WorldWideScience

Sample records for landmark genome scanning

  1. Application of the Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning (RLGS Method for Analysis of Genetic Diversity between Asian and African Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisato Okuizumi*, Tomotsugu Noguchi, Tatsuya Saguchi,Takuma Fujita, Eri Nonaka, Shinsuke Yamanaka, Koffi Kombate, Subbarayan Sivakumar , Kulandaivelu Ganesamurthy, Yasufumi Murakami

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning (RLGS used to detect large numbers of restriction landmarks in a single experiment andapplied to analyze the genetic diversity of Asian and African sorghum accessions. This method is one of the genome analysistools based on the concept that restriction enzyme sites can serve as landmarks throughout a genome. RLGS uses direct endlabelingof the genomic DNA digested with a rare-cutting restriction enzyme and high-resolution two-dimensionalelectrophoresis. It has an advantage of providing precise information on a spot intensity that reflects the copy number ofrestriction landmarks and to visualize differences in methylation levels across the genome. RLGS becomes very useful for doingwhole genome scans that equals the work of thousands of polymerase chain reactions. A study was carried out using Sorghumaccessions collected from countries viz., Morocco, Nigeria, Sudan, South Africa, Japan, South Korea, and China. Onerepresentative sample was chosen from a country for analysis carried out at National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences(NIAS. Two dimensional spot images for seven accessions obtained and spot intensities were scanned. Totally, 119 spots weredetected of which 95 spots observed as polymorphic and 24 as non polymorphic. Unique presence and null spots werespecifically detected in all accessions taken for study. A total of 37 unique spots and 12 null spots, detected in this experiment.Principal Coordinate Analysis indicated, four African accessions scattered in the diagram were diverse and three Asianaccessions closely distributed with narrow diversity. The phylogenetic tree showed that Sudan and Nigerian accessions weredistant while Chinna, Japan and Korea accessions had close proximity

  2. The Application of Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning Method for Surveillance of Non-Mendelian Inheritance in F1 Hybrids

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    Tomoko Takamiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inheritance of DNA methylation in reciprocal F1 hybrids (subsp. japonica cv. Nipponbare × subsp. indica cv. Kasalath of rice (Oryza sativa L. using restriction landmark genome scanning (RLGS, and detected differing RLGS spots between the parents and reciprocal F1 hybrids. MspI/HpaII restriction sites in the DNA from these different spots were suspected to be heterozygously methylated in the Nipponbare parent. These spots segregated in F1 plants, but did not segregate in selfed progeny of Nipponbare, showing non-Mendelian inheritance of the methylation status. As a result of RT-PCR and sequencing, a specific allele of the gene nearest to the methylated sites was expressed in reciprocal F1 plants, showing evidence of biased allelic expression. These results show the applicability of RLGS for scanning of non-Mendelian inheritance of DNA methylation and biased allelic expression.

  3. Methylation and downregulated expression of mac25/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 is associated with liver tumorigenesis in SV40T/t antigen transgenic mice, screened by restriction landmark genomic scanning for methylation (RLGS-M).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, S; Okazaki, Y; Tateno, M; Kawai, J; Konno, H; Kusakabe, M; Yoshiki, A; Muramatsu, M; Held, W A; Hayashizaki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Restriction landmark genomic scanning for methylation (RLGS-M) was used to detect alterations in DNA methylation associated with murine SV40 T/t antigen-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. An altered locus/spot (S130) was cloned and found to correspond to sequences in the 5' flanking region and 5' portion of the cDNA for the murine mac25/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 (Igfbp-7) gene. IGFBPs are believed to be capable of binding insulin, Igf1, and Igf2 and modulating mitogenic effects. Previous studies have shown that Igf2 has an important role in promoting liver tumorigenesis. Quantitative PCR was used to access the methylation status of the NotI site just 5' to the coding region and the expression level of the mac25/igfbp-7 gene. The results indicated that the degree of methylation was inversely related to the expression level and is consistent with a role for DNA methylation in silencing mac25/Igfbp-7 gene expression and function for mac25/Igfbp-7 as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10623583

  4. A landmark-based method for the geometrical 3D calibration of scanning microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, M.

    2007-04-27

    This thesis presents a new strategy and a spatial method for the geometric calibration of 3D measurement devices at the micro-range, based on spatial reference structures with nanometersized landmarks (nanomarkers). The new method was successfully applied for the 3D calibration of scanning probe microscopes (SPM) and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). Moreover, the spatial method was also used for the photogrammetric self-calibration of scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In order to implement the calibration strategy to all scanning microscopes used, the landmark-based principle of reference points often applied at land survey or at close-range applications has been transferred to the nano- and micro-range in the form of nanomarker. In order to function as a support to the nanomarkers, slope-shaped step pyramids have been developed and fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) induced metal deposition. These FIB produced 3D microstructures have been sized to embrace most of the measurement volume of the scanning microscopes. Additionally, their special design allows the homogenous distribution of the nanomarkers. The nanomarkers were applied onto the support and the plateaus of the slope-step pyramids by FIB etching (milling) as landmarks with as little as several hundreds of nanometers in diameter. The nanomarkers are either of point-, or ring-shaped design. They are optimized so that they can be spatially measured by SPM and CLSM, and, imaged and photogrammetrically analyzed on the basis of SEM data. The centre of the each nanomarker serves as reference point in the measurement data or images. By applying image processing routines, the image (2D) or object (3D) coordinates of each nanomarker has been determined with subpixel accuracy. The correlative analysis of the SPM, CLSM and photogrammetric SEM measurement data after 3D calibration resulted in mean residues in the measured coordinates of as little as 13 nm. Without the coupling factors the mean

  5. Clinical applications of Genome Polymorphism Scans

    OpenAIRE

    Weber James L

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Applications of Genome Polymorphism Scans range from the relatively simple such as gender determination and confirmation of biological relationships, to the relatively complex such as determination of autozygosity and propagation of genetic information throughout pedigrees. Unlike nearly all other clinical DNA tests, the Scan is a universal test – it covers all people and all genes. In balance, I argue that the Genome Polymorphism Scan is the most powerful, affordable clinical DNA te...

  6. Genome-based peptide fingerprint scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Giddings, Michael C.; Shah, Atul A.; Gesteland, Ray; Moore, Barry

    2002-01-01

    We have implemented a method that identifies the genomic origins of sample proteins by scanning their peptide-mass fingerprint against the theoretical translation and proteolytic digest of an entire genome. Unlike previously reported techniques, this method requires no predefined ORF or protein annotations. Fixed-size windows along the genome sequence are scored by an equation accounting for the number of matching peptides, the number of missed enzymatic cleavages in each peptide, the number ...

  7. Clinical applications of Genome Polymorphism Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber James L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Applications of Genome Polymorphism Scans range from the relatively simple such as gender determination and confirmation of biological relationships, to the relatively complex such as determination of autozygosity and propagation of genetic information throughout pedigrees. Unlike nearly all other clinical DNA tests, the Scan is a universal test – it covers all people and all genes. In balance, I argue that the Genome Polymorphism Scan is the most powerful, affordable clinical DNA test available today. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Scott Weiss (nominated by Neil Smalheiser, Roberta Pagon (nominated by Jerzy Jurka and Val Sheffield (nominated by Neil Smalheiser.

  8. Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS): a novel cDNA display system using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Hara, A; Kuwajima, G; Wantanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new method, designated restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS), which displays many cDNA species quantitatively and simultaneously as two-dimensional gel spots. In this method cDNA species of uniform length were prepared for each mRNA species using restriction enzymes. After the restriction enzyme sites were radiolabeled as landmarks, the labeled fragments were subjected to high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In analyses of cDNA samples from adult mouse liver and brain (cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem) we detected approximately 500 and >1000 discrete gel spots respectively of various intensities at a time. The spot patterns of the three brain regions were very similar, although not identical, but were quite different from the pattern for the liver. RNA blot hybridization analysis using several cloned spot DNAs as probes showed that differences in intensity of the spots among RLCS profiles correlated well with expression levels of the corresponding mRNA species in the brain regions. Because the spots and their intensities reflect distinct mRNA species and their expression level respectively, the RLCS is a novel cDNA display system which provides a great deal of information and should be useful for systematic documentation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:8628652

  9. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  10. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S; Carvalho, Marcelo A; Woods, Nicholas T; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2016-01-01

    This protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions that are active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework for identifying candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning, allowing one to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in 8 weeks. PMID:26658467

  11. An optimal set of landmarks for metopic craniosynostosis diagnosis from shape analysis of pediatric CT scans of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos S.; Safdar, Nabile; Myers, Emmarie; Kittisarapong, Tanakorn; Rogers, Gary F.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2013-02-01

    Craniosynostosis (premature fusion of skull sutures) is a severe condition present in one of every 2000 newborns. Metopic craniosynostosis, accounting for 20-27% of cases, is diagnosed qualitatively in terms of skull shape abnormality, a subjective call of the surgeon. In this paper we introduce a new quantitative diagnostic feature for metopic craniosynostosis derived optimally from shape analysis of CT scans of the skull. We built a robust shape analysis pipeline that is capable of obtaining local shape differences in comparison to normal anatomy. Spatial normalization using 7-degree-of-freedom registration of the base of the skull is followed by a novel bone labeling strategy based on graph-cuts according to labeling priors. The statistical shape model built from 94 normal subjects allows matching a patient's anatomy to its most similar normal subject. Subsequently, the computation of local malformations from a normal subject allows characterization of the points of maximum malformation on each of the frontal bones adjacent to the metopic suture, and on the suture itself. Our results show that the malformations at these locations vary significantly (p<0.001) between abnormal/normal subjects and that an accurate diagnosis can be achieved using linear regression from these automatic measurements with an area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of 0.97.

  12. Improved restriction landmark cDNA scanning and its application to global analysis of genes regulated by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, K; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Kojima, S; Watanabe, S; Suzuki, H

    1998-07-30

    Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS) is a novel method by which more than 1000 genes can be simultaneously and quantitatively displayed as two-dimensional gel spots. Here we present an adaptation that allows an individual spot to correspond to a unique gene species without redundancy in more than two gel patterns. Using this improved RLCS, we examined global changes on the gene expression of PC12 cells before and after treatment with nerve growth factor. Among a total of 3000 spots, 21 (0.70%) and 91 (3.03%) spots newly appeared and became more intense with treatment. On the other hand, 15 (0.50%) and 44 (1.47%) spots disappeared, becoming less intense with treatment. These observations suggest that approx. 6% of the detected PC12 genes are up-(3.73%) or down-(1.97%) regulated when the cells differentiate to neuronal cells. In comparison with the results obtained using the expressed-sequence-tag approach, previously reported by Lee et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92 (1995) 8303-8307), RLCS should be useful for quantitatively examining the global change of differentially expressed genes of various expression levels. PMID:9714711

  13. Controlling false discoveries in genome scans for selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Olivier; Martins, Helena; Caye, Kevin; Schoville, Sean D

    2016-01-01

    Population differentiation (PD) and ecological association (EA) tests have recently emerged as prominent statistical methods to investigate signatures of local adaptation using population genomic data. Based on statistical models, these genomewide testing procedures have attracted considerable attention as tools to identify loci potentially targeted by natural selection. An important issue with PD and EA tests is that incorrect model specification can generate large numbers of false-positive associations. Spurious association may indeed arise when shared demographic history, patterns of isolation by distance, cryptic relatedness or genetic background are ignored. Recent works on PD and EA tests have widely focused on improvements of test corrections for those confounding effects. Despite significant algorithmic improvements, there is still a number of open questions on how to check that false discoveries are under control and implement test corrections, or how to combine statistical tests from multiple genome scan methods. This tutorial study provides a detailed answer to these questions. It clarifies the relationships between traditional methods based on allele frequency differentiation and EA methods and provides a unified framework for their underlying statistical tests. We demonstrate how techniques developed in the area of genomewide association studies, such as inflation factors and linear mixed models, benefit genome scan methods and provide guidelines for good practice while conducting statistical tests in landscape and population genomic applications. Finally, we highlight how the combination of several well-calibrated statistical tests can increase the power to reject neutrality, improving our ability to infer patterns of local adaptation in large population genomic data sets. PMID:26671840

  14. A new approach for using genome scans to detect recent positive selection in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Tang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scanning for signals of recent positive selection is essential for a comprehensive and systematic understanding of human adaptation. Here, we present a genomic survey of recent local selective sweeps, especially aimed at those nearly or recently completed. A novel approach was developed for such signals, based on contrasting the extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH profiles between populations. We applied this method to the genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data of both the International HapMap Project and Perlegen Sciences, and detected widespread signals of recent local selection across the genome, consisting of both complete and partial sweeps. A challenging problem of genomic scans of recent positive selection is to clearly distinguish selection from neutral effects, given the high sensitivity of the test statistics to departures from neutral demographic assumptions and the lack of a single, accurate neutral model of human history. We therefore developed a new procedure that is robust across a wide range of demographic and ascertainment models, one that indicates that certain portions of the genome clearly depart from neutrality. Simulations of positive selection showed that our tests have high power towards strong selection sweeps that have undergone fixation. Gene ontology analysis of the candidate regions revealed several new functional groups that might help explain some important interpopulation differences in phenotypic traits.

  15. Genome scan for meat quality traits in Nelore beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizioto, P C; Decker, J E; Taylor, J F; Schnabel, R D; Mudadu, M A; Silva, F L; Mourão, G B; Coutinho, L L; Tholon, P; Sonstegard, T S; Rosa, A N; Alencar, M M; Tullio, R R; Medeiros, S R; Nassu, R T; Feijó, G L D; Silva, L O C; Torres, R A; Siqueira, F; Higa, R H; Regitano, L C A

    2013-11-01

    Meat quality traits are economically important because they affect consumers' acceptance, which, in turn, influences the demand for beef. However, selection to improve meat quality is limited by the small numbers of animals on which meat tenderness can be evaluated due to the cost of performing shear force analysis and the resultant damage to the carcass. Genome wide-association studies for Warner-Bratzler shear force measured at different times of meat aging, backfat thickness, ribeye muscle area, scanning parameters [lightness, redness (a*), and yellowness] to ascertain color characteristics of meat and fat, water-holding capacity, cooking loss (CL), and muscle pH were conducted using genotype data from the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip array to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) in all phenotyped Nelore cattle. Phenotype count for these animals ranged from 430 to 536 across traits. Meat quality traits in Nelore are controlled by numerous QTL of small effect, except for a small number of large-effect QTL identified for a*fat, CL, and pH. Genomic regions harboring these QTL and the pathways in which the genes from these regions act appear to differ from those identified in taurine cattle for meat quality traits. These results will guide future QTL mapping studies and the development of models for the prediction of genetic merit to implement genomic selection for meat quality in Nelore cattle.

  16. Genome-Wide Scan for Methylation Profiles in Keloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamont R. Jones

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keloids are benign fibroproliferative tumors of the skin which commonly occur after injury mainly in darker skinned patients. Medical treatment is fraught with high recurrence rates mainly because of an incomplete understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to keloids. The purpose of this project was to examine keloid pathogenesis from the epigenome perspective of DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling used the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to interrogate DNA from 6 fresh keloid and 6 normal skin samples from 12 anonymous donors. A 3-tiered approach was used to call out genes most differentially methylated between keloid and normal. When compared to normal, of the 685 differentially methylated CpGs at Tier 3, 510 were hypomethylated and 175 were hypermethylated with 190 CpGs in promoter and 495 in nonpromoter regions. The 190 promoter region CpGs corresponded to 152 genes: 96 (63% were hypomethylated and 56 (37% hypermethylated. This exploratory genome-wide scan of the keloid methylome highlights a predominance of hypomethylated genomic landscapes, favoring nonpromoter regions. DNA methylation, as an additional mechanism for gene regulation in keloid pathogenesis, holds potential for novel treatments that reverse deleterious epigenetic changes. As an alternative mechanism for regulating genes, epigenetics may explain why gene mutations alone do not provide definitive mechanisms for keloid formation.

  17. Genome scan for linkage to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, C.L.; Livingston, J.; Williamson, R. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a familial, neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic, intermittent motor and vocal tics. In addition to tics, affected individuals frequently display symptoms such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive compulsive disorder. Genetic analyses of family data have suggested that susceptibility to the disorder is most likely due to a single genetic locus with a dominant mode of transmission and reduced penetrance. In the search for genetic linkage for TS, we have collected well-characterized pedigrees with multiple affected individuals on whom extensive diagnostic evaluations have been done. The first stage of our study is to scan the genome systematically using a panel of uniformly spaced (10 to 20 cM), highly polymorphic, microsatellite markers on 5 families segregating TS. To date, 290 markers have been typed and 3,660 non-overlapping cM of the genome have been excluded for possible linkage under the assumption of genetic homogeneity. Because of the possibility of locus heterogeneity overall summed exclusion is not considered tantamount to absolute exclusion of a disease locus in that region. The results from each family are carefully evaluated and a positive lod score in a single family is followed up by typing closely linked markers. Linkage to TS was examined by two-point analysis using the following genetic model: single autosomal dominant gene with gene frequency .003 and maximum penetrance of .99. An age-of-onset correction is included using a linear function increasing from age 2 years to 21 years. A small rate of phenocopies is also incorporated into the model. Only individuals with TS or CMT according to DSM III-R criteria were regarded as affected for the purposes of this summary. Additional markers are being tested to provide coverage at 5 cM intervals. Moreover, we are currently analyzing the data non-parametrically using the Affected-Pedigree-Member Method of linkage analysis.

  18. Comparative analysis of whole genome structure of Streptococcus suis using whole genome PCR scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak associated with Streptococcus suis infection in humans emerged in Sichuan province, China in 2005. The outbreak is atypical for the apparent large number of human cases, high fatality rate and geographical spread. To determine whether the bacterium has changed, we compared both human and animal isolates from the Sichuan outbreak with those collected previously within China and in other countries using whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScaning) comparative sequencing of several known virulence factor genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. WGPScanning analysis showed that all primer pairs yielded PCR products of the expected sizes in all four strains tested. The nucleotide sequences of all the detected virulence factor genes are identical in the four strains and MLST results showed that the four isolates studied and reference strain all belonged to the ST1 com-plex. No new genetic changes were found in the genome structure of the isolates from this Sichuan outbreak.

  19. Comparative analysis of whole genome structure of Streptococcus suis using whole genome PCR scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak associated with Streptococcus suis infection in humans emerged in Sichuan province, China in 2005. The outbreak is atypical for the apparent large number of human cases, high fatality rate and geographical spread. To determine whether the bacterium has changed, we compared both human and animal isolates from the Sichuan outbreak with those collected previously within China and in other countries using whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScaning) comparative sequencing of several known virulence factor genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. WGPScanning analysis showed that all primer pairs yielded PCR products of the expected sizes in all four strains tested. The nucleotide sequences of all the detected virulence factor genes are identical in the four strains and MLST results showed that the four isolates studied and reference strain all belonged to the ST1 complex. No new genetic changes were found in the genome structure of the isolates from this Sichuan outbreak.

  20. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using GeneScan and BLAST

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew M. Lynn; Chakresh Kumar Jain; K. Kosalai; Pranjan Barman; Nupur Thakur; Harish Batra; Alok Bhattacharya

    2001-04-01

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated annotation of genome DNA sequences.

  1. Genome scan for parent-of-origin QTL effects on bovine growth and carcass traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imumorin, I.G.; Kim, B.; Li, Y.; Koning, de D.J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Donato, S.

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We ident

  2. Genome Scan Meta-Analysis of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder, Part II: Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Cathryn M.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Wise, Lesley H.; Delisi, Lynn E.; Straub, Richard E.; Hovatta, Iiris; Williams, Nigel M.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Pulver, Ann E; Faraone, Stephen V.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Kaufmann, Charles A.; Garver, David L.; Gurling, Hugh M.D.; Lindholm, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common disorder with high heritability and a 10-fold increase in risk to siblings of probands. Replication has been inconsistent for reports of significant genetic linkage. To assess evidence for linkage across studies, rank-based genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) was applied to data from 20 schizophrenia genome scans. Each marker for each scan was assigned to 1 of 120 30-cM bins, with the bins ranked by linkage scores (1 = most significant) and the ranks averaged across stu...

  3. Genomic scans for selective sweeps using SNP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Williamson, Scott; Kim, Yuseob;

    2005-01-01

    Detecting selective sweeps from genomic SNP data is complicated by the intricate ascertainment schemes used to discover SNPs, and by the confounding influence of the underlying complex demographics and varying mutation and recombination rates. Current methods for detecting selective sweeps have...... little or no robustness to the demographic assumptions and varying recombination rates, and provide no method for correcting for ascertainment biases. Here, we present several new tests aimed at detecting selective sweeps from genomic SNP data. Using extensive simulations, we show that a new parametric...... test, based on composite likelihood, has a high power to detect selective sweeps and is surprisingly robust to assumptions regarding recombination rates and demography (i.e., has low Type I error). Our new test also provides estimates of the location of the selective sweep(s) and the magnitude...

  4. Ab initio gene identification: prokaryote genome annotation with GeneScan and GLIMMER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Aggarwal; Ramakrishna Ramaswamy

    2002-02-01

    We compare the annotation of three complete genomes using the ab initio methods of gene identification GeneScan and GLIMMER. The annotation given in GenBank, the standard against which these are compared, has been made using GeneMark. We find a number of novel genes which are predicted by both methods used here, as well as a number of genes that are predicted by GeneMark, but are not identified by either of the nonconsensus methods that we have used. The three organisms studied here are all prokaryotic species with fairly compact genomes. The Fourier measure forms the basis for an efficient non-consensus method for gene prediction, and the algorithm GeneScan exploits this measure. We have bench-marked this program as well as GLIMMER using 3 complete prokaryotic genomes. An effort has also been made to study the limitations of these techniques for complete genome analysis. GeneScan and GLIMMER are of comparable accuracy insofar as gene-identification is concerned, with sensitivities and specificities typically greater than 0.9. The number of false predictions (both positive and negative) is higher for GeneScan as compared to GLIMMER, but in a significant number of cases, similar results are provided by the two techniques. This suggests that there could be some as-yet unidentified additional genes in these three genomes, and also that some of the putative identifications made hitherto might require re-evaluation. All these cases are discussed in detail.

  5. Genome scan for parent-of-origin QTL effects on bovine growth and carcass traits

    OpenAIRE

    Ikhide G. Imumorin; Eun-Hee eKim; Yun-Mi eLee; Dirk-Jan eDe Koning; Johan eVan Arendonk; Marcos eDe Donato; Jeremy Francis Taylor; Jong-Joo eKim

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus x Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE-QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs) of which 6 were significant at 5% genome-wide level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15...

  6. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage scans of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Dempfle, Astrid; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Bakker, Steven C; Banaschewski, Tobias; Biederman, Joseph; Buitelaar, Jan; Castellanos, F Xavier; Doyle, Alysa; Ebstein, Richard P; Ekholm, Jenny; Forabosco, Paola; Franke, Barbara; Freitag, Christine; Friedel, Susann; Gill, Michael; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Jacob, Christian; Lesch, Klaus Peter; Loo, Sandra K; Lopera, Francisco; McCracken, James T; McGough, James J; Meyer, Jobst; Mick, Eric; Miranda, Ana; Muenke, Maximilian; Mulas, Fernando; Nelson, Stanley F; Nguyen, T Trang; Oades, Robert D; Ogdie, Matthew N; Palacio, Juan David; Pineda, David; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J; Roeyers, Herbert; Romanos, Marcel; Rothenberger, Aribert; Schäfer, Helmut; Sergeant, Joseph; Sinke, Richard J; Smalley, Susan L; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; van der Meulen, Emma; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Lewis, Cathryn M; Faraone, Stephen V; Asherson, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Genetic contribution to the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is well established. Seven independent genome-wide linkage scans have been performed to map loci that increase the risk for ADHD. Although significant linkage signals were identified in some of the studies, th

  7. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for bovine milk protein composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopen, G.C.B.; Koks, P.D.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Bovenhuis, H.; Visker, M.H.P.W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk protein composition in 849 Holstein–Friesian cows originating from seven sires. One morning milk sample was analysed for the major milk proteins using capillary zone electrophoresis. A gen

  8. Genome-wide scans using archived neonatal dried blood spot samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiuf Carsten

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of disease susceptible genes requires access to DNA from numerous well-characterised subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot samples from national newborn screening programs may provide DNA from entire populations and medical registries the corresponding clinical information. The amount of DNA available in these samples is however rarely sufficient for reliable genome-wide scans, and whole-genome amplification may thus be necessary. This study assess the quality of DNA obtained from different amplification protocols by evaluating fidelity and robustness of the genotyping of 610,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, using the Illumina Infinium HD Human610-Quad BeadChip. Whole-genome amplified DNA from 24 neonatal dried blood spot samples stored between 15 to 25 years was tested, and high-quality genomic DNA from 8 of the same individuals was used as reference. Results Using 3.2 mm disks from dried blood spot samples the optimal DNA-extraction and amplification protocol resulted in call-rates between 99.15% – 99.73% (mean 99.56%, N = 16, and conflicts with reference DNA in only three per 10,000 genotype calls. Conclusion Whole-genome amplified DNA from archived neonatal dried blood spot samples can be used for reliable genome-wide scans and is a cost-efficient alternative to collecting new samples.

  9. Landmarks in Insulin Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Colin W.; Lawrence, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of insulin and its role in the regulation of glucose uptake and utilization, there has been great interest in insulin, its structure and the way in which it interacts with its receptor and effects signal transduction. As the 90th anniversary of the discovery of insulin approaches, it is timely to provide an overview of the landmark discoveries relating to the structure and function of this remarkable molecule and its receptor.

  10. Combined amplification and hybridization techniques for genome scanning in vegetatively propagated crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of PCR- and hybridization-based genome scanning techniques and sequence comparisons between non-coding chloroplast DNA flanking tRNA genes has been employed to screen Dioscorea species for intra- and interspecific genetic diversity. This methodology detected extensive polymorphisms within Dioscorea bulbifera L., and revealed taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships among cultivated Guinea yams varieties and their potential wild progenitors. Finally, screening of yam germplasm grown in Jamaica permitted reliable discrimination between all major cultivars. Genome scanning by micro satellite-primed PCR (MP-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis in combination with the novel random amplified micro satellite polymorphisms (RAMPO) hybridization technique has shown high potential for the genetic analysis of yams, and holds promise for other vegetatively propagated orphan crops. (author)

  11. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A;

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early...... report represents one of the biggest genome scans so far reported for asthma related phenotypes. This study also demonstrates the utility of increased sample sizes and quantitative phenotypes in linkage analysis of complex disorders....

  12. Genome-wide association scan for five major dimensions of personality

    OpenAIRE

    Terracciano, Antonio; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Deiana, Barbara; Usala, Gianluca; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Scally, Matthew; Patriciu, Nicholas; Chen, Wei-Min; Distel, Marijn A.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Villafuerte, Sandra; Śliwerska, Elżbieta

    2008-01-01

    Personality traits are summarized by five broad dimensions with pervasive influences on major life outcomes, strong links to psychiatric disorders, and clear heritable components. To identify genetic variants associated with each of the five dimensions of personality we performed a genome wide association (GWA) scan of 3,972 individuals from a genetically isolated population within Sardinia, Italy. Based on analyses of 362,129 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) we found several strong sig...

  13. Non-random mate choice in humans: insights from a genome scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, R; Toupance, B; Chaix, R

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about the genetic factors influencing mate choice in humans. Still, there is evidence for non-random mate choice with respect to physical traits. In addition, some studies suggest that the Major Histocompatibility Complex may affect pair formation. Nowadays, the availability of high density genomic data sets gives the opportunity to scan the genome for signatures of non-random mate choice without prior assumptions on which genes may be involved, while taking into account socio-demographic factors. Here, we performed a genome scan to detect extreme patterns of similarity or dissimilarity among spouses throughout the genome in three populations of African, European American, and Mexican origins from the HapMap 3 database. Our analyses identified genes and biological functions that may affect pair formation in humans, including genes involved in skin appearance, morphogenesis, immunity and behaviour. We found little overlap between the three populations, suggesting that the biological functions potentially influencing mate choice are population specific, in other words are culturally driven. Moreover, whenever the same functional category of genes showed a significant signal in two populations, different genes were actually involved, which suggests the possibility of evolutionary convergences.

  14. Memory consolidation of landmarks in good navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Gabriele; Jansen, Clemens; van Turennout, Miranda

    2008-01-01

    Landmarks play an important role in successful navigation. To successfully find your way around an environment, navigationally relevant information needs to be stored and become available at later moments in time. Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies shows that the human parahippocampal gyrus encodes the navigational relevance of landmarks. In the present event-related fMRI experiment, we investigated memory consolidation of navigationally relevant landmarks in the medial temporal lobe after route learning. Sixteen right-handed volunteers viewed two film sequences through a virtual museum with objects placed at locations relevant (decision points) or irrelevant (nondecision points) for navigation. To investigate consolidation effects, one film sequence was seen in the evening before scanning, the other one was seen the following morning, directly before scanning. Event-related fMRI data were acquired during an object recognition task. Participants decided whether they had seen the objects in the previously shown films. After scanning, participants answered standardized questions about their navigational skills, and were divided into groups of good and bad navigators, based on their scores. An effect of memory consolidation was obtained in the hippocampus: Objects that were seen the evening before scanning (remote objects) elicited more activity than objects seen directly before scanning (recent objects). This increase in activity in bilateral hippocampus for remote objects was observed in good navigators only. In addition, a spatial-specific effect of memory consolidation for navigationally relevant objects was observed in the parahippocampal gyrus. Remote decision point objects induced increased activity as compared with recent decision point objects, again in good navigators only. The results provide initial evidence for a connection between memory consolidation and navigational ability that can provide a basis for successful

  15. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model.

  16. A genome-wide scan for Eysenckian personality dimensions in adolescent twin sibships: psychoticism, extraversion, neuroticism, and lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Nathan A; Zhu, Gu; Evans, David M; Medland, Sarah E; Wright, Margie J; Martin, Nick G

    2008-12-01

    We report the first genome-wide scan of adolescent personality. We conducted a genome-wide scan to detect linkage for measures of adolescent Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Lie from the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Data are based on 1,280 genotyped Australian adolescent twins and their siblings. The highest linkage peaks were found on chromosomes 16 and 19 for Neuroticism, on chromosomes 1, 7, 10, 13 m, and 18 for Psychoticism, and on chromosomes 2 and 3 for Extraversion.

  17. Genome Scan for Parent-of-Origin QTL Effects on Bovine Growth and Carcass Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imumorin, Ikhide G; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Yun-Mi; De Koning, Dirk-Jan; van Arendonk, Johan A; De Donato, Marcos; Taylor, Jeremy F; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE-QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs) of which six were significant at 5% genome-wide (GW) level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide (CW) significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15 were maternally expressed. Three QTL influencing post-weaning growth map to the proximal end of BTA2 (linkage region of 0-9 cM; genomic region of 5.0-10.8 Mb), for which only one imprinted ortholog is known so far in the human and mouse genomes, and therefore may potentially represent a novel imprinted region. The detected QTL individually explained 1.4 ∼ 5.1% of each trait's phenotypic variance. Comparative in silico analysis of bovine genomic locations show that 32 out of 1,442 known mammalian imprinted genes from human and mouse homologs map to the identified QTL regions. Although several of the 32 genes have been associated with quantitative traits in cattle, only two (GNAS and PEG3) have experimental proof of being imprinted in cattle. These results lend additional support to recent reports that POE on quantitative traits in mammals may be more common than previously thought, and strengthen the need to identify and experimentally validate cattle orthologs of imprinted genes so as to investigate their effects on quantitative traits.

  18. Genome scan for parent-of-origin QTL effects on bovine growth and carcass traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhide G. Imumorin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Parent-of-origin effects (POE such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus x Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE-QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs of which 6 were significant at 5% genome-wide level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15 were maternally expressed. Three QTL influencing post-weaning growth map to the proximal end of BTA2 [linkage region of 0 – 9 cM; genomic region of 5.0 – 10.8 Mb], for which only one imprinted orthologue is known so far in the human and mouse genomes, and therefore may potentially represent a novel imprinted region. The detected QTL individually explained 1.4% ~ 5.1% of each trait’s phenotypic variance. Comparative in-silico analysis of bovine genomic locations show that 32 out of 1,442 known mammalian imprinted genes from human and mouse homologues map to the identified QTL regions. Although several of the 32 genes have been associated with quantitative traits in cattle, only 2 (GNAS and PEG3 have experimental proof of being imprinted in cattle. These results lend additional support to recent reports that POE on quantitative traits in mammals may be more common than previously thought, and strengthen the need to identify and experimentally validate cattle orthologues of imprinted genes so as to investigate their effects on quantitative traits.

  19. Genome Scan for Parent-of-Origin QTL Effects on Bovine Growth and Carcass Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imumorin, Ikhide G; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Yun-Mi; De Koning, Dirk-Jan; van Arendonk, Johan A; De Donato, Marcos; Taylor, Jeremy F; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE-QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs) of which six were significant at 5% genome-wide (GW) level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide (CW) significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15 were maternally expressed. Three QTL influencing post-weaning growth map to the proximal end of BTA2 (linkage region of 0-9 cM; genomic region of 5.0-10.8 Mb), for which only one imprinted ortholog is known so far in the human and mouse genomes, and therefore may potentially represent a novel imprinted region. The detected QTL individually explained 1.4 ∼ 5.1% of each trait's phenotypic variance. Comparative in silico analysis of bovine genomic locations show that 32 out of 1,442 known mammalian imprinted genes from human and mouse homologs map to the identified QTL regions. Although several of the 32 genes have been associated with quantitative traits in cattle, only two (GNAS and PEG3) have experimental proof of being imprinted in cattle. These results lend additional support to recent reports that POE on quantitative traits in mammals may be more common than previously thought, and strengthen the need to identify and experimentally validate cattle orthologs of imprinted genes so as to investigate their effects on quantitative traits. PMID:22303340

  20. Combined genome scans for body stature in 6,602 European twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perola, Markus; Sammalisto, Sampo; Hiekkalinna, Tero;

    2007-01-01

    Twin cohorts provide a unique advantage for investigations of the role of genetics and environment in the etiology of variation in common complex traits by reducing the variance due to environment, age, and cohort differences. The GenomEUtwin (http://www.genomeutwin.org) consortium consists...... of eight twin cohorts (Australian, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, and United Kingdom) with the total resource of hundreds of thousands of twin pairs. We performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of one of the most heritable human complex traits, adult stature (body height......) using genome-wide scans performed for 3,817 families (8,450 individuals) derived from twin cohorts from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Netherlands, Sweden, and United Kingdom with an approximate ten-centimorgan microsatellite marker map. The marker maps for different studies differed and they were...

  1. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/software/baypass/.

  2. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  3. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  4. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Nielsen, M; Lamberth, K;

    2004-01-01

    of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design.......An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes......-CoV) was isolated and full-length sequenced (Marra et al., Science 2003: 300: 1399-404). Here, we have combined advanced bioinformatics and high-throughput immunology to perform an HLA supertype-, genome-wide scan for SARS-specific CTL epitopes. The scan includes all nine human HLA supertypes in total covering >99...

  5. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C.; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.;

    2004-01-01

    of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design.......An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes......-CoV) was isolated and full-length sequenced (Marra et al., Science 2003: 300: 1399404). Here, we have combined advanced bioinformatics and high-throughput immunology to perform an HLA supertype-, genome-wide scan for SARS-specific CTL epitopes. The scan includes all nine human HLA supertypes in total covering >99...

  6. HybGFS: a hybrid method for genome-fingerprint scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Naoyuki

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein identification based on mass spectrometry (MS has previously been performed using peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF or tandem MS (MS/MS database searching. However, these methods cannot identify proteins that are not already listed in existing databases. Moreover, the alternative approach of de novo sequencing requires costly equipment and the interpretation of complex MS/MS spectra. Thus, there is a need for novel high-throughput protein-identification methods that are independent of existing predefined protein databases. Results Here, we present a hybrid method for genome-fingerprint scanning, known as HybGFS. This technique combines genome sequence-based peptide MS/MS ion searching with liquid-chromatography elution-time (LC-ET prediction, to improve the reliability of identification. The hybrid method allows the simultaneous identification and mapping of proteins without a priori information about their coding sequences. The current study used standard LC-MS/MS data to query an in silico-generated six-reading-frame translation and the enzymatic digest of an entire genome. Used in conjunction with precursor/product ion-mass searching, the LC-ETs increased confidence in the peptide-identification process and reduced the number of false-positive matches. The power of this method was demonstrated using recombinant proteins from the Escherichia coli K12 strain. Conclusion The novel hybrid method described in this study will be useful for the large-scale experimental confirmation of genome coding sequences, without the need for transcriptome-level expression analysis or costly MS database searching.

  7. A genome scan for type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci in a genetically isolated population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permutt, M A; Wasson, J C; Suarez, B K; Lin, J; Thomas, J; Meyer, J; Lewitzky, S; Rennich, J S; Parker, A; DuPrat, L; Maruti, S; Chayen, S; Glaser, B

    2001-03-01

    A total of 896 individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent were ascertained in Israel from 267 multiplex families, including 472 sib-pairs affected with type 2 diabetes. A genome-wide scan with average marker spacing of 9.5 cM revealed five regions on four chromosomes (4q, 8q, 14q, and 20q) that exhibited nominal evidence for linkage (P families were ranked by BMI (in increasing order) did a subset attain nominal significance, and only for chromosome 4. The findings reported here lend credence to the hypothesis, now supported by four studies of Caucasian populations and most recently by a combined analysis of 1,852 pedigrees, that a type 2 diabetes susceptibility locus resides on chromosome 20q. This population, because of its unique genetic attributes, may facilitate identification of this and other genes contributing to type 2 diabetes. PMID:11246891

  8. Scanning for signatures of geographically restricted selection based on population genomics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Natural selection, as the driving force of human evolution, has direct impact on population differentiation. However, it is still unclear to what extent the genetic differentiation has been caused by natural selection. To explore this question, we performed a genome-wide scan with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the International HapMap Project. Single locus FST analysis was applied to assess the frequency difference among populations in autosomes. Based on the empirical distribution of FST, we identified 12669 SNPs correlating to population differentiation and 1853 candidate genes subjected to geographic restricted natural selection. Further interpretation of gene ontogeny revealed 121 categories of biological process with the enrichments of candidate genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may play an important role in human population differentiation. In addition, our analysis provides new clues as well as research methods for our understanding of population differentiation and natural selection.

  9. Efficient strategies for genome scanning using maximum-likelihood affected-sib-pair analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmans, P.; Craddock, N. [Univ. of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Detection of linkage with a systematic genome scan in nuclear families including an affected sibling pair is an important initial step on the path to cloning susceptibility genes for complex genetic disorders, and it is desirable to optimize the efficiency of such studies. The aim is to maximize power while simultaneously minimizing the total number of genotypings and probability of type I error. One approach to increase efficiency, which has been investigated by other workers, is grid tightening: a sample is initially typed using a coarse grid of markers, and promising results are followed up by use of a finer grid. Another approach, not previously considered in detail in the context of an affected-sib-pair genome scan for linkage, is sample splitting: a portion of the sample is typed in the screening stage, and promising results are followed up in the whole sample. In the current study, we have used computer simulation to investigate the relative efficiency of two-stage strategies involving combinations of both grid tightening and sample splitting and found that the optimal strategy incorporates both approaches. In general, typing half the sample of affected pairs with a coarse grid of markers in the screening stage is an efficient strategy under a variety of conditions. If Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds, it is most efficient not to type parents in the screening stage. If Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold (e.g., because of stratification) failure to type parents in the first stage increases the amount of genotyping required, although the overall probability of type I error is not greatly increased, provided the parents are used in the final analysis. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to Trichostrongylus colubriformis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, K J; Hulme, D J; Callaghan, M J; Leish, Z; Lenane, I; Windon, R G; Maddox, J F

    2002-04-01

    A genome linkage scan was carried out using a resource flock of 1029 sheep in six half-sib families. The families were offspring of sires derived by crossing divergent lines of sheep selected for response to challenge with the intestinal parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis. All animals in the resource flock were phenotypically assessed for worm resistance soon after weaning using a vaccination/challenge regime. After correcting for fixed effects using a least squares linear model the faecal egg count data obtained following the first challenge and the faecal egg count data obtained after the second challenge were designated Trait 1 and Trait 2, respectively. A total of 472 lambs drawn from the phenotypic extremes of the Trait 2 faecal egg count distribution were genotyped with a panel of 133 microsatellite markers covering all 26 sheep autosomes. Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for each of the faecal egg count traits was determined using interval analysis with the Animap program with recombination rates between markers derived from an existing marker map. No chromosomal regions attained genome-wide significance for QTL influencing either of the traits. However, one region attained chromosome-wide significance and five other regions attained point-wise significance for the presence of QTL affecting parasite resistance.

  11. Genome-wide Scan of 29,141 African Americans Finds No Evidence of Directional Selection since Admixture

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The extent of recent selection in admixed populations is currently an unresolved question. We scanned the genomes of 29,141 African Americans and failed to find any genome-wide-significant deviations in local ancestry, indicating no evidence of selection influencing ancestry after admixture. A recent analysis of data from 1,890 African Americans reported that there was evidence of selection in African Americans after their ancestors left Africa, both before and after admixture. Selection afte...

  12. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for bovine milk protein composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopen, G C B; Koks, P D; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H; Visker, M H P W

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk protein composition in 849 Holstein-Friesian cows originating from seven sires. One morning milk sample was analysed for the major milk proteins using capillary zone electrophoresis. A genetic map was constructed with 1341 single nucleotide polymorphisms, covering 2829 centimorgans (cM) and 95% of the cattle genome. The chromosomal regions most significantly related to milk protein composition (P(genome) casein, alpha(S2)-casein, beta-casein and kappa-casein. The QTL on BTA11 was found at 124 cM, and affected beta-lactoglobulin, and the QTL on BTA14 was found at 0 cM, and affected protein percentage. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTL was 3.6% for beta-casein and 7.9% for kappa-casein on BTA6, 28.3% for beta-lactoglobulin on BTA11, and 8.6% for protein percentage on BTA14. The QTL affecting alpha(S2)-casein on BTA6 and 17 showed a significant interaction. We investigated the extent to which the detected QTL affecting milk protein composition could be explained by known polymorphisms in beta-casein, kappa-casein, beta-lactoglobulin and DGAT1 genes. Correction for these polymorphisms decreased the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTL previously found on BTA6, 11 and 14. Thus, several significant QTL affecting milk protein composition were found, of which some QTL could partially be explained by polymorphisms in milk protein genes.

  13. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting body conformation traits in Spanish Churra dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Alvarez, L; de la Fuente, L F; Sanchez, J P; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J J

    2011-08-01

    A genome scan for chromosomal regions influencing body conformation traits was conducted for a population of Spanish Churra dairy sheep following a daughter design. A total of 739 ewes from 11 half-sib sire families were included in the study. The ewes were scored for the 5 linear traits used in the breeding scheme of the Churra breed to assess body conformation: stature, rear legs-rear view, foot angle, rump width, and general appearance. All the animals, including the 11 sires, were genotyped for 181 microsatellite markers evenly distributed across the 26 sheep autosomes. Using the yield deviations of the raw scores adjusted for fixed factors as phenotypic measurements, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed on the basis of a multi-marker regression method. Seven suggestive QTL were identified on chromosomes Ovis aries (OAR)2, OAR5, OAR16, OAR23, and OAR26, but none reached a genome-wise significance level. Putative QTL were identified for all of the traits analyzed, except for general appearance score. The suggestive QTL showing the highest test statistic influenced rear legs-rear view and was localized on OAR16, close to the growth hormone receptor coding gene, GHR. Some of the putative linkage associations reported here are consistent with previously reported QTL in cattle for similar traits. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first report of QTL for body conformation traits in dairy sheep; further studies will be needed to confirm and redefine the linkage associations reported herein. It is expected that future genome-wide association analyses of larger families will help identify genes underlying these putative genetic effects and provide useful markers for marker-assisted selection of such functional traits.

  14. Genome-wide scan of 29,141 African Americans finds no evidence of selection since admixture

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Tandon, Arti; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; William J Blot; Bock, Cathryn H.; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    We scanned through the genomes of 29,141 African Americans, searching for loci where the average proportion of African ancestry deviates significantly from the genome-wide average. We failed to find any genome-wide significant deviations, and conclude that any selection in African Americans since admixture is sufficiently weak that it falls below the threshold of our power to detect it using a large sample size. These results stand in contrast to the findings of a recent study of selection in...

  15. Selecting landmarks in novel environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jared; Carlson, Laura

    2011-02-01

    People use salient landmarks when learning a route through a novel environment. However, it is not clear what makes a given landmark salient. In two experiments, subjects learned a route through a virtual museum, performed a recognition memory test for objects in the museum, and provided spatial descriptions and drew maps of the learned route. Objects with strong perceptual features occurred at decision points or at non-decision points along the route. Objects with both of these features were recognized faster and were included more often in the maps and written directions. When these features were separated, perceptual features maintained a strong influence on the recognition task, but had no influence on the spatial tasks, which were influenced only by spatial features. These findings challenge the idea that either a recognition task or descriptive task alone provides a complete account of landmark representation. PMID:21327344

  16. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Identifying signatures of natural selection in Tibetan and Andean populations using dense genome scan data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Bigham

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude hypoxia (reduced inspired oxygen tension due to decreased barometric pressure exerts severe physiological stress on the human body. Two high-altitude regions where humans have lived for millennia are the Andean Altiplano and the Tibetan Plateau. Populations living in these regions exhibit unique circulatory, respiratory, and hematological adaptations to life at high altitude. Although these responses have been well characterized physiologically, their underlying genetic basis remains unknown. We performed a genome scan to identify genes showing evidence of adaptation to hypoxia. We looked across each chromosome to identify genomic regions with previously unknown function with respect to altitude phenotypes. In addition, groups of genes functioning in oxygen metabolism and sensing were examined to test the hypothesis that particular pathways have been involved in genetic adaptation to altitude. Applying four population genetic statistics commonly used for detecting signatures of natural selection, we identified selection-nominated candidate genes and gene regions in these two populations (Andeans and Tibetans separately. The Tibetan and Andean patterns of genetic adaptation are largely distinct from one another, with both populations showing evidence of positive natural selection in different genes or gene regions. Interestingly, one gene previously known to be important in cellular oxygen sensing, EGLN1 (also known as PHD2, shows evidence of positive selection in both Tibetans and Andeans. However, the pattern of variation for this gene differs between the two populations. Our results indicate that several key HIF-regulatory and targeted genes are responsible for adaptation to high altitude in Andeans and Tibetans, and several different chromosomal regions are implicated in the putative response to selection. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaption and provide a basis for future genotype/phenotype association

  18. The Great American Landmarks Adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Kay

    This profusely illustrated booklet, written primarly for school children, includes drawings and descriptions of 43 of the National Historic Landmarks located in the United States. The accounts move chronologically from prehistoric cave paintings through the moon rocks collected by the Apollo astronauts in 1969. Most of the drawings represent the…

  19. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A.; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identifi...

  20. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A.; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−119), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified l...

  1. A genome scan for QTL affecting resistance to Haemonchus contortus in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallé, G; Jacquiet, P; Gruner, L; Cortet, J; Sauvé, C; Prévot, F; Grisez, C; Bergeaud, J P; Schibler, L; Tircazes, A; François, D; Pery, C; Bouvier, F; Thouly, J C; Brunel, J C; Legarra, A; Elsen, J M; Bouix, J; Rupp, R; Moreno, C R

    2012-12-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are one of the main health issues in sheep breeding. To identify loci affecting the resistance to Haemonchus contortus, a genome scan was carried out using 1,275 Romane × Martinik Black Belly backcross lambs. The entire population was challenged with Haemonchus contortus in 2 consecutive experimental infections, and fecal egg counts (FEC) and packed cell volumes were measured. A subgroup of 332 lambs with extreme FEC was necropsied to determine the total worm burden, length of female worms, sex ratio in the worm population, abomasal pH, and serum and mucosal G immunoglobulins (IgG) responses. Pepsinogen concentration was measured in another subset of 229 lambs. For QTL detection, 160 microsatellite markers were used as well as the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip that provided 42,469 SNP markers after quality control. Linkage, association, and joint linkage and association analyses were performed with the QTLMAP software. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was estimated within each pure breed, and association analyses were carried out either considering or not the breed origin of the haplotypes. Four QTL regions on sheep chromosomes (OAR)5, 12, 13, and 21 were identified as key players among many other QTL with small to moderate effects. A QTL on OAR21 affecting pepsinogen concentration exactly matched the pepsinogen (PGA5) locus. A 10-Mbp region affecting FEC after the 1st and 2nd infections was found on OAR12. The SNP markers outperformed microsatellites in the linkage analysis. Taking advantage of the LD helped to refine the locations of the QTL mapped on OAR5 and 13.

  2. Cross-laboratory validation of the OncoScan® FFPE Assay, a multiplex tool for whole genome tumour profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Joseph M.; Oumie, Assa; Togneri, Fiona S.; Vasques, Fabiana Ramos; Hau, Debra; Taylor, Morag; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma; Southward, Katie; Medlow, Paul; McGreeghan-Crosby, Keith; Halfpenny, Iris; McMullan, Dominic J.; Quirke, Phil; Keating, Katherine E; Griffiths, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Adoption of new technology in both basic research and clinical settings requires rigorous validation of analytical performance. The OncoScan® FFPE Assay is a multiplexing tool that offers genome-wide copy number and loss of heterozygosity detection, as well as identification of frequently tested somatic mutations. Methods In this study, 162 formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples, representing six different tumour types, were profiled in triplicate across three independent laborat...

