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Sample records for lake albert uganda

  1. Transmission studies of intestinal schistosomiasis in Lake Albert, Uganda and experimental compatibility of local Biomphalaria spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazibwe, F.; Makanga, B.; Rubaire-Akiiki, C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite ongoing preventive chemotherapy campaigns, intestinal schistosomiasis is hyper-endemic in shoreline communities living along Lake Albert, Uganda. To provide a deeper insight into the local epidemiology of Schistosoma mansoni, a variety of field-based studies were undertaken focusing upon ...... environmental modification(s), i.e. improvement in sanitation and hygiene and control of snail populations, is needed to bolster the impact of chemotherapy-based interventions....

  2. Chemical and Isotope Compositions of Neogene Hippopotamidae Teeth From Lake Albert (Uganda): Implications for Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmann, G. E.; Brachert, T. C.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2008-12-01

    The Neogene was a period of long-term global cooling and increasing climatic variability on astronomical time scales. Lake systems strongly depend on rainfall patterns and size or geographical distribution of river networks. To unravel environmental change and watershed dynamics in the western branch of the East African Rift (Lake Albert, Uganda) during the Late Neogene, we use proxy data (trace elements, O, C and Sr isotopes) from Hippopotamidae teeth. Laser ablation ICPMS profiles in enamel measured from the outside rim towards the dentin show an asymmetric trace element distribution in that the concentrations continuously decrease by up to 5 orders of magnitude within a distance of about 1 mm until a minimum is reached (migration pathways and palaeoenvironmental changes. On geological time scales δ13C compositions reflect a transition from pure C3 browsers (-11 per mil PDB) at 5 to 6 Ma towards C4 dominated grazers (0 per mil PDB) at 2.0 to 2.5 Ma. The oxygen stable isotope (δ18O) composition of enamel rises from 26 per mil at 5 to 6 Ma to a maximum of 32 per mil SMOW at 2.3 Ma. Increasing δ18O values suggest enhanced evaporation of the lake due to rising aridity. This is in agreement with a synchronous spread of C4 vegetation in the reach of Hippopotamid populations. The Sr isotopic composition of enamel displays a large variation and 87Sr/86Sr is 0.714 about 5 Ma ago, reaches a maximum of 0.717 at about 2.3 Ma and decreases from there on to about 0.708. Thus, Sr and O isotopic compositions correlate with each other on the geological time scale. This is plausible if the Sr isotopic composition of Hippopotamid enamel dominantly reflects the changes of the water chemistry of the lake, and is therefore a powerful tool for tracing ancient hydrological networks. The large variation of the Sr isotope composition can be explained if the lake is fed by different sources: water draining Cenozoic volcanic terrains have low 87Sr/86Sr (~ 0.704), whereas Proterozoic

  3. Les bois fossiles mio-pliocènes de Nkondo (lac Albert, Ouganda), composition minéralogique et mode de formationThe Mio-Pliocene fossil woods from Nkondo (Lake Albert, Uganda), mineralogical composition and formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailler, Delphine; Flicoteaux, René; Ambrosi, Jean-Paul; Médus, Jacques

    2000-08-01

    The fossil wood samples found in the Mio-Pliocene lacustrine sediments of the Nkondo Formation, on the eastern shore of Lake Albert (Uganda), have undergone different mineralisations. The first epigenetic replacement by hematite, goethite and apatite preserved the plant structures, whereas subsequent replacement by goethite erased it. Some precipitations likely to be of microbial origin are associated with the epigenesis in apatite. The characteristics of the different mineralisations reveal that the fossilisation of the wood samples started with their transportation into the lake and continued after their deposition into the ironstone levels that have yielded the fossil woods.

  4. The Lake Albert Rift (uganda, East African Rift System): Deformation, Basin and Relief Evolution Since 17 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendan, Simon; François, Guillocheau; Cécile, Robin; Olivier, Dauteuil; Thierry, Nalpas; Martin, Pickford; Brigitte, Senut; Philippe, Lays; Philippe, Bourges; Martine, Bez

