sahu, S K; Baral, R C; Singaraju, R N; Ahammed, Z; Saini, J; Basu, S; Bala, R; Gupta, R; Di bari, D; Bruno, G E; Biasotto, M; Esumi, S; Sano, M; Roehrich, D; Lonne, P; Drakin, Y; Manko, V; Nikulin, S; Yushmanov, I; Kozlov, K; Kerbikov, B; Stavinskiy, A; Sultanov, R; Raniwala, R; Zhu, H; Meres, M; Kralik, I; Evans, D; Tudor jones, G; Kinson, J; Rizzi, V; Orlandi, A; Fabris, D; Viesti, G; Lea, R; Kuijer, P G; Figiel, J; Gorlich, L M; Shabratova, G; Lobanov, V; Zaporozhets, S; Pocheptsov, T; Ivanov, A; Iglovikov, V; Ochirov, A; Petrov, V; Garner, R M; Jacobs, P M; De gruttola, D; Corsi, F; Varma, R; Koyithatta meethaleveedu, G; Kumar, J; Parmar, S; Nania, R; Zalite, A; Samsonov, V; Pruneau, C A; Caines, H L; Aronsson, T; Adare, A M; Zwick, S M; Fearick, R W; Ostrowski, P K; Kulasinski, K; Heine, N; Wilk, A; Ilkaev, R; Ilkaeva, L; Pavlov, V; Mikhaylyukov, K; Rybin, A; Naumov, N; Mudnic, E; Cortese, P; Listratenko, O; Stan, I; Nooren, G; Song, J; Krawutschke, T; Kim, S Y; Hwang, D S; Lee, S H; Leon monzon, I; Vorobyev, I; Wikne, J; Dordic, O; Yan, Y; Mazumder, R; Palmeri, A; La rocca, P; Pajares vales, C; Shahoyan, R; Kluge, A; Safarik, K; Tauro, A; Lakomov, I; Van hoorne, J W; Foka, P; Frankenfeld, U M; Masciocchi, S; Schwarz, K E; Anguelov, V; Hansen, A; Baldisseri, A; Aphecetche, L B; Berenyi, D; Sahoo, S; Nayak, T K; Muhuri, S; Patra, R N; Adhya, S P; Potukuchi, B; Saavedra san martin, O; Arnaldi, R; Scomparin, E; Beole, S; Mizuno, S; Enyo, H; Cuautle flores, E; Djuvsland, O; Altinpinar, S; Wagner, B; Fehlker, D; Velure, A; Potin, S; Zynovyev, M; Kurepin, A; Belyaev, S; Ryabinkin, E; Kiselev, I; Pestov, Y; Hayrapetyan, A; Manukyan, N; Lutz, J; Belikov, I; Roy, C S; Takahashi, J; Araujo silva figueredo, M; Tang, S; Szarka, I; Kapusta, S; Hasko, J; Putis, M; Sandor, L; Vrlakova, J; Antonczyk, D W; Bailhache, R M; Ladron de guevara, P; Acero fernandez, A; Diaz corchero, M A; Platt, R J; Kour, R; Scott, P A; Das, S; Turrisi, R; Hayashi, S; Van rijn, A J; Siemiarczuk, T; Petrovici, M; Petris, M; Stenlund, E A; Malinina, L; Fateev, O; Kolozhvari, A; Altsybeev, I; Sadovskiy, S; Soloviev, A; Markert, C; Ploskon, M A; Mayes, B W; Sorensen, S P; Awes, T; Virgili, T; Pagano, P; Kim, B; Krus, M; Vulpescu, B; Sett, P; Bhatt, H; Sinha, B; Khan, P; Antonioli, P; Scioli, G; Sakaguchi, H; Volkov, S; Ivanov, V; Khanzadeev, A; Malaev, M; Lisa, M A; Salzwedel, J S N; Loggins, V R; Schuster, T R; Hicks, B R; Scharenberg, R P; Masoni, A; Incani, E; Debski, P R; Oleniacz, J; Westerhoff, U; Wilde, M R; Yanovskiy, V; Domrachev, S; Smirnova, Y; Zimmermann, S; Ahmad, N; Shestakov, V; Veldhoen, M; Van der maarel, J; Kileng, B; Seo, J; Lopez torres, E; Ceballos sanchez, C; Camerini, P; Jang, H J; Buthelezi, E Z; Steyn, G F; Suleymanov, M K O; Belmont moreno, E; Skaali, B; Milosevic, J; Zhao, C; Perales, M; Kobdaj, C; Mishra, A N; Roukoutakis, F; Gonzalez ferreiro, E; Keil, M; Morsch, A; Rademakers, A; Soos, C; Zampolli, C; Grigoras, C; Chibante barroso, V M; Schuchmann, S; Grigoras, A G; Berzano, D; Lafuente mazuecos, A; Wegrzynek, A T; Bielcikova, J; Kushpil, S; Braun-munzinger, P; Andronic, A; Zimmermann, A; Wilkinson, J J; Arbor, N; Erazmus, B E; Pichot, P; Pillot, P; Grossiord, J; Boldizsar, L; Costanza, S; Gallio, M; Masera, M; Simonetti, L; Prino, F; Oppedisano, C; Toscano, L; Nappi, G; Botta, E; Vargas trevino, A D; Nystrand, J I; Ullaland, K; Haaland, O S; Huang, M; Naumov, S; Trubnikov, V; Alkin, A; Ivanytskyi, O; Guber, F; Karavichev, O; Nyanin, A; Sibiryak, Y; Peresunko, D Y; Patarakin, O; Aleksandrov, D; Blau, D; Yasnopolskiy, S; Chumakov, M; Vetlitskiy, I; Nedosekin, A; Selivanov, A; Okorokov, V; Grigoryan, A; Papikyan, V; Kuhn, C C; Wan, R; Zhou, D; Cajko, F; Siska, M; Mares, J; Zavada, P; Pitz, N; Rubio montero, A J; Reolon, A R; Antinori, F; Gunji, T; Snellings, R; Mayer, C; Matyja, A T; Klusek-gawenda, M J; Schiaua, C C; Andrei, C; Herghelegiu, A I; Soegaard, C; Panebrattsev, Y; Penev, V; Efimov, L; Zanevskiy, Y; Vechernin, V; Zarochentsev, A; Kolevatov, R; Agapov, A; Polishchuk, B; Loizides, C; Anwar, R; Anticic, T; Kwon, Y; Kim, M; Moon, T; Petran, M; Rosnet, P; Ramillien barret, V; Sahoo, B; Das bose, L; Hushnud, H; Hatzifotiadou, D; Shigaki, K; Jha, D M; Soltz, R A; Murray, S; Mastroserio, A; Puddu, G; Serci, S; Siddi, E; Siddhanta, S; Badala, A; Putevskoy, S; Shapovalova, E; Ahmad, A; Haiduc, M; Mitu, C M; Mischke, A; Grelli, A; Hetland, K F; Rachevski, A; Menchaca-rocha, A A; De cuveland, J; Hutter, D; Langhammer, M; Dahms, T; Watkins, E P; Kumar, L; Petta, C; Gago medina, A M; Planinic, M; Riegler, W; Telesca, A; Lazaridis, L; Ferencei, J; Martin, N A; Windelband, B S; Nielsen, B S; Chojnacki, M; Espagnon, B; Uras, A; Lemmon, R C; Agocs, A G; Viyogi, Y; Pal, S K; Singhal, V; Khan, S A; Alam, S N; Bagnasco, S; Rodriguez cahuantzi, M; Maslov, M; Kurepin, A; Ippolitov, M; Lebedev, V; Tsvetkov, A; Klimov, A; Agafonov, G; Martemiyanov, A; Loginov, V; Kononov, S; Grigoryan, S; Jangal, S G; Hnatic, M; Kalinak, P; Appelshaeuser, H; Ulery, J G; Luettig, P J; Heckel, S T; Trzaska, W H; Kral, J; Lietava, R; Matthews, Z L; Palaha, A S; Raha, S; Calero diaz, L; Segato, G; Canoa roman, V; Cruz albino, R; Botje, M; Gladysz-dziadus, E; Marszal, T; Dobrowolski, T A; Oskarsson, A N E; Otterlund, I; Tydesjo, H; Ljunggren, H M; Vodopyanov, A; Akichine, P; Kuznetsov, A; Vedeneyev, V; Naumenko, P; Bilov, N; Rogalev, R; Evdokimov, S; Braidot, E; Bellwied, R; De caro, A; Kang, J H; Gorbunov, Y; Lee, J; Pachr, M; Baldit, A; Manso, F; Crochet, P; Batista camejo, A; Dash, S; Roy, P K; Cifarelli, L; Laurenti, G; Margotti, A; Bellini, F; Sugitate, T; Zhalov, M; Pavlinov, A; Harris, J W; Caballero orduna, D; Pluta, J M; Kisiel, A R; Wrobel, D; Klein-boesing, C; Zhitnik, A; Nazarenko, S; Zavyalov, N; Miroshnikov, D; Kuryakin, A; Vyushin, A; Mamonov, A; Vickovic, L; Niculescu, M; De rooij, R S; Fragiacomo, E; Ahn, S U; Ahn, S; Foertsch, S V; Brown, C R; Munzer, R H; Lovhoiden, G; Harton, A V; Khosonthongkee, K; Schmidt, H R; Barbera, R; Giudice, N; Grimaldi, A; Betev, L; Buncic, P; Carena, F; Di mauro, A; Martinengo, P; Gargiulo, C; Grosse-oetringhaus, J F; Costa, F; Baltasar dos santos pedrosa, F; Laudi, E; Adamova, D; Lippmann, C; Schmidt, C J; Grajcarek, R; Volkl, M A; Christensen, C H; Rakotozafindrabe, A M; Conesa balbastre, G; Martinez-garcia, G; Suire, C P; Ducroux, L; Tieulent, R N; Barnafoldi, G G; Pochybova, S; Dubey, A K; Acharya, S; Gupta, A; Ricci, R A; Meddi, F; Vercellin, E; Chujo, T; Watanabe, K; Onishi, H; Akiba, Y; Vergara limon, S; Tejeda munoz, G; Skjerdal, K; Svistunov, S; Reshetin, A; Maevskaya, A; Antonenko, V; Mishustin, N; Meleshko, E; Korsheninnikov, A; Balygin, K; Zagreev, B; Akindinov, A; Mikhaylov, K; Gushchin, O; Grigoryev, V; Gulkanyan, H; Sanchez castro, X; Peretti pezzi, R; Oliveira da silva, A C; Harmanova, Z; Vokal, S; Beitlerova, A; Kramer, F; Book, J H; Montes prado, E; Rak, J; Jusko, A; Ghosh, S K; Spiriti, E; Ronchetti, F; Casanova diaz, A O; Lunardon, M; Aiftimiei, C; Kuzmin, N; Melkumov, G; Zinchenko, A; Shklovskaya, A; Bunzarov, Z I; Chernenko, S; Toulina, T; Kompaniets, M; Titov, A; Kharlov, Y; Dantsevich, G; Stolpovskiy, M; Porter, R J; Datskova, O V; Nattrass, C; Mazer, J A; Seger, J E; Kim, J; Kim, D S; Jung, W W; Kim, H; Bielcik, J; Pospisil, V; Cepila, J; Dupieux, P; Bastid, N; Das, D; Bhati, A K; Williams, C; Pesci, A; Roshchin, E; Humanic, T; Steinpreis, M D; Yaldo, C G; Abelev, B B; Smirnov, N; Heinz, M T; Connors, M E; Barile, F; Fiore, E M; Orzan, G; Wielanek, D H; Servais, E L J; Patecki, M; Passfeld, A; Zhelezov, S; Morkin, A; Zabelin, O; Hussain, T; Ramello, L; Rogachevskiy, O; Van leeuwen, M; Van den brink, A; Bertens, R A; Lodato, D F; Haque, M R; Kim, E J; Coccetti, F; Margagliotti, G V; Rauf, A W; Sandoval, A; Berger, M E; Qvigstad, H; Lindal, S; Cervantes jr, M; Kebschull, U W; Engel, H; Karasu uysal, A; Hess, B A; Calvo villar, E; Augustinus, A; Carena, W; Chochula, P; Chapeland, S; Dobrin, A F; Reidt, F; Bock, F; Galdames perez, A; Sumbera, M; Averbeck, R P; Garabatos cuadrado, J; Stachel, J; Wang, Y; Boggild, H; Gulbrandsen, K H; Hansen, J C; Charvet, J F; Shabetai, A; Hadjidakis, C M; Vertesi, R; Mitra, J; Altini, V; Riccati, L; Ferretti, A; Gagliardi, M; Bufalino, S; Sakata, D; Niida, T; Martinez hernandez, M I; Yang, S; Langoy, R; Karpechev, E; Veselovskiy, A; Konevskikh, A; Finogeev, D; Fokin, S; Karadzhev, K; Kucheryaev, Y; Plotnikov, V; Ryabinin, M; Golubev, A; Kaplin, V; Ter-minasyan, A; Abramyan, A; Raniwala, S; Hippolyte, B; Zhang, H; Strmen, P; Krivan, F; Reichelt, P S; Marquard, M; Broker, T A; Zyzak, M; Kulakov, I; Sahlmuller, B; Kalliokoski, T E A; Chang, B; Krivda, M; De cataldo, G; Paticchio, V; Fantoni, A; Soramel, F; Scarlassara, F; Bombonati, C; Gomez jimenez, R; Christakoglou, P; Cyz, A; Wilk, G A; Kurashvili, P; Pop, A; Arefiev, V; Batyunya, B; Kadyshevskiy, V; Lioubochits, V; Zryuev, V; Sokolov, M; Patalakha, D; Xaplanteris karampatsos, L; Grounds, A; Pinsky, L; Timmins, A R; Petracek, V; Krelina, M; Chattopadhyay, S; Basile, M; Falchieri, D; Miftakhov, N; Konyushikhin, M; Joseph, N; Cleymans, J W A; Dietel, T; Pawlak, T J; Kucinski, M; Janik, M A; Surma, K D; Niedziela, J; Wessels, J P; Riggi, F; Ivanov, A; Selin, I; Budnikov, D; Filchagin, S; Sitta, M; Gheata, M; Danu, A; Diomkin, V; Peitzmann, T; Reicher, M; Helstrup, H; Subasi, M; Mathis, A M; Nilsson, M S; Banerjee, S S; Goyal, D; Rist, J A S; Jena, C; Lara martinez, C E; Vasileiou, M; Spyropoulou-stassinaki, M; Simatovic, G

    2002-01-01

    %title\\\\ \\\\ALICE is a general-purpose heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. It currently includes more than 750~physicists and $\\sim$70 institutions in 27 countries.\\\\ \\\\The detector is designed to cope with the highest particle multiplicities anticipated for Pb-Pb reactions (dN/dy~$\\approx$~8000) and it will be operational at the start-up of the LHC. In addition to heavy systems, the ALICE Collaboration will study collisions of lower-mass ions, which are a means of varying the energy density, and protons (both pp and p-nucleus), which provide reference data for the nucleus-nucleus collisions.\\\\ \\\\ALICE consists of a central part, which measures event-by-event hadrons, electrons and photons, and a forward spectrometer to measure muons. The central part, which covers polar angles from 45$^{0} $ to 135$^{0} $ ($\\mid \\eta \\mid $ < 0.9) over the full azimuth, is embedded in the large L3 solenoidal mag...

  7. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  8. The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Delepine

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study protonproton collisions at unprecedented energies and luminosities. In this article we providefi rst a brief general introduction to particle physics. We then explain what CERN is. Thenwe describe the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the most powerful particle acceleratorever built. Finally we describe the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, its physics goals,construction details, and current status.El experimento Compact Muon Solenoid en el Large Hadron Collider del CERN estudiarácolisiones protón protón a energías y luminosidades sin precedente. En este artículo presentamos primero una breve introducción general a la física de partículas. Despuésexplicamos lo que es el CERN. Luego describimos el Large Hadron Collider, el más potente acelerador de partículas construido por el hombre, en el CERN. Finalmente describimos el experimento Compact Muon Solenoid, sus objetivos en física, los detalles de su construcción,y su situación presente.

  9. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  10. Learning to See at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The staged commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider presents an opportunity to map gross features of particle production over a significant energy range. I suggest a visual tool - event displays in (pseudo)rapidity-transverse-momentum space - as a scenic route that may help sharpen intuition, identify interesting classes of events for further investigation, and test expectations about the underlying event that accompanies large-transverse-momentum phenomena.

  11. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  12. Future colliders at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsesmelis, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    Following an outline of the Large Hadron Collider, this paper will analyze CERN's scientific plans for high-energy colliders for the years to come. The immediate plans include the upgrades to the Large Hadron Collider and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, the Compact Linear Collider. This paper describes the design of these future colliders at CERN, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Free Electron Laser for Gamma-Gamma Collider at a Low-Energy Option of International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, Evgeny; Schneidmiller, Evgeny; Yurkov, Mikhail; /DESY; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Different scenarios of a start-up with International Linear Collider (ILC) are under discussion at the moment in the framework of the Global Design Effort (GDE). One of them assumes construction of the ILC in stages from some minimum CM energy up to final target of 500 GeV CM energy. Gamma-gamma collider with CM energy of 180GeV is considered as a candidate for the first stage of the facility. In this report we present conceptual design of a free electron laser as a source of primary photons for the first stage of ILC.

  14. Electroweak corrections to Higgs production through ZZ fusion at the linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjema, F.; Fujimoto, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Kaneko, T.; Kato, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Yasui, Y.

    2004-10-01

    We present the full O (α) electroweak radiative corrections to e+e- →e+e- H. The computation is performed with the help of GRACE-loop. The extraction of the full QED corrections is performed, these are quite large at threshold. The genuine weak corrections, for the linear collider energies, when expressed in the Gμ scheme are of order -2 to - 4 % for Higgs masses preferred by the latest precision data. We also extract the mt2 type corrections and make a comparison with the weak corrections for the process e+e- → ννbar H.

  15. Double Higgs production at the linear colliders and the probing of the Higgs self-coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Boudjema, F

    1995-01-01

    We study double Higgs production in the e^+ e^- and \\gamma \\gamma modes of the linear collider. It is also shown how one can probe the scalar potential in these reactions. We discuss the effective longitudinal W approximation in \\gamma \\gamma processes and the W_L W_L luminosities in the two modes of a high-energy linear collider. A generalised non-linear gauge-fixing condition, which is particularly useful for tree-level calculations of electroweak processes for the laser induced collider, is presented. Its connection with the background-field approach to gauge fixing is given.

  16. Design and higher order optimisation of final focus systems for linear colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Marín Lacoma, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator and particle physics communities are considering a lepton Linear Collider LC as the most appropriate machine to carry out high precision particle physics research in the TeV energy regime. The Compact Linear Collider CLIC and the International Linear Collider ILC are the two proposals for the future e+e- LC. Both designs achieve a luminosity L above 10^(34) cm-2 s-1 at the interaction point IP, satisfying the particle physics requirements. The LC consists of different syste...

  17. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Gilles, Abelin R

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the highest-energy particle collider ever constructed and is considered "one of the great engineering milestones of mankind." It was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) from 1998 to 2008, with the aim of allowing physicists to test the predictions of different theories of particle physics and high-energy physics, and particularly prove or disprove the existence of the theorized Higgs boson and of the large family of new particles predicted by supersymmetric theories. In this book, the authors study the phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions of LHC. Topics discussed include neutral and charged black hole remnants at the LHC; the modified statistics approach for the thermodynamical model of multiparticle production; and astroparticle physics and cosmology in the LHC era.

  18. The ALICE experiment at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munhoz, Marcelo Gameiro [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only experiment form the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) dedicated mainly to study relativistic heavy ion collisions. The experiment was optimized to measure a great variety of observables that allow us to study the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma, a new state of nuclear matter where quarks and gluons are deconfined from hadrons. The enlightenment of such properties will provide great insight in the understanding of the strong interaction described by QCD. In this talk, I will present the ALICE experiment, the latest results obtained by the collaboration in the last 2 years and discuss the Brazilian participation in this very interesting and important international project. (author)

  19. Champagne moments[Expections of the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider could bring CERN huge rewards - but there are risks too. Anyone who is not a particle physicist is likely to look on in envy at the massive sums being spent on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It has cost -1.8bn to build the machine's accelerator, which will whip protons in opposite directions around a 27 km-long underground ring before smashing them together at energies up to 14 TeV some billion times a second. The four giant detectors - including the two general-purpose experiments CMS and ATLAS - have swallowed up several more billion Euros. Then there is the new Grid computer system, which is meant to analyse the vast streams of data spewing out from thee detectors every second. The total bill? A cool - Euro6.3bn, give or take the odd bottle of champagne. (U.K.)

  20. Beauty and charm to study new physics at future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, M. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); CERN, DG Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    The b and c hadrons are instrumental to the identification and study of the Higgs sector and new physics at a future lepton collider. This paper reviews highlights of b and c physics for the linear collider programs and the directions of ongoing R and D on pixellated silicon sensors for its vertex tracker.

  1. Electroweak Precision Measurements and Collider Probes of the Standard Model with Large Extra Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    1999-06-03

    The elementary particles of the Standard Model may live in more than 3+1 dimensions. We study the consequences of large compactified dimensions on scattering and decay observables at high-energy colliders. Our analysis includes global fits to electroweak precision data, indirect tests at high-energy electron-positron colliders (LEP2 and NLC), and direct probes of the Kaluza-Klein resonances at hadron colliders (Tevatron and LHC). The present limits depend sensitively on the Higgs sector, both the mass of the Higgs boson and how many dimensions it feels. If the Higgs boson is trapped on a 3+1 dimensional wall with the fermions, large Higgs masses (up to 500 GeV) and relatively light Kaluza-Klein mass scales (less than 4 TeV) can provide a good fit to precision data. That is, a light Higgs boson is not necessary to fit the electroweak precision data, as it is in the Standard Model. If the Higgs boson propagates in higher dimensions, precision data prefer a light Higgs boson (less than 260 GeV), and a higher compactification scale (greater than 3.8 TeV). Future colliders can probe much larger scales. For example, a 1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider can indirectly discover Kaluza-Klein excitations up to 31 TeV if 500 fb{sup {minus}1} integrated luminosity is obtained.

  2. Discriminating Supersymmetry and Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Arunava

    2008-01-01

    We show how to differentiate the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model from black hole events at the Large Hadron Collider. Black holes are simulated with the CATFISH generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of PYTHIA and ISAJET. Our study, based on event shape variables, visible and missing momenta, and analysis of dilepton events, demonstrates that supersymmetry and black hole events at the LHC can be easily discriminated.

  3. Discriminating Supersymmetry and Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglia, Marco

    2008-04-01

    We assess the distinguishability between supersymmetry and black hole events at the Large Hadron Collider. Black hole events are simulated with the CATFISH black hole generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of PYTHIA and ISAJET. Our study, based on event shape variables, visible and missing momenta, and analysis of dilepton events, shows that supersymmetry and black hole events at the LHC can be easily discriminated.

  4. Beamstrahlung and QED backgrounds at future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, D.V.

    1990-10-01

    This dissertation is a detailed study of several aspects of beamstrahlung and related phenomena. The problem is formulated as the relativistic scattering of an electron from a strong but slowly varying potential. The solution is readily interpreted in terms of a classical electron trajectory, and differs from the solution of the corresponding classical problem mainly in the effect of quantum recoil due to the emission of hard photons. When the general solution is expanded for the case of an almost-uniform field, the leading term is identical to the well-known formula for quantum synchrotron radiation. The first non-leading term is negligible in all cases of interest where the expansion is valid. In applying the standard synchrotron radiation formula to the beamstrahlung problem, the effects of radiation reaction on the emission of multiple photons can be significant for some machine designs. Another interesting feature is the helicity dependence of the radiation process, which is relevant to the case where the electron beam is polarized. The inverse process of coherent electron-positron pair production by a beamstrahlung photon is a potentially serious background source at future colliders, since low-energy pairs can exit the bunch at a large angle. Pairs can also be produced incoherently by the collision of the two photons, either real or virtual. The rates, spectra, and angular distributions for both the coherent and incoherent processes are estimated here. At a 1/2 TeV machine the incoherent process will be more common, resulting in roughly 10{sup 6} pairs per bunch crossing. One member of each pair is always pushed outward, at an angle determined by its energy, by the field of the oncoming bunch. In addition, a small number of pairs are initially produced with a comparable or larger angle.

  5. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, K

    2003-01-01

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e sup + e sup - linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 (micro)m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  6. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Foster, Brian; Fuster, Juan; Harrison, Mike; McEwan Paterson, James; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Hitoshi (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    A review is given about the planned International Linear Collider. Especially described are the technical design, the accelerator layout and design, the R and D during the technical design phase, and the detectors. (HSI)

  7. [New technology for linear colliders]. Annual progress report and renewal proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  8. Positrons sources and related activities for Future Linear Collider at LAL Orsay Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Dadoun, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the positrons sources studies for the Future Linear Collider, the Accelerator Department at LAL Orsay is involved since several years in different activities both experiments and simulations.