  3. A scan statistic to extract causal gene clusters from case-control genome-wide rare CNV data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer Stephen W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several statistical tests have been developed for analyzing genome-wide association data by incorporating gene pathway information in terms of gene sets. Using these methods, hundreds of gene sets are typically tested, and the tested gene sets often overlap. This overlapping greatly increases the probability of generating false positives, and the results obtained are difficult to interpret, particularly when many gene sets show statistical significance. Results We propose a flexible statistical framework to circumvent these problems. Inspired by spatial scan statistics for detecting clustering of disease occurrence in the field of epidemiology, we developed a scan statistic to extract disease-associated gene clusters from a whole gene pathway. Extracting one or a few significant gene clusters from a global pathway limits the overall false positive probability, which results in increased statistical power, and facilitates the interpretation of test results. In the present study, we applied our method to genome-wide association data for rare copy-number variations, which have been strongly implicated in common diseases. Application of our method to a simulated dataset demonstrated the high accuracy of this method in detecting disease-associated gene clusters in a whole gene pathway. Conclusions The scan statistic approach proposed here shows a high level of accuracy in detecting gene clusters in a whole gene pathway. This study has provided a sound statistical framework for analyzing genome-wide rare CNV data by incorporating topological information on the gene pathway.

  4. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  5. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-03-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair.

  6. An Evaluation of Cellular Neural Networks for the Automatic Identification of Cephalometric Landmarks on Digital Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Leonardi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several efforts have been made to completely automate cephalometric analysis by automatic landmark search. However, accuracy obtained was worse than manual identification in every study. The analogue-to-digital conversion of X-ray has been claimed to be the main problem. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to evaluate the accuracy of the Cellular Neural Networks approach for automatic location of cephalometric landmarks on softcopy of direct digital cephalometric X-rays. Forty-one, direct-digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained by a Siemens Orthophos DS Ceph and were used in this study and 10 landmarks (N, A Point, Ba, Po, Pt, B Point, Pg, PM, UIE, LIE were the object of automatic landmark identification. The mean errors and standard deviations from the best estimate of cephalometric points were calculated for each landmark. Differences in the mean errors of automatic and manual landmarking were compared with a 1-way analysis of variance. The analyses indicated that the differences were very small, and they were found at most within 0.59 mm. Furthermore, only few of these differences were statistically significant, but differences were so small to be in most instances clinically meaningless. Therefore the use of X-ray files with respect to scanned X-ray improved landmark accuracy of automatic detection. Investigations on softcopy of digital cephalometric X-rays, to search more landmarks in order to enable a complete automatic cephalometric analysis, are strongly encouraged.

  7. A general and efficient method for estimating continuous IBD functions for use in genome scans for QTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlborg Örjan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identity by descent (IBD matrix estimation is a central component in mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL using variance component models. A large number of algorithms have been developed for estimation of IBD between individuals in populations at discrete locations in the genome for use in genome scans to detect QTL affecting various traits of interest in experimental animal, human and agricultural pedigrees. Here, we propose a new approach to estimate IBD as continuous functions rather than as discrete values. Results Estimation of IBD functions improved the computational efficiency and memory usage in genome scanning for QTL. We have explored two approaches to obtain continuous marker-bracket IBD-functions. By re-implementing an existing and fast deterministic IBD-estimation method, we show that this approach results in IBD functions that produces the exact same IBD as the original algorithm, but with a greater than 2-fold improvement of the computational efficiency and a considerably lower memory requirement for storing the resulting genome-wide IBD. By developing a general IBD function approximation algorithm, we show that it is possible to estimate marker-bracket IBD functions from IBD matrices estimated at marker locations by any existing IBD estimation algorithm. The general algorithm provides approximations that lead to QTL variance component estimates that even in worst-case scenarios are very similar to the true values. The approach of storing IBD as polynomial IBD-function was also shown to reduce the amount of memory required in genome scans for QTL. Conclusion In addition to direct improvements in computational and memory efficiency, estimation of IBD-functions is a fundamental step needed to develop and implement new efficient optimization algorithms for high precision localization of QTL. Here, we discuss and test two approaches for estimating IBD functions based on existing IBD estimation algorithms. Our

  8. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  9. Localization of skeletal and aortic landmarks in trauma CT data based on the discriminative generalized Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Hansis, Eberhard; Weese, Jürgen; Carolus, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography is the modality of choice for poly-trauma patients to assess rapidly skeletal and vascular integrity of the whole body. Often several scans with and without contrast medium or with different spatial resolution are acquired. Efficient reading of the resulting extensive set of image data is vital, since it is often time critical to initiate the necessary therapeutic actions. A set of automatically found landmarks can facilitate navigation in the data and enables anatomy oriented viewing. Following this intention, we selected a comprehensive set of 17 skeletal and 5 aortic landmarks. Landmark localization models for the Discriminative Generalized Hough Transform (DGHT) were automatically created based on a set of about 20 training images with ground truth landmark positions. A hierarchical setup with 4 resolution levels was used. Localization results were evaluated on a separate test set, consisting of 50 to 128 images (depending on the landmark) with available ground truth landmark locations. The image data covers a large amount of variability caused by differences of field-of-view, resolution, contrast agent, patient gender and pathologies. The median localization error for the set of aortic landmarks was 14.4 mm and for the set of skeleton landmarks 5.5 mm. Median localization errors for individual landmarks ranged from 3.0 mm to 31.0 mm. The runtime performance for the whole landmark set is about 5s on a typical PC.

  10. Whole genome PCR scanning reveals the syntenic genome structure of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae strains in the O1/O139 population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Pang

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is commonly found in estuarine water systems. Toxigenic O1 and O139 V. cholerae strains have caused cholera epidemics and pandemics, whereas the nontoxigenic strains within these serogroups only occasionally lead to disease. To understand the differences in the genome and clonality between the toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139, we employed a whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScanning method, an rrn operon-mediated fragment rearrangement analysis and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to analyze the genome structure of different strains. WGPScanning in conjunction with CGH revealed that the genomic contents of the toxigenic strains were conservative, except for a few indels located mainly in mobile elements. Minor nucleotide variation in orthologous genes appeared to be the major difference between the toxigenic strains. rrn operon-mediated rearrangements were infrequent in El Tor toxigenic strains tested using I-CeuI digested pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis and PCR analysis based on flanking sequence of rrn operons. Using these methods, we found that the genomic structures of toxigenic El Tor and O139 strains were syntenic. The nontoxigenic strains exhibited more extensive sequence variations, but toxin coregulated pilus positive (TCP+ strains had a similar structure. TCP+ nontoxigenic strains could be subdivided into multiple lineages according to the TCP type, suggesting the existence of complex intermediates in the evolution of toxigenic strains. The data indicate that toxigenic O1 El Tor and O139 strains were derived from a single lineage of intermediates from complex clones in the environment. The nontoxigenic strains with non-El Tor type TCP may yet evolve into new epidemic clones after attaining toxigenic attributes.

  11. A bi-dimensional genome scan for prolificacy traits in pigs shows the existence of multiple epistatic QTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidanel Jean P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolificacy is the most important trait influencing the reproductive efficiency of pig production systems. The low heritability and sex-limited expression of prolificacy have hindered to some extent the improvement of this trait through artificial selection. Moreover, the relative contributions of additive, dominant and epistatic QTL to the genetic variance of pig prolificacy remain to be defined. In this work, we have undertaken this issue by performing one-dimensional and bi-dimensional genome scans for number of piglets born alive (NBA and total number of piglets born (TNB in a three generation Iberian by Meishan F2 intercross. Results The one-dimensional genome scan for NBA and TNB revealed the existence of two genome-wide highly significant QTL located on SSC13 (P SSC17 (P P P P P Conclusions The complex inheritance of prolificacy traits in pigs has been evidenced by identifying multiple additive (SSC13 and SSC17, dominant and epistatic QTL in an Iberian × Meishan F2 intercross. Our results demonstrate that a significant fraction of the phenotypic variance of swine prolificacy traits can be attributed to first-order gene-by-gene interactions emphasizing that the phenotypic effects of alleles might be strongly modulated by the genetic background where they segregate.

  12. An international collaborative family-based whole genome quantitative trait linkage scan for myopic refractive error

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Diana; Li, Yi-Ju; Guggenheim, Jeremy A;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate quantitative trait loci linked to refractive error, we performed a genome-wide quantitative trait linkage analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism markers and family data from five international sites....

  13. A Genome-Wide Scan for Breast Cancer Risk Haplotypes among African American Women

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Chi; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Jennifer J Hu; Ziegler, Regina G.; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V.; Sue A Ingles; Michael F. Press; Deming, Sandra L.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) simultaneously investigating hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have become a powerful tool in the investigation of new disease susceptibility loci. Haplotypes are sometimes thought to be superior to SNPs and are promising in genetic association analyses. The application of genome-wide haplotype analysis, however, is hindered by the complexity of haplotypes themselves and sophistication in computation. We systematically analyz...

  14. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); J.C. Randall (Joshua); C. Lamina (Claudia); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); L. Qi (Lu); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); C.J. Willer (Cristen); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Lim (Noha); P. Scheet (Paul); N. Soranzo (Nicole); N. Amin (Najaf); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.C. Chambers (John); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Luan; H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sanna (Serena); N. Timpson (Nicholas); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); H.Z. Jing; P. Almgren (Peter); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Cherkas (Lynn); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); C. Cooper (Charles); G. Crawford (Gabe); A. Doering (Angela); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); P. Elliott (Paul); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G. Fischer (Guido); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); C. Guiducci (Candace); D. Hadley (David); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); J.W. Holloway (John); T. Illig (Thomas); B. Isomaa (Bo); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); K. Jameson (Karen); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Nordström (Anna); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); F. Payne (Felicity); J. Peden (John); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Renström (Frida); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Song (Kijoung); X. Yuan (Xin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zhang (Cuilin); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G.D. Smith; I.N.M. Day (Ian); P.W. Franks (Paul); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.R. Jarvelin; A. Kong (Augustine); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); M. Laakso (Markku); E. Lakatta (Edward); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Waterworth (Dawn); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); D.J. Hunter (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); D. Schlessinger (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); I. Barroso (Inês); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evid

  15. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S.; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J.; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Boelte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R.; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H.; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M.; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Lionel, Anath C.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R.; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J.; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F.; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; osey, David J.; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Bierut, Laura J.; Rice, John P.; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Ines; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cantor, Rita M.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L.; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nurnberger, John I.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD fa

  16. A genome-wide scan for breast cancer risk haplotypes among African American women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Song

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS simultaneously investigating hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP have become a powerful tool in the investigation of new disease susceptibility loci. Haplotypes are sometimes thought to be superior to SNPs and are promising in genetic association analyses. The application of genome-wide haplotype analysis, however, is hindered by the complexity of haplotypes themselves and sophistication in computation. We systematically analyzed the haplotype effects for breast cancer risk among 5,761 African American women (3,016 cases and 2,745 controls using a sliding window approach on the genome-wide scale. Three regions on chromosomes 1, 4 and 18 exhibited moderate haplotype effects. Furthermore, among 21 breast cancer susceptibility loci previously established in European populations, 10p15 and 14q24 are likely to harbor novel haplotype effects. We also proposed a heuristic of determining the significance level and the effective number of independent tests by the permutation analysis on chromosome 22 data. It suggests that the effective number was approximately half of the total (7,794 out of 15,645, thus the half number could serve as a quick reference to evaluating genome-wide significance if a similar sliding window approach of haplotype analysis is adopted in similar populations using similar genotype density.

  17. Enhancing SAT Based Planning with Landmark Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elffers, J.; Konijnenberg, D.; Walraven, E.M.P.; Spaan, M.T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Several approaches exist to solve Artificial Intelligence planning problems, but little attention has been given to the combination of using landmark knowledge and satisfiability (SAT). Landmark knowledge has been exploited successfully in the heuristics of classical planning. Recently it was also s

  18. Efficient Haplotype Inference Algorithms in One Whole Genome Scan for Pedigree Data with Non-genotyped Founders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongxi Cheng; Hadi Sabaa; Zhipeng Cai; Randy Goebel; Guohui Lin

    2009-01-01

    An efficient rule-based algorithm is presented for haplotype inference from general pedigree genotype data, with the assumption of no recombination. This algorithm generalizes previous algorithms to handle the cases where some pedigree founders are not genotyped, provided that for each nuclear family at least one parent is genotyped and each non-genotyped founder appears in exactly one nuclear family. The importance of this generalization lies in that such cases frequently happen in real data, because some founders may have passed away and their genotype data can no longer be collected. The algorithm runs in O(m3n3) time, where m is the number of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci under consideration and n is the number of genotyped members in the pedigree. This zero-recombination haplotyping algorithm is extended to a maximum parsimoniously haplotyping algorithm in one whole genome scan to minimize the total number of breakpoint sites, or equivalently, the number of maximal zero-recombination chromosomal regions. We show that such a whole genome scan haplotyping algorithm can be implemented in O(m3n3) time in a novel incremental fashion,here m denotes the total number of SNP loci along the chromosome.

  19. Genome scan for quantitative trait loci influencing HDL levels: evidence for multilocus inheritance in familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, France; Jarvik, Gail P; Badzioch, Michael D; Motulsky, Arno G; Brunzell, John D; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2005-09-01

    Several genome scans in search of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been performed. However, to date the actual identification of genes implicated in the regulation of common forms of HDL abnormalities remains unsuccessful. This may be due, in part, to the oligogenic and multivariate nature of HDL regulation, and potentially, pleiotropy affecting HDL and other lipid-related traits. Using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach, we recently provided evidence of linkage of HDL level variation to the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex, in familial combined hyperlipidemia pedigrees, with an estimated number of two to three large QTLs remaining to be identified. We also presented results consistent with pleiotropy affecting HDL and triglycerides at the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex. Here we use the same MCMC analytic strategy, which allows for oligogenic trait models, as well as simultaneous incorporation of covariates, in the context of multipoint analysis. We now present results from a genome scan in search for the additional HDL QTLs in these pedigrees. We provide evidence of linkage for additional HDL QTLs on chromosomes 3p14 and 13q32, with results on chromosome 3 further supported by maximum parametric and variance component LOD scores of 3.0 and 2.6, respectively. Weaker evidence of linkage was also obtained for 7q32, 12q12, 14q31-32 and 16q23-24.

  20. A 2cM genome-wide scan of European Holstein cattle affected by classical BSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Aparna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is an acquired prion disease that is invariably fatal in cattle and has been implicated as a significant human health risk. Polymorphisms that alter the prion protein of sheep or humans have been associated with variations in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy susceptibility or resistance. In contrast, there is no strong evidence that non-synonymous mutations in the bovine prion gene (PRNP are associated with classical BSE disease susceptibility. However, two bovine PRNP insertion/deletion polymorphisms, one within the promoter region and the other in intron 1, have been associated with susceptibility to classical BSE. These associations do not explain the full extent of BSE susceptibility, and loci outside of PRNP appear to be associated with disease incidence in some cattle populations. To test for associations with BSE susceptibility, we conducted a genome wide scan using a panel of 3,072 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers on 814 animals representing cases and control Holstein cattle from the United Kingdom BSE epidemic. Results Two sets of BSE affected Holstein cattle were analyzed in this study, one set with known family relationships and the second set of paired cases with controls. The family set comprises half-sibling progeny from six sires. The progeny from four of these sires had previously been scanned with microsatellite markers. The results obtained from the current analysis of the family set yielded both some supporting and new results compared with those obtained in the earlier study. The results revealed 27 SNPs representing 18 chromosomes associated with incidence of BSE disease. These results confirm a region previously reported on chromosome 20, and identify additional regions on chromosomes 2, 14, 16, 21 and 28. This study did not identify a significant association near the PRNP in the family sample set. The only association found in the PRNP

  1. Haptic Landmark Positioning and Automatic Landmark Transfer in 4D Lung CT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Matthias; Gawenda, Björn; Bohn, Christian-Arved; Handels, Heinz

    Manual landmark positioning in volumetric image data is a complex task and often results in erroneous landmark positions. The landmark positioning tool presented uses image curvature features to precompute suitable candidates for landmark positions on surface data of anatomical structures. A force-feedback I/O device is then used to haptically guide the user during the definition of the correct landmarks in the 3D data volume. Furthermore, existing landmarks in a time-point of a sequence of 3D volumes (4D data set) can iteratively be transferred to other time-points using a surface based registration technique. First results show significant time savings and small interobserver variability (IROV) compared to the IROV of manually defined landmark positions using orthogonal slices of the image data.

  2. Genome wide scan for quantitative trait loci affecting tick resistance in cattle (Bos taurus × Bos indicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Simone EF

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In tropical countries, losses caused by bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus infestation have a tremendous economic impact on cattle production systems. Genetic variation between Bos taurus and Bos indicus to tick resistance and molecular biology tools might allow for the identification of molecular markers linked to resistance traits that could be used as an auxiliary tool in selection programs. The objective of this work was to identify QTL associated with tick resistance/susceptibility in a bovine F2 population derived from the Gyr (Bos indicus × Holstein (Bos taurus cross. Results Through a whole genome scan with microsatellite markers, we were able to map six genomic regions associated with bovine tick resistance. For most QTL, we have found that depending on the tick evaluation season (dry and rainy different sets of genes could be involved in the resistance mechanism. We identified dry season specific QTL on BTA 2 and 10, rainy season specific QTL on BTA 5, 11 and 27. We also found a highly significant genome wide QTL for both dry and rainy seasons in the central region of BTA 23. Conclusions The experimental F2 population derived from Gyr × Holstein cross successfully allowed the identification of six highly significant QTL associated with tick resistance in cattle. QTL located on BTA 23 might be related with the bovine histocompatibility complex. Further investigation of these QTL will help to isolate candidate genes involved with tick resistance in cattle.

  3. Genome-wide linkage scans for major depression in individuals with alcohol dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Neale, Michael C.; Walsh, Dermot; Patterson, Diana G.; Riley, Brien; Prescott, Carol A.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    Major depression is more prevalent among individuals with alcoholism than in the general population. Twin studies have found a moderate degree of genetic correlation for alcohol dependence (AD) and major depression (MD), suggesting the existence of loci that confer susceptibility to both disorders. The aim of the present study was to conduct genome-wide linkage analyses to identify loci and to replicate prior evidence for linkage to MD, and to search for linkage regions that may confer risk t...

  4. Genome-Wide Scans Provide Evidence for Positive Selection of Genes Implicated in Lassa Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon Rachel; Happi, Christian Tientcha; Sabeti, Pardis Christine

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural sele...

  5. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R.; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural sele...

  6. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2012-03-19

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural selection in West African populations where Lassa haemorrhagic fever is endemic. In this study, we provide further evidence for this notion. By applying tests for selection to genome-wide data from the International Haplotype Map Consortium and the 1000 Genomes Consortium, we demonstrate evidence for positive selection in LARGE and interleukin 21 (IL21), two genes implicated in LASV infectivity and immunity. We further localized the signals of selection, using the recently developed composite of multiple signals method, to introns and putative regulatory regions of those genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may have targeted variants giving rise to alternative splicing or differential gene expression of LARGE and IL21. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that selective pressures imposed by LASV may have led to the emergence of particular alleles conferring resistance to Lassa fever, and opens up new avenues of research pursuit. PMID:22312054

  7. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural selection in West African populations where Lassa haemorrhagic fever is endemic. In this study, we provide further evidence for this notion. By applying tests for selection to genome-wide data from the International Haplotype Map Consortium and the 1000 Genomes Consortium, we demonstrate evidence for positive selection in LARGE and interleukin 21 (IL21), two genes implicated in LASV infectivity and immunity. We further localized the signals of selection, using the recently developed composite of multiple signals method, to introns and putative regulatory regions of those genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may have targeted variants giving rise to alternative splicing or differential gene expression of LARGE and IL21. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that selective pressures imposed by LASV may have led to the emergence of particular alleles conferring resistance to Lassa fever, and opens up new avenues of research pursuit. PMID:22312054

  8. A genome-wide scan for selection signatures in Nellore cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, A L; Sonstegard, T S; Higa, R H; Rosa, A N; Siqueira, F; Silva, L O C; Torres Júnior, R A A; Coutinho, L L; Mudadu, M A; Alencar, M M; Regitano, L C A

    2014-12-01

    Brazilian Nellore cattle (Bos indicus) have been selected for growth traits for over more than four decades. In recent years, reproductive and meat quality traits have become more important because of increasing consumption, exports and consumer demand. The identification of genome regions altered by artificial selection can potentially permit a better understanding of the biology of specific phenotypes that are useful for the development of tools designed to increase selection efficiency. Therefore, the aims of this study were to detect evidence of recent selection signatures in Nellore cattle using extended haplotype homozygosity methodology and BovineHD marker genotypes (>777,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms) as well as to identify corresponding genes underlying these signals. Thirty-one significant regions (P meat quality, fatty acid profiles and immunity. In addition, 545 genes were identified in regions harboring selection signatures. Within this group, 58 genes were associated with growth, muscle and adipose tissue metabolism, reproductive traits or the immune system. Using relative extended haplotype homozygosity to analyze high-density single nucleotide polymorphism marker data allowed for the identification of regions potentially under artificial selection pressure in the Nellore genome, which might be used to better understand autozygosity and the effects of selection on the Nellore genome.

  9. Visual EKF-SLAM from Heterogeneous Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Jiménez, Jorge Othón; Devy, Michel; Gordillo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Many applications require the localization of a moving object, e.g., a robot, using sensory data acquired from embedded devices. Simultaneous localization and mapping from vision performs both the spatial and temporal fusion of these data on a map when a camera moves in an unknown environment. Such a SLAM process executes two interleaved functions: the front-end detects and tracks features from images, while the back-end interprets features as landmark observations and estimates both the landmarks and the robot positions with respect to a selected reference frame. This paper describes a complete visual SLAM solution, combining both point and line landmarks on a single map. The proposed method has an impact on both the back-end and the front-end. The contributions comprehend the use of heterogeneous landmark-based EKF-SLAM (the management of a map composed of both point and line landmarks); from this perspective, the comparison between landmark parametrizations and the evaluation of how the heterogeneity improves the accuracy on the camera localization, the development of a front-end active-search process for linear landmarks integrated into SLAM and the experimentation methodology. PMID:27070602

  10. Visual EKF-SLAM from Heterogeneous Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Othón Esparza-Jiménez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many applications require the localization of a moving object, e.g., a robot, using sensory data acquired from embedded devices. Simultaneous localization and mapping from vision performs both the spatial and temporal fusion of these data on a map when a camera moves in an unknown environment. Such a SLAM process executes two interleaved functions: the front-end detects and tracks features from images, while the back-end interprets features as landmark observations and estimates both the landmarks and the robot positions with respect to a selected reference frame. This paper describes a complete visual SLAM solution, combining both point and line landmarks on a single map. The proposed method has an impact on both the back-end and the front-end. The contributions comprehend the use of heterogeneous landmark-based EKF-SLAM (the management of a map composed of both point and line landmarks; from this perspective, the comparison between landmark parametrizations and the evaluation of how the heterogeneity improves the accuracy on the camera localization, the development of a front-end active-search process for linear landmarks integrated into SLAM and the experimentation methodology.

  11. Visual EKF-SLAM from Heterogeneous Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Jiménez, Jorge Othón; Devy, Michel; Gordillo, José L

    2016-04-07

    Many applications require the localization of a moving object, e.g., a robot, using sensory data acquired from embedded devices. Simultaneous localization and mapping from vision performs both the spatial and temporal fusion of these data on a map when a camera moves in an unknown environment. Such a SLAM process executes two interleaved functions: the front-end detects and tracks features from images, while the back-end interprets features as landmark observations and estimates both the landmarks and the robot positions with respect to a selected reference frame. This paper describes a complete visual SLAM solution, combining both point and line landmarks on a single map. The proposed method has an impact on both the back-end and the front-end. The contributions comprehend the use of heterogeneous landmark-based EKF-SLAM (the management of a map composed of both point and line landmarks); from this perspective, the comparison between landmark parametrizations and the evaluation of how the heterogeneity improves the accuracy on the camera localization, the development of a front-end active-search process for linear landmarks integrated into SLAM and the experimentation methodology.

  12. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anney, Richard

    2010-10-15

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner\\'s curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C.

  13. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep. PMID:26990958

  14. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S.; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J.; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R.; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H.; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M.; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Lionel, Anath C.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R.; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J.; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F.; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Bierut, Laura J.; Rice, John P.; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cantor, Rita M.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L.; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nurnberger, John I.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10−8. When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10−8 threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C. PMID:20663923

  15. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep.

  16. A scan for positively selected genes in the genomes of humans and chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Nielsen

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the divergence of humans and chimpanzees about 5 million years ago, these species have undergone a remarkable evolution with drastic divergence in anatomy and cognitive abilities. At the molecular level, despite the small overall magnitude of DNA sequence divergence, we might expect such evolutionary changes to leave a noticeable signature throughout the genome. We here compare 13,731 annotated genes from humans to their chimpanzee orthologs to identify genes that show evidence of positive selection. Many of the genes that present a signature of positive selection tend to be involved in sensory perception or immune defenses. However, the group of genes that show the strongest evidence for positive selection also includes a surprising number of genes involved in tumor suppression and apoptosis, and of genes involved in spermatogenesis. We hypothesize that positive selection in some of these genes may be driven by genomic conflict due to apoptosis during spermatogenesis. Genes with maximal expression in the brain show little or no evidence for positive selection, while genes with maximal expression in the testis tend to be enriched with positively selected genes. Genes on the X chromosome also tend to show an elevated tendency for positive selection. We also present polymorphism data from 20 Caucasian Americans and 19 African Americans for the 50 annotated genes showing the strongest evidence for positive selection. The polymorphism analysis further supports the presence of positive selection in these genes by showing an excess of high-frequency derived nonsynonymous mutations.

  17. A Genome Scan for Modifiers of Age at Onset in Huntington Disease: The HD MAPS Study

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian-Liang; Hayden, Michael R.; Almqvist, Elisabeth W.; Brinkman, Ryan R; Durr, Alexandra; Dodé, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Rosenblatt, Adam; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Cabrero, David Mayo; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina

    2003-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat within the coding region of a novel gene on 4p16.3. Although the variation in age at onset is partly explained by the size of the expanded repeat, the unexplained variation in age at onset is strongly heritable (h2=0.56), which suggests that other genes modify the age at onset of HD. To identify these modifier loci, we performed a 10-cM density genomewide scan in 629 affected sibling pairs (295 pedigrees and 695 individuals), ...

  18. Whole-Genome Scans Provide Evidence of Adaptive Evolution in Malawian Plasmodium falciparum Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocholla, Harold; Preston, Mark D; Mipando, Mwapatsa;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Selection by host immunity and antimalarial drugs has driven extensive adaptive evolution in Plasmodium falciparum and continues to produce ever-changing landscapes of genetic variation. METHODS:  We performed whole-genome sequencing of 69 P. falciparum isolates from Malawi and used...... population genetics approaches to investigate genetic diversity and population structure and identify loci under selection. RESULTS:  High genetic diversity (π = 2.4 × 10(-4)), moderately high multiplicity of infection (2.7), and low linkage disequilibrium (500-bp) were observed in Chikhwawa District, Malawi......, an area of high malaria transmission. Allele frequency-based tests provided evidence of recent population growth in Malawi and detected potential targets of host immunity and candidate vaccine antigens. Comparison of the sequence variation between isolates from Malawi and those from 5 geographically...

  19. A genome-wide scan in affected sibling pairs with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage suggests genetic linkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Nielsen, H S; Moltke, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    Previously, siblings of patients with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage (IRM) have been shown to have a higher risk of miscarriage. This study comprises two parts: (i) an epidemiological part, in which we introduce data on the frequency of miscarriage among 268 siblings of 244 patients with IRM and...... (ii) a genetic part presenting data from a genome-wide linkage study of 38 affected sibling pairs with IRM. All IRM patients (probands) had experienced three or more miscarriages and affected siblings two or more miscarriages. The sibling pairs were genotyped by the Affymetrix GeneChip 50K Xba......I platform and non-parametric linkage analysis was performed via the software package Merlin. We find that siblings of IRM patients exhibit a higher frequency of miscarriage than population controls regardless of age at the time of pregnancy. We identify chromosomal regions with LOD scores between 2.5 and 3...

  20. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  1. Genomic Scans of Zygotic Disequilibrium and Epistatic SNPs in HapMap Phase III Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Sheng Hu

    Full Text Available Previous theory indicates that zygotic linkage disequilibrium (LD is more informative than gametic or composite digenic LD in revealing natural population history. Further, the difference between the composite digenic and maximum zygotic LDs can be used to detect epistatic selection for fitness. Here we corroborate the theory by investigating genome-wide zygotic LDs in HapMap phase III human populations. Results show that non-Africa populations have much more significant zygotic LDs than do Africa populations. Africa populations (ASW, LWK, MKK, and YRI possess more significant zygotic LDs for the double-homozygotes (DAABB than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABb, DAaBB, and DAaBb, while non-Africa populations generally have more significant DAaBb's than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABB, DAABb, and DAaBB. Average r-squares for any significant zygotic LDs increase generally in an order of populations YRI, MKK, CEU, CHB, LWK, JPT, CHD, TSI, GIH, ASW, and MEX. Average r-squares are greater for DAABB and DAaBb than for DAaBB and DAABb in each population. YRI and MKK can be separated from LWK and ASW in terms of the pattern of average r-squares. All population divergences in zygotic LDs can be interpreted with the model of Out of Africa for modern human origins. We have also detected 19735-95921 SNP pairs exhibiting strong signals of epistatic selection in different populations. Gene-gene interactions for some epistatic SNP pairs are evident from empirical findings, but many more epistatic SNP pairs await evidence. Common epistatic SNP pairs rarely exist among all populations, but exist in distinct regions (Africa, Europe, and East Asia, which helps to understand geographical genomic medicine.

  2. Landmarks selection in street map design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Taiwan many electrical maps present their landmarks according to the category of the feature, a designer short of knowledge about mental representation of space, can cause the map to lose its communication effects. To resolve this map design problem, in this research through long-term memory recall, navigation and observation, and short-term memory processing 111 participants were asked to select the proper landmark from study area. The results reveal that in Taiwan convenience stores are the most popular local landmark in rural and urban areas. Their commercial signs have a unique design and bright color. Contrasted to their background, this makes the convenience store a salient feature. This study also developed a rule to assess the priority of the landmarks to design them in different scale maps

  3. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally......The use of landmarks for robot navigation is a popular alternative to having a geometrical model of the environment through which to navigate and monitor self-localization. If the landmarks are defined as special visual structures already in the environment then we have the possibility of fully...... available environment features (natural landmarks). The goal is also to integrate techniques and algorithms (also related to other research field) in the same navigation system, in order to improve localization performance and system autonomy. The proposed localization strategy is based on a continuous...

  4. Genome-wide scan of 29,141 African Americans finds no evidence of directional selection since admixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Aldrich, Melinda C; Ambrosone, Christine B; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Deming, Sandra L; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Henderson, Brian E; Ingles, Sue A; Isaacs, William; De Jager, Phillip L; John, Esther M; Kittles, Rick A; Larkin, Emma; McNeill, Lorna H; Millikan, Robert C; Murphy, Adam; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S; Tucker, Margaret A; Wiencke, John K; Witte, John S; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Chanock, Stephen J; Haiman, Christopher A; Reich, David; Price, Alkes L

    2014-10-01

    The extent of recent selection in admixed populations is currently an unresolved question. We scanned the genomes of 29,141 African Americans and failed to find any genome-wide-significant deviations in local ancestry, indicating no evidence of selection influencing ancestry after admixture. A recent analysis of data from 1,890 African Americans reported that there was evidence of selection in African Americans after their ancestors left Africa, both before and after admixture. Selection after admixture was reported on the basis of deviations in local ancestry, and selection before admixture was reported on the basis of allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations. The local-ancestry deviations reported by the previous study did not replicate in our very large sample, and we show that such deviations were expected purely by chance, given the number of hypotheses tested. We further show that the previous study's conclusion of selection in African Americans before admixture is also subject to doubt. This is because the FST statistics they used were inflated and because true signals of unusual allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations would be best explained by selection that occurred in Africa prior to migration to the Americas.

  5. Genome-wide Scan of 29,141 African Americans Finds No Evidence of Directional Selection since Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Harris, Curtis C.; Henderson, Brian E.; Ingles, Sue A.; Isaacs, William; De Jager, Phillip L.; John, Esther M.; Kittles, Rick A.; Larkin, Emma; McNeill, Lorna H.; Millikan, Robert C.; Murphy, Adam; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Wiencke, John K.; Witte, John S.; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Reich, David; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    The extent of recent selection in admixed populations is currently an unresolved question. We scanned the genomes of 29,141 African Americans and failed to find any genome-wide-significant deviations in local ancestry, indicating no evidence of selection influencing ancestry after admixture. A recent analysis of data from 1,890 African Americans reported that there was evidence of selection in African Americans after their ancestors left Africa, both before and after admixture. Selection after admixture was reported on the basis of deviations in local ancestry, and selection before admixture was reported on the basis of allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations. The local-ancestry deviations reported by the previous study did not replicate in our very large sample, and we show that such deviations were expected purely by chance, given the number of hypotheses tested. We further show that the previous study’s conclusion of selection in African Americans before admixture is also subject to doubt. This is because the FST statistics they used were inflated and because true signals of unusual allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations would be best explained by selection that occurred in Africa prior to migration to the Americas. PMID:25242497

  6. Landmark perception planning for mobile robot localization

    OpenAIRE

    Armingol, José M.; Moreno, Luis; Escalera, Arturo de la; Salichs, Miguel A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy perception planner that takes into account the time cost, the suitability of every landmark detection and the different uncertainties the robot encounters along its path for mobile robot localization. The sensor used is a camera with a motorized zoom on a pan & tilt platform and the artificial landmarks are circles detected through normalized grayscale correlation. An Extended Kalman Filter is used to correct the position and orientation of the vehicle. The resulti...

  7. Evolutionary change driven by metal exposure as revealed by coding SNP genome scan in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger-Deschênes, Sébastien; Couture, Patrice; Campbell, Peter G C; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-07-01

    Pollution can drive rapid evolutionary change in wild populations. This study targets functional polymorphisms of chronically metal-contaminated wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A de novo transcriptome scan contrasted subsets of individuals from clean (n = 16) and contaminated (n = 16) lakes to identify 87 candidate annotated coding SNPs. Candidate genotypes and liver [metal] were obtained in 10 populations (n = 1,052) and a genome scan distinguished outliers: one nuclear (cyclin G1 gene) and two mitochondrial (cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 genes) also displaying allelic correlation to mean population [cadmium]. Whole mtDNA and 17 kb surrounding cyclin G1 were characterised through 454 sequencing thus revealing two non-synonymous substitutions involving dissimilar amino acids. Based on associated functions and inter-population differentiation, contaminated perch may have been selected for fast life cycle completion (p53 pathway) and memorization impairment mitigation (long-term potentiation pathway). In accordance with predicted evolutionary trajectory for stressed and energy deprived organisms, adapted perch would not compensate for repair mechanism inhibition, instead reallocating energy towards growth and favouring inexpensive impairment mitigation adaptations over costly detoxification. Overall, 85 years of selection could have driven rapid, potentially adaptive evolution by selecting alleles increasing perch fitness in polluted environments. PMID:23722603

  8. Genome scan for locus involved in mandibular prognathism in pedigrees from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known that genetic components play an important role in the etiology of mandibular prognathism, but few susceptibility loci have been mapped. METHODOLOGY: In order to identify linkage regions for mandibular prognathism, we analyzed two Chinese pedigrees with 6,090 genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers from Illumina Linkage-12 DNA Analysis Kit (average spacing 0.58 cM. Multipoint parametric and non-parametric (model-free linkage analyses were used for the pedigrees. PRINCIPAL FINDING: The most statistically significant linkage results were with markers on chromosome 4 (LOD=3.166 and NPL=3.65 with rs 875864, 4p16.1, 8.38 cM. Candidate genes within the 4p16.1 include EVC, EVC2. CONCLUSION: We detected a novel suggestive linkage locus for mandibular prognathism in two Chinese pedigrees, and this linkage region provides target for susceptibility gene identification, a process that will provide important insights into the molecular and cellular basis of mandibular prognathism.

  9. Univariate/multivariate genome-wide association scans using data from families and unrelated samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available As genome-wide association studies (GWAS are becoming more popular, two approaches, among others, could be considered in order to improve statistical power for identifying genes contributing subtle to moderate effects to human diseases. The first approach is to increase sample size, which could be achieved by combining both unrelated and familial subjects together. The second approach is to jointly analyze multiple correlated traits. In this study, by extending generalized estimating equations (GEEs, we propose a simple approach for performing univariate or multivariate association tests for the combined data of unrelated subjects and nuclear families. In particular, we correct for population stratification by integrating principal component analysis and transmission disequilibrium test strategies. The proposed method allows for multiple siblings as well as missing parental information. Simulation studies show that the proposed test has improved power compared to two popular methods, EIGENSTRAT and FBAT, by analyzing the combined data, while correcting for population stratification. In addition, joint analysis of bivariate traits has improved power over univariate analysis when pleiotropic effects are present. Application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 (GAW16 data sets attests to the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  10. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia M Lindgren

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580 informative for adult waist circumference (WC and waist-hip ratio (WHR. We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9x10(-11 and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9x10(-9. A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6x10(-8. The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity.

  11. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting the Salmonella carrier-state in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumstead Nat

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selection for increased resistance to Salmonella colonisation and excretion could reduce the risk of foodborne Salmonella infection. In order to identify potential loci affecting resistance, differences in resistance were identified between the N and 61 inbred lines and two QTL research performed. In an F2 cross, the animals were inoculated at one week of age with Salmonella enteritidis and cloacal swabs were carried out 4 and 5 wk post inoculation (thereafter called CSW4F2 and CSW4F2 and caecal contamination (CAECF2 was assessed 1 week later. The animals from the (N × 61 × N backcross were inoculated at six weeks of age with Salmonella typhimurium and cloacal swabs were studied from wk 1 to 4 (thereafter called CSW1BC to CSW4BC. A total of 33 F2 and 46 backcross progeny were selectively genotyped for 103 and 135 microsatellite markers respectively. The analysis used least-squares-based and non-parametric interval mapping. Two genome-wise significant QTL were observed on Chromosome 1 for CSW2BC and on Chromosome 2 for CSW4F2, and four suggestive QTL for CSW5F2 on Chromosome 2, for CSW5F2 and CSW2BC on chromosome 5 and for CAECF2 on chromosome 16. These results suggest new regions of interest and the putative role of SAL1.

  12. Genome-wide linkage scan for factors of metabolic syndrome in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Juliana CN

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared genetic factors may contribute to the phenotypic clustering of different components of the metabolic syndrome (MES. This study aims to identify genetic loci that contribute to individual or multiple factors related to MES. Results We studied 478 normoglycemic subjects ascertained through 163 families participating in the Hong Kong Family Diabetes Study. Factor analysis on 15 MES-related traits yielded 6 factors including adiposity factor (body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, insulin factor (fasting insulin and insulin AUC during OGTT, glucose factor (fasting glucose and glucose AUC during OGTT, TC-LDLC factor (total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, blood pressure factor (systolic and diastolic blood pressure and TG-HDLC factor (triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. Genome-wide linkage analyses were performed on these factors using variance component approach. Suggestive evidence for linkage (LOD = 1.24 - 2.46 were observed for adiposity factor (chromosome 1 at 187 cM, chromosome 9 at 34 cM and chromosome 17 at 10 cM, insulin factor (chromosome 2 at 128 cM, chromosome 5 at 21 cM and chromosome 12 at 7 cM, glucose factor (chromosome 7 at 155 cM, TC-LDLC factor (chromosome 7 at 151 cM and chromosome 13 at 15 cM and TG-HDLC factor (chromosome 7 at 155 cM. Conclusions In summary, our findings suggest the presence of susceptibility loci that influence either single (chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 9, 12, 13 and 17 or multiple factors (chromosome 7 for MES in Hong Kong Chinese without diabetes.

  13. A Genome Scan to Detect Quantitative Trait Loci for Economically Important Traits in Holstein Cattle Using Two Methods and a Dense Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Map

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daetwyler, H.D.; Schenkel, F.S.; Sargolzaei, M.; Robinson, J.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Genome scans for detection of bovine quantitative trait loci (QTL) were performed via variance component linkage analysis and linkage disequilibrium single-locus regression (LDRM). Four hundred eighty-four Holstein sires, of which 427 were from 10 grandsire families, were genotyped for 9,919 single

  14. Genome-wide scan for bovine milk-fat composition. I. Quantitative trait loci for short- and medium-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, W.M.; Schennink, A.; Visker, M.H.P.W.; Mullaart, E.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2009-01-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for short- and medium-chain fatty acids (expressed in wt/wt %). Milk samples were available from 1,905 cows from 398 commercial herds in the Netherlands, and milk-fat composition was measured by gas chromatography. DNA was av

  15. Genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs identifies candidate genes involved in T helper cells and macrophage signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2....

  16. Deviation of landmarks in accordance with methods of establishing reference planes in three-dimensional facial CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kaeng Won; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol; Kook, Min Suk; Lee, Jae Seo [School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hee [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Palomo, Juan Martin [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the deviation of landmarks from horizontal or midsagittal reference planes according to the methods of establishing reference planes. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 18 patients who received orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment were reviewed. Each CT scan was reconstructed by three methods for establishing three orthogonal reference planes (namely, the horizontal, midsagittal, and coronal reference planes). The horizontal (bilateral porions and bilateral orbitales) and midsagittal (crista galli, nasion, prechiasmatic point, opisthion, and anterior nasal spine) landmarks were identified on each CT scan. Vertical deviation of the horizontal landmarks and horizontal deviation of the midsagittal landmarks were measured. The porion and orbitale, which were not involved in establishing the horizontal reference plane, were found to deviate vertically from the horizontal reference plane in the three methods. The midsagittal landmarks, which were not used for the midsagittal reference plane, deviated horizontally from the midsagittal reference plane in the three methods. In a three-dimensional facial analysis, the vertical and horizontal deviations of the landmarks from the horizontal and midsagittal reference planes could vary depending on the methods of establishing reference planes.

  17. Reproducibility of the sella turcica landmark in three dimensions using a sella turcica-specific reference system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittayapat, Pisha; Jacobs, Reinhilde [University Hospitals Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Odri, Guillaume A. [Service de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Traumatologique, Centre Hospitalier Regional d' Orleans, Orleans Cedex2 (France); De Faria Vasconcelos, Karla [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Division of Oral Radiology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Willems, Guy [Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, Orthodontics, KU Leuven and Dentistry, University Hospitals Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Olszewski, Raphael [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to assess the reproducibility of identifying the sella turcica landmark in a three-dimensional (3D) model by using a new sella-specific landmark reference system. Thirty-two cone-beam computed tomographic scans (3D Accuitomo 170, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) were retrospectively collected. The 3D data were exported into the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine standard and then imported into the Maxilim software (Medicim NV, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium) to create 3D surface models. Five observers identified four osseous landmarks in order to create the reference frame and then identified two sella landmarks. The x, y, and z coordinates of each landmark were exported. The observations were repeated after four weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using the multiple paired t-test with Bonferroni correction (intraobserver precision: p<0.005, interobserver precision: p<0.0011). The intraobserver mean precision of all landmarks was <1 mm. Significant differences were found when comparing the intraobserver precision of each observer (p<0.005). For the sella landmarks, the intraobserver mean precision ranged from 0.43±0.34 mm to 0.51±0.46 mm. The intraobserver reproducibility was generally good. The overall interobserver mean precision was <1 mm. Significant differences between each pair of observers for all anatomical landmarks were found (p<0.0011). The interobserver reproducibility of sella landmarks was good, with >50% precision in locating the landmark within 1 mm. A newly developed reference system offers high precision and reproducibility for sella turcica identification in a 3D model without being based on two-dimensional images derived from 3D data.

  18. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  19. Genome-wide association scan shows genetic variants in the FTO gene are associated with obesity-related traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Scuteri

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The obesity epidemic is responsible for a substantial economic burden in developed countries and is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The disease is the result not only of several environmental risk factors, but also of genetic predisposition. To take advantage of recent advances in gene-mapping technology, we executed a genome-wide association scan to identify genetic variants associated with obesity-related quantitative traits in the genetically isolated population of Sardinia. Initial analysis suggested that several SNPs in the FTO and PFKP genes were associated with increased BMI, hip circumference, and weight. Within the FTO gene, rs9930506 showed the strongest association with BMI (p = 8.6 x10(-7, hip circumference (p = 3.4 x 10(-8, and weight (p = 9.1 x 10(-7. In Sardinia, homozygotes for the rare "G" allele of this SNP (minor allele frequency = 0.46 were 1.3 BMI units heavier than homozygotes for the common "A" allele. Within the PFKP gene, rs6602024 showed very strong association with BMI (p = 4.9 x 10(-6. Homozygotes for the rare "A" allele of this SNP (minor allele frequency = 0.12 were 1.8 BMI units heavier than homozygotes for the common "G" allele. To replicate our findings, we genotyped these two SNPs in the GenNet study. In European Americans (N = 1,496 and in Hispanic Americans (N = 839, we replicated significant association between rs9930506 in the FTO gene and BMI (p-value for meta-analysis of European American and Hispanic American follow-up samples, p = 0.001, weight (p = 0.001, and hip circumference (p = 0.0005. We did not replicate association between rs6602024 and obesity-related traits in the GenNet sample, although we found that in European Americans, Hispanic Americans, and African Americans, homozygotes for the rare "A" allele were, on average, 1.0-3.0 BMI units heavier than homozygotes for the more common "G" allele. In summary, we have completed a whole genome-association scan for

  20. Desert ants learn vibration and magnetic landmarks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Buehlmann

    Full Text Available The desert ants Cataglyphis navigate not only by path integration but also by using visual and olfactory landmarks to pinpoint the nest entrance. Here we show that Cataglyphis noda can additionally use magnetic and vibrational landmarks as nest-defining cues. The magnetic field may typically provide directional rather than positional information, and vibrational signals so far have been shown to be involved in social behavior. Thus it remains questionable if magnetic and vibration landmarks are usually provided by the ants' habitat as nest-defining cues. However, our results point to the flexibility of the ants' navigational system, which even makes use of cues that are probably most often sensed in a different context.

  1. Genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci influencing LDL size and plasma triglyceride in familial hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Melissa A; Edwards, Karen L; Monks, Stephanie A; Koprowicz, Kent M; Brunzell, John D; Motulsky, Arno G; Mahaney, Michael C; Hixson, James E

    2003-11-01

    Small, dense LDLs and hypertriglyceridemia, two highly correlated and genetically influenced risk factors, are known to predict for risk of coronary heart disease. The objective of this study was to perform a whole-genome scan for linkage to LDL size and triglyceride (TG) levels in 26 kindreds with familial hypertriglyceridemia (FHTG). LDL size was estimated using gradient gel electrophoresis, and genotyping was performed for 355 autosomal markers with an average heterozygosity of 76% and an average spacing of 10.2 centimorgans (cMs). Using variance components linkage analysis, one possible linkage was found for LDL size [logarithm of odds (LOD) = 2.1] on chromosome 6, peak at 140 cM distal to marker F13A1 (closest marker D6S2436). With adjustment for TG and/or HDL cholesterol, the LOD scores were reduced, but remained in exactly the same location. For TG, LOD scores of 2.56 and 2.44 were observed at two locations on chromosome 15, with peaks at 29 and 61 cM distal to marker D15S822 (closest markers D15S643 and D15S211, respectively). These peaks were retained with adjustment for LDL size and/or HDL cholesterol. These findings, if confirmed, suggest that LDL particle size and plasma TG levels could be caused by two different genetic loci in FHTG.

  2. TINA manual landmarking tool: software for the precise digitization of 3D landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schunke Anja C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in the placing of landmarks and subsequent morphometric analyses of shape for 3D data has increased with the increasing accessibility of computed tomography (CT scanners. However, current computer programs for this task suffer from various practical drawbacks. We present here a free software tool that overcomes many of these problems. Results The TINA Manual Landmarking Tool was developed for the digitization of 3D data sets. It enables the generation of a modifiable 3D volume rendering display plus matching orthogonal 2D cross-sections from DICOM files. The object can be rotated and axes defined and fixed. Predefined lists of landmarks can be loaded and the landmarks identified within any of the representations. Output files are stored in various established formats, depending on the preferred evaluation software. Conclusions The software tool presented here provides several options facilitating the placing of landmarks on 3D objects, including volume rendering from DICOM files, definition and fixation of meaningful axes, easy import, placement, control, and export of landmarks, and handling of large datasets. The TINA Manual Landmark Tool runs under Linux and can be obtained for free from http://www.tina-vision.net/tarballs/.

  3. Using Local Symmetry for Landmark Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, Gert; de Jong, Sjoerd; Schomaker, Lambert R. B.; Fritz, M; Schiele, B; Piater, JH

    2009-01-01

    Most visual Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM) methods use interest points as landmarks in their maps of the environment. Often the interest points are detected using contrast features, for instance those of the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). The SIFT interest points, however, h

  4. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  5. TINA manual landmarking tool: software for the precise digitization of 3D landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Schunke Anja C; Bromiley Paul A; Tautz Diethard; Thacker Neil A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Interest in the placing of landmarks and subsequent morphometric analyses of shape for 3D data has increased with the increasing accessibility of computed tomography (CT) scanners. However, current computer programs for this task suffer from various practical drawbacks. We present here a free software tool that overcomes many of these problems. Results The TINA Manual Landmarking Tool was developed for the digitization of 3D data sets. It enables the generation of a modifi...

  6. Genome-wide SNP-based linkage scan identifies a locus on 8q24 for an age-related hearing impairment trait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huyghe, J.R.; Laer, L. Van; Hendrickx, J.J.;

    2008-01-01

    conducted a genome-wide association as well as a linkage scan with high-density SNP microarrays. Because of the presence of genetic population substructure, association testing was stratified after which evidence was combined by meta-analysis. No association signals reaching genome-wide significance were...... results of a cross-sectional family-based genetic study employing audiometric data. By using principal component analysis, we were able to reduce the dimensionality of this multivariate phenotype while capturing most of the variation and retaining biologically important features of the audiograms. We...... detected. Linkage analysis identified a linkage peak on 8q24.13-q24.22 for a trait correlated to audiogram shape. The signal reached genome-wide significance, as assessed by simulations. This finding represents the first locus for an ARHI trait Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/12...