    2016-04-01

    This study is based on a coupled basin infilling study and a landforms analysis of the Lake Albert Rift located at the northern part of the western branch of the East African Rift. The basin infilling study is based on both subsurface data and outcrops analysis. The objective was to (1) obtain an age model based on onshore mammals biozones, (2) to reconstruct the 3D architecture of the rift using sequence stratigraphy correlations and seismic data interpretation, (3) to characterize the deformation and its changes through times and (4) to quantify the accommodation for several time intervals. The infilling essentially consists of isopach fault-bounded units composed of lacustrine deposits wherein were characterized two major unconformities dated at 6.2 Ma (Uppermost Miocene) and 2.7 Ma (Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary), coeval with major subsidence and climatic changes. The landforms analysis is based on the characterization and relative dating (geometrical relationships with volcanism) of Ugandan landforms which consist of stepped planation surfaces (etchplains and peplians) and incised valleys. We here proposed a seven-steps reconstruction of the deformation-erosion-sedimentation relationships of the Lake Albert Basin and its catchments: - 55-45 Ma: formation of laterites corresponding to the African Surface during the very humid period of the Lower-Middle Eocene; - 45-22: stripping of the African Surface in response of the beginning of the East-African Dome uplift and formation of a pediplain which associated base level is the Atlantic Ocean; - 17-2.5 Ma: Initiation of the Lake Albert Basin around 17 Ma and creation of local base levels (Lake Albert, Edward and George) on which three pediplains tend to adapt; - 18 - 16 Ma to 6.2 Ma: "Flexural" stage (subsidence rate: 150-200 m/Ma; sedimentation rate 1.3 km3/Ma between 17 and 12 Ma and 0.6 km3/Ma from 12 to 6 Ma) - depocenters location (southern part of Lake Albert Basin) poorly controlled by fault; - 6.2 Ma to 2

  5. Environmental Epidemiology of Intestinal Schistosomiasis in Uganda: Population Dynamics of Biomphalaria (Gastropoda: Planorbidae in Lake Albert and Lake Victoria with Observations on Natural Infections with Digenetic Trematodes

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    Candia Rowel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study documented the population dynamics of Biomphalaria and associated natural infections with digenetic trematodes, along the shores of Lake Albert and Lake Victoria, recording local physicochemical factors. Over a two-and-a-half-year study period with monthly sampling, physicochemical factors were measured at 12 survey sites and all freshwater snails were collected. Retained Biomphalaria were subsequently monitored in laboratory aquaria for shedding trematode cercariae, which were classified as either human infective (Schistosoma mansoni or nonhuman infective. The population dynamics of Biomphalaria differed by location and by lake and had positive relationship with pH (P<0.001 in both lakes and negative relationship with conductivity (P=0.04 in Lake Albert. Of the Biomphalaria collected in Lake Albert N=6,183, 8.9% were infected with digenetic trematodes of which 15.8% were shedding S. mansoni cercariae and 84.2% with nonhuman infective cercariae. In Lake Victoria, 2.1% of collected Biomphalaria  N=13,172 were infected with digenetic trematodes with 13.9% shedding S. mansoni cercariae, 85.7% shedding nonhuman infective cercariae, and 0.4% of infected snails shedding both types of cercariae. Upon morphological identification, species of Biomphalaria infected included B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. stanleyi in Lake Albert and B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. choanomphala in Lake Victoria. The study found the physicochemical factors that influenced Biomphalaria population and infections. The number and extent of snails shedding S. mansoni cercariae illustrate the high risk of transmission within these lake settings. For better control of this disease, greater effort should be placed on reducing environmental contamination by improvement of local water sanitation and hygiene.

  6. Environmental Epidemiology of Intestinal Schistosomiasis in Uganda: Population Dynamics of Biomphalaria (Gastropoda: Planorbidae) in Lake Albert and Lake Victoria with Observations on Natural Infections with Digenetic Trematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowel, Candia; Fred, Besigye; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose C.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Stothard, J. Russell

    2015-01-01

    This study documented the population dynamics of Biomphalaria and associated natural infections with digenetic trematodes, along the shores of Lake Albert and Lake Victoria, recording local physicochemical factors. Over a two-and-a-half-year study period with monthly sampling, physicochemical factors were measured at 12 survey sites and all freshwater snails were collected. Retained Biomphalaria were subsequently monitored in laboratory aquaria for shedding trematode cercariae, which were classified as either human infective (Schistosoma mansoni) or nonhuman infective. The population dynamics of Biomphalaria differed by location and by lake and had positive relationship with pH (P < 0.001) in both lakes and negative relationship with conductivity (P = 0.04) in Lake Albert. Of the Biomphalaria collected in Lake Albert (N = 6,183), 8.9% were infected with digenetic trematodes of which 15.8% were shedding S. mansoni cercariae and 84.2% with nonhuman infective cercariae. In Lake Victoria, 2.1% of collected Biomphalaria  (N = 13,172) were infected with digenetic trematodes with 13.9% shedding S. mansoni cercariae, 85.7% shedding nonhuman infective cercariae, and 0.4% of infected snails shedding both types of cercariae. Upon morphological identification, species of Biomphalaria infected included B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. stanleyi in Lake Albert and B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. choanomphala in Lake Victoria. The study found the physicochemical factors that influenced Biomphalaria population and infections. The number and extent of snails shedding S. mansoni cercariae illustrate the high risk of transmission within these lake settings. For better control of this disease, greater effort should be placed on reducing environmental contamination by improvement of local water sanitation and hygiene. PMID:25705680