  9. Detector and trigger challenge for supersymmetrical dark matter scenarios at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Z Zhang

    2007-12-01

    Two supersymmetrical (SUSY) dark matter scenarios are discussed to illustrate how challenging it is to detect and trigger these events out of standard model background events at a future international linear collider (ILC).

  10. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  11. Of Linear Colliders, the GDE Workshop at Bangalore, Mughals, Camels, Elephants and Sundials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Greg

    2006-04-17

    In this colloquium, the speaker will give a summary of the recent International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE) Workshop at Bangalore and how the High Energy Physics community converged to this meeting after many years of electron-positron linear collider design and experimental work. Given that this workshop for the first time took place in India, the speaker will also show a few pictures and talk briefly about what he learned in that fascinating country.

  12. Design Study for a Staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex W.

    2002-02-27

    Particle physics makes its greatest advances with experiments at the highest energy. The only sure way to advance to a higher-energy regime is through hadron colliders--the Tevatron, the LHC, and then, beyond that, a Very Large Hadron Collider. At Snowmass-1996 [1], investigators explored the best way to build a VLHC, which they defined as a 100 TeV collider. The goals in this study are different. The current study seeks to identify the best and cheapest way to arrive at frontier-energy physics, while simultaneously starting down a path that will eventually lead to the highest-energy collisions technologically possible in any accelerator using presently conceivable technology. This study takes the first steps toward understanding the accelerator physics issues, the technological possibilities and the approximate cost of a particular model of the VLHC. It describes a staged approach that offers exciting physics at each stage for the least cost, and finally reaches an energy one-hundred times the highest energy currently achievable.

  13. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN, Physics, Machine, Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphson, C

    2011-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new electron-hadron collider, the LHeC, in which electrons of $60$ to possibly $140$\\,GeV collide with LHC protons of $7000$\\,GeV. With an $ep$ design luminosity of about $10^{33}$\\,cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, the Large Hadron Electron Collider exceeds the integrated luminosity collected at HERA by two orders of magnitude and the kinematic range by a factor of twenty in the four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements. These are projected to solve a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The LHeC thus becomes the world's cleanest high resolution microscope, designed to continue the path of deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering into unknown areas of physics and kinematics. The physics ...

  14. Future Linear Colliders: Detector R&D, Jet Reconstruction and Top Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2098729; Ros Martinez, Eduardo

    During the 20th century, discoveries and measurements at colliders, combined with progress in theoretical physics, allowed us to formulate the Standard Model of the in- teractions between the constituents of matter. Today, there are two advanced projects for a new installation that will collide electrons and positrons covering an energy range from several hundreds of GeV to the multi-TeV scale, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). These Future Linear Colliders give the opportunity to study the top quark with unprecedented precision. Measurements of top quark properties are of special interest, as the top quark is the heaviest ele- mentary particle of the SM. Precision measurements of top quark properties at e+e colliders promise therefore to be highly sensitive to physics beyond the SM. This thesis has three complementary parts. The first is dedicated to the R&D of the ILD detector concept for future e+e- colliders, more precisely, the innermost region of the de...

  15. W±πt干 Associated Production at Large Hadron Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGJin-Shu; PANQun-Na

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the production of a charged top pion in association with a W boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the context of the topcolor assisted technicolor model. We find that the cross section of pp → bb- → W±πt干 is roughly corresponding to the result of the process pp → bb- → W±πt干= in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, and for reasonable ranges of the parameters, the cross section can reach a few hundred fb. The W±πt干 signal should be clearly visible at LHC unless π t± is very heavy.

  16. Lepton Flavor Violation at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Kamon, Teruki; Krislock, Abram

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a potential of discovering lepton flavor violation (LFV) at the Large Hadron Collider. A sizeable LFV in low energy supersymmetry can be induced by massive right handed neutrinos, which can explain neutrino oscillations via the seesaw mechanism. We investigate a scenario where the distribution of an invariant mass of two hadronically decaying taus ($\\tauh\\tauh$) from $\\schizero{2}$ decays is the same in events with or without LFV. We first develop a transfer function using this ditau massdistribution to model the shape of the non-LFV $\\tauh\\mu$ invariant mass. We then show the feasibility of extracting the LFV $\\tauh\\mu$ signal.

  17. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  18. Studies of radiation hardness of MOS devices for application in a linear collider vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyu

    2008-10-17

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) together with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN serve as a combined tool to explore the mysteries of the universe: the former is a precision machine and the latter can be considered as a finding machine. The key component of the ILC is the vertex detector that should be placed as close as possible to the Interaction Point (IP) and has better radiation tolerance against the dominant electron-positron pair production background from beam-beam interactions. A new generation of MOS-type Depleted-Field-Effect Transistor (MOSDEPFET) active pixel detectors has been proposed and developed by Semiconductor Labor Munich for Physics and for extraterrestrial Physics in order to meet the requirements of the vertex detector at the ILC. Since all MOS devices are susceptible to ionizing radiation, the main topic is focused on the radiation hardness of detectors, by which a series of physical processes are analyzed: e.g. surface damage due to ionizing radiation as well as damage mechanisms and their associated radiation effects. As a consequence, the main part of this thesis consists of a large number of irradiation experiments and the corresponding discussions. Finally, radiation hardness of the detectors should be improved through a set of concluded experiences that are based on a series of analysis of the characteristic parameters using different measurement techniques. The feasibility of the MOSDEPFET-based vertex detector is, therefore, predicted at ILC. (orig.)

  19. Forward-central jet correlations at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deak, M. [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC; Hautmann, F. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Dept.; Jung, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Antwerpen Univ. (Belgium). Elementaire Deeltjes Fysics; Kutak, K. [Antwerpen Univ. (Belgium). Elementaire Deeltjes Fysics

    2010-12-15

    For high-p{sub T} forward processes at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), QCD logarithmic corrections in the hard transverse momentum and in the large rapidity interval may both be quantitatively significant. The theoretical framework to resum consistently both kinds of logarithmic corrections to higher orders in perturbation theory is based on QCD high-energy factorization. We present numerical Monte Carlo applications of this method to final-state observables associated with production of one forward and one central jet. By computing jet correlations in rapidity and azimuth, we analyze the role of corrections to the parton-showering chain from large-angle gluon radiation, and discuss this in relationship with Monte Carlo results modeling interactions due to multiple parton chains. (orig.)

  20. Advances in Cryogenics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1998-01-01

    After a decade of intensive R&D in the key technologies of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets and superfluid helium cryogenics, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has now fully entered its co nstruction phase, with the adjudication of major procurement contracts to industry. As concerns cryogenic engineering, this R&D program has resulted in significant developments in several fields, amon g which thermo-hydraulics of two-phase saturated superfluid helium, efficient cycles and machinery for large-capacity refrigeration at 1.8 K, insulation techniques for series-produced cryostats and mu lti-kilometre long distribution lines, large-current leads using high-temperature superconductors, industrial precision thermometry below 4 K, and novel control techniques applied to strongly non-line ar processes. We review the most salient advances in these domains.

  1. The higgsino-singlino world at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Soo [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Ray, Tirtha Sankar [University of Melbourne, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2015-02-01

    We consider light higgsinos and singlinos in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model at the large hadron collider. We assume that the singlino is the lightest supersymmetric particle and that the higgsino is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle with the remaining supersymmetric particles in the multi-TeV range. This scenario, which is motivated by the flavor and CP issues, provides a phenomenologically viable dark matter candidate and improved electroweak fit consistent with the measured Higgs mass. Here, the higgsinos decay into on (off)-shell gauge boson and the singlino. We consider the leptonic decay modes and the resulting signature is three isolated leptons and missing transverse energy which is known as the trilepton signal. We simulate the signal and the Standard Model backgrounds and present the exclusion region in the higgsino-singlino mass plane at the large hadron collider at √(s) = 14 TeV for an integrated luminosity of 300 fb{sup -1}. (orig.)

  2. Detector Development for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367854; Gößling, Claus

    To maximise the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider, it will be upgraded to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider in 2024. New detector challenges arise from the higher instantaneous luminosity and the higher particle flux. The new ATLAS Inner Tracker will replace the current tracking detector to be able to cope with these challenges. Many pixel detector technologies exist for particle tracking, but their suitability for the ATLAS Inner Tracker needs to be studied. Active high-voltage CMOS sensors, which are produced in industrialised processes, offer a fast readout and radiation tolerance. In this thesis the HV2FEI4v2 sensor, which is capacitively coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chip, is characterised for the usage in the outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker. Key quantities of this prototype module are studied, such as the hit efficiency and the subpixel encoding. The early HV2FEI4v2 prototype shows promising results as a starting point for further module developments. Active CMO...

  3. A Laser-Driven Linear Collider: Sample Machine Parameters and Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, E.R.; England, R.J.; Noble, R.J.; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    We present a design concept for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider based on laser-driven dielectric accelerator structures, and discuss technical issues that must be addressed to realize such a concept. With a pulse structure that is quasi-CW, dielectric laser accelerators potentially offer reduced beamstrahlung and pair production, reduced event pileup, and much cleaner environment for high energy physics and. For multi-TeV colliders, these advantages become significant.

  4. Jet Physics with A Large Ion Collider Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Jochen

    In the presence of the strongly-interacting medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, highly energetic partons from hard interactions lose energy through scattering and radiating. This effect, referred to as jet quenching, is observed as a suppression of particles with large momenta transverse to the beam axis (high-$p_\\perp$). To study the impact of the medium evolution on the energy loss modelling in the Monte Carlo event generator JEWEL, we compare results obtained for different scenarios of Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For this purpose, JEWEL was extended to use the output of relativistic hydrodynamic calculations in the OSCAR2008H format. We find the modelling of common observables, e.g. the nuclear modification factor, to be rather insensitive to the details of the medium evolution, for which the analytically accessible Bjorken expansion can thus be considered adequate. The OSCAR interface now allows further studies also at LHC energies. Jets of large transve...

  5. $H^{+}H^{-}$ Pair Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos-Bendezu, A A

    2000-01-01

    We study the pair production of charged Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in the context of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. We compare the contributions due to qq-bar annihilation at the tree level and gg fusion, which proceeds at one loop. At small or large values of tan(beta), H^+H^- production proceeds dominantly via bb-bar annihilation, due to Feynman diagrams involving neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and top quarks, which come in addition to the usually considered Drell-Yan diagrams. In the case of gg fusion, the squark loop contributions may considerably enhance the well-known quark loop contributions.

  6. Heavy ions: Results from the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan K Nayak

    2012-10-01

    On November 8, 2010 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN collided the first stable beams of heavy ions (Pb on Pb) at the centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon. The LHC worked exceedingly well during its one month of operation with heavy ions, delivering about 10 −1 of data, with peak luminosity reaching to $L_{O} = 2 × 10^{25}$ cm-2 s-1 towards the end of the run. Three experiments, ALICE, ATLAS and CMS, recorded their first heavy-ion data, which were analysed in a record time. The results of the multiplicity, flow, fluctuations and Bose–Einstein correlations indicate that the fireball formed in nuclear collisions at the LHC is hotter, lives longer, and expands to a larger size at freeze-out as compared to lower energies. We give an overview of these as well as new results on quarkonia and heavy flavour suppression, and jet energy loss.

  7. Gluino pair production at linear e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, S.; Klasen, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2002-08-01

    We study the potential of high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders for the production of gluino pairs within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). In this model, the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} gg is mediated by quark/squark loops, dominantly of the third generation, where the mixing of left- and right-handed states can become large. Taking into account realistic beam polarization effects, photon and Z{sup 0}-boson exchange, and current mass exclusion limits, we scan the MSSM parameter space for various e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies to determine the regions, where gluino production should be visible. (orig.)

  8. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    CERN Document Server

    Levinsen, Yngve Inntjore; Tomas, Rogelio; Schulte, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of {\\sigma} = 1 nm vertically and {\\sigma} = 45 nm horizontally. Given the small and very flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded from the impact of the experimental solenoid field in combination with a large crossing angle. Main effects include y-x'-coupling and increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field, increases the beam emittance. A detailed study of the impact from a realistic solenoid field and the associated correction techniques for the CLIC Final Focus is presented. In particular, the impact of techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions due to the detector solenoid main field and its overlap with the final focus magnets are shown. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR has been evaluated, and found to...

  9. Electroweak corrections to Higgs production through ZZ fusion at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjema, F. [LAPTH, B.P.110, Annecy-le-Vieux F-74941 (France)]. E-mail: boudjema@lapp.in2p3.fr; Fujimoto, J. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ishikawa, T. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kaneko, T. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kato, K. [Kogakuin University, Nishi-Shinjuku 1-24, Shinjuku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Kurihara, Y. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimizu, Y. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yasui, Y. [Tokyo Management College, Ichikawa, Chiba 272-0001 (Japan)

    2004-10-21

    We present the full O({alpha}) electroweak radiative corrections to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}H. The computation is performed with the help of GRACE-loop. The extraction of the full QED corrections is performed, these are quite large at threshold. The genuine weak corrections, for the linear collider energies, when expressed in the G{sub {mu}} scheme are of order -2 to -4% for Higgs masses preferred by the latest precision data. We also extract the m{sub t}{sup 2} type corrections and make a comparison with the weak corrections for the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}{nu}-bar H.

  10. New developments of the R & D silicon tracking for linear collider on silicon trackers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Savoy-Navarro; on behalf of the SiLC R&D Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The status of the R & D activity achieved so far within the SiLC (silicon tracking for the linear collider) collaboration is reported here. It includes the following items: present status of the collaboration, new developments on sensors, on mechanics (new directions for module construction, large support structure, cooling, and alignment and integration issues), new lab test bench results on electronics and sensors. The perspectives over a period of four years are presented with a detailed test beam schedule and the roadmap including the construction of new mechanical prototypes equipped with front end and readout chips in deep sub-micron CMOS technology are discussed. Combined tests with other sub-detectors are finally addressed. This test beam program is inserted in the framework of the EUDET European project.

  11. Research at SLAC towards a 0. 5 TeV linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the ongoing research at SLAC toward a next-generation linear collider (NLC). The energy of the collider is taken to be 0.5 TeV in the CM with view towards upgrading to 1.0 TeV. The luminosity is in the range of 10{sup 33} to 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2} sec {sup {minus}1}. The energy is achieved by acceleration with a gradient of about a factor of five higher than SLC, which yields a linear collider approximately twice as long as SLC. The detailed trade-off between length and acceleration will be based on total cost. A very broad optimum occurs when the total linear costs equal the total cost of RF power. 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Beam-Beam Scans Within a Linear Collider Bunch-Train Crossing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-22

    Beam-beam deflection scans provide important beam diagnostics at the interaction point of a linear collider. Beam properties such as spot sizes, alignment, and waists are measured by sweeping one beam across the other. Proposed linear colliders use trains of bunches; if beam-beam scans can be done within the time of a bunch-train crossing rather than integrating over the bunch train, the acquisition rate of diagnostic information can be increased and the sensitivity of the scan to pulse-to-pulse jitter and slow drifts reduced. The existence of intra-train deflection feedback provides most of the hardware needed to implement intra-train beam-beam scans for diagnostic purposes. A conceptual design is presented for such beam-beam scans at the Next Linear Collider (NLC).

  13. Accuracy of the Transverse Emittance Measurements of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, Federico; Dehning, Bernd Dehning

    High energy accelerators and storage rings are designed to collide charged particle beams and study their collision products. The production rate of the collision products has to be maximized in order to reduce the statistical uncertainty of the produced events. Monitoring the transverse distribution of the accelerated species allows to measure and optimize the beam transverse emittance, which directly affects the secondary particles production rate. The beam transverse emittance is measured by a class of diagnostics, the transverse profile monitors, designed to observe the particles transverse distributions. This thesis work aims at determining the accuracy of two classes of profile monitors presently installed in the CERN accelerators and foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): wire scanners and residual gas monitors. The explanation of the linear dynamics that characterize the particles transverse motion in an accelerator is followed by the description of the principles of operation of the studied mo...

  14. High temperature superconducting current leads for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    1999-01-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) will be equipped with about 8000 superconducting magnets. Some 3380 leads will feed the currents ranging from 60 to 13000 A. To reduce the heat inleak into the liquid helium, CERN aims to use high temperature superconducting material for leads having current ratings between 600 and 13000 A. Specifications have been written for 13000 A current leads, incorporating a high temperature superconducting section, for the main of the LHC, and contracts have been placed with several firms for the supply of prototypes for comparative testing. The leads used for feeding locally the 60 and 120 A dipole orbit correctors will be conventional conduction cooledmagnets resistive leads. An optimized lead of variable cross section has been tested, and an integral design has been initiated. This report describes the design status of the current leads for the LHC, emphasizing, for the different solutions, the principle of optimization and the choice of cooling methods. (8 refs).

  15. Black Holes and other exotica at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglia, Marco

    2009-05-01

    If the fundamental scale of gravity is of the order of 1 TeV, black holes might be produced at the Large Hadron Collider. We present simulations of black holes and other exotic predictions of physics beyond the Standard Model - supersymmetry and string theory. Black hole events are simulated using the CATFISH Monte Carlo generator, simulations of string resonances use PYTHIA and supersymmetric simulations use a combination of ISAJET and PYTHIA. Our analysis shows that black holes can be discriminated from supersymmetry and string resonances. Isolated leptons with high transverse momentum can be used to distinguish black holes and supersymmetry. Z bosons and photons with high transverse momentum allow the discrimination of black holes and string resonances. The analysis of visible and missing energy /momenta, event-shape variables and multilepton events complement these techniques.

  16. In the loop Large Hadron Collider project - UK engineering firms

    CERN Document Server

    Wilks, N

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the latest measures being taken to boost the level of UK engineering firms' involvement in research at CERN (Centre for Nuclear Research), including its 27 km circular Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. Virtually all of the components on this complex project have had to be custom-made, usually in the form of collaboration. It is part of these collaborations that some UK firms have proved they can shine. However, despite the proven capabilities, the financial return continues to be less than the government's funding. Each of the 20 CERN member states provides funds in proportion to its GDP and the UK is the second largest financial contributor. UK firms become price-competitive where a contract calls for a degree of customisation or product development, project management and tight quality control. Development of the Particle Physics Grid, for dissemination and analysis of data from the LHC, continues to provide major supply opportunities for UK manufacturers.

  17. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  18. Development of an ASIC for CCD readout at the vertex detectors of the intrenational linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, P; Stefanov, K D; Woolliscroft, T

    2007-01-01

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification Collaboration is developing sensors and readout electronics suitable for the International Linear Collider vertex detector. In order to achieve high data rates the proposed detector utilises column parallel CCDs, each read out by a custom designed ASIC. The prototype chip (CPR2) has 250 channels of electronics, each with a preamplifier, 5-bit flash ADC, data sparsification logic for identification of significant data clusters, and local memory for storage of data awaiting readout. CPR2 also has hierarchical 2-level data multiplexing and intermediate data memory, enabling readout of the sparsified data via the 5-bit data output bus.

  19. Tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider Intra-Train Beam Feedback System at the ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, P N; Clarke, Christine; Frisch, Josef; Hartin, Anthony F; Kalinin, Alexander; Khah, H; Markiewicz, Thomas W; McCormick, Douglas; Molloy, Stephen; Perry, Colin; Ross, Marc; Smith, Stephen; Smith, Tonee; White, Glen

    2005-01-01

    We report preliminary results of beam tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider intra-train position feedback system prototype at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a novel beam position monitor (BPM) processor with a latency below 5 nanoseconds, and a kicker driver amplifier with similar low latency. The 56 nanosecond-long bunchtrain in the ATF extraction line was used to test the prototype with delay-loop feedback operation. The achieved latency represents a demonstration of intra-train feedback on timescales relevant even for the CLIC Linear Collider design.

  20. Higgs boson pair production at the Photon Linear Collider in the two Higgs doublet model

    CERN Document Server

    Asakawa, Eri; Kanemura, Shinya; Okada, Yasuhiro; Tsumura, Koji

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the cross section of the lightest Higgs boson pair production at the Photon Linear Collider in the two Higgs doublet model. We focus on the scenario in which the lightest Higgs boson has the standard model like couplings to gauge bosons. We take into account the one-loop correction to the $hhh$ coupling as well as additional one-loop diagrams due to charged bosons to the $\\gamma\\gamma \\to hh$ helicity amplitudes. We discuss the impact of these corrections on the $hhh$ coupling measurement at the Photon Linear Collider.

  1. Tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider Intra-Train Beam Feedback System at the ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Frisch, J.C.; Markiewicz, T.W.; McCormick, D.J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; /SLAC; Kalinin, A.; /Daresbury; Perry, C.; /Oxford Instruments

    2006-03-14

    We report preliminary results of beam tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider intra-train position feedback system prototype at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a novel beam position monitor (BPM) processor with a latency below 5 nanoseconds, and a kicker driver amplifier with similar low latency. The 56 nanosecond-long bunchtrain in the ATF extraction line was used to test the prototype BPM processor. The achieved latency will allow a demonstration of intra-train feedback on timescales relevant even for the CLIC Linear Collider design.

  2. Linear polarization of gluons and photons in unpolarized collider experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisano, Cristian; Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Buffing, Maarten G. A.; Mulders, Piet J.

    2013-01-01

    We study azimuthal asymmetries in heavy quark pair production in unpolarized electron-proton and proton-proton collisions, where the asymmetries originate from the linear polarization of gluons inside unpolarized hadrons. We provide cross section expressions and study the maximal asymmetries allowed

  3. Grid Interface Design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Jankovic, Maria; Clare, Jon; Wheeler, Pat; Aguglia, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the grid interface challenges for CERN’s proposed Compact Linear Colliders’ (CLIC) klystron modulators, including a 280 MW power system optimisation. The modular multilevel converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for a Medium Voltage grid interface along with a control method for reducing the impact of klystron modulators on the electrical network.

  4. Simulations on pair creation from beam-beam interaction in linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P.; Tauchi, T. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Yokoya, K. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1991-05-01

    It has been recognized that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pair creation during the collision of intense beams in linear colliders will cause potential background problems for high energy experiments. Detailed knowledge of the angular-momentum spectrum of these low energy pairs is essential to the design of the interaction region. In this paper, we modify the computer code ABEL (Analysis of Beam-beam Effects in Linear colliders) to include the pair creation processes, using the equivalent photon approximation. Special care has been taken on the non-local nature of the virtual photon exchanges. The simulation results are then compared with known analytic formulas, and applied to the next generation colliders such as JLC. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  5. ICFA announces launch of technology recommendation process for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators has announced the membership and chair of the 12-person International Technology Recommendation Panel. The ITRP, with four members each from Europe, North America and Asia, is charged with recommending which of two leading accelerating technologies will form the best choice for a future international linear collider (1 page).

  6. New final doublets and power densities for the international linear collider small crossing angle layout

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Appleby; P Bambade

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we use current and proposed final doublet magnet technologies to reoptimise the interaction region of the international linear collider and reduce the power losses. The result is a set of three new final doublet layouts with improved beam transport properties. The effect of localised power deposition and it's reduction using tungsten liners are considered.

  7. e{sup {plus}}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders and new particle searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders and new particle searches that can be done with them. In the discussion of new particle searches we examine the following topics: searches for gauge boson structure, searches for a strongly interacting Higgs sector, top quark studies, Higgs searches, supersymmetric particle searches and measurements of soft supersymmetry breaking parameters.

  8. Proceedings of the international workshop on next-generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, M. (ed.)

    1988-12-01

    This report contains papers on the next-generation of linear colliders. The particular areas of discussion are: parameters; beam dynamics and wakefields; damping rings and sources; rf power sources; accelerator structures; instrumentation; final focus; and review of beam-beam interaction.

  9. International Linear Collider Steering Committee issues charge to Technology Recommendation Panel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Following its November 19 meeting in Paris, the International Linear Collider Steering Committee, a subcommittee of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, has published the charge http://www.fnal.gov/directorate/icfa/ITRP_Charge.pdf to the International Technology Recommendation Panel appointed by ICFA" (2 paragraphs).

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Progress of Linear Collider Final Focus Design and ATF2 Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Zimmermann, Frank; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    In this brief overview we will reflect on the process of the design of the linear collider (LC) final focus (FF) optics, and will also describe the theoretical and experimental efforts on design and practical realisation of a prototype of the LC FF optics implemented in the ATF2 facility at KEK, Japan, presently being commissioned and operated.

  11. Developments in Readout for Silicon Microstrip Sensors at a Linear Collider Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, Jerome; Crosby, Sean; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Schumm, Bruce A; Spencer, Ned

    2010-01-01

    We report recent results on the use of charge division to obtain a longitudinal coordinate from silicon strip detectors, and on sources of electronic readout noise for long, thin strips. These results hold promise for the design of Linear Collider charged particle tracking system composed of silicon microstrip sensors.