  7. Genome-wide linkage scan and association study of PARL to the expression of LHON families in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phasukkijwatana, Nopasak; Kunhapan, Bussaraporn; Stankovich, Jim; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha L; Thomson, Russell; Thornton, Timothy; Bahlo, Melanie; Mushiroda, Taisei; Nakamura, Yusuke; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Tun, Aung Win; Srisawat, Chatchawan; Limwongse, Chanin; Peerapittayamongkol, Chayanon; Sura, Thanyachai; Suthammarak, Wichit; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2010-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrially inherited disease causing blindness, preferentially in young adult males. Most of the patients carry the G11778A mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. However, the marked incomplete penetrance and the gender bias indicate some additional genetic and/or environmental factors to disease expression. Herein, we first conducted a genome-wide linkage scan with 400 microsatellite markers in 9 large Thai LHON G11778A pedigrees. Using an affecteds-only nonparametric linkage analysis, 4 regions on chromosomes 3, 12, 13 and 18 showed Zlr scores greater than 2 (P 2 in 10 of 16 allele sharing models tested) was then expanded to include the region 3q26.2-3q28 covering SLC7A14 (3q26.2), MFN1 (3q26.32), MRPL47 (3q26.33), MCCC1 (3q27.1), PARL (3q27.1) and OPA1 (3q28-q29). All of these candidate genes were selected from the Maestro database and had known to be localized in mitochondria. Sixty tag SNPs were genotyped in 86 cases, 211 of their relatives and 32 unrelated Thai controls, by multiplex-PCR-based Invader assay. Analyses using a powerful association testing tool that adjusts for relatedness (the M(QLS) statistic) showed the most evidence of association between two SNPs, rs3749446 and rs1402000 (located in PARL presenilins-associated rhomboid-like) and LHON expression (both P = 8.8 x 10(-5)). The mitochondrial PARL protease has been recently known to play a role with a dynamin-related OPA1 protein in preventing apoptotic events by slowing down the release of cytochrome c out of mitochondrial cristae junctions. Moreover, PARL is required to activate the intramembranous proteolyses resulting in the degradation of an accumulated pro-apoptotic protein in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Under these circumstances, variants of PARL are suggested to influence cell death by apoptosis which has long been believed to intrigue the neurodegeneration of LHON.

  8. Mapped Landmark Algorithm for Precision Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew; Ansar, Adnan; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses a computer vision algorithm for position estimation to enable precision landing during planetary descent. The Descent Image Motion Estimation System for the Mars Exploration Rovers has been used as a starting point for creating code for precision, terrain-relative navigation during planetary landing. The algorithm is designed to be general because it handles images taken at different scales and resolutions relative to the map, and can produce mapped landmark matches for any planetary terrain of sufficient texture. These matches provide a measurement of horizontal position relative to a known landing site specified on the surface map. Multiple mapped landmarks generated per image allow for automatic detection and elimination of bad matches. Attitude and position can be generated from each image; this image-based attitude measurement can be used by the onboard navigation filter to improve the attitude estimate, which will improve the position estimates. The algorithm uses normalized correlation of grayscale images, producing precise, sub-pixel images. The algorithm has been broken into two sub-algorithms: (1) FFT Map Matching (see figure), which matches a single large template by correlation in the frequency domain, and (2) Mapped Landmark Refinement, which matches many small templates by correlation in the spatial domain. Each relies on feature selection, the homography transform, and 3D image correlation. The algorithm is implemented in C++ and is rated at Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 4.

  9. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems.

  10. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems. PMID:25754883

  11. Electronic and film portal images: a comparison of landmark visibility and review accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare a scanning liquid ion chamber electronic portal imaging device (SLIC-EPID) and an amorphous silicon flat panel (aSi) EPID with portal film in clinical applications using measures of landmark visibility and treatment review accuracy. Methods and Materials: Six radiation oncologists viewed 39 electronic portal images (EPIs) from the SLIC-EPID, 36 EPIs from the aSi-EPID, and portal films of each of these treatment fields. The physicians rated the clarity of anatomic landmarks in the portal images, and the scores were compared between EPID and film. Nine hundred portal image reviews were performed. EPID and film portal images were acquired with known setup errors in either phantom or cadaver treatments. Physicians identified the errors visually in portal films and with computerized analysis for EPID. Results: There were no statistically significant (p<0.05) differences between film and SLIC-EPID in ratings of landmark clarity. Eleven of 12 landmarks were more visible in aSi-EPID than in film. Translational setup errors were identified with an average accuracy of 2.5 mm in film, compared to 1.5 mm with SLIC-EPID and 1.3 mm with aSi-EPID. Conclusions: Both EPIDs are clinically viable replacements for film, but aSi-EPID represents a significant advancement in image quality over film

  12. A genome-wide scan of selective sweeps in two broiler chicken lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic regions controlling abdominal fatness (AF were studied in the Northeast Agricultural University broiler line divergently selected for AF. In this study, the chicken 60KSNP chip and extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH test were used to detect genome-wide signatures of AF. Results A total of 5357 and 5593 core regions were detected in the lean and fat lines, and 51 and 57 reached a significant level (PRB1, BBS7, MAOA, MAOB, EHBP1, LRP2BP, LRP1B, MYO7A, MYO9A and PRPSAP1, were detected. These genes may be important for AF deposition in chickens. Conclusions We provide a genome-wide map of selection signatures in the chicken genome, and make a contribution to the better understanding the mechanisms of selection for AF content in chickens. The selection for low AF in commercial breeding using this information will accelerate the breeding progress.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum genome-wide scans for positive selection, recombination hot spots and resistance to antimalarial drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Jianbing; Myers, Rachel A.; Jiang, Hongying; Liu, Shengfa; Ricklefs, Stacy; Waisberg, Michael; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Wilairata, Polrat; Krudsood, Srivicha; White, Nicholas J; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Cui, Liwang; Ho, May; Ou, Fengzheng; Li, Haibo

    2010-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs impose strong pressure on Plasmodium falciparum parasites and leave signatures of selection in the parasite genome 1,2. Search for signals of selection may lead to genes encoding drug or immune targets 3. The lack of high-throughput genotyping methods, inadequate knowledge of parasite population history, and time-consuming adaptations of parasites to in vitro culture have hampered genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of parasite traits. Here we report genotyping of DNA fr...

  14. The behavioural relevance of landmark texture for honeybee homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eDittmar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Honeybees visually pinpoint the location of a food source using landmarks. Studies on the role of visual memories have suggested that bees approach the goal by finding a close match between their current view and a memorized view of the goal location. The most relevant landmark features for this matching process seem to be their retinal positions, the size as defined by their edges, and their colour. Recently, we showed that honeybees can use landmarks that are statically camouflaged, suggesting that motion cues are relevant as well. Currently it is unclear how bees weight these different landmark features when accomplishing navigational tasks, and whether this depends on their saliency. Since natural objects are often distinguished by their texture, we investigate the behavioural relevance and the interplay of the spatial configuration and the texture of landmarks. We show that landmark texture is a feature that bees memorise, and being given the opportunity to identify landmarks by their texture improves the bees’ navigational performance. Landmark texture is weighted more strongly than landmark configuration when it provides the bees with positional information and when the texture is salient. In the vicinity of the landmark honeybees changed their flight behaviour according to its texture.

  15. Landmark experiments in twentieth-century physics

    CERN Document Server

    Trigg, George L

    2011-01-01

    Physics is very much an experimental science, but too often, students at the undergraduate level are not exposed to the reality of experimental physics ― i.e., what was done in a given experiment, why it was done, the background of physics against which the experiment was carried out and the changes in theory and knowledge that resulted. In this hook, the author helps to remedy the situation by presenting a variety of ""landmark"" experiments that have brought about significant alterations in our ideas about some aspect of nature. Among these scientific milestones are discoveries about the wa

  16. Longwall automation - an ACARP Landmark Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, M.; Hainsworth, D.; Lever, P.; Gurgenci, H. [CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Kenmore, Qld. (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    A Landmark Longwall Automation project was commenced in July 2001. The major outcome of automation using on-face observation has been divided into ten outcome areas that have been fully scoped for a three-year initial project life. A major facilitating technology has been the implementation of inertial navigation system (INS) technology that can map the shearer position in 3D. A focus of the project is to deliver a system that is at least as productive as the current most productive manually controlled longwall face. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Efficient and Accurate Indoor Localization Using Landmark Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, F.; Kealy, A.; Khoshelham, K.; Shang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Indoor localization is important for a variety of applications such as location-based services, mobile social networks, and emergency response. Fusing spatial information is an effective way to achieve accurate indoor localization with little or with no need for extra hardware. However, existing indoor localization methods that make use of spatial information are either too computationally expensive or too sensitive to the completeness of landmark detection. In this paper, we solve this problem by using the proposed landmark graph. The landmark graph is a directed graph where nodes are landmarks (e.g., doors, staircases, and turns) and edges are accessible paths with heading information. We compared the proposed method with two common Dead Reckoning (DR)-based methods (namely, Compass + Accelerometer + Landmarks and Gyroscope + Accelerometer + Landmarks) by a series of experiments. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 73% accuracy with a positioning error less than 2.5 meters, which outperforms the other two DR-based methods.

  18. The Behavioral Relevance of Landmark Texture for Honeybee Homing

    OpenAIRE

    Laura eDittmar; Martin eEgelhaaf; Wolfgang eStürzl; Norbert eBoeddeker

    2011-01-01

    Honeybees visually pinpoint the location of a food source using landmarks. Studies on the role of visual memories have suggested that bees approach the goal by finding a close match between their current view and a memorized view of the goal location. The most relevant landmark features for this matching process seem to be their retinal positions, the size as defined by their edges, and their colour. Recently, we showed that honeybees can use landmarks that are statically camouflaged, suggest...

  19. 36 CFR 62.7 - Natural landmark modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nationally significant features, professional error in the original designation, or additional landowners... landmark: Loss of integrity of the natural features or professional error in the original designation....

  20. Genomic scan of selective sweeps in thin and fat tail sheep breeds for identifying of candidate regions associated with fat deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Mohammad Hossein

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of genomic regions that have been targets of selection for phenotypic traits is one of the most important and challenging areas of research in animal genetics. However, currently there are relatively few genomic regions identified that have been subject to positive selection. In this study, a genome-wide scan using ~50,000 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs was performed in an attempt to identify genomic regions associated with fat deposition in fat-tail breeds. This trait and its modification are very important in those countries grazing these breeds. Results Two independent experiments using either Iranian or Ovine HapMap genotyping data contrasted thin and fat tail breeds. Population differentiation using FST in Iranian thin and fat tail breeds revealed seven genomic regions. Almost all of these regions overlapped with QTLs that had previously been identified as affecting fat and carcass yield traits in beef and dairy cattle. Study of selection sweep signatures using FST in thin and fat tail breeds sampled from the Ovine HapMap project confirmed three of these regions located on Chromosomes 5, 7 and X. We found increased homozygosity in these regions in favour of fat tail breeds on chromosome 5 and X and in favour of thin tail breeds on chromosome 7. Conclusions In this study, we were able to identify three novel regions associated with fat deposition in thin and fat tail sheep breeds. Two of these were associated with an increase of homozygosity in the fat tail breeds which would be consistent with selection for mutations affecting fat tail size several thousand years after domestication.

  1. A Landmark-Free Method for Three-Dimensional Shape Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Pomidor

    Full Text Available The tools and techniques used in morphometrics have always aimed to transform the physical shape of an object into a concise set of numerical data for mathematical analysis. The advent of landmark-based morphometrics opened new avenues of research, but these methods are not without drawbacks. The time investment required of trained individuals to accurately landmark a data set is significant, and the reliance on readily-identifiable physical features can hamper research efforts. This is especially true of those investigating smooth or featureless surfaces.In this paper, we present a new method to perform this transformation for data obtained from high-resolution scanning technology. This method uses surface scans, instead of landmarks, to calculate a shape difference metric analogous to Procrustes distance and perform superimposition. This is accomplished by building upon and extending the Iterative Closest Point algorithm. We also explore some new ways this data can be used; for example, we can calculate an averaged surface directly and visualize point-wise shape information over this surface. Finally, we briefly demonstrate this method on a set of primate skulls and compare the results of the new methodology with traditional geometric morphometric analysis.

  2. High-precision Detection of Facial Landmarks to Estimate Head Motions Based on Vision Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong W. Gao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach of determination of head movement is presented from the pictures recorded via digital cameras monitoring the scanning processing of PET. Two human vision models of CIECAMs and BMV are applied to segment the face region via skin colour and to detect local facial landmarks respectively. The developed algorithms are evaluated on the pictures (n=12 monitoring a subject’s head while simulating PET scanning captured by two calibrated cameras (located in the front and left side from a subject. It is shown that centers of chosen facial landmarks of eye corners and middle point of nose basement have been detected with very high precision (1 0.64 pixels. Three landmarks on pictures received by the front camera and two by the side camera have been identified. Preliminary results on 2D images with known moving parameters show that movement parameters of rotations and translations along X, Y, and Z directions can be obtained very accurately via the described methods.

  3. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting growth-related traits in an F1 family of Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body weight and length are economically important traits in foodfish species influenced by quantitative trait loci (QTL and environmental factors. It is usually difficult to dissect the genetic and environmental effects. Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer is an important marine foodfish species with a compact genome (~700 Mb. The recent construction of a first generation linkage map of Asian seabass with 240 microsatellites provides a good opportunity to determine the number and position of QTL, and the magnitude of QTL effects with a genome scan. Results We conducted a genome scan for QTL affecting body weight, standard length and condition factors in an F1 family containing 380 full-sib individuals from a breeding stock by using 97 microsatellites evenly covering 24 chromosomes. Interval mapping and multiple QTL model mapping detected five significant and 27 suggestive QTL on ten linkage groups (LGs. Among the five significant QTL detected, three (qBW2-a, qTL2-a and qSL2-a controlling body weight, total and standard length respectively, were mapped on the same region near Lca287 on LG2, and explained 28.8, 58.9 and 59.7% of the phenotypic variance. The other two QTL affecting body weight, qBW2-b and qBW3, were located on LG2 and 3, and accounted for 6.4 and 8.8% of the phenotypic variance. Suggestive QTL associated with condition factors are located on six different LGs. Conclusion This study presents the first example of QTL detection for growth-related traits in an F1 family of a marine foodfish species. The results presented here will enable further fine-mapping of these QTL for marker-assisted selection of the Asian seabass, eventually identifying individual genes responsible for growth-related traits.

  4. Genome-wide linkage scan for contraction velocity characteristics of knee musculature in the Leuven Genes for Muscular Strength Study

    OpenAIRE

    De Mars, Gunther; Windelinckx, An; Huygens, Wim; Peeters, Maarten W.; Beunen, Gaston P; Aerssens, Jeroen; Vlietinck, Robert; Thomis, Martine A. I.

    2008-01-01

    The torque-velocity relationship is known to be affected by ageing, decreasing its protective role in the prevention of falls. Interindividual variability in this torque-velocity relationship is partly determined by genetic factors (h2: 44–67%). As a first attempt, this genome-wide linkage study aimed to identify chromosomal regions linked to the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexors and extensors. A selection of 283 informative male siblings (17–36 yr), belonging to 105 families, ...

  5. AFLP genome scan to detect genetic structure and candidate loci under selection for local adaptation of the invasive weed Mikania micrantha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available Why some species become successful invaders is an important issue in invasive biology. However, limited genomic resources make it very difficult for identifying candidate genes involved in invasiveness. Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae, one of the world's most invasive weeds, has adapted rapidly in response to novel environments since its introduction to southern China. In its genome, we expect to find outlier loci under selection for local adaptation, critical to dissecting the molecular mechanisms of invasiveness. An explorative amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP genome scan was used to detect candidate loci under selection in 28 M. micrantha populations across its entire introduced range in southern China. We also estimated population genetic parameters, bottleneck signatures, and linkage disequilibrium. In binary characters, such as presence or absence of AFLP bands, if all four character combinations are present, it is referred to as a character incompatibility. Since character incompatibility is deemed to be rare in populations with extensive asexual reproduction, a character incompatibility analysis was also performed in order to infer the predominant mating system in the introduced M. micrantha populations. Out of 483 AFLP loci examined using stringent significance criteria, 14 highly credible outlier loci were identified by Dfdist and Bayescan. Moreover, remarkable genetic variation, multiple introductions, substantial bottlenecks and character compatibility were found to occur in M. micrantha. Thus local adaptation at the genome level indeed exists in M. micrantha, and may represent a major evolutionary mechanism of successful invasion. Interactions between genetic diversity, multiple introductions, and reproductive modes contribute to increase the capacity of adaptive evolution.

  6. Whole-genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci associated with milk protein composition in 3 French dairy cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M P; Govignon-Gion, A; Ferrand, M; Gelé, M; Pourchet, D; Amigues, Y; Fritz, S; Boussaha, M; Capitan, A; Rocha, D; Miranda, G; Martin, P; Brochard, M; Boichard, D

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the PhénoFinLait project, a genome-wide analysis was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect milk protein composition estimated using mid-infrared spectrometry in the Montbéliarde (MO), Normande (NO), and Holstein (HO) French dairy cattle breeds. The 6 main milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and αS1-, αS2-, β-, and κ-caseins) expressed as grams per 100g of milk (% of milk) or as grams per 100g of protein (% of protein) were estimated in 848,068 test-day milk samples from 156,660 cows. Genotyping was performed for 2,773 MO, 2,673 NO, and 2,208 HO cows using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Individual test-day records were adjusted for environmental effects and then averaged per cow to define the phenotypes analyzed. Quantitative trait loci detection was performed within each breed using a linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis approach. A total of 39 genomic regions distributed on 20 of the 29 Bos taurus autosomes (BTA) were significantly associated with milk protein composition at a genome-wide level of significance in at least 1 of the 3 breeds. The 9 most significant QTL were located on BTA2 (133 Mbp), BTA6 (38, 47, and 87 Mbp), BTA11 (103 Mbp), BTA14 (1.8 Mbp), BTA20 (32 and 58 Mbp), and BTA29 (8 Mbp). The BTA6 (87 Mbp), BTA11, and BTA20 (58 Mbp) QTL were found in all 3 breeds, and they had highly significant effects on κ-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and α-lactalbumin, expressed as a percentage of protein, respectively. Each of these QTL explained between 13% (BTA14) and 51% (BTA11) of the genetic variance of the trait. Many other QTL regions were also identified in at least one breed. They were located on 14 additional chromosomes (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, and 27), and they explained 2 to 8% of the genetic variance of 1 or more protein composition traits. Concordance analyses, performed between QTL status and sequence-derived polymorphisms from

  7. Evolution of the pygmy phenotype: evidence of positive selection fro genome-wide scans in African, Asian, and Melanesian pygmies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Romero, Irene Gallego; Metspalu, Mait; Leavesley, Matthew; Pagani, Luca; Antao, Tiago; Huang, Da-Wei; Sherman, Brad T; Siddle, Katharine; Scholes, Clarissa; Hudjashov, Georgi; Kaitokai, Elton; Babalu, Avis; Belatti, Maggie; Cagan, Alex; Hopkinshaw, Byrony; Shaw, Colin; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Ene; Mägi, Reedik; Lempicki, Richard A; Villems, Richard; Lahr, Marta Mirazon; Kivisild, Toomas

    2013-01-01

    Human pygmy populations inhabit different regions of the world, from Africa to Melanesia. In Asia, short-statured populations are often referred to as "negritos." Their short stature has been interpreted as a consequence of thermoregulatory, nutritional, and/or locomotory adaptations to life in tropical forests. A more recent hypothesis proposes that their stature is the outcome of a life history trade-off in high-mortality environments, where early reproduction is favored and, consequently, early sexual maturation and early growth cessation have coevolved. Some serological evidence of deficiencies in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor axis have been previously associated with pygmies' short stature. Using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data, we first tested whether different negrito groups living in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea are closely related and then investigated genomic signals of recent positive selection in African, Asian, and Papuan pygmy populations. We found that negritos in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea are genetically more similar to their nonpygmy neighbors than to one another and have experienced positive selection at different genes. These results indicate that geographically distant pygmy groups are likely to have evolved their short stature independently. We also found that selection on common height variants is unlikely to explain their short stature and that different genes associated with growth, thyroid function, and sexual development are under selection in different pygmy groups.

  8. Single-Copy Nuclear Gene Primers for Streptanthus and Other Brassicaceae from Genomic Scans, Published Data, and ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ivalú Cacho

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We report 11 primer sets for nine single-copy nuclear genes in Streptanthus and other Thelypodieae (Brassicaceae and their utility at tribal-level and species-level phylogenetics in this poorly resolved group. Methods and Results: We selected regions based on a cross-referenced matrix of previous studies and public Brassica expressed sequence tags. To design primers, we used alignments of low-depth-coverage Illumina sequencing of genomic DNA for two species of Brassica mapped onto Arabidopsis thaliana. We report several primer combinations for five regions that consistently amplified a single band and yielded high-quality sequences for at least 70% of the species assayed, and for four additional regions whose utility might be clade specific. Conclusions: Our primers will be useful in improving resolution at shallow depths across the Thelypodieae, and likely in other Brassicaceae.

  9. Sex-specific variability and a 'cage effect' independently mask a neuropathic pain quantitative trait locus detected in a whole genome scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, Marshall; Gilad, Amit; Arbilly, Michal; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Yakir, Benjamin; Raber, Pnina; Minert, Anne; Pisanté, Anne; Darvasi, Ariel

    2007-08-01

    Sex and environment may dramatically affect genetic studies, and thus should be carefully considered. Beginning with two inbred mouse strains with contrasting phenotype in the neuroma model of neuropathic pain (autotomy), we established a backcross population on which we conducted a genome-wide scan. The backcross population was partially maintained in small social groups and partially in isolation. The genome scan detected one previously reported quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 15 (pain1), but no additional QTLs were found. Interestingly, group caging introduced phenotypic noise large enough to completely mask the genetic effect of the chromosome 15 QTL. The reason appears to be that group-caging animals from the low-autotomy strain together with animals from the high-autotomy strain dramatically increases autotomy in the otherwise low-autotomy mice (males or females). The converse, suppression of pain behaviour in the high-autotomy strain when caged with the low-autotomy strain was also observed, but only in females. Even in isolated mice, the genetic effect of the chromosome 15 QTL was significant only in females. To determine why, we evaluated autotomy levels of females in 12 different inbred stains of mice and compared them to previously reported levels for males. Strikingly larger environmental variation was observed in males than in females for this pain phenotype. The high baseline variance in males can explain the difficulty in detecting the genetic effect, which was readily seen in females. Our study emphasizes the importance of sex and environment in the genetic analysis of pain.

  10. Genome-wide linkage scan for contraction velocity characteristics of knee musculature in the Leuven Genes for Muscular Strength Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mars, Gunther; Windelinckx, An; Huygens, Wim; Peeters, Maarten W; Beunen, Gaston P; Aerssens, Jeroen; Vlietinck, Robert; Thomis, Martine A I

    2008-09-17

    The torque-velocity relationship is known to be affected by ageing, decreasing its protective role in the prevention of falls. Interindividual variability in this torque-velocity relationship is partly determined by genetic factors (h(2): 44-67%). As a first attempt, this genome-wide linkage study aimed to identify chromosomal regions linked to the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexors and extensors. A selection of 283 informative male siblings (17-36 yr), belonging to 105 families, was used to conduct a genome-wide SNP-based (Illumina Linkage IVb panel) multipoint linkage analysis for the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexors and extensors. The strongest evidence for linkage was found at 15q23 for the torque-velocity slope of the knee extensors (TVSE). Other interesting linkage regions with LOD scores >2 were found at 7p12.3 [logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD) = 2.03, P = 0.0011] for the torque-velocity ratio of the knee flexors (TVRF), at 2q14.3 (LOD = 2.25, P = 0.0006) for TVSE, and at 4p14 and 18q23 for the torque-velocity ratio of the knee extensors TVRE (LOD = 2.23 and 2.08; P = 0.0007 and 0.001, respectively). We conclude that many small contributing genes are involved in causing variation in the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexor and extensor muscles. Several earlier reported candidate genes for muscle strength and muscle mass and new candidates are harbored within or in close vicinity of the linkage regions reported in the present study. PMID:18682575

  11. Detecting loci under recent positive selection in dairy and beef cattle by combining different genome-wide scan methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Tani Utsunomiya

    Full Text Available As the methodologies available for the detection of positive selection from genomic data vary in terms of assumptions and execution, weak correlations are expected among them. However, if there is any given signal that is consistently supported across different methodologies, it is strong evidence that the locus has been under past selection. In this paper, a straightforward frequentist approach based on the Stouffer Method to combine P-values across different tests for evidence of recent positive selection in common variations, as well as strategies for extracting biological information from the detected signals, were described and applied to high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data generated from dairy and beef cattle (taurine and indicine. The ancestral Bovinae allele state of over 440,000 SNP is also reported. Using this combination of methods, highly significant (P<3.17×10(-7 population-specific sweeps pointing out to candidate genes and pathways that may be involved in beef and dairy production were identified. The most significant signal was found in the Cornichon homolog 3 gene (CNIH3 in Brown Swiss (P = 3.82×10(-12, and may be involved in the regulation of pre-ovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. Other putative pathways under selection are the glucolysis/gluconeogenesis, transcription machinery and chemokine/cytokine activity in Angus; calpain-calpastatin system and ribosome biogenesis in Brown Swiss; and gangliosides deposition in milk fat globules in Gyr. The composite method, combined with the strategies applied to retrieve functional information, may be a useful tool for surveying genome-wide selective sweeps and providing insights in to the source of selection.

  12. DETEKSI LANDMARK CITRA WAJAH DENGAN EXTRAKSI FITUR GABOR ANALISA FUZZY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resmana Lim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method that automatically finds human faces as well as its landmark points in color images based on a fuzzy analysis. The proposed approach first uses color information to detect face candidate regions and then uses a fuzzy analysis of the color, shape, symmetry and interior facial features. A deformable Gabor wavelet graph matching is used to locate the facial landmark points describing the face. The latter allows for size and orientation variation since the search for landmark points allows for affine transformations as well as local deformations of the Gabor wavelet graph. The search is performed using a genetic algorithm that is essential because it effectively searches the solution space. Results based on the proposed method are included to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Paper ini mengusulkan sebuah metode deteksi wajah beserta dengan titik landmarknya pada citra berwarna menggunakan analisa fuzzy. Proses awal menggunakan informasi warna kulit untuk menseleksi calon-calon obyek lantas dilanjukan dengan analisa fuzzy terhadap warna, bentuk, simetri dan fitur/landmark wajah. Proses lokalisasi landmark wajah menggunakan Gabor wavelet graph matching dengan memaksimalkan kemiripan antara landmark wajah model dengan obyek inputan. Proses maksimalisasi kemiripan ini menggunakan algoritma genetika. Hasil-hasil percobaan ditampilkan untuk memberikan gambaran keberhasilan dari metode yang diusulkan. Kata kunci: lokalisasi landmark wajah, analisa fuzzy, graph matching, algoritma genetika, Gabor wavelet.

  13. Visual EKF-SLAM from Heterogeneous Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Jiménez, Jorge Othón; Devy, Michel; Gordillo, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Many applications require the localization of a moving object, e.g., a robot, using sensory data acquired from embedded devices. Simultaneous localization and mapping from vision performs both the spatial and temporal fusion of these data on a map when a camera moves in an unknown environment. Such a SLAM process executes two interleaved functions: the front-end detects and tracks features from images, while the back-end interprets features as landmark observations and estimates both the landmarks and the robot positions with respect to a selected reference frame. This paper describes a complete visual SLAM solution, combining both point and line landmarks on a single map. The proposed method has an impact on both the back-end and the front-end. The contributions comprehend the use of heterogeneous landmark-based EKF-SLAM (the management of a map composed of both point and line landmarks); from this perspective, the comparison between landmark parametrizations and the evaluation of how the heterogeneity improves the accuracy on the camera localization, the development of a front-end active-search process for linear landmarks integrated into SLAM and the experimentation methodology. PMID:27070602

  14. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  15. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  16. Landmark detection and coupled patch registration for cardiac motion tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Shi, Wenzhe; Zhuang, Xiahai; Wu, Xianliang; Tung, Kai-Pin; Ourselin, Sebastien; Edwards, Philip; Rueckert, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on the estimation of the deformation of the endocardium to aid the diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Landmark tracking can provide sparse, anatomically relevant constraints to help establish correspondences between images being tracked or registered. However, landmarks on the endocardium are often characterized by ambiguous appearance in cardiac MR images which makes the extraction and tracking of these landmarks problematic. In this paper we propose an automatic framework to select and track a sparse set of distinctive landmarks in the presence of relatively large deformations in order to capture the endocardial motion in cardiac MR sequences. To achieve this a sparse set of the landmarks is identified using an entropy-based approach. In particular we use singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the search space and localize the landmarks with relatively large deformation across the cardiac cycle. The tracking of the sparse set of landmarks is performed simultaneously by optimizing a two-stage Markov Random Field (MRF) model. The tracking result is further used to initialize registration based dense motion tracking. We have applied this framework to extract a set of landmarks at the endocardial border of the left ventricle in MR image sequences from 51 subjects. Although the left ventricle undergoes a number of different deformations, we show how the radial, longitudinal motion and twisting of the endocardial surface can be captured by the proposed approach. Our experiments demonstrate that motion tracking using sparse landmarks can outperform conventional motion tracking by a substantial amount, with improvements in terms of tracking accuracy of 20:8% and 19:4% respectively.

  17. A genome-wide scan study identifies a single nucleotide substitution in ASIP associated with white versus non-white coat-colour variation in sheep (Ovis aries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M-H; Tiirikka, T; Kantanen, J

    2014-02-01

    In sheep, coat colour (and pattern) is one of the important traits of great biological, economic and social importance. However, the genetics of sheep coat colour has not yet been fully clarified. We conducted a genome-wide association study of sheep coat colours by genotyping 47 303 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Finnsheep population in Finland. We identified 35 SNPs associated with all the coat colours studied, which cover genomic regions encompassing three known pigmentation genes (TYRP1, ASIP and MITF) in sheep. Eighteen of these associations were confirmed in further tests between white versus non-white individuals, but none of the 35 associations were significant in the analysis of only non-white colours. Across the tests, the s66432.1 in ASIP showed significant association (P=4.2 × 10(-11) for all the colours; P=2.3 × 10(-11) for white versus non-white colours) with the variation in coat colours and strong linkage disequilibrium with other significant variants surrounding the ASIP gene. The signals detected around the ASIP gene were explained by differences in white versus non-white alleles. Further, a genome scan for selection for white coat pigmentation identified a strong and striking selection signal spanning ASIP. Our study identified the main candidate gene for the coat colour variation between white and non-white as ASIP, an autosomal gene that has been directly implicated in the pathway regulating melanogenesis. Together with ASIP, the two other newly identified genes (TYRP1 and MITF) in the Finnsheep, bordering associated SNPs, represent a new resource for enriching sheep coat-colour genetics and breeding.

  18. A new guide to the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J.

    1995-12-22

    The construction of a detailed physical map of the human genome, with 15,000 sequence-based landmarks, opens the door to genome-wide sequencing. This article summarizes the researchers, the research, the approach, and the usefulness of a new physical map of the human genome.

  19. Genome-wide scan on total serum IgE levels identifies FCER1A as novel susceptibility locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Weidinger

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available High levels of serum IgE are considered markers of parasite and helminth exposure. In addition, they are associated with allergic disorders, play a key role in anti-tumoral defence, and are crucial mediators of autoimmune diseases. Total IgE is a strongly heritable trait. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS, we tested 353,569 SNPs for association with serum IgE levels in 1,530 individuals from the population-based KORA S3/F3 study. Replication was performed in four independent population-based study samples (total n = 9,769 individuals. Functional variants in the gene encoding the alpha chain of the high affinity receptor for IgE (FCER1A on chromosome 1q23 (rs2251746 and rs2427837 were strongly associated with total IgE levels in all cohorts with P values of 1.85 x 10(-20 and 7.08 x 10(-19 in a combined analysis, and in a post-hoc analysis showed additional associations with allergic sensitization (P = 7.78 x 10(-4 and P = 1.95 x 10(-3. The "top" SNP significantly influenced the cell surface expression of FCER1A on basophils, and genome-wide expression profiles indicated an interesting novel regulatory mechanism of FCER1A expression via GATA-2. Polymorphisms within the RAD50 gene on chromosome 5q31 were consistently associated with IgE levels (P values 6.28 x 10(-7-4.46 x 10(-8 and increased the risk for atopic eczema and asthma. Furthermore, STAT6 was confirmed as susceptibility locus modulating IgE levels. In this first GWAS on total IgE FCER1A was identified and replicated as new susceptibility locus at which common genetic variation influences serum IgE levels. In addition, variants within the RAD50 gene might represent additional factors within cytokine gene cluster on chromosome 5q31, emphasizing the need for further investigations in this intriguing region. Our data furthermore confirm association of STAT6 variation with serum IgE levels.

  20. Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for human adult stature identifies novel Loci and associations with measures of skeletal frame size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Soranzo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide (GW scans have identified several independent loci affecting human stature, but their contribution through the different skeletal components of height is still poorly understood. We carried out a genome-wide scan in 12,611 participants, followed by replication in an additional 7,187 individuals, and identified 17 genomic regions with GW-significant association with height. Of these, two are entirely novel (rs11809207 in CATSPER4, combined P-value = 6.1x10(-8 and rs910316 in TMED10, P-value = 1.4x10(-7 and two had previously been described with weak statistical support (rs10472828 in NPR3, P-value = 3x10(-7 and rs849141 in JAZF1, P-value = 3.2x10(-11. One locus (rs1182188 at GNA12 identifies the first height eQTL. We also assessed the contribution of height loci to the upper- (trunk and lower-body (hip axis and femur skeletal components of height. We find evidence for several loci associated with trunk length (including rs6570507 in GPR126, P-value = 4x10(-5 and rs6817306 in LCORL, P-value = 4x10(-4, hip axis length (including rs6830062 at LCORL, P-value = 4.8x10(-4 and rs4911494 at UQCC, P-value = 1.9x10(-4, and femur length (including rs710841 at PRKG2, P-value = 2.4x10(-5 and rs10946808 at HIST1H1D, P-value = 6.4x10(-6. Finally, we used conditional analyses to explore a possible differential contribution of the height loci to these different skeletal size measurements. In addition to validating four novel loci controlling adult stature, our study represents the first effort to assess the contribution of genetic loci to three skeletal components of height. Further statistical tests in larger numbers of individuals will be required to verify if the height loci affect height preferentially through these subcomponents of height.

  1. Virtual skeletal complex model- and landmark-guided orthognathic surgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jeong; Woo, Sang-Yoon; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Han, Jeong Joon; Yang, Hoon Joo; Hwang, Soon Jung; Yi, Won-Jin

    2016-05-01

    In this study, correction of the maxillofacial deformities was performed by repositioning bone segments to an appropriate location according to the preoperative planning in orthognathic surgery. The surgery was planned using the patient's virtual skeletal models fused with optically scanned three-dimensional dentition. The virtual maxillomandibular complex (MMC) model of the patient's final occlusal relationship was generated by fusion of the maxillary and mandibular models with scanned occlusion. The final position of the MMC was simulated preoperatively by planning and was used as a goal model for guidance. During surgery, the intraoperative registration was finished immediately using only software processing. For accurate repositioning, the intraoperative MMC model was visualized on the monitor with respect to the simulated MMC model, and the intraoperative positions of multiple landmarks were also visualized on the MMC surface model. The deviation errors between the intraoperative and the final positions of each landmark were visualized quantitatively. As a result, the surgeon could easily recognize the three-dimensional deviation of the intraoperative MMC state from the final goal model without manually applying a pointing tool, and could also quickly determine the amount and direction of further MMC movements needed to reach the goal position. The surgeon could also perform various osteotomies and remove bone interference conveniently, as the maxillary tracking tool could be separated from the MMC. The root mean square (RMS) difference between the preoperative planning and the intraoperative guidance was 1.16 ± 0.34 mm immediately after repositioning. After surgery, the RMS differences between the planning and the postoperative computed tomographic model were 1.31 ± 0.28 mm and 1.74 ± 0.73 mm for the maxillary and mandibular landmarks, respectively. Our method provides accurate and flexible guidance for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery based on

  2. Pterion: An anatomical variation and surgical landmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant E Natekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The frontal and the parietal bones superiorly and the greater wing of the sphenoid and the squamous temporal inferiorly of one side meet at an H-shaped sutural junction termed the pterion. This is an important anatomical and anthropological landmark as it overlies both the anterior branch of middle meningeal artery and the lateral fissure of the cerebral hemisphere. The knowledge of sutural joints between frontal, parietal, sphenoid and temporal bones at pterion is clinically, radiologically and surgically important during surgical interventions involving burr hole surgeries. Materials and Methods : Study performed on 150 dry temporal bones. The pterion, and its sutural articulations with frontal, parietal, sphenoid and temporal bones and also anatomical variations, if any, were studied. Results : Four types of pterion, i.e. sphenoparietal, frontotemporal, stellate and epipteric, were observed. Conclusions : The knowledge of the variations of pterion and its surgical anatomy, in Indian population are important for surgeons operating in the fieldThe present study will also contribute additional information of skull bone fractures in infancy and early childhood, which may be associated with large intersutural bones giving false appearance of fracture radiologically and also during surgical interventions involving burr hole surgeries, as their extensions may lead to continuation of fracture lines.

  3. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  4. Indoor monocular mobile robot navigation based on color landmarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yuan; ZHANG Bai-sheng; ZHANG Yi; LI Ling

    2009-01-01

    A robot landmark navigation system based on monocular camera was researched theoretically and experimentally. First the landmark setting and its data structure in programming was given; then the coordinates of them getting by robot and global localization of the robot was described; finally experiments based on Pioneer III mobile robot show that this system can work well at different topographic situation without lose of signposts.

  5. Genome-wide scan for serum ghrelin detects linkage on chromosome 1p36 in Hispanic children: results from the Viva La Familia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Göring, Harald H H; Diego, Vincent P; Cai, Guowen; Mehta, Nitesh R; Haack, Karin; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2007-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate genetic influence on serum ghrelin and its relationship with adiposity-related phenotypes in Hispanic children (n=1030) from the Viva La Familia study (VFS). Anthropometric measurements and levels of serum ghrelin were estimated and genetic analyses conducted according to standard procedures. Mean age, body mass index (BMI), and serum ghrelin were 11+/-0.13 y, 25+/-0.24 kg/m2 and 38+/-0.5 ng/mL, respectively. Significant heritabilities (p<0.001) were obtained for BMI, weight, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and ghrelin. Bivariate analyses of ghrelin with adiposity traits showed significant negative genetic correlations (p<0.0001) with weight, BMI, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio. A genome-wide scan for ghrelin detected significant linkage on chromosome 1p36.2 between STR markers D1S2697 and D1S199 (LOD=3.2). The same region on chromosome 1 was the site of linkage for insulin (LOD=3.3), insulinlike growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) (LOD=3.4), homeostatic model assessment method (HOMA) (LOD=2.9), and C-peptide (LOD=2.0). Several family-based studies have reported linkages for obesity-related phenotypes in the region of 1p36. These results indicate the importance of this region in relation to adiposity in children from the VFS.

  6. A genome-wide admixture scan identifies MYH9 as a candidate locus associated with non-diabetic end stage renal disease in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Kao, WH; Klag, Michael J; Meoni, Lucy A; Reich, David; Berthier-Schaad, Yvette; Li, Man; Coresh, Josef; Patterson, Nick; Tandon, Arti; Powe, Neil R; Fink, Nancy E; Sadler, John H; Weir, Matthew R; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon; Divers, Jasmin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Freedman, Barry I; Kimmel, Paul L; Knowler, William C; Kohn, Orly F; Kramp, Kristopher; Leehey, David J; Nicholas, Susanne; Pahl, Madeleine; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Sedor, John R; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Winkler, Cheryl A; Smith, Michael W.; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2008-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) has a four times higher incidence in African Americans compared to European Americans. This led to the hypothesis that susceptibility alleles for ESRD have a higher frequency in West African than European gene pool. We performed a genome-wide admixture scan in 1,372 ESRD cases and 806 controls and demonstrated a highly significant association between excess African ancestry and non-diabetic ESRD (LOD 5.70) but not diabetic ESRD (LOD 0.47) on chromosome 22q12. Each copy of the European ancestral allele conferred a relative risk of 0.50 (95% credible interval 0.39 – 0.63) compared to African ancestry. Multiple common SNPs (allele frequency ranging from 0.2 to 0.6) in the gene that encodes non-muscle myosin heavy chain type II isoform A (MYH9) were associated with 2-4 times greater risk of non-diabetic ESRD and accounted for a large proportion of the excess risk of ESRD observed in African compared to European Americans. PMID:18794854

  7. When genetic distance matters: Measuring genetic differentiation at microsatellite loci in whole-genome scans of recent and incipient mosquito species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zheng, Liangbiao; Touré, Yeya T.; Dandekar, Thomas; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    2001-01-01

    Genetic distance measurements are an important tool to differentiate field populations of disease vectors such as the mosquito vectors of malaria. Here, we have measured the genetic differentiation between Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae, as well as between proposed emerging species of the latter taxon, in whole genome scans by using 23–25 microsatellite loci. In doing so, we have reviewed and evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of standard parameters of genetic distance, FST, RST, (δμ)2, and D. Further, we have introduced new parameters, D′ and DK, which have well defined statistical significance tests and complement the standard parameters to advantage. D′ is a modification of D, whereas DK is a measure of covariance based on Pearson's correlation coefficient. We find that A. gambiae and A. arabiensis are closely related at most autosomal loci but appear to be distantly related on the basis of X-linked chromosomal loci within the chromosomal Xag inversion. The M and S molecular forms of A. gambiae are practically indistinguishable but differ significantly at two microsatellite loci from the proximal region of the X, outside the Xag inversion. At one of these loci, both M and S molecular forms differ significantly from A. arabiensis, but remarkably, at the other locus, A. arabiensis is indistinguishable from the M molecular form of A. gambiae. These data support the recent proposal of genetically differentiated M and S molecular forms of A. gambiae. PMID:11553812

  8. Influence of Head Motion on the Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT: Landmark Identification Errors in Maxillofacial Surface Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Min Lee

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of head motion on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT scan.Fifteen dry skulls were incorporated into a motion controller which simulated four types of head motion during CBCT scan: 2 horizontal rotations (to the right/to the left and 2 vertical rotations (upward/downward. Each movement was triggered to occur at the start of the scan for 1 second by remote control. Four maxillofacial surface models with head motion and one control surface model without motion were obtained for each skull. Nine landmarks were identified on the five maxillofacial surface models for each skull, and landmark identification errors were compared between the control model and each of the models with head motion.Rendered surface models with head motion were similar to the control model in appearance; however, the landmark identification errors showed larger values in models with head motion than in the control. In particular, the Porion in the horizontal rotation models presented statistically significant differences (P < .05. Statistically significant difference in the errors between the right and left side landmark was present in the left side rotation which was opposite direction to the scanner rotation (P < .05.Patient movement during CBCT scan might cause landmark identification errors on the 3D surface model in relation to the direction of the scanner rotation. Clinicians should take this into consideration to prevent patient movement during CBCT scan, particularly horizontal movement.

  9. Landmark learning by the Ozark zigzag salamander Plethodon angusticlavius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. CRANE, Alicia MATHIS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although salamanders have been shown to respond to classical conditioning, spatial learning has been largely unstudied. We tested whether salamanders could learn to locate foraging areas by using landmarks. We trained 10 salamanders Plethodon angusticlavius to use landmarks (small rocks to locate patches within the arena containing food (blackworms Lumbriculus variegatus. At the corners of each square testing arena were four plastic dishes, one containing blackworms and the other three empty. A rock was placed in front of the dish containing blackworms, and the location of the food-dish was randomly chosen for each training trial. A control group was also trained to feed on blackworms in the presence of a rock, but the rock was positioned randomly among the four dish locations so that the rock was not a reliable landmark for the worms. Although the length of the training period for individual salamanders varied (22–38 trainings per individual, the mean number of trainings for salamanders in the control and experimental groups was equal (30 training trials. During testing, no blackworms were present to eliminate any visual or chemical cues emanating directly from the prey. Individuals trained with the rock landmarks spent significantly more time in the area of the landmark than did control salamanders [Current Zoology 57 (4: 485–490, 2011].

  10. WIKIPEDIA ENTRIES AS A SOURCE OF CAR NAVIGATION LANDMARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Binski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Car navigation system devices provide today with an easy and simple solution to the basic concept of reaching a destination. Although these systems usually achieve this goal, they still deliver a limited and poor sequence of instructions that do not consider the human nature of using landmarks during wayfinding. This research paper addresses the concept of enriching navigation route instructions by adding supplementary route information in the form of landmarks. We aim at using a contributed source of landmarks information, which is easy to access, available, show high update rate, and have a large scale of information. For this, Wikipedia was chosen, since it represents the world’s largest free encyclopaedia that includes information about many spatial entities. A survey and classification of available landmarks is implemented, coupled with ranking algorithms based on the entries’ categories and attributes. These are aimed at retrieving the most relevant landmark information required that are valuable for the enrichment of a specific navigation route. The paper will present this methodology, together with examples and results, showing the feasibility of using this concept and its potential of enriching navigation processes.

  11. The reliability of tablet computers in depicting maxillofacial radiographic landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadinada, Aditya; Mahdian, Mina; Sheth, Sonam; Chandhoke, Taranpreet K.; Gopalakrishna, Aadarsh; Potluri, Anitha; Yadav, Sumit [University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the identification of anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs on a standard medical grade picture archiving communication system (PACS) monitor and a tablet computer (iPad 5). A total of 1000 radiographs, including 500 panoramic and 500 lateral cephalometric radiographs, were retrieved from the de-identified dataset of the archive of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology of the University Of Connecticut School Of Dental Medicine. Major radiographic anatomical landmarks were independently reviewed by two examiners on both displays. The examiners initially reviewed ten panoramic and ten lateral cephalometric radiographs using each imaging system, in order to verify interoperator agreement in landmark identification. The images were scored on a four-point scale reflecting the diagnostic image quality and exposure level of the images. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two displays regarding the visibility and clarity of the landmarks in either the panoramic or cephalometric radiographs. Tablet computers can reliably show anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs.

  12. Wikipedia Entries as a Source of CAR Navigation Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binski, N.; Zhang, L.; Dalyot, S.

    2016-06-01

    Car navigation system devices provide today with an easy and simple solution to the basic concept of reaching a destination. Although these systems usually achieve this goal, they still deliver a limited and poor sequence of instructions that do not consider the human nature of using landmarks during wayfinding. This research paper addresses the concept of enriching navigation route instructions by adding supplementary route information in the form of landmarks. We aim at using a contributed source of landmarks information, which is easy to access, available, show high update rate, and have a large scale of information. For this, Wikipedia was chosen, since it represents the world's largest free encyclopaedia that includes information about many spatial entities. A survey and classification of available landmarks is implemented, coupled with ranking algorithms based on the entries' categories and attributes. These are aimed at retrieving the most relevant landmark information required that are valuable for the enrichment of a specific navigation route. The paper will present this methodology, together with examples and results, showing the feasibility of using this concept and its potential of enriching navigation processes.

  13. Spatial Language and Children’s Spatial Landmark Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber A. Ankowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined how spatial language affected search behavior in a landmark spatial search task. In Experiment 1, two- to six-year-old children were trained to find a toy in the center of a square array of four identical landmarks. Children heard one of three spatial language cues once during the initial training trial (“here,” “in the middle,” “next to this one”. After search performance reached criterion, children received a probe test trial in which the landmark array was expanded. In Experiment 2, two- to four-year-old children participated in the search task and also completed a language comprehension task. Results revealed that children’s spatial language comprehension scores and spatial language cues heard during training trials were related to children’s performance in the search task.

  14. Multirobot FastSLAM Algorithm Based on Landmark Consistency Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Ming Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the influence of uncertain map information on multirobot SLAM problem, a multirobot FastSLAM algorithm based on landmark consistency correction is proposed. Firstly, electromagnetism-like mechanism is introduced to the resampling procedure in single-robot FastSLAM, where we assume that each sampling particle is looked at as a charged electron and attraction-repulsion mechanism in electromagnetism field is used to simulate interactive force between the particles to improve the distribution of particles. Secondly, when multiple robots observe the same landmarks, every robot is regarded as one node and Kalman-Consensus Filter is proposed to update landmark information, which further improves the accuracy of localization and mapping. Finally, the simulation results show that the algorithm is suitable and effective.

  15. Quality-Aware Estimation of Facial Landmarks in Video Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    for facial landmark detection. If the face quality is low the proposed system corrects the facial landmarks that are detected by SDM. Depending upon the face velocity in consecutive video frames and face quality measure, two algorithms are proposed for correction of landmarks in low quality faces by using......Face alignment in video is a primitive step for facial image analysis. The accuracy of the alignment greatly depends on the quality of the face image in the video frames and low quality faces are proven to cause erroneous alignment. Thus, this paper proposes a system for quality aware face...... alignment by using a Supervised Decent Method (SDM) along with a motion based forward extrapolation method. The proposed system first extracts faces from video frames. Then, it employs a face quality assessment technique to measure the face quality. If the face quality is high, the proposed system uses SDM...

  16. Automated localization of vertebra landmarks in MRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Akshay; Narasimhamurthy, Anand; Rao, V. S. Veeravasarapu; Vaidya, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    The identification of key landmark points in an MR spine image is an important step for tasks such as vertebra counting. In this paper, we propose a template matching based approach for automatic detection of two key landmark points, namely the second cervical vertebra (C2) and the sacrum from sagittal MR images. The approach is comprised of an approximate localization of vertebral column followed by matching with appropriate templates in order to detect/localize the landmarks. A straightforward extension of the work described here is an automated classification of spine section(s). It also serves as a useful building block for further automatic processing such as extraction of regions of interest for subsequent image processing and also in aiding the counting of vertebra.

  17. Adaptive Landmark-Based Navigation System Using Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidan, Bassel; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin;

    2014-01-01

    The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal. In...... hexapod robots. As a result, it allows the robots to successfully learn to navigate to distal goals in complex environments.......The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal....... Inspired by this, we develop an adaptive landmark-based navigation system based on sequential reinforcement learning. In addition, correlation-based learning is also integrated into the system to improve learning performance. The proposed system has been applied to simulated simple wheeled and more complex...