  7. Patterns of intestinal schistosomiasis among mothers and young children from Lake Albert, Uganda: water contact and social networks inferred from wearable global positioning system dataloggers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Y. W. Seto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a national control programme (NCP in Uganda has led to routine treatment of intestinal schistosomiasis with praziquantel in the communities along Lake Albert. However, because regular water contact remains a way of life for these populations, re-infection continues to mitigate the sustainability of the chemotherapy-based programme. A six-month longitudinal study was conducted in one Lake Albert community with the aim of characterizing water contact exposure and infection among mothers and their young preschool-aged children as the latter are not yet formally included within the NCP. At baseline the cohort of 37 mothers, 36 preschool-aged children had infection prevalences of 62% and 67%, respectively, which diminished to 20% and 29%, respectively, at the 6-month post-treatment follow-up. The subjects wore global positioning system (GPS datalogging devices over a 3-day period shortly after baseline, allowing for the estimation of time spent at the lakeshore as an exposure metric, which was found to be associated with prevalence at follow-up (OR = 2.1, P = 0.01 for both mothers and young children and odds ratio (OR = 4.4, P = 0.01 for young children alone. A social network of interpersonal interactions was also derived from the GPS data, and the exposures were positively associated both with the number and duration of peer interaction, suggesting the importance of socio-cultural factors associated with water contact behaviour. The findings illustrate reduction in both prevalence and intensity of infection in this community after treatment as well as remarkably high rates of water contact exposure and re-infection, particularly among younger children. We believe that this should now be formally considered within NCP, which may benefit from more in-depth ethnographic exploration of factors related to water contact as this should provide new opportunities for sustaining control.

  8. Planation surfaces as a record of medium to large wavelength deformation: the example of the Lake Albert Rift (Uganda) on the East African Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendan, Simon; François, Guillocheau; Cécile, Robin; Jean, Braun; Olivier, Dauteuil; Massimo, Dall'Asta

    2016-04-01

    African relief is characterized by planation surfaces, some of them of continental scale. These surfaces are slightly deformed according to different wavelengths (x10 km; x100 km, x1000 km) which record both mantle dynamics (very long wavelength, x 1000 km) and lithosphere deformation (long wavelength deformation, x 100 km). Different types of these planation surfaces are recognized: - Etchplains capped by iron-duricrust which correspond to erosional nearly flat weathered surfaces resulting from the growth of laterites under warm and humid conditions. - Pediments which define mechanical erosional surfaces with concave or rectilinear profiles delimited by upslope scarps connected upstream with the upper landforms. We here focused on the Lake Albert Rift at the northern termination of the western branch of the East African Rift System of which the two branches are surimposed on the East-African Dome. Different wavelengths of deformation were characterized based on the 3D mapping of stepped planation surfaces: (1) very long wavelength deformations resulting from the uplift of the East African Dome; (2) long wavelength deformations resulting from the opening of the eastern branch and (3) medium wavelength deformations represented by the uplift of rift shoulders like the Rwenzori Mountains. The paleo-landscape reconstruction of Uganda shows the existence of four generations of landforms dated according to their geometrical relationships with volcanic rocks. A four stepped evolution of the Ugandan landforms is proposed: • 70 - 22 Ma: generation of two weathered planation surfaces (etchplain Uw and Iw). The upper one (Uw) records a very humid period culminating at time of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (70-45 Ma). It corresponds to the African Surface. A first uplift of the East African Dome generates a second lower planation surface (Iw) connected to the Atlantic Ocean base level; • 17-2.7 Ma: planation of large pediplains connected to the local base level induced