  12. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001 - Part 3: Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, T.; et al.

    2001-06-13

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  13. Software for the international linear collider: Simulation and reconstruction frameworks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ties Behnke; Frank Gaede; DESY Hamburg

    2007-12-01

    Software plays an increasingly important role already in the early stages of a large project like the ILC. In international collaboration a data format for the ILC detector and physics studies has been developed. Building upon this software frameworks are made available which ease the event reconstruction and analysis.

  14. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sharma

    2003-05-01

    Gaseous detectors have been pushed to the limits when required to operate in the ferocious and aggressive rate environment of the new generation of HEP experiments. A great effort has resulted in the optimization and construction of large systems of gas detectors, some operational and some due for installation. In this paper some examples are presented along with the impediments that have been overcome; some open issues will be highlighted.

  15. Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, M.

    2011-04-30

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  16. Time evolution of ground motion-dependent depolarisation at linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, I; Beckmann, M; Hartin, A; Helebrant, C; Kaefer, D; List, J; Moortgat-Pick, G

    2011-01-01

    Future linear colliders plan to collide polarised beams and the planned physics reach requires knowledge of the state of polarisation as precisely as possible. The polarised beams can undergo depolarisation due to various mechanisms. In order to quantify the uncertainty due to depolarisation, spin tracking simulations in the International Linear Collider (ILC) Beam Delivery System (BDS) and at the Interaction Point (IP) have been performed. Spin tracking in the BDS was achieved using the BMAD subroutine library, and the CAIN program was used to do spin tracking through the beam-beam collision. Assuming initially aligned beamline elements in the BDS, a ground motion model was applied to obtain realistic random misalignments over various time scales. Depolarisation at the level of 0.1% occurs within a day of ground motion at a noisy site. Depolarisation at the IP also exceeds 0.1% for the nominal parameter sets for both the ILC and for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Theoretical work is underway to include ...

  17. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Grah; on behalf of the FCAL Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The detectors of the ILC will feature a calorimeter system in the very forward region. The system comprises mainly two electromagnetic calorimeters: LumiCal, which is dedicated to the measurement of the absolute luminosity with highest precision and BeamCal, which uses the energy deposition from beamstrahlung pairs for a fast luminosity measure and the determination of beam parameters. The FCAL system is designed as a universal system fitting all detector concepts. It was implemented and simulated as a subsystem of the large detector concept [1]. The studies are carried out within the FCAL collaboration.

  18. Search for invisibly decaying Higgs boson at Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bansal; K Mazumdar; J B Singh

    2010-02-01

    In several scenarios of Beyond Standard Model physics, the invisible decay mode of the Higgs boson is an interesting possibility. The search strategy for an invisible Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), using weak boson fusion process, has been studied in detail, by taking into account all possible backgrounds. Realistic simulations have been used in the context of CMS experiment to devise a set of event selection criteria which eventually enhances the signal contribution compared to the background processes in characteristic distributions. In cut-based analysis, multi-jet background is found to overwhelm the signal in the finally selected sample. With an integrated luminosity of 10 fb-1, an upper limit of 36% on the branching ratio can be obtained for Higgs boson with a mass of 120 GeV/c2 for LHC energy of 14 TeV. Since the analysis essentially depends on the background estimation, detailed studies have been done to determine the background rates from real data.

  19. Anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations at the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, You

    One of the fundamental questions in the phenomenology of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is what the properties of matter are at the extreme densities and temperatures where quarks and gluons are in a new state of matter, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Collisions of high-energy heavy-ions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), allow us to create and study the properties of such a system in the laboratory. Anisotropic flow (vn) is strong evidence for the existence of QGP, and has been described as one of the most important observations measured in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the anisotropic flow of not only charged particles but also identified particles are presented. In addition, the investigations of correlations and fluctuations of both flow angle (symmetry plane) and magnitude were discussed. The main goal of this thesis is to understand the nature of anisotropic flow and its response to the initial geometry of the created system as well as its fluctuations.

  20. Commissioning and First Operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2010-01-01

    After some fifteen years of construction, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was commissioned at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research in 2008. This high-energy particle accelerator of 26.7 km circumference – the largest scientific instrument ever built – brings into collision intense beams of protons and ions to probe the structure of matter and study the forces acting on its elementary components at the TeV scale, an order of magnitude higher than the previous stateof-the-art. To guide and focus its particle beams, the LHC uses several thousands high-field superconducting magnets operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The project therefore constitutes a technological feat: all its components were developed, industrialized and series produced by industrial companies according to demanding specifications. Started as a CERN undertaking – by decision of the CERN Council and its twenty European member states – the project soon became global with special contributions from Canada, India, Jap...

  1. Superconducting Cable and Magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a high energy, high luminosity particle accelerator under construction at CERN and it will be the largest application of superconductivity. Most of the existing 27 km underground tunnel will be filled with superconducting magnets, mainly 15 m long dipoles and 3 m long quadrupoles. These 1232 dipole and 400 quadrupole magnets as well as many other magnets, are wound with copper stabilized NbTi Rutherford cables and will be operated at 1.9 K by means of pressurized superfluid helium. The operating dipole field is 8.33 T; however the whole system is designed for possible operation up to 9 T. The coils are powered at about 12 kA and about 12 GJ of magnetic energy will be stored in superconducting devices. After a brief review of the main characteristics of the superconductors and of the magnets, the special measures taken to fulfill the mass production with the necessary accuracy are presented. The results on one third of the superconducting cable production and on the first f...

  2. Using Data from the Large Hadron Collider in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Now is an exciting time for physics students, because they have access to technology and experiments all over the world that were unthinkable a generation ago. Therefore, now is also the ideal time to bring these experiments into the classroom, so students can see what cutting edge science looks like, both in terms of the underlying physics and in terms of the technology used to gather data. With the continued running of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the lab's continued dedication to providing open, worldwide access to their data, there is a unique opportunity for students to use these data in a manner very similar to how it's done in the particle physics community. In this session, we will explore ways for students to analyze real data from the CMS experiment at the LHC, plot these data to discover patterns and signals, and use these plots to determine quantities such as the invariant masses of the W, Z and Higgs bosons. Furthermore, we will show how such activities already fit well into standard introductory physics classes, and can in fact enhance already-existing lessons in the topics of momentum, kinematics, energy and electromagnetism.

  3. Large hadron collider (LHC) project quality assurance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullo, Lisa; Karpenko, Victor; Robinson, Kem; Turner, William; Wong, Otis

    2002-09-30

    The LHC Quality Assurance Plan is a set of operating principles, requirements, and practices used to support Berkeley Lab's participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project. The LHC/QAP is intended to achieve reliable, safe, and quality performance in the LHC project activities. The LHC/QAP is also designed to fulfill the following objectives: (1) The LHC/QAP is Berkeley Lab's QA program document that describes the elements necessary to integrate quality assurance, safety management, and conduct of operations into the Berkeley Lab's portion of the LHC operations. (2) The LHC/QAP provides the framework for Berkeley Lab LHC Project administrators, managers, supervisors, and staff to plan, manage, perform, and assess their Laboratory work. (3) The LHC/QAP is the compliance document that conforms to the requirements of the Laboratory's Work Smart Standards for quality assurance (DOE O 414.1, 10 CFR 830.120), facility operations (DOE O 5480.19), and safety management (DOE P 450.4).

  4. Maps for electron cloud density in Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Demma

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a quasistationary electron cloud inside the beam pipe through beam-induced multipacting processes has become an area of intensive study. The analyses performed so far have been based on heavy computer simulations taking into account photoelectron production, secondary emission, electron dynamics, and space charge effects, providing a detailed description of the electron-cloud evolution. Iriso and Peggs [U. Iriso and S. Peggs, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 024403 (2005PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.024403] have shown that, for the typical parameters of RHIC, the bunch-to-bunch evolution of the average electron-cloud density at a point can be represented by a cubic map. Simulations based on this map formalism are orders of magnitude faster compared to those based on standard particle tracking codes. In this communication we show that the map formalism is also applicable to the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, and that, in particular, it reproduces the average electron-cloud densities computed using a reference code to within ∼15% for general LHC bunch filling patterns. We also illustrate the dependence of the polynomial map coefficients on the physical parameters affecting the electron cloud (secondary emission yield, bunch charge, bunch spacing, etc..

  5. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Pran; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Han, Tao; Langacker, Paul; Mohapatra, Rabi; Valle, Jose; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Zerwas, Dirk; AbdusSalam, Shehu; Adam-Bourdarios, Claire; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Allanach, Benjamin; Altunkaynak, B; Anchordoqui, Luis A; Baer, Howard; Bajc, Borut; Buchmueller, O; Carena, M; Cavanaugh, R; Chang, S; Choi, Kiwoon; Csaki, C; Dawson, S; de Campos, F; De Roeck, A; Duhrssen, M; Eboli, O J.P; Ellis, J R; Flacher, H; Goldberg, H; Grimus, W; Haisch, U; Heinemeyer, S; Hirsch, M; Holmes, M; Ibrahim, Tarek; Isidori, G; Kane, Gordon; Kong, K; Lafaye, Remi; Landsberg, G; Lavoura, L; Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Seung J; Lisanti, M; Lust, Dieter; Magro, M B; Mahbubani, R; Malinsky, M; Maltoni, Fabio; Morisi, S; Muhlleitner, M M; Mukhopadhyaya, B; Neubert, M; Olive, K A; Perez, Gilad; Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Plehn, T; Ponton, E; Porod, Werner; Quevedo, F; Rauch, M; Restrepo, D; Rizzo, T G; Romao, J C; Ronga, F J; Santiago, Jose; Schechter, J; Senjanovic, G; Shao, J; Spira, M; Stieberger, S; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Tim M P; Tata, Xerxes; Taylor, T R; Toharia, M; Wacker, J; Wagner, C E.M; Wang, Lian-Tao; Weiglein, G; Zeppenfeld, D; Zurek, K

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory ...

  6. Superconductive technologies for the Large Hadron collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is the largest plant based on superconductivity and cryogenics: 27 km of tunnel filled with superconducting magnets and other equipment that will be kept at 1.9 K. The dipole magnets have to generate a minimum magnetic field of 8.3 T to allow collisions of proton beams at an energy of 14 TeV in the centre of mass. The construction of LHC started in 1997 at CERN in Geneva and required 10 years of research and development on fine- filament NbTi superconducting wires and cables, on magnet technology and on He-II refrigerators. In particular the project needs the production of about 1000 tons of high-homogeneity NbTi with current densities of more than 2000 A mm/sup -2/ at 9 T and 1.9 K, with tight control also of all other cable properties such as magnetization, interstrand resistance and copper resistivity. The paper describes the main dipole magnets and reviews the most significant steps in the research and development, focusing on the issues related to the conductor, to...

  7. Longitudinal emittance blowup in the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on Landau damping for longitudinal stability. To avoid decreasing the stability margin at high energy, the longitudinal emittance must be continuously increased during the acceleration ramp. Longitudinal blowup provides the required emittance growth. The method was implemented through the summer of 2010. Band-limited RF phase-noise is injected in the main accelerating cavities during the whole ramp of about 11min. Synchrotron frequencies change along the energy ramp, but the digitally created noise tracks the frequency change. The position of the noise-band, relative to the nominal synchrotron frequency, and the bandwidth of the spectrum are set by pre-defined constants, making the diffusion stop at the edges of the demanded distribution. The noise amplitude is controlled by feedback using the measurement of the average bunch length. This algorithm reproducibly achieves the programmed bunch length of about 1.2ns, at flat top with low bunch-to-bunch scatter and provides a...

  8. Integration of Mathematica in the Large Hadron Collider Database

    CERN Document Server

    Beauquis, J

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the major project in particle physics in the world. The particle accelerator is a 27 km ring where many thousands of superconducting magnets keep protons on track. Results from complex measurements of, for example, the magnetic field and the geometry of the main bending and focusing magnets are stored in databases for analysis and quality control. The geometry of the 15 m long main bending magnet weighing almost 30 tons has to be controlled within tenths of mm. All measurements are stored in ORACLE data bases. They are organized in two types: raw and derived data. Raw data come from the measurement devices and derived data describe quality measures calculated from the raw measurements. For example, the transverse position of the beam tube center relative to the theoretical axis of the accelerator is measured along the magnet. This data is used to simulate improvements or to calculate quality criteria, used in the daily quality checks of all produced magnets. The positio...

  9. Development of superconducting links for the Large Hadron Collider machine

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine, new superconducting lines are being developed for the feeding of the LHC magnets. The proposed electrical layout envisages the location of the power converters in surface buildings, and the transfer of the current from the surface to the LHC tunnel, where the magnets are located, via superconducting links containing tens of cables feeding different circuits and transferring altogether more than 150 kA. Depending on the location, the links will have a length ranging from 300 m to 500 m, and they will span a vertical distance of about 80 m. An overview of the R&D program that has been launched by CERN is presented, with special attention to the development of novel types of cables made from MgB 2 and high temperature superconductors (Bi-2223 and REBCO) and to the results of the tests performed on prototype links. Plans for future activities are presented, together with a timeline for potential future integration in the LHC machine.

  10. Physics at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is presented of the physics opportunities at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. Examples are given of physics that might emerge in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions and in {gamma}{gamma} collisions using the back-scattered laser technique, including {gamma}{gamma} {yields} ZZ scattering as a probe of ultraheavy quanta. The second portion of the talk focuses on physics that must emerge at or below the TeV scale--the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. In particular a very rough estimate is presented of the most challenging possible signal of symmetry breaking, strong WW scattering, as a function of collider energy. A subtheme, made explicit in the concluding section, is the continuing complementarity of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and pp colliders in the domain of TeV physics.

  11. Physics at TeV e sup + e sup minus linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is presented of the physics opportunities at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. Examples are given of physics that might emerge in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions and in {gamma}{gamma} collisions using the back-scattered laser technique, including {gamma}{gamma} {yields} ZZ scattering as a probe of ultraheavy quanta. The second portion of the talk focuses on physics that must emerge at or below the TeV scale--the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. In particular a very rough estimate is presented of the most challenging possible signal of symmetry breaking, strong WW scattering, as a function of collider energy. A subtheme, made explicit in the concluding section, is the continuing complementarity of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and pp colliders in the domain of TeV physics.

  12. Solid State Modulators for the International Linear Collider (ILC)

    CERN Document Server

    Kempkes, Michael; Casey, Jeffrey; Gaudreau, Marcel; Roth, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Diversified Technologies, Inc. is developing two solid state modulator designs for the ILC under SBIR funding from the DOE. The first design consists of a 150 kV hard switch. The key development in this design is the energy storage system, which must provide 25 kJ per pulse, at very tight voltage regulation over the 1.5 millisecond pulse. DTI's design uses a quasi-resonant bouncer (with a small auxiliary power supply and switch) to maintain the voltage flattop, eliminating the need for massive capacitor banks. The second design uses a solid state Marx bank, with ~10 kV stages, to drive the ILC klystron. In this design, staggered turn-on of the Marx stages provides voltage regulation without the need for large capacitor banks. This paper will discuss design tradeoffs, power supply and control considerations, and energy storage requirements and alternatives for both designs.

  13. Probing universal extra dimension at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Bhattacharyya

    2007-11-01

    We consider the UED scenario and study the detectability of the first KK electron-positron pair at the ILC. A few hundred GeV KK electron decays into a nearly degenerate KK photon, which carries away missing energy, and the standard electron. The mass splitting between the KK electron and KK photon is controlled by the bulk- and brane-induced radiative corrections. We look for the signal event + - + large missingenergy for $\\sqrt{s} = 1$ TeV and observe that with a few hundred fb-1 luminosity the signal can be deciphered from the standard model background. We briefly outline how the UED signals may be distinguished from the supersymmetric signals.

  14. Scintillator calorimeters for a future linear collider experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartbrich, Oskar

    2016-07-15

    shower start shows considerable differences between physics lists, especially for the higher end of beam energies available in this analysis. Two separate energy reconstruction algorithms are presented in this thesis. The standard reconstruction uses constant weights per sub-detector to reconstruct the primary pion energy. The implementation of a software compensation reconstruction developed for this analysis aims to distinguish electromagnetic sub-shower depositions in hadronic showers by the deposited energy in each hit. The implementation differs from a previous software compensation scheme used within CALICE by forcing less dependencies on the shapes of the optimised weights, increasing the number of free parameters but ultimately resulting in a more stable parameter optimisation. The software compensation reconstruction improves the energy resolution of data events by 10% to 20%. Applying the software compensation weights obtained from simulations to data events yields a similar performance compared to the native data weights, slightly degrading the response linearity while even slightly improving the energy resolution. The calorimeter prototypes used in the testbeam analysis presented in this thesis were built to prove the general feasibility of high granularity scintillator-SiPM calorimeters, which they fully accomplished. To demonstrate the scalability of such calorimeters to the size and requirements of a full-scale particle physics experiment as ILD, second generation prototypes with fully integrated readout electronics are developed within the CALICE collaboration. A toy simulation study performed for this thesis shows that the development of scintillator-SiPM tile systems should target a lightyield of 15 (px)/(MIP) in order to maintain a 95% MIP efficiency even for 2σ outliers, when assuming a hit energy threshold of 0.5 MIP. An efficient method to extract and validate trigger thresholds positions for all cells of the detector system is presented, requiring

  15. 1995 second modulator-klystron workshop: A modulator-klystron workshop for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This second workshop examined the present state of modulator design and attempted an extrapolation for future electron-positron linear colliders. These colliders are currently viewed as multikilometer-long accelerators consisting of a thousand or more RF sources with 500 to 1,000, or more, pulsed power systems. The workshop opened with two introductory talks that presented the current approaches to designing these linear colliders, the anticipated RF sources, and the design constraints for pulse power. The cost of main AC power is a major economic consideration for a future collider, consequently the workshop investigated efficient modulator designs. Techniques that effectively apply the art of power conversion, from the AC mains to the RF output, and specifically, designs that generate output pulses with very fast rise times as compared to the flattop. There were six sessions that involved one or more presentations based on problems specific to the design and production of thousands of modulator-klystron stations, followed by discussion and debate on the material.

  16. Physical mechanism of the linear beam-size effect at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, K. [Institut fuer Physik, THEP, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudinger weg 7, D 55099 Mainz (Germany); Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G. [Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russia)

    1996-09-01

    We present a qualitative but precise description of the linear beam-size effect predicted for the processes in which unstable but long-living particles collide with each other. We derive a physically pronounced equation for the event rate which proves that the linear beam-size effect corresponds to the scattering of one beam of particles on the decay products of the other. We compare this linear beam-size effect with the known logarithmic beam-size effect measured in the experiments on a single bremsstrahlung at Novosibirsk{close_quote}s VEPP-4 and DESY HERA. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Physical mechanism of the linear beam-size effect at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Melnikov, K; Serbo, V G

    1996-01-01

    We present qualitative but precise description of the linear beam-size effect predicted for the processes in which unstable but long--living particles collide with each other. We derive physically pronounced equation for the events rate which proves that the linear beam-size effect corresponds to the scattering of one beam of particles on the decay products of the other. We compare this linear beam-size effect with the known logarithmic beam-size effect measured in the experiments on a single bremsstrahlung at VEPP-4 and HERA.

  18. W production at large transverse momentum at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Richard J; Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Sabio Vera, Agustín

    2005-11-25

    We study the production of W bosons at large transverse momentum in pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We calculate the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the differential cross section. We find that the NLO corrections provide a large increase to the cross section but, surprisingly, do not reduce the scale dependence relative to leading order (LO). We also calculate next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) soft-gluon corrections and find that, although they are small, they significantly reduce the scale dependence thus providing a more stable result.

  19. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-06

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  20. Alignment and vibration issues in TeV linear collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1989-07-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of public-beam-derived placement information are mentioned. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Alighment and Vibration Issues in TeV Linear Collider Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of particle-beam-derived placement information are mentioned.

  2. ATF2 for Final Focus Test Beam for Future Linear Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, S.; ATF2 Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    In future linear colliders, extremely small beam size is required at collision point for high luminosity. For example, it is of order of nanometer in ILC(International Linear Collider). ATF2 is a project at ATF(Accelerator Test Facility) in KEK which demonstrates performance of final focus system experimentally. ATF2 beam line is a prototype of ILC final focus system where the local chromaticity correction scheme is adopted. The optics is basically the same and the natural chromaticity, too. Thus the tolerance of magnet alignment and field error is similar for both of the beam lines. We report here observation of small beam size of about 45nm there. We also report plan for smaller beam size with higher beam intensity.

  3. A calibration system for Compton polarimetry at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormwald, Benedikt; Vauth, Annika [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Polarimetry with permille-level precision is essential for future electron-positron linear colliders. Compton polarimeters can reach negligible statistical uncertainties within seconds of measurement time. The dominating systematic uncertainties originate from the response and alignment of the detector which records the Compton scattered electrons. The robust baseline technology for the Compton polarimeters foreseen at future linear colliders is based on an array of gas Cherenkov detectors read out by photomultipliers. In this paper, we will present a calibration method which promises to monitor nonlinearities in the response of such a detector at the level of a few permille. This method has been implemented in an LED-based calibration system which matches the existing prototype detector. The performance of this calibration system is sufficient to control the corresponding contribution to the total uncertainty on the extracted polarisation to better than 0.1%.

  4. A Calibration System for Compton Polarimetry at $e^+e^-$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Vormwald, Benedikt; Vauth, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Polarimetry with permille-level precision is essential for future electron-positron linear colliders. Compton polarimeters can reach negligible statistical uncertainties within seconds of measurement time. The dominating systematic uncertainties originate from the response and alignment of the detector which records the Compton scattered electrons. The robust baseline technology for the Compton polarimeters foreseen at future linear colliders is based on an array of gas Cherenkov detectors read out by photomultipliers. In this paper, we will present a calibration method which promises to monitor nonlinearities in the response of such a detector at the level of a few permille. This method has been implemented in an LED-based calibration system which matches the existing prototype detector. The performance of this calibration system is sufficient to control the corresponding contribution to the total uncertainty on the extracted polarisation to better than $0.1\\%$.

  5. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  6. Improvements in emittance wake field optimization for the SLAC Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef

    2003-01-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time ...

  7. Radiation and Thermal Analysis of Superconducting Quadrupoles in the Interaction Region of Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-10-14

    Radiation heat deposition in the superconducting magnets of the Interaction Region (IR) of a linear collider can be a serious issue that limits the magnet operating margins and shortens the material lifetime. Radiation and thermal analyses of the IR quadrupoles in the incoming and extraction beam lines of the ILC are performed in order to determine the magnet limits. This paper presents an analysis of the radial, azimuthal and longitudinal distributions of heat deposition in the incoming and disrupted beam doublets. Operation margins of the magnets based on NbTi superconductor are calculated and compared. The radiation and thermal analysis of the ILC IR quadrupoles based on Rutherford type cables was performed. It was found that the peak radiation heat deposition takes place in the second extraction quadrupole QFEX2. The maximum power density in the coil is {approx}17mW/g. This is rather high, comparing to the proton machines (LHC). However, the fast radial decay of the heat deposition together with the high thermal conductivity of the Rutherford type cable limits the coil temperatures to a moderate level. It was determined that both 2-layer and 4-layer QFEX2 magnet designs have thermal margins of a factor of {approx}4 at the nominal gradient of 31.3 T/m. Because of the large margins, these magnets can easily accommodate possible changes in the IR optics and heat deposition levels.

  8. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inntjore Levinsen, Y.; Dalena, B.; Tomás, R.; Schulte, D.

    2014-05-01

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of σy=1 nm vertically and σx=45 nm horizontally. With exceptionally small and flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded due to the combination of the experimental solenoid field and a large crossing angle. The two main effects reducing the luminosity are y-x'-coupling and an increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field increases the beam emittance and results in unrecoverable luminosity degradation. A novel approach to evaluate the ISR effect from a realistic solenoid field without knowledge of the full compensation of the geometric aberrations is presented. This approach is confirmed by a detailed study of the correction techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR for CLIC at 3 TeV has been evaluated, and found to be around 4% to 5% for the solenoid design under study.

  9. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Inntjore Levinsen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of σ_{y}=1  nm vertically and σ_{x}=45  nm horizontally. With exceptionally small and flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded due to the combination of the experimental solenoid field and a large crossing angle. The two main effects reducing the luminosity are y-x^{′}-coupling and an increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field increases the beam emittance and results in unrecoverable luminosity degradation. A novel approach to evaluate the ISR effect from a realistic solenoid field without knowledge of the full compensation of the geometric aberrations is presented. This approach is confirmed by a detailed study of the correction techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR for CLIC at 3 TeV has been evaluated, and found to be around 4% to 5% for the solenoid design under study.