  18. MICROSURGICAL LANDMARKS IN MINIMALLY INVASIVE TRANSFORAMINAL LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Quillo-Olvera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsurgical landmarks of the facet joint complex were defined to provide guidance and security within the tubular retractor during transforaminal surgery. A retrospective observational study was performed in segments L4-L5 by the left side approach. Microsurgical relevant photos, anatomical models and drawing were used to expose the suggested landmarks. The MI-TLIF technique has advantages compared with conventional open TLIF technique, however minimally invasive technique implies lack of security for the surgeon due to the lack of defined microanatomical landmarks compared to open spine surgery, and disorientation within the tubular retractor, the reason why to have precise microsurgical references and its recognition within the surgical field provide speed and safety when performing minimally invasive technique.

  19. A genome-wide association scan on the levels of markers of inflammation in Sardinians reveals associations that underpin its complex regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Naitza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the genes that influence levels of pro-inflammatory molecules can help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this process. We first conducted a two-stage genome-wide association scan (GWAS for the key inflammatory biomarkers Interleukin-6 (IL-6, the general measure of inflammation erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP in a large cohort of individuals from the founder population of Sardinia. By analysing 731,213 autosomal or X chromosome SNPs and an additional ∼1.9 million imputed variants in 4,694 individuals, we identified several SNPs associated with the selected quantitative trait loci (QTLs and replicated all the top signals in an independent sample of 1,392 individuals from the same population. Next, to increase power to detect and resolve associations, we further genotyped the whole cohort (6,145 individuals for 293,875 variants included on the ImmunoChip and MetaboChip custom arrays. Overall, our combined approach led to the identification of 9 genome-wide significant novel independent signals-5 of which were identified only with the custom arrays-and provided confirmatory evidence for an additional 7. Novel signals include: for IL-6, in the ABO gene (rs657152, p = 2.13×10(-29; for ESR, at the HBB (rs4910472, p = 2.31×10(-11 and UCN119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 8.91×10(-10 loci; for MCP-1, near its receptor CCR2 (rs17141006, p = 7.53×10(-13 and in CADM3 (rs3026968, p = 7.63×10(-13; for hsCRP, within the CRP gene (rs3093077, p = 5.73×10(-21, near DARC (rs3845624, p = 1.43×10(-10, UNC119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 1.50×10(-14, and ICOSLG/AIRE (rs113459440, p = 1.54×10(-08 loci. Confirmatory evidence was found for IL-6 in the IL-6R gene (rs4129267; for ESR at CR1 (rs12567990 and TMEM57 (rs10903129; for MCP-1 at DARC (rs12075; and for hsCRP at CRP (rs1205, HNF1A (rs225918, and APOC-I (rs4420638. Our

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Scan on the Levels of Markers of Inflammation in Sardinians Reveals Associations That Underpin Its Complex Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitza, Silvia; Porcu, Eleonora; Steri, Maristella; Taub, Dennis D.; Mulas, Antonella; Xiao, Xiang; Strait, James; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Usala, Gianluca; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Pitzalis, Maristella; Loi, Alessia; Virdis, Francesca; Piras, Roberta; Deidda, Francesca; Whalen, Michael B.; Crisponi, Laura; Concas, Antonio; Podda, Carlo; Uzzau, Sergio; Scheet, Paul; Longo, Dan L.; Lakatta, Edward; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Cao, Antonio; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the genes that influence levels of pro-inflammatory molecules can help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this process. We first conducted a two-stage genome-wide association scan (GWAS) for the key inflammatory biomarkers Interleukin-6 (IL-6), the general measure of inflammation erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in a large cohort of individuals from the founder population of Sardinia. By analysing 731,213 autosomal or X chromosome SNPs and an additional ∼1.9 million imputed variants in 4,694 individuals, we identified several SNPs associated with the selected quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and replicated all the top signals in an independent sample of 1,392 individuals from the same population. Next, to increase power to detect and resolve associations, we further genotyped the whole cohort (6,145 individuals) for 293,875 variants included on the ImmunoChip and MetaboChip custom arrays. Overall, our combined approach led to the identification of 9 genome-wide significant novel independent signals—5 of which were identified only with the custom arrays—and provided confirmatory evidence for an additional 7. Novel signals include: for IL-6, in the ABO gene (rs657152, p = 2.13×10−29); for ESR, at the HBB (rs4910472, p = 2.31×10−11) and UCN119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 8.91×10−10) loci; for MCP-1, near its receptor CCR2 (rs17141006, p = 7.53×10−13) and in CADM3 (rs3026968, p = 7.63×10−13); for hsCRP, within the CRP gene (rs3093077, p = 5.73×10−21), near DARC (rs3845624, p = 1.43×10−10), UNC119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 1.50×10−14), and ICOSLG/AIRE (rs113459440, p = 1.54×10−08) loci. Confirmatory evidence was found for IL-6 in the IL-6R gene (rs4129267); for ESR at CR1 (rs12567990) and TMEM57 (rs10903129); for MCP-1 at DARC (rs12075); and for hsCRP at CRP (rs1205), HNF1A (rs225918), and APOC-I (rs

  1. "Direct DICOM Slice Landmarking" A Novel Research Technique to Quantify Skeletal Changes in Orthognathic Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Almukhtar

    Full Text Available The limitations of the current methods of quantifying the surgical movements of facial bones inspired this study. The aim of this study was the assessment of the accuracy and reproducibility of directly landmarking of 3D DICOM images (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine to quantify the changes in the jaw bones following surgery. The study was carried out on plastic skull to simulate the surgical movements of the jaw bones. Cone beam CT scans were taken at 3mm, 6mm, and 9mm maxillary advancement; together with a 2mm, 4mm, 6mm and 8mm "down graft" which in total generated 12 different positions of the maxilla for the analysis. The movements of the maxilla were calculated using two methods, the standard approach where distances between surface landmarks on the jaw bones were measured and the novel approach where measurements were taken directly from the internal structures of the corresponding 3D DICOME slices. A one sample t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two methods of measurements for the y and z directions, however, the x direction showed a significant difference. The mean difference between the two absolute measurements were 0.34±0.20mm, 0.22±0.16mm, 0.18±0.13mm in the y, z and x directions respectively. In conclusion, the direct landmarking of 3D DICOM image slices is a reliable, reproducible and informative method for assessment of the 3D skeletal changes. The method has a clear clinical application which includes the analysis of the jaw movements "orthognathic surgery" for the correction of facial deformities.

  2. The Finland–United States Investigation of Non–Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Genetics (FUSION) Study. II. An Autosomal Genome Scan for Diabetes-Related Quantitative-Trait Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Richard M; Ghosh, Soumitra; Langefeld, Carl D.; Valle, Timo T.; Hauser, Elizabeth R; Magnuson, Victoria L.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Silander, Kaisa; Ally, Delphine S.; Chines, Peter; Blaschak-Harvan, Jillian; Douglas, Julie A.; Duren, William L.; Epstein, Michael P.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.

    2000-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disorder encompassing multiple metabolic defects. We report results from an autosomal genome scan for type 2 diabetes–related quantitative traits in 580 Finnish families ascertained for an affected sibling pair and analyzed by the variance components-based quantitative-trait locus (QTL) linkage approach. We analyzed diabetic and nondiabetic subjects separately, because of the possible impact of disease on the traits of interest. In diabetic individuals, o...

  3. Elections and landmark policies in Tanzania and Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Therkildsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    political elites to focus on policies they perceive to be able to gain votes. This is based on analyses of six landmark decisions made during the last fifteen years in the social, productive and public finance sectors in Tanzania and Uganda. Such policies share a number of key characteristics...

  4. Landmark Finding Algorithms for Indoor Autonomous Mobile Robot Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tóth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is oriented to ways of computer vision algorithms for mobile robot localization in internal and external agricultural environment. The main aim of this work was to design, create, verify and evaluate speed and functionality of computer vision localization algorithm. An input colour camera data and depth data were captured by MS® Kinect sensor that was mounted on 6-wheel-drive mobile robot chassis. The design of the localization algorithm was focused to the most significant blobs and points (landmarks on the colour picture. Actual coordinates of autonomous mobile robot were calculated out from measured distances (depth sensor and calculated angles (RGB camera with respect to landmark points. Time measurement script was used to compare the speed of landmark finding algorithm for localization in case of one and more landmarks on picture. The main source code was written in MS Visual studio C# programming language with Microsoft.Kinect.1.7.dll on Windows based PC. Algorithms described in this article were created for a future development of an autonomous agronomical m obile robot localization and control.

  5. An Adaptive Algorithm for Finding Frequent Sets in Landmark Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Ong, Kok-Leong; Lee, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We consider a CPU constrained environment for finding approximation of frequent sets in data streams using the landmark window. Our algorithm can detect overload situations, i.e., breaching the CPU capacity, and sheds data in the stream to “keep up”. This is done within a controlled error threshold...

  6. Audiovisual navigation in virtual mazes : The benefits of audiovisual landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, Peter; Philippi, Tom; van Erp, J.B.F.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that multisensory presentation can improve perception, attention, and object memory compared with unisensory presentation. Consequently, we expect that multisensory presentation of landmarks can improve spatial memory and navigation. In this study we tested the effect of visual, au

  7. Learning-based landmarks detection for osteoporosis analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Erkang; Zhu, Ling; Yang, Jie; Azhari, Azhari; Sitam, Suhardjo; Liang, Xin; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Ling, Haibin

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is the common cause for a broken bone among senior citizens. Early diagnosis of osteoporosis requires routine examination which may be costly for patients. A potential low cost diagnosis is to identify a senior citizen at high risk of osteoporosis by pre-screening during routine dental examination. Therefore, osteoporosis analysis using dental radiographs severs as a key step in routine dental examination. The aim of this study is to localize landmarks in dental radiographs which are helpful to assess the evidence of osteoporosis. We collect eight landmarks which are critical in osteoporosis analysis. Our goal is to localize these landmarks automatically for a given dental radiographic image. To address the challenges such as large variations of appearances in subjects, in this paper, we formulate the task into a multi-class classification problem. A hybrid feature pool is used to represent these landmarks. For the discriminative classification problem, we use a random forest to fuse the hybrid feature representation. In the experiments, we also evaluate the performances of individual feature component and the hybrid fused feature. Our proposed method achieves average detection error of 2:9mm.

  8. Neural dynamics for landmark orientation and angular path integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Johannes D; Jayaraman, Vivek

    2015-05-14

    Many animals navigate using a combination of visual landmarks and path integration. In mammalian brains, head direction cells integrate these two streams of information by representing an animal's heading relative to landmarks, yet maintaining their directional tuning in darkness based on self-motion cues. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging in head-fixed Drosophila melanogaster walking on a ball in a virtual reality arena to demonstrate that landmark-based orientation and angular path integration are combined in the population responses of neurons whose dendrites tile the ellipsoid body, a toroidal structure in the centre of the fly brain. The neural population encodes the fly's azimuth relative to its environment, tracking visual landmarks when available and relying on self-motion cues in darkness. When both visual and self-motion cues are absent, a representation of the animal's orientation is maintained in this network through persistent activity, a potential substrate for short-term memory. Several features of the population dynamics of these neurons and their circular anatomical arrangement are suggestive of ring attractors, network structures that have been proposed to support the function of navigational brain circuits. PMID:25971509

  9. Navigating virtual mazes : The benefits of audiovisual landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, P.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Philippi, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that multisensory presentation can improve perception, attention, and object memory compared with unisensory presentation. Consequently, we expect that multisensory presentation of landmarks can improve spatial memory and navigation. In this study we tested the effect of visual, au

  10. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the endo

  11. 36 CFR 62.8 - Natural landmark designation removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the site did not meet the criteria for national significance at the time of designation; (ii) When the... whether the NPS considers the documentation sufficient to consider removal of the natural landmark... submits a recommendation for removal to the National Park System Advisory Board. The Advisory...

  12. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  13. Visual SLAM for underwater vehicles using video velocity log and natural landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Salvi, Joaquim; Petillot, Yvan R.; Thomas, Stephen; Aulinas Masó, Josep M.

    2008-01-01

    A visual SLAM system has been implemented and optimised for real-time deployment on an AUV equipped with calibrated stereo cameras. The system incorporates a novel approach to landmark description in which landmarks are local sub maps that consist of a cloud of 3D points and their associated SIFT/SURF descriptors. Landmarks are also sparsely distributed which simplifies and accelerates data association and map updates. In addition to landmark-based localisation the system utilises visual odom...

  14. Coincident linkage of type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and measures of cardiovascular disease in a genome scan of the diabetes heart study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Donald W; Rudock, Megan; Ziegler, Julie; Lehtinen, Allison B; Xu, Jianzhao; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Herrington, David; Rich, Stephen S; Freedman, Barry I; Carr, J Jeffrey; Langefeld, Carl D

    2006-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes, but the relationship between CVD and type 2 diabetes is not well understood. The Diabetes Heart Study is a study of type 2 diabetes-enriched families extensively phenotyped for measures of CVD, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. A total of 977 Caucasian subjects from 358 pedigrees (575 type 2 diabetic relative pairs) with at least two individuals with type 2 diabetes and, where possible, unaffected siblings were included in a genome scan. Qualitative traits evaluated in this analysis are with or without the presence of coronary calcified plaque (CCP) and with or without carotid calcified plaque (CarCP) measured by electrocardiogram-gated helical computed tomography. In addition, prevalent CVD was measured using two definitions: CVD1, based on self-reported history of clinical CVD (393 subjects), and CVD2, defined as CVD1 and/or CCP >400 (606 subjects). These discrete traits (type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, CVD1, CVD2, CCP, and CarCP) frequently coincide in the same individuals with concordance ranging from 42.9 to 99%. Multipoint nonparametric linkage analysis revealed evidence for coincident mapping of each trait (type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, CVD1, CVD2, CCP, and CarCP) to three different genomic regions: a broad region on chromosome 3 (70-160 cM; logarithm of odds [LOD] scores ranging between 1.15 and 2.71), chromosome 4q31 (peak LOD 146 cM; LOD scores ranging between 0.90 and 2.41), and on chromosome 14p (peak LOD 23 cM; LOD scores ranging between 1.43 and 2.31). Ordered subset analysis (OSA) suggests that the linked chromosome 3 region consists of at least two separate loci on 3p and 3q. In addition, OSA based on lipid measures and other traits identify family subsets with significantly stronger evidence of linkage (e.g., CVD2 on chromosome 3 at 87 cM subsetting on low HDL with an initial LOD of 2.19 is maximized to an LOD of 7.04 in a subset of

  15. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagihara Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS, which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. Methods DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. Results DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20 of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification and 4.7% (4/86 of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification. KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild

  16. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS), which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20) of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification) and 4.7% (4/86) of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification). KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild-type KRAS resulted in the inhibition of cell growth and

  17. Audible Signage as a Wayfinding Aid: Verbal Landmark versus Talking Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, B. L.; Mitchell, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Comparison by 40 users of 2 technologies--Verbal Landmark and Talking Signs--that provide speech messages to hand-held receivers for blind travelers found that, on all measures, the Talking Signs system proved superior to the Verbal Landmark system. This was attributed to Verbal Landmark's more cognitively demanding technology. (DB)

  18. Cephalometric landmark variability among orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durao, Ana Paula Reis; Ferreira, Afonso P. [Dept.of Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Morosolli, Aline [Dept.of Surgery, Dentistry School, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pittayapat, Pisha [Dept.of Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Bolstad, Napat [Dept.of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso (Norway); Jacobs, Reinhilde [Dept.of Oral Imaging Center, OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Dept. of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The aim this study was to compare the accuracy of orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists in identifying 17 commonly used cephalometric landmarks, and to determine the extent of variability associated with each of those landmarks. Twenty digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were evaluated by two groups of dental specialists, and 17 cephalometric landmarks were identified. The x and y coordinates of each landmark were recorded. The mean value for each landmark was considered the best estimate and used as the standard. Variation in measurements of the distance between landmarks and measurements of the angles associated with certain landmarks was also assessed by a subset of two observers, and intraobserver and interobserver agreement were evaluated. Intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent for intraobserver agreement, but only good for interobserver agreement. The least reliable landmark for orthodontists was the gnathion (Gn) point (standard deviation [SD], 5.92 mm), while the orbitale (Or) was the least reliable landmark (SD, 4.41 mm) for dentomaxillofacial radiologists. Furthermore, the condylion (Co)-Gn plane was the least consistent (SD, 4.43 mm). We established that some landmarks were not as reproducible as others, both horizontally and vertically. The most consistently identified landmark in both groups was the lower incisor border, while the least reliable points were Co, Gn, Or, and the anterior nasal spine. Overall, a lower level of reproducibility in the identification of cephalometric landmarks was observed among orthodontists.

  19. 78 FR 13377 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... INFORMATION: The purpose of the meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board... Historic Landmarks to the National Park System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and...

  20. A physical map of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, J.D.; Marra, M.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R.H.; Chinwalla, A.; Wallis, J.; Sekhon, M.; Wylie, K.; Mardis, E.R.; Wilson, R.K.; Fulton, R.; Kucaba, T.A.; Wagner-McPherson, C.; Barbazuk, W.B.; Gregory, S.G.; Humphray, S.J.; French, L.; Evans, R.S.; Bethel, G.; Whittaker, A.; Holden, J.L.; McCann, O.T.; Dunham, A.; Soderlund, C.; Scott, C.E.; Bentley, D.R.; Schuler, G.; Chen, H.-C.; Jang, W.; Green, E.D.; Idol, J.R.; Maduro, V.V. Braden; Montgomery, K.T.; Lee, E.; Miller, A.; Emerling, S.; Kucherlapati; Gibbs, R.; Scherer, S.; Gorrell, J.H.; Sodergren, E.; Clerc-Blankenburg, K.; Tabor, P.; Naylor, S.; Garcia, D.; de Jong, P.J.; Catanese, J.J.; Nowak, N.; Osoegawa, K.; Qin, S.; Rowen, L.; Madan, A.; Dors, M.; Hood, L.; Trask, B.; Friedman, C.; Massa, H.; Cheung, V.G.; Kirsch, I.R.; Reid, T.; Yonescu, R.; Weissenbach, J.; Bruls, T.; Heilig, R.; Branscomb, E.; Olsen, A.; Doggett, N.; Cheng, J.F.; Hawkins, T.; Myers, R.M.; Shang, J.; Ramirez, L.; Schmutz, J.; Velasquez, O.; Dixon, K.; Stone, N.E.; Cox, D.R.; Haussler, D.; Kent, W.J.; Furey, T.; Rogic, S.; Kennedy, S.; Jones, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Wen, G.; Schilhabel, M.; Gloeckner, G.; Nyakatura, G.; Siebert, R.; Schlegelberger, B.; Korenberg, J.; Chen, X.N.; Fujiyama, A.; Hattori, M.; Toyoda, A.; Yada, T.; Park, H.S.; Sakaki, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Asakawa, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Sasaki, T.; Shintani, A.; Shimizu, A.; Shibuya, K.; Kudoh, J.; Minoshima, S.; Ramser, J.; Seranski, P.; Hoff, C.; Poustka, A.; Reinhardt, R.; Lehrach, H.

    2001-01-01

    The human genome is by far the largest genome to be sequenced, and its size and complexity present many challenges for sequence assembly. The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium constructed a map of the whole genome to enable the selection of clones for sequencing and for the accurate assembly of the genome sequence. Here we report the construction of the whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) map and its integration with previous landmark maps and information from mapping efforts focused on specific chromosomal regions. We also describe the integration of sequence data with the map.

  1. Automatic facial expression recognition based on features extracted from tracking of facial landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Deepak; Lee, Joonwhoan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automatic facial expression recognition system using support vector machines, with geometric features extracted from the tracking of facial landmarks. Facial landmark initialization and tracking is performed by using an elastic bunch graph matching algorithm. The facial expression recognition is performed based on the features extracted from the tracking of not only individual landmarks, but also pair of landmarks. The recognition accuracy on the Extended Kohn-Kanade (CK+) database shows that our proposed set of features produces better results, because it utilizes time-varying graph information, as well as the motion of individual facial landmarks.

  2. Landmark Analysis Of Leaf Shape Using Polygonal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmansyah, Zakhi; Herdiyeni, Yeni; Paruhum Silalahi, Bib; Douady, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    This research proposes a method to extract landmark of leaf shape using static threshold of polygonal approximation. Leaf shape analysis has played a central role in many problems in vision and perception. Landmark-based shape analysis is the core of geometric morphometric and has been used as a quantitative tool in evolutionary and developmental biology. In this research, the polygonal approximation is used to select the best points that can represent the leaf shape variability. We used a static threshold as the control parameter of fitting a series of line segment over a digital curve of leaf shape. This research focuses on seven leaf shape, i.e., eliptic, obovate, ovate, oblong and special. Experimental results show static polygonal approximation shows can be used to find the important points of leaf shape.

  3. Visual EKF-SLAM from Heterogeneous Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Othón Esparza-Jiménez; Michel Devy; Gordillo, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Many applications require the localization of a moving object, e.g., a robot, using sensory data acquired from embedded devices. Simultaneous localization and mapping from vision performs both the spatial and temporal fusion of these data on a map when a camera moves in an unknown environment. Such a SLAM process executes two interleaved functions: the front-end detects and tracks features from images, while the back-end interprets features as landmark observations and estimates both the land...

  4. The influence of off-screen landmarks on user orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Korda, Amichai

    2014-01-01

    Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Geospatial Technologies. Maps displayed on hand held devices, such as smartphones; provide limited visibility due to their small screen display. In order to overcome display limitations, researchers have developed new techniques that point users to objects and landmarks located off-screen, which is known as an “off-screen interface”. Since this is a new type of map interface, there is l...

  5. Visual landmarks facilitate rodent spatial navigation in virtual reality environments

    OpenAIRE

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain areas. Virtual reality offers a unique approach to ask whether visual landmark cues alone are sufficient to improve performance in a spatial task. We ...

  6. Insite: Canada's landmark safe injecting program at risk

    OpenAIRE

    Drucker Ernest

    2006-01-01

    Abstract InSite is North Americas first supervised injection site and a landmark public heath initiative operating in Vancouver since 2003. The program is a vital component of that cities internationally recognized harm reduction approach to its serious problems with drugs, crime, homelessness and AIDS. InSite currently operates under a waiver of Federal rules that allow it to provide services as a research project. An extensive evaluation has produced very positive results for thousands of u...

  7. Global and local spatial landmarks: their role during foraging by Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Anna N

    2006-01-01

    Locating food and refuge is essential for an animal's survival. However, little is known how mammals navigate under natural conditions and cope with given environmental constraints. In a series of six experiments, I investigated landmark-based navigation in free-ranging Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus). Squirrels were trained individually to find a baited platform within an array of nine identical platforms and artificial landmarks set up on their territories. After animals learned the location of the food platform in the array, the position of the latter with respect to local artificial, local natural, and global landmarks was manipulated, and the animal's ability to find the food platform was tested. When only positions of local artificial landmarks were changed, squirrels located food with high accuracy. When the location of the array relative to global landmarks was altered, food-finding accuracy decreased but remained significant. In the absence of known global landmarks, the presence of a familiar route and natural local landmarks resulted in significant but not highly accurate performance. Squirrels likely relied on multiple types of cues when orienting towards a food platform. Local landmarks were used only as a secondary mechanism of navigation, and were not attended to when a familiar route and known global landmarks were present. This study provided insights into landmark use by a wild mammal in a natural situation, and it demonstrated that an array of platforms can be employed to investigate landmark-based navigation under such conditions. PMID:16163480

  8. Landmarks or panoramas: what do navigating ants attend to for guidance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnon Guy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects are known to rely on terrestrial landmarks for navigation. Landmarks are used to chart a route or pinpoint a goal. The distant panorama, however, is often thought not to guide navigation directly during a familiar journey, but to act as a contextual cue that primes the correct memory of the landmarks. Results We provided Melophorus bagoti ants with a huge artificial landmark located right near the nest entrance to find out whether navigating ants focus on such a prominent visual landmark for homing guidance. When the landmark was displaced by small or large distances, ant routes were affected differently. Certain behaviours appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that guidance was based on the landmark only. Instead, comparisons of panoramic images recorded on the field, encompassing both landmark and distal panorama, could explain most aspects of the ant behaviours. Conclusion Ants navigating along a familiar route do not focus on obvious landmarks or filter out distal panoramic cues, but appear to be guided by cues covering a large area of their panoramic visual field, including both landmarks and distal panorama. Using panoramic views seems an appropriate strategy to cope with the complexity of natural scenes and the poor resolution of insects' eyes. The ability to isolate landmarks from the rest of a scene may be beyond the capacity of animals that do not possess a dedicated object-perception visual stream like primates.

  9. Landmark Optimization Using Local Curvature for Point-Based Nonlinear Rodent Brain Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a technique to automate landmark selection for point-based interpolating transformations for nonlinear medical image registration. Materials and Methods. Interpolating transformations were calculated from homologous point landmarks on the source (image to be transformed and target (reference image. Point landmarks are placed at regular intervals on contours of anatomical features, and their positions are optimized along the contour surface by a function composed of curvature similarity and displacements of the homologous landmarks. The method was evaluated in two cases (=5 each. In one, MRI was registered to histological sections; in the second, geometric distortions in EPI MRI were corrected. Normalized mutual information and target registration error were calculated to compare the registration accuracy of the automatically and manually generated landmarks. Results. Statistical analyses demonstrated significant improvement (<0.05 in registration accuracy by landmark optimization in most data sets and trends towards improvement (<0.1 in others as compared to manual landmark selection.

  10. AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF RETINAL VASCULAR LANDMARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this paper is introducing a method to distinguish between different landmarks of the retina: bifurcations and crossings. The methodology may help in differentiating between arteries and veins and is useful in identifying diseases and other special pathologies, too. The method does not need any special skills, thus it can be assimilated to an automatic way for pinpointing landmarks; moreover it gives good responses for very small vessels. A skeletonized representation, taken out from the segmented binary image (obtained through a preprocessing step, is used to identify pixels with three or more neighbors. Then, the junction points are classified into bifurcations or crossovers depending on their geometrical and topological properties such as width, direction and connectivity of the surrounding segments. The proposed approach is applied to the public-domain DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with the state-of-the-art methods using proper validation parameters. The method was successful in identifying the majority of the landmarks; the average correctly identified bifurcations in both DRIVE and STARE datasets for the recall and precision values are: 95.4% and 87.1% respectively; also for the crossovers, the recall and precision values are: 87.6% and 90.5% respectively; thus outperforming other studies.

  11. CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  12. Thyroid scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PET scan Skin nodules Thyroid cancer Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma Toxic nodular goiter ... Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid Tests Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  13. New Statistical Method to Analyze Three-Dimensional Landmark Configurations Obtained with Cone-Beam CT: Basic Features and Clinical Application for Rapid Maxillary Expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Jennifer; Lagravere, Manuel O.; Major, Paul W.; Heo, Giseon [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    To describe a statistical method of three-dimensional landmark configuration data and apply it to an orthodontic data set comparing two types of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) treatments. Landmark configurations obtained from cone beam CT scans were used to represent patients in two types (please describe what were two types) of RME groups and a control group over four time points. A method using tools from persistent homology and dimensionality reduction is presented and used to identify variability between the subjects. The analysis was in agreement with previous results using conventional methods, which found significant differences between treatment groups and the control, but no distinction between the types of treatment. Additionally, it was found that second molar eruption varied considerably between the subjects, and this has not been evaluated in previous analyses. This method of analysis allows entire configurations to be considered as a whole, and does not require specific inter-landmark distances or angles to be selected. Sources of variability present themselves, without having to be individually sought after. This method is suggested as an additional tool for the analysis of landmark configuration data.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies a Risk Locus for Preeclampsia on 2q14, Near the Inhibin, Beta B Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Shaun P Brennecke; East, Christine E.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Kent, Jack W.; Thomas D Dyer; Said, Joanne M.; Roten, Linda T; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Abraham, Lawrence J.; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58×10−7, OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26×10−7, OR = 1.56) satisfied our genome-wide signific...

  15. Genome-wide association scan identifies a risk locus for preeclampsia on 2q14, near the inhibin, beta B gene

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Shaun P Brennecke; East, Christine; Göring, Harald H. H.; Kent, Jack W.; Thomas D Dyer; Said, Joanne M.; Roten, Linda Tømmerdal; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Abraham, Lawrence J.; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58×10−7, OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26×10−7, OR = 1.56) satisfied our genome-wide signific...

  16. Automated planning of MRI neuro scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stewart; Bystrov, Daniel; Netsch, Thomas; Bergmans, Rene; van Muiswinkel, Arianne; Visser, Fredy; Sprigorum, Rudolf; Gieseke, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    In clinical MRI examinations, the geometry of diagnostic scans is defined in an initial planning phase. The operator plans the scan volumes (off-centre, angulation, field-of-view) with respect to patient anatomy in 'scout' images. Often multiple plans are required within a single examination, distracting attention from the patient waiting in the scanner. A novel and robust method is described for automated planning of neurological MRI scans, capable of handling strong shape deviations from healthy anatomy. The expert knowledge required to position scan geometries is learned from previous example plans, allowing site-specific styles to be readily taken into account. The proposed method first fits an anatomical model to the scout data, and then new scan geometries are positioned with respect to extracted landmarks. The accuracy of landmark extraction was measured to be comparable to the inter-observer variability, and automated plans are shown to be highly consistent with those created by expert operators using clinical data. The results of the presented evaluation demonstrate the robustness and applicability of the proposed approach, which has the potential to significantly improve clinical workflow.

  17. Volumetric Image Guidance Using Carina vs Spine as Registration Landmarks for Conventionally Fractionated Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavoie, Caroline; Higgins, Jane; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Sun, Alexander; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.bezjak@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of 2 image guided radiation therapy methods using carina vs spine as landmarks and then to identify which landmark is superior relative to tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: For 98 lung patients, 2596 daily image-guidance cone-beam computed tomography scans were analyzed. Tattoos were used for initial patient alignment; then, spine and carina registrations were performed independently. A separate analysis assessed the adequacy of gross tumor volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume coverage on cone-beam computed tomography using the initial, middle, and final fractions of radiation therapy. Coverage was recorded for primary tumor (T), nodes (N), and combined target (T+N). Three scenarios were compared: tattoos alignment, spine registration, and carina registration. Results: Spine and carina registrations identified setup errors {>=}5 mm in 35% and 46% of fractions, respectively. The mean vector difference between spine and carina matching had a magnitude of 3.3 mm. Spine and carina improved combined target coverage, compared with tattoos, in 50% and 34% (spine) to 54% and 46% (carina) of the first and final fractions, respectively. Carina matching showed greater combined target coverage in 17% and 23% of fractions for the first and final fractions, respectively; with spine matching, this was only observed in 4% (first) and 6% (final) of fractions. Carina matching provided superior nodes coverage at the end of radiation compared with spine matching (P=.0006), without compromising primary tumor coverage. Conclusion: Frequent patient setup errors occur in locally advanced lung cancer patients. Spine and carina registrations improved combined target coverage throughout the treatment course, but carina matching provided superior combined target coverage.

  18. SHEsisEpi, a GPU-enhanced genome-wide SNP-SNP interaction scanning algorithm, efficiently reveals the risk genetic epistasis in bipolar disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohan Hu; Qiang Liu; Zhao Zhang; Zhiqiang Li; Shilin Wang; Lin He; Yongyong Shi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, We developed a GPU-based analytical method, named as SHEsisEpi, which purely focuses on risk epistasis in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of complex traits, excluding the contamination of marginal effects caused by single-locus association. We analyzed the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium's (WTCCC)GWAS data of bipolar disorder (BPD) with 500K SNPs.

  19. Notes on the Landmark Development of CBR in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahong Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Community-based rehabilitation has a history of 22 years in China.In spite of the preliminary achievement and experiences obtained by the pioneering and trial projects,it was not until the beginning of the new century that CBR in China experienced a landmark development.This iS characterized by a number of favorable pohcy by the government for CBR;the mechanism facilitating primary health care with CBR,a new work-force system of CBR reorganized with better motivation and efficiency,99 demonstration projects of CBR bringing about benchmark promotion effect and the active involvement in CBR by social resources agents.

  20. The importance of context to the genetic architecture of diabetes-related traits is revealed in a genome-wide scan of a LG/J × SM/J murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Heather A; Lee, Arthur; Fawcett, Gloria L; Wang, Bing; Pletscher, L Susan; Maxwell, Taylor J; Ehrich, Thomas H; Kenney-Hunt, Jane P; Wolf, Jason B; Semenkovich, Clay F; Cheverud, James M

    2011-04-01

    Variations in diabetic phenotypes are caused by complex interactions of genetic effects, environmental factors, and the interplay between the two. We tease apart these complex interactions by examining genome-wide genetic and epigenetic effects on diabetes-related traits among different sex, diet, and sex-by-diet cohorts in a Mus musculus model. We conducted a genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci that affect serum glucose and insulin levels and response to glucose stress in an F(16) Advanced Intercross Line of the LG/J and SM/J intercross (Wustl:LG,SM-G16). Half of each sibship was fed a high-fat diet and half was fed a relatively low-fat diet. Context-dependent genetic (additive and dominance) and epigenetic (parent-of-origin imprinting) effects were characterized by partitioning animals into sex, diet, and sex-by-diet cohorts. We found that different cohorts often have unique genetic effects at the same loci, and that genetic signals can be masked or erroneously assigned to specific cohorts if they are not considered individually. Our data demonstrate that the effects of genes on complex trait variation are highly context-dependent and that the same genomic sequence can affect traits differently depending on an individual's sex and/or dietary environment. Our results have important implications for studies of complex traits in humans.

  1. Using Regulatory and Epistatic Networks to Extend the Findings of a Genome Scan: Identifying the Gene Drivers of Pigmentation in Merino Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Elsa García-Gámez; Antonio Reverter; Vicki Whan; McWilliam, Sean M.; Juan José Arranz; James Kijas

    2011-01-01

    Extending genome wide association analysis by the inclusion of gene expression data may assist in the dissection of complex traits. We examined piebald, a pigmentation phenotype in both human and Merino sheep, by analysing multiple data types using a systems approach. First, a case control analysis of 49,034 ovine SNP was performed which confirmed a multigenic basis for the condition. We combined these results with gene expression data from five tissue types analysed with a skin-specific micr...

  2. Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baute, Gregory J; Kane, Nolan C; Grassa, Christopher J; Lai, Zhao; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-04-01

    The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study, we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a globally important oilseed. To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes, including wild, landrace, and modern lines of H. annuus, as well as two cross-compatible wild relatives, Helianthus argophyllus and Helianthus petiolaris. Outlier analyses identified 122 and 15 candidate genes associated with domestication and improvement, respectively. As in several previous studies, genes putatively involved in oil biosynthesis were the most extreme outliers. Additionally, several promising associations were observed with previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs), such as branching. Admixture analyses revealed that all the modern cultivar genomes we examined contained one or more introgressions from wild populations, with every chromosome having evidence of introgression in at least one modern line. Cumulatively, introgressions cover c. 10% of the cultivated sunflower genome. Surprisingly, introgressions do not avoid candidate domestication genes, probably because of the reintroduction of branching.

  3. Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baute, Gregory J; Kane, Nolan C; Grassa, Christopher J; Lai, Zhao; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-04-01

    The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study, we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a globally important oilseed. To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes, including wild, landrace, and modern lines of H. annuus, as well as two cross-compatible wild relatives, Helianthus argophyllus and Helianthus petiolaris. Outlier analyses identified 122 and 15 candidate genes associated with domestication and improvement, respectively. As in several previous studies, genes putatively involved in oil biosynthesis were the most extreme outliers. Additionally, several promising associations were observed with previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs), such as branching. Admixture analyses revealed that all the modern cultivar genomes we examined contained one or more introgressions from wild populations, with every chromosome having evidence of introgression in at least one modern line. Cumulatively, introgressions cover c. 10% of the cultivated sunflower genome. Surprisingly, introgressions do not avoid candidate domestication genes, probably because of the reintroduction of branching. PMID:25641359

  4. Disorientation inhibits landmark use in 12-18-month-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Adina R; Foster, Kirsty A; Bremner, J Gavin

    2006-07-01

    Recent research has indicated that, particularly under conditions of inertial disorientation, mammals may be sensitive to landmark configuration geometry at the expense of individual featural information when locating hidden goals. The current study sought to establish whether landmark use could be demonstrated in 12-18-month-old infants with and without a disorientation procedure, and with geometrically ambiguous landmark configurations. A peekaboo paradigm was employed in which infants learned to anticipate a peekaboo event after a cue from two locations within a circular arena, followed by a test trial from a novel position in which no peekaboo occurred after the cue. In all conditions, an isosceles triangle arrangement of landmarks was used, with peekaboo occurring between the landmarks of one of the two equal "sides", thus being geometrically ambiguous. In two conditions, the landmarks were distinctive, and in two further conditions, they were identical. In one of the distinctive conditions and one of the identical landmark conditions, infants underwent a disorientation procedure in between training and test trials. Only oriented infants with distinctive landmarks were successful in test trials, thus suggesting that infants are able to use the individual features of landmarks to locate a goal, but can only do so if oriented. PMID:17138289

  5. The use of radial symmetry to localize retinal landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachetti, A; Ballerini, L; Trucco, E; Wilson, P J

    2013-01-01

    Locating the optic disc center and the fovea in digital fundus images is surprisingly difficult due to the variation range in color and contrast and the possible presence of pathologies creating bright spots or changing the appearance of retinal landmarks. These reasons make it difficult to find good templates of optic disc and fovea shape and color for pattern matching. In this paper we propose radial symmetry as the principal cue to locate both optic disc and macula centers. Centers of bright and dark circularly symmetrical regions with arbitrary radii, can be found robustly against changes in brightness and contrast by using the Fast Radial Symmetry transform. Detectors based on this transform coupled with a weak hypothesis on vessel density (optic disc intersects large vessels while the fovea lies in an avascular region), can provide a fast location of both OD and macula with accuracy similar or better than state-of-the-art methods. The approach has been chosen as the default technique for fast localization of the two landmarks in the VAMPIRE software suite. PMID:23886574

  6. Landmarks in nature to support wayfinding: the effects of seasons and experimental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Pyry; Irvankoski, Katja; Krause, Christina M; Sarjakoski, L Tiina

    2013-08-01

    Landmarks constitute an essential basis for a structural understanding of the spatial environment. Therefore, they are crucial factors in external spatial representations such as maps and verbal route descriptions, which are used to support wayfinding. However, selecting landmarks for these representations is a difficult task, for which an understanding of how people perceive and remember landmarks in the environment is needed. We investigated the ways in which people perceive and remember landmarks in nature using the thinking aloud and sketch map methods during both the summer and the winter seasons. We examined the differences between methods to identify those landmarks that should be selected for external spatial representations, such as maps or route descriptions, in varying conditions. We found differences in the use of landmarks both in terms of the methods and also between the different seasons. In particular, the participants used passage and tree-related landmarks at significantly different frequencies with the thinking aloud and sketch map methods. The results are likely to reflect the different roles of the landmark groups when using the two methods, but also the differences in counting landmarks when using both methods. Seasonal differences in the use of landmarks occurred only with the thinking aloud method. Sketch maps were drawn similarly in summertime and wintertime; the participants remembered and selected landmarks similarly independent of the differences in their perceptions of the environment due to the season. The achieved results may guide the planning of external spatial representations within the context of wayfinding as well as when planning further experimental studies.

  7. Using an Inbred Horse Breed in a High Density Genome-Wide Scan for Genetic Risk Factors of Insect Bite Hypersensitivity (IBH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velie, Brandon D.; Shrestha, Merina; Franҫois, Liesbeth; Schurink, Anouk; Tesfayonas, Yohannes G.; Stinckens, Anneleen; Blott, Sarah; Ducro, Bart J.; Mikko, Sofia; Thomas, Ruth; Swinburne, June E.; Sundqvist, Marie; Eriksson, Susanne; Buys, Nadine; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    While susceptibility to hypersensitive reactions is a common problem amongst humans and animals alike, the population structure of certain animal species and breeds provides a more advantageous route to better understanding the biology underpinning these conditions. The current study uses Exmoor ponies, a highly inbred breed of horse known to frequently suffer from insect bite hypersensitivity, to identify genomic regions associated with a type I and type IV hypersensitive reaction. A total of 110 cases and 170 controls were genotyped on the 670K Axiom Equine Genotyping Array. Quality control resulted in 452,457 SNPs and 268 individuals being tested for association. Genome-wide association analyses were performed using the GenABEL package in R and resulted in the identification of two regions of interest on Chromosome 8. The first region contained the most significant SNP identified, which was located in an intron of the DCC netrin 1 receptor gene. The second region identified contained multiple top SNPs and encompassed the PIGN, KIAA1468, TNFRSF11A, ZCCHC2, and PHLPP1 genes. Although additional studies will be needed to validate the importance of these regions in horses and the relevance of these regions in other species, the knowledge gained from the current study has the potential to be a step forward in unraveling the complex nature of hypersensitive reactions. PMID:27070818

  8. Genome-wide association scan identifies a risk locus for preeclampsia on 2q14, near the inhibin, beta B gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Johnson

    Full Text Available Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58×10(-7, OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26×10(-7, OR = 1.56 satisfied our genome-wide significance threshold (modified Bonferroni p0.92. We attempted to provide evidence of a putative regulatory role for these SNPs using bioinformatic analyses and found that they all reside within regions of low sequence conservation and/or low complexity, suggesting functional importance is low. We also explored the mRNA expression in decidua of genes ±500 kb of INHBB and found a nominally significant correlation between a transcript encoded by the EPB41L5 gene, ∼250 kb centromeric to INHBB, and preeclampsia (p = 0.03. We were unable to replicate the associations shown by the significant GWAS SNPs in case-control cohorts from Norway and Finland, leading us to conclude that it is more likely that these SNPs are in LD with as yet unidentified causal variant(s.

  9. Genome-wide association scan identifies a risk locus for preeclampsia on 2q14, near the inhibin, beta B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew P; Brennecke, Shaun P; East, Christine E; Göring, Harald H H; Kent, Jack W; Dyer, Thomas D; Said, Joanne M; Roten, Linda T; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Abraham, Lawrence J; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58×10(-7), OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26×10(-7), OR = 1.56) satisfied our genome-wide significance threshold (modified Bonferroni p0.92). We attempted to provide evidence of a putative regulatory role for these SNPs using bioinformatic analyses and found that they all reside within regions of low sequence conservation and/or low complexity, suggesting functional importance is low. We also explored the mRNA expression in decidua of genes ±500 kb of INHBB and found a nominally significant correlation between a transcript encoded by the EPB41L5 gene, ∼250 kb centromeric to INHBB, and preeclampsia (p = 0.03). We were unable to replicate the associations shown by the significant GWAS SNPs in case-control cohorts from Norway and Finland, leading us to conclude that it is more likely that these SNPs are in LD with as yet unidentified causal variant(s). PMID:22432041

  10. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  11. CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... come from a CT scan. Some people have allergies to contrast dye. Let your doctor know if you have ... vein contains iodine. If you have an iodine allergy, a type of contrast may cause nausea or vomiting , sneezing , itching , or ...

  12. The Finland–United States Investigation of Non–Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Genetics (FUSION) Study. I. An Autosomal Genome Scan for Genes That Predispose to Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Watanabe, Richard M; Valle, Timo T.; Hauser, Elizabeth R; Magnuson, Victoria L.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Ally, Delphine S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Silander, Kaisa; Kohtamäki, Kimmo; Chines, Peter; Balow, Jr., James; Birznieks, Gunther; Chang, Jennie; Eldridge, William

    2000-01-01

    We performed a genome scan at an average resolution of 8 cM in 719 Finnish sib pairs with type 2 diabetes. Our strongest results are for chromosome 20, where we observe a weighted maximum LOD score (MLS) of 2.15 at map position 69.5 cM from pter and secondary weighted LOD-score peaks of 2.04 at 56.5 cM and 1.99 at 17.5 cM. Our next largest MLS is for chromosome 11 (MLS = 1.75 at 84.0 cM), followed by chromosomes 2 (MLS = 0.87 at 5.5 cM), 10 (MLS = 0.77 at 75.0 cM), and 6 (MLS = 0.61 at 112.5 ...

  13. STUDY ON COMPARISON BETWEEN LANDMARK GUIDED (BRINKMAN'S TECHNIQUE ) AND ULTRASOUND GUIDED INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN CANNULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod; Sashi Walling

    2015-01-01

    Technique of cannulating the central veins , until recently has been based on landmark guided technique . Recently ultrasound machines with high frequency probes are being used to increase success rate and reducing complications. OBJECTIVE: In our study we compare landmark guided technique ( Brinkman's technique ) ( 1 ) with ultrasound guided technique. STUDY DESIGN: outcome was evaluated in terms of 1 ) Number of attempts 2 ) ...

  14. Reorienting strategies in a rectangular array of landmarks by domestic chicks (Gallus gallus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchia, Tommaso; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Spatial reorientation in a rectangular array of four landmarks located in the center of a circular enclosure was investigated in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus). One of the landmark possessed unique visual features, indicating the location of a food reward. After training, chicks were tested (a) with the same array as during the training; (b) with four identical landmarks of the type previously nonrewarded, of the type previously rewarded, or of a new type; (c) after having transformed one of the landmarks located at the geometric incorrect location into the type of landmark previously rewarded; or (d) with a fifth landmark of the rewarded type at a new location. Chicks encoded information provided by local featural cues but not the geometric information provided by the shape of the array. Moreover, when trained in a rectangular array of identical landmarks chicks failed to reorient. In a second series of experiments, the array was located in correspondence to the corners of a rectangular enclosure. This time chicks successfully learned to locate the reward using geometric information. However, when the rectangular array was located in the center of a larger rectangular enclosure, chicks failed to reorient, indicating that the geometric information given by the macroscopic layout of arena surfaces was not used to specify different locations. These results suggest that chicks reorient on the basis of a local representation of single landmarks and that encoding of the global aspects of geometry only occurs with respect to the large, extended surfaces of an enclosure. PMID:20476814

  15. Visual landmark-directed scatter-hoarding of Siberian chipmunks Tamias sibiricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyuan; Li, Jia; Wang, Zhenyu; Yi, Xianfeng

    2016-05-01

    Spatial memory of cached food items plays an important role in cache recovery by scatter-hoarding animals. However, whether scatter-hoarding animals intentionally select cache sites with respect to visual landmarks in the environment and then rely on them to recover their cached seeds for later use has not been extensively explored. Furthermore, there is a lack of evidence on whether there are sex differences in visual landmark-based food-hoarding behaviors in small rodents even though male and female animals exhibit different spatial abilities. In the present study, we used a scatter-hoarding animal, the Siberian chipmunk, Tamias sibiricus to explore these questions in semi-natural enclosures. Our results showed that T. sibiricus preferred to establish caches in the shallow pits labeled with visual landmarks (branches of Pinus sylvestris, leaves of Athyrium brevifrons and PVC tubes). In addition, visual landmarks of P. sylvestris facilitated cache recovery by T. sibiricus. We also found significant sex differences in visual landmark-based food-hoarding strategies in Siberian chipmunks. Males, rather than females, chipmunks tended to establish their caches with respect to the visual landmarks. Our studies show that T. sibiricus rely on visual landmarks to establish and recover their caches, and that sex differences exist in visual landmark-based food hoarding in Siberian chipmunks. PMID:27160702

  16. Interactions of visual odometry and landmark guidance during food search in honeybees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T; Hemmi, JM; Srinivasan, MV; Zeil, J

    2005-01-01

    How do honeybees use visual odometry and goal-defining landmarks to guide food search? In one experiment, bees were trained to forage in an optic-flow-rich tunnel with a landmark positioned directly above the feeder. Subsequent food-search tests indicated that bees searched much more accurately when

  17. The Development of Landmark and Beacon Use in Young Children: Evidence from a Touchscreen Search Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Children ages 2, 3 and 4 years participated in a novel hide-and-seek search task presented on a touchscreen monitor. On beacon trials, the target hiding place could be located using a beacon cue, but on landmark trials, searching required the use of a nearby landmark cue. In Experiment 1, 2-year-olds performed less accurately than older children…

  18. Fully Automatic System for Accurate Localisation and Analysis of Cephalometric Landmarks in Lateral Cephalograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Claudia; Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Cootes, Tim F

    2016-01-01

    Cephalometric tracing is a standard analysis tool for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fully automatic landmark annotation (FALA) system for finding cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms and its application to the classification of skeletal malformations. Digital cephalograms of 400 subjects (age range: 7-76 years) were available. All cephalograms had been manually traced by two experienced orthodontists with 19 cephalometric landmarks, and eight clinical parameters had been calculated for each subject. A FALA system to locate the 19 landmarks in lateral cephalograms was developed. The system was evaluated via comparison to the manual tracings, and the automatically located landmarks were used for classification of the clinical parameters. The system achieved an average point-to-point error of 1.2 mm, and 84.7% of landmarks were located within the clinically accepted precision range of 2.0 mm. The automatic landmark localisation performance was within the inter-observer variability between two clinical experts. The automatic classification achieved an average classification accuracy of 83.4% which was comparable to an experienced orthodontist. The FALA system rapidly and accurately locates and analyses cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms, and has the potential to significantly improve the clinical work flow in orthodontic treatment. PMID:27645567

  19. 3D facial landmarks: Inter-operator variability of manual annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine; Rosengren, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    was randomly chosen. Six operators twice manually annotated 73 anatomical and pseudo-landmarks, using a three-step scheme producing a dense point correspondence map. We analyzed both the intra- and inter-operator variability, using mixed-model ANOVA. We then compared four sparse sets of landmarks in order...

  20. 78 FR 69437 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Federal Regulations, that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board... National Park System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and time to be determined....

  1. Chronic Pancreatitis: Landmark Papers, Management Decisions, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMagno, Eugene P; DiMagno, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    On May 16, 2015 at the invitation of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute Council E.P.D. presented a state-of-the-art lecture at Digestive Disease Week 2015. The aims were to discuss a selection of landmark papers in chronic pancreatitis (CP) that influence modern management and to conclude by suggesting some future directions. This is based on that presentation. We will specifically review the following: duct anatomy and pancreas divisum, description of chronic relapsing pancreatitis and its differentiation from recurrent acute pancreatitis and established CP (ECP), natural histories and gene discoveries of alcoholic, idiopathic and hereditary pancreatitis, development of pancreatic cancer in CP, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and calculation of dose and delivery of enzymes, endoscopic ultrasonography, and autoimmune pancreatitis. With some exceptions, we exclude basic science and surgery.