  9. Risk estimates for children and pregnant women exposed to mercury-contaminated Oreochromis niloticus and Lates niloticus in Lake Albert Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Tamale; Francis, Ejobi; Charles, Muyanja; Irene, Naigaga; Jesca, Nakavuma; Ocaido, Micheal; Drago, Kato; Celsus, Sente; Deborah, Amulen; Rumbeiha, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Exposure to mercury contaminated fish predisposes populations particularly children and pregnant women to various health hazards including neurotoxicity, reproductive abnormalities and cognitive disorders. Earlier studies in the Lake Albert community have demonstrated the presence of mercury in Nile tilapia and Nile perch. However, the risk estimates for vulnerable groups such as Children and pregnant women is not well documented. Secondary data-set from previous studies were employed comprising family household size and fish consumption history, fish consumption quantity and frequency and mercury levels in fish species in comparison with FAO/WHO guidelines. Data collected was used to establish the hazard quotients (HQs) for the vulnerable group and the general population. A risk model was developed using iRISK to demonstrate the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for eating different parts of the fish (muscle and bellyfat). HQ values (HQ = 2.05) above one for the vulnerable group were realized especially with Nile perch muscle. The highest DALYs (0.111) was obtained with tilapia muscle consumption. The study outcome reveals that vulnerable populations are at risk of non-carcinogenic complications. Therefore, there is a need for sensitization of the community especially the vulnerable groups about risks associated with consuming mercury-contaminated fish.

  10. Object-based 3D geomodel with multiple constraints for early Pliocene fan delta in the south of Lake Albert Basin, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xu; Lei, Fang; Xinye, Zhang; Pengfei, Wang; Xiaoli, Yang; Xipu, Yang; Jun, Liu

    2017-01-01

    The early Pliocene fan delta complex developed in the south of Lake Albert Basin which is located at the northern end of the western branch in the East African Rift System. The stratigraphy of this succession is composed of distributary channels, overbank, mouthbar and lacustrine shales. Limited by the poor seismic quality and few wells, it is full of challenge to delineate the distribution area and patterns of reservoir sands. Sedimentary forward simulation and basin analogue were applied to analyze the spatial distribution of facies configuration and then a conceptual sedimentary model was constructed by combining with core, heavy mineral and palynology evidences. A 3D geological model of a 120 m thick stratigraphic succession was built using well logs and seismic surfaces based on the established sedimentary model. The facies modeling followed a hierarchical object-based approach conditioned to multiple trend constraints like channel intensity, channel azimuth and channel width. Lacustrine shales were modeled as background facies and then in turn eroded by distribute channels, overbank and mouthbar respectively. At the same time a body facies parameter was created to indicate the connectivity of the reservoir sands. The resultant 3D facies distributions showed that the distributary channels flowed from east bounding fault to west flank and overbank was adhered to the fringe of channels while mouthbar located at the end of channels. Furthermore, porosity and permeability were modeled using sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS) honoring core observations and petrophysical interpretation results. Despite the poor seismic is not supported to give enough information for fan delta sand distribution, creating a truly representative 3D geomodel is still able to be achieved. This paper highlights the integration of various data and comprehensive steps of building a consistent representative 3D geocellular fan delta model used for numeral simulation studies and field

  11. Compatibility of Ugandan Schistosoma mansoni isolates with Biomphalaria snail species from Lake Albert and Lake Victoria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriko, Moses; Standley, Claire J.; Tinkitina, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the capacity of being intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the Ugandan F1 generation of Biomphalaria snail species that were laboratory-bred from parent populations originally collected from either Lake Victoria or Lake Albert was challenged with sympatric and non......-sympatric S. mansoni isolates. After a prepatent period of 20 days, a daily 10-hourly snail shedding for cercariae was done to determine the infection rate, cercarial production per hour and survival period of infected snails. The study suggests that when parasite strains from a different geographical origin...... is used for infection, survival of infected snails increase, leading to an increased transmission potential. Although earlier literature had indicated that the Lake Victoria Biomphalaria sudanica is refractory to S. mansoni, we showed that all Ugandan Biomphalaria spp., including B. sudanica from all...

  12. Extreme drought causes distinct water acidification and eutrophication in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert), Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T.; Mao, Rong; Xiong, Lihua; Ye, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Droughts are set to increase in frequency and magnitude with climate change and water extraction, and understanding their influence on ecosystems is urgent in the Holocene. Low rainfall across the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia resulted in an unprecedented water level decline in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert) at the downstream end of the river system. A comprehensive data covering pre-drought (2004-2006), drought (2007-2010) and post-drought (2010-2013) was firstly used to unravel drought effects on water quality in the contrasting main parts and margins of the two Lakes, particularly following water acidification resulting from acid sulfate soil oxidation. Salinity, nutrients and Chl-a significantly increased during the drought in the Lake main waterbody, while pH remained stable or showed minor shifts. In contrast to the Lake Alexandrina, total dissolved solid (TDS) and electrical conductivity (EC) during the post-drought more than doubled the pre-drought period in the Lake Albert as being a terminal lake system with narrow and shallow entrance. Rewetting of the exposed pyrite-containing sediment resulted in very low pH (below 3) in Lake margins, which positively contributed to salinity increases via SO42- release and limestone dissolution. Very acidic water (pH 2-3) was neutralised naturally by lake refill, but aerial limestone dosing was required for neutralisation of water acidity during the drought period. The Lower Lakes are characterized as hypereutrophic with much higher salinity, nutrient and algae concentrations than guideline levels for aquatic ecosystem. These results suggest that, in the Lower Lakes, drought could cause water quality deterioration through water acidification and increased nutrient and Chl-a concentrations, more effective water management in the lake catchment is thus crucial to prevent the similar water quality deterioration since the projected intensification of droughts. A comparative assessment on lake