  10. Damage test for International Linear Collider positron generation target at KEKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, M.; Mimashi, T.; Saito, K.; Kikuchi, M.; Kamitani, T.

    2006-07-01

    ILC (International Linear Collider) is aiming to conduct electron-positron collisions at 1 TeV center-of-mass energy. One bunch train will contain up to 2800 3.2 nC bunches with a 308 ns bunch spacing or 5600 1.6 nC bunches with a 154 ns spacing. The bunch-train length will be 0.9 ms. Because of this extremely large amount of beam in a train, serious damage to a positron production target driven by 6 GeV incident electron beam is of concern. As the ILC positron source, several different methods have been proposed. The target hardness is a key point concerning the selection. In this article, we report on a test experiment to examine the target hardness by using a stored electron beam in KEKB HER (High Energy Ring). The project name is IPPAK (ILC Positron Project At KEKB). By manipulating the abort kicker, a condition similar to that of the ILC positron production target can be reproduced. The experiment was carried out on June 29 and 30, 2005. The target was seriously damaged under the heaviest condition (KEKB mode), but the damage was less and nothing for those of the ILC mode. Possible impacts to the ILC positron production scheme are also discussed.

  11. The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

  12. Higgs self-coupling in the fusion channel at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Moeing; A Rosca

    2007-11-01

    We investigate the Higgs pair production process at the international linear collider (ILC), focusing on the measurement of the trilinear self-coupling of the Higgs boson in the fusion channel. The sensitivity of this measurement is discussed in the Higgs mass range 140-200 GeV at a center-of-mass energy between 1 TeV and 1.5 TeV.

  13. Final Report for the UNIVERSITY-BASED DETECTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E [Univ. of Oregon

    2013-04-22

    The U.S Linear Collider Detector R&D program, supported by the DOE and NSF umbrella grants to the University of Oregon, made significant advances on many critical aspects of the ILC detector program. Progress advanced on vertex detector sensor development, silicon and TPC tracking, calorimetry on candidate technologies, and muon detection, as well as on beamline measurements of luminosity, energy, and polarization.

  14. Associated single photons and doubly-charged scalars at linear - - colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya; Santosh Kumar Rai

    2007-11-01

    Doubly-charged scalars, predicted in many models having exotic Higgs representations, can in general have lepton-number violating (LFV) couplings. We show that by using an associated monoenergetic final state photon seen at a future linear - - collider, we can have a clear and distinct signature for a doubly-charged resonance. The strength of the = 2 coupling can also be probed quite effectively as a function of the recoil mass of the doubly-charged scalar.

  15. Lepton flavour violation at high energies: the LHC and a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Teixeira, A M; Figueiredo, A J R; Romao, J C

    2014-01-01

    We discuss several manifestations of charged lepton flavour violation at high energies. Focusing on a supersymmetric type I seesaw, considering constrained and semi-constrained supersymmetry breaking scenarios, we analyse different observables, both at the LHC and at a future Linear Collider. We further discuss how the synergy between low- and high-energy observables can shed some light on the underlying mechanism of lepton flavour violation.

  16. Monte Carlo based studies of a polarized positron source for international linear collider (ILC).

    OpenAIRE

    Schälicke, A.; Dollan, R.; Laihem, K.

    2006-01-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of an International Linear Collider (ILC) requires the development of a polarized positron beam. New concepts of polarized positron sources are based on the development of circularly polarized photon sources. The polarized photons create electron-positron pairs in a thin target and transfer their polarization state to the outgoing leptons. To achieve a high level of positron polarization the understanding of the production mechanisms in the targe...

  17. The reach of a future Linear Collider after the g-2 result

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, F

    2001-01-01

    Combining the cosmological requirement on dark matter with the recent BNL g-2 measurement it is argued that, within the mSUGRA framework, the preferred region for SUSY mass parameters falls well inside the area covered by the future linear colliders under consideration for right handed sleptons and of the 2 lightest neutralinos. The coverage for the lightest chargino and left handed sleptons is also favoured but with smaller confidence.

  18. Identifying new physics contributions in the Higgs sector at linear + - colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh Kumar Rai

    2007-11-01

    Loop-driven decay modes of the Higgs are sensitive to new physics contributions because of new particles in the loops. To highlight this we look at the dilepton-dijet signal in the dominant Higgs production channel at a linear + - collider. We show that by taking a simple ratio between cross-sections of two different final states such contributions can be very easily identified.

  19. The road towards the international linear collider: Higgs, top/quantum chromodynamics, loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Heinemeyer

    2007-11-01

    The international linear +− collider (ILC) could go into operation in the second half of the upcoming decade. Experimental analyses and theory calculations for the physics at the ILC are currently performed. We review recent progress, as presented at the LCWS06 in Bangalore, India, in the fields of Higgs boson physics and top/QCD. Also the area of loop calculations, necessary to achieve the required theory precision, is included.

  20. Destination Universe: The Incredible Journey of a Proton in the Large Hadron Collider (English version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    This brochure illustrates the incredible journey of a proton as he winds his way through the CERN accelerator chain and ends up inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC is CERN's flagship particle accelerator which can collide protons together at close to the speed of light, creating circumstances like those just seconds after the Big Bang.

  1. Destination Universe: The Incredible Journey of a Proton in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    This brochure illustrates the incredible journey of a proton as he winds his way through the CERN accelerator chain and ends up inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC is CERN's flagship particle accelerator which can collide protons together at close to the speed of light, creating circumstances like those just seconds after the Big Bang.

  2. Littlest Higgs Model and Higgs Boson Associated Production with Top Quark Pair at High Energy Linear e+e- Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In the parameter space allowed by the electroweak precision measurement data, we consider the contributions of the new particles predicted by the littlest Higgs model to the Higgs boson associated production with top quark pair in the future high energy linear e+ e- collider (ILC). We find that the contributions mainly come from the new gauge bosons ZH and BH. For reasonable values of the free parameters, the absolute value of the relative correction parameter δσ/σSM can be significanly large, which might be observed in the future ILC experiment with √S = 800 GeV.

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.; Nixon, R. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken.

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.; Nixon, R. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken.

  5. WIMP search in the mono-photon channel at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermehl, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a planned electron-positron collider with √(s) tunable from 250 to 500 GeV, with a possible upgrade to 1 TeV. Besides precision measurements of the Higgs boson its physics goals comprise searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, e.g. searches for Dark Matter. This collider search assumes the production of WIMPs in pairs. They are not visible in the detector but the energy carried away can be observed via an additional (''tag'') particle. Photon emission from the initial state leads to the almost model independent signature: e{sup +}e{sup -} → χχγ. As this analysis tests couplings between WIMPs and leptons it is complementary to analogues searches at the LHC. A precise study is facilitated by the clean environment of lepton colliders with small systematics of electroweak backgrounds. While the conceptual feasibility and the sensitivity reach of the ILC have been shown in the past, this talk focusses on the consequences for the detector design. The requirements for the central detector as well as for the instrumentation of the forward region are discussed in the context of the ILD detector concept.

  6. Design and System Integration of the Superconducting Wiggler Magnets for the Compact Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard, A; Bragin, A; Karppinen, M; Maccaferri, R; Mezentsev, N; Papaphilippou, Y; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Rumolo, G; Russenschuck, S; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K

    2012-01-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 nm and 4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultra-low emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86 GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. This paper describes a technical design concept for the CLIC damping wigglers.

  7. Could Large CP Violation Be Detected at Colliders?

    CERN Document Server

    Im, C J C; Malde, P

    1993-01-01

    We argue that CP--violation effects below a few tenths of a percent are probably undetectable at hadron and electron colliders. Thus only operators whose contributions interfere with tree--level Standard Model amplitudes are detectable. We list these operators for Standard Model external particles and some two and three body final state reactions that could show detectable effects. These could test electroweak baryogenesis scenarios.

  8. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The design presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume one covers the following: the introduction; electron source; positron source; NLC damping rings; bunch compressors and prelinac; low-frequency linacs and compressors; main linacs; design and dynamics; and RF systems for main linacs.

  9. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The ``design`` presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume II covers the following: collimation systems; IP switch and big bend; final focus; the interaction region; multiple bunch issues; control systems; instrumentation; machine protection systems; NLC reliability considerations; NLC conventional facilities. Also included are four appendices on the following topics: An RF power source upgrade to the NLC; a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron; ground motion: theory and measurement; and beam-based feedback: theory and implementation.

  10. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  11. Precision study of MSSM at future e+e- linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, K; Tsukamoto, T; Fujii, Keisuke; Nojiri, Mihoko M; Tsukamoto, Toshifumi

    1995-01-01

    The lighter scalar tau lepton \\sti may be the lightest scalar lepton and therefore would be found earlier in future collider experiments. We point out the impact of the measurement of the mass and the mixing angle of \\st to discriminate the models of SUSY breaking. Furthermore, the measurement of the polarization of \\tau lepton(P_{\\tau}) from the decaying \\sti helps to determine the Yukawa sector of minimal supersymmetric standard model. We present our MC study of the production and the decay of \\sti lepton at a future linear collider at \\sqrt{s}=500 GeV. The mass, mixing angle of \\sti and P_{\\tau}(\\sti\\rightarrow\\tau \\chi_1^0) would be measured precisely at the future LC. ( talks given at Yukawa International Seminar(YIKS) '95 on some very hot and humid day in August, and also at Workshop on {\\it Physics and Experiments with Linear e^+e^- Colliders} Appi, Iwate Japan Sep.8-12 1995.)

  12. SiD Linear Collider Detector R&D, DOE Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Demarteau, Marcel [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The Department of Energy’s Office of High Energy Physics supported the SiD university detector R&D projects in FY10, FY11, and FY12 with no-cost extensions through February, 2015. The R&D projects were designed to advance the SiD capabilities to address the fundamental questions of particle physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC): • What is the mechanism responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of mass? • How do the forces unify? • Does the structure of space-time at small distances show evidence for extra dimensions? • What are the connections between the fundamental particles and forces and cosmology? Silicon detectors are used extensively in SiD and are well-matched to the challenges presented by ILC physics and the ILC machine environment. They are fast, robust against machine-induced background, and capable of very fine segmentation. SiD is based on silicon tracking and silicon-tungsten sampling calorimetry, complemented by powerful pixel vertex detection, and outer hadronic calorimetry and muon detection. Radiation hard forward detectors which can be read out pulse by pulse are required. Advanced calorimetry based on a particle flow algorithm (PFA) provides excellent jet energy resolution. The 5 Tesla solenoid is outside the calorimeter to improve energy resolution. PFA calorimetry requires fine granularity for both electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, leading naturally to finely segmented silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimetry. Since silicon-tungsten calorimetry is expensive, the detector architecture is compact. Precise tracking is achieved with the large magnetic field and high precision silicon microstrips. An ancillary benefit of the large magnetic field is better control of the e⁺e⁻ pair backgrounds, permitting a smaller radius beampipe and improved impact parameter resolution. Finally, SiD is designed with a cost constraint in mind. Significant advances and new capabilities have been made and

  13. Mitigation of ground motion effects via feedback systems in the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, Jürgen; Schmickler, Hermann; Schulte, Daniel

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future multi-TeV electron positron collider, which is currently being designed at CERN. To achieve its ambitious goals, CLIC has to produce particle beams of the highest quality, which makes the accelerator very sensitive to ground motion. Four mitigation methods have been foreseen by the CLIC design group to cope with the feasibility issue of ground motion. This thesis is concerned with the design of one of these mitigation methods, named linac feedback (L-FB), but also with the simultaneous simulation and validation of all mitigation methods. Additionally, a technique to improve the quality of the indispensable system knowledge has been developed. The L-FB suppresses beam oscillations along the accelerator. Its design is based on the decoupling of the overall accelerator system into independent channels. For each channel an individual compensator is found with the help of a semi- automatic control synthesis procedure. This technique allows the designer to incorporate ...

  14. Radiative Neutrino Mass Model at the $e^{-}e^{+}$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ahriche, Amine; Soualah, Rachik

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a Standard Model (SM) extension with two charged singlet scalars and three right handed (RH) neutrinos at an electron-positron collider. In this model, the neutrino mass is generated radiatively at three-loop, the lightest RH neutrino is a good dark matter candidate; and the electroweak phase transition strongly first order as required for baryogenesis. We focus on the process $e^{+}+e^{-}\\rightarrow e^{-}\\mu^{+}+E_{miss}$, where the model contains new lepton flavor violating interactions that contribute to the missing energy. We investigate the feasibility of detecting this process at future $e^{-}e^{+}$ linear colliders at different center of mass energies: $E_{CM}$=250, 350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV.

  15. DEPFET active pixel detectors for a future linear $e^+e^-$ collider

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, O; Dieguez, A; Dingfelder, J; Hemperek, T; Kishishita, T; Kleinohl, T; Koch, M; Krueger, H; Lemarenko, M; Luetticke, F; Marinas, C; Schnell, M; Wermes, N; Campbell, A; Ferber, T; Kleinwort, C; Niebuhr, C; Soloviev, Y; Steder, M; Volkenborn, R; Yaschenko, S; Fischer, P; Kreidl, C; Peric, I; Knopf, J; Ritzert, M; Curras, E; Lopez-Virto, A; Moya, D; Vila, I; Boronat, M; Esperante, D; Fuster, J; Garcia Garcia, I; Lacasta, C; Oyanguren, A; Ruiz, P; Timon, G; Vos, M; Gessler, T; Kuehn, W; Lange, S; Muenchow, D; Spruck, B; Frey, A; Geisler, C; Schwenker, B; Wilk, F; Barvich, T; Heck, M; Heindl, S; Lutz, O; Mueller, Th; Pulvermacher, C; Simonis, H.J; Weiler, T; Krausser, T; Lipsky, O; Rummel, S; Schieck, J; Schlueter, T; Ackermann, K; Andricek, L; Chekelian, V; Chobanova, V; Dalseno, J; Kiesling, C; Koffmane, C; Gioi, L.Li; Moll, A; Moser, H.G; Mueller, F; Nedelkovska, E; Ninkovic, J; Petrovics, S; Prothmann, K; Richter, R; Ritter, A; Ritter, M; Simon, F; Vanhoefer, P; Wassatsch, A; Dolezal, Z; Drasal, Z; Kodys, P; Kvasnicka, P; Scheirich, J

    2013-01-01

    The DEPFET collaboration develops highly granular, ultra-transparent active pixel detectors for high-performance vertex reconstruction at future collider experiments. The characterization of detector prototypes has proven that the key principle, the integration of a first amplification stage in a detector-grade sensor material, can provide a comfortable signal to noise ratio of over 40 for a sensor thickness of 50-75 $\\mathrm{\\mathbf{\\mu m}}$. ASICs have been designed and produced to operate a DEPFET pixel detector with the required read-out speed. A complete detector concept is being developed, including solutions for mechanical support, cooling and services. In this paper the status of DEPFET R & D project is reviewed in the light of the requirements of the vertex detector at a future linear $\\mathbf{e^+ e^-}$ collider.

  16. Simulations of the TESLA Linear Collider with a Fast Feedback System

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel; White, G

    2003-01-01

    The tolerances on the beams as they collide at the interaction point of the TESLA linear collider are very tight due to the nano-metre scale final vertical bunch spot sizes. Ground motion causes the beams to increase in emittance and drift out of collision leading to dramatic degradation of luminosity performance. To combat this, both slow orbit and fast intra-train feedback systems will be used. The design of these feedback systems depends critically on how component misalignment effects the beam throughout the whole accelerator. A simulation has been set up to study in detail the accelerator performance under such conditions by merging the codes of PLACET, MERLIN and GUINEA-PIG together with Simulink code to model feedback systems, all under a Matlab environment.

  17. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-09-07

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments operating at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions.

  18. Design of a Multi-Bunch BPM for the Next Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrew; McCormick, Douglas; Ross, Marc; Smith, Stephen R.; Hayano, H.; Naito, T.; Terunuma, N.; Araki, S.

    2002-12-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) will collide 180-bunch trains of electrons and positrons with bunch spacing of 1.4 ns. The small spot size (σy monitors (BPMs) are to determine the bunch-to-bunch misalignment on each machine pulse. High bandwidth kickers will then be programmed to bring the train into better alignment on the next machine cycle. A prototype multi-bunch BPM system with bandwidth (350 MHz) sufficient to distinguish adjacent bunches has been built at SLAC. It is based on 5 G sample/s digitization of analog sum and difference channels. Calibration tone injection and logging of the single bunch impulse response provide the kernel for deconvolution of bunch-by-bunch position from the sum and difference waveforms. These multi-bunch BPMs have been tested in the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK and in the PEP-II ring at SLAC. The results of these measurements are presented in this paper.

  19. Experimental validation of a novel compact focusing scheme for future energy-frontier linear lepton colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, G R; Ainsworth, R; Akagi, T; Alabau-Gonzalvo, J; Angal-Kalinin, D; Araki, S; Aryshev, A; Bai, S; Bambade, P; Bett, D R; Blair, G; Blanch, C; Blanco, O; Blaskovic-Kraljevic, N; Bolzon, B; Boogert, S; Burrows, P N; Christian, G; Corner, L; Davis, M R; Faus-Golfe, A; Fukuda, M; Gao, J; García-Morales, H; Geffroy, N; Hayano, H; Heo, A Y; Hildreth, M; Honda, Y; Huang, J Y; Hwang, W H; Iwashita, Y; Jang, S; Jeremie, A; Kamiya, Y; Karataev, P; Kim, E S; Kim, H S; Kim, S H; Kim, Y I; Komamiya, S; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Lam, B; Lekomtsev, K; Liu, S; Lyapin, A; Marin, E; Masuzawa, M; McCormick, D; Naito, T; Nelson, J; Nevay, L J; Okugi, T; Omori, T; Oroku, M; Park, H; Park, Y J; Perry, C; Pfingstner, J; Phinney, N; Rawankar, A; Renier, Y; Resta-López, J; Ross, M; Sanuki, T; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Shevelev, M; Shimizu, H; Snuverink, J; Spencer, C; Suehara, T; Sugahara, R; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, R; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tomás, R; Urakawa, J; Wang, D; Warden, M; Wendt, M; Wolski, A; Woodley, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamanaka, T; Yan, J; Yokoya, K; Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-24

    A novel scheme for the focusing of high-energy leptons in future linear colliders was proposed in 2001 [P. Raimondi and A. Seryi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3779 (2001)]. This scheme has many advantageous properties over previously studied focusing schemes, including being significantly shorter for a given energy and having a significantly better energy bandwidth. Experimental results from the ATF2 accelerator at KEK are presented that validate the operating principle of such a scheme by demonstrating the demagnification of a 1.3 GeV electron beam down to below 65 nm in height using an energy-scaled version of the compact focusing optics designed for the ILC collider.

  20. CERN Library | Mario Campanelli presents "Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider" | 16 March

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2016-01-01

    "Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider" by Mario Campanelli. Presentation on Wednesday, 16 March at 4 p.m. in the Library (bldg 52-1-052) The book aims to explain the historical development of particle physics, with special emphasis on CERN and collider physics. It describes in detail the LHC accelerator and its detectors, describing the science involved as well as the sociology of big collaborations, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs boson.  Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider  Mario Campanelli World Scientific Publishing, 2015  ISBN 9789814656641​

  1. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  2. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podobedov, B.

    1999-12-14

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch, and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blow-up in quadruple or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of the instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional the authors had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency ({approximately}10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. The authors have also employed a state-of-the-art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of the streak camera experiments the authors have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. The authors have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments the authors have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, the authors have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive observation and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally, the authors performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance.

  3. Concept of a software trigger for an experiment at the TESLA linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerlin, G; Heuer, R D; Le Dû, P; Quast, G

    2000-01-01

    TESLA is one of the design proposals for a TeV range linear electron positron collider. Electrons and positrons are grouped in bunch trains which collide with a rate of 5 Hz. Each train itself consists out of 2820 bunches with a bunch to bunch distance of 337 ns giving 2820 possible collisions in 950 mus followed by 199 ms without any interaction. This operation mode requires a deadtime free data taking within 1 ms but leaves 200 ms afterwards for reading the data before the next trains will collide. In conjunction with the aim of being able to select rare and maybe as yet unknown event topologies it gives rise to the proposal of a pure software trigger concept in the proposed detector design. All detector signals are digitized and stored in buffers for each collision prior to event building via a fast network. All bunches are then analyzed in a processor farm and classified in various streams from interesting physics to background, monitoring and calibration events. Finally, all events are stored in appropri...

  4. Top quark threshold scan and study of detectors for highly granular hadron calorimeters at future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesar, Michal

    2014-03-11

    Two major projects for future linear electron-positron colliders, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), are currently under development. These projects can be seen as complementary machines to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which permit a further progress in high energy physics research. They overlap considerably and share the same technological approaches. To meet the ambitious goals of precise measurements, new detector concepts like very finely segmented calorimeters are required. We study the precision of the top quark mass measurement achievable at CLIC and the ILC. The employed method was a t anti t pair production threshold scan. In this technique, simulated measurement points of the t anti t production cross section around the threshold are fitted with theoretical curves calculated at next-to-next-to-leading order. Detector effects, the influence of the beam energy spectrum and initial state radiation of the colliding particles are taken into account. Assuming total integrated luminosity of 100 fb{sup -1}, our results show that the top quark mass in a theoretically well-defined 1S mass scheme can be extracted with a combined statistical and systematic uncertainty of less than 50 MeV. The other part of this work regards experimental studies of highly granular hadron calorimeter (HCAL) elements. To meet the required high jet energy resolution at the future linear colliders, a large and finely segmented detector is needed. One option is to assemble a sandwich calorimeter out of many low-cost scintillators read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). We characterize the areal homogeneity of SiPM response with the help of a highly collimated beam of pulsed visible light. The spatial resolution of the experiment reach the order of 1 μm and allows to study the active area structures within single SiPM microcells. Several SiPM models are characterized in terms of relative photon detection efficiency and probability

  5. Physics at the e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Liebler, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Baer, H. [University of Oklahoma, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Norman, OK (United States); Battaglia, M.; Stefaniak, T. [University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Belanger, G.; Serpico, P. [Universite Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), B.P.110, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Fujii, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Kiyo, Y. [Juntendo University, Department of Physics, Inzai, Chiba (Japan); Olive, K. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Simon, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Uwer, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Berlin (Germany); Wackeroth, D. [SUNY at Buffalo, Department of Physics, Buffalo, NY (United States); Zerwas, P.M.; List, J.; Mnich, J.; Moenig, K.; Stanitzki, M.; Weiglein, G.; Mnich, J. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Arbey, A.; Mahmoudi, F. [Universite de Lyon, Villeurbonne Cedex (France); Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5574, Saint-Genis Laval Cedex (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Asano, M. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Bagger, J.; Bagger, J. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD (United States); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bechtle, P.; Desch, K.; Kroseberg, J. [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Bharucha, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department T31, Garching (Germany); CNRS, Aix Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, Marseille (France); Brau, J.; Brau, J. [University of Oregon, Department of Physics, Eugene, OR (United States); Bruemmer, F. [LUPM, UMR 5299, Universite de Montpellier II et CNRS, Montpellier (France); Choi, S.Y. [Chonbuk National University, Department of Physics, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Denner, A.; Porod, W. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dittmaier, S. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Ellwanger, U.; Mambrini, Y. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique, UMR 8627, CNRS, Orsay (France); Englert, C. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Freitas, A. [University of Pittsburgh, PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ginzburg, I. [Sobolev Institute of Mathematics and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Godfrey, S. [Carleton University, Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Ottawa (Canada); Greiner, N. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Grojean, C. [ICREA at IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Gruenewald, M. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Heisig, J. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany); Hoecker, A.; Moortgat, F.; Schlatter, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kanemura, S. [University of Toyama, Department of Physics, Toyama (Japan); Kawagoe, K.; Kawagoe, K. [Kyushu University, Department of Physics, Fukuoka (Japan); Kogler, R. [University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kronfeld, A.S.; Kronfeld, A.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study, Garching (Germany); Matsumoto, S. [The University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Muehlleitner, M.M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Poeschl, R. [Laboratoire de L' accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (FR); Porto, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (DE); Rolbiecki, K. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (PL); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (ES); Schmitt, M. [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, IL (US); Staal, O. [Stockholm University, The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (SE); Stoeckinger, D. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (DE); Wilson, G.W. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (US); Zeune, L. [ITFA, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (NL); Xella, S. [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute, Kobenhavn (DK); Ellis, J. [CERN, Geneva (CH); King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, Strand, London (GB); Komamiya, S. [The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, and International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, Tokyo (JP); Peskin, M. [SLAC, Stanford University, CA (US); Wagner, A. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (DE); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (DE); Yamamoto, H. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Sendai, Miyagi (JP)

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider in the energy range of √(s) = 92 GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well. (orig.)