  2. FACIAL LANDMARKING LOCALIZATION FOR EMOTION RECOGNITION USING BAYESIAN SHAPE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan F. Garcia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a framework for emotion recognition, based in facial expression analysis using Bayesian Shape Models (BSM for facial landmarking localization. The Facial Action Coding System (FACS compliant facial feature tracking based on Bayesian Shape Model. The BSM estimate the parameters of the model with an implementation of the EM algorithm. We describe the characterization methodology from parametric model and evaluated the accuracy for feature detection and estimation of the parameters associated with facial expressions, analyzing its robustness in pose and local variations. Then, a methodology for emotion characterization is introduced to perform the recognition. The experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively detect the different facial expressions. Outperforming conventional approaches for emotion recognition obtaining high performance results in the estimation of emotion present in a determined subject. The model used and characterization methodology showed efficient to detect the emotion type in 95.6% of the cases.

  3. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied. PMID:17152604

  4. Digital radiographic localization for CT scanning of the larynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, P.M.; Korobkin, M.; Rauch, R.F.

    1983-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the larynx is the preferred method for staging laryngeal carcinoma and assessing the extent of injury from trauma. The standard method of examination consists of 5 mm contiguous scans throughout the larynx in quiet respiration. Scans are performed with the patient supine with the neck slightly extended allowing the long axis of the larynx to be perpendicular to the scanning plane. A complete examination requires scanning from the supraglottic region (level of hyoid bone) to the subglottic region (level of cricoid cartlage). In the authors' experience when this method is used, multiple scans are performed cephalad to the level of interest because no upper limit of the examination is established before transaxial scans are done. We have used the lateral digital radiograph of the neck to identify specific landmarks so that the upper and lower limets of the examination can be established before scanning.

  5. Quantitative trait loci involved in sex determination and body growth in the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L. through targeted genome scan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Loukovitis

    Full Text Available Among vertebrates, teleost fish exhibit a considerably wide range of sex determination patterns that may be influenced by extrinsic parameters. However even for model fish species like the zebrafish Danio rerio the precise mechanisms involved in primary sex determination have not been studied extensively. The zebrafish, a gonochoristic species, is lacking discernible sex chromosomes and the sex of juvenile fish is difficult to determine. Sequential protandrous hermaphrodite species provide distinct determination of the gender and allow studying the sex determination process by looking at the mechanism of sex reversal. This is the first attempt to understand the genetic basis of phenotypic variation for sex determination and body weight in a sequential protandrous hermaphrodite species, the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata. This work demonstrates a fast and efficient strategy for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL detection in the gilthead sea bream, a non-model but target hermaphrodite fish species. Therefore a comparative mapping approach was performed to query syntenies against two other Perciformes, the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, a gonochoristic species and the Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer a protandrous hermaphrodite. In this manner two significant QTLs, one QTL affecting both body weight and sex and one QTL affecting sex, were detected on the same linkage group. The co-segregation of the two QTLs provides a genomic base to the observed genetic correlation between these two traits in sea bream as well as in other teleosts. The identification of QTLs linked to sex reversal and growth, will contribute significantly to a better understanding of the complex nature of sex determination in S. aurata where most individuals reverse to the female sex at the age of two years through development and maturation of the ovarian portion of the gonad and regression of the testicular area. [Genomic sequences reported in this manuscript have been

  6. The format of children's mental images: Evidence from mental scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Marina C; Maras, Katie L; Robinson, Elizabeth J; Thomas, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the development and format of children's mental images. Children (4-, 5-, 6-7-, 8-9-, and 11-year-olds) and adults (N=282) viewed a map of a fictitious island containing various landmarks and two misleading signposts, indicating that some equidistant landmarks were different distances apart. Five-year-olds already revealed the linear time-distance scanning effect, previously shown in adults (Experiments 1 and 2): They took longer to mentally scan their image of the island with longer distances between corresponding landmarks, indicating the depictive format of children's mental images. Unlike adults, their scanning times were not affected by misleading top-down distance information on the signposts until age 8 (Experiment 1) unless they were prompted to the difference from the outset (Experiment 2). Findings provide novel insights into the format of children's mental images in a mental scanning paradigm and show that children's mental images can be susceptible to top-down influences as are adults'. PMID:27239749

  7. Landmark and route knowledge in children’s spatial representation of a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eNys

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the development of landmark and route knowledge in complex wayfinding situations. Our study focuses on how children (aged 6, 8 and 10 years and young adults (n=79 indicate, recognize, and bind landmarks and directions in both verbal and visuo-spatial tasks after learning a virtual route. Performance in these tasks is also related to general verbal and visuo-spatial abilities as assessed by independent standardized tests (attention, working memory, perception of direction, production and comprehension of spatial terms, sentences and stories. The results first show that the quantity and quality of landmarks and directions produced and recognized by participants in both verbal and visuo-spatial tasks increased with age. In addition, an increase with age was observed in participants’ selection of decisional landmarks (i.e. landmarks associated with a change of direction, as well as in their capacity to bind landmarks and directions. Our results confirm the view that children first acquire landmark knowledge, then route knowledge, as shown by their late developing ability to bind knowledge of directions and landmarks. Overall, the quality of verbal and visuo-spatial information in participants’ spatial representations was found to vary mostly with their visuo-spatial abilities (attention and perception of directions and not with their verbal abilities. Interestingly, however, when asked to recognize landmarks encountered during the route, participants show an increasing bias with age toward choosing a related landmark of the same category, regardless of its visual characteristics, i.e. they incorrectly choose the picture of another fountain. The discussion highlights the need for further studies to determine more precisely the role of verbal and visuo-spatial knowledge and the nature of how children learn to represent and memorize routes.

  8. Genome-wide linkage scan to identify loci associated with type 2 diabetes and blood lipid phenotypes in the Sikh Diabetes Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharambir K Sanghera

    Full Text Available In this investigation, we have carried out an autosomal genome-wide linkage analysis to map genes associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D and five quantitative traits of blood lipids including total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in a unique family-based cohort from the Sikh Diabetes Study (SDS. A total of 870 individuals (526 male/344 female from 321 families were successfully genotyped using 398 polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 9.26 cM on the autosomes. Results of non-parametric multipoint linkage analysis using S(all statistics (implemented in Merlin did not reveal any chromosomal region to be significantly associated with T2D in this Sikh cohort. However, linkage analysis for lipid traits using QTL-ALL analysis revealed promising linkage signals with p≤0.005 for total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol at chromosomes 5p15, 9q21, 10p11, 10q21, and 22q13. The most significant signal (p = 0.0011 occurred at 10q21.2 for HDL cholesterol. We also observed linkage signals for total cholesterol at 22q13.32 (p = 0.0016 and 5p15.33 (p = 0.0031 and for LDL cholesterol at 10p11.23 (p = 0.0045. Interestingly, some of linkage regions identified in this Sikh population coincide with plausible candidate genes reported in recent genome-wide association and meta-analysis studies for lipid traits. Our study provides the first evidence of linkage for loci associated with quantitative lipid traits at four chromosomal regions in this Asian Indian population from Punjab. More detailed examination of these regions with more informative genotyping, sequencing, and functional studies should lead to rapid detection of novel targets of therapeutic importance.

  9. Using regulatory and epistatic networks to extend the findings of a genome scan: identifying the gene drivers of pigmentation in merino sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gámez, Elsa; Reverter, Antonio; Whan, Vicki; McWilliam, Sean M; Arranz, Juan José; Kijas, James

    2011-01-01

    Extending genome wide association analysis by the inclusion of gene expression data may assist in the dissection of complex traits. We examined piebald, a pigmentation phenotype in both human and Merino sheep, by analysing multiple data types using a systems approach. First, a case control analysis of 49,034 ovine SNP was performed which confirmed a multigenic basis for the condition. We combined these results with gene expression data from five tissue types analysed with a skin-specific microarray. Promoter sequence analysis of differentially expressed genes allowed us to reverse-engineer a regulatory network. Likewise, by testing two-loci models derived from all pair-wise comparisons across piebald-associated SNP, we generated an epistatic network. At the intersection of both networks, we identified thirteen genes with insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) and the tetraspanin platelet activator CD9 at the kernel of the intersection. Further, we report a number of differentially expressed genes in regions containing highly associated SNP including ATRN, DOCK7, FGFR1OP, GLI3, SILV and TBX15. The application of network theory facilitated co-analysis of genetic variation with gene expression, recapitulated aspects of the known molecular biology of skin pigmentation and provided insights into the transcription regulation and epistatic interactions involved in piebald Merino sheep.

  10. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting grain yield and its components of maize both in single-and two-locus levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jianbing; TANG Hua; HUANG Yiqin; ZHENG Yonglian; SUBHASH Chander; LI Jiansheng

    2006-01-01

    By adding thirty-one markers in the previous linkage map, a new genetic linkage map containing 205 markers was constructed, spanning a total of 2305.4 cM with an average interval of 11.2 cM. The genotypic errors in the whole genome were detected by the statistical method and removed manually. The precision of the linkage map was improved significantly. Main and epistatic QTL were detected by R/qtl, and main QTL were confirmed and refined by multiple interval mapping (MIM). Finally, MIM detected seven QTL for rows number, and five QTL for each grain yield, kernels per row and 100-kernel weight. The contribution to genetic variations of QTL varied from 35.3% for grain yield to 61.5% for rows number. Only kernels per row exhibited significant epistatic interactions between QTL. Twenty-four epistatic QTL were detected which distributed on almost all the ten chromosomes. About two-third epistatic QTL were observed between main QTL and another locus, which had no significant effects. These results indicate rather clearly that there are a number of QTL affecting trait expressions, not directly but indirectly through interactions with other loci. Thus, epistatic QTL effects may play a crucial role, if not more important than main QTL effects, in the genetic variation for the measured traits in present study.

  11. Using regulatory and epistatic networks to extend the findings of a genome scan: identifying the gene drivers of pigmentation in merino sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa García-Gámez

    Full Text Available Extending genome wide association analysis by the inclusion of gene expression data may assist in the dissection of complex traits. We examined piebald, a pigmentation phenotype in both human and Merino sheep, by analysing multiple data types using a systems approach. First, a case control analysis of 49,034 ovine SNP was performed which confirmed a multigenic basis for the condition. We combined these results with gene expression data from five tissue types analysed with a skin-specific microarray. Promoter sequence analysis of differentially expressed genes allowed us to reverse-engineer a regulatory network. Likewise, by testing two-loci models derived from all pair-wise comparisons across piebald-associated SNP, we generated an epistatic network. At the intersection of both networks, we identified thirteen genes with insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7, platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA and the tetraspanin platelet activator CD9 at the kernel of the intersection. Further, we report a number of differentially expressed genes in regions containing highly associated SNP including ATRN, DOCK7, FGFR1OP, GLI3, SILV and TBX15. The application of network theory facilitated co-analysis of genetic variation with gene expression, recapitulated aspects of the known molecular biology of skin pigmentation and provided insights into the transcription regulation and epistatic interactions involved in piebald Merino sheep.

  12. A genome-wide scan reveals important roles of DNA methylation in human longevity by regulating age-related disease genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hui Xiao

    Full Text Available It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to human longevity. Besides the hypothesis of existence of longevity genes, another suggests that a lower frequency of risk alleles decreases the incidence of age-related diseases in the long-lived people. However, the latter finds no support from recent genetic studies. Considering the crucial role of epigenetic modification in gene regulation, we then hypothesize that suppressing disease-related genes in longevity individuals is likely achieved by epigenetic modification, e.g. DNA methylation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the genome-wide methylation profile in 4 Chinese female centenarians and 4 middle-aged controls using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. 626 differentially methylated regions (DMRs were observed between both groups. Interestingly, genes with these DMRs were enriched in age-related diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and Alzheimer's disease. This pattern remains rather stable after including methylomes of two white individuals. Further analyses suggest that the observed DMRs likely have functional roles in regulating disease-associated gene expressions, with some genes [e.g. caspase 3 (CASP3] being down-regulated whereas the others [i.e. interleukin 1 receptor, type 2 (IL1R2] up-regulated. Therefore, our study suggests that suppressing the disease-related genes via epigenetic modification is an important contributor to human longevity.

  13. Scan Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  14. Landmarks of History of Soil Science in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapa, R.

    2012-04-01

    Sri Lanka is a tropical Island in the Southern tip of Indian subcontinent positioned at 50 55' to 90 50' N latitude and 790 42' to 810 53' E longitude surrounded by the Indian Ocean. It is an island 435 km in length and 224 km width consisting of a land are of 6.56 million ha with a population of 20 million. In area wise it is ranked as 118th in the world, where at present ranked as 47 in population wise and ranked 19th in population density. The country was under colonial rule under Portuguese, Dutch and British from 1505 to 1948. The majority of the people in the past and present earn their living from activities based on land, which indicates the important of the soil resource. The objective of this paper is to describe the landmarks of the history of Soil Science to highlight the achievements and failures, which is useful to enrich our present understanding of Sri Lankan soils. The landmarks of the history of Soil Science in Sri Lanka can be divided to three phases namely, the early period (prior to 1956), the middle period (1956 to 1972) and the present period (from 1972 onwards). During the early period, detailed analytical studies of coffee and tea soils were compiled, and these gave mainly information on up-country soils which led to fertilizer recommendations based on field trials. In addition, rice and forest soils were also studied in less detail. The first classification of Sri Lankan soils and a provisional soil map based on parent material was published by Joachim in 1945 which is a major landmark of history of Soil Science in Sri Lanka. In 1959 Ponnamperuma proposed a soil classification system for wetland rice soils. From 1963 to 1968 valuable information on the land resource was collected and documented by aerial resource surveys funded by Canada-Ceylon Colombo plan aid project. This covered 18 major river basins and about 1/4th of Sri Lanka, which resulted in producing excellent soil maps and information of the areas called the Kelani Aruvi Ara

  15. Encoding and retrieval of landmark-related spatial cues during navigation: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegman, Joost; Tyborowska, Anna; Janzen, Gabriele

    2014-07-01

    To successfully navigate, humans can use different cues from their surroundings. Learning locations in an environment can be supported by parallel subsystems in the hippocampus and the striatum. We used fMRI to look at differences in the use of object-related spatial cues while 47 participants actively navigated in an open-field virtual environment. In each trial, participants navigated toward a target object. During encoding, three positional cues (columns) with directional cues (shadows) were available. During retrieval, the removed target had to be replaced while either two objects without shadows (objects trial) or one object with a shadow (shadow trial) were available. Participants were informed in blocks about which type of retrieval trial was most likely to occur, thereby modulating expectations of having to rely on a single landmark or on a configuration of landmarks. How the spatial learning systems in the hippocampus and caudate nucleus were involved in these landmark-based encoding and retrieval processes were investigated. Landmark configurations can create a geometry similar to boundaries in an environment. It was found that the hippocampus was involved in encoding when relying on configurations of landmarks, whereas the caudate nucleus was involved in encoding when relying on single landmarks. This might suggest that the observed hippocampal activation for configurations of objects is linked to a spatial representation observed with environmental boundaries. Retrieval based on configurations of landmarks activated regions associated with the spatial updation of object locations for reorientation. When only a single landmark was available during retrieval, regions associated with updating the location of oneself were activated. There was also evidence that good between-participant performance was predicted by right hippocampal activation. This study therefore sheds light on how the brain deals with changing demands on spatial processing related purely

  16. Perineal scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanty, P; d'Alton, M; Romero, R; Hobbins, J C

    1986-10-01

    Although various techniques have been described to aid in the ultrasound diagnosis of placenta previa and incompetent cervix, these maneuvers depend on the precise identification of the internal cervical os, a feat which is notoriously difficult to accomplish consistently. In an attempt to get a closer view of the cervix we tried another approach. This simple technique of perineal scanning has the potential to help considerably with these problems. PMID:3530265

  17. Faithful Completion of Images of Scenic Landmarks Using Internet Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhe; Huang, Hao-Zhi; Tan, Zhi-Peng; Xu, Kun; Hu, Shi-Min

    2016-08-01

    Previous works on image completion typically aim to produce visually plausible results rather than factually correct ones. In this paper, we propose an approach to faithfully complete the missing regions of an image. We assume that the input image is taken at a well-known landmark, so similar images taken at the same location can be easily found on the Internet. We first download thousands of images from the Internet using a text label provided by the user. Next, we apply two-step filtering to reduce them to a small set of candidate images for use as source images for completion. For each candidate image, a co-matching algorithm is used to find correspondences of both points and lines between the candidate image and the input image. These are used to find an optimal warp relating the two images. A completion result is obtained by blending the warped candidate image into the missing region of the input image. The completion results are ranked according to combination score, which considers both warping and blending energy, and the highest ranked ones are shown to the user. Experiments and results demonstrate that our method can faithfully complete images. PMID:26394429

  18. [The landmarks of the measurement of cerebral blood flow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    István, Nyáry

    2008-01-30

    History of the measurement of local cerebral blood flow may cover a period of one and a half centuries. Parallel forthcoming of both theoretical and technical development were the key elements of ensuing progress resulting in the present state, when by the aid of in vivo blood flow and metabolic maps, we can visualize locales of brain functioning and their interconnections. Two theoretical landmarks should be mentioned in this historic process. First, the work of Adolf Fick, as the starter of quantitative measurements in this field, and Seymour Kety's model of a single, homogenously perfused tissue element. The solution of this model, in the form of Kety's equation is still fundamental to present day blood flow mapping techniques. Among the numerous investigators over the past years, two Hungarian scientist can be named as major contributors. Kálmán Sántha made substantial studies with continuous registration of local cerebral blood flow by the aid of thermocouples, while Emil P6sztor invented the hydrogen clearance method for the measurement of local cerebral blood flow both in human and in animal studies.

  19. A global solution for the gravity field, rotation, landmarks and ephemeris of Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopliv, A. S.; Miller, J. K.; Owen, W. M.; Yeomans, D. K.; Giorgini, J. D.; Garmier, R.; Barriot, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    This solution uses the entire one-year in orbit collection of X-band radiometric tracking (Doppler and range) from the Deep Space Network and landmark tracking observations generated from the NEAR spacecraft images of Eros.

  20. Links Between Surgical Landmarks of the Temporal Bone and Cochlear Implant Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Lostun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to underline the surgical importance of the distances between the landmarks of the temporal bone, important for quantifying the benefits and disadvantages of two different cochlear implant techniques.

  1. An Efficient Ceiling-view SLAM Using Relational Constraints Between Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Hyukdoo Choi; Ryunseok Kim; Euntai Kim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new indoor ‘simultaneous localization and mapping’ (SLAM) technique based on an upward-looking ceiling camera. Adapted from our previous work [17], the proposed method employs sparsely-distributed line and point landmarks in an indoor environment to aid with data association and reduce extended Kalman filter computation as compared with earlier techniques. Further, the proposed method exploits geometric relationships between the two types of landmarks to provide ad...

  2. Cálculo distribuido de landmarks para sistemas de planificación multiagente

    OpenAIRE

    Oropesa Física, Ana

    2013-01-01

    En este Proyecto Final de Carrera se verá la motivación por la que hacer una heurística multiagente utilizando landmarks, la construcción de ésta y unos posteriores resultados y comparativas con la heurística monoagente entre otras. Oropesa Física, A. (2013). Cálculo distribuido de landmarks para sistemas de planificación multiagente. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/32520. Archivo delegado

  3. Effects of image enhancement on reliability of landmark identification in digital cephalometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Oshagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although digital cephalometric radiography is gaining popularity in orthodontic practice, the most important source of error in its tracing is uncertainty in landmark identification. Therefore, efforts to improve accuracy in landmark identification were directed primarily toward the improvement in image quality. One of the more useful techniques of this process involves digital image enhancement which can increase overall visual quality of image, but this does not necessarily mean a better identification of landmarks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of digital image enhancements on reliability of landmark identification. Materials and Methods: Fifteen common landmarks including 10 skeletal and 5 soft tissues were selected on the cephalograms of 20 randomly selected patients, prepared in Natural Head Position (NHP. Two observers (orthodontists identified landmarks on the 20 original photostimulable phosphor (PSP digital cephalogram images and 20 enhanced digital images twice with an intervening time interval of at least 4 weeks. The x and y coordinates were further analyzed to evaluate the pattern of recording differences in horizontal and vertical directions. Reliability of landmarks identification was analyzed by paired t test. Results: There was a significant difference between original and enhanced digital images in terms of reliability of points Ar and N in vertical and horizontal dimensions, and enhanced images were significantly more reliable than original images. Identification of A point, Pogonion and Pronasal points, in vertical dimension of enhanced images was significantly more reliable than original ones. Reliability of Menton point identification in horizontal dimension was significantly more in enhanced images than original ones. Conclusion: Direct digital image enhancement by altering brightness and contrast can increase reliability of some landmark identification and this may lead to more

  4. Sequential egocentric navigation and reliance on landmarks in Williams syndrome and typical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eBroadbent

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Visuospatial difficulties in Williams syndrome (WS are well documented. Recently, research has shown that spatial difficulties in WS extend to large-scale space, particularly in coding space using an allocentric frame of reference. Typically developing (TD children and adults predominantly rely on the use of a sequential egocentric strategy to navigate a large-scale route (retracing a sequence of left-right body turns. The aim of this study was to examine whether individuals with WS are able to employ a sequential egocentric strategy to guide learning and the retracing of a route. Forty-eight TD children, aged 5, 7 and 9 years and 18 participants with WS were examined on their ability to learn and retrace routes in two (6-turn virtual environment mazes (with and without landmarks. The ability to successfully retrace a route following the removal of landmarks (use of sequential egocentric coding was also examined.Although in line with TD 5 year-olds when learning a route with landmarks, individuals with WS showed significantly greater detriment when these landmarks were removed, relative to all TD groups. Moreover, the WS group made significantly more errors than all TD groups when learning a route that never contained landmarks. On a perceptual view-matching task, results revealed a high level of performance across groups, indicative of an ability to use this visual information to potentially aid navigation. These findings suggest that individuals with WS rely on landmarks to a greater extent than TD children, both for learning a route and for retracing a recently learned route. TD children, but not individuals with WS, were able to fall back on the use of a sequential egocentric strategy to navigate when landmarks were not present. Only TD children therefore coded sequential route information simultaneously with landmark information. The results are discussed in relation to known atypical cortical development and perceptual-matching abilities

  5. EXPLOITING 3D ULTRASOUND FOR FETAL DIAGNOSTIC PURPOSE THROUGH FACIAL LANDMARKING

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Vezzetti; Domenico Speranza; Federica Marcolin; Giulia Fracastoro; Giorgia Buscicchio

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, three-dimensional landmarking has gained attention for different applications, such as face recognition for both identification of suspects and authentication, facial expression recognition, corrective and aesthetic surgery, syndrome study and diagnosis. This work focuses on the last one by proposing a geometrically-based landmark extraction algorithm aimed at diagnosing syndromes on babies before their birth. Pivotal role in this activity is the support provided by physic...

  6. Indirect building localization based on a prominent solid landmark from a forward-looking infrared imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Wang; Tianxu Zhang; Xiaoyu Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel indirect building localization technique based on a prominent solid landmark from a forwardlooking infrared imagery is proposed to localize low, deeply buried, or carefully camouflaged buildings in dense urban areas.First, the widely used effective methods are applied to detect and localize the solid landmark.The building target is then precisely indirectly localized by perspective transformation according to the imaging parameters and the space constraint relations between the building target and the solid landmark.Experimental results demonstrate this technique can indirectly localize buildings in dense urban areas effectively.%@@ A novel indirect building localization technique based on a prominent solid landmark from a forward-looking infrared imagery is proposed to localize low, deeply buried, or carefully camouflaged buildings in dense urban areas.First, the widely used effective methods are applied to detect and localize the solid landmark.The building target is then precisely indirectly localized by perspective transformation according to the imaging parameters and the space constraint relations between the building target and the solid landmark.Experimental results demonstrate this technique can indirectly localize buildings in dense urban areas effectively.

  7. Ultrasound Guided Internal Jugular Venous Cannulation: Comparison with Land-Mark Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare real-time ultrasonography-guided technique versus the traditional land-mark technique for internal Jugular venous cannulation. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anaesthesia, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from September 2013 to July 2014. Methodology:Atotal of 200 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned using either real-time ultrasound-guided technique or land-mark technique. Access time, number of attempts until successful cannulation, complications and the demographics of each patient were recorded. Results:Access time was significantly less in real-time ultrasound group (34.95 ± 11.47 vs. 146.59 ± 40.20 seconds, p < 0.001). Cannulation was performed in first attempt in 99 percentage of patients in ultrasound group as compared to 89 percentage of landmark group. Complication rate was significantly higher in the land-mark group than in the ultrasound-guided group. Carotid artery puncture rate (9 percentage vs. 1 percentage) and haematoma formation (7 percentage vs. 0 percentage) were more frequent in the land-mark group than in the ultrasound-guided group. Brachial plexus irritation was also more in land-mark group (6 percentage vs. 0 percentage). Conclusion:Access time, failure rate and procedure related complications are reduced when real-time ultrasonography is used to cannulate internal Jugular vein. (author)

  8. Insite: Canada's landmark safe injecting program at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drucker Ernest

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract InSite is North Americas first supervised injection site and a landmark public heath initiative operating in Vancouver since 2003. The program is a vital component of that cities internationally recognized harm reduction approach to its serious problems with drugs, crime, homelessness and AIDS. InSite currently operates under a waiver of Federal rules that allow it to provide services as a research project. An extensive evaluation has produced very positive results for thousands of users. Normally such strong evidence documenting the successes of such a program, and the medical and public health significance of these positive outcomes, would be the basis for celebration and moves to expand the model and provide similar services elsewhere in Canada. Instead, there is a distinct possibility that InSite will be closed by the newly elected Canadian Prime Minister Paul Harper – a conservative who has traveled to the US to visit George WQ Bush and come back antagonistic to harm reduction in all its forms. Because InSites federal waiver is expiring and up for renewal in September, the fear is that Mr. Harpers will not renew the approval and that the program will be forced to close down. The risks associated with the potential closure of InSite need to be fully understood. This editorial lays out these public health risks and the associated economic impact if InSite were to be closed. In addition to preventable deaths and disease, InSites closure will cost Vancouver and British Columbia between $3.8 and $ 8.8 million in preventable health care expenses over the next two years.

  9. Usefulness of the anterior surface and supracondylar region of the femur as a landmark for femoral rotational alignment in knee surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the possibility that a line tangential to the anterior surface of the femur could serve as a landmark for rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The subjects were 37 women treated with TKA for medial knee osteoarthritis. Before surgery X-ray films and computed tomography scans were obtained. The three axes -the posterior condylar axis, the transepicondylar axis, and the anterior surface at the supracondyle- were constructed on each CT scan, and the angles between two axes were measured with the X-Caliper system. The results obtained from 35 subjects showed that the angle between the transepicondylar axis and the posterior condylar axis ranged from 3.1 to 10.7 degrees and bad a mean value of 6.35±1.93 degrees. The angle between the transepicondylar axis and the anterior femoral surface at the supracondyle ranged from 6.1 to 15.4 degrees and had a mean value of 11.21±2.48 degrees. The anterior surface was internally rotated relative to the posterior condylar axis in all cases, and its value indicated the degree of anterolateral notching. The anterior femoral surface at the supracondylar level is easy to identify during surgery. Thus, it may be a useful landmark for determining the correct rotational alignment of the femoral component in TKA. (author)

  10. Personal Landmarks from the Legacy of Arthur Phelps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowke, John

    2013-09-01

    I have been influenced for my whole life by Art Phelps, more than by anyone else - other than my wife! I first heard of Art Phelps in 1960 when, in the middle of doing my PhD in Adelaide, South Australia, Frost and Phelps published their land-mark paper, not only on drift velocities, the subject of my PhD, but on Boltzmann analyses, which were to deliver detailed cross sections for all common gases. Later I dared to suggest to my university that one of my two external PhD examiners be Phelps, a move that led to me being accepted for a position at Westinghouse Research Laboratories in Pittsburgh for 6 years, with Phelps as my direct supervisor. Throughout this period, Phelps refused to be a co-author of any of my papers, leaving me with severe doubts as to what he thought of their quality! I list areas where insights from Phelps inspired the growth of new fruit. (1) That transverse and longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients differ, typically by a factor of two. (2) That averaging radiation absorption coefficients in electric arcs, using common weightings involving Black Body radiation, can and usually do lead to errors of orders of magnitude. (3) That CO2 laser discharges are largely controlled by electron attachment rather than by diffusion or recombination. (4) That boundary conditions for electrons at metal electrodes in arc welding, are not zero, but from an astrophysical analogy, are zero when extrapolated to one mean free path beyond the surface. (5) That the metastable vibrational states of nitrogen become an energy gain rather than a loss process for low energy electrons as occur in electrical breakdown in air, resulting in increases of the ionisation coefficient by orders of magnitude. Coupled with the detachment of electrons from negative ions by singlet delta states of metastable oxygen molecules, sustaining discharge electric fields are reduced a factor of five. Phelps worked on this problem with me until a few months before he died.

  11. Multiple landmarks, the encoding of environmental geometry and the spatial logics of a dual brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, A Della; Pecchia, T; Tommasi, L; Vallortigara, G

    2006-10-01

    A series of place learning experiments was carried out in young chicks (Gallus gallus) in order to investigate how the geometry of a landmark array and that of a walled enclosure compete when disoriented animals could rely on both of them to re-orient towards the centre of the enclosure. A square-shaped array (four wooden sticks) was placed in the middle of a square-shaped enclosure, the two structures being concentric. Chicks were trained to ground-scratch to search for food hidden in the centre of the enclosure (and the array). To check for effects of array degradation, one, two, three or all landmarks were removed during test trials. Chicks concentrated their searching activity in the central area of the enclosure, but their accuracy was inversely contingent on the number of landmarks removed; moreover, the landmarks still present within the enclosure appeared to influence the shape of the searching patterns. The reduction in the number of landmarks affected the searching strategy of chicks, suggesting that they had focussed mainly on local cues when landmarks were present within the enclosure. When all the landmarks were removed, chicks searched over a larger area, suggesting an absolute encoding of distances from the local cues and less reliance on the relationships provided by the geometry of the enclosure. Under conditions of monocular vision, chicks tended to rely on different strategies to localize the centre on the basis of the eye (and thus the hemisphere) in use, the left hemisphere attending to details of the environment and the right hemisphere attending to the global shape. PMID:16941155

  12. The accuracy of a designed software for automated localization of craniofacial landmarks on CBCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional projection radiographs have been traditionally considered the modality of choice for cephalometric analysis. To overcome the shortcomings of two-dimensional images, three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) has been used to evaluate craniofacial structures. However, manual landmark detection depends on medical expertise, and the process is time-consuming. The present study was designed to produce software capable of automated localization of craniofacial landmarks on cone beam (CB) CT images based on image registration and to evaluate its accuracy. The software was designed using MATLAB programming language. The technique was a combination of feature-based (principal axes registration) and voxel similarity-based methods for image registration. A total of 8 CBCT images were selected as our reference images for creating a head atlas. Then, 20 CBCT images were randomly selected as the test images for evaluating the method. Three experts twice located 14 landmarks in all 28 CBCT images during two examinations set 6 weeks apart. The differences in the distances of coordinates of each landmark on each image between manual and automated detection methods were calculated and reported as mean errors. The combined intraclass correlation coefficient for intraobserver reliability was 0.89 and for interobserver reliability 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 0.93). The mean errors of all 14 landmarks were <4 mm. Additionally, 63.57% of landmarks had a mean error of <3 mm compared with manual detection (gold standard method). The accuracy of our approach for automated localization of craniofacial landmarks, which was based on combining feature-based and voxel similarity-based methods for image registration, was acceptable. Nevertheless we recommend repetition of this study using other techniques, such as intensity-based methods

  13. Online updating of context-aware landmark detectors for prostate localization in daily treatment CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiubin [College of Geographic and Biologic Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210015, China and IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Gao, Yaozong [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In image guided radiation therapy, it is crucial to fast and accurately localize the prostate in the daily treatment images. To this end, the authors propose an online update scheme for landmark-guided prostate segmentation, which can fully exploit valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images and can achieve improved performance in landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Methods: To localize the prostate in the daily treatment images, the authors first automatically detect six anatomical landmarks on the prostate boundary by adopting a context-aware landmark detection method. Specifically, in this method, a two-layer regression forest is trained as a detector for each target landmark. Once all the newly detected landmarks from new treatment images are reviewed or adjusted (if necessary) by clinicians, they are further included into the training pool as new patient-specific information to update all the two-layer regression forests for the next treatment day. As more and more treatment images of the current patient are acquired, the two-layer regression forests can be continually updated by incorporating the patient-specific information into the training procedure. After all target landmarks are detected, a multiatlas random sample consensus (multiatlas RANSAC) method is used to segment the entire prostate by fusing multiple previously segmented prostates of the current patient after they are aligned to the current treatment image. Subsequently, the segmented prostate of the current treatment image is again reviewed (or even adjusted if needed) by clinicians before including it as a new shape example into the prostate shape dataset for helping localize the entire prostate in the next treatment image. Results: The experimental results on 330 images of 24 patients show the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed online update scheme in improving the accuracies of both landmark detection and prostate segmentation

  14. Helix Scan: A Scan Design for Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; HU Yu; LI Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Scan design is a widely used design-for-testability technique to improve test quality and efficiency. For the scan-designed circuit, test and diagnosis of the scan chain and the circuit is an important process for silicon debug and yield learning. However, conventional scan designs and diagnosis methods abort the subsequent diagnosis process after diagnosing the scan chain if the scan chain is faulty. In this work, we propose a design-for-diagnosis scan strategy called helix scan and a diagnosis algorithm to address this issue. Unlike previous proposed methods, helix scan has the capability to carry on the diagnosis process without losing information when the scan chain is faulty. What is more, it simplifies scan chain diagnosis and achieves high diagnostic resolution as well as accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our design.

  15. This place looks familiar – how navigators distinguish places with ambiguous landmark objects when learning novel routes

    OpenAIRE

    Marianne eStrickrodt; Mary eO'Malley; Wiener, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present two experiments investigating how navigators deal with ambiguous landmark information when learning unfamiliar routes. In the experiments we presented landmark objects repeatedly along a route, which allowed us to manipulate how informative single landmarks were (1) about the navigators’ location along the route and (2) about the action navigators had to take at that location. Experiment 1 demonstrated that reducing location informativeness alone did not affect route learning perfo...

  16. This Place Looks Familiar—How Navigators Distinguish Places with Ambiguous Landmark Objects When Learning Novel Routes

    OpenAIRE

    Strickrodt, Marianne; O'Malley, Mary; Wiener, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present two experiments investigating how navigators deal with ambiguous landmark information when learning unfamiliar routes. In the experiments we presented landmark objects repeatedly along a route, which allowed us to manipulate how informative single landmarks were (1) about the navigators' location along the route and (2) about the action navigators had to take at that location. Experiment 1 demonstrated that reducing location informativeness alone did not affect route learning perfo...

  17. The Use of Quick Response (QR Codes in Landmark-Based Pedestrian Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahid Basiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle navigation systems usually simply function by calculating the shortest fastest route over a road network. In contrast, pedestrian navigation can have more diverse concerns. Pedestrians are not constrained to road/path networks; their route may involve going into buildings (where accurate satellite locational signals are not available and they have different priorities, for example, preferring routes that are quieter or more sheltered from the weather. In addition, there are differences in how people are best directed: pedestrians noticing landmarks such as buildings, doors, and steps rather than junctions and sign posts. Landmarks exist both indoors and outdoors. A system has been developed that uses quick response (QR codes affixed to registered landmarks allowing users to localise themselves with respect to their route and with navigational instructions given in terms of these landmarks. In addition, the system includes images of each landmark helping users to navigate visually in addition to through textual instructions and route maps. The system runs on a mobile device; the users use the device’s camera to register each landmark’s QR code and so update their position (particularly indoors and progress through the route itinerary.

  18. The definitions of three-dimensional landmarks on the human face: an interdisciplinary view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katina, Stanislav; McNeil, Kathryn; Ayoub, Ashraf; Guilfoyle, Brendan; Khambay, Balvinder; Siebert, Paul; Sukno, Federico; Rojas, Mario; Vittert, Liberty; Waddington, John; Whelan, Paul F; Bowman, Adrian W

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of shape is a key part of anatomical research and in the large majority of cases landmarks provide a standard starting point. However, while the technology of image capture has developed rapidly and in particular three-dimensional imaging is widely available, the definitions of anatomical landmarks remain rooted in their two-dimensional origins. In the important case of the human face, standard definitions often require careful orientation of the subject. This paper considers the definitions of facial landmarks from an interdisciplinary perspective, including biological and clinical motivations, issues associated with imaging and subsequent analysis, and the mathematical definition of surface shape using differential geometry. This last perspective provides a route to definitions of landmarks based on surface curvature, often making use of ridge and valley curves, which is genuinely three-dimensional and is independent of orientation. Specific definitions based on curvature are proposed. These are evaluated, along with traditional definitions, in a study that uses a hierarchical (random effects) model to estimate the error variation that is present at several different levels within the image capture process. The estimates of variation at these different levels are of interest in their own right but, in addition, evidence is provided that variation is reduced at the observer level when the new landmark definitions are used. PMID:26659272

  19. An Efficient Ceiling-view SLAM Using Relational Constraints Between Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyukdoo Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new indoor ‘simultaneous localization and mapping’ (SLAM technique based on an upward-looking ceiling camera. Adapted from our previous work [17], the proposed method employs sparsely-distributed line and point landmarks in an indoor environment to aid with data association and reduce extended Kalman filter computation as compared with earlier techniques. Further, the proposed method exploits geometric relationships between the two types of landmarks to provide added information about the environment. This geometric information is measured with an upward-looking ceiling camera and is used as a constraint in Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed ceiling-view (CV SLAM is demonstrated through simulations and experiments. The proposed method performs localization and mapping more accurately than those methods that use the two types of landmarks without taking into account their relative geometries.

  20. The Architectural Features and Prevalence of Contemporary Landmarks in Kaunas City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almantas Bružas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on contemporary architectural accents and their architectural features in Kaunas city. The paper also analyses the prevalence of contemporary architectural accents in the city. Some tendencies towards creating Kaunas landmarks, relationship between them and the built environment and aesthetic measures are discussed on the basis of analyzing the most important and characteristic sacral, commercial, industrial and residential architecture patterns. It can be concluded that contemporary materials as well as a lightweight construction and the courage of architects helped with producing the image of modern architectural landmark, though the spread of Kaunas contemporary landmarks has a chaotic character and the cityscape has not been enriched by the powerful dominants of space structure.Article in Lithuanian

  1. The language of landmarks: the role of background knowledge in indoor wayfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Julia; Brüssow, Sven; Ruzzoli, Felix; Hölscher, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    To effectively wayfind through unfamiliar buildings, humans infer their relative position to target locations not only by interpreting geometric layouts, especially length of line of sight, but also by using background knowledge to evaluate landmarks with respect to their probable spatial relation to a target. Questionnaire results revealed that participants have consistent background knowledge about the relative position of target locations. Landmarks were rated significantly differently with respect to their spatial relation to targets. In addition, results from a forced-choice task comparing snapshots of a virtual environment revealed that background knowledge influenced wayfinding decisions. We suggest that landmarks are interpreted semantically with respect to their function and spatial relation to the target location and thereby influence wayfinding decisions. This indicates that background knowledge plays a role in wayfinding.

  2. Boosting multi-features with prior knowledge for mini unmanned helicopter landmark detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Without sufficient real training data, the data driven classification algorithms based on boosting method cannot solely be utilized to applications such as the mini unmanned helicopter landmark image detection. In this paper, we propose an approach which uses a boosting algorithm with the prior knowledge for the mini unmanned helicopter landmark image detection. The stage forward stagewise additive model of boosting is analyzed, and the approach how to combine it with the prior knowledge model is presented. The approach is then applied to landmark image detection, where the multi-features are boosted to solve a series of problems, such as rotation, noises affected, etc. Results of real flight experiments demonstrate that for small training examples the boosted learning system using prior knowledge is dramatically better than the one driven by data only.

  3. Geodesic distances to landmarks for dense correspondence on ensembles of complex shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Manasi; Lyu, Ilwoo; Kim, SunHyung; Cates, Joshua; Styner, Martin A; Whitaker, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Establishing correspondence points across a set of biomedical shapes is an important technology for a variety of applications that rely on statistical analysis of individual subjects and populations. The inherent complexity (e.g. cortical surface shapes) and variability (e.g. cardiac chambers) evident in many biomedical shapes introduce significant challenges in finding a useful set of dense correspondences. Application specific strategies, such as registration of simplified (e.g. inflated or smoothed) surfaces or relying on manually placed landmarks, provide some improvement but suffer from limitations including increased computational complexity and ambiguity in landmark placement. This paper proposes a method for dense point correspondence on shape ensembles using geodesic distances to a priori landmarks as features. A novel set of numerical techniques for fast computation of geodesic distances to point sets is used to extract these features. The proposed method minimizes the ensemble entropy based on these features, resulting in isometry invariant correspondences in a very general, flexible framework. PMID:24579119

  4. Automatic landmark extraction from image data using modified growing neural gas network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemizadeh, Emad; Lucas, Caro; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2003-06-01

    A new method for automatic landmark extraction from MR brain images is presented. In this method, landmark extraction is accomplished by modifying growing neural gas (GNG), which is a neural-network-based cluster-seeking algorithm. Using modified GNG (MGNG) corresponding dominant points of contours extracted from two corresponding images are found. These contours are borders of segmented anatomical regions from brain images. The presented method is compared to: 1) the node splitting-merging Kohonen model and 2) the Teh-Chin algorithm (a well-known approach for dominant points extraction of ordered curves). It is shown that the proposed algorithm has lower distortion error, ability of extracting landmarks from two corresponding curves simultaneously, and also generates the best match according to five medical experts. PMID:12834162

  5. Self-motivated visual scanning predicts flexible navigation in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploran, Elisabeth J; Bevitt, Jacob; Oshiro, Jaris; Parasuraman, Raja; Thompson, James C

    2014-01-01

    The ability to navigate flexibly (e.g., reorienting oneself based on distal landmarks to reach a learned target from a new position) may rely on visual scanning during both initial experiences with the environment and subsequent test trials. Reliance on visual scanning during navigation harkens back to the concept of vicarious trial and error, a description of the side-to-side head movements made by rats as they explore previously traversed sections of a maze in an attempt to find a reward. In the current study, we examined if visual scanning predicted the extent to which participants would navigate to a learned location in a virtual environment defined by its position relative to distal landmarks. Our results demonstrated a significant positive relationship between the amount of visual scanning and participant accuracy in identifying the trained target location from a new starting position as long as the landmarks within the environment remain consistent with the period of original learning. Our findings indicate that active visual scanning of the environment is a deliberative attentional strategy that supports the formation of spatial representations for flexible navigation.

  6. Self-motivated visual scanning predicts flexible navigation in a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Jeannette Ploran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to navigate flexibly (e.g., reorienting oneself based on distal landmarks to reach a learned target from a new position may rely on visual scanning during both initial experiences with the environment and subsequent test trials. Reliance on visual scanning during navigation harkens back to the concept of vicarious trial and error, a description of the side-to-side head movements made by rats as they explore previously traversed sections of a maze in an attempt to find a reward. In the current study, we examined if visual scanning predicted the extent to which participants would navigate to a learned location in a virtual environment defined by its position relative to distal landmarks. Our results demonstrated a significant positive relationship between the amount of visual scanning and participant accuracy in identifying the trained target location from a new starting position as long as the landmarks within the environment remain consistent with the period of original learning. Our findings indicate that active visual scanning of the environment is a deliberative attentional strategy that supports the formation of spatial representations for flexible navigation.

  7. EXPLOITING 3D ULTRASOUND FOR FETAL DIAGNOSTIC PURPOSE THROUGH FACIAL LANDMARKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Vezzetti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, three-dimensional landmarking has gained attention for different applications, such as face recognition for both identification of suspects and authentication, facial expression recognition, corrective and aesthetic surgery, syndrome study and diagnosis. This work focuses on the last one by proposing a geometrically-based landmark extraction algorithm aimed at diagnosing syndromes on babies before their birth. Pivotal role in this activity is the support provided by physicians and 3D ultrasound tools for working on real faces. In particular, the landmarking algorithm here proposed only relies on descriptors coming from Differential Geometry (Gaussian, mean, and principal curvatures, derivatives, coefficients of first and second fundamental forms, Shape and Curvedness indexes and is tested on nine facial point clouds referred to nine babies taken by a three-dimensional ultrasound tool at different weeks' gestation. The results obtained, validated with the support of four practitioners, show that the localization is quite accurate. All errors lie in the range between 0 and 3.5 mm and the mean distance for each shell is in the range between 0.6 and 1.6 mm. The landmarks showing the highest errors are the ones belonging to the mouth region. Instead, the most precise landmark is the pronasal, on the nose tip, with a mean distance of 0.55 mm. Relying on current literature, this study is something missing in the state-of-the-art of the field, as present facial studies on 3D ultrasound do not work on automatic landmarking yet.

  8. A Catalytic Role for Mod5 in the Formation of the Tea1 Cell Polarity Landmark

    OpenAIRE

    Bicho, Claudia C.; Kelly, David A.; Snaith, Hilary A.; Goryachev, Andrew B.; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many systems regulating cell polarity involve stable landmarks defined by internal cues [1–5]. In the rod-shaped fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, microtubules regulate polarized vegetative growth via a landmark involving the protein Tea1 [6–9]. Tea1 is delivered to cell tips as packets of molecules associated with growing microtubule ends [10] and anchored at the plasma membrane via a mechanism involving interaction with the membrane protein Mod5 [11, 12]. Tea1 and Mod5 are hi...

  9. UAV Control on the Basis of 3D Landmark Bearing-Only Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-11-27

    The article presents an approach to the control of a UAV on the basis of 3D landmark observations. The novelty of the work is the usage of the 3D RANSAC algorithm developed on the basis of the landmarks' position prediction with the aid of a modified Kalman-type filter. Modification of the filter based on the pseudo-measurements approach permits obtaining unbiased UAV position estimation with quadratic error characteristics. Modeling of UAV flight on the basis of the suggested algorithm shows good performance, even under significant external perturbations.

  10. Localization and navigation using a novel artificial landmark for indoor mobile robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Feng; Yuan Kui; Zheng Rui

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a practical topological navigation system for indoor mobile robots, making use of a novel artificial landmark which is called MR code. This new kind of paper-made landmarks can be easily attached on the ceilings or on the walls. Localization algorithms for the two cases are given respectively. A docking control algorithm is also described, which a robot employs to approach its current goal. A simple topological navigation algorithm is proposed. Experiment results show the effectiveness of the method in real environment.

  11. Application of a Fast Connected Components Labeling Algorithm in Processing Landmark Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Extracting geometric data of landmarks from fluoroscopic images plays an important role in camera calibration process of a fluoroscopic-image-based surgical navigation system. Connected components labeling is the essential technique for the extraction. A new fast connected components labeling algorithm was presented. The definition of upward concave set was introduced to explain the algorithm. Feasibility and efficiency of the algorithm were verified with experiments. This algorithm performs well in labeling non-upward concave set connected components and applies to landmarks labeling well. Moreover, the proposed algorithm possesses a desirable characteristic that will facilitate the subsequent processing of fluoroscopic images.

  12. UAV Control on the Basis of 3D Landmark Bearing-Only Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an approach to the control of a UAV on the basis of 3D landmark observations. The novelty of the work is the usage of the 3D RANSAC algorithm developed on the basis of the landmarks' position prediction with the aid of a modified Kalman-type filter. Modification of the filter based on the pseudo-measurements approach permits obtaining unbiased UAV position estimation with quadratic error characteristics. Modeling of UAV flight on the basis of the suggested algorithm shows good performance, even under significant external perturbations. PMID:26633394

  13. Evaluation of clinically relevant landmarks of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve: A three-dimensional study with application to avoiding facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Joel C; Ravichandiran, Mayoorendra; Agur, Anne M; Fattah, Adel

    2016-03-01

    Injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (MMN) during surgery often results in poor functional and cosmetic outcomes. A line two finger breadths or 2 cm inferior to the border of the mandible is commonly used in planning neck incisions to avoid injury to the MMN. The purpose was to compare the two finger breadth/2 cm landmarks in predicting MMN course, and their accuracy/reliability. Thirty-one cadaveric specimens were scanned to obtain 3D surface topography (FARO® scanner). Four independent raters pinned the inferior border of the mandible and a two finger breadth line and 2cm line below. The location of each pin was digitized (Microscribe™). A preauricular flap was raised, and MMN branches were digitized and modelled (Geomagic®/Maya®) enabling quantification of the accuracy of these landmarks. The location of the two-finger breadth line was variable, spanning 25-51 mm below the inferior border of the mandible (ICC = 0.10). The most inferior MMN branch did not pass below the two-finger breadth line in any specimen, but a narrow clearance zone (≤5 mm) was found in two. In contrast, in 7/31 specimens, the most inferior MMN branch coursed below the 2 cm line and would be at risk of injury. It was concluded that an incision two finger breadths below the inferior border of the mandible could provide safer access than the 2 cm line. After an incision has been placed using the two finger-breadth landmark, caution must be exercised during dissection as branches of the MMN may lie only a few millimeters superior to the incision. PMID:26096443

  14. Rhizosphere of Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. as a landmark for polythene degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnawaz, Mohd; Sangale, Manisha K; Ade, Avinash B

    2016-07-01

    Due to high durability, cheap cost, and ease of manufacture, 311 million tons of plastic-based products are manufactured around the globe per annum. The slow/least rate of plastic degradation leads to generation of million tons of plastic waste per annum, which is of great environmental concern. Of the total plastic waste generated, polythene shared about 64 %. Various methods are available in the literature to tackle with the plastic waste, and biodegradation is considered as the most accepted, eco-friendly, and cost-effective method of polythene waste disposal. In the present study, an attempt has been made to isolate, screen, and characterize the most efficient polythene degrading bacteria by using rhizosphere soil of Avicennia marina as a landmark. From 12 localities along the west coast of India, a total of 123 bacterial isolates were recorded. Maximum percent weight loss (% WL; 21.87 ± 6.37 %) was recorded with VASB14 at pH 3.5 after 2 months of shaking at room temperature. Maximum percent weight gain (13.87 ± 3.6 %) was reported with MANGB5 at pH 7. Maximum percent loss in tensile strength (% loss in TS; 87.50 ± 4.8 %) was documented with VASB1 at pH 9.5. The results based on the % loss in TS were only reproducible. Further, the level of degradation was confirmed by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. In SEM analysis, scions/crakes were found on the surface of the degraded polythene, and mass of bacterial cell was also recorded on the weight-gained polythene strips. Maximum reduction in carbonyl index (4.14 %) was recorded in untreated polythene strip with Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain VASB14/WL. Based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence homology, the most efficient polythene degrading bacteria were identified as L. fusiformis strainVASB14/WL and Bacillus cereus strain VASB1/TS. PMID:27072028

  15. Dorsolateral Striatal Lesions Impair Navigation Based on Landmark-Goal Vectors but Facilitate Spatial Learning Based on a "Cognitive Map"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Yutaka; Poulter, Steven L.; Austen, Joe M.; McGregor, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    In three experiments, the nature of the interaction between multiple memory systems in rats solving a variation of a spatial task in the water maze was investigated. Throughout training rats were able to find a submerged platform at a fixed distance and direction from an intramaze landmark by learning a landmark-goal vector. Extramaze cues were…

  16. Animals' Use of Landmarks and Metric Information to Reorient: Effects of the Size of the Experimental Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Bisazza, Angelo; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Disoriented children could use geometric information in combination with landmark information to reorient themselves in large but not in small experimental spaces. We tested fish in the same task and found that they were able to conjoin geometric and non-geometric (landmark) information to reorient themselves in both the large and the small space…

  17. 3D ultrasound-CT registration of the liver using combined landmark-intensity information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important issue in computer-assisted surgery of the liver is a fast and reliable transfer of preoperative resection plans to the intraoperative situation. One problem is to match the planning data, derived from preoperative CT or MR images, with 3D ultrasound images of the liver, acquired during surgery. As the liver deforms significantly in the intraoperative situation non-rigid registration is necessary. This is a particularly challenging task because pre- and intraoperative image data stem from different modalities and ultrasound images are generally very noisy. One way to overcome these problems is to incorporate prior knowledge into the registration process. We propose a method of combining anatomical landmark information with a fast non-parametric intensity registration approach. Mathematically, this leads to a constrained optimization problem. As distance measure we use the normalized gradient field which allows for multimodal image registration. A qualitative and quantitative validation on clinical liver data sets of three different patients has been performed. We used the distance of dense corresponding points on vessel center lines for quantitative validation. The combined landmark and intensity approach improves the mean and percentage of point distances above 3 mm compared to rigid and thin-plate spline registration based only on landmarks. The proposed algorithm offers the possibility to incorporate additional a priori knowledge - in terms of few landmarks - provided by a human expert into a non-rigid registration process. (orig.)