  13. Schistosomiasis transmission at high altitude crater lakes in Western Uganda

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    Philbert Clouds

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contrary to previous reports which indicated no transmission of schistosomiasis at altitude >1,400 m above sea level in Uganda, in this study it has been established that schistosomiasis transmission can take place at an altitude range of 1487–1682 m above sea level in western Uganda. Methods An epidemiological survey of intestinal schistosomiasis was carried out in school children staying around 13 high altitude crater lakes in Western Uganda. Stool samples were collected and then processed with the Kato-Katz technique using 42 mg templates. Thereafter schistosome eggs were counted under a microscope and eggs per gram (epg of stool calculated. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain demographic data and information on risk factors. Results 36.7% of the pupils studied used crater lakes as the main source of domestic water and the crater lakes studied were at altitude ranging from 1487–1682 m above sea level. 84.6% of the crater lakes studied were infective with over 50% of the users infected. The overall prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni infection was 27.8% (103/370 with stool egg load ranging from 24–6048 per gram of stool. 84.3%( 312 had light infections (400 egg/gm of stool. Prevalence was highest in the age group 12–14 years (49.5% and geometric mean intensity was highest in the age group 9–11 years (238 epg. The prevalence and geometric mean intensity of infection among girls was lower (26%; 290 epg compared to that of boys (29.6%; 463 epg (t = 4.383, p Conclusion and recommendations The altitudinal threshold for S. mansoni transmission in Uganda has changed and use of crater water at an altitude higher than 1,400 m above sea level poses a risk of acquiring S. mansoni infection in western Uganda. However, further research is required to establish whether the observed altitudinal threshold change is as a result of climate change or other factors. It is also necessary to establish the impact this could

  14. Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Uganda occupies 94,354 square miles in central Africa, bounded by Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Zaire, and Sudan. It includes part of Lake Victoria, and the Ruwenzori mountains are on its border with Zaire. The country is largely on a plateau and thus has a pleasant climate. 12% of the land is devoted to national parks and game preserves. The northeast is semiarid; the southwest and west are rainy. The population of 15,900,896, growing at 3.7% a year, is mostly rural and is composed of 3 ethnic groups: The Bantu, including the Buganda, the Banyankole and the Basoga; the Nilo-Hamitic Iteso; and the Nilots. There are also some Asians and Arabs. The official language is English, but Luganda and Swahili are widely used. The majority of the people are Christian. Literacy is about 52%, and 57% of school-age children attend primary school. Infant mortality rate is 108/1000, and life expectancy is 49 years. The 1st Englishman to see Uganda was Captain John Speke in 1862. The Kingdom of Buganda became a British protectorate in 1894, and the protectorate was extended to the rest of the country in 1896. In the 1950s the British began an africanization of the government prior to formal independence, but the 1st general elections in 1961 were boycotted by the Bugandans, who wanted autonomy. In the 2nd election, in March, 1962, the Democratic Party, led by Benedicto Kiwanuka, defeated the Uganda People's Congress (UPC), led by Apollo Milton Obote; however, a month later, the UPC allied with the Buganda traditionalists, the Kabaka Yekka, and formed a collision government under Obote. Uganda became independent in 1962 with the King of Buganda, Sir Edward Frederick Mutesa II as president. Political rivalries continued, and in 1966 Prime Minister Obote suspended the constitution, and the Buganda government lost its semiautonomy. Obote's government was overthrown in 1971 by Idi Amin Dada, under whose 8-year reign of terror 100,000 Ugandans were murdered. Amin was ousted by an invading

  15. An Agroforestry Design for the Model Ecovillage at the Lake Victoria,Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 舞

    2008-01-01

    This is a presentation of an agroforestry design proposal for the Model Ecovillage-A University at Lake Victoria and Islands project site in Kaazi-Busabala, Uganda. This is a collaborative project currently taking place between Tenri University and Makerere University, and supported and funded by the Ambassador of the Republic of Uganda to Japan. The proposal seeks to convey the importance of and the potential for an agroforestry design for the overall success of the project. It is based on a...