  6. Selection of the optimum magnet design for the International Linear Collider positron source helical undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of possible undulator designs for the International Linear Collider positron source has resulted in a superconducting bifilar wire design being selected. After a comprehensive paper study and fabrication of the two preeminent designs, the superconducting undulator was chosen instead of the permanent magnet alternative. This was because of its superior performance in terms of magnetic field strength and quality, operational flexibility, risk of radiation damage, ease in achieving the required vacuum, and cost. The superconducting undulator design will now be developed into a complete system design for the full 200 m long magnet that is required.

  7. Proceedings of the 2. International Linear Collider Test-beam workshop - LCTW'09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wormser, G.; Poeschl, R.; Takeshi, M.; Yu, J.; Hauptman, J.; Jeans, D.; Velthuis, J.; Repond, J.; Stanitzki, M.; Chefdeville, M.; Pauletta, G.; Hauptman, J.; Kulis, S.; Charpy, A.; Rivera, R.; Turchetti, M.; Vos, M.; Dehmelt, K.; Settles, R.; Decotigny, D.; Killenberg, M.; Haas, D.; Gaede, F.; Graf, N.; Wing, M.; Gaede, F.; Karstensen, S.; Meyners, N.; Hast, C.; Vrba, V.; Takeshita, T.; Kawagoe, K.; Linssen, L.; Ramberg, E.; Demarteau, M.; Fisk, H.E.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Videau, H.; Boudry, V.; Hauptman, J.; Lipton, R.; Nelson, T.

    2009-07-01

    At this workshop detector and simulation experts have described and discussed the necessary ILC (International Linear Collider) detector research and development program in view of its need for test beams. This workshop has provided an opportunity to evaluate the capabilities and shortcomings of existing facilities in the context of planned test beam activities. This document gathers together the slides of the presentations. The presentations have been classified into 4 topics: -) plans of sub-detectors - calorimetry, silicon and gaseous tracking, -) data acquisition, -) test beam facilities, and -) resources and infrastructure for future test beams

  8. Start-to-End Tracking Simulations of the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Dalena, Barbara; Schulte, Daniel; Snuverink, Jochem; Stulle, Frank; Tomas, Rogelio; Latina, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We present the current status of the beam tracking simulations of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) from the exit of the damping ring to the interaction point, including the ring to main linac (RTML) section, main linac, beam delivery system (BDS) and beam-beam interactions. This model introduces realistic alignment survey errors, dynamic imperfections and also the possibility to study collective effects in the main linac and the BDS. Special emphasis is put on low emittance transport and beam stabilisation studies, applying beam based alignment methods and feedback systems. The aim is to perform realistic integrated simulations to obtain reliable luminosity predictions

  9. PLUME collaboration: Ultra-light ladders for linear collider vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomerotski, A., E-mail: A.Nomerotski@physics.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Particle Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bachynska, O. [DESY Hamburg, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Baudot, J.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; De Masi, R. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Deveaux, M. [IK-Frankfurt, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Dulinski, W. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Gauld, R. [University of Oxford, Particle Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Goffe, M. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Goldstein, J. [University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Gregor, I.-M. [DESY Hamburg, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Hu-Guo, Ch.; Imhoff, M. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Koetz, U. [DESY Hamburg, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lau, W. [University of Oxford, Particle Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Muntz, C. [IK-Frankfurt, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Santos, C. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Schrader, C. [IK-Frankfurt, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Specht, M. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); and others

    2011-09-11

    The PLUME (Pixelated Ladder with Ultra-Low Material Embedding) Collaboration is developing ultra-light ladders for the vertex detector for a future linear collider. The double-sided ladder will integrate the sensors, readout infrastructure and mechanical supports with the aim of total material budget of 0.3% of radiation length. The requirement of as light as possible construction is driven by physics, in particular by measurements requiring determination of the quark charge sign. The first prototype ladders were prepared and tested in the beam. The alignment issues for the ladders will be tested within the AIDA (Advanced European Infrastructures for Detectors at Accelerators) EU FP7 project.

  10. Physics at the CLIC $e^{+}e^{-}$ Linear Collider - Input to the Snowmass process 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Halina; Afanaciev, K.; Alexander, G.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Alonso, O.; Andersen, K.K.; Arfaoui, S.; Balazs, C.; Barklow, T.; Battaglia, M.; Benoit, M.; Bilki, B.; Blaising, J.J.; Boland, M.; Boronat, M.; Bozovic Jelisavcic, I.; Burrows, P.; Chefdeville, M.; Contino, R.; Dannheim, D.; Demarteau, M.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Dieguez, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Eigen, G.; Elsener, K.; Feldman, D.; Felzmann, U.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Francis, K.; Gaede, F.; Garcia Garcia, I.; Ghenescu, V.; Giudice, G.; Graf, N.; Grefe, C.; Grojean, C.; Gupta, R.S.; Hauschild, M.; Holmestad, H.; Idzik, M.; Joram, C.; Kananov, S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; Kraml, S.; Krupa, B.; Kulis, S.; Lastovicka, T.; LeBlanc, G.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci Timoce, A.; Lukic, S.; Makarenko, V.; Marshall, J.; Martin, V.; Mikkelsen, R.E.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Monig, K.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moron, J.; Munnich, A.; Neagu, A.; Pandurovic, M.; Pappadopulo, D.; Pawlik, B.; Porod, W.; Poss, S.; Preda, T.; Rassool, R.; Rattazzi, R.; Redford, S.; Reichold, A.; Repond, J.; Riemann, S.; Robson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ros, E.; Rosten, J.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Rzehak, H.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, K.; Shumeiko, N.; Sicking, E.; Simon, F.; Smith, J.; Soldner, C.; Stapnes, S.; Strube, J.; Suehara, T.; Swientek, K.; Szalay, M.; Tanabe, T.; Tesar, M.; Thamm, A.; Thomson, M.; Trenado Garcia, J.; Uggerhoj, U.I.; van der Kraaij, E.; Vila, I.; Vilella, E.; Villarejo, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M.A.; Vos, M.; Watson, N.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J.D.; Weuste, L.; Wistisen, T.N.; Wootton, K.; Xia, L.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the physics potential of the CLIC high-energy e+e- linear collider. It provides input to the Snowmass 2013 process for the energy-frontier working groups on The Higgs Boson (HE1), Precision Study of Electroweak Interactions (HE2), Fully Understanding the Top Quark (HE3), as well as The Path Beyond the Standard Model -- New Particles, Forces, and Dimensions (HE4). It is accompanied by a paper describing the CLIC accelerator study, submitted to the Frontier Capabilities group of the Snowmass process

  11. Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, Hitoshi; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; Appleby, Robert; Araki, Sakae; Bambade, Philip; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Blair, Grahame A; Boogert, Stewart Takashi; Boorman, Gary; Brachmann, Axel; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Burrows, P N; Carter, John; Choi Jae Young; Christian, Glenn B; Danagulyan, S; Delerue, Nicolas; Driouichi, Chafik; Gao, Jie; Grishanov, Boris I; Gronberg, Jeff; Higashi, Yasuo; Himel, Thomas; Honda, Yosuke; Howell, David Francis; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Jones, James; Kalinin, Alexander; Kanazawa, Ken Ichi; Kang Heung Sik; Kim Eun San; Kim Sang Hee; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kumada, Masayuki; Kume, T; Kuriki, Masao; Kuroda, Shigeru; Lyapin, A; Liu Wan Ming; Logatchev, P V; Malton, Stephen; Markiewicz, Thomas W; Masuzawa, Mika; Mihara, Takanori; Molloy, Stephen; Mtingwa, S; Naito, Takashi; Napoly, Olivier; Nelson, Janice; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Payet, Jacques; Pei Guo Xi; Phinney, Nan; Pivi, M T F; Podgorny, Fedor; Price, Michael T; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Reichold, Armin; Ross, Marc; Ruland, Robert; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Schulte, Daniel; Seryi, Andrei; Soo Ko In; Spencer, Cherrill M; Suehara, Taikan; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Takahashi, Takeshi; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Telnov, Valery I; Tenenbaum, P G; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Toge, Nobu; Torrence, Eric; Urakawa, Junji; Urner, David; Vogel, Vladimir; Walker, Nicholas J; Wang Jiu Qing; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Yamaoka, Hiroshi; Yokoya, Kaoru; Yun Huang Jung; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The realization of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require the ability to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittancies are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 35nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

  12. An L-Band Polarized Electron PWT Photoinjector for the International Linear Collider (ILC)

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, David; Chen Ping; Lundquist, Martin; Luo, Yan; Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2005-01-01

    A multi-cell, standing-wave, L-band, p-mode, plane-wave-transformer (PWT) photoinjector with an integrated photocathode in a novel linac structure is proposed by DULY Research Inc. as a polarized electron source. The PWT photoinjector is capable of operation in ultra high vacuum and moderate field gradient. Expected performance of an L-band polarized electron PWT injector operating under the parameters for the International Linear Collider is presented. The projected normalized transverse rms emittance is an order of magnitude lower than that produced with a polarized electron dc gun followed by subharmonic bunchers.

  13. Development of a modular and scalable data acquisition system for calorimeters at a linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Goodrick, M J; Shaw, R; Ward, D R; Bailey, D S; Kelly, M; Boisvert, V; Green, B; Misiejuk, A; Bartsch, V; Postranecky, M; Warren, M; Wing, M

    2011-01-01

    A data acquisition (DAQ) system has been developed which will read out and control calorimeters serving as prototype systems for a future detector at an electron-positron linear collider. This is a modular, flexible and scalable DAQ system in which the hardware and signals are standards-based, using FPGAs and serial links. The idea of a backplaneless system was also pursued with a commercial development board housed in a PC and a chain of concentrator cards between it and the detector forming the basis of the system. As well as describing the concept and performance of the system, its merits and disadvantages are discussed.

  14. The design of the HOM-damping cells for the S-band linear collider

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Wolfgang F. O.; Hülsmann, Peter; Kurz, Martin; Glock, Hans-Walter; Klein, Horst

    2005-01-01

    Damping cells for the higher order modes are necessary for the S-band linear collider to minimize BBU (Beam-Break-Up). The construction of the damper cells has to take into account the different field geometries of the higher order modes. So two different types of dampers have been designed: a wall slotted an an iris slotted cell. In order to optimize the two types of damping cells with respect to damping strength, impedance matching between coupling system and waveguide dampers and between d...

  15. Physics at the e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G., E-mail: gudrid.moortgat-pick@desy.de [II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761, Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, 22603, Hamburg (Germany); Baer, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 73019, Norman, OK (United States); Battaglia, M. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Belanger, G. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), Université Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, B.P.110, 74941, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Fujii, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); and others

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider in the energy range of √s=92 GeV–3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  16. Heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons at the photon linear collider - a comparison of two analyses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Spira; P Nieżurawski; M Krawczyk; A F Żarnecki

    2007-11-01

    Measurement of the heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons and production in the process → / → $b\\bar{b}$ at the Photon Linear Collider [1,2] has been considered in two independent analyses for the parameter range corresponding to the so-called `LHC wedge'. Significantly different conclusions were obtained; signal-to-background ratio 36 vs. 2. Here assumptions and results of these two analyses are compared. We have found that differences in the final results are mainly due to different assumptions on -luminosity spectra, jet definitions and selection cuts.

  17. Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Higashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuriki, M.; Kuroda, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Naito, T.; Okugi, T.; Sugahara, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Toge, N.; Urakawa, J.; Vogel, V.; Yamaoka, H.; Yokoya, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /CERN /Hiroshima

    2005-05-27

    To reach design luminosity, the International Linear Collider (ILC) must be able to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittances are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 37 nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

  18. A Multi-Parameter Optimization of Plasma Density for an Advanced Linear Collider*

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P; Hillenbrand, S

    2011-01-01

    Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments showed that an accelerating gradient as high as 50 GV/m can be driven and sustained over a meter-long plasma [1]. Based on this result, a straw man design for a future, multi-stage, PWFA-based electron/positron collider with an energy gain of ~ 25 GeV/stage has been generated [2]. However, the choice of plasma density remains open. On one hand, high density means large accelerating gradients and possibly a shorter collider. On the other it means that the accelerating structure dimensions become very small, on the order of the plasma wavelength. Operating at high gradient and with such small structure imposes very strong constraints on the particle bunches: small dimensions and spacing, large current or limited charge, etc. These constraints result is challenges in producing the bunches (compression, shaping for optimum loading, etc.) and could limit the achievable collider luminosity. We explore the global implications of operating at a lower accelerating...

  19. The Large Hadron Collider harvest of run 1

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive volume summarizes and structures the multitude of results obtained at the LHC in its first running period and draws the grand picture of today’s physics at a hadron collider. Topics covered are Standard Model measurements, Higgs and top-quark physics, flavour physics, heavy-ion physics and searches for super symmetry and other extensions of the Standard Model. Emphasis is placed on overview and presentation of the lessons learned. Chapters on detectors and the LHC machine and a thorough outlook into the future complement the book. The individual chapters are written by teams of expert authors working at the forefront of LHC research, typically one from each of the two multi-purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS and one from theory.

  20. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Helene Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  1. Design optimization of the International Linear Collider Final Focus System with a long L*

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, Fabien

    This Master's Thesis work has been done in the Aerospace Engineering master's programme framework and carried out at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It was conducted under the 500 GeV e-e+ International Linear Collider (ILC) study and focused on the design and performance optimization of the Final Focus System (FFS). The purpose of the final focus system of the future linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) is to demagnify the beam to the required transverse size at the interaction point (IP). The FFS is designed for a flat-beam in a compact way based on a local chromaticity correction which corrects both horizontal and vertical chromaticities simultaneously. An alternative FFS configuration based on the traditional scheme with two dedicated chromatic correction sections for horizontal and vertical chromaticities and a long L * option has been developed. A longer free space between the last quadrupole and the IP allows to place the last quadrupole on a stable ground, with fewer engineering ...

  2. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator \\& in the Technical Design Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  3. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 1: Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Foster, Brian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fuster, Juan [Univ. of Valencia (Spain); Harrison, Mike [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Paterson, James McEwan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Peskin, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanitzki, Marcel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Walker, Nicholas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  4. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  5. DCal: A custom integrated circuit for calorimetry at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, James R.; Mekkaoui, Abderrazek; Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab; Drake, Gary; Repond, Jose; /Argonne

    2005-10-01

    A research and development collaboration has been started with the goal of producing a prototype hadron calorimeter section for the purpose of proving the Particle Flow Algorithm concept for the International Linear Collider. Given the unique requirements of a Particle Flow Algorithm calorimeter, custom readout electronics must be developed to service these detectors. This paper introduces the DCal or Digital Calorimetry Chip, a custom integrated circuit developed in a 0.25um CMOS process specifically for this International Linear Collider project. The DCal is capable of handling 64 channels, producing a 1-bit Digital-to-Analog conversion of the input (i.e. hit/no hit). It maintains a 24-bit timestamp and is capable of operating either in an externally triggered mode or in a self-triggered mode. Moreover, it is capable of operating either with or without a pipeline delay. Finally, in order to permit the testing of different calorimeter technologies, its analog front end is capable of servicing Particle Flow Algorithm calorimeters made from either Resistive Plate Chambers or Gaseous Electron Multipliers.

  6. Exploring the Top-Higgs FCNC Couplings at Polarized Linear Colliders with Top Spin Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Melić, Blaženka

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of the flavor changing neutral couplings of the top quark with the Higgs boson and the up/charm quark in the $t\\bar{t}$ production at linear colliders. There are previous bounds on such tqH couplings at both, linear and hadronic colliders, with the assumption that it couples equally to the left and the right handed fermions. In this paper we examine the chirality of the tqH coupling and construct different observables which will be sensitive to it. The kinematics of the emitted q from t $\\rightarrow$ qH in $t\\bar{t}$ production is discussed and it was found that the polar angle distribution of q is sensitive to the chiral nature of tqH couplings. The observables in the context of top-antitop spin correlations, which are sensitive to new physics in the top decay are considered using different spin-quantization bases. It was found that in particular the off-diagonal basis can be useful to distinguish among the chiral tqH couplings. The sensitivity of the unpolarized ILC in probing the coupli...

  7. Exploring the top-Higgs FCNC couplings at polarized linear colliders with top spin observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melić, Blaženka; Patra, Monalisa

    2017-01-01

    We study the nature of flavor changing neutral couplings of the top quark with the Higgs boson and the up/charm quark in the toverline{t} production at linear colliders. There are previous bounds on such tqH couplings at both, linear and hadronic colliders, with the assumption that the top couples equally to the left and the right handed fermions. In this paper we examine chirality of the tqH coupling and construct different observables which will be sensitive to it. The kinematics of the emitted q from t → qH in toverline{t} production is discussed and it was found that the polar angle distribution of q is sensitive to the chiral nature of tqH couplings. The observables in the context of top-antitop spin correlations, which are sensitive to new physics in the top decay are considered using different spin-quantization bases. It was found that in particular the off-diagonal basis can be useful to distinguish among the chiral tqH couplings. The sensitivity of the unpolarized ILC in probing the couplings at the 3 σ level at √{s}=500 GeV and ℒ = 500 fb-1 is also studied, resulting in predicted BR( t → qH) left handed electrons and right handed positrons.

  8. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  9. Wakefield damping in a pair of X-band accelerators for linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger M. Jones

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the means to damp the wakefield left behind ultrarelativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of traveling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wakefield left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wakefield on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make up the electromagnetic field, damping the wakefield, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wakefield and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wakefield conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wakefields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  10. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  11. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  12. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  13. Measuring the Higgs self-coupling at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerig, Claude Fabienne

    2016-10-15

    In this thesis, the experimental prospects of measuring the Standard Model (SM) Higgs self-coupling λ{sub SM} at the International Linear Collider (ILC) are investigated. The observation of double Higgs production is necessary to directly establish a non-zero Higgs self-coupling. Information on λ{sub SM} can be extracted from a measurement of the cross section for this process. At a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=500 GeV double Higgs-strahlung is the dominant Higgs-pair production process. This measurement is extremely challenging due to very small production cross sections and multi-jet final states which pose large challenges to detector technologies and event reconstruction techniques. A detailed full detector simulation of the International Large Detector is performed for a Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV. The analysis is based on ILC beam parameters according to the Technical Design Report and investigates several improvements compared to earlier studies. These include an isolated lepton selection strategy and the application of kinematic fits to final states with heavy-flavoured jets. Depending on the decay mode of the Z boson, relative improvements of up to 25% are obtained in the selection of ZHH (HH → bbbb) events. This results in a relative improvement of 10% in the measurement of σ{sub ZHH} when combining all channels. For the SM scenario, an evidence of 3.5σ for the observation of double Higgs-strahlung and a measurement precision of 30% on σ{sub ZHH} is reached with an integrated luminosity of L=2ab{sup -1} and a beam polarisation of P(e{sup +}e{sup -})=(0.3,-0.8). The result extrapolates to an achievable precision of 21% on σ{sub ZHH} after the full ILC running scenario, which corresponds to a 5.9σ discovery for the observation of double Higgs-strahlung. Combined with the channel HH→bbWW, σ{sub ZHH} can even be measured to a precision of 16%, which corresponds to a precision of 26% on λ{sub SM}. Additionally, the impact of

  14. Mirror mesons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Triantaphyllou, George

    2016-01-01

    The existence of mirror partners of Standard-Model fermions offers a viable alternative to a fundamental BEH mechanism, with the coupling corresponding to the gauged mirror generation symmetry becoming naturally strong at energies around 1 TeV. The resulting non-perturbative processes produce dynamical katoptron masses which might range from 0.1 to 1.15 TeV in a way circumventing usual problems with the S parameter. Moreover, they create mirror mesons belonging in two main groups, with masses differing from each other approximately by a factor of six and which might range approximately from 0.1 to 2.8 TeV. Since the corresponding phenomenology expected at hadron colliders is particularly rich, some interesting mirror-meson cross-sections are presented, something that might also lead to a deeper understanding of the underlying mirror fermion structure. Among other findings, results in principle compatible with indications from LHC concerning decays of new particles to two photons are analyzed.

  15. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Danisi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 μm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic im...

  16. Status of Dual-readout R&D for a linear collider in T1015 Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Gatto, Corrado; Hahn, Eileen; Mazzacane, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The hadronic energy resolution required for an hadronic operating at lepton collider is at the limits or even exceeds that obtained with traditional techniques. Furthermore, it is a well established fact that the presence of an electromagnetic section in front of an hadron calorimeter, as occurs in the layouts of the majority of detectors operating at a collider, would deteriorate the hadronic energy resolution of the device. The novel $ADRIANO$ technology (\\textit{A Dual-readout Integrally Active Non-segmented Option}), currently under development at Fermilab, overcomes the above limitations by complementing an integrally active calorimeter with the dual-readout technique. Detailed Monte Carlo studies indicate that the energy resolution is in the $25\\%/\\sqrt{E}$ - $38\\%/\\sqrt{E}$ interval with a linear response of the detector up to an energy of 200 GeV. A baseline configuration is chosen with an estimated energy resolution of $\\sigma(E)/E\\approx30\\%/\\sqrt{E}$. Several prototypes have been built by \\textit{T...

  17. Design of a Multi-Bunch BPM for the Next Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Young, A

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) design requires precise control of colliding trains of high-intensity (1.4 x 10 sup 1 sup 0 particles/bunch) and low-emittance beams. High-resolution multi-bunch beam position monitors (BPMs) are required to ensure uniformity across the bunch trains with bunch spacing of 1.4ns. A high bandwidth (approx 350 MHz) multi-bunch BPM has been designed based on a custom-made stripline sum and difference hybrid on a Teflon-based material. High bandwidth RF couplers were included to allow injection of a calibration tone. Three prototype BPMs were fabricated at SLAC and tested in the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK and in the PEP-II ring at SLAC. Tone calibration data and single-bunch and multi-bunch beam data were taken with high-speed (5Gsa/s) digitizers. Offline analysis determined the deconvolution of individual bunches in the multi-bunch mode by using the measured single bunch response. The results of these measurements are presented in this paper.

  18. Cp Violating Effects In W And Z Boson Pair Production At The International Linear Collider In The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Pahel, D J

    2005-01-01

    In the standard electroweak model, the sole source of CP violation is a CP violating phase of the CKM quark mixing matrix. The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model offers a large number of possible new sources of CP violation; these include both flavor dependent and flavor independent sources. These CP violating effects are studied in gauge boson production and decay processes with intermediate W and Z boson exchange. The prospects of measuring these effects in the International Linear Collider are explored.

  19. Study of highly-excited string states at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, Douglas M

    2008-01-01

    In TeV-scale gravity scenarios with large extra dimensions, black holes may be produced at future colliders. Good arguments have been made for why general relativistic black holes may be just out of reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, in weakly-coupled string theory, highly excited string states - string balls - could be produced at the LHC with high rates and decay thermally, not unlike general relativistic black holes. In this paper, we simulate and study string ball production and decay at the LHC. We specifically emphasize the experimentally-detectable similarities and differences between string balls and general relativistic black holes at a TeV scale.

  20. Hangout With CERN: The Large Hadron Collider (S01E02)

    CERN Multimedia

    Kahle, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In this second Hangout with CERN "The Large Hadron Collider" ATLAS physicist Steven Goldfarb is joined by Giulia Papotti and Laurette Ponce from the CERN Control Centre, Despina Hatzifotiadou and Ken Read from the ALICE experiment, Achintya Rao and Roberto Rossin from the CMS experiment and Patrick Koppenburg from the LHCb experiment, as well as Jaana Nystrom from Finland and Liz Krane from the USA. This hangout answers questions about the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) received via #askCERN on Twitter and Google+ and via YouTube and Facebook comments. Recorded live on 8th November 2012.

  1. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Crittenden

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications.

  2. Unique heavy lepton signature at $e^+e^-$ linear collider with polarized beams

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G; Pankov, A A; Tsytrinov, A V

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e^+e^-\\to W^+W^- within E_6 models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e^+e^- International Linear Collider (ILC) for \\sqrt{s}=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W^\\pm bosons is considered.

  3. Design and optimization of Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Grudiev, Alexej

    2016-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) main linac uses waveguide damped structure as its baseline design. The current baseline structure design written in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report is named "CLIC-G." Recent activities on the CLIC-G design including high power tests on structure prototypes and the study of machining cost assessment had raised the need of reoptimizing the structure design to minimize the machining cost and the pulse surface temperature rise. This work presents optimization of the structure geometry, high-order-mode (HOM) damping loads and the design of a HOM-free power splitter for the input coupler. Compared to the current baseline design CLIC-G, the new structure design reduced the pulse surface temperature rise, input power and manufacturing cost and achieves better suppression to the long range transverse wakefield. Cell disks and damping loads for the new structure design are also more compact than those of the CLIC-G design.