  18. Illusionary Inclusion--What Went Wrong with New Labour's Landmark Educational Policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the emergence and evolution of New Labour's landmark educational policy; namely that of inclusion. The author, Alan Hodkinson, associate professor at the Centre for Cultural and Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University, illuminates his conceptual difficulties in attempting to define what inclusion was and what…

  19. Robust 3D face landmark localization based on local coordinate coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingli; Tao, Dacheng; Sun, Shengpeng; Chen, Chun; Maybank, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    In the 3D facial animation and synthesis community, input faces are usually required to be labeled by a set of landmarks for parameterization. Because of the variations in pose, expression and resolution, automatic 3D face landmark localization remains a challenge. In this paper, a novel landmark localization approach is presented. The approach is based on local coordinate coding (LCC) and consists of two stages. In the first stage, we perform nose detection, relying on the fact that the nose shape is usually invariant under the variations in the pose, expression, and resolution. Then, we use the iterative closest points algorithm to find a 3D affine transformation that aligns the input face to a reference face. In the second stage, we perform resampling to build correspondences between the input 3D face and the training faces. Then, an LCC-based localization algorithm is proposed to obtain the positions of the landmarks in the input face. Experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to state of the art methods in terms of its robustness, flexibility, and accuracy. PMID:25296404

  20. Obstacles Facing Promoting Tourism for Islamic Landmarks from the Perspective of Tour Operators in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Bakri Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The UNESCO launched a campaign #unite4heritage in Egypt to defeat extremism and intolerance. The message of such campaigne is peace, dialogue and unity embedded in cultural heritage. As culture and tourism are linked together, such message could be delivered through improving culture heritage tourism in Egypt. Islamic landmarks  are considered as a part of human heritage. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify how much tour operators in Egypt include Islamic landmarks in their programs to determine the obstacles facing promoting cultural tourism in Islamic landmarks' areas. Additionally, the study would identify positive results in the case of developing heritage tourism in Egypt. To achieve a high result, a survey approach was employed to collect data from 100 tour operators, using a completed questionnaire technique as well as a Likert Scale and statistical models in order to test and interpret the research outcomes. The research findings indicated that although tour operators in Egypt are convinced of the significance of the Islamic landmarks, there is no contradiction between creating global understanding and at the same time achieving benefit to the local community. However, there is a range of obstacles facing promoting such type of tourism in Egypt. Keywords: Culture heritage tourism, community, Egypt, Islamic civilization.

  1. Global Polity in Adult Education and UNESCO: Landmarking, Brokering and Framing Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milana, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Aknowledging the complexity of local-global interconnections, the author argues for the adoption of a global polity perspective in adult education, here applied to study mobilisation processes that occur through UNESCO. The findings point to three processes that cross geopolitical borders and professional interests: "landmarking," by…

  2. Landmark Recognition in Alzheimer's Dementia: Spared Implicit Memory for Objects Relevant for Navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Doormaal, A.A.M. van; Janzen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In spatial navigation, landmark recognition is crucial. Specifically, memory for objects placed at decision points on a route is relevant. Previous fMRI research in healthy adults showed higher medial-temporal lobe (MTL) activation for objects placed at decision points compared to non-de

  3. Landmark recognition in Alzheimer's dementia: spared implicit memory for objects relevant for navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Doormaal, A. van; Janzen, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spatial navigation, landmark recognition is crucial. Specifically, memory for objects placed at decision points on a route is relevant. Previous fMRI research in healthy adults showed higher medial-temporal lobe (MTL) activation for objects placed at decision points compared to non-de

  4. Smells like home: Desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis, use olfactory landmarks to pinpoint the nest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knaden Markus

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cataglyphis fortis ants forage individually for dead arthropods in the inhospitable salt-pans of Tunisia. Locating the inconspicuous nest after a foraging run of more than 100 meters demands a remarkable orientation capability. As a result of high temperatures and the unpredictable distribution of food, Cataglyphis ants do not lay pheromone trails. Instead, path integration is the fundamental system of long-distance navigation. This system constantly informs a foraging ant about its position relative to the nest. In addition, the ants rely on visual landmarks as geocentric navigational cues to finally pinpoint the nest entrance. Results Apart from the visual cues within the ants' habitat, we found potential olfactory landmark information with different odour blends coupled to various ground structures. Here we show that Cataglyphis ants can use olfactory information in order to locate their nest entrance. Ants were trained to associate their nest entrance with a single odour. In a test situation, they focused their nest search on the position of the training odour but not on the positions of non-training odours. When trained to a single odour, the ants were able to recognise this odour within a mixture of four odours. Conclusion The uniform salt-pans become less homogenous if one takes olfactory landmarks into account. As Cataglyphis ants associate environmental odours with the nest entrance they can be said to use olfactory landmarks in the vicinity of the nest for homing.

  5. An intelligent gradient detector with minimization of visual landmarks distortion for monitoring of passenger flows

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbenko, A.; Popov, V.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of monitoring of passenger flows. We consider an intelligent gradient algorithm to solve the problem. We use a method of minimization of visual landmarks distortion to improve the quality of recognition. © 2013 Anna Gorbenko and Vladimir Popov.

  6. Parallel striatal and hippocampal systems for landmarks and boundaries in spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeller, Christian F; King, John A; Burgess, Neil

    2008-04-15

    How the memory systems centered on the hippocampus and dorsal striatum interact to support behavior remains controversial. We used functional MRI while people learned the locations of objects by collecting and replacing them over multiple trials within a virtual environment comprising a landmark, a circular boundary, and distant cues for orientation. The relative location of landmark and boundary was occasionally changed, with specific objects paired with one or other cue, allowing dissociation of learning and performance relative to either cue. Right posterior hippocampal activation reflected learning and remembering of boundary-related locations, whereas right dorsal striatal activation reflected learning and remembering of landmark-related locations. Within the right hippocampus, anterior processing of environmental change (spatial novelty) was dissociated from posterior processing of location. Behavioral studies show that landmark-related learning obeys associative reinforcement, whereas boundary-related learning is incidental [Doeller CF, Burgess N (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:5909-5914]. The distinct incidental hippocampal processing of boundaries is suggestive of a "geometric module" or "cognitive map" and may explain the hippocampal support of incidental/observational learning in "declarative" or "episodic" memory versus the striatal support of trial-and-error learning in "procedural" memory. Finally, the hippocampal and striatal systems appear to combine "bottom-up," simply influencing behavior proportional to their activations, without direct interaction, with "top-down" ventromedial prefrontal involvement when both are similarly active. PMID:18408152

  7. The developmental trajectory of intramaze and extramaze landmark biases in spatial navigation: An unexpected journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew G; Haselgrove, Mark; Smith, Alastair D

    2015-06-01

    Adults learning to navigate to a hidden goal within an enclosed space have been found to prefer information provided by the distal cues of an environment, as opposed to proximal landmarks within the environment. Studies with children, however, have shown that 5- or 7-year-olds do not display any preference toward distal or proximal cues during navigation. This suggests that a bias toward learning about distal cues occurs somewhere between the age of 7 years and adulthood. We recruited 5- to 11-year-old children and an adult sample to explore the developmental profile of this putative change. Across a series of 3 experiments, participants were required to navigate to a hidden goal in a virtual environment, the location of which was signaled by both extramaze and intramaze landmark cues. During testing, these cues were placed into conflict to assess the search preferences of participants. Consistent with previously reported findings, adults were biased toward using extramaze information. However, analysis of the data from children, which incorporated age as a continuous variable, suggested that older children in our sample were, in fact, biased toward using the intramaze landmark in our task. These findings suggest the bias toward using distal cues in spatial navigation, frequently displayed by adults, may be a comparatively late developing trait, and one that could supersede an initial developmental preference for proximal landmarks. PMID:25844850

  8. Precision landmark location for machine vision and photogrammetry finding and achieving the maximum possible accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, José A

    2007-01-01

    Shows the reader how to derive theoretical limits to the precision of landmark identification in electronic imagesMATLAB® package assists the reader with applying theoretical results in real engineering systemsSteps outside the usual earth-sciences and civil-engineering base of photogrammetry to improve animation, medical imaging and robotic vision applications

  9. Influence of anatomic landmarks in the virtual environment on simulated angled laparoscope navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzink, S.N.; Christie, L.S.; Goossens, R.H.M.; De Ridder, H.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the presence of anatomic landmarks on the performance of angled laparoscope navigation on the SimSurgery SEP simulator. Methods - Twenty-eight experienced laparoscopic surgeons (familiar with 30º angled laparoscope, >100 basic lap

  10. Automatic 2.5-D Facial Landmarking and Emotion Annotation for Social Interaction Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Zou, Jianhua; Li, Huibin; Dellandrea, Emmanuel; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A; Chen, Liming

    2016-09-01

    People with low vision, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorder experience difficulties in perceiving or interpreting facial expression of emotion in their social lives. Though automatic facial expression recognition (FER) methods on 2-D videos have been extensively investigated, their performance was constrained by challenges in head pose and lighting conditions. The shape information in 3-D facial data can reduce or even overcome these challenges. However, high expenses of 3-D cameras prevent their widespread use. Fortunately, 2.5-D facial data from emerging portable RGB-D cameras provide a good balance for this dilemma. In this paper, we propose an automatic emotion annotation solution on 2.5-D facial data collected from RGB-D cameras. The solution consists of a facial landmarking method and a FER method. Specifically, we propose building a deformable partial face model and fit the model to a 2.5-D face for localizing facial landmarks automatically. In FER, a novel action unit (AU) space-based FER method has been proposed. Facial features are extracted using landmarks and further represented as coordinates in the AU space, which are classified into facial expressions. Evaluated on three publicly accessible facial databases, namely EURECOM, FRGC, and Bosphorus databases, the proposed facial landmarking and expression recognition methods have achieved satisfactory results. Possible real-world applications using our algorithms have also been discussed. PMID:26316289

  11. 76 FR 60079 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Board will be held beginning at 1 p.m. on November 8, 2011, at the following location. The meeting... System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and time to be determined. The Committee...

  12. 76 FR 55701 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Board will be held beginning at 1 p.m. on November 8, 2011, at the following location. The meeting... System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and time to be determined. The Committee...

  13. 77 FR 14420 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Board will be held beginning at 10 a.m. on May 15, 2012, at the following location. The meeting... National Park System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and time to be determined....

  14. 36 CFR 62.4 - Natural landmark designation and recognition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sufficient representation of the significant natural features. (g) National Park System Advisory Board. (1... qualifies for national natural landmark designation. (2) Notice of Advisory Board meetings to review... also attend the board meeting and upon request may address the board concerning an area's...

  15. Landmark-based morphometrics of the normal adult brain using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, S L; O'Higgins, P; Maudgil, D D; Dryden, I L; Lemieux, L; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D

    2001-05-01

    We describe the application of statistical shape analysis to homologous landmarks on the cortical surface of the adult human brain. Statistical shape analysis has a sound theoretical basis. Landmarks are identified on the surface of a 3-D reconstruction of the segmented cortical surface from magnetic resonance image (MRI) data. Using publicly available software (morphologika) the location and size dependence of the landmarks are removed and the differences in landmark distribution across subjects are analysed using principal component analysis. These differences, representing shape differences between subjects, can be visually assessed using wireframe models and transformation grids. The MRI data of 58 adult brains (27 female and 15 left handed) were examined. Shape differences in the whole brain are described which concern the relative orientation of frontal lobe sulci. Analysis of all 116 hemispheres revealed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) between left and right hemispheres. This finding was significant for right- but not left-handed subjects alone. No other significant age, gender, handedness, or brain-size correlations with shape differences were found.

  16. Landmarks in the Professional and Academic Development of Mid-Career Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Vivienne; Thompson, Simon; Hryniewicz, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the professional and academic development of mid-career teacher educators from two universities in England. The objectives of the study were to analyse and compare the career experiences of teacher educators; in particular, to identify stages of development, landmark events and contextual factors affecting professional…

  17. Observer Reliability of Three-Dimensional Cephalometric Landmark Identification on Cone-Beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Ana Emilia F.; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena S.; Phillips, Ceib; Motta, Alexandre; Burke, Brandon; Tyndall, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate reliability in 3D landmark identification using Cone-Beam CT. Study Design Twelve pre-surgery CBCTs were randomly selected from 159 orthognathic surgery patients. Three observers independently repeated three times the identification of 30 landmarks in the sagittal, coronal, and axial slices. A mixed effects ANOVA model estimated the Intraclass Correlations (ICC) and assessed systematic bias. Results The ICC was >0.9 for 86% of intra-observer assessments and 66% of inter-observer assessments. Only 1% of intra-observer and 3% of inter-observer coefficients were <0.45. The systematic difference among observers was greater in X and Z than in Y dimensions, but the maximum mean difference was quite small. Conclusion Overall, the intra- and inter-observer reliability was excellent. 3D landmark identification using CBCT can offer consistent and reproducible data, if a protocol for operator training and calibration is followed. This is particularly important for landmarks not easily specified in all three planes of space. PMID:18718796

  18. Visual homing in the absence of feature-based landmark information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillner, Sabine; Weiss, Anja M; Mallot, Hanspeter A

    2008-10-01

    Despite that fact that landmarks play a prominent role in human navigation, experimental evidence on how landmarks are selected and defined by human navigators remains elusive. Indeed, the concept of a 'landmark' is itself not entirely clear. In everyday language, the term landmark refers to salient, distinguishable, and usually nameable objects, rendering the problem of landmark recognition a special case of the general object recognition problem. In contrast, in the insect and robot literature, this notion of landmarks is often replaced by the "local position information" [e.g., Trullier, O., Wiener, S., Berthoz, A., & Meyer, J.-A. (1997). Biologically based artificial navigation systems: Review and prospects. Progress in Neurobiology, 51, 483-544], referring to the entire set of sensor readings obtained at one location. This set may then serve as a characteristic of the particular location. Honey bees have been shown to base place recognition and homing on a snapshot-like memory of the place's visual environment, not on the distances to recognized objects [Cartwright, B., & Collett, T. (1983). Landmark learning in bees. Experiments and models. Journal of Comparative Physiology A, 151, 521-543]. A number of theoretical models of snapshot-based homing [e.g., Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H. A., Bülthoff, H. H. (1998). Where did I take that snapshot? Scene-based homing by image matching. Biological Cybernetics, 79, 191-202; Vardy, A., & Möller, R. (2005). Biologically plausible visual homing methods based on optical flow techniques. Connection Science, 17, 47-89] predict that the accuracy of snapshot-based homing should depend on image contrast. For rodent hippocampal place fields, models have been developed using additional image information such as three-dimensional depth and allocentric orientations (e.g., room axes) and are thus less sensitive to image contrast and noise [e.g. Barry, C., Lever, C., Hayman, R., Hartley, T., Burton, S., O'Keefe, J., et al

  19. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  20. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  1. Building human genome maps with radiation hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slonim, D.; Kruglyak, L.; Stein, L.; Lander, E. [MIT Center for Genome Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Genome maps are crucial tools in human genetic research, providing known landmarks for locating disease genes and frameworks for large-scale sequencing. Radiation hybrid mapping is one technique for building genome maps. In this paper, we describe the methods used to build radiation hybrid maps of the entire human genome. We present the hidden Markov model that we employ to estimate the likelihood of a map despite uncertainty about the data, and we discuss the problem of searching for maximum-likelihood maps. We describe the graph algorithms used to find sparse but reliable initial maps and our methods of extending them. Finally, we show results validating our software on simulated data, and we describe our genome-wide human radiation hybrid maps and the evidence supporting them. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Scan BIST with biased scan test signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Dong; CHEN MingJing; SUN JiaGuang

    2008-01-01

    The conventional test-per-scan built-in self-test (BIST) scheme needs a number of shift cycles followed by one capture cycle.Fault effects received by the scan flip-flops are shifted out while shifting in the next test vector like scan testing.Unlike deterministic testing,it is unnecessary to apply a complete test vector to the scan chains.A new scan-based BIST scheme is proposed by properly controlling the test signals of the scan chains,Different biased random values are assigned to the test signals of scan flip-flops in separate scan chains.Capture cycles can be inserted at any clock cycle if necessary.A new testability estimation procedure according to the proposed testing scheme is presented.A greedy procedure is proposed to select a weight for each scan chain.Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve test effectiveness of scan-based BIST greatly,and most circuits can obtain complete fault coverage or very close to complete fault coverage.

  3. Within-compound associations explain potentiation and failure to overshadow learning based on geometry by discrete landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, Joe M; Kosaki, Yutaka; McGregor, Anthony

    2013-07-01

    In three experiments, rats were trained to locate a submerged platform in one of the base corners of a triangular arena above each of which was suspended one of two distinctive landmarks. In Experiment 1, it was established that these landmarks differed in their salience by the differential control they gained over behavior after training in compound with geometric cues. In Experiment 2, it was shown that locating the platform beneath the less salient landmark potentiated learning based on geometry compared with control rats for which landmarks provided ambiguous information about the location of the platform. The presence of the more salient landmark above the platform for another group of animals appeared to have no effect on learning based on geometry. Experiment 3 established that these landmark and geometry cues entered into within-compound associations during compound training. We argue that these within-compound associations can account for the potentiation seen in Experiment 2, as well as previous failures to demonstrate overshadowing of geometric cues. We also suggest that these within-compound associations need not be of different magnitudes, despite the different effects of each of the landmarks on learning based on geometry seen in Experiment 2. Instead, within-compound associations appear to mitigate the overshadowing effects that traditional theories of associative learning would predict.

  4. Software Designation to Assess the Proximity of Different Facial Anatomic Landmarks to Midlines of the Mouth and Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshkelgosha V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recognition and determination of facial and dental midline is important in dentistry. Currently, there are no verifiable guidelines that direct the choice of specific anatomic landmarks to determine the midline of the face or mouth. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine which of facial anatomic landmarks is closest to the midline of the face as well as that of the mouth. Materials and Methods: Frontal full-face digital images of 92 subjects (men and women age range: 20-30 years in smile were taken under standardized conditions; commonly used anatomic landmarks, nasion, tip of the nose, and tip of the philtrum were digitized on the images of subjects and aesthetic analyzer software used for midline analysis using Esthetic Frame. Deviations from the midlines of the face and mouth were measured for the 3 clinical landmarks; the existing dental midline was considered as the fourth landmark. The entire process of midline analysis was done by a single observer and repeated twice. Reliability analysis and 1-sample t- tests were conducted. Results: The Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs for reliability analysis of RFV and RCV measures made two times revealed that the reliabilities were all acceptable. The results indicated that each of the 4 landmarks deviated uniquely and significantly (P<.001 from the midlines of the face as well as mouth in both males and females. Conclusions: There was a significant difference between the mean ratios of the chosen anatomic landmarks and the midlines of the face and mouth. The hierarchy of anatomic landmarks closest to the midline of the face is: (1 midline of the commissures, (2 nasion , (3 tip of philtrum,(4 dental midline, and (5 tip ofthe nose. The closest anatomic landmarks to the mouth midline are: (1 tip of philtrum, (2 dental midline, (3 tip of nose, and (4 nasion.

  5. Modeling and matching of landmarks for automation of Mars Rover localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, begun in January 2004, has been extremely successful. However, decision-making for many operation tasks of the current MER mission and the 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission is performed on Earth through a predominantly manual, time-consuming process. Unmanned planetary rover navigation is ideally expected to reduce rover idle time, diminish the need for entering safe-mode, and dynamically handle opportunistic science events without required communication to Earth. Successful automation of rover navigation and localization during the extraterrestrial exploration requires that accurate position and attitude information can be received by a rover and that the rover has the support of simultaneous localization and mapping. An integrated approach with Bundle Adjustment (BA) and Visual Odometry (VO) can efficiently refine the rover position. However, during the MER mission, BA is done manually because of the difficulty in the automation of the cross-sitetie points selection. This dissertation proposes an automatic approach to select cross-site tie points from multiple rover sites based on the methods of landmark extraction, landmark modeling, and landmark matching. The first step in this approach is that important landmarks such as craters and rocks are defined. Methods of automatic feature extraction and landmark modeling are then introduced. Complex models with orientation angles and simple models without those angles are compared. The results have shown that simple models can provide reasonably good results. Next, the sensitivity of different modeling parameters is analyzed. Based on this analysis, cross-site rocks are matched through two complementary stages: rock distribution pattern matching and rock model matching. In addition, a preliminary experiment on orbital and ground landmark matching is also briefly introduced. Finally, the reliability of the cross-site tie points selection is validated by fault detection, which

  6. Age-Related Differences in Associative Learning of Landmarks and Heading Directions in a Virtual Navigation Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jimmy Y; Moffat, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have showed that spatial memory declines with age but have not clarified the relevance of different landmark cues for specifying heading directions among different age groups. This study examined differences between younger, middle-aged and older adults in route learning and memory tasks after they navigated a virtual maze that contained: (a) critical landmarks that were located at decision points (i.e., intersections) and (b) non-critical landmarks that were located at non-decision points (i.e., the sides of the route). Participants were given a recognition memory test for critical and non-critical landmarks and also given a landmark-direction associative learning task. Compared to younger adults, older adults committed more navigation errors during route learning and were poorer at associating the correct heading directions with both critical and non-critical landmarks. Notably, older adults exhibited a landmark-direction associative memory deficit at decision points; this was the first finding to show that an associative memory deficit exist among older adults in a navigational context for landmarks that are pertinent for reaching a goal, and suggest that older adults may expend more cognitive resources on the encoding of landmark/object features than on the binding of landmark and directional information. This study is also the first to show that older adults did not have a tendency to process non-critical landmarks, which were regarded as distractors/irrelevant cues for specifying the directions to reach the goal, to an equivalent or larger extent than younger adults. We explain this finding in view of the low number of non-critical cues in our virtual maze (relative to a real-world urban environment) that might not have evoked older adults' usual tendency toward processing or encoding distractors. We explain the age differences in navigational and cognitive performance with regards to functional and structural changes in the hippocampus and

  7. Monocular vision for intelligent wheelchair indoor navigation based on natural landmark matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Luo, Yuan; Kong, Weixi

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a real-time navigation system in a behavior-based manner. We show that autonomous navigation is possible in different rooms with the use of a single camera and natural landmarks. Firstly the intelligent wheelchair is manually guided on a path passing through different rooms and a video sequence is recorded with a front-facing camera. A 3D structure map is then gotten from this learning sequence by calculating the natural landmarks. Finally, the intelligent wheelchair uses this map to compute its localization and it follows the learning path or a slightly different path to achieve the real-time navigation. Experimental results indicate that this method is effective even when the viewpoint and scale is changed.

  8. Conventional cerebrospinal fluid scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, H.

    1985-06-01

    Conventional cerebrospinal fluid scanning (CSF scanning) today is mainly carried out in addition to computerized tomography to obtain information about liquor flow kinetics. Especially in patients with communicating obstructive hydrocephalus, CSF scanning is clinically useful for the decision for shunt surgery. In patients with intracranial cysts, CSF scanning can provide information about liquor circulation. Further indications for CSF scanning include the assessment of shunt patency especially in children, as well as the detection and localization of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

  9. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmook, Maria T.; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology/Division of Neuro- and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Integrative Morphology Group, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology / Division of Obstetrics and Feto-maternal Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average {+-}sd: gw 22 {+-} 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p=0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p<0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided. (orig.)

  10. Single Robot Localisation Approach for Indoor Robotic Systems through Integration of Odometry and Artificial Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Ņikitenko, A; Liekna, A; Ekmanis, M.; Kuļikovskis, G; Andersone, I

    2013-01-01

    we present an integrated approach for robot localization that allows to integrate for the artificial landmark localization data with odometric sensors and signal transfer function data to provide means for different practical application scenarios. The sensor data fusion deals with asynchronous sensor data using inverse Laplace transform. We demonstrate a simulation software system that ensures smooth integration of the odometry-based and signal transfer – based localization into one approach.

  11. Knee joint secondary motion accuracy improved by quaternion-based optimizer with bony landmark constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Zheng, Naiqaun Nigel

    2010-12-01

    Skin marker-based motion analysis has been widely used in biomechanical studies and clinical applications. Unfortunately, the accuracy of knee joint secondary motions is largely limited by the nonrigidity nature of human body segments. Numerous studies have investigated the characteristics of soft tissue movement. Utilizing these characteristics, we may improve the accuracy of knee joint motion measurement. An optimizer was developed by incorporating the soft tissue movement patterns at special bony landmarks into constraint functions. Bony landmark constraints were assigned to the skin markers at femur epicondyles, tibial plateau edges, and tibial tuberosity in a motion analysis algorithm by limiting their allowed position space relative to the underlying bone. The rotation matrix was represented by quaternion, and the constrained optimization problem was solved by Fletcher's version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization technique. The algorithm was validated by using motion data from both skin-based markers and bone-mounted markers attached to fresh cadavers. By comparing the results with the ground truth bone motion generated from the bone-mounted markers, the new algorithm had a significantly higher accuracy (root-mean-square (RMS) error: 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in axial rotation and 0.4 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus) in estimating the knee joint secondary rotations than algorithms without bony landmark constraints (RMS error: 1.7 ± 0.4 deg in axial rotation and 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus). Also, it predicts a more accurate medial-lateral translation (RMS error: 0.4 ± 0.1 mm) than the conventional techniques (RMS error: 1.2 ± 0.2 mm). The new algorithm, using bony landmark constrains, estimates more accurate secondary rotations and medial-lateral translation of the underlying bone.

  12. Nasolacrimal Duct Orifice: A Cadaveric Study in Relation to Important Anatomical Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Ankolekar, Vrinda Hari; Hosapatna, Mamatha; Das M, Aswin; Supriya, Supriya; Anne D Souza; Antony Sylvan D Souza

    2014-01-01

    AbstractThe nasolacrimal apparatus is intimately associated with the lateral nasal wall and may be approached using an endoscopic technique. This study was undertaken to describe in detail the gross anatomy of the nasolacrimal duct orifice in relation to various landmarks of the lateral nasal wall to improve the safety and efficiency of endoscopic surgical procedures. The study was conducted on 25 sagittal sections of adult cadavers in the Department of Anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Mani...

  13. Design of an enhanced visual odometry by building and matching compressive panoramic landmarks online

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LU; Zhi-yu XIANG; Ji-lin LIU

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and precise localization is a prerequisite for the intelligent navigation of mobile robots. Traditional visual localization systems, such as visual odometry (VO) and simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), suffer from two short-comings: a drift problem caused by accumulated localization error, and erroneous motion estimation due to illumination varia-tion and moving objects. In this paper, we propose an enhanced VO by introducing a panoramic camera into the traditional stereo-only VO system. Benefiting from the 360° field of view, the panoramic camera is responsible for three tasks: (1) detect-ing road junctions and building a landmark library online; (2) correcting the robot’s position when the landmarks are revisited with any orientation; (3) working as a panoramic compass when the stereo VO cannot provide reliable positioning results. To use the large-sized panoramic images efficiently, the concept of compressed sensing is introduced into the solution and an adap-tive compressive feature is presented. Combined with our previous two-stage local binocular bundle adjustment (TLBBA) stereo VO, the new system can obtain reliable positioning results in quasi-real time. Experimental results of challenging long-range tests show that our enhanced VO is much more accurate and robust than the traditional VO, thanks to the compressive panoramic landmarks built online.

  14. Radiographic and anatomic landmarks to approach the anterior capsule in hip arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Antonio Porthos

    2015-12-01

    Hip arthroscopy (HA) is considered to be a very difficult and demanding surgical procedure, special instruments, an image intensifier and a fracture table or hip distractor are required to access the hip joint, the most common and worldwide used HA technique is entering blindly to the central compartment with the use of fluoroscopy and continuous distraction; with the potential danger if performed in unskillful hands of labral penetrations, labral resections and scuffing of the femoral head cartilage. Our technique describes the arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), performing a preoperative planning using radiographic and anatomic landmarks to approach the anterior capsule without the use of fluoroscopy. Access to the hip joint is made extra-articularly from the peritrochanteric compartment palpating the greater trochanter and posteriorly penetrating the iliotibial band sliding the arthroscopic sheath and obturator from the trochanteric border to the anterior femoral neck to visualize the anterior capsule bursa and anterior capsule fibers and posteriorly following our previous landmarks perform an anterior oblique Inverted 'T' or 'H' capsulotomy with a radiofrequency wand to access the cam-type impingement and distraction is made under direct controlled arthroscopic vision. Our technique in HA aiming the anterior capsule using radiographic and anatomic landmarks is safe, reliable and reproducible in FAI with big cams, deep sockets and cases with mild arthritis where the capsule is thick, stiff and calcified. PMID:27011869

  15. A low-cost test-bed for real-time landmark tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Ambrus; Hanan, Jay C.; Moreels, Pierre; Assad, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    A low-cost vehicle test-bed system was developed to iteratively test, refine and demonstrate navigation algorithms before attempting to transfer the algorithms to more advanced rover prototypes. The platform used here was a modified radio controlled (RC) car. A microcontroller board and onboard laptop computer allow for either autonomous or remote operation via a computer workstation. The sensors onboard the vehicle represent the types currently used on NASA-JPL rover prototypes. For dead-reckoning navigation, optical wheel encoders, a single axis gyroscope, and 2-axis accelerometer were used. An ultrasound ranger is available to calculate distance as a substitute for the stereo vision systems presently used on rovers. The prototype also carries a small laptop computer with a USB camera and wireless transmitter to send real time video to an off-board computer. A real-time user interface was implemented that combines an automatic image feature selector, tracking parameter controls, streaming video viewer, and user generated or autonomous driving commands. Using the test-bed, real-time landmark tracking was demonstrated by autonomously driving the vehicle through the JPL Mars yard. The algorithms tracked rocks as waypoints. This generated coordinates calculating relative motion and visually servoing to science targets. A limitation for the current system is serial computing-each additional landmark is tracked in order-but since each landmark is tracked independently, if transferred to appropriate parallel hardware, adding targets would not significantly diminish system speed.

  16. Neural Network-Based Landmark Recognition and Navigation with IAMRs. Understanding the Principles of Thought and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    Research on neural networks and hippocampal function demonstrating how mammals construct mental maps and develop navigation strategies is being used to create Intelligent Autonomous Mobile Robots (IAMRs). Such robots are able to recognize landmarks and navigate without "vision." (SK)

  17. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel eMertes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks - salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location - can play an important role in guiding the animal’s homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are encoded by the visual system is still open. Recently, it could be shown that motion cues are sufficient to allow bees localizing their goal using landmarks that can hardly be discriminated from the background texture. Here, we tested the hypothesis that motion sensitive neurons in the bee’s visual pathway provide information about such landmarks during a learning flight and might, thus, play a role for goal localization. We tracked learning flights of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris in an arena with distinct visual landmarks, reconstructed the visual input during these flights, and replayed ego-perspective movies to tethered bumblebees while recording the activity of direction-selective wide-field neurons in their optic lobe. By comparing neuronal responses during a typical learning flight and targeted modifications of landmark properties in this movie we demonstrate that these objects are indeed represented in the bee’s visual motion pathway. We find that object-induced responses vary little with object texture, which is in agreement with behavioral evidence. These neurons thus convey information about landmark properties that are useful for view-based homing.

  18. Software Designation to Assess the Proximity of Different Facial Anatomic Landmarks to Midlines of the Mouth and Face

    OpenAIRE

    Moshkelgosha V.; Zare R; Safari A

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Recognition and determination of facial and dental midline is important in dentistry. Currently, there are no verifiable guidelines that direct the choice of specific anatomic landmarks to determine the midline of the face or mouth. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine which of facial anatomic landmarks is closest to the midline of the face as well as that of the mouth. Materials and Methods: Frontal full-face digital images of 92 subject...

  19. Transabdominal ultrasound for detection of pregnancy, fetal and placental landmarks, and fetal age before Day 45 of gestation in the sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda K; Gately, Rachael E; McFadden, Katelyn K; Zinn, Steven A; Govoni, Kristen E; Reed, Sarah A

    2016-03-15

    Detection of pregnancy during early gestation is advantageous for flock breeding management. Transabdominal ultrasound is a practical and efficient approach for monitoring pregnancy and fetal growth in small ruminants. However, there is limited information using the transabdominal technique before Day 45 of gestation in sheep. Therefore, our objective was to determine how accurately transabdominal ultrasound could be used to detect pregnancy, to identify pregnancy landmarks, and to quantify fetal length before Day 45 in ewes. Multiparous Western White-faced ewes (n = 99) were estrus synchronized and exposed to one of four Dorset rams. The day a ewe was marked by a ram was considered Day 0 of gestation. Ewes not remarked by Day 20 were separated for ultrasonography. To detect pregnancy and landmarks, ewes were scanned three times per week between Day 26.0 ± 0.3 (mean ± standard error) and Day 40.0 ± 0.2. A single technician performed all scans in the right nonhaired abdominal pit using a real-time portable Eazi-Scan machine and a 5-MHz linear rectal transducer. All data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS (with repeated measures where appropriate). Because of rebreeding activity, 113 ultrasound periods were initiated. The specificity and positive predictive value were 100% during the entire study. The accuracy, sensitivity, and negative predictive value of ultrasound scanning were greater than 90% beginning at Day 33 ± 1. On average, pregnancy (n = 85) was detected at Day 28.7 ± 0.4 and nonpregnancy (n = 28) at Day 25.5 ± 0.6. Three early fetal losses were identified at Day 39.7 ± 0.7. In pregnant ewes (n = 82), the overall accuracy of fetal counting was 78%. The first observance of an enlarged uterus (P = 0.05) and pregnancy (P = 0.03) was detected earlier when multiple fetuses were developing compared with singletons. Placentome evagination was first observed earlier in triplets compared with twins and singletons (P = 0.02). Fetal length

  20. Delivering high-resolution landmarks using inkjet micropatterning for spatial monitoring of leaf expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronk Quentin CB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inkjet micropatterning is a versatile deposition technique with broad applications in numerous fields. However, its application in plant science is largely unexplored. Leaf expansion is one of the most important parameters in the field of plant science and many methods have been developed to examine differential expansion rates of different parts of the leaf lamina. Among them, methods based on the tracking of natural landmarks through digital imaging require a complicated setup in which the leaf must remain fixed and under tension. Furthermore, the resolution is limited to that of the natural landmarks, which are often difficult to find, particularly in young leaves. To study the fine scale expansion dynamics of the leaf lamina using artificial landmarks it is necessary to place small, noninvasive marks on a leaf surface and then recover the location of those marks after a period of time. Results To monitor leaf expansion in two dimensions, at very fine scales, we used a custom designed inkjet micropatterning system to print a grid composed of c. 0.19 mm2 cells on small developing leaves of ivy (Hedera helix using 40 μm dots at a spacing of c. 91 μm. The leaves in different growing stages were imaged under magnification to extract the coordinates of the marks which were then used in subsequent computer-assisted leaf expansion analyses. As an example we obtained quantified global and local expansion information and created expansion maps over the entire leaf surface. The results reveal a striking pattern of fine-scale expansion differences over short periods of time. In these experiments, the base of the leaf is a "cold spot" for expansion, while the leaf sinuses are "hot spots" for expansion. We have also measured a strong shading effect on leaf expansion. We discuss the features required to build an inkjet printing apparatus optimized for use in plant science, which will further maximize the range of tissues that can be

  1. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    OpenAIRE

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded...

  2. RBC nuclear scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  3. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health care ...

  4. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  5. [Dyspraxia: landmarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeau, M

    2010-03-01

    Despite its frequency, little is known about dyspraxia. Dyspraxia, which represents disorders in development and learning movements, within the context of a deficiency in the management of spatial information (in children whose verbal intelligence is spared), is often a severe handicap at school and in social life. Dyspraxia must be distinguished from "common" difficulties of unmotivated children at school, with which it is often confused. Hence, the diagnosis must correspond to rigorous methodology. And one should avoid proposing endless training for the deficient action (writing, getting dressed...); indeed such strategies only lead to short-term 'pseudo' progress, without any long term efficacy on the educational success of these intelligent children. To the contrary, the child should be rapidly oriented in two therapeutic directions: (1) a battle between the "double-task" effect stemming from the graphical and spatial difficulties; (2) the use of palliatives (including computing). In conditions of early diagnosis (at 4-8/9 years of age) and well-coordinated management with the school, the prognosis would be excellent in terms of schooling, choice of a profession and social insertion. If not, or if (as is the case in almost a third of cases) dyspraxia is not isolated (associated with dyslexia, hyperactivity, attentional deficit and psychotic traits), the child should be oriented towards a specialised classroom and care. PMID:19942418

  6. Effect of deformable registration on the dose calculated in radiation therapy planning CT scans of lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Armato, Samuel G.; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Contee, Clay; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: hal-hallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of deformable image registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pretherapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map were collected. To establish correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pretherapy scans then were coregistered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the demons deformable registration algorithm and two variants of the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm (“Fast” and “EMPIRE10”). Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from each of the three algorithms. The Euclidean distance between manually and automatically mapped landmark points (d{sub E}) and the absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) were calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of d{sub E}, dose (D), dose standard deviation (SD{sub dose}) in an eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: Over 1400 landmark point pairs were identified, with 58–93 (median: 84) points identified per patient. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.5 Gy (range: 0.9–10.6 Gy). Registration accuracy was highest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm, with an average d{sub E} across patients of 5.2 mm (compared with >7 mm for the other two algorithms). Consequently, average |ΔD| was also lowest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of d{sub E} (0.42 Gy/mm), D (0.05 Gy/Gy), SD{sub dose} (1.4 Gy/Gy), and the algorithm used (≤1 Gy). Conclusions: An

  7. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  8. Line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carucci, John A.; Stevenson, Mary; Gareau, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We created a line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope as part of a new procedure: video assisted micrographic surgery (VAMS). The need for rapid pathological assessment of the tissue on the surface of skin excisions very large since there are 3.5 million new skin cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The new design presented here is a confocal microscope without any scanning optics. Instead, a line is focused in space and the sample, which is flattened, is physically translated such that the line scans across its face in a direction perpendicular to the line its self. The line is 6mm long and the stage is capable of scanning 50 mm, hence the field of view is quite large. The theoretical diffraction-limited resolution is 0.7um lateral and 3.7um axial. However, in this preliminary report, we present initial results that are a factor of 5-7 poorer in resolution. The results are encouraging because they demonstrate that the linear array detector measures sufficient signal from fluorescently labeled tissue and also demonstrate the large field of view achievable with VAMS.

  9. A New 2D Corner Detector for Extracting Landmarks from Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Gelareh; Fatemizadeh, Emad

    2007-01-01

    Point-based registration of images strongly depends on the extraction of suitable landmarks. Recently, various 2D operators have been proposed for the detection of corner points but most of them are not effective for medical images that need a high accuracy. In this paper we have proposed a new automatic corner detector based on the covariance between the small region of support around a central pixel and its rotated one. The main goal of this paper is medical images so we especially focus on...

  10. The relationship of maxillary canines to the facial anatomical landmarks in a group of Thai people

    OpenAIRE

    Sinavarat, Potchaman; Anunmana, Chuchai; Hossain, Sharafat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective was to evaluate canine positions, intercanine tip width (ICTW) and width of distal surface of canine (WDC), related to facial landmarks including interalar width (IAW), intercommissural width (ICoW), and distance between left and right projection lines drawn from inner canthus of eyes to alae of the nose (DPICa) in a group of Thai. MATERIALS AND METHODS One hundred Thai subjects aged 18-35 years were selected. IAW and ICoW were measured on subject's face using digital ve...

  11. A Stochastic Approach to Diffeomorphic Point Set Registration with Landmark Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesov, Ivan; Lee, Jehoon; Sharp, Gregory; Vela, Patricio; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a deformable point set registration algorithm that seeks an optimal set of radial basis functions to describe the registration. A novel, global optimization approach is introduced composed of simulated annealing with a particle filter based generator function to perform the registration. It is shown how constraints can be incorporated into this framework. A constraint on the deformation is enforced whose role is to ensure physically meaningful fields (i.e., invertible). Further, examples in which landmark constraints serve to guide the registration are shown. Results on 2D and 3D data demonstrate the algorithm's robustness to noise and missing information. PMID:26761731

  12. Performance Characterization of a Landmark Measurement System for ARRM Terrain Relative Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Michael; Wright, Cinnamon; Liounis, Andrew; Getzandanner, Kenneth; Van Eepoel, John; Deweese, Keith

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the landmark measurement system being developed for terrain relative navigation on NASAs Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM),and the results of a performance characterization study given realistic navigational and model errors. The system is called Retina, and is derived from the stereophotoclinometry methods widely used on other small-body missions. The system is simulated using synthetic imagery of the asteroid surface and discussion is given on various algorithmic design choices. Unlike other missions, ARRMs Retina is the first planned autonomous use of these methods during the close-proximity and descent phase of the mission.

  13. Undecidability and temporal logic: some landmarks from Turing to the present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goranko, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    This is a selective survey and discussion of some of the landmark undecidability results in temporal logic, beginning with Turing's undecidability of the Halting problem which, in retrospect, can be regarded as the historically first undecidability result for a suitable temporal logic over...... configuration graphs of Turing machines. I will discuss some of the natural habitats of undecidable temporal logics, such as first-order, interval-based and real time temporal logics, as well as some extensions that often lead to undecidability, such as two-dimensional temporal logics and temporal...

  14. Construction of high resolution genetic linkage maps to improve the soybean genome sequence assembly Glyma1.01

    Science.gov (United States)

    A landmark in soybean research, Glyma1.01, the first whole genome sequence of variety Williams 82 (Glycine max L. Merr.) was completed in 2010 and is widely used. However, because the assembly was primarily built based on the linkage maps constructed with a limited number of markers and recombinant...

  15. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla;

    2002-01-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration ...

  16. Integration of tomato reproductive developmental landmarks and expression profiles, and the effect of SUN on fruit shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dongmei

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universally accepted landmark stages are necessary to highlight key events in plant reproductive development and to facilitate comparisons among species. Domestication and selection of tomato resulted in many varieties that differ in fruit shape and size. This diversity is useful to unravel underlying molecular and developmental mechanisms that control organ morphology and patterning. The tomato fruit shape gene SUN controls fruit elongation. The most dramatic effect of SUN on fruit shape occurs after pollination and fertilization although a detailed investigation into the timing of the fruit shape change as well as gene expression profiles during critical developmental stages has not been conducted. Results We provide a description of floral and fruit development in a red-fruited closely related wild relative of tomato, Solanum pimpinellifolium accession LA1589. We use established and propose new floral and fruit landmarks to present a framework for tomato developmental studies. In addition, gene expression profiles of three key stages in floral and fruit development are presented, namely floral buds 10 days before anthesis (floral landmark 7, anthesis-stage flowers (floral landmark 10 and fruit landmark 1, and 5 days post anthesis fruit (fruit landmark 3. To demonstrate the utility of the landmarks, we characterize the tomato shape gene SUN in fruit development. SUN controls fruit shape predominantly after fertilization and its effect reaches a maximum at 8 days post-anthesis coinciding with fruit landmark 4 representing the globular embryo stage of seed development. The expression profiles of the NILs that differ at sun show that only 34 genes were differentially expressed and most of them at a less than 2-fold difference. Conclusion The landmarks for flower and fruit development in tomato were outlined and integrated with the effect of SUN on fruit shape. Although we did not identify many genes differentially expressed in

  17. Flexible learning and use of multiple-landmark information by pigeons (Columba livia) in a touch screen-based goal searching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushitani, Tomokazu; Jitsumori, Masako

    2011-08-01

    Three touch screen-based experiments were conducted to investigate whether pigeons would learn to use configural information about a goal's location in relation to a multiple-landmark array. In Experiment 1, 4 pigeons (Columba livia) were trained to peck a computer monitor at a location that constituted the third vertex of a hypothetical triangle defined by 2 different landmarks. The landmarks appeared in 3 orientations during the training, and the pigeons' goal-searching ability easily transferred to the landmarks presented in 3 novel orientations. Each landmark was asymmetric, so we next examined whether the pigeons used (a) the small-scale, local orientation information that could be inferred from each landmark individually, or (b) the large-scale, configural information that could be inferred from the spatial arrangement of multiple landmarks taken as a whole. Even when each single landmark appeared by itself, the pigeons were able to locate the goal accurately, suggesting that the large-scale, configural information was not essential. However, when 1 landmark locally pointed to a location that was consistent with the triangular configuration and the other landmark locally pointed to a different location, the pigeons predominantly pecked at the configurally array-consistent location. These results suggest that the pigeons redundantly learned both the large-scale, configural strategy and the local, single-landmark strategy, but they mainly used the latter information, and used the former information solely to disambiguate conflicts when the 2 landmarks pointed toward different targets. Such flexible learning and use of redundant information may reflect the pigeons' adaptation to unstable wild environments during their evolutionary history. PMID:21574692

  18. Radionucleotide scanning in osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionucleotide bone scanning can be an excellent adjunct to the standard radiograph and clinical findings in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scans have the ability to detect osteomyelitis far in advance of the standard radiograph. The sequential use of technetium and gallium has been useful in differentiating cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Serial scanning with technetium and gallium may be used to monitor the response of osteomyelitis to antibiotic therapy

  19. Domestication genomics: evidence from animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Dong; Xie, Hai-Bing; Peng, Min-Sheng; Irwin, David; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Animal domestication has far-reaching significance for human society. The sequenced genomes of domesticated animals provide critical resources for understanding the genetic basis of domestication. Various genomic analyses have shed a new light on the mechanism of artificial selection and have allowed the mapping of genes involved in important domestication traits. Here, we summarize the published genomes of domesticated animals that have been generated over the past decade, as well as their origins, from a phylogenomic point of view. This review provides a general description of the genomic features encountered under a two-stage domestication process. We also introduce recent findings for domestication traits based on results from genome-wide association studies and selective-sweep scans for artificially selected genomic regions. Particular attention is paid to issues relating to the costs of domestication and the convergent evolution of genes between domesticated animals and humans.

  20. Fusion of WiFi, smartphone sensors and landmarks using the Kalman filter for indoor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenghua; Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Qingchang; Soh, Yeng Chai; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS) have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m. PMID:25569750

  1. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning. PMID:27608019

  2. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-An Deng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR, and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF. For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning.

  3. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  4. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning. PMID:27608019

  5. Fusion of WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks Using the Kalman Filter for Indoor Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBS have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m.

  6. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that ...

  7. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  8. Frequency scanning microstrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Magnus; Jørgensen, Rolf

    1979-01-01

    The principles of using radiating microstrip resonators as elements in a frequency scanning antenna array are described. The resonators are cascade-coupled. This gives a scan of the main lobe due to the phase-shift in the resonator in addition to that created by the transmission line phase...

  9. Abdominal CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than regular x-rays. Many x-rays or CT scans over time may increase your risk for cancer. However, the risk from any one scan is small. Talk to your doctor about this risk and the benefit of the test for getting a correct diagnosis ...

  10. Environmental Scanning Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckee Meadows Community Coll., Sparks, NV.

    This report describes Truckee Meadows Community College's (Nevada) environmental scanning process and results. The college decided that environmental scanning and forecasting techniques should be used to plan for both short-term and long-term external factors that impact programs, enrollment, and budgets. Strategic goals include: (1) keeping pace…

  11. Optical Scanning Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Hans

    The successful use of optical scanning at the University of the Pacific (UOP) indicates that such techniques can simplify a number of administrative data processing tasks. Optical scanning is regularly used at UOP to assist with data processing in the areas of admissions, registration and grade reporting and also has applications for other tasks…

  12. Knee CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risks of CT scans include: Exposure to radiation Allergy to contrast dye CT scans give off more radiation than ... injected contrast dye. The most common type of contrast contains ... you have this an iodine allergy. If you need to have this kind of ...