  16. Fingerponds: managing nutrients and primary productivity for enhanced fish production in Lake Victoria's wetlands, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaggwa, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Fingerponds are earthen ponds dug at the edge of natural wetlands and stocked naturally with wild fish during flooding. In this study, the management of nutrients and primary productivity in enhancing fish production in these systems is examined in Lake Victorias wetlands, Uganda. Key factors determ

  17. Economic viabilty of fishing enterprises on Lake Victoria, Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Wegoye, J.; Kaidhiwa, M.

    2005-01-01

    Fishing in Uganda are largely developed into comericially oriented activity as a result of the fish export trade that started in the late 1980's. Despite this rapid commercialization,poverty level among fishing communities have remained relatively high thus raising concerns about the profitability of fishing. An analysis of the costs, earnings and profitability of the various fishing enterprises in Uganda was undertaken to address this concern.

  18. Perceptions about mercury and lead in fish consumed in Lake Albert fishing communities Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Tamale; Francis, Ejobi; Charles, Muyanja; Naigaga, Irene; Jesca, Nakavuma; Micheal, Ocaido; Anne, Katuhoire; Deborah, Amulen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fish consumption is a lifestyle in fishing communities influenced by individual and communal perceptions. However, information about individual perceptions about fish consumption in the vulnerable fishing community in a developing country is lacking. Without this study, the benefits of fish consumption in a vulnerable community may not be realized. Data collection was executed using key informant interviews and survey structured questionnaires. The key informants include fisheries, community development, veterinary, community and environmental officers. The household heads were the respondents. The Qualitative data was organized and queried using QSR Nvivo 10 and quantitative data analyzed with SPSS version 22. The perceived benefits of eating fish are health, income, nutrition and manhood. The perceived risks are Stigma and ill health. The factors increasing fish consumption are heedless of fish consumption benefits (p = 0.041) and household size i.e. number of adults more than seven (p = 0.020). Those decreasing are methods of preparation of fish i.e. boiling and frying (p = 0.019 and p = 0.010) and oblivious about organizations dealing with fishing activities (p = 0.029). An awareness campaign is needed to demystify the health benefits and fallacies of fish consumption. The knowledge on individual perceptions associated with fish consumption will increase fish consumption but with fewer risks.

  19. Albert's Alphabet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Ann R.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how she introduced a lesson called Albert's Alphabet to her kindergarten students. This lesson introduces the design thinking process to kindergartners in a developmentally appropriate way. She began the lesson by reading Leslie Tyron's book "Albert's Alphabet," which tells the story of Albert Goose,…

  20. Albert Camus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hopenhayn, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Based on the death of Albert Camus, occurred on January 4th 1960 because of a car accident, the author writes the following short-text, where he relates the event to others suggesting possible and curious coincidences...

  1. Impact of tailings from the Kilembe copper mining district on Lake George, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owor, Michael; Hartwig, Tina; Muwanga, Andrew; Zachmann, Dieter; Pohl, Walter

    2007-01-01

    The abandoned Kilembe copper mine in western Uganda is a source of contaminants, mobilised from mine tailings into R. Rukoki flowing through a belt of wetlands into Lake George. Water and sediments were investigated on the lakeshore and the lakebed. Metal associations in the sediments reflect the Kilembe sulphide mineralisation. Enrichment of metals was compared between lakebed sediments, both for wet and dry seasons. Total C in a lakebed core shows a general increment, while Cu and Co decrease with depth. The contaminants are predominant (> 65%) in the ≤ 63 μm sediment size range with elevated Cu and Zn (> 28%), while Ni, Pb and Co are low (extraction of Fe for lakeshore sediment samples reveals low Fe mobility. Relatively higher mobility and biological availability is seen for Co, Cu and S. Heavy metal contents in lake waters are not an immediate risk to the aquatic environment.

  2. Chequered fortunes in global exports: The sociogenesis of African entrepreneurship in the Nile Perch Business at Lake Victoria, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuving, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at African entrepreneurship in the Nile perch export business at Lake Victoria, Uganda. Often heralded as an economic success story, this business has perhaps another tale to tell. The fishermen, traders and other small-scale entrepreneurs at the lower end of the export chain face

  3. Seroepidemiological investigation of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotypes in cattle around Lake Mburo National Park in South-Western Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwiine, Frank Norbert; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Alexandersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks in cattle occur annually in Uganda. In this study the authors investigated antibodies against FMD virus (FMDV) in cattle in surrounding areas of Lake Mburo National Park in South-western Uganda. Two hundred and eleven serum samples from 23 cattle herds were...