  4. Fine Grained Silicon-Tungsten Calorimetry for a Linear Collider Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, D.; Frey, R.; /Oregon U.; Breidenbach, M.; Freytag, D.; Graf, N.; Haller, G.; Milgrome, O.; /SLAC; Radeka, V.; /Brookhaven

    2006-02-08

    A fine grained silicon-tungsten calorimeter is ideal for use as the electromagnetic calorimeter in a linear collider detector optimized for particle-flow reconstruction. We are designing a calorimeter that is based on readout chips which are bump bonded to the silicon wafers that serve as the active medium in the calorimeter. By using integrated electronics we plan to demonstrate that fine granularity can be achieved at a reasonable price. Our design minimizes the gap between tungsten layers leading to a small Moliere radius, an important figure of merit for particle-flow detectors. Tests of the silicon detectors to be used in a test beam prototype as well as timing measurements based on similar silicon detectors are discussed.

  5. Study of D~0-D~0 mixing at a giga-Z linear collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of studying D 0-D 0 mixing at a giga-Z linear collider "Z factory" where 10 9 hadronic Z 0 decays can be accumulated is examined.We discuss the sensitivity for the measurements of neutral D mixing parameters.These results are compared to those attainable at B factories.We find that the typical decay length of the neutral D mesons at Z factory is about 10 times larger than that at B factory.In addition,the resolution of the vertex detector of a giga-Z factory is 2-3 times better than that of B factory.The proper time resolution at Z factory is about 20-30 times better than that at B factory.Therefore the determination of the mixing parameters at a giga-Z factory is more precise.

  6. Linear Collider Test of a Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Mechanism in left-right Symmetric Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, James; Rodejohann, Werner

    2012-01-01

    There are various diagrams leading to neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric theories based on the gauge group SU(2)_L x SU(2)_R. All can in principle be tested at a linear collider running in electron-electron mode. We argue that the so-called lambda-diagram is the most promising one. Taking the current limit on this diagram from double beta decay experiments, we evaluate the relevant cross section e e to W_L W_R, where W_L is the Standard Model W-boson and W_R the one from SU(2)_R. It is observable if the life-time of double beta decay and the mass of the W_R are close to current limits. Beam polarization effects and the high-energy behavior of the cross section are also analyzed.

  7. Final-focus systems for multi-TeV linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Garcia Morales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3779 (2001, a compact final focus system (FFS was presented. This scheme was compared to the nonlocal chromatic correction FFS concluding with the superiority of the local system. Nevertheless, the sensitivity of the system to errors and its mitigation was missing in the comparison. In this paper, an extended comparison of the Compact Linear Collider local FFS and an improved nonlocal FFS is presented at 3 TeV and 500 GeV. We demonstrate that, at high energies, luminosity delivered by the ideal machine is no longer the most important figure of merit but the recovered luminosity after tuning with imperfections, where the improved traditional scheme shows a better performance. This result might have an important relevance also for ILC at 1 TeV.

  8. Failure Studies at the Compact Linear Collider: Main Linac and Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Maidana, C O; Jonker, M

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme. The energy of two high-intensity, low-energy drive beams is extracted and transferred to two low-intensity, high-energy main beams. The CERN Technology Department - Machine protection and electrical integrity group has the mission to develop and maintain the systems to protect machine components from damage caused by ill controlled conditions. Various failure scenarios were studied and the potential damage these failures could cause to the machine structures was estimated. In this paper, first results of the beam response to kick induced failures in the main LINAC and in the beam delivery system (BDS) sections are presented together with possible collimator damage scenarios.

  9. Beam Delivery System Dogleg Design and Integration for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, J

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed to investigate the option of moving the positron source to the end of the main linac as a part of the central integration in the International Linear Collider(ILC) project. The positron source incorporates an undulator at the end of the main linac and the photons generated in the undulator are transported to the target, located at a distance of around 400 m. The dogleg design has been optimised to provide the required transverse offset at the location of the target and to give minimum emittance growth at 500 GeV. The design of the dogleg, the layout changes and the tolerances on beam tuning as a result of locating this dogleg in the beginning of the beam delivery system (BDS) are presented.

  10. Associated production of Higgs at linear collider in the inert Higgs Doublet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam [Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, Departement de Mathematique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, B. 416, Tangier (Morocco); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei (China); Benbrik, Rachid [Faculte Polydisciplinaire de Safi, MSISM team, Departement de Physique, Sidi Bouzid, B.P. 4162, Safi (Morocco); Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Cadi Ayyad University, LPHEA, FSSM, B.P. 2390, Marrakech (Morocco); Yuan, Tzu-Chiang [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei (China)

    2014-05-15

    We study the correlation between the Standard Model Higgs decay h → γγ and h → Zγ in the Inert Higgs Doublet Model. It is found that these two one-loop-induced decays are positively correlated, with the latter channel having slightly smaller branching ratio than the former one. At the Linear Collider, we study the interplay of the off-shell extension of these two amplitudes that contributed significantly to the associated production of the Higgs boson with a photon in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} → γh and with an electron in the process e{sup -}γ → e{sup -}h in the s and t channels, respectively, via both γ and Z exchange for each process. (orig.)

  11. Budgeting and control of the mechanical noise in the International Linear Collider final focus system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshilumba, D.; Oriunno, M.; Markiewicz, T.; Collette, C.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present a simplified vibration model of the silicon detector (SiD), where the final doublet (QD0) is captured inside the detector and the penultimate magnet (QF1) is inside the machine tunnel. Ground motion spectra measured at the detector hall at SLAC have been used together with a spectrum of the technical noise on the detector. The model predicts that the maximum level of rms (root mean square) vibration seen by QD0 is well below the capture range of the interaction point (IP) feedback system available in the ILC. With the addition of an active stabilization system on QD0, it is also possible to get closer to the stability requirements of the compact linear collider (CLIC). These results can have important implications for CLIC.

  12. Budgeting and control of the mechanical noise in the International Linear Collider final focus system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tshilumba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a simplified vibration model of the silicon detector (SiD, where the final doublet (QD0 is captured inside the detector and the penultimate magnet (QF1 is inside the machine tunnel. Ground motion spectra measured at the detector hall at SLAC have been used together with a spectrum of the technical noise on the detector. The model predicts that the maximum level of rms (root mean square vibration seen by QD0 is well below the capture range of the interaction point (IP feedback system available in the ILC. With the addition of an active stabilization system on QD0, it is also possible to get closer to the stability requirements of the compact linear collider (CLIC. These results can have important implications for CLIC.

  13. The cryogenic system for the superconducting e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider TESLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlitz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    The superconducting electron/positron collider TESLA (center of mass energy 500 GeV) requires a cryogenic supply system of total estimated cooling capacities of 33 kW at 2.0 K, 36 kW at 4.5 K, 243 kW at 40/80 K and current lead cooling flow rate (liquefaction power) of 0.2 kg/s. The system is spread over a linear range of about 30 km. A new layout is presented in this paper (reduction of HF - pulse rate from 10/s to 5/s results in reduced heat loads, lower numbers of cryo halls with refrigerators and increased subunit lengths). (author)

  14. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.

    2014-02-28

    We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications

  15. Monte-Carlo-based studies of a polarized positron source for International Linear Collider (ILC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollan, Ralph; Laihem, Karim; Schälicke, Andreas

    2006-04-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of an International Linear Collider (ILC) requires the development of a polarized positron beam. New concepts of polarized positron sources are based on the development of circularly polarized photon sources. The polarized photons create electron-positron pairs in a thin target and transfer their polarization state to the outgoing leptons. To achieve a high level of positron polarization the understanding of the production mechanisms in the target is crucial. Therefore, a general framework for the simulation of polarized processes with GEANT4 is under development. In this contribution the current status of the project and its application to a study of the positron production process for the ILC is presented.

  16. Bhabha vs. Moeller scattering as a contact-interaction analyzer at a polarized linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pankov, A A

    2002-01-01

    We discuss electron-electron contact-interaction searches in the processes e sup + e sup -->e sup + e sup - and e sup - e sup -->e sup - e sup - at planned Linear Colliders run in the e sup + e sup - and e sup - e sup - modes with both beams longitudinally polarized. Our analysis is based on the measurement, for the two processes, of polarized differential cross sections, and allows to simultaneously take into account the general set of electron contact interaction couplings as independent, non-zero, parameters thus avoiding the simplifying choice of a model. We evaluate the corresponding model-independent constraints on the contact coupling constants, emphasizing the role of the available beam polarization and the complementarity, as far as the chirality of the constants is concerned, of the two processes in giving the best constraints. We also make a comparison with the potential of e sup + e sup --> mu supmu sup - at the same energy and initial beams polarization.

  17. Potential of a Linear Collider for Lepton Flavour Violation studies in the SUSY seesaw

    CERN Document Server

    Figueiredo, A J R; Romao, J C; Teixeira, A M

    2013-01-01

    We study the potential of an e+- e- Linear Collider for charged lepton flavour violation studies in a supersymmetric framework where neutrino masses and mixings are explained by a type-I seesaw. Focusing on e-mu flavour transitions, we evaluate the background from standard model and supersymmetric charged currents to the e mu + missing E_T signal. We study the energy dependence of both signal and background, and the effect of beam polarisation in increasing the signal over background significance. Finally, we consider the mu- mu- + missing E_T final state in e- e- collisions that, despite being signal suppressed by requiring two e-mu flavour transitions, is found to be a clear signature of charged lepton flavour violation due to a very reduced standard model background.

  18. Stripline design for the extraction kicker of Compact Linear Collider damping rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belver-Aguilar, C.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Toral, F.; Barnes, M. J.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of the design study of future linear colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, predamping rings (PDRs) and damping rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several kicker systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. In order to achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedance matching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. In this paper, we present the complete design of the striplines for the DR extraction kicker, since it is the most challenging from the field homogeneity point of view. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most common shapes introduce separately. Furthermore, a detailed study of the different operating modes of a stripline kicker allowed the beam coupling impedance to be reduced at low frequencies: this cannot be achieved by tapering the electrodes. The optimum design of the striplines and their components has been based on studies of impedance matching, field homogeneity, power transmission, beam coupling impedance, and manufacturing tolerances. Finally, new ideas for further improvement of the performance of future striplines are reported.

  19. High-power multimode X-band rf pulse compression system for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami G. Tantawi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC. The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  20. Probing quartic couplings through three gauge boson production at an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Likhoded, A. [International Inst. of Theoretical and Applied Physics, Ames, IA (United States); Valencia, G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Yushchenko, O. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    1996-11-22

    We explore the capability of a 500 or 1000 GeV e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} linear collider to measure anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings. In the framework of a non-linear effective Lagrangian with a custodial SU(2) symmetry, there are only two next-to-leading order operators which contribute to quartic, but not to two- and three-gauge boson interactions. The limits on the coefficients of these operators from present and future e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} colliders are compared with those available from other sources.

  1. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC): The Energy Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brianti, Giorgio; Jenni, Peter

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Superconducting Magnets: Powerful, Precise, Plentiful * LHC Cryogenics: Quantum Fluids at Work * Current Leads: High Temperature Superconductors to the Fore * A Pumping Vacuum Chamber: Ultimate Simplicity * Vertex Detectors at LHC: In Search of Beauty * Large Silicon Trackers: Fast, Precise, Efficient * Two Approaches to High Resolution Electromagnetic Calorimetry * Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber: Chronometry of Particles * The LHCb RICH: The Lord of the Cherenkov Rings * Signal Processing: Taming the LHC Data Avalanche * Giant Magnets for Giant Detectors

  2. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. A new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton--proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. This article summarizes what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  3. Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider from the proton to the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Campanelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The book aims to explain the historical development of particle physics, with special emphasis on CERN and collider physics. It describes in detail the LHC accelerator and its detectors, describing the science involved as well as the sociology of big collaborations, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs boson. Readers are led step-by-step to understanding why we do particle physics, as well as the tools and problems involved in the field. It provides an insider's view on the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  5. Improving the discovery potential of charged Higgs bosons at the Tevatron and large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stefano Moretti

    2003-02-01

    We outline several improvements to the experimental analyses carried out at Tevatron (Run 2) or simulated in view of the large hadron collider (LHC) that could increase the scope of CDF/D0 and ATLAS/CMS in detecting charged Higgs bosons.

  6. CERN celebrating the Lowering of the final detector element for large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of the morning the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector began the descent into its underground experimental cavern in preparation for the start-up of CERNs Large Hadron Collider (LHC) this summer. This is a pivotal moment for the CMS collaboration.

  7. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Engelen

    2012-01-01

    n this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly c

  8. NCG gluon fusion for the Higgs production at large hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R. [Laboratoire de Physique Mathematique et Subatomique, University of Constantine (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    A pure NCG gluon fusion contribution to the Higgs production at large hadron colliders is discussed. It is shown that the NCG results become relevant at very high energies. This can be a good signal for the space-time non commutativity events.

  9. Discovering a Light Scalar or Pseudoscalar at The Large Hadron Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The allowed standard model Higgs mass range has been reduced to a region between 114 and 130 GeV or above 500 GeV, at the 99% confidence level, since the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program started. Furthermore some of the experiments at Tevatron and LHC observe excesses that could arise from...

  10. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  11. Smash! exploring the mysteries of the Universe with the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Latta, Sara

    2017-01-01

    What is the universe made of? At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, scientists have searched for answers to this question using the largest machine in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. It speeds up tiny particles, then smashes them togetherand the collision gives researchers a look at the building blocks of the universe.

  12. A Tale of Two Searches, with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bouffard, Julian Michael

    Two searches carried out with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hardron Collider at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. Primarily, a search for the associated production of a Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a top quark pair. Additionally, a search for the existence of R-Parity violating Supersymmetry.

  13. Large Hadron particle collider may not have its run this November

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), based at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, will not run in November this year as scheduled. The LHC was supposed to have a test run this yera, before switching on the scientific search for the Higgs boson in 2008."(1 page)

  14. Study of Dark Matter inspired cMSSM scenarios at a TeV-class Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Marco

    2004-10-08

    The accuracy in the measurement of the masses of sleptons and heavy Higgs bosons in cMSSM scenarios, compatible with the WMAP result on cold dark matter, has been re-analysed in view of the requirements for predicting this density to a few percent level from SUSY measurements at the linear collider.

  15. Simulation studies for a high resolution time projection chamber at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muennich, A.

    2007-03-26

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is planned to be the next large accelerator. The ILC will be able to perform high precision measurements only possible at the clean environment of electron positron collisions. In order to reach this high accuracy, the requirements for the detector performance are challenging. Several detector concepts are currently under study. The understanding of the detector and its performance will be crucial to extract the desired physics results from the data. To optimise the detector design, simulation studies are needed. Simulation packages like GEANT4 allow to model the detector geometry and simulate the energy deposit in the different materials. However, the detector response taking into account the transportation of the produced charge to the readout devices and the effects ofthe readout electronics cannot be described in detail. These processes in the detector will change the measured position of the energy deposit relative to the point of origin. The determination of this detector response is the task of detailed simulation studies, which have to be carried out for each subdetector. A high resolution Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with gas amplification based on micro pattern gas detectors, is one of the options for the main tracking system at the ILC. In the present thesis a detailed simulation tool to study the performance of a TPC was developed. Its goal is to find the optimal settings to reach an excellent momentum and spatial resolution. After an introduction to the present status of particle physics and the ILC project with special focus on the TPC as central tracker, the simulation framework is presented. The basic simulation methods and implemented processes are introduced. Within this stand-alone simulation framework each electron produced by primary ionisation is transferred through the gas volume and amplified using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The output format of the simulation is identical to the raw data from a

  16. Quantitative Calculations for Black Hole Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The framework of Large Extra Dimensions provides a way to explain why gravity is weaker compared to the other forces in nature. A consequence of this model is the possible production of D-dimensional Black Holes in high energy p-p collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. The present work uses the CATFISH Black Hole generator to study quantitatively how these events could be observed in the hadronic channel at mid-rapidity using a particle tracking detector.

  17. Quantitative Calculations for Black Hole Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Nicolas; Humanic, Thomas J.

    The framework of large extra dimensions provides a way to explain why gravity is weaker than the other forces in nature. A consequence of this model is the possible production of D-dimensional black holes in high energy p-p collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. The present work uses the CATFISH black hole generator to study quantitatively how these events could be observed in the hadronic channel at midrapidity using a particle-tracking detector.

  18. Diffractive Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enberg, R; Ingelman, G; Kissavos, A; Tîmneanu, N

    2002-08-19

    Improved possibilities to find the Higgs boson in diffractive events, having less hadronic activity, depend on whether the cross section is large enough. Based on the soft color interaction models that successfully describe diffractive hard scattering at DESY HERA and the Fermilab Tevatron, we find that only a few diffractive Higgs events may be produced at the Tevatron, but we predict a substantial rate at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  19. The CLIC Programme: Towards a Staged $e^+e^−$ Linear Collider Exploring the Terascale CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.; Schulte, D.; Simon, F.; Stapnes, S.; Toge, N.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the exploration of fundamental questions in particle physics at the energy frontier with a future TeV-scale $e^+e^-$ linear collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration technology. A high-luminosity high-energy $e^+e^-$ collider allows for the exploration of Standard Model physics, such as precise measurements of the Higgs, top and gauge sectors, as well as for a multitude of searches for New Physics, either through direct discovery or indirectly, via high-precision observables. Given the current state of knowledge, following the observation of a 125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, and pending further LHC results at 8 TeV and 14 TeV, a linear $e^+e^-$ collider built and operated in centre-of-mass energy stages from a few-hundred GeV up to a few TeV will be an ideal physics exploration tool, complementing the LHC. In this document, an overview of the physics potential of CLIC is given. Two example scenarios are presented for a CLIC accelerator built in th...

  20. High-gradient breakdown studies of an X -band Compact Linear Collider prototype structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaowei; Shi, Jiaru; Chen, Huaibi; Shao, Jiahang; Abe, Tetsuo; Higo, Toshiyasu; Matsumoto, Shuji; Wuensch, Walter

    2017-05-01

    A Compact Linear Collider prototype traveling-wave accelerator structure fabricated at Tsinghua University was recently high-gradient tested at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). This X -band structure showed good high-gradient performance of up to 100 MV /m and obtained a breakdown rate of 1.27 ×10-8 per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 250 ns. This performance was similar to that of previous structures tested at KEK and the test facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), thereby validating the assembly and bonding of the fabricated structure. Phenomena related to vacuum breakdown were investigated and are discussed in the present study. Evaluation of the breakdown timing revealed a special type of breakdown occurring in the immediately succeeding pulse after a usual breakdown. These breakdowns tended to occur at the beginning of the rf pulse, whereas usual breakdowns were uniformly distributed in the rf pulse. The high-gradient test was conducted under the international collaboration research program among Tsinghua University, CERN, and KEK.

  1. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Spin transport and polarimetry in the beam delivery system of the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, M.; Vauth, A.; Vormwald, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; List, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Polarised electron and positron beams are key ingredients to the physics programme of future linear colliders. Due to the chiral nature of weak interactions in the Standard Model - and possibly beyond - the knowledge of the luminosity-weighted average beam polarisation at the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point is of similar importance as the knowledge of the luminosity and has to be controlled to permille-level precision in order to fully exploit the physics potential. The current concept to reach this challenging goal combines measurements from Laser-Compton polarimeters before and after the interaction point with measurements at the interaction point. A key element for this enterprise is the understanding of spin-transport effects between the polarimeters and the interaction point as well as collision effects. We show that without collisions, the polarimeters can be cross-calibrated to 0.1 %, and we discuss in detail the impact of collision effects and beam parameters on the polarisation value relevant for the interpretation of the e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data.

  3. Development of an intense positron source using a crystal--amorphous hybrid target for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, Y; Chehab, R; Dadoun, O; Furukawa, K; Kamitani, T; Kawada, S; Omori, T; Takahashi, T; Umemori, K; Urakawa, U; Satoh, M; Strakhovenko, V; Suwada, T; Variola, A

    2013-01-01

    In a conventional positron source driven by a few GeV electron beam, a high amount of heat is loaded into a positron converter target to generate intense positrons required by linear colliders, and which would eventually damage the converter target. A hybrid target, composed of a single crystal target as a radiator of intense gamma--rays, and an amorphous converter target placed downstream of the crystal, was proposed as a scheme which could overcome the problem.This paper describes the development of an intense positron source with the hybrid target. A series of experiments on positron generation with the hybrid target has been carried out with a 8--GeV electron beam at the KEKB linac. We observed that positron yield from the hybrid target increased when the incident electron beam was aligned to the crystal axis and exceeded the one from the conventional target with the converter target of the same thickness, when its thickness is less than about 2 radiation length. The measurements in the temperature rise o...

  4. A scalable gigabit data acquisition system for calorimeters for linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gastaldi, F; Magniette, F; Boudry, V

    2015-01-01

    prototypes of ultra-granular calorimeters for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Our design is generic enough to cope with other applications with some minor adaptations. The DAQ is made up of four different modules, including an optional concentrator. A Detector InterFace (DIF) is placed at one end of the detector elements (SLAB) holding up to 160 ASICs. It is connected by a single HDMI cable which is used to transmit both slow-control and readout data over a serial link 8b/10b encoded characters at 50 Mb/s to the Gigabit Concentrator Card (GDCC). One GDCC controls up to 7 DIFs, distributes the system clock and ASICs configuration, and collects data from them. Each DIFs data packet is encapsulated in Ethernet format and sent out via an optical or copper link. The Data Concentrator Card (DCC) is a multiplexer (1 to 8) that can be optionally inserted between the GDCC and the DIFs, increasing the number of managed ...

  5. Unique heavy lepton signature at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Osland, P. [Univ. Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V. [Technical Univ. Gomel (Belarus). Abdus Salam ICTP Affliated Centre

    2013-03-15

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} within E{sub 6} models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) for {radical}(s)=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W{sup {+-}} bosons is considered.

  6. Studies towards optimisation of the analog hadronic calorimeter for future linear collider detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Huong Lan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Collaboration: CALICE-D-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Analog Hadronic Calorimeter (AHCAL) is a highly granular calorimeter developed in the CALICE collaboration for future linear collider detectors. Its design concept is based on 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} scintillator tiles readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). With this design the ambitious required jet energy resolution of 3-4 % can be achieved using the Pandora Particle Flow Algorithm (PandoraPFA). Recent discussions concerning the overall size and cost of the ILD detector has triggered new studies to optimise AHCAL cell size. A smaller number of cells can reduce the detector cost but the corresponding larger cell size can lead to a degradation of the jet energy resolution. The AHCAL optimisation study therefore has to achieve the best balance between physics performance and cost. Recent studies using the latest version of PandoraPFA with improved pattern recognition have shown significant improvement of jet energy resolution. Moreover, a better energy reconstruction of single particles, in which software compensation plays an important role, can lead to further improvements. This talk will discuss the software compensation technique and its impact on the final cell size optimisation.

  7. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  8. Event generation for next to leading order chargino production at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robens, T.

    2006-10-15

    At the International Linear Collider (ILC), parameters of supersymmetry (SUSY) can be determined with an experimental accuracy matching the precision of next-to-leading order (NLO) and higher-order theoretical predictions. Therefore, these contributions need to be included in the analysis of the parameters. We present a Monte-Carlo event generator for simulating chargino pair production at the ILC at next-to-leading order in the electroweak couplings. We consider two approaches of including photon radiation. A strict fixed-order approach allows for comparison and consistency checks with published semianalytic results in the literature. A version with soft- and hard-collinear resummation of photon radiation, which combines photon resummation with the inclusion of the NLO matrix element for the production process, avoids negative event weights, so the program can simulate physical (unweighted) event samples. Photons are explicitly generated throughout the range where they can be experimentally resolved. In addition, it includes further higher-order corrections unaccounted for by the fixed-order method. Inspecting the dependence on the cutoffs separating the soft and collinear regions, we evaluate the systematic errors due to soft and collinear approximations for NLO and higher-order contributions. In the resummation approach, the residual uncertainty can be brought down to the per-mil level, coinciding with the expected statistical uncertainty at the ILC. We closely investigate the two-photon phase space for the resummation method. We present results for cross sections and event generation for both approaches. (orig.)

  9. Study and development of a laser based alignment system for the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083149

    The first objective of the PhD thesis is to develop a new type of positioning sensor to align components at micrometre level over 200 m with respect to a laser beam as straight line reference. The second objective is to estimate the measurement accuracy of the total alignment system over 200 m. The context of the PhD thesis is the Compact Linear Collider project, which is a study for a future particle accelerator. The proposed positioning sensor is made of a camera and an open/close shutter. The sensor can measure the position of the laser beam with respect to its own coordinate system. To do a measurement, the shutter closes, a laser spot appears on it, the camera captures a picture of the laser spot and the coordinates of the laser spot centre are reconstructed in the sensor coordinate system with image processing. Such a measurement requires reference targets on the positioning sensor. To reach the rst objective of the PhD thesis, we used laser theory...