  13. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A ...

  14. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de ...

  15. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  16. Corrective surgery for canine patellar luxation in 75 cases (107 limbs: landmark for block recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Isaka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine medial patellar luxation (MPL is a very common orthopedic disease in small animals. Because the pathophysiology of this disease involves various pathways, the surgical techniques and results vary according to the veterinarian. Further, the landmark for block recession is not completely clear. We retrospectively evaluated 75 dogs (107 limbs with MPL in whom our landmark for block recession was used from July 2008 to May 2013. Information regarding the breed, age, sex, body weight, body condition score (BCS, lateral vs bilateral, pre-operative grading, surgical techniques, removal of implants, concomitance with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture, re-luxation, re-operation, and rehabilitation was obtained from the medical records. The breeds were as follows: Chihuahua (n=23, Pomeranian (n=12, Yorkshire Terrier (n=9, and so on. The study group consisted of 33 males (castrated n=13 and 42 females (spayed n=21. The median age was 53.3±35.9 months (32-146 months; 13 cases were less than 12 months of age (17.3%. The pre-surgical BCSs were as follows: 1 (n=0, 2 (n=20, 3 (n=24, 4 (n=24 and 5 (n=7. The body weight was 4.51±3.48 kg (1.34-23.0 kg; 71 cases (94.7% were less than 10 kg. The MPL grades (each limb were G1 (n=1, G2 (n=18, G3 (n=78, and G4 (n=10; 32 cases were bilateral and 43 cases were unilateral (right n=27; left n=16. The specific surgical procedure (distal femoral osteotomy was 3 stifles in Chihuahuas. Concurrent with ACL rupture was 16/107 stifles (15.0% corrected with the over-the-top method or the extracapsular method in Papillons (5/6, Chihuahuas (5/23, and so on. The occurrences of re-luxation and re-operation were 3 out of 107 stifles (2.8% and 0%, respectively. In this retrospective study, we present a potentially good surgical landmark for block recession of MPL in dogs.

  17. Scanning with Iodine-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of I125 as I125-iodide for scanning of the thyroid and of thyroid carcinoma métastasés and as I125-labelled Rose Bengal for scanning of the liver has been investigated in our laboratories. In some patients, the thyroid scans and the scans of thyroid carcinoma metastases were repeated with I131. The liver scans were repeated with colloidal Au198. Cold nodules in the thyroid which could not be detected with I131 were clearly seen with I125. Anterior métastasés in the lungs could be differentiated from posterior métastasés with I125, while with I131 this was not possible. Using the same doses of radioactivity the background with I131 was much higher and could not be eliminated, as this would have reduced the counting rate over the lesions to levels which could not be detected. Some of the photoscans and mechanical scans of livers carried out with colloidal Au198 could not be interpreted. However, ''cold'' lesions were clearly seen on the scans of the same livers with I125-labelled Rose Bengal. (author)

  18. SU-E-J-220: Assessment of MRI Geometric Distortion in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Scanned in Immobilized Radiation Treatment Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, C; Mohamed, A; Weygand, J; Ding, Y; Fuller, C; Frank, S; Wang, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uncertainties about geometric distortion have somewhat hindered MRI simulation in radiation therapy. Most of the geometric distortion studies were performed with phantom measurements but another major aspect of MR distortion is patient related. We studied the geometric distortion in patient images by comparing their MRI scans with the corresponding CT, using CT as the non-distorted gold standard. Methods: Ten H&N cancer patients were imaged with MRI as part of a prospective IRB approved study. All patients had their treatment planning CT done on the same day or within one week of the MRI. MR Images were acquired with a T2 SE sequence (1×1×2.5mm voxel size) in the same immobilization position as in the CT scans. MRI to CT rigid registration was then done and geometric distortion comparison was done by measuring the corresponding anatomical landmarks on both the MRI and the CT images by two observers. Several skin to skin (9 landmarks), bone to bone (8 landmarks), and soft tissue (3 landmarks) were measured at specific levels in horizontal and vertical planes of both scans. Results: The mean distortion for all landmark measurements in all scans was 1.8±1.9mm. For each patient 11 measurements were done in the horizontal plane while 9 were done in the vertical plane. The measured geometric distortion were significantly lower in the horizontal axis compared to the vertical axis (1.3±0.16 mm vs 2.2±0.19 mm, respectively, P=0.003*). The magnitude of distortion was lower in the bone to bone landmarks compared to the combined soft tissue and skin to skin landmarks (1.2±0.19 mm vs 2.3±0.17 mm, P=0.0006*). The mean distortion measured by observer one was not significantly different compared toobserver 2 (2.3 vs 2.4 mm, P=0.4). Conclusion: MRI geometric distortions were quantified in H&N patients with mean error of less than 2 mm. JW received a corporate sponsored research grant from Elekta.

  19. SU-E-J-220: Assessment of MRI Geometric Distortion in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Scanned in Immobilized Radiation Treatment Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Uncertainties about geometric distortion have somewhat hindered MRI simulation in radiation therapy. Most of the geometric distortion studies were performed with phantom measurements but another major aspect of MR distortion is patient related. We studied the geometric distortion in patient images by comparing their MRI scans with the corresponding CT, using CT as the non-distorted gold standard. Methods: Ten H&N cancer patients were imaged with MRI as part of a prospective IRB approved study. All patients had their treatment planning CT done on the same day or within one week of the MRI. MR Images were acquired with a T2 SE sequence (1×1×2.5mm voxel size) in the same immobilization position as in the CT scans. MRI to CT rigid registration was then done and geometric distortion comparison was done by measuring the corresponding anatomical landmarks on both the MRI and the CT images by two observers. Several skin to skin (9 landmarks), bone to bone (8 landmarks), and soft tissue (3 landmarks) were measured at specific levels in horizontal and vertical planes of both scans. Results: The mean distortion for all landmark measurements in all scans was 1.8±1.9mm. For each patient 11 measurements were done in the horizontal plane while 9 were done in the vertical plane. The measured geometric distortion were significantly lower in the horizontal axis compared to the vertical axis (1.3±0.16 mm vs 2.2±0.19 mm, respectively, P=0.003*). The magnitude of distortion was lower in the bone to bone landmarks compared to the combined soft tissue and skin to skin landmarks (1.2±0.19 mm vs 2.3±0.17 mm, P=0.0006*). The mean distortion measured by observer one was not significantly different compared toobserver 2 (2.3 vs 2.4 mm, P=0.4). Conclusion: MRI geometric distortions were quantified in H&N patients with mean error of less than 2 mm. JW received a corporate sponsored research grant from Elekta

  20. Effects of Spatial Ability, Gender Differences, and Pictorial Training on Children Using 2-D and 3-D Environments to Recall Landmark Locations from Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Otumfuor, Beryl A.; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of spatial ability, gender differences, and pictorial training on fourth grade students' ability to recall landmark locations from memory. Ninety-six students used Google Earth over a 3-week period to locate landmarks (3-D) and mark their location on a 2-D topographical map. Analysis of covariance on posttest scores…

  1. Semi-Automatic Anatomical Tree Matching for Landmark-Based Elastic Registration of Liver Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Drechsler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One promising approach to register liver volume acquisitions is based on the branching points of the vessel trees as anatomical landmarks inherently available in the liver. Automated tree matching algorithms were proposed to automatically find pair-wise correspondences between two vessel trees. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of the existing automatic methods are completely error free. After a review of current literature and methodologies on the topic, we propose an efficient interaction method that can be employed to support tree matching algorithms with important pre-selected correspondences or after an automatic matching to manually correct wrongly matched nodes. We used this method in combination with a promising automatic tree matching algorithm also presented in this work. The proposed method was evaluated by 4 participants and a CT dataset that we used to derive multiple artificial datasets.

  2. Landmarks in particle physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Brookhaven Lecture Series, Number 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Adair's lecture on Landmarks in Particle Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair describes ten researches in elementary particle physics at Brookhaven that had a revolutionary impact on the understanding of elementary particles. Two of the discoveries were made in 1952 and 1956 at the Cosmotron, BNL's first proton accelerator. Four were made in 1962 and 1964 at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, the Cosmotron's replacement. Two other discoveries in 1954 and 1956 were theoretical, and strong focusing (1952) is the only technical discovery. One discovery (1958) happened in an old barrack. Four of the discoveries were awarded the Nobel prize in Physics. Adair believes that all of the discoveries are worthy of the Nobel prize. 14 figs

  3. Maximized Posteriori Attributes Selection from Facial Salient Landmarks for Face Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Phalguni; Sing, Jamuna Kanta; Tistarelli, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a robust and dynamic face recognition technique based on the extraction and matching of devised probabilistic graphs drawn on SIFT features related to independent face areas. The face matching strategy is based on matching individual salient facial graph characterized by SIFT features as connected to facial landmarks such as the eyes and the mouth. In order to reduce the face matching errors, the Dempster-Shafer decision theory is applied to fuse the individual matching scores obtained from each pair of salient facial features. The proposed algorithm is evaluated with the ORL and the IITK face databases. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of the proposed face recognition technique also in case of partially occluded faces.

  4. Landmark-based shape analysis of the archaic Homo calvarium from Ceprano (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Emiliano; Manzi, Giorgio

    2007-03-01

    The Ceprano calvarium represents one of the most important sources of information about both the dynamics of the earliest hominid dispersal toward Europe and the evolution of the genus Homo in the early-to-middle Pleistocene. In this paper, the midsagittal vault profile and the 3D frontal bone morphology of Ceprano are investigated comparatively, using landmark coordinates and Procrustes superimposition. In fact, despite the fact that the skull appears partially distorted by diagenetic pressures (thus precluding a comprehensive landmark-based analysis), some aspects of the overall morphology are suitable for consideration in terms of geometric morphometrics. The midsagittal profile shows an archaic shape, comparable with the H. ergaster/erectus range of variation because of the fronto-parietal flattening, the development of the supraorbital and nuchal structures, and the occurrence of a slightly larger occipital bone. By contrast, the frontal bone displays a derived 3D shape that, mostly because of the widening of the frontal squama, appears comparable with the Afro-European variation of the Middle Pleistocene (i.e., H. heidelbergensis/rhodesiensis). Taking into account the unique morphological pattern displayed by Ceprano, its role as a link between early Homo and the Middle Pleistocene populations of Europe and Africa is not falsified. Thus, when aspects of the Ceprano's morphology are described within the analytical framework provided by geometric morphometrics, the relationships between Ceprano and the subsequent Afro-European fossil record are emphasized, suggesting the occurrence of an ancestral stock of H. heidelbergensis/rhodesiensis that is properly represented by the Italian specimen. PMID:17177181

  5. Germ band retraction as a landmark in glucose metabolism during Aedes aegypti embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logullo Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito A. aegypti is vector of dengue and other viruses. New methods of vector control are needed and can be achieved by a better understanding of the life cycle of this insect. Embryogenesis is a part of A. aegypty life cycle that is poorly understood. In insects in general and in mosquitoes in particular energetic metabolism is well studied during oogenesis, when the oocyte exhibits fast growth, accumulating carbohydrates, lipids and proteins that will meet the regulatory and metabolic needs of the developing embryo. On the other hand, events related with energetic metabolism during A. aegypti embryogenesis are unknown. Results Glucose metabolism was investigated throughout Aedes aegypti (Diptera embryonic development. Both cellular blastoderm formation (CBf, 5 h after egg laying - HAE and germ band retraction (GBr, 24 HAE may be considered landmarks regarding glucose 6-phosphate (G6P destination. We observed high levels of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH activity at the very beginning of embryogenesis, which nevertheless decreased up to 5 HAE. This activity is correlated with the need for nucleotide precursors generated by the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, of which G6PDH is the key enzyme. We suggest the synchronism of egg metabolism with carbohydrate distribution based on the decreasing levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK activity and on the elevation observed in protein content up to 24 HAE. Concomitantly, increasing levels of hexokinase (HK and pyruvate kinase (PK activity were observed, and PEPCK reached a peak around 48 HAE. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3 activity was also monitored and shown to be inversely correlated with glycogen distribution during embryogenesis. Conclusions The results herein support the hypothesis that glucose metabolic fate changes according to developmental embryonic stages. Germ band retraction is a moment that was characterized as a landmark in glucose

  6. Chromosome landmarks and autosome-sex chromosome translocations in Rumex hastatulus, a plant with XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska-Joachimiak, Aleksandra; Kula, Adam; Książczyk, Tomasz; Chojnicka, Joanna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Joachimiak, Andrzej J

    2015-06-01

    Rumex hastatulus is the North American endemic dioecious plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. It is differentiated into two chromosomal races: Texas (T) race characterised by a simple XX/XY sex chromosome system and North Carolina (NC) race with a polymorphic XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system. The gross karyotype morphology in NC race resembles the derived type, but chromosomal changes that occurred during its evolution are poorly understood. Our C-banding/DAPI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments demonstrated that Y chromosomes of both races are enriched in DAPI-positive sequences and that the emergence of polymorphic sex chromosome system was accompanied by the break of ancestral Y chromosome and switch in the localization of 5S rDNA, from autosomes to sex chromosomes (X and Y2). Two contrasting domains were detected within North Carolina Y chromosomes: the older, highly heterochromatinised, inherited from the original Y chromosome and the younger, euchromatic, representing translocated autosomal material. The flow-cytometric DNA estimation showed ∼3.5 % genome downsizing in the North Carolina race. Our results are in contradiction to earlier reports on the lack of heterochromatin within Y chromosomes of this species and enable unambiguous identification of autosomes involved in the autosome-heterosome translocation, providing useful chromosome landmarks for further studies on the karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in this species.

  7. Evaluation of Distal Femoral Rotational Alignment with Spiral CT Scan before Total Knee Arthroplasty (A Study in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Jabalameli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluating the landmarks for rotation of the distal femur is a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Although the posterior femoral condyle axis is a good landmark for surgeons, the surgical transepicondylar axis may be a better option with the help of preoperative CT scanning. The purpose of this study was to ascertain relationships among the axes’ guiding distal femur rotational alignment in preoperative CT scans of Iranian patients who were candidates for total knee arthroplasty and the effects of age, gender, and knee alignment on these relationships. Methods: One hundred and eight cases who were admitted to two university hospitals for total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. The rotation of the distal femur was evaluated using single axial CT images through the femoral epicondyle. Four lines were drawn digitally in this view: anatomical and surgical transepicondylar axes, posterior condylar axis and the Whiteside anteroposterior line. The alignment of the extremity was evaluated in the standing alignment view. Then the angles were measured along these lines and their relationship was evaluated. Results: The mean angle between the anatomical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis and between the surgical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis were 5.9 ± 1.6 degrees and 1.6±1.7 degrees respectively. The mean angle between the Whiteside’s anteroposterior line and the line perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was 3.7±2.1 degrees. Significant differences existed between the two genders in these relationships. No significant correlation between the age of patients and angles of the distal femur was detected. The anatomical surgical transepicondylar axis was in 4.3 degrees external rotation in relation to the surgical transepicondylar axis. Conclusion: Preoperative CT scanning can help accurately determine rotational landmarks of the distal femur. If one of the reference axes cannot be

  8. The conical scan radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosch, T.; Hennings, D.

    1982-07-01

    A satellite-borne conical scan radiometer (CSR) is proposed, offering multiangular and multispectral measurements of Earth radiation fields, including the total radiances, which are not available from conventional radiometers. Advantages of the CSR for meteorological studies are discussed. In comparison to conventional cross track scanning instruments, the CSR is unique with respect to the selected picture element size which is kept constant by means of a specially shaped detector matrix at all scan angles. The conical scan mode offers the chance to improve angular sampling. Angular sampling gaps of previous satellite-borne radiometers can be interpolated and complemented by CSR data. Radiances are measured through 10 radiometric channels which are selected to study cloudiness, water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, ground and mean stratospheric temperature, and aerosols.

  9. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  10. Pelvic CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess (collection of pus) Bladder stones Broken bone Cancer Diverticulitis ... scans over time may increase your risk of cancer. But the risk from any ... to contrast dye. Let your provider know if you have ever ...

  11. Sinus CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be due to: Birth defects Bone fractures Cancer Polyps in the sinuses Sinus infection (sinusitis) ... scans over time may increase your risk for cancer. However, the risk ... to contrast dye. Let your provider know if you have ever ...

  12. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines whe...

  13. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  14. Automated Extraction of Cranial Landmarks from Computed Tomography Data using a Combined Method of Knowledge and Pattern Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan N. RAJAPAKSE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of anatomical structures from medical imaging data is a significant and critical function in the medical domain. Past studies in this context have mainly utilized two main approaches, the knowledge and learning methodologies based methods. Further, most of previous reported studies have focused on identification of landmarks from lateral X-ray Computed Tomography (CT data, particularly in the field of orthodontics. However, this study focused on extracting cranial landmarks from large sets of cross sectional CT slices using a combined method of the two aforementioned approaches. The proposed method of this study is centered mainly on template data sets, which were created using the actual contour patterns extracted from CT cases for each of the landmarks in consideration. Firstly, these templates were used to devise rules which are a characteristic of the knowledge based method. Secondly, the same template sets were employed to perform template matching related to the learning methodologies approach. The proposed method was tested on two landmarks, the Dorsum sellae and the Pterygoid plate, using CT cases of 5 subjects. The results indicate that, out of the 10 tests, the output images were within the expected range (desired accuracy in 7 instances and acceptable range (near accuracy for 2 instances, thus verifying the effectiveness of the combined template sets centric approach proposed in this study.

  15. Learning Your Way around Town: How Virtual Taxicab Drivers Learn to Use Both Layout and Landmark Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ehren L.; Caplan, Jeremy B.; Kirschen, Matthew P.; Korolev, Igor O.; Sekuler, Robert; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    By having subjects drive a virtual taxicab through a computer-rendered town, we examined how landmark and layout information interact during spatial navigation. Subject-drivers searched for passengers, and then attempted to take the most efficient route to the requested destinations (one of several target stores). Experiment 1 demonstrated that…

  16. Advanced Network Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiqur Rahman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Network scanning is à procedure for identifying active hosts on a network, either for the purpose of attacking them or for network security assessment. Scanning procedures, such as ping sweeps and port scans, return information about which IP addresses map to live hosts that are active on the Internet and what services they offer. Another scanning method, inverse mapping, returns information about what IP addresses do not map to live hosts; this enables an attacker to make assumptions about viable addresses. Scanning is one of three components of intelligence gathering for an attacker. In the foot printing phase, the attacker creates a profile of the target organization, with information such as its domain name system (DNS and e-mail servers, and its IP address range. Most of this information is available online. In the scanning phase, the attacker finds information about the specific IP addresses that can be accessed over the Internet, their operating systems, the system architecture, and the services running on each computer. In the enumeration phase, the attacker gathers information such as network user and group names, routing tables, and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP data

  17. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shannon L.; Burnham, Robert S.; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1–S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1–S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network. PMID:27747222

  18. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two types of scans: ventilation and perfusion. The ventilation scan shows where air flows in your lungs. The perfusion scan shows where blood flows in your lungs. Both scans use radioisotopes (a low-risk radioactive substance). For the ventilation scan, you ...

  19. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  20. Comparison of Two Deformable Registration Algorithms in the Presence of Radiologic Change Between Serial Lung CT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Straus, Christopher; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A; Armato, Samuel G

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the image registration accuracy achieved using two deformable registration algorithms when radiation-induced normal tissue changes were present between serial computed tomography (CT) scans. Two thoracic CT scans were collected for each of 24 patients who underwent radiation therapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer, eight of whom experienced radiologically evident normal tissue damage between pre- and post-RT scan acquisition. For each patient, 100 landmark point pairs were manually placed in anatomically corresponding locations between each pre- and post-RT scan. Each post-RT scan was then registered to the pre-RT scan using (1) the Plastimatch demons algorithm and (2) the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm. The registration accuracy for each scan pair was evaluated by comparing the distance between landmark points that were manually placed in the post-RT scans and points that were automatically mapped from pre- to post-RT scans using the displacement vector fields output by the two registration algorithms. For both algorithms, the registration accuracy was significantly decreased when normal tissue damage was present in the post-RT scan. Using the Plastimatch algorithm, registration accuracy was 2.4 mm, on average, in the absence of radiation-induced damage and 4.6 mm, on average, in the presence of damage. When the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm was instead used, registration errors decreased to 1.3 mm, on average, in the absence of damage and 2.5 mm, on average, when damage was present. This work demonstrated that the presence of lung tissue changes introduced following RT treatment for lung cancer can significantly decrease the registration accuracy achieved using deformable registration.

  1. Exploring the origin of the D genome of oat by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaomei; Zhang, Haiqin; Kang, Houyang; Fan, Xing; Wang, Yi; Sha, Lina; Zhou, Yonghong

    2014-09-01

    Further understanding of the origin of cultivated oat would accelerate its genetic improvement. In particular, it would be useful to clarify which diploid progenitor contributed the D genome of this allohexaploid species. In this study, we demonstrate that the landmarks produced by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of species of Avena using probes derived from Avena sativa can be used to explore the origin of the D genome. Selected sets of probes were hybridized in several sequential experiments performed on exactly the same chromosome spreads, with multiple probes of cytological preparations. Probes pITS and A3-19 showed there might be a similar distribution of pITS between the Ac and D genomes. These results indicated that the Ac genome is closely related to the D genome, and that Avena canariensis (AcAc) could be the D-genome donor of cultivated oat.

  2. Lung scans and malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experience of pulmonary isotope scanning carried out with mercury 197 labelled mercury chloride and acetate, cobalt 57-labelled bleomycin, and Cu67 and Cu64 labelled copper citrate was presented. The scans were carried out with various isotopes supplied by the French Atomic Energy Authority, and gave comparable results, which may be summarised as follows: increased uptake in more than 90% of cases of carcinoma, absent uptake in all cases of benign tumour, frequent increased uptake in acute or advanced inflammatory lesions, absence of uptake, very commonly, in tuberculoma and chronic lesions with scar formation. Radio-isotope scan using Cu67 labelled copper citrate permitted discrimination of malignant tumours (increased fixation which showed up best at the 24th hour) from inflammatory lesions (increased fixation which was reduced on the 24th hour). The positive or negative character of the fixation in a given lesions remains the same, whatever the isotope used in our experience

  3. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  4. Can osseous landmarks in the distal medial humerus be used to identify the attachment sites of ligaments and tendons: paleopathologic-anatomic imaging study in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Zoner, Cristiane S.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Randall, Tori D. [San Diego Museum of Man, Physical Anthropology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To describe osseous landmarks that allow identification of the attachments of the ligaments and tendons in the distal medial aspect of the humerus. Reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus were identified in 34 well-preserved specimens from a paleopathologic collection. These osseous landmarks were then sought in magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten cadaveric elbow specimens so that the ease of their visualization and optimal imaging plane could be assessed. To assign these osseous landmarks to specific attachments of the tendons and ligaments in the distal medial humerus, we cut the specimens in slices and photographed and examined them. Subsequently, the prevalence of these osseous landmarks as well as the attachment sites of the tendons and ligaments in this location was determined. We determined ten reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus, their prevalence and ease of identification, and their relationship to the attachments of the tendons and ligaments at the medial distal humerus. It is possible to use osseous landmarks at the distal medial humerus to facilitate identification of the different attachments of tendons and ligaments when MR images of the elbow are assessed. (orig.)

  5. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  6. Scan This Book!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an interview with Brewster Kahle, leader of the Open Content Alliance (OCA). OCA book scan program is an alternative to Google's library project that aims to make books accessible online. In this interview, Kahle discusses his views on the challenges of getting books on the Web, on Google's library…

  7. Lung gallium scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Lung Diseases Nuclear Scans Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  8. Surface micromachined scanning mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1992-01-01

    Both aluminum cantilever and torsional scanning mirrors have been fabricated and their static and dynamic properties are studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments showed resonance frequencies in the range of 163 k-Hz - 632 kHz for cantilever beams with Q values between 5 and 11. T...

  9. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  10. Cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point as a reliable landmark to place the corticectomy and reach the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Frigeri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish preoperatively the localization of the cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point (ICP and use it as a reliable landmark when approaching the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus access. To review relevant anatomical features regarding selective amigdalohippocampectomy (AH for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Method The cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point was used in more than 300 surgeries by one authors as a reliable landmark to reach the temporal horn. In the laboratory, forty cerebral hemispheres were examined. Conclusion The cortical projection of the ICP is a reliable landmark for reaching the temporal horn.

  11. RTS,S: Toward a first landmark on the Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, David C; Biernaux, Sophie

    2015-12-22

    The Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap calls for a 2015 landmark goal of a first-generation malaria vaccine that has protective efficacy against severe disease and death, lasting longer than one year. This review focuses on product development efforts over the last five years of RTS,S, a pre-erythrocytic, recombinant subunit, adjuvanted, candidate malaria vaccine designed with this goal of a first-generation malaria vaccine in mind. RTS,S recently completed a successful pivotal Phase III safety, efficacy and immunogenicity study. Although vaccine efficacy was found to be modest, a substantial number of cases of clinical malaria were averted over a 3-4 years period, particularly in settings of significant disease burden. European regulators have subsequently adopted a positive opinion under the Article 58 procedure for an indication of active immunization of children aged 6 weeks up to 17 months against malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum and against hepatitis B. Further evaluations of the benefit, risk, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of RTS,S are now anticipated through policy and financing reviews at the global and national levels. PMID:26431982

  12. Investigation of radon and thoron concentrations in a landmark skyscraper in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporal variation of the radon concentration, and the radon and thoron concentrations every 3 months for a year were measured using two types of devices in a landmark skyscraper, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Daiichi Building. In the measurement of temporal variation of the radon concentration using a pulse type ionization chamber, the average radon concentration was 21 ± 13 Bq m-3 (2-68 Bq m-3). The measured indoor radon concentration had a strong relationship with the operation of the mechanical ventilation system and the activities of the office workers. The radon concentration also increased together with temperature. Other environmental parameters, such as air pressure and relative humidity, were not related to the radon concentration. In the long-term measurements using a passive radon and thoron discriminative monitor, no seasonal variation was observed. The annual average concentrations of radon and thoron were 16 ± 8 and 16 ± 7 Bq m-3, respectively. There was also no relationship between the two concentrations. The annual average effective dose for office workers in this skyscraper was estimated to be 0.08 mSv y-1 for 2000 working hours per year. When considering the indoor radon exposure received from their residential dwellings using the annual mean radon concentration indoors in Japan (15.5 Bq m-3), the annual average effective dose was estimated to be 0.37 mSv y-1. This value was 31 % of the worldwide average annual effective dose. (author)

  13. Anatomic landmarks of fluoroscopy guided puncture of the pulseless femoral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Min Hee; Han, Gi Seok; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Kil Sun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Bae, Il Hun; Lee, Seung Young [College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    We wanted to improve puncturing the pulseless femoral artery by evaluating the anatomic landmarks that suggest the course of the femoral artery on fluoroscopy. We analyzed 37 hemipelvis spot images that were centered on the arterial sheath after puncture of the femoral artery. The inguinal angles were measured between the inguinal line connecting the anterior superior iliac spine and the symphysis pubis, and the line of the arterial sheath. Inguinal ligament ratios were measured as the distance from the symphysis pubis to the arterial sheath to the length of the inguinal ligament on the inguinal line. The femoral head ratios were measured as the distance from the medial margin of the femur head to the arterial sheath to the transverse length of the femur head. The mean inguinal angle was 66.5 and the mean inguinal ligament ratio was 0.42 ({+-} 0.03). The mean femoral head ratio was 0.08 ({+-} 0.18). In comparing the men and women, there was no significant difference in the inguinal angle and the femoral head ratio, but the inguinal distance ratio was larger in women (men: 0.41 {+-} 0.033, women: 0.44 {+-} 0.031, {rho} < 0.05). The femoral artery generally courses just lateral to the medial margin of the femur head (femoral head ratio: 0.08) and the medial 40% of the inguinal ligament (inguinal ligament ratio: 0.42). So, consideration of these relations may be helpful for puncturing the pulseless femoral artery.

  14. An analysis of anatomic landmark mobility and setup deviations in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify thoracic structures that exhibit little internal motion during irradiation and to determine setup variations in patients with lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional images were generated with an electronic portal-imaging device from the AP fields of 10 patients, during several fractions. To determine the intrafractional mobility of thoracic structures, visible structures were contoured in every image and matched with a reference image by means of a cross-correlation algorithm. Setup variations were determined by comparing portal images with the digitized simulator films using the stable structures as landmarks. Results: Mobility was limited in the lateral direction for the trachea, thoracic wall, paraspinal line, and aortic notch, and in the craniocaudal direction for the clavicle, aortic notch, and thoracic wall. Analysis of patient setup revealed random deviations of 2.0 mm (1 SD) in the lateral direction and 2.8 mm in the craniocaudal direction, while the systematic deviations were 2.5 and 2.0 mm (1 SD) respectively. Conclusions: We have identified thoracic structures that exhibit little internal motion in the frontal plane, and recommend that these structures be used for verifying patient setup during radiotherapy. The daily variation in the setup of lung cancer patients at our center appears to be acceptable

  15. Functional genomics of tomato: opportunities and challenges in post-genome NGS era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Khurana, Ashima

    2014-12-01

    The Tomato Genome Sequencing Project represented a landmark venture in the history of sequencing projects where both Sanger's and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies were employed, and a highly accurate and one of the best assembled plant genomes along with a draft of the wild relative, Solanum pimpinellifolium, were released in 2012. However, the functional potential of the major portion of this newly generated resource is still undefined. The very first challenge before scientists working on tomato functional biology is to exploit this high-quality reference sequence for tapping of the wealth of genetic variants for improving agronomic traits in cultivated tomatoes. The sequence data generated recently by 150 Tomato Genome Consortium would further uncover the natural alleles present in different tomato genotypes. Therefore, we found it relevant to have a fresh outlook on tomato functional genomics in the context of application of NGS technologies in its post-genome sequencing phase. Herein, we provide an overview how NGS technologies vis-a-vis available reference sequence have assisted each other for their mutual improvement and how their combined use could further facilitate the development of other 'omics' tools, required to propel the Solanaceae research. Additionally, we highlight the challenges associated with the application of these cutting-edge technologies.

  16. Functional genomics of tomato: Opportunities and challenges in post-genome NGS era

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Kumar; Ashima Khurana

    2014-12-01

    The Tomato Genome Sequencing Project represented a landmark venture in the history of sequencing projects where both Sanger’s and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies were employed, and a highly accurate and one of the best assembled plant genomes along with a draft of the wild relative, Solanum pimpinellifolium, were released in 2012. However, the functional potential of the major portion of this newly generated resource is still undefined. The very first challenge before scientists working on tomato functional biology is to exploit this high-quality reference sequence for tapping of the wealth of genetic variants for improving agronomic traits in cultivated tomatoes. The sequence data generated recently by 150 Tomato Genome Consortium would further uncover the natural alleles present in different tomato genotypes. Therefore, we found it relevant to have a fresh outlook on tomato functional genomics in the context of application of NGS technologies in its post-genome sequencing phase. Herein, we provide an overview how NGS technologies vis-à-vis available reference sequence have assisted each other for their mutual improvement and how their combined use could further facilitate the development of other ‘omics’ tools, required to propel the Solanaceae research. Additionally, we highlight the challenges associated with the application of these cutting-edge technologies.

  17. Landmark-based geometric morphometric analysis of wing shape among certain species of Aedes mosquitoes in District Dehradun (Uttarakhand), India

    OpenAIRE

    Ritwik Mondal; Pemola Devi, N.; R.K. Jauhari

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Insect wing morphology has been used in many studies to describe variations among species and populations using traditional morphometrics, and more recently geometric morphometrics. A landmark-based geometric morphometric analysis of the wings of three species of Aedes (Diptera: Culicidae), viz. Ae. aegypti, Ae. albopictus and Ae. pseudotaeniatus, at District Dehradun was conducted belling on the fact that it can provide insight into the population structure, ecology ...

  18. Dimensional ultrasonographic relationship of the right lobe of pancreas with associated anatomic landmarks in clinically normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasekara Rajapakshage, Bandula Kumara; Ellearaewe Garuhamilage, Janaka Pradeep Kumara; De Silva, Dona Daphney Niranjala; Dangolla, Ashoka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to establish the ultrasonographic characteristics of the dimension of the right pancreatic lobe with that of the associated anatomic landmarks in healthy dogs. Ultrasonographic examinations were performed on 25 dogs. The thickness of the right pancreatic lobe was compared with that of mural thickness of duodenum, diameter of duodenum, pancreatic duct, abdominal aorta, portal vein, caudal vena cava, and length and width of the right kidney and right adrenal gland. The correlation between each pancreatic parameter and the dimensions of the anatomical landmarks were assessed using linear regression analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) test. Significant, but weak linear correlations were observed between thickness of right pancreatic lobe with that of duodenum mural thickness (r=0.605, R(2)=0.339, P=0.001); duodenum diameter (r=0.573, R(2)=0.299, P=0.003); and right adrenal gland length (r=0.508, R(2)=0.052, P=0.01). There was no significant dimensional relationship with other selected anatomic landmarks. The ratio between the thickness of right pancreatic lobe and the mural thickness of duodenum, diameter of duodenum and length of right adrenal gland were 2.88 ± 0.53, 1.27 ± 0.27 and 0.81 ± 0.15, respectively. Calculating the ratio of thickness of the right pancreatic lobe with the dimension of significantly correlated anatomic landmarks is a useful and simple method for evaluating the size of the right pancreatic lobe in dogs in clinical practice. PMID:26234888

  19. Landmark-based robust navigation for tactical UGV control in GPS-denied communication-degraded environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yoichiro; Balloch, Jonathan C.; Grushin, Alexander; Lee, Mun Wai; Handelman, David

    2016-05-01

    Control of current tactical unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) is typically accomplished through two alternative modes of operation, namely, low-level manual control using joysticks and high-level planning-based autonomous control. Each mode has its own merits as well as inherent mission-critical disadvantages. Low-level joystick control is vulnerable to communication delay and degradation, and high-level navigation often depends on uninterrupted GPS signals and/or energy-emissive (non-stealth) range sensors such as LIDAR for localization and mapping. To address these problems, we have developed a mid-level control technique where the operator semi-autonomously drives the robot relative to visible landmarks that are commonly recognizable by both humans and machines such as closed contours and structured lines. Our novel solution relies solely on optical and non-optical passive sensors and can be operated under GPS-denied, communication-degraded environments. To control the robot using these landmarks, we developed an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) that allows the operator to select landmarks in the robot's view and direct the robot relative to one or more of the landmarks. The integrated UGV control system was evaluated based on its ability to robustly navigate through indoor environments. The system was successfully field tested with QinetiQ North America's TALON UGV and Tactical Robot Controller (TRC), a ruggedized operator control unit (OCU). We found that the proposed system is indeed robust against communication delay and degradation, and provides the operator with steady and reliable control of the UGV in realistic tactical scenarios.

  20. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  1. Optimal landmarks selection and fiducial marker placement for minimal target registration error in image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Joskowicz, Leo; Shoshan, Yigal

    2009-02-01

    We describe a new framework and method for the optimal selection of anatomical landmarks and optimal placement of fiducial markers in image-guided neurosurgery. The method allows the surgeon to optimally plan the markers locations on routine diagnostic images before preoperative imaging and to intraoperatively select the fiducial markers and the anatomical landmarks that minimize the Target Registration Error (TRE). The optimal fiducial marker configuration selection is performed by the surgeon on the diagnostic image following the target selection based on a visual Estimated TRE (E-TRE) map. The E-TRE map is automatically updated when the surgeon interactively adds and deletes candidate markers and targets. The method takes the guesswork out of the registration process, provides a reliable localization uncertainty error for navigation, and can reduce the localization error without additional imaging and hardware. Our clinical experiments on five patients who underwent brain surgery with a navigation system show that optimizing one marker location and the anatomical landmarks configuration reduces the average TRE from 4.7mm to 3.2mm, with a maximum improvement of 4mm. The reduction of the target registration error has the potential to support safer and more accurate minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures.

  2. Resources or landmarks: which factors drive homing success in Tetragonula carbonaria foraging in natural and disturbed landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D; Kaluza, Benjamin F; Wallace, Helen; Heard, Tim A

    2016-10-01

    To date, no study has investigated how landscape structural (visual) alterations affect navigation and thus homing success in stingless bees. We addressed this question in the Australian stingless bee Tetragonula carbonaria by performing marking, release and re-capture experiments in landscapes differing in habitat homogeneity (i.e., the proportion of elongated ground features typically considered prominent visual landmarks). We investigated how landscape affected the proportion of bees and nectar foragers returning to their hives as well as the earliest time bees and foragers returned. Undisturbed landscapes with few landmarks (that are conspicuous to the human eye) and large proportions of vegetation cover (natural forests) were classified visually/structurally homogeneous, and disturbed landscapes with many landmarks and fragmented or no extensive vegetation cover (gardens and plantations) visually/structurally heterogeneous. We found that proportions of successfully returning nectar foragers and earliest times first bees and foragers returned did not differ between landscapes. However, most bees returned in the visually/structurally most (forest) and least (garden) homogeneous landscape, suggesting that they use other than elongated ground features for navigation and that return speed is primarily driven by resource availability in a landscape.

  3. APFiLoc: An Infrastructure-Free Indoor Localization Method Fusing Smartphone Inertial Sensors, Landmarks and Map Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianga Shang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The utility and adoption of indoor localization applications have been limited due to the complex nature of the physical environment combined with an increasing requirement for more robust localization performance. Existing solutions to this problem are either too expensive or too dependent on infrastructure such as Wi-Fi access points. To address this problem, we propose APFiLoc—a low cost, smartphone-based framework for indoor localization. The key idea behind this framework is to obtain landmarks within the environment and to use the augmented particle filter to fuse them with measurements from smartphone sensors and map information. A clustering method based on distance constraints is developed to detect organic landmarks in an unsupervised way, and the least square support vector machine is used to classify seed landmarks. A series of real-world experiments were conducted in complex environments including multiple floors and the results show APFiLoc can achieve 80% accuracy (phone in the hand and around 70% accuracy (phone in the pocket of the error less than 2 m error without the assistance of infrastructure like Wi-Fi access points.

  4. Energy Scan program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poniatowska Katarzyna M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtoscopy of two non-identical particles in heavy ion collisions enables one to study the space-time asymmetry in the particle's emission process. Theoretical studies based on EPOS model performed for collision energies from the Beam Energy Scan program in STAR allow us to investigate the dependence of source sizes and dynamics effects. Obtained information will enable us to predict the collective behaviour of femtoscopic particle's source.

  5. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  6. Linking the genomes of nonmodel teleosts through comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarropoulou, E; Nousdili, D; Magoulas, A; Kotoulas, G

    2008-01-01

    Recently the genomes of two more teleost species have been released: the medaka (Oryzias latipes), and the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculateus). The rapid developments in genomics of fish species paved the way to new and valuable research in comparative genetics and genomics. With the accumulation of information in model species, the genetic and genomic characterization of nonmodel, but economically important species, is now feasible. Furthermore, comparison of low coverage gene maps of aquacultured fish species against fully sequenced fish species will enhance the efficiency of candidate genes identification projected for quantitative trait loci (QTL) scans for traits of commercial interest. This study shows the syntenic relationship between the genomes of six different teleost species, including three fully sequenced model species: Tetraodon nigroviridis, Oryzias latipes, Gasterosteus aculateus, and three marine species of commercial and evolutionary interest: Sparus aurata, Dicentrarchus labrax, Oreochromis spp. All three commercial fish species belong to the order Perciformes, which is the richest in number of species (approximately 10,000) but poor in terms of available genomic information and tools. Syntenic relationships were established by using 800 EST and microsatellites sequences successfully mapped on the RH map of seabream. Comparison to the stickleback genome produced most positive BLAT hits (58%) followed by medaka (32%) and Tetraodon (30%). Thus, stickleback was used as the major stepping stone to compare seabass and tilapia to seabream. In addition to the significance for the aquaculture industry, this approach can encompass important ecological and evolutionary implications. PMID:18297360

  7. An investigation on the facial midline distance to some anatomic landmarks of the jaws among people with natural dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharraf R

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the dental midline is necessary in most dental procedures."nOne of the methods to fulfill this goal is to determine the facial midline based on the midpoints of the"nforehead, nose, upper lip and chin. However, for various reasons, this method has not always been"nproved successful. In such cases, different techniques, based on the investigations in the edentulous"npatients, have been suggested."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the conformity of some landmarks such as labial"nfrenum, incisive papilla and mid palatal suture with dental and facial midlines among people with natural"ndentition in order to obtain accurate anatomic landmarks for denture replacement."nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 96 dental students, having all their permanent teeth"nand without any orthognathic problem, were chosen. For each subject, Alginate impressions and dental"ncasts were prepared. Then, centric occlusion was recorded with a biting wax and the facial mid line was"ndetermined on the anterior part of it. The distances from the facial midline to the upper teeth midline,"nincisive papilla, labial frenum and mid palatal suture were determined with a special tool and were"nmeasured by a VERNIEH two times. In order to analyze the results, Chi- Square and t-student tests were"nused."nResults: The average of facial midline distance to the upper teeth midline, the labial frenum, the incisive"npapilla and the mid palatal suture were 0.83±0.60, 0.67±G.54, 0.83±00.63 and 0.81±0.62 mm,"nrespectively. There was no significant difference between males and females. Labial frenum showed the"nminimum distance to the facial midline, while the incisive papilla had the maximum. There was no"nsignificant difference between these anatomic landmarks, in conformity or unconformity with the facial"nmidline"nConclusion: Considering the low percentage of the subjects with complete conformity and the lack of

  8. Institutional landmarks in Brazilian research on soil erosion: a historical overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Santos Telles

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of soil erosion in Brazil has been a focus of agricultural scientific research since the 19th century. The aim of this study was to provide a historical overview of the institutional landmarks which gave rise to the first studies in soil erosion and established the foundations of agricultural research in Brazil. The 19th century and beginning of the 20th century saw the founding of a series of institutions in Brazil, such as Botanical Gardens, executive institutions, research institutes, experimental stations, educational institutions of agricultural sciences, as well as the creation and diversification of scientific journals. These entities, each in its own way, served to foster soil erosion research in Brazil. During the Imperial period (1808-1889, discussions focused on soil degradation and conserving the fertility of agricultural land. During the First Republic (1889-1930, with the founding of various educational institutions and consolidation of research on soil degradation conducted by the Agronomic Institute of Campinas in the State of São Paulo, studies focused on soil depletion, identification of the major factors causing soil erosion and the measures necessary to control it. During the New State period (1930-1945, many soil conservation practices were developed and disseminated to combat erosion and field trials were set up, mainly to measure soil and water losses induced by hydric erosion. During the Brazilian New Republic (1945-1964, experiments were conducted throughout Brazil, consolidating soil and water conservation as one of the main areas of Soil Science in Brazil. This was followed by scientific conferences on erosion and the institutionalization of post-graduate studies. During the Military Regime (1964-1985, many research and educational institutions were founded, experimental studies intensified, and coincidently, soil erosion reached alarming levels which led to the development of the no-tillage system.

  9. [Therapy for systemic metabolic disorders based on the detection of basic corneal landmarks in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisch, W; Pitz, S; Geerling, G

    2013-06-01

    Many systemic lysosomal storage disorders show basic corneal opacities already in childhood. The lysosome is a cell organelle, produced by Golgi's apparatus, that is surrounded by a membrane and contains hydrolytic enzymes that break down food molecules, especially proteins and other complex molecules. The ophthalmologist's precise diagnosis of corneal clouding at the slit-lamp may reveal the correct interpretation of the specific lysosomal storage disorder. It is very important to diagnose such diseases as soon as possible because today the development of systemic enzymatic therapies has broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for the current standard of care. The following corneal landmarks of systemic storage diseases and of the modern systemic therapy are presented: cornea verticillata in Fabry's disease, periodic infusion of alpha-galactosidase a; Kayser-Fleischer's ring in Wilson's disease, zinc, trienetin, low copper diet; multiple, punctiform crystals in cystinosis, cysteamine, Raptor RP 103(DR cysteamine) that reduces the cytotoxity in form of continous dissolving of cystine from lysosome, renal transplantation, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation; peripheral ring, but not true lipid arc, and moderate stromal haze in LCAT-deficiency, injection of recombinant enzyme or of encapsulated LCAT-secreting cells; diffuse stromal haze in mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Enzyme replacement therapy is currently indicated for MPS I, MPS II, and MPS VI, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation; painful, bilateral pseudo-dendritic opacities in tyrosinemia type II (eponym: Richner-Hanhart syndrome), low phenylalanine and tyrosine diet result in complete disappearance of corneal alterations with a consecutive painfree period. Strict diet during the whole life is necessary to prevent corneal recurrences and the occurrence of palmo-plantar keratoses. Such therapies can enable the patient to lead an otherwise normal life for decades.

  10. Landmark recognition in Alzheimer's dementia: spared implicit memory for objects relevant for navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy P C Kessels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spatial navigation, landmark recognition is crucial. Specifically, memory for objects placed at decision points on a route is relevant. Previous fMRI research in healthy adults showed higher medial-temporal lobe (MTL activation for objects placed at decision points compared to non-decision points, even at an implicit level. Since there is evidence that implicit learning is intact in amnesic patients, the current study examined memory for objects relevant for navigation in patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 21 AD patients participated with MTL atrophy assessed on MRI (mean MMSE = 21.2, SD = 4.0, as well as 20 age- and education-matched non-demented controls. All participants watched a 5-min video showing a route through a virtual museum with 20 objects placed at intersections (decision points and 20 at simple turns (non-decision points. The instruction was to pay attention to the toys (half of the objects for which they were supposedly tested later. Subsequently, a recognition test followed with the 40 previously presented objects among 40 distracter items (both toys and non-toys. Results showed a better performance for the non-toy objects placed at decision points than non-decision points, both for AD patients and controls. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that AD patients with MTL damage have implicit memory for object information relevant for navigation. No decision point effect was found for the attended items. Possibly, focusing attention on the items occurred at the cost of the context information in AD, whereas the controls performed at an optimal level due to intact memory function.

  11. Anatomic landmarks of fluoroscopy guided puncture of the pulseless femoral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to improve puncturing the pulseless femoral artery by evaluating the anatomic landmarks that suggest the course of the femoral artery on fluoroscopy. We analyzed 37 hemipelvis spot images that were centered on the arterial sheath after puncture of the femoral artery. The inguinal angles were measured between the inguinal line connecting the anterior superior iliac spine and the symphysis pubis, and the line of the arterial sheath. Inguinal ligament ratios were measured as the distance from the symphysis pubis to the arterial sheath to the length of the inguinal ligament on the inguinal line. The femoral head ratios were measured as the distance from the medial margin of the femur head to the arterial sheath to the transverse length of the femur head. The mean inguinal angle was 66.5 and the mean inguinal ligament ratio was 0.42 (± 0.03). The mean femoral head ratio was 0.08 (± 0.18). In comparing the men and women, there was no significant difference in the inguinal angle and the femoral head ratio, but the inguinal distance ratio was larger in women (men: 0.41 ± 0.033, women: 0.44 ± 0.031, ρ < 0.05). The femoral artery generally courses just lateral to the medial margin of the femur head (femoral head ratio: 0.08) and the medial 40% of the inguinal ligament (inguinal ligament ratio: 0.42). So, consideration of these relations may be helpful for puncturing the pulseless femoral artery

  12. [Landmarks of physiological development of the voice in childhood and adolescense (Part 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M

    2008-01-01

    The area of the functioning of the voice is a fundamental element of human communication apart from language, speaking, hearing and perceiving. Detailed knowledge of normal vocal development is a prerequisite for the diagnosis and therapy of vocal dysfunctions among children and adolescents by means of methods suitable for their age and their stages of development. In an overview, the landmarks of physiological development with normal value ranges relevant to practice are presented--from the newborn baby's first cry up to the age of young adults. The effects of various degrees of vocal activity on the part of children and adolescents on the parameters of vocal capacity and quality are taken into account, as well as the relationship between physical and vocal development. Furthermore, an overview of diagnostic methods suitable for this age group is given. Specialists for ENT and for Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology should be able to assess suitability for increased vocal activity and to care for vocal development during the vulnerable phase of the voice change. Manifold socio-cultural and pedagogical influences are already possible in early childhood and throughout the phase of the "voice in growth". They should be taken advantage of prophylactically--also with regard to the learning of physiological vocal behavior as a prerequisite for dealing with possible subsequent strain in vocally intensive professions. In the following second part of this publication, the fundamentals described here are applied to diagnostics and therapy of vocal dysfunctions in this age group by means of methods suitable for this stage of development. PMID:18080235

  13. Looking for landmarks: the role of expert review and bibliometric analysis in evaluating scientific publication outputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Allen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare expert assessment with bibliometric indicators as tools to assess the quality and importance of scientific research papers. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Shortly after their publication in 2005, the quality and importance of a cohort of nearly 700 Wellcome Trust (WT associated research papers were assessed by expert reviewers; each paper was reviewed by two WT expert reviewers. After 3 years, we compared this initial assessment with other measures of paper impact. RESULTS: Shortly after publication, 62 (9% of the 687 research papers were determined to describe at least a 'major addition to knowledge' -6 were thought to be 'landmark' papers. At an aggregate level, after 3 years, there was a strong positive association between expert assessment and impact as measured by number of citations and F1000 rating. However, there were some important exceptions indicating that bibliometric measures may not be sufficient in isolation as measures of research quality and importance, and especially not for assessing single papers or small groups of research publications. CONCLUSION: When attempting to assess the quality and importance of research papers, we found that sole reliance on bibliometric indicators would have led us to miss papers containing important results as judged by expert review. In particular, some papers that were highly rated by experts were not highly cited during the first three years after publication. Tools that link expert peer reviews of research paper quality and importance to more quantitative indicators, such as citation analysis would be valuable additions to the field of research assessment and evaluation.