  4. Albert Einstein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    泓桀

    2006-01-01

    Albert Einstein (1879-1955) was a German-born Jewish theoretical physicist, who contributed more than any other scientist since Sir Isaac Newton to our understanding of physical reality. In 2000 Times Magazire named him the leading figure of the 20th century.

  5. Albert Hirschman

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    Amartya Sen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is part of the special issue of the journal, including the proceedings of the conference "Albert Hirschman scienziato sociale" held in Rome at the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei. The author comments upon his personal relations (both family ties and professional relations with Hirschman, and discusses the latter's economic and social thought in opposition to the economic mainstream.

  6. Tsetse fly (G. f. fuscipes) distribution in the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mugenyi; Wardrop, Nicola A; Atkinson, Peter M; Torr, Steve J; Welburn, Susan C

    2015-04-01

    Tsetse flies transmit trypanosomes, the causative agent of human and animal African trypanosomiasis. The tsetse vector is extensively distributed across sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosomiasis maintenance is determined by the interrelationship of three elements: vertebrate host, parasite and the vector responsible for transmission. Mapping the distribution and abundance of tsetse flies assists in predicting trypanosomiasis distributions and developing rational strategies for disease and vector control. Given scarce resources to carry out regular full scale field tsetse surveys to up-date existing tsetse maps, there is a need to devise inexpensive means for regularly obtaining dependable area-wide tsetse data to guide control activities. In this study we used spatial epidemiological modelling techniques (logistic regression) involving 5000 field-based tsetse-data (G. f. fuscipes) points over an area of 40,000 km2, with satellite-derived environmental surrogates composed of precipitation, temperature, land cover, normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) and elevation at the sub-national level. We used these extensive tsetse data to analyse the relationships between presence of tsetse (G. f. fuscipes) and environmental variables. The strength of the results was enhanced through the application of a spatial autologistic regression model (SARM). Using the SARM we showed that the probability of tsetse presence increased with proportion of forest cover and riverine vegetation. The key outputs are a predictive tsetse distribution map for the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda and an improved understanding of the association between tsetse presence and environmental variables. The predicted spatial distribution of tsetse in the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda will provide significant new information to assist with the spatial targeting of tsetse and trypanosomiasis control.

  7. Tsetse fly (G. f. fuscipes distribution in the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugenyi Albert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies transmit trypanosomes, the causative agent of human and animal African trypanosomiasis. The tsetse vector is extensively distributed across sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosomiasis maintenance is determined by the interrelationship of three elements: vertebrate host, parasite and the vector responsible for transmission. Mapping the distribution and abundance of tsetse flies assists in predicting trypanosomiasis distributions and developing rational strategies for disease and vector control. Given scarce resources to carry out regular full scale field tsetse surveys to up-date existing tsetse maps, there is a need to devise inexpensive means for regularly obtaining dependable area-wide tsetse data to guide control activities. In this study we used spatial epidemiological modelling techniques (logistic regression involving 5000 field-based tsetse-data (G. f. fuscipes points over an area of 40,000 km2, with satellite-derived environmental surrogates composed of precipitation, temperature, land cover, normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI and elevation at the sub-national level. We used these extensive tsetse data to analyse the relationships between presence of tsetse (G. f. fuscipes and environmental variables. The strength of the results was enhanced through the application of a spatial autologistic regression model (SARM. Using the SARM we showed that the probability of tsetse presence increased with proportion of forest cover and riverine vegetation. The key outputs are a predictive tsetse distribution map for the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda and an improved understanding of the association between tsetse presence and environmental variables. The predicted spatial distribution of tsetse in the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda will provide significant new information to assist with the spatial targeting of tsetse and trypanosomiasis control.

  8. stocks in Lake Albert

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Mobutu Sese Seko is a sensitive environment of .... The price per kilogram of each of the two species was recorded. Individual lengths ... length classes of fish (Nikolsky, 1963;. Bagenal and ..... environmental and social overview. tullow oil Plc ...

  9. Albert Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson-Harding, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Albert Einstein's studies and findings are world renowned, and this beginner biography walks elementary readers through the life of one of history's most amazing scientists. With many color photos, the book details his early life and struggles in Germany. Readers will learn about Einstein's personal life in Germany and Italy. His major scientific achievements are clearly and simply explained, as are general physics terms. Readers will enjoy this lively life story and are apt to be inspired by Einstein's achievements and determination.