  10. SU(3) Simple Group Model and New Z' Properties in Future Linear Colliders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yao-Bei; WANG Shuai-Wei; ZHANG Wen-Qing

    2009-01-01

    In the SU(3) simple group model, the new neutral gauge boson Z' couples to pairs of SM fermions with couplings fixed in terms of the SM gauge couplings and depending only on the choice of the fermion embedding.In this paper, we calculate the contributions of this new particle to the processes e+e-→ l+l+, bb, and cc and study the possibility of detecting this new particle via these processes in the future high-energy linear e+ e+ collider (LC) experiments with (s)= 500 GeV and £int= 340 fb-1.We find that the new gauge boson Z' is most sensitive to the process e+e+ → b(b).As long as Mz' ≤2 TeV, the absolute values of the relative correction parameter are larger than 5%.We calculate the forward-backward asymmetries and left-right asymmetries for the process e+ e-→ c(c), with both the universal and anomaly-free fermion embeddings.Bounds on Z' masses are also estimated within 95% confidence level.

  11. High-gradient breakdown studies of an X-band Compact Linear Collider prototype structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A Compact Linear Collider prototype traveling-wave accelerator structure fabricated at Tsinghua University was recently high-gradient tested at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK. This X-band structure showed good high-gradient performance of up to 100  MV/m and obtained a breakdown rate of 1.27×10^{−8} per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 250 ns. This performance was similar to that of previous structures tested at KEK and the test facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN, thereby validating the assembly and bonding of the fabricated structure. Phenomena related to vacuum breakdown were investigated and are discussed in the present study. Evaluation of the breakdown timing revealed a special type of breakdown occurring in the immediately succeeding pulse after a usual breakdown. These breakdowns tended to occur at the beginning of the rf pulse, whereas usual breakdowns were uniformly distributed in the rf pulse. The high-gradient test was conducted under the international collaboration research program among Tsinghua University, CERN, and KEK.

  12. A vertically integrated pixel readout device for the Vertex Detector at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Christian, David; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    3D-Integrated Circuit technology enables higher densities of electronic circuitry per unit area without the use of nanoscale processes. It is advantageous for mixed mode design with precise analog circuitry because processes with conservative feature sizes typically present lower process dispersions and tolerate higher power supply voltages, resulting in larger separation of a signal from the noise floor. Heterogeneous wafers (different foundries or different process families) may be combined with some 3D integration methods, leading to the optimization of each tier in the 3D stack. Tracking and vertexing in future High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments involves construction of detectors composed of up to a few billions of channels. Readout electronics must record the position and time of each measurement with the highest achievable precision. This paper reviews a prototype of the first 3D readout chip for HEP, designed for a vertex detector at the International Linear Collider. The prototype features 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 64 x 64 elements and was fabricated in a 3-tier 0.18 {micro}m Fully Depleted SOI CMOS process at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory. The tests showed correct functional operation of the structure. The chip performs a zero-suppressed readout. Successive submissions are planned in a commercial 3D bulk 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process to overcome some of the disadvantages of an FDSOI process.

  13. Application of International Linear Collider superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on π-mode to provide a maximum accelerating gradient. A significant research and development effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its rf system which resulted in excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above ∼1.2  GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for β_{G}=0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H^{-} from ∼420  MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new β_{G}=0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9π-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  14. A study with a small prototype TPC for the international linear collider experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, K. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Arai, S. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Arogancia, D.C.; Bacala, A.M. [Mindanao State University, Iligan City (Philippines); Ball, M.; Behnke, T. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Bito, H. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Eckardt, V. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Fujii, K. [KEK, IPNS, Ibaraki (Japan); Fusayasu, T. [Nagasaki Institute of Applied Science, Nagasaki (Japan); Ghodbane, N. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gooc, H.C Jr. [Mindanao State University, Iligan City (Philippines); Kijima, T. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Hamann, M. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Habu, M. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Heuer, R.-D. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Hiramatsu, K. [Kinki University, Osaka (Japan); Ikematsu, K. [KEK, IPNS, Ibaraki (Japan); Kaukher, A. [Universitaet Rostock, Rostock (Germany); Kuroiwa, H. [Saga University, Saga (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    A time projection chamber (TPC) is a strong candidate for the central tracker of the international linear collider (ILC) experiment and we have been conducting a series of cosmic ray experiments under a magnetic field up to 4 T, using a small prototype TPC with a replaceable readout device: multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) or gas electron multiplier (GEM). We first confirmed that the MWPC readout could not be a fall-back option of the ILC-TPC under a strong axial magnetic field of 4 T since its spatial resolution suffered severely from the so called ExB effect in the vicinity of the wire planes. The GEM readout, on the other hand, was found to be virtually free from the ExB effect and gave the resolution determined by the transverse diffusion of the drift electrons (diffusion limited). Furthermore, GEMs allow a wider choice of gas mixtures than MWPCs. Among the gases we tried so far a mixture of Ar-CF{sub 4}-isobutane seems promising as the operating gas of the ILC-TPC because of its small diffusion constant especially under a strong magnetic field. We report the spatial resolution obtained with the GEM readout in this gas mixture. Also presented is the spatial resolution of a GEM-based ILC-TPC estimated from the measurement with the prototype.

  15. Spin Transport and Polarimetry in the Beam Delivery System of the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Moritz; Vauth, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Polarised electron and positron beams are key ingredients to the physics programme of future linear colliders. Due to the chiral nature of weak interactions in the Standard Model - and possibly beyond - the knowledge of the luminosity-weighted average beam polarisation at the $e^+e^-$ interaction point is of similar importance as the knowledge of the luminosity and has to be controlled to permille-level precision in order to fully exploit the physics potential. The current concept to reach this challenging goal combines measurements from Laser-Compton polarimeters before and after the interaction point with measurements at the interaction point. A key element for this enterprise is the understanding of spin-transport effects between the polarimeters and the interaction point as well as collision effects. We show that without collisions, the polarimeters can be cross-calibrated to 0.1 %, and we discuss in detail the impact of collision effects and beam parameters on the polarisation value relevant for the inte...

  16. Cryogenic system configuration for the International Linear Collider (ILC) at mountainous site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, H.; Okamura, T.; Delikaris, D.; Peterson, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    2017-02-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) plans to make use of ten cryoplants for its main linacs, each providing 19 kW at 4.5 K equivalent and among of it 3.6 kW at 2 K. Each cryoplant will consist of various cryogenic components such as a 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, a 2 K refrigerator cold box, and helium compressors and so on. In the technical design report (TDR) of the ILC, due to the mountainous topology, almost all cryogenic components would be installed in underground cryogenic caverns next to the main linac tunnels and only cooling towers on surface area. However, we would like to find a more effective and sophisticated configuration of the cryoplant components (cryogenic configuration). Under several constraints of technical, geographical, and environmental points of view, the cryogenic configuration should be considered carefully to satisfy such various conditions. After discussions on this topic conducted at various workshops and conferences, an updated cryogenic configuration is suggested. The proposed updated configuration may affect the total construction cost of the ILC and the entire structure of the ILC conventional facilities. The updated cryogenic configuration is presented and the on-going discussions with the conventional facilities and siting (CFS) colleagues for further improvement of the cryogenic configuration is introduced.

  17. Modelling of the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the Two-Beam Module for the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Raatikainen, Riku; Österberg, K; Lehtovaara, A; Pajunen, S

    2011-01-01

    To fulfil the mechanical requirements set by the luminosity goals of the compact linear collider, the 2-m long two-beam modules, the shortest repetitive elements in the main linear accelerator, have to be controlled at micrometer level. At the same time these modules are exposed to high power dissipation that varies while the accelerator is ramped up to nominal power and when the mode of the accelerator operation is modified. These variations will give rise to inevitable temperature transients driving mechanical distortions in and between different module components. Therefore, the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the module is of a high importance. This thesis describes a finite element method model for the two-beam compact linear collider module. The components are described in detail compared to earlier models, which should result in a realistic description of the module. Due to the complexity of the modules, the modelling is divided into several phases from geometrical simplification and modification to the...

  18. Studies on the measurement of differential luminosity using Bhabha events at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Andre Philippe

    2009-04-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron-collider with a variable center-of-mass energy {radical}(2) between 200 and 500 GeV. The small bunch sizes needed to reach the design luminosity of L{sub Peak}=2.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} necessary for the physics goals of the ILC, cause the particles to radiate beamstrahlung during the bunch crossings. Beamstrahlung reduces the center-of-mass energy from its nominal value to the effective center-of-mass energy {radical}(2'). The spectrum of the effective center-of-mass energy {radical}(2') is the differential luminosity dL/d{radical}(2'), which has to be known to precisely measure particle masses through threshold scans. The differential luminosity can be measured by using Bhabha events. The real differential luminosity is simulated by the GuineaPig software. The energy spectrum of the Bhabha events is measured by the detector and compared to the energy spectrum of Monte Carlo (MC) Bhabha events with a known differential luminosity given by an approximate parameterization. The parameterization is used to assign each MC event a weight. By re-weighting the events, until the energy spectra from the real and the MC Bhabha events match, the differential luminosity can be measured. The approximate parameterization of the differential luminosity is given by the Circe parameterization introduced by T. Ohl (1997), which does not include the correlation between the particle energies due to beamstrahlung. The Circe parameterization is extended to include the correlation and better describe the differential luminosity. With this new parameterization of the differential luminosity it is possible to predict the observed production cross section of a MC toy particle with a mass of 250 GeV/c{sup 2} to a precision better than 0.2%. Using the re-weighting fit with the extended parameterization also allows the measurement of the beam energy spreads of {sigma}{sub E}=0.0014 for electrons and {sigma

  19. Discriminating between Z'-boson effects and effects of anomalous gauge couplings in the double production of W ± bosons at a linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Vasili V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The potential of the International Linear electron-positron Collider (ILC) for seeking, in the annihilation production of W ±-boson pairs, signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by models belonging to various classes and featuring an extended gauge sector is studied. Limits that will be obtained at ILC for the parameters and masses of Z' bosons are compared with present-day and future data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The possibility of discriminating between the effects of Z-Z' mixing and signals induced by anomalous gauge couplings (AGC) is demonstrated within theoretically motivated trilinear gauge models involving several free anomalous parameters. It is found that the sensitivity of ILC to the effects of Z-Z' mixing in the process e + e - → W + W - and its ability to discriminate between these two new-physics scenarios, Z' and AGC, become substantially higher upon employing polarized initial ( e + e -) and final ( W ±) states.

  20. Investigation of induced radioactivity in the CERN Large Electron Positron collider for its decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The future installation of the Large Hadron Collider in the tunnel formerly housing the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) required the dismantling of the latter after 11-year operation. As required by the French legislation, an extensive theoretical study was conducted before decommissioning to establish the possible activation paths both in the accelerator and in the four experiments (L3, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI) installed around the ring. The aim was to define which areas may contain activated material and which ones would be completely free of activation. The four major sources of activation in LEP, i.e., distributed and localized beam losses, synchrotron radiation and the super-conducting RF cavities, were investigated. Conversion coefficients from unit lost beam power to induced specific activity were established for a number of materials. A similar study was conducted for the four experiments, evaluating the four potential sources of induced radioactivity, namely e**+e **- annihilation events, two-p...

  1. Heavy-Ion Collimation at the Large Hadron Collider Simulations and Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083002; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Bruce, Roderik; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Bruce, Roderik

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) stores and collides proton and $^{208}$Pb$^{82+}$ beams of unprecedented energy and intensity. Thousands of superconducting magnets, operated at 1.9 K, guide the very intense and energetic particle beams, which have a large potential for destruction. This implies the demand for a multi-stage collimation system to provide protection from beam-induced quenches or even hardware damage. In heavy-ion operation, ion fragments with significant rigidity offsets can still scatter out of the collimation system. When they irradiate the superconducting LHC magnets, the latter risk to quench (lose their superconducting property). These secondary collimation losses can potentially impose a limitation for the stored heavy-ion beam energy. Therefore, their distribution in the LHC needs to be understood by sophisticated simulations. Such simulation tools must accurately simulate the particle motion of many different nuclides in the magnetic LHC lattice and simulate their interaction with t...

  2. Toward particle-level filtering of individual collision events at the Large Hadron Collider and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Colecchia, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Low-energy strong interactions are a major source of background at hadron colliders, and methods of subtracting the associated energy flow are well established in the field. Traditional approaches treat the contamination as diffuse, and estimate background energy levels either by averaging over large data sets or by restricting to given kinematic regions inside individual collision events. On the other hand, more recent techniques take into account the discrete nature of background, most notably by exploiting the presence of substructure inside hard jets, i.e. inside collections of particles originating from scattered hard quarks and gluons. However, none of the existing methods subtract background at the level of individual particles inside events. We illustrate the use of an algorithm that will allow particle-by-particle background discrimination at the Large Hadron Collider, and we envisage this as the basis for a novel event filtering procedure upstream of the official reconstruction chains. Our hope is t...

  3. Discriminating supersymmetry and black holes at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglià, Marco

    2008-03-01

    We show how to differentiate the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model from black hole events at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Black holes are simulated with the CATFISH generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of pythia and isajet. Our study, based on event-shape variables, visible and missing momenta, and analysis of dilepton events, demonstrates that supersymmetry and black hole events at the LHC can be easily discriminated.

  4. Probing Neutrino Oscillations in Supersymmetric Models at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    De Campos, F; Hirsch, M; Magro, M B; Porod, W; Restrepo, D; Valle, J W F

    2010-01-01

    The lightest supersymmetric particle may decay with branching ratios that correlate with neutrino oscillation parameters. In this case the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has the potential to probe the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle with sensitivity competitive to its low-energy determination by underground experiments. Under realistic detection assumptions, we identify the necessary conditions for the experiments at CERN's LHC to probe the simplest scenario for neutrino masses induced by minimal supergravity with bilinear R parity violation.

  5. Determining the structure of Higgs couplings at the CERN LargeHadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2002-02-01

    Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has the capability to determine the dominant CP nature of a Higgs boson, via the tensor structure of its coupling to weak bosons. This information is contained in the azimuthal angle distribution of the two outgoing forward tagging jets. The technique is independent of both the Higgs boson mass and the observed decay channel.

  6. Status and future developments of the International Linear Collider%国际直线对撞机研究现状及未来发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高杰

    2011-01-01

    文章介绍了国际直线对撞机(ILC)的科学目标及直线对撞机(LC)与强子对撞机(LHC)的关系.结合对正负电子直线对撞机历史的回顾及国际直线对撞机方案的选择,对国际直线对撞机的发展现状及未来发展趋势进行了介绍.对中国科学家在国际直线对撞机中所做的国际合作研究进行了简要的回顾,并强调了中国抓住国际直线对撞机国际合作机遇对中国科学发展的重要性.%The scientific goals of the International Linear Collider (ILC) and its relationship with the Large Hadron Collider are introduced. The history of linear colliders and ILC, as well as the prospects of ILC, are reviewed. A summary of China's participation in international collaboration in the ILC program is given, with stress on the important opportunities it provides for China's scientific development.

  7. Particle collider magnet failure blamed on faulty engineering Experts are still weighing whether the hitch will delay the start-up of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Researchers have identified the cause of a hiccup in the construction of the world's next top particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During stress tests last week at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), a support structure tore loose from the housing of a keay ultracold magnet."(1 page)

  8. Nanosecond-Timescale Intra-Bunch-Train Feedback for the Linear Collider: Results of the FONT2 Run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, R.; Dufau, M.; Kalinin, A.; /Daresbury; Myatt, G.; Perry, C.; /Oxford U.; Burrows, P.N.; Hartin, T.; Hussain, S.M.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; /Queen Mary, U. of; Adolphsen, C.; Frisch, J.C.; Hendrickson, L.; Jobe, R.K.; Markiewicz, T.; McCormick, D.J.; Nelson, J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-11

    We report on experimental results from the December 2003/January 2004 data run of the Feedback On Nanosecond Timescales (FONT) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at SLAC. We built a second-generation prototype intra-train beam-based feedback system incorporating beam position monitors, fast analogue signal processors, a feedback circuit, fast-risetime amplifiers and stripline kickers. We applied a novel real-time charge-normalization scheme to account for beam current variations along the train. We used the system to correct the position of the 170-nanosecond-long bunchtrain at NLCTA. We achieved a latency of 53 nanoseconds, representing a significant improvement on FONT1 (2002), and providing a demonstration of intra-train feedback for the Linear Collider.

  9. Spin transport at the international linear collider and its impact on the measurement of polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Moritz

    2013-12-15

    At the planned International Linear Collider (ILC), the longitudinal beam polarization needs to be determined with an unprecedented precision. For that purpose, the beam delivery systems (BDS) are equipped with two laser Compton polarimeters each, which are foreseen to achieve a systematic uncertainty of {<=} 0.25 %. The polarimeters are located 1.6 km upstream and 150 m downstream of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point (IP). The average luminosity-weighted longitudinal polarization P{sup lumi}{sub z}, which is the decisive quantity for the experiments, has to be determined from these measurements with the best possible precision. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the spin transport in the BDS is mandatory to estimate how precise the longitudinal polarization at the IP is known from the polarimeter measurements. The envisaged precision for the propagation of the measurement value is {<=} 0.1 %. This thesis scrutinizes the spin transport in view of the achievable precision. A detailed beamline simulation for the BDS has been developed, including the simulation of the beam-beam collisions at the IP. The following factors which might limit the achievable precision is investigated: a variation of the beam parameters, the beam alignment precision at the polarimeters and the IP, the bunch rotation at the IP, the detector magnets, the beam-beam collisions, the emission of synchrotron radiation and misalignments of the beamline elements. In absence of collisions, a precision of 0.085% on the propagation of the measured longitudinal polarization has been found achievable. This result however depends mainly on the presumed precisions for the parallel alignment of the beam at the polarimeters and for the alignment of polarization vector. In presence of collisions, the measurement at the downstream polarimeter depends strongly on the intensity of the collision and the size of the polarimeter laser spot. Therefore, a more detailed study of the laser-bunch interaction is

  10. Literature in focus - The Large Hadron Collider: A Marvel of Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Cecile Noels

    Inside an insulating vacuum chamber in a tunnel about 100 metres below the surface of the Franco-Swiss plain near Geneva, packets of protons whirl around the 27-km circumference of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a speed close to that of light, colliding every 25 nanoseconds at four beam crossing points. The products of these collisions, of which hundreds of billions will be produced each second, are observed and measured with the most advanced particle-detection technology, capable of tracking individual particles as they generate a signature track during their passage through the detectors. All this information is captured, filtered and piped to huge networks of microprocessors for analysis and study by an international team of physicists. When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comes on line in 2009, it will be the largest scientific experiment ever constructed, and the data it produces will lead to a new understanding of our Universe. Many thousands of scientists and engineers were behind the planning...

  11. Literature in focus - The Large Hadron Collider: A Marvel of Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Cecile Noels

    2009-01-01

    Inside an insulating vacuum chamber in a tunnel about 100 metres below the surface of the Franco-Swiss plain near Geneva, packets of protons whirl around the 27-km circumference of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a speed close to that of light, colliding every 25 nanoseconds at four beam crossing points. The products of these collisions, of which hundreds of billions will be produced each second, are observed and measured with the most advanced particle-detection technology, capable of tracking individual particles as they generate a signature track during their passage through the detectors. All this information is captured, filtered and piped to huge networks of microprocessors for analysis and study by an international team of physicists. When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comes on line in 2009, it will be the largest scientific experiment ever constructed, and the data it produces will lead to a new understanding of our Universe. Many thousands of scientists and engineers were behind the planning...

  12. Large Hadron Collider Physics (LHCP2017) conference | 15-20 May 2017 | Shanghai

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The fifth Annual Large Hadron Collider Physics will be held in Shanghai and hosted by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in the period of May 15-20, 2017. The main goal of the conference is to provide intense and lively discussions between experimenters and theorists in such research areas as the Standard Model Physics and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Heavy Quark Physics and Heavy Ion Physics as well as to share a recent progress in the high luminosity upgrades and future colliders developments.     The LHCP2017 website: http://lhcp2017.physics.sjtu.edu.cn/ Event date: 15 - 20 May 2017 Location: Shanghai, China

  13. Thermal photon radiation in high multiplicity p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, C; Denicol, G S; Jeon, S; Gale, C

    2015-01-01

    The collective behaviour of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low $p_T$ direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a clean signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.

  14. Test of Relativistic Gravity for Propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated `antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  15. Energy Extraction in the CERN Large Hadron Collider a Project Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Medvedko, A S; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B

    2001-01-01

    In case of a resistive transition (quench), fast and reliable extraction of the magnetic energy, stored in the superconducting coils of the electromagnets of a particle collider, represents an important part of its magnet protection system. In general, the quench detectors, the quench heaters and the cold by-pass diodes across each magnet, together with the energy extraction facilities provide the required protection of the quenching superconductors against damage due to local energy dissipation. In CERN's LHC machine the energy stored in each of its eight superconducting dipole chains exceeds 1300 MJ. Following an opening of the extraction switches this energy will be absorbed in large extraction resistors located in the underground collider tunnel or adjacent galleries, during the exponential current decay. Also the sixteen, 13 kA quadrupole chains (QF, QD) and more than one hundred and fifty, 600 A circuits of the corrector magnets will be equipped with extraction systems. The extraction switch-gear is bas...

  16. Mass measurement of right-handed scalar quarks and time measurement of hadronic showers for the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Weuste, Lars

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a 48.3km long e+ e- accelerator with a center-of-mass energy of 3TeV. Its purpose is the precise measurement of particles discovered by the LHC as well as the discovery of yet unknown particles. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of its detector concepts which was specifically designed for the usage of the Particle Flow Algorithm. This thesis is divided into two parts, both within the context of CLIC. In the first part of this thesis the unprecedented measurement on time structure of hadronic showers in calorimeters with tungsten absorber material, which is used in the ILD concept for CLIC, will be presented. It shows the development and the construction of a small testbeam experiment called Tungsten Timing Testbeam (T3B) which consists of only 15 scintillator tiles of 30mm x 30mm x 5mm, read out with Silicon Photomultipliers which in turn were connected to USB oscilloscopes. T3B was placed downstream of the CALICE tungsten analog hadron calorimet...

  17. Low emittance design of the electron gun and the focusing channel of the Compact Linear Collider drive beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayyani Kelisani, M.; Doebert, S.; Aslaninejad, M.

    2017-04-01

    For the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN, the power for the main linacs is extracted from a drive beam generated from a high current electron source. The design of the electron source and its subsequent focusing channel has a great impact on the beam dynamic considerations of the drive beam. We report the design of a thermionic electron source and the subsequent focusing channels with the goal of production of a high quality beam with a very small emittance.

  18. Finite width and irreducible background effects to t$\\overline{t}$ production at $\\gamma\\gamma$ next linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, S

    1995-01-01

    We study the complete process \\phphbbww\\ using exact matrix element computations at tree-level, at a \\sqrt s=500 GeV \\eeb\\ linear collider of the next generation. Incoming photons produced via back-scattering of laser light are considered. Sizable effects due to the finite width of the top quark as well as to the irreducible background to t\\bar t production and decay are predicted.

  19. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  20. Possible application of an EBIS in preinjectors for large heavy ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseroth, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Prelec, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-08-01

    High energy, heavy ion nuclear physics has so far been limited to experiments with a fixed target. Presently there are two projects that would greatly extend the available collision energy: the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) planned at CERN. While RHIC was from the very beginning designed for collisions of all heavy ions up to gold, LHC was initially considered as a p-p and, perhaps eventually, an e-p collider, with the heavy ion option added at a later stage; this option is now included in the planning right from the beginning. The present RHIC scenario for acceleration of gold ions starts with the BNL Tandem injecting Au{sup 14+} ions into the Booster; after acceleration ions are stripped to a charge state of 77+, injected into the AGS, stripped again to 79+ and injected into RHIC, with three bunches per cycle. The LHC scenario for acceleration of lead ions will use as the injector the CERN Heavy Ion Facility: production of ions in a charge state around 27+ in an ECR ion source, followed by an RFQ/linac combination, stripping to Pb{sup 53+} at 4.2 MeV/u, acceleration in the PSB and PS, stripping to the state 82+, and acceleration in the SPS. There would be 144 bunches injected into the LHC per SPS cycle. However, the resulting luminosity would be rather low and several accumulating schemes are being considered as well. In this paper we are considering a next-generation EBIS device as a possible substitution for ion sources in the preinjector stages of the two colliders with the objective of achieving an improved performance.

  1. University of Tennessee deploys force10 C-series to analyze data from CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1 page)

  2. Construction and testing of a large scale prototype of a silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for a future lepton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rouëné,J

    2013-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes of highly granular calorimeters for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. After several beam campaigns at DESY, CERN and FNAL, the CALICE collaboration has demonstrated the principle of highly granular electromagnetic calorimeters with a first prototype called physics prototype. The next prototype, called technological prototype, addresses the engineering challenges which come along with the realisation of highly granular calorimeters. This prototype will comprise 30 layers where each layer is composed of four 9_9 cm2 silicon wafers. The front end electronics is integrated into the detector layers. The size of each pixel is 5_5 mm2. This prototype enter sits construction phase. We present results of the first layers of the technological prototype obtained during beam test campaigns in spring and summer 2012. According to these results the signal over noise ratio of the detector exceeds the R&D goal of10:1.