  14. Visualization in Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning is essentially a method of making the unknown known, and for the vast majority of scanning work this means making the invisible visible. Visualization is developed as a process involving a model of eye and brain function, display performance and counter performance combined with the spatial frequency components in the object scanned. The performance of a scanner or gamma camera depends in part on its display system and experiments have been performed to determine the fractional change in count-rate which can be perceived by the eye from colour, photoscan and cathode-ray tube displays, for both circular and line sources of radioactivity. For circular sources, colour and photoscan displays are capable of making 10% increases in count-rate perceptible in backgrounds ranging from 5 to 100 counts/s for sources of 1 to 4 cm diameter, whilst cathode-ray tube and black-mark displays show only 20% at best. The results for line sources are also given. In testing for the statistical significance of count-rate differences on a scan, the counts are usually compared for equal areas. On this basis the cathode-ray tube display is only able to show five standard deviations of difference whereas colour and photoscan displays show from 2.5 to 3 standard deviations, levels not usually accepted statistically as significant. It is suggested that if the eye examines the areas surrounding the area of interest then the significance of a count-rate difference may be established more accurately and in general will be increased, thereby accounting for the visualization of apparently 'insignificant' regions. This theory is used to predict the areas of count density which should be visually perceived in the presence of noise, and extended to consider practical display conditions, which have been described in this paper. The performance of a scanner can be considered in terms of its modulation transfer function (derived from a line spread function). Fourier analysis has been performed

  15. Interfraction Displacement of Primary Tumor and Involved Lymph Nodes Relative to Anatomic Landmarks in Image Guided Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Nuzhat; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai [Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Weiss, Elisabeth, E-mail: eweiss@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze primary tumor (PT) and lymph node (LN) position changes relative to each other and relative to anatomic landmarks during conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In 12 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer PT, LN, carina, and 1 thoracic vertebra were manually contoured on weekly 4-dimensional fan-beam CT scans. Systematic and random interfraction displacements of all contoured structures were identified in the 3 cardinal directions, and resulting setup margins were calculated. Time trends and the effect of volume changes on displacements were analyzed. Results: Three-dimensional displacement vectors and systematic/random interfraction displacements were smaller for carina than for vertebra both for PT and LN. For PT, mean (SD) 3-dimensional displacement vectors with carina-based alignment were 7 (4) mm versus 9 (5) mm with bony anatomy (P<.0001). For LN, smaller displacements were found with carina- (5 [3] mm, P<.0001) and vertebra-based (6 [3] mm, P=.002) alignment compared with using PT for setup (8 [5] mm). Primary tumor and LN displacements relative to bone and carina were independent (P>.05). Displacements between PT and bone (P=.04) and between PT and LN (P=.01) were significantly correlated with PT volume regression. Displacements between LN and carina were correlated with LN volume change (P=.03). Conclusions: Carina-based setup results in a more reproducible PT and LN alignment than bony anatomy setup. Considering the independence of PT and LN displacement and the impact of volume regression on displacements over time, repeated CT imaging even with PT-based alignment is recommended in locally advanced disease.

  16. Guitar: An R/Bioconductor Package for Gene Annotation Guided Transcriptomic Analysis of RNA-Related Genomic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological features, such as genes and transcription factor binding sites, are often denoted with genome-based coordinates as the genomic features. While genome-based representation is usually very effective in correlating various biological features, it can be tedious to examine the relationship between RNA-related genomic features and the landmarks of RNA transcripts with existing tools due to the difficulty in the conversion between genome-based coordinates and RNA-based coordinates. We developed here an open source Guitar R/Bioconductor package for sketching the transcriptomic view of RNA-related biological features represented by genome based coordinates. Internally, Guitar package extracts the standardized RNA coordinates with respect to the landmarks of RNA transcripts, with which hundreds of millions of RNA-related genomic features can then be efficiently analyzed within minutes. We demonstrated the usage of Guitar package in analyzing posttranscriptional RNA modifications (5-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenosine derived from high-throughput sequencing approaches (MeRIP-Seq and RNA BS-Seq and show that RNA 5-methylcytosine (m5C is enriched in 5′UTR. The newly developed Guitar R/Bioconductor package achieves stable performance on the data tested and revealed novel biological insights. It will effectively facilitate the analysis of RNA methylation data and other RNA-related biological features in the future.

  17. Guitar: An R/Bioconductor Package for Gene Annotation Guided Transcriptomic Analysis of RNA-Related Genomic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaodong; Wei, Zhen; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Hui; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Huang, Yufei; Meng, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Biological features, such as genes and transcription factor binding sites, are often denoted with genome-based coordinates as the genomic features. While genome-based representation is usually very effective in correlating various biological features, it can be tedious to examine the relationship between RNA-related genomic features and the landmarks of RNA transcripts with existing tools due to the difficulty in the conversion between genome-based coordinates and RNA-based coordinates. We developed here an open source Guitar R/Bioconductor package for sketching the transcriptomic view of RNA-related biological features represented by genome based coordinates. Internally, Guitar package extracts the standardized RNA coordinates with respect to the landmarks of RNA transcripts, with which hundreds of millions of RNA-related genomic features can then be efficiently analyzed within minutes. We demonstrated the usage of Guitar package in analyzing posttranscriptional RNA modifications (5-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenosine) derived from high-throughput sequencing approaches (MeRIP-Seq and RNA BS-Seq) and show that RNA 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C) is enriched in 5'UTR. The newly developed Guitar R/Bioconductor package achieves stable performance on the data tested and revealed novel biological insights. It will effectively facilitate the analysis of RNA methylation data and other RNA-related biological features in the future. PMID:27239475

  18. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  19. Comparison of difference registration landmarks for image - guided radiotherapy for lung cancer%肺癌图像引导IMRT配准标志的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦新; 惠周光; 李明辉; 章众; 符贵山; 戴建荣

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of anatomical landmarks on registration in image⁃guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for central and peripheral lung cancer. Methods Twenty⁃five patients with central or peripheral lung cancer for IGRT were enrolled in this study. Kilo⁃voltage cone⁃beam CT ( kV⁃CBCT) scanning was acquired before irradiotion. Tumor coverage on CBCT was assessed using gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), and planning target volume (PTV) contours according to tumor alignment, carina registration, and spine registration, respectively. The grading analysiswas based on visual tumor assessment as follows:grade 0, tumor within GTV;grade 1, tumor outside GTV but inside CTV;grade 2, tumor outside CTV but inside PTV;and grade 3, tumor outside PTV. Results Totally 177 sets of kV⁃CBCT of 25 patients was collected. According to the registration landmarks of the tumor, carina and spine for central lung cancer, the percentages were 57�55%, 53�77% and 16�04% in grade 0, 39�62%, 45�28%and 58�49% in grade 1, and 1�89%, 0�94% and 25�47% in grade 2, respectively. For peripheral lung cancer, the percentages were 47�89%, 14�08% and 2�82% in grade 0, 43�66%, 29�58% and 45�07% in grade 1, and 8�45%, 40�85% and 35�21% in grade 2, respectively. Conclusions For central lung cancer,the tumor was recommended as the best registration landmark, and the carina was recommended as well, while the spine was not recommended. For peripheral lung cancer, the tumor was recommended as the best registration landmark, while the spine and the carina were not recommended.%目的:研究肺癌患者图像引导IMRT中采用不同配准标志的靶区符合度差异,确定合理的图像配准方法。方法回顾性收集和分析25例肺癌患者CBCT影像,按原发肿瘤位置分为中央型和周围型两组,每组分别采用肿瘤、隆突、脊柱为标志的配准方法。根据肿瘤组织靶区符合度分为4

  20. Nuclear Medicine Scans for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Nuclear Medicine Scans for Cancer Other names for these ... inflammation, or cancer. Use of monoclonal antibodies in nuclear scans A special type of antibody made in ...

  1. Identifying characteristic back shapes from anatomical scans of wheelchair users to improve seating design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crytzer, Theresa M; Hong, Eun-Kyoung; Dicianno, Brad E; Pearlman, Jon; Schmeler, Mark; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-09-01

    Spinal deformities are common in people who require the use of a wheelchair for mobility as a result of spinal cord injuries and other disabilities. Sitting positions vary between individuals with disabilities who use wheelchairs and individuals without disabilities. In individuals with spinal cord injury, spinal deformities can result in the development of back contours that deviate from the shape of standard rigid back support shells. The purpose of this study was to distinguish and classify various back contours of wheelchair users by utilizing digital anatomic scanning technology in order to inform the future development of back supports that would enhance postural support for those with spinal deformities. The three dimensional (3D) locations of bony landmarks were digitized when participants were in position, using a mechanical wand linked to the FastScan(tm) system commonly used to measure surface contours. Raw FastScan(tm) data were transformed according to bony landmarks. A total of 129 individuals participated in this study. A wide range of back contours were identified and categorized. Although participant characteristics (e.g., gender, diagnosis) were similar amongst the contour groups; no one characteristic explained the contours. Participants who were seated in a forward lean position had a higher amount of pelvic obliquity compared to those seated in an upright position; however, participants' back contour was not correlated with pelvic obliquity. In conclusion, an array of different back shapes were classified in our cohort through 3D laser scanning technology. The methods and technology applied in this study could be replicated in future studies to categorize ranges of back shapes in larger populations of people with spinal cord injuries. Preliminary evidence indicates that customized postural support may be warranted to optimize positioning and posture when a standard rigid shell does not align with contours of a person's back. To optimize

  2. Scanned-cantilever atomic force microscope with large scanning range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jintao Yang; Wendong Xu

    2006-01-01

    A scanned-cantilever atomic force microscope (AFM) with large scanning range is proposed, which adopts a new design named laser spot tracking. The scanned-cantilever AFM uses the separate flexure x-y scanner and z scanner instead of the conventional piezoelectric tube scanner. The closed-loop control and integrated capacitive sensors of these scanners can insure that the images of samples have excellent linearity and stability. According to the experimental results, the scanned-cantilever AFM can realize maximal 100 × 100 (μm) scanning range, and 1-nm resolution in z direction, which can meet the requirements of large scale sample testing.

  3. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  4. A Scanning Cavity Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Mader, Matthias; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1700-fold signal enhancement compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity below 1 nm2, we show a method to improve spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for opt...

  5. Telescopic horizon scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, Jan

    2014-12-20

    The problem of "distortionless" viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems (mainly "binoculars") remains problematic. The so called "globe effect" is only partially counteracted in modern designs. Theories addressing the phenomenon have never reached definitive closure. In this paper, we show that exact distortionless viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems is not possible in general, but that it is in principle possible in-very frequent in battle field and marine applications-the case of horizon scanning. However, this involves cylindrical optical elements. For opto-electronic systems, a full solution is more readily feasible. The solution involves a novel interpretation of the relevant constraints and objectives. For final design decisions, it is not necessary to rely on a corpus of psychophysical (or ergonomic) data, although one has to decide whether the instrument is intended as an extension of the eye or as a "pictorial" device. PMID:25608206

  6. Micro scanning probes

    CERN Document Server

    Niblock, T

    2001-01-01

    This thesis covers the design methodology, theory, modelling, fabrication and evaluation of a Micro-Scanning-Probe. The device is a thermally actuated bimorph quadrapod fabricated using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems technology. A quadrapod is a structure with four arms, in this case a planar structure with the four arms forming a cross which is dry etched out of a silicon diaphragm. Each arm has a layer of aluminium deposited on it forming a bimorph. Through heating each arm actuation is achieved in the plane of the quadrapod and the direction normal to it. Fabrication of the device has required the development of bulk micromachining techniques to handle post CMOS fabricated wafers and the patterning of thickly sputtered aluminium in bulk micro machined cavities. CMOS fabrication techniques were used to incorporate diodes onto the quadrapod arms for temperature measurement of the arms. Fine tungsten and silicon tips have also been fabricated to allow tunnelling between the tip and the platform at the centr...

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, J.; Grooth, de B.G.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single ch

  8. A comparative study of two techniques (electrocardiogram- and landmark-guided for correct depth of the central venous catheter placement in paediatric patients undergoing elective cardiovascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Barnwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The complications of central venous catheterisation can be minimized by ensuring catheter tip placement just above the superior vena cava-right atrium junction. We aimed to compare two methods, using an electrocardiogram (ECG or landmark as guides, for assessing correct depth of central venous catheter (CVC placement. Methods: In a prospective randomised study of sixty patients of <12 years of age, thirty patients each were allotted randomly to two groups (ECG and landmark. After induction, central venous catheterisation was performed by either of the two techniques and position of CVC tip was compared in post-operative chest X-ray with respect to carina. Unpaired t-test was used for quantitative data and Chi-square test was used for qualitative data. Results: In ECG group, positions of CVC tip were above carina in 12, at carina in 9 and below carina in 9 patients. In landmark group, the positions of CVC tips were above carina in 10, at carina in 4 and below carina in 16 patients. Mean distance of CVC tip in ECG group was 0.34 ± 0.23 cm and 0.66 ± 0.35 cm in landmark group (P = 0.0001. Complications occurred in one patient in ECG group and in nine patients in landmark group (P = 0.0056. Conclusion: Overall, landmark-guided technique was comparable with ECG technique. ECG-guided technique was more precise for CVC tip placement closer to carina. The incidence of complications was more in the landmark group.

  9. Factors influencing superimposition error of 3D cephalometric landmarks by plane orientation method using 4 reference points: 4 point superimposition error regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Joon; Kim, Kee-Deog; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Jeong, Ho-Gul

    2014-01-01

    Superimposition has been used as a method to evaluate the changes of orthodontic or orthopedic treatment in the dental field. With the introduction of cone beam CT (CBCT), evaluating 3 dimensional changes after treatment became possible by superimposition. 4 point plane orientation is one of the simplest ways to achieve superimposition of 3 dimensional images. To find factors influencing superimposition error of cephalometric landmarks by 4 point plane orientation method and to evaluate the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks for analyzing superimposition error, 20 patients were analyzed who had normal skeletal and occlusal relationship and took CBCT for diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. The nasion, sella turcica, basion and midpoint between the left and the right most posterior point of the lesser wing of sphenoidal bone were used to define a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical reference co-ordinate system. Another 15 reference cephalometric points were also determined three times in the same image. Reorientation error of each landmark could be explained substantially (23%) by linear regression model, which consists of 3 factors describing position of each landmark towards reference axes and locating error. 4 point plane orientation system may produce an amount of reorientation error that may vary according to the perpendicular distance between the landmark and the x-axis; the reorientation error also increases as the locating error and shift of reference axes viewed from each landmark increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the reorientation error, accuracy of all landmarks including the reference points is important. Construction of the regression model using reference points of greater precision is required for the clinical application of this model. PMID:25372707

  10. Estimating the age of Calliphora vicina eggs (Diptera: Calliphoridae): determination of embryonic morphological landmarks and preservation of egg samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Vega, Daniel; Hall, Martin J R

    2016-05-01

    Blow fly eggs may sometimes be the only entomological evidence recovered in a forensic case, especially in cooler weather when hatching might take several days: hence, a method for estimating their age is greatly needed. However, developmental data on blow fly eggs are mainly limited to records of the time to larval hatching. The current paper describes the morphological changes occurring during embryogenesis of the blow fly Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and their timing in relation to temperature, in order to determine those characters which can be used for simple egg age estimation using light microscopy. At 7.3 and 25 °C, 15 easily visualised morphological landmarks were determined in C. vicina living embryos, allowing for their age estimation with a resolution of 10-20% of total egg developmental time. The observed age intervals were compared to the embryonic stages described for the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, which are used as reference data in multiple developmental studies. Moreover, current guidelines for preservation of egg samples, which recommend the placement of living eggs directly into 80% ethanol, were tested against the hot water killing (HWK) method prior to preservation in 80% ethanol, recommended for larval and pupal specimens. Direct placement of eggs into 80% ethanol caused marked decomposition of samples, and no morphological landmarks were discernible. On the other hand, HWK fixation prior to preservation in 80% ethanol enabled visualisation of 11 of the 15 age-specific morphological landmarks that were discernible in living embryos. Therefore, HWK fixation prior to preservation in 80% ethanol is recommended for egg samples, thus unifying the protocols for collecting entomological evidence.

  11. Integrated genetic map of Anopheles gambiae: use of RAPD polymorphisms for genetic, cytogenetic and STS landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, G; Zheng, L; Kumar, V; della Torre, A; Kafatos, F C; Louis, C

    1996-06-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers have been integrated in the genetic and cytogenetic maps of the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Fifteen of these markers were mapped by recombination, relative to microsatellite markers that had been mapped previously. Thirty-four gel-purified RAPD bands were cloned and sequenced, generating sequence tagged sites (STSs) that can be used as entry points to the A. gambiae genome. Thirty one of these STSs were localized on nurse cell polytene chromosomes through their unique hybridization signal in in situ hybridization experiments. Five STSs map close to the breakpoints of polymorphic inversions, which are notable features of the Anopheles genome. The usefulness and limitations of this integrated mosquito map are discussed. PMID:8725241

  12. Scan mirrors relay for high resolution laser scanning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David

    2014-09-01

    Two dimensional beam deflection is often required in medical laser scanning systems such as OCT or confocal microscopy. Commonly two linear galvo mirrors are used for performance in terms of their large apertures and scan angles. The galvo mirrors are placed at the vicinity of entrance pupil of the scan lens with a "displacement distance" separating them. This distance limits the scan fields and/or reduces the effective aperture of the scan lens. Another option is to use a beam or pupil relay, and image one galvo mirror onto the other. However, beam (or pupil) relays are notoriously complicated, expensive and can add significant aberrations. This paper discusses a simple, all reflective, diffraction limited, color corrected, beam relay, capable of large scan angles and large deflecting mirrors. The design is based on a unique combination of an Offner configuration with a Schmidt aspheric corrector. The design is highly corrected up to large scan mirrors and large scan angles down to milliwaves of aberrations. It allows significantly larger scan field and or scan lenses with higher numerical aperture as compared with scanners using galvos separated by the displacement distance. While this relay is of exceptionally high performance, it has one element located where the beam is focused which may present a problem for high power lasers. Thus modifications of the above design are introduced where the beam is focused in mid air thus making it usable for high power systems such including laser marking and fabrication systems.

  13. The Tea4-PP1 landmark promotes local growth by dual Cdc42 GEF recruitment and GAP exclusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkoris K.; Gallo Castro D.; Martin S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarization relies on small GTPases, such as Cdc42, which can break symmetry through self-organizing principles, and landmarks that define the axis of polarity. In fission yeast, microtubules deliver the Tea1-Tea4 complex to mark cell poles for growth, but how this complex activates Cdc42 is unknown. Here, we show that ectopic targeting of Tea4 to cell sides promotes the local activation of Cdc42 and cell growth. This activity requires that Tea4 binds the type I phosphatase (PP1) cataly...

  14. Evaluation of normal brain CT scan in Koreans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of procedure combined with wealth of information have resulted in rapid acceptance of CT as a practical and reliable neurodiagnostic technique. To understand the alternation in tissue density and associated displacement and distortion caused by pathologic lesion in CT, it is necessary to have clear understanding of normal anatomical landmark. For the purpose of establishing normartive criteria in Koreans for comparative diagnosis, 500 normal CT scan without neurologic sign were studied. The brief results are follows; 1. Among many ventricular index measured for lateral ventricle, the bifrontal CVI is more sensitive and easily determined. Ventricular size increased with age, especially after 6th decade but no difference with sex. 2. Mean width of third ventricle is 5mm( ± 0.3), more wider in male (male; 5.2mm, female; 4.5mm) and increased with age. 3. Mean width of fourth ventricle is 13mm( ± 1.3), without difference in age and sex. The shape of ventricle is variable form of triangle. The position of ventricle relative to Twining's line can be determined, so ratio of distance from tuberculum sellae to center of fourth ventricle to Twining's line is between 0.46-0.52. 4. Suprasellar cistern is visible in 89.7% of scan and shape of cistern is found to be pentagonal (73.3%), hexagonal (23.0%) and tetragonal (3.7%). 5. Choroid plexus can be identified in 90% and asymetrical in 4%. 45% of identified choroid plexus can be visible on scan without contrast enhancement, and more frequently visible in older age

  15. Evaluation of normal brain CT scan in Korean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of procedure combined with wealth of information have resulted in rapid acceptance of CT as a practical and reliable neurodignostic technique. To understand the alternation in tissue density and associated displacement and distortion caused by pathologic lesion in CT, it is necessary to have clear understanding of normal anatomical landmark. For the purpose of establishing normative criteria in Korean for comparative diagnosis, 500 normal CT scan without neurologic sign were studied. The brief results are follows; 1. Among many ventricular index measured for lateral ventricle, the bifrontal CVI is more sensitive and easily determined. Ventricular size increased with age, especially after 6th decade but no difference with sex. 2. Mean width of third ventricle is 5 mm (± 0.3), more wider in male (male; 5.2 mm, female; 4.5 mm) and increased with age. 2. Mean width of fourth ventricle is 13 mm (± 1.3), without difference in age and sex. The shape of ventricle is variable form of triangle. The position of ventricle relative to Twining's line can be determined, so ratio of distance from tuberculum sellae to center of fourth ventricle to Twining's line is between 0.46-0.52. 4. Suprasellar cistern is visible in 89.7% of scan and shape of cistern is found to be pentagonal (73.3%), hexagonal (23.0%) and tetragonal (3.7%). 5. Choroid plexus can be identified in 90% and asymmetrical in 4%. 45% of identified choroid plexus can be visible on scan without contrast enhancement, and more frequently visible in older age

  16. Listeria Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  17. Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

  18. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus;

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austria...... active in sequencing, assembling and annotating genomes, agreed on a set of cephalopod species of particular importance for initial sequencing and developed strategies and an organization (CephSeq Consortium) to promote this sequencing. The conclusions and recommendations of this meeting are described...

  19. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  20. 不同标记点对肺癌图像引导放疗图像配准结果的影响%Impact of different anatomical landmarks on registration in imaging-guided radiation for lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳阳; 傅小龙; 夏冰

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of different anatomical landmarks on registration in imaging-guided radiation (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods For 20 patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Fudan University Cancer Hospital, 100 frames of kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography scanning were evaluated in this study. The spine, carina and tumor were selected as landmarks for registration, respectively. Results of registration using different landmarks were documented and compared. Results The average set-up errors in the left-right, superiorinferior and anterior-posterior directions were -0. 08 cm ±0. 32 cm, -0. 16 cm ±0. 45 cm and 0. 06 cm ±0. 23 cm with the spine for registration;0. 06 cm ±0. 34 cm, -0. 13 cm ±0. 45 cm and -0. 02 cm±0.23 cm with the carina;and -0. 17 cm ±0.25 cm, 0.03 cm ±0.47 cm and 0. 15 cm ±0.38 cm with tumor. The registration results between using the carina and tumor as landmarks were statistically significant different (q=4.61, P=0. 002 ;q = 2. 23 , P=0. 118;q=3.44, P=0. 017). The registration results were equal when using the spine and tumor as landmarks ( q = 1.85, P = 0. 195; q = 2. 54, P = 0. 075; q = 1.89,P=0. 185), as well as using the carina and tumor as landmarks (q=2.76, P=0. 054;q=0.31, P=0. 826 ;q = 1.55, P = 0. 276). Conclusions For early stage lung cancer, the spine and tumor can be used equally as registration landmarks in imaging-guided SBRT. The carina is not suggested for its poor reproducible position.%目的 分析不同标记点对千伏锥形束CT(KVCBCT)图像与计划设计参考图像配准的影响,为选择适合于肺癌图像引导放疗的标记点提供依据.方法 共20例(男18例,女2例)行立体定向放疗的非小细胞肺癌患者进入研究.每位患者每次治疗均行KVCBCT在线引导放疗技术分析.选择每例患者每次治疗时获得的第1幅KVCBCT图像用于研究,20例患者100幅KVCBCT图像进入分析.将胸椎、隆突

  1. The location of midfacial landmarks according to the method of establishing the midsagittal reference plane in three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of facial asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheock; Yoon, Suk Ja [Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Song, In Ja [Dept. of Nursing, Kwangju Women' s University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of methods of establishing the midsagittal reference plane (MRP) on the locations of midfacial landmarks in the three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis of facial asymmetry. A total of 24 patients (12 male and 12 female; mean age, 22.5 years; age range, 18.2-29.7 years) with facial asymmetry were included in this study. The MRP was established using two different methods on each patient's CT image. The x-coordinates of four midfacial landmarks (the menton, nasion, upper incisor, and lower incisor) were obtained by measuring the distance and direction of the landmarks from the MRP, and the two methods were compared statistically. The direction of deviation and the severity of asymmetry found using each method were also compared. The x-coordinates of the four anatomic landmarks all showed a statistically significant difference between the two methods of establishing the MRP. For the nasion and lower incisor, six patients (25.0%) showed a change in the direction of deviation. The severity of asymmetry also changed in 16 patients (66.7%). The results of this study suggest that the locations of midfacial landmarks change significantly according to the method used to establish the MRP.

  2. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  3. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  4. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen;

    2015-01-01

    , archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when...

  5. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying;

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...

  6. Adiponectin is associated with cardiovascular disease in male renal transplant recipients: baseline results from the LANDMARK 2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudge David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is a major adipocyte-derived protein with insulin-sensitizing, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties. Adiponectin levels correlate inversely with renal function and higher levels are predictive of lower cardiovascular disease (CVD in patients with normal renal function and chronic kidney disease. No data exists on the association between adiponectin and CVD in renal transplant recipients (RTR. Methods Standard biochemistry, clinical data and adiponectin were collected from 137 RTR recruited to the LANDMARK 2 study at baseline. The LANDMARK 2 study is an ongoing randomized controlled study that compares the outcome of aggressive risk factor modification for cardiovascular disease versus standard post-transplant care in renal transplant recipients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus. Results Mean patient age was 53.4 ± 12 years and the median post-transplantation period was 5 (0.5-31.9 years. Mean serum adiponectin level was 12.3 ± 7.1 μg/mL. On univariate analysis, adiponectin was positively associated with female gender (P = 0.01 and serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL concentration (P Conclusion In conclusion, adiponectin is positively correlated with inflammation, dyslipidemia and abnormal glucose tolerance in RTR. Furthermore, hypoadiponectinemia correlated with increased baseline CVD in male RTR.

  7. Megaliths as land-marks. Chronicle of the territorial role of the megalithic monuments through written sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinón-Torres, Marcos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Megalithic monuments have played dijferent roles throughout History. One of them has a spatial function, i.e. as landmarks. The aim of this paper has been to collect and analyse every written reference concerning Galician megaliths operating as landmarks between the 6th and 19th centuries AD. On this basis, the evolution of this social-territorial function of the monuments through time is reconstructed, and an interpretative hypothesis for this phenomenon is proposed. Finally, the importance of reviewing written sources as a methodology for archaeological survey and for studies of the topographic settings of monuments is emphasised.

    A lo largo de la Historia, los monumentos megalíticos han desempeñado, entre otras, una función espacial, como marcos de territorio. Para este artículo se recogen y analizan las referencias escritas a megalitos gallegos funcionando como marcadores o identificadores espaciales, entre los siglos VI y XIX d.C. A partir de este registro de fuentes se reconstruye la evolución de este papel social-territorial de los monumentos en las distintas épocas. Se plantea un modelo interpretativo para este fenómeno, y se valora la revisión de fuentes escritas como metodología para la prospección arqueológica y para los estudios de emplazamiento de megalitos.

  8. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Jessica C; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, 'genetic maps' were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in the determination of genome sequences have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. What do we see if we shift our focus from gene content (the 'inventory' of genes contained within a genome) to the composition and organization of a genome? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome as well as the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology.

  9. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  10. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M.R. De Luca; R.M.P. Breedijk; R.A.J. Brandt; C.H.C. Zeelenberg; B.E. de Jong; W. Timmermans; L.N. Azar; R.A. Hoebe; S. Stallinga; E.M.M. Manders

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity wh

  11. Shape Analysis of 3D Head Scan Data for U.S. Respirator Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slice DennisE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH conducted a head-and-face anthropometric survey of diverse, civilian respirator users. Of the 3,997 subjects measured using traditional anthropometric techniques, surface scans and 26 three-dimensional (3D landmark locations were collected for 947 subjects. The objective of this study was to report the size and shape variation of the survey participants using the 3D data. Generalized Procrustes Analysis (GPA was conducted to standardize configurations of landmarks associated with individuals into a common coordinate system. The superimposed coordinates for each individual were used as commensurate variables that describe individual shape and were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA to identify population variation. The first four principal components (PC account for 49% of the total sample variation. The first PC indicates that overall size is an important component of facial variability. The second PC accounts for long and narrow or short and wide faces. Longer narrow orbits versus shorter wider orbits can be described by PC3, and PC4 represents variation in the degree of ortho/prognathism. Geometric Morphometrics provides a detailed and interpretable assessment of morphological variation that may be useful in assessing respirators and devising new test and certification standards.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  14. Citrus Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Talon, Manuel; Gmitter, Fred G.Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most widespread fruit crops globally, with great economic and health value. It is among the most difficult plants to improve through traditional breeding approaches. Currently, there is risk of devastation by diseases threatening to limit production and future availability to the human population. As technologies rapidly advance in genomic science, they are quickly adapted to address the biological challenges of the citrus plant system and the world's industries. The hist...

  15. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DXA)? Bone density scanning, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ( ... is today's established standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  16. The function genomics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Genomics is a biology term appeared ten years ago, used to describe the researches of genomic mapping, sequencing, and structure analysis, etc. Genomics, the first journal for publishing papers on genomics research was born in 1986. In the past decade, the concept of genomics has been widely accepted by scientists who are engaging in biology research. Meanwhile, the research scope of genomics has been extended continuously, from simple gene mapping and sequencing to function genomics study. To reflect the change, genomics is divided into two parts now, the structure genomics and the function genomics.

  17. Visualization for genomics: the Microbial Genome Viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, R.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Boekhorst, J.; Molenaar, D.; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY: A Web-based visualization tool, the Microbial Genome Viewer, is presented that allows the user to combine complex genomic data in a highly interactive way. This Web tool enables the interactive generation of chromosome wheels and linear genome maps from genome annotation data stored in a My

  18. Combined bone scintigraphy and indium-111 leukocyte scans in neuropathic foot disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Park, H.M.; Burt, R.W.; Mock, B.H.; Wellman, H.N.

    1988-10-01

    It is difficult to diagnose osteomyelitis in the presence of neurotrophic osteoarthropathy. We performed combined (99mTc)MDP bone scans and indium-111 (111In) leukocyte studies on 35 patients who had radiographic evidence of neuropathic foot disease and clinically suspected osteomyelitis. The (111In)leukocyte study determined if there was an infection and the bone scan provided the anatomic landmarks so that the infection could be localized to the bone or the adjacent soft tissue. Seventeen patients had osteomyelitis and all showed increased (111In)leukocyte activity localized to the bone, giving a sensitivity of 100%. Among the 18 patients without osteomyelitis, eight had no accumulation of (111In)leukocytes, seven had the (111In)leukocyte activity correctly localized to the soft tissue, two had (111In)leukocyte activity mistakenly attributed to the bone, and one had (111In)leukocyte accumulation in a proven neuroma which was mistakenly attributed to bone. These three false-positive results for osteomyelitis reduced the specificity to 83%. Considering only the 27 patients with a positive (111In)leukocyte study, the combined bone scan and (111In)leukocyte study correctly localized the infection to the soft tissues or bone in 89%. Uninfected neurotrophic osteoarthropathy does not accumulate (111In)leukocytes. We found the combined bone scan and (111In) leukocyte study useful for the detection and localization of infection to soft tissue or bone in patients with neuropathic foot disease.

  19. Dating the age of admixture via wavelet transform analysis of genome-wide data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Pugach (Irina); R. Matveyev (Rostislav); A. Wollstein (Andreas); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); M. Stoneking (Mark)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe describe a PCA-based genome scan approach to analyze genome-wide admixture structure, and introduce wavelet transform analysis as a method for estimating the time of admixture. We test the wavelet transform method with simulations and apply it to genome-wide SNP data from eight admixe

  20. Is the omega sign a reliable landmark for the neurosurgical team? An anatomical study about the central sulcus region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thiago; Rodrigues, Mariana; Paz, Daniel; Costa, Marcos Devanir; Santos, Bruno; Braga, Vinicius; Paiva Neto, Manoel de; Centeno, Ricardo; Cavalheiro, Sergio; Chaddad-Neto, Feres

    2015-11-01

    The central sulcus region is an eloquent area situated between the frontal and parietal lobes. During neurosurgical procedures, it is sometimes difficult to understand the cortical anatomy of this region.Objective Find alternative ways to anatomically navigate in this region during neurosurgical procedures.Method We analyzed eighty two human hemispheres using a surgical microscope and completed a review of the literature about central sulcus region.Results In 68/82 hemispheres, the central sulcus did not reach the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus. A knob on the second curve of the precentral gyrus was reliably identified in only 64/82 hemispheres.Conclusion The morphometric data presented in this article can be useful as supplementary method to identify the central sulcus region landmarks.

  1. Verification of selected anatomic landmarks used as reference points for universal goniometer positioning during knee joint mobility range measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, P; Lewandowski, J; Marecki, B

    2001-01-01

    The study was concerned with verification of the selection of reference points used for knee joint mobility range goniometry. The verification was based on photometric and electrogoniometric methods of femorotibial angle measurements. The material for measurements were three knee joint preparations. The obtained data were subjected to descriptive analysis; photographic documentation of geometric relations between the reference points was also prepared. Considerable divergence of measurement results was observed with respect to the actual knee joint flexion angle, amounting even to 16 degrees. The differences are due to the selection of anatomic landmarks, and depend in particular on the distance of the point to which the goniometer axis is applied from the approximate location of the mechanical joint axis. The corrections of knee joint flexion angle measurements were also estimated on the basis of data obtained from the photographs and the derived mathematical formula.

  2. Is the omega sign a reliable landmark for the neurosurgical team? An anatomical study about the central sulcus region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe central sulcus region is an eloquent area situated between the frontal and parietal lobes. During neurosurgical procedures, it is sometimes difficult to understand the cortical anatomy of this region.Objective Find alternative ways to anatomically navigate in this region during neurosurgical procedures.Method We analyzed eighty two human hemispheres using a surgical microscope and completed a review of the literature about central sulcus region.Results In 68/82 hemispheres, the central sulcus did not reach the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus. A knob on the second curve of the precentral gyrus was reliably identified in only 64/82 hemispheres.Conclusion The morphometric data presented in this article can be useful as supplementary method to identify the central sulcus region landmarks.

  3. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giulia M R; Breedijk, Ronald M P; Brandt, Rick A J; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H C; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Azar, Leila Nahidi; Hoebe, Ron A; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik M M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity while maintaining the sectioning capability of a standard confocal microscope. This simple technology is typically useful for biological applications where the combination high-resolution and high-sensitivity is required.

  4. Navigating in small-scale space: the role of landmarks and resource monitoring in understanding saddleback tamarin travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Paul A; Porter, Leila M

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies of spatial memory in wild nonhuman primates indicate that foragers may rely on a combination of navigational strategies to locate nearby and distant feeding sites. When traveling in large-scale space, tamarins are reported to encode spatial information in the form of a route-based map. However, little is known concerning how wild tamarins navigate in small-scale space (between feeding sites located at a distance of ≤60 m). Therefore, we collected data on range use, diet, and the angle and distance traveled to visit sequential feeding sites in the same group of habituated Bolivian saddleback tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis weddelli) in 2009 and 2011. For 7-8 hr a day for 54 observation days, we recorded the location of the study group at 10 min intervals using a GPS unit. We then used GIS software to map and analyze the monkeys' movements and travel paths taken between feeding sites. Our results indicate that in small-scale space the tamarins relied on multiple spatial strategies. In 31% of cases travel was route-based. In the remaining 69% of cases, however, the tamarins appeared to attend to the spatial positions of one or more near-to-site landmarks to relocate feeding sites. In doing so they approached the same feeding site from a mean of 4.5 different directions, frequently utilized different arboreal pathways, and traveled approximately 30% longer than then the straight-line distance. In addition, the monkeys' use of non-direct travel paths allowed them to monitor insect and fruit availability in areas within close proximity of currently used food patches. We conclude that the use of an integrated spatial strategy (route-based travel and attention to near-to-goal landmarks) provides tamarins with the opportunity to relocate productive feeding sites as well as monitor the availability of nearby resources in small-scale space.

  5. Establishing an Environmental Scanning Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James L.

    1985-01-01

    A formal environmental scanning system designed to identify emerging issues, events, or trends threatening or bringing opportunity to an institution is discussed that uses a committee to systematically collect and analyze data from a variety of sources. (MSE)

  6. Heart region segmentation from low-dose CT scans: an anatomy based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Anthony P.; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in developed countries. The concurrent detection of heart diseases during low-dose whole-lung CT scans (LDCT), typically performed as part of a screening protocol, hinges on the accurate quantification of coronary calcification. The creation of fully automated methods is ideal as complete manual evaluation is imprecise, operator dependent, time consuming and thus costly. The technical challenges posed by LDCT scans in this context are mainly twofold. First, there is a high level image noise arising from the low radiation dose technique. Additionally, there is a variable amount of cardiac motion blurring due to the lack of electrocardiographic gating and the fact that heart rates differ between human subjects. As a consequence, the reliable segmentation of the heart, the first stage toward the implementation of morphologic heart abnormality detection, is also quite challenging. An automated computer method based on a sequential labeling of major organs and determination of anatomical landmarks has been evaluated on a public database of LDCT images. The novel algorithm builds from a robust segmentation of the bones and airways and embodies a stepwise refinement starting at the top of the lungs where image noise is at its lowest and where the carina provides a good calibration landmark. The segmentation is completed at the inferior wall of the heart where extensive image noise is accommodated. This method is based on the geometry of human anatomy and does not involve training through manual markings. Using visual inspection by an expert reader as a gold standard, the algorithm achieved successful heart and major vessel segmentation in 42 of 45 low-dose CT images. In the 3 remaining cases, the cardiac base was over segmented due to incorrect hemidiaphragm localization.

  7. Overview of cell-free protein synthesis: historic landmarks, commercial systems, and expanding applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shaorong

    2014-10-01

    During the early days of molecular biology, cell-free protein synthesis played an essential role in deciphering the genetic code and contributed to our understanding of translation of protein from messenger RNA. Owing to several decades of major and incremental improvements, modern cell-free systems have achieved higher protein synthesis yields at lower production costs. Commercial cell-free systems are now available from a variety of material sources, ranging from "traditional" E. coli, rabbit reticulocyte lysate, and wheat germ extracts, to recent insect and human cell extracts, to defined systems reconstituted from purified recombinant components. Although each cell-free system has certain advantages and disadvantages, the diversity of the cell-free systems allows in vitro synthesis of a wide range of proteins for a variety of downstream applications. In the post-genomic era, cell-free protein synthesis has rapidly become the preferred approach for high-throughput functional and structural studies of proteins and a versatile tool for in vitro protein evolution and synthetic biology. This unit provides a brief history of cell-free protein synthesis and describes key advances in modern cell-free systems, practical differences between widely used commercial cell-free systems, and applications of this important technology.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    McKinlay, K.J.; Scotchford, C A; Grant, D M; Oliver, J M; King, John R.; Brown, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of conventional high vacuum scanning electron microscopy (HVSEM), environmental SEM (ESEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in the assessment of cell-material interactions is made. The processing of cells cultured for conventional HVSEM leads to the loss of morphological features that are retained when using ESEM. The use of ESEM in conjunction with CLSM of the labeled cytoskeleton gives an indication of changes to the cell morphology as a consequence of incubation t...

  9. A completed audit cycle of the lateral scan projection radiograph in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA); the impact on scan length and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To investigate the effect of incorporating a lateral scan projection radiograph (topogram) in addition to the standard frontal topogram on excess scan length in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and to quantify the impact on effective dose. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive patients referred for exclusion of pulmonary embolism who had undergone a CTPA examination with conventional frontal topogram to plan scan length (protocol A) were compared with 50 consecutive patients who had undergone a CTPA study with frontal and additional lateral topogram for planning (protocol B) in a retrospective audit. Optimal scan length was defined from lung apex to lung base. Mean excess scan length beyond these landmarks was determined. The mean organ doses to the thyroid, liver, and stomach, as well as mean effective dose, were estimated using standard conversion factors. Results: The mean excess scan length was significantly lower in protocol B compared to the protocol A cohort (19.5 ± 17.4 mm [mean ± standard deviation] versus 39.1 ± 20.4 mm, p < 0.0001). The mean excess scan length below the lung bases was significantly lower in the protocol B cohort compared to the protocol A group (7.5 ± 12.7 mm versus 23 ± 16.6 mm, p < 0.0001), as were the mean organ doses to the stomach (4.24 ± 0.81 mGy versus 5.22 ± 1.06 mGy, p < 0.0001) and liver (5.60 ± 0.64 mGy versus 6.38 ± 0.81 mGy, p < 0.0001). A non-significant reduction in over-scanning above the apices in protocol B was observed compared with protocol A (12 ± 8.8 mm versus 16.2 ± 13.6 mm, p = 0.07), which equated to lower mean thyroid organ dose in (3.28 ± 1.76 mGy versus 4.11 ± 3.11 mGy, p = 0.104). Conclusion: The present audit indicates that incorporation of a lateral topogram into the CTPA protocol, together with radiographer education, reduces excess scan length, which significantly reduces the dose to the liver and stomach, and potentially lowers the dose to the thyroid. This simple

  10. Establishing Cephalometric Landmarks for the Translational Study of Le Fort-based Facial Transplantation in Swine: Enhanced applications using computer-assisted surgery and custom cutting guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Gabriel F.; Susarla, Srinivas M.; Al Rakan, Mohammed; Coon, Devin; Rada, Erin M.; Sarhane, Karim; Shores, Jamie T.; Bonawitz, Steven C.; Cooney, Damon; Sacks, Justin; Murphy, Ryan J.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Brandacher, Gerald; Lee, WP Andrew; Liacouras, Peter; Grant, Gerald; Armand, Mehran; Gordon, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Le Fort-based, maxillofacial allotransplantation is a reconstructive alternative gaining clinical acceptance. However, the vast majority of single-jaw transplant recipients demonstrate less-than-ideal skeletal and dental relationships with suboptimal aesthetic harmony. The purpose of this study was to investigate reproducible cephalometric landmarks in a large animal model, where refinement of computer-assisted planning, intra-operative navigational guidance, translational bone osteotomies, and comparative surgical techniques could be performed. Methods Cephalometric landmarks that could be translated into the human craniomaxillofacial skeleton, and would remain reliable following maxillofacial osteotomies with mid-facial alloflap inset, were sought on six miniature swine. Le Fort I-and Le Fort III-based alloflaps were harvested in swine with osteotomies, and all alloflaps were either auto-replanted or transplanted. Cephalometric analyses were performed on lateral cephalograms pre- and post-operatively. Critical cephalometric data sets were identified with the assistance of surgical planning and virtual prediction software, and evaluated for reliability and translational predictability. Results Several pertinent landmarks and human analogues were identified including pronasale (PRN), zygion (Zy), parietale (PA), gonion (GO), gnathion (GN), lower incisior base (LIB), and alveolare (ALV). PA-PRN-ALV and PA-PRN-LIB were found to be reliable correlates of SNA and SNB measurements in humans, respectively. Conclusions There is a set of reliable cephalometric landmarks and measurement angles pertinent for utilization within a translational large animal model. These craniomaxillofacial landmarks will allow us to develop novel navigational software technology, improve our cutting guide designs, and explore new avenues for investigation and collaboration. Level of Evidence N/A (Large Animal Study) PMID:24445879

  11. Pairagon+N-SCAN_EST: a model-based gene annotation pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wei, Chaochun; Brown, Randall H;

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes Pairagon+N-SCAN_EST, a gene annotation pipeline that uses only native alignments. For each expressed sequence it chooses the best genomic alignment. Systems like ENSEMBL and ExoGean rely on trans alignments, in which expressed sequences are aligned to the genomic loci...... of putative homologs. Trans alignments contain a high proportion of mismatches, gaps, and/or apparently unspliceable introns, compared to alignments of cDNA sequences to their native loci. The Pairagon+N-SCAN_EST pipeline's first stage is Pairagon, a cDNA-to-genome alignment program based on a Pair......HMM probability model. This model relies on prior knowledge, such as the fact that introns must begin with GT, GC, or AT and end with AG or AC. It produces very precise alignments of high quality cDNA sequences. In the genomic regions between Pairagon's cDNA alignments, the pipeline combines EST alignments...

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  13. Genomes on ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhill, Julian

    2016-03-01

    This month's Genome Watch discusses the analysis of a Helicobacter pylori genome from the preserved Copper-Age mummy known as the Iceman and how ancient genomes shed light on the history of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26853114

  14. Environmental Scanning and the Information Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, James; McInerney, Claire

    1990-01-01

    Discusses nine components of an environmental scanning model: selecting the scanning team; selecting resources to scan; choosing criteria for scanning; scanning the resources; identifying signals of new issues; selecting key events/issues; monitoring and analyzing events/issues; disseminating information; and deciding on appropriate organizational…

  15. Interesting bone scans - unusual findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, M.; Wadhwa, S.S.; Mansberg, R.; Fernandes, V.B. [Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-01

    A 59-year-old female with carcinoma of the colon and known liver metastatic disease was referred for bone scan to evaluate for bone metastases. Although no bone metastases were found, there was abnormal uptake noted in the liver corresponding to a metastatic calcified lesion. The only other findings were of degenerative disease in the cervical spine, right shoulder and small joints of the hands. A 69-year-old male with carcinoma of the prostate and right side low back pain was referred for bone scan. No focal abnormalities to suggest metastatic disease were identified; findings within the cervical spine, lumber spine and knees were presumed secondary to degenerative disease. Intermittent pain persisted and the patient was referred for a repeat bone scan six months later. Previous scan findings of degenerative disease and no metastatic disease were confirmed; however, closer inspection revealed an enlarged right kidney with significant retention of tracer in the pelvicalyceal system suggesting possible obstruction. A Retrograde pyelogram was performed, and no obvious obstruction demonstrated. As bone scan findings were very suggestive of obstruction, a DTPA scan with lasix was performed showing a dilated right collecting system with no functional obstruction. Given the degree of dilation, it is possible that the patient experiences intermittent PUJ obstruction causing his symptoms. A 33-year-old male with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and viral arthritis was referred for a bone scan. A three phase revealed increased uptake in the region of the knee and leR proximal tibia. Delayed whole body images revealed multiple focal areas of osteoblastic activity in the leR tibia. Abnormal uptake was also seen in the upper third of the leR femur. The remainder of the skeletal survey was normal. X-ray correlation of the leR tibia and femoral findings was undertaken. Combinating unilateral changes on bone scan and X-ray although very suggestive of sclerotic polyostotic

  16. The boundary-scan handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Kenneth P

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at electronics industry professionals, this 4th edition of the Boundary Scan Handbook describes recent changes to the IEEE1149.1 Standard Test Access Port and Boundary-Scan Architecture. This updated edition features new chapters on the possible effects of the changes on the work of the practicing test engineers and the new 1149.8.1 standard. Anyone needing to understand the basics of boundary scan and its practical industrial implementation will need this book. Provides an overview of the recent changes to the 1149.1 standard and the effect of the changes on the work of test engineers;   Explains the new IEEE 1149.8.1 subsidiary standard and applications;   Describes the latest updates on the supplementary IEEE testing standards. In particular, addresses: IEEE Std 1149.1                      Digital Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.4                      Analog Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.6                      Advanced I/O Testing IEEE Std 1149.8.1           �...

  17. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P. falciparu

  18. Broad scan linkage analysis in a large Tourette family pedigree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffer, A.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wetering, B.J.M. van der [Univ. Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01

    Attempts to find a gene causing Tourette syndrome (TS) using linkage analysis have been unsuccessful even though as much as 65% of the autosomal genetic map has been excluded by the pooled results from several laboratories collaborating worldwide. One reason for this failure may be the misclassification of affection status of marry-in spouses. Specifically, we have found that six unrelated spouses in our Utah TS pedigree suffer from TS, obsessive-compulsive disorder or chronic motor tics. In light of these findings we decided to conduct a complete genomic scan from this Utah kindred with polymorphic markers in three related sibships in which there was no assortative mating. A linkage study assuming autosomal dominant inheritance was done using tetranucleotide repeat markers developed at the University of Utah. We selected markers that were less than 300 bp in size and that gave a heterozygosity of over 70% upon analysis in 4 CEPH families. Results to date with 95 markers run at an interval of 30 cM (covering 61% of the genome) show no evidence of linkage. We intend to extend the coverage to 100% of the genome. Pending completion of this scan, failure to provide evidence of linkage in our TS pedigree might then be attributed to phenotypic misclassification or erroneous assumptions regarding the genetic model of transmission.

  19. Mutation scanning of peach floral genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde H Dayton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation scanning technology has been used to develop crop species with improved traits. Modifications that improve screening throughput and sensitivity would facilitate the targeted mutation breeding of crops. Technical innovations for high-resolution melting (HRM analysis are enabling the clinic-based screening for human disease gene polymorphism. We examined the application of two HRM modifications, COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR, to the mutation scanning of genes in peach, Prunus persica. The targeted genes were the putative floral regulators PpAGAMOUS and PpTERMINAL FLOWER I. Results HRM analysis of PpAG and PpTFL1 coding regions in 36 peach cultivars found one polymorphic site in each gene. PpTFL1 and PpAG SNPs were used to examine approaches to increase HRM throughput. Cultivars with SNPs could be reliably detected in pools of twelve genotypes. COLD-PCR was found to increase the sensitivity of HRM analysis of pooled samples, but worked best with small amplicons. Examination of QMC-PCR demonstrated that primary PCR products for further analysis could be produced from variable levels of genomic DNA. Conclusions Natural SNPs in exons of target peach genes were discovered by HRM analysis of cultivars from a southeastern US breeding program. For detecting natural or induced SNPs in larger populations, HRM efficiency can be improved by increasing sample pooling and template production through approaches such as COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR. Technical advances developed to improve clinical diagnostics can play a role in the targeted mutation breeding of crops.

  20. Scanning Terahertz Heterodyne Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter; Dengler, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging systems are now at an early stage of development. In a basic scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging system, (see Figure 1) two far-infrared lasers generate beams denoted the local-oscillator (LO) and signal that differ in frequency by an amount, denoted the intermediate frequency (IF), chosen to suit the application. The LO beam is sent directly to a mixer as one of two inputs. The signal beam is focused to a spot on or in the specimen. After transmission through or reflection from the specimen, the beams are focused to a spot on a terahertz mixer, which extracts the IF outputs. The specimen is mounted on a translation stage, by means of which the focal spot is scanned across the specimen to build up an image.