  3. Determination of AC Characteristics of Superconducting Dipole Magnets in the Large Hadron Collider Based on Experimental Results and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ambjørndalen, Sara; Verweij, Arjan

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) utilizes high-field superconducting Main Dipole Magnets that bend the trajectory of the beam. The LHC ring is electrically divided into eight octants, each allocating a 7 km chain of 154 Main Dipole Magnets. Dedicated de- tection and protection systems prevent irreversible magnet damage caused by quenches. Quench is a local transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state. Triggering of such systems, along with other failure scenarios, result in fast transient phenomena. In order to analyze the consequence of such electrical transients and failures in the dipole chain, one needs a circuit model that is validated against measurements. Currently, there exists an equivalent circuit of the Main Dipole Magnet resolved at an aperture level. Each aperture model takes into account the dynamic effects occurring in the magnets, trough a lossy-inductance model and parasitic capacitances to ground. At low frequencies the Main Dipole Magnet behaves as a linear inductor. Ca...

  4. Large Area Silicon Tracking Detectors with Fast Signal Readout for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Köstner, S

    2005-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles, which is summarized briefly in the second chapter, incorporates a number of successful theories to explain the nature and consistency of matter. However not all building blocks of this model could yet be tested by experiment. To confirm existing theories and to improve nowadays understanding of matter a new machine is currently being built at CERN, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), described in the third chapter. LHC is a proton-proton collider which will reach unprecedented luminosities and center of mass energies. Five experiments are attached to it to give answers to questions like the existence of the Higgs meson, which allows to explain the mass content of matter, and the origin of CP-violation, which plays an important role in the baryogenesis of the universe. Supersymmetric theories, proposing a bosonic superpartner for each fermion and vice versa, will be tested. By colliding heavy ions, high energy and particle densities can be achieved and probed. This stat...

  5. Realization of beam polarization at the linear collider and its application to EW processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Sollova, F.

    2006-07-15

    The use of beam polarization at the future ILC e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will benefit the physics program significantly. This thesis explores three aspects of beam polarization: the application of beam polarization to the study of electroweak processes, the precise measurement of the beam polarization, and finally, the production of polarized positrons at a test beam experiment. In the first part of the thesis the importance of beam polarization at the future ILC is exhibited: the benefits of employing transverse beam polarization (in both beams) for the measurement of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the W-pair production process are studied. The sensitivity to anomalous TGC values is compared for the cases of transverse and longitudinal beam polarization at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV. Due to the suppressed contribution of the t-channel {nu} exchange, the sensitivity is higher for longitudinal polarization. For some physics analyses the usual polarimetry techniques do not provide the required accuracy for the measurement of the beam polarization (around 0.25% with Compton polarimetry). The second part of the thesis deals with a complementary method to measure the beam polarization employing physics data acquired with two polarization modes. The process of single-W production is chosen due to its high cross section. The expected precision for 500 fb{sup -1} and W{yields}{mu}{nu} decays only, is {delta}P{sub e{sup -}}/P{sub e{sup -}}=0.26% and {delta}P{sub e{sup +}}/P{sub e{sup +}}=0.33%, which can be further improved by employing additional W-decay channels. The first results of an attempt to produce polarized positrons at the E-166 experiment are shown in the last part of the thesis. The E-166 experiment, located at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC's LINAC employs a helical undulator to induce the emission of circularly polarized gamma rays by the beam electrons. These gamma rays are converted into longitudinally polarized electron

  6. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC. Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi and 3.45 MPa (500 psi], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa, full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two

  7. Standard Model Higgs boson searches with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aleandro Nisati; on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    The investigation of the mechanism responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking is one of the most important tasks of the scientific program of the Large Hadron Collider. The experimental results on the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson with 1 to 2 fb-1 of proton–proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector are presented and discussed. No significant excess of events is found with respect to the expectations from Standard Model processes, and the production of a Higgs boson is excluded at 95% Confidence Level for the mass regions 144–232, 256–282 and 296–466 GeV.

  8. Boosting Higgs CP properties via VH production at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Rohini; Miller, David J.; Mohan, Kirtimaan; White, Chris D.

    2014-03-01

    We consider ZH and WH production at the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs decays to a bbbar pair. We use jet substructure techniques to reconstruct the Higgs boson and construct angular observables involving leptonic decay products of the vector bosons. These efficiently discriminate between the tensor structure of the HVV vertex expected in the Standard Model and that arising from possible new physics, as quantified by higher dimensional operators. This can then be used to examine the CP nature of the Higgs as well as CP mixing effects in the HZZ and HWW vertices separately.

  9. Boosting Higgs CP properties via VH Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini; Mohan, Kirtimaan; White, Chris D

    2013-01-01

    We consider ZH and WH production at the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs decays to a bb pair. We use jet substructure techniques to reconstruct the Higgs boson and construct angular observables involving leptonic decay products of the vector bosons. These efficiently discriminate between the tensor structure of the HVV vertex expected in the Standard Model and that arising from possible new physics, as quantified by higher dimensional operators. This can then be used to examine the CP nature of the Higgs as well as CP mixing effects in the HZZ and HWW vertices separately.

  10. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Matter Antimatter Asymmetries at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, Chris; Gutierrez, J

    2015-01-01

    This document is the student manual for a third year undergraduate laboratory experiment at the University of Manchester. This project aims to measure a fundamental difference between the behaviour of matter and antimatter through the analysis of data collected by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The three-body dmecays $B^\\pm \\rightarrow h^\\pm h^+ h^-$, where $h^\\pm$ is a $\\pi^\\pm$ or $K^\\pm$ are studied. The inclusive matter antimatter asymmetry is calculated, and larger asymmetries are searched for in localized regions of the phase-space.

  11. Story of a journey: Rutherford to the Large Hadron Collider and onwards

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I set out arguments why the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) : the machine and the experiments with it, are a watershed for particle physics. I give a historical perspective of the essential link between development of particle accelerators and that in our knowledge of the laws governing interactions among the fundamental particles, showing how this journey has reached destination LHC. I explain how the decisions for the LHC design; the energy and number of particles in the beam, were arrived at. I will end by discussing the LHC physics agenda and the time line in which the particle physicists hope to achieve it.

  12. Experience with High-Intensity Beam Scraping and Tail Population at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Burkart, F; Bruce, R; Mirarchi, D; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The population of beam tails at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a source of concern for the operation at higher beam energies and intensities when even small fractions of the beam could represent a potential danger is case of slow or fast losses, e.g. caused by orbit transients or by collimator movements. Different studies have been performed using the technique of collimator scans to probe the beam tail population in different conditions. The experience accumulated during the operation at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV is reviewed.

  13. Searches for the technicolor signatures via gg→W±π_t~(-+) at the Large Hadron Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jin-Shu; SONG Tai-Ping; WANG Shuai-Wei; LU Gong-Ru

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the production of a charged top pion in association with a W boson via gg fusion at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in the context of the topcolor assisted technicolor model. We find that the total cross section of pp→gg→W±π_t~(-+) is several dozen femtobarns with reasonable values of the parameters, and the total cross section of pp→W±π_t~(-+) can reach a few hundred femtobarns when we consider the sum of the contributions of these two parton subprocesses, gg→W±π_t~(-+) and bb~-→W±π_t~(-+).

  14. Probing new physics in diphoton production with proton tagging at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fichet, S; Kepka, O.; Lenzi, B.; Royon, C.; Saimpert, M.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivities to anomalous quartic photon couplings at the Large Hadron Collider are estimated using diphoton production via photon fusion. The tagging of the protons proves to be a very powerful tool to suppress the background and unprecedented sensitivities down to $6 \\cdot 10^{-15}$\\gev$^{-4}$ are obtained, providing a new window on extra dimensions and strongly-interacting composite states in the multi-TeV range. Generic contributions to quartic photon couplings from charged and neutral particles with arbitrary spin are also presented.

  15. Identification and Classification of Beam Loss Patterns in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Panagiotis, Theodoropoulos; Valentino, Gianluca; Redaelli, Stefano; Herbster, Mark

    The Large Hadron Collider, is the largest particle accelerator ever built, achieving record beam energy and beam intensity. Beam losses are unavoidable and can risk the safety of accelerator’s components. Beam loss maps are used to validate the collimation system, designed to protect the accelerator against beam losses. The complexity of this system requires well defined inspection methods and well defined case studies that ensure normal operation and efficient performance evaluation. In this work, enhancements are proposed to the existing validation methods with extensions towards automating the inspection mechanisms, introducing pattern recognition and statistical learning methods.

  16. Pair production of neutral Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos-Bendezu, A A

    2001-01-01

    We study the hadroproduction of two neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model, which provides a handle on the trilinear Higgs couplings. We include the contributions from quark-antiquark annihilation at the tree level and those from gluon-gluon fusion, which proceeds via quark and squark loops. We list compact results for the tree-level partonic cross sections and the squark loop amplitudes, and we confirm previous results for the quark loop amplitudes. We quantitatively analyze the hadronic cross sections at the CERN Large Hadron Collider assuming a favorable supergravity-inspired scenario.

  17. Associated production of Z and neutral Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Palisoc, Caesar P. [Univ. of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines). National Inst. of Physics

    2011-12-15

    We study the hadroproduction of a CP-even or CP-odd neutral Higgs boson in association with a Z boson in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) We include the contributions from quark-antiquark annihilation at the tree level and those from gluon-gluon fusion, which proceeds via quark and squark loops, and list compact analytic results. We quantitatively analyze the hadronic cross sections at the CERN Large Hadron Collider assuming a favorable supergravity-inspired MSSM scenario. (orig.)

  18. Observable T_7 Lepton Flavor Symmetry at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    More often than not, models of flavor symmetry rely on the use of nonrenormalizable operators (in the guise of flavons) to accomplish the phenomenologically successful tribimaximal mixing of neutrinos. We show instead how a simple renormalizable two-parameter neutrino mass model of tribimaximal mixing can be constructed with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T_7 and the gauging of B-L. This is also achieved without the addition of auxiliary symmetries and particles present in almost all other proposals. Most importantly, it is verifiable at the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Observable T7 lepton flavor symmetry at the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Khalil, Shaaban; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    More often than not, models of flavor symmetry rely on the use of nonrenormalizable operators (in the guise of flavons) to accomplish the phenomenologically successful tribimaximal mixing of neutrinos. We show instead how a simple renormalizable two-parameter neutrino mass model of tribimaximal mixing can be constructed with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T(7) and the gauging of B-L. This is also achieved without the addition of auxiliary symmetries and particles present in almost all other proposals. Most importantly, it is verifiable at the Large Hadron Collider.

  20. Associated production of Z and neutral Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Palisoc, Caesar P. [Univ. of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines). National Inst. of Physics

    2011-12-15

    We study the hadroproduction of a CP-even or CP-odd neutral Higgs boson in association with a Z boson in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) We include the contributions from quark-antiquark annihilation at the tree level and those from gluon-gluon fusion, which proceeds via quark and squark loops, and list compact analytic results. We quantitatively analyze the hadronic cross sections at the CERN Large Hadron Collider assuming a favorable supergravity-inspired MSSM scenario. (orig.)

  1. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, Igor M.

    2009-06-01

    The goals of the physics to be studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very impressive. Four major experimental installations are ready to compete in obtaining and analyzing the data from high-energy hadron collisions. The main hope is to answer the most intricate questions ever asked concerning the most fundamental problems of matter and its fundamental forces and space structure. The design of the LHC and its four detectors is briefly described. We then review the main facts revealed previously by experimentalists at other accelerators. The most pertinent topics and the stage-by-stage plans for LHC investigations are discussed. Further prospects for high-energy physics are outlined.

  2. Lower limit on dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jonathan L; Su, Shufang; Takayama, Fumihiro

    2006-04-21

    We evaluate the prospects for finding evidence of dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We consider weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and superWIMPs and characterize their properties through model-independent parametrizations. The observed relic density then implies lower bounds on dark matter production rates as functions of a few parameters. For WIMPs, the resulting signal is indistinguishable from background. For superWIMPs, however, this analysis implies significant production of metastable charged particles. For natural parameters, these rates may far exceed Drell-Yan cross sections and yield spectacular signals.

  3. Usage of Liquid Metals in the Positron Production System of Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailichenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this publication we collected descriptions of some installations with liquid metals which could be used for high-energy colliders, ILC particularly, for the purposes of targeting, collimation, cooling, collection of secondary particles etc. Some important components of the system with liquid metals, such as pumps, nozzles, windows, and the fluid dynamics in the Lithium lens are described also.

  4. Physics perspectives of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Riccati, L

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN will deliver ion beams up to centre of mass energies of the order of 5.5 TeV per nucleon, in case of lead. If compared to the available facilities for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions (SPS and RHIC) , this represents a huge step forward in terms of both volume and energy density that can be attained in nuclear interactions. ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only detector specifically designed for the physics of nuclear collisions at LHC, even though it can also study high cross section processes occurring in proton- proton collisions. The main goal of the experiment is to observe and study the phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined partonic matter (quark gluon plasma - QGP). ALICE is conceived as a general purpose detector and will address most of the phenomena related to the QGP formation at LHC energies: to this purpose, a large fraction of the hadrons, leptons and photons produced in each interaction will be measure...

  5. Physics perspectives of the ALICE experiment at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Massimo Masera

    2003-04-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) under construction at CERN will deliver ion beams up to centre of mass energies of the order of 5.5 TeV per nucleon, in case of lead. If compared to the available facilities for the study of nucleus–nucleus collisions (SpS and RHIC), this represents a huge step forward in terms of both volume and energy density that can be attained in nuclear interactions. ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) is the only detector specifically designed for the physics of nuclear collisions at LHC, even though it can also study high cross-section processes occurring in proton–proton collisions. The main goal of the experiment is to observe and study the phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined partonic matter (quark gluon plasma – QGP). ALICE is conceived as a general-purpose detector and will address most of the phenomena related to the QGP formation at LHC energies: for this purpose, a large fraction of the hadrons, leptons and photons produced in each interaction will be measured and identified.

  6. Role-Based Access Control for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, I

    2010-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest scientific instrument ever created. It was built with the intention of testing the most extreme conditions of the matter. Taking into account the significant dangers of LHC operations, European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has developed multi-pronged approach for machine safety, including access control system. This system is based on role-based access control (RBAC) concept. It was designed to protect from accidental and unauthorized access to the LHC and injector equipment. This paper introduces the new model of the role-based access control developed at CERN and gives detailed mathematical description of it. We propose a new technique called dynamic authorization that allows deploying RBAC gradually in the large systems. Moreover, we show how the protection for the very large distributed equipment control system may be implemented in efficient way. This paper also describes motivation of the project, requirements and overview of the main components: au...

  7. Supersymmetry phenomenology in the context of neutrino physics and the large hadron collider LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanussek, Marja

    2012-05-15

    Experimentally, it is well established that the Standard Model of particle physics requires an extension to accommodate the neutrino oscillation data, which indicates that at least two neutrinos are massive and that two of the neutrino mixing angles are large. Massive neutrinos are naturally present in a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model which includes lepton-number violating terms (the B3 MSSM). Furthermore, supersymmetry stabilizes the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and the scale of unified theories or the Planck scale. In this thesis, we study in detail how neutrino masses are generated in the B3 MSSM. We present a mechanism how the experimental neutrino oscillation data can be realized in this framework. Then we discuss how recently published data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be used to constrain the parameter space of this model. Furthermore, we present work on supersymmetric models where R-parity is conserved, considering scenarios with light stops in the light of collider physics and scenarios with near-massless neutralinos in connection with cosmological restrictions.

  8. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  9. Supersymmetry, naturalness and the "fine-tuning price" of the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fowlie, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The absence of supersymmetry or other new physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has lead many to question naturalness arguments. With Bayesian statistics, we argue that natural models are most probable and that naturalness is not merely an aesthetic principle. We calculate a probabilistic measure of naturalness, the Bayesian evidence, for the Standard Model (SM) with and without quadratic divergences, confirming that the SM with quadratic divergences is improbable. We calculate the Bayesian evidence for the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with naturalness priors in three cases: with only the $M_Z$ measurement; with the $M_Z$ measurement and LHC measurements; and with the $M_Z$ measurement, $m_h$ measurement and a hypothetical null result from a $\\sqrt{s}=100\\,\\text{TeV}$ Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with $3000/\\text{fb}$. The "fine-tuning price" of the VLHC given LHC results would be $\\sim400$, which is slightly less than that of the LHC results given the electroweak scale ...

  10. submitter Training Behavior of the Main Dipoles in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, Ezio; Bajko, Marta; Bottura, Luca; Bruning, Oliver; De Rijk, Gijs; Fessia, Paolo; Hagen, Per; Naour, Sandrine Le; Modena, Michele; Perez, Juan Carlos; Rossi, Lucio; Schmidt, Rudiger; Siemko, Andrzej; Tock, Jean-Philippe; Tommasini, Davide; Verweij, Arjan; Willering, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the 1232 Nb-Ti dipole magnets in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been commissioned to 7.8 T operational field, with 172 quenches. More than 80% of these quenches occurred in the magnets of one of the three cold mass assemblers (3000 series), confirming what was already observed in 2008. In this paper, the recent analysis carried out on the quench performance of the Large Hadron Collider dipole magnets is reported, including the individual reception tests and the 2008 and 2015 commissioning campaigns, to better understand the above-mentioned anomaly and give an outlook for future operation and possible increase of the operational field. The lower part of the quench probability spectrum is compatible with Gaussian distributions; therefore, the training curve can be fit through error functions. An essential ingredient in this analysis is the estimate of the error to be associated with the training data due to sampling of rare events, allowing to test different hypothesis. Using this approach, an es...

  11. Studies of Machine Protections for Fast Crab Cavity Failures in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yee Rendon, Bruce; Lopez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Crab Cavities (CCs) play a main role in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) project for increasing the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their successful installation at KEKB accelerator allowed reaching a peak luminosity of 2.1x10^34/cm^2/s. However, CCs have exhibited abrupt changes of phase and voltage during a time period of the order of a few LHC turns. If similar scenarios take place in the HL-LHC, considering the significant stored energy in the beam, CC failures represent a serious threat in regard to LHC machine protection. This thesis presents and discusses the effect of CC voltage or phase changes on a time interval similar to, or longer than, the one needed to dump the beam. The simulations assume a quasi-stationary state (QSS) distribution, before the failure is produced, in order to assess the particles losses for the HL-LHC. These distributions produce beam losses below the safe operation threshold for Gaussian tails, while, for non-Gaussian tails, they are on the sa...

  12. A feasibility study of high intensity positron sources for the S-band and TESLA linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, R.

    1997-10-01

    Future high energy linear colliders require luminosities above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Therefore beam intensities have to be provided up to two orders of magnitude higher than achieved at present. It is comparably simple to reach high electron intensities. Positron intensities in this range, however, are difficult to realize with conventional positron sources. A new method of positron production was proposed in 1979 by V.E. Balakin and A.A. Mikhailichenko. The photons, necessary for pair production, are not generated by bremsstrahlung but by high energy electrons passing through an undulator. Based on this principle, a high intensity, unpolarized and polarized positron source for linear colliders was developed by K.Floettmann. In the present work, the requirements derived by K.Floettmann are used to study the feasibility of both the polarized and the unpolarized positron source. For economical reasons it is advantageous to use the beam after the interaction for positron production. In the main part of the present work a beam line is developed which guarantees a stable operation of the unpolarized wiggler-based positron source for the S-Band and TESLA linear collider. The requirements on the electron beam emittances are much higher for the polarized undulator-based source. For TESLA it is shown, that an operation of the polarized source is possible for design interactions. For a stable operation, taking into account perturbations at the interaction point, further investigations are necessary. For the SBLC, an operation of the polarized source is not possible with the present design.

  13. Effects of R-Parity Violating Supersymmetry in Top Pair Production at Linear Colliders with Polarized Beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation, the lepton number violating top quark interactions can contribute to the top pair production at a linear collider via tree-level u-channel squark exchange diagrams. We calculate such contributions and find that in the allowed range of these R-violating couplings, the top pair production rate as well as the top quark polarization and the forward-backward asymmetry can be significantly altered.By comparing the unpolarized beams with the polarized beams, we find that the polarized beams are more powerful in probing such new physics.

  14. Comparison of Alignment Tolerances in the Linear Collider Damping with Those in Operating Rings(LCC-0112)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T

    2004-01-05

    The next generation linear colliders require damping rings to generate beam with very small transverse emittances to attain the desired luminosity. The required emittances are smaller than that of most operating synchrotron radiation sources. In this paper, the alignment tolerances needed to attain these small emittances are compared with those of the operating synchrotron radiation facilities and a prototype damping ring, the ATF at KEK. The concept of this study originated at the Nanobeams Workshop during a discussion in the Storage Rings Working Group although the results were not discussed at that meeting.

  15. Charged and neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs boson decays and measurement of tan at the compact linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Coniavitis; A Ferrari

    2007-11-01

    The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) predicts the existence of new charged and neutral Higgs bosons. The pair creation of these new particles at the multi-TeV + − compact linear collider (CLIC), followed by decays into standard model particles, were simulated along with the corresponding background. High-energy beam–beam effects such as ISR, beamstrahlung and hadronic background were included. We have investigated the possibility of using the ratio between the number of events found in various decay channels to determine the MSSM parameter tan and we have derived the corresponding statistical error from the uncertainties on the measured cross-sections and Higgs boson masses.

  16. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Yang, Chun-Bin; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2016-08-01

    It has been proposed that electric fields may lead to chiral separation in quark-gluon plasma (QGP). This is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both be completely produced in off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We use the Woods-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of off-central collisions. The chiral electric field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy regions are studied in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375069, 11435054, 11075061, 11221504) and Key Laboratory Foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University)(QLPL2014P01)

  17. High baryon densities in heavy ion collisions at energies attainable at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Kapusta, Joseph I.

    2017-01-01

    In very high-energy collisions nuclei are practically transparent to each other but produce very hot nearly baryon-free matter in the so-called central rapidity region. The energy in the central rapidity region comes from the kinetic energy of the colliding nuclei. We calculate the energy and rapidity loss of the nuclei using the color glass condensate model. This model also predicts the excitation energy of the nuclear fragments. Using a space-time picture of the collision we calculate the baryon and energy densities of the receding baryonic fireballs. For central collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energy attainable at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, for example, we find baryon densities more than ten times that of atomic nuclei over a large volume.

  18. Magnetic-field-induced squeezing effect at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Endrődi, Gergely; Petersen, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    In off-central heavy-ion collisions, quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is exposed to the strongest magnetic fields ever created in the universe. Because of the paramagnetic nature of the QGP at high temperatures, the spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field configuration exerts an anisotropic force density that competes with the pressure gradients resulting from purely geometric effects. In this paper, we simulate (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics with external magnetic fields to estimate the effect of this force density on the anisotropic expansion of the QGP in collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While negligible for quickly decaying magnetic fields, we find that long-lived fields generate a substantial force density that suppresses the momentum anisotropy of the plasma by up to 20 % at the LHC energy and also leaves its imprint on the elliptic flow v2 of charged pions.

  19. High Baryon Densities in Heavy Ion Collisions at Energies Attainable at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In very high energy collisions nuclei are practically tranparent to each other but produce very hot, nearly baryon-free, matter in the so-called central rapidity region. The energy in the central rapidity region comes from the kinetic energy of the colliding nuclei. We calculate the energy and rapidity loss of the nuclei using the color glass condensate model. This model also predicts the excitation energy of the nuclear fragments. Using a space-time picture of the collision we calculate the baryon and energy densities of the receding baryonic fireballs. For central collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energy attainable at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, for example, we find baryon densities more than ten times that of atomic nuclei over a large volume.

  20. Willingness to pay for basic research: a contingent valuation experiment on the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Catalano, Gelsomina; Giffoni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of countries and institutions are investing in large-scale research infrastructures (RIs) and in basic research. Scientific discoveries, which are expected thanks to RIs, may have a non-use value, in analogy with environmental and cultural public goods. This paper provides, for the first time, an empirical estimation of the willingness to pay (WTP) for discoveries in basic research by the general public. We focus on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator worldwide, where in 2012 the Higgs boson was discovered. Nobody knows the practical value of such discovery, beyond knowledge per se. The findings of our study are based on a dichotomous choice contingent valuation (CV) survey carried out in line with the NOAA guidelines. The survey involved 1,022 undergraduate students enrolled in more than 30 different degrees (including the humanities) at five universities located in four countries (Italy, France, Spain, UK). We ask two main research questions: Which are the ...