  10. Albert Einstein

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Escobar, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    En 2015/16 se conmemoran cien años de la Teoría de la Relatividad General de Albert Einstein, el científico más conocido y popular del siglo XX. Diez años antes, había introducido la Teoría de la Relatividad Especial, en un estudio sobre el movimiento de cuerpos en ausencia de un campo gravitatorio y electromagnetismo, y en noviembre de 1915 presentaba en la Academia Prusiana de las Ciencias su Teoría de la Relatividad General, en la que Einstein revoluciona la física de Newton y proporciona...

  11. Albert Einstein

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Escobar, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    En 2015/16 se conmemoran cien años de la Teoría de la Relatividad General de Albert Einstein, el científico más conocido y popular del siglo XX. Diez años antes, había introducido la Teoría de la Relatividad Especial, en un estudio sobre el movimiento de cuerpos en ausencia de un campo gravitatorio y electromagnetismo, y en noviembre de 1915 presentaba en la Academia Prusiana de las Ciencias su Teoría de la Relatividad General, en la que Einstein revoluciona la física de Newton y proporciona...

  12. Habitat niche community-level analysis of an amphibian assemblage at Lake Nabugabo, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Behangana

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Community structure was studied across six different habitat types in an amphibian assemblage constituted by 24 species belonging to five families, from Lake Nabugabo, Uganda. We employed a suite of different statistical methods, including univariate, multivariate, and Monte Carlo procedures to investigate the randomness/nonrandomness and the seasonal effects (wet versus dry season of the community assembly. We calculated for each species in each habitat type an index of relative abundance by using a time constrained counting technique, with 48 1-h counts for each habitat type. Co-occurrence was analysed by C score with 30 000 simulations; resource partitioning patterns by RA2 and RA3 algorithms with 30 000 simulations; and apparent dissimilarity among species in terms of habitat use by UPGMA dendrograms. After pooling data from wet and dry seasons, it resulted that the amphibian community was non-randomly assembled according to C-score analyses, but both RA2 and RA3 were unable to uncover any competitive structure for the dataset. Seasonal effects were evident, and although C score analyses confirmed a nonrandom structure for the community under study (particularly in wet season, RA3 showed that species with high relative abundance tended to significantly concentrate in one habitat type (swamp forest rather than to partition the habitat resource. UPGMA dendrograms grouped the species differently in dry versus wet seasons. Overall, the comparative evidence of 1 non-random community structure according to C-score analysis, and 2 absence of resource partitioning according to niche overlap null models analysis, suggests that community organization in Lake Nabugabo amphibians is generated by habitat affinities rather than by interspecific competition.

  13. Use of Modern Family Planning Methods in Fishing Communities of Lake Victoria, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annet Nanvubya

    Full Text Available Fishing communities (FCs in Uganda have high HIV infection rates but poor access to health services including family planning (FP. Although FP is a cost-effective public health intervention, there is a paucity of data on knowledge and use of modern FP in FCs. This study determined knowledge and use of modern FP methods in FCs of Uganda.Data were accrued from a 12-month follow up of 1,688 HIV-uninfected individuals, 18-49 years from 8 FCs along Lake Victoria, between September 2011 and March 2013. Data on knowledge and use of modern FP were collected through a semi-structured questionnaire. Prevalence Risk Ratios with corresponding 95% CIs were used to determine factors associated with Modern FP knowledge and use.The mean age was 31.4 years, with nearly half (48.8% being females while more than half (58.6% had attained up to primary education level. Knowledge of modern FP was high, 87.5% (1477/1688; significantly higher among females [adj. PRR = 4.84 (95% CI; 3.08, 7.61], among older respondents (25-29 years [adj. PRR = 1.83 (95% CI; 1.12, 2.99] compared to younger ones (18-24 years and among those conducting business [adj. PRR = 2.42(95% CI; 1.02, 5.74] relative to those primarily in fishing. Just over a third (35.2%, 595/1688 reported use of at least one modern FP method. Use of modern FP methods was significantly higher among females [adj. PRR = 2.04 (95% CI; 1.56, 2.65, and among those reporting multiple sexual partnerships [adj. PRR = 2.12, 95% CI; 1.63, 2.76]. Nonuse of modern methods was mostly due to desire for more children (30.6%, fear of side effects (12.2% and partner refusal (5.2%.Despite their high knowledge of FP, FCs have low use of modern FP methods. Key barriers to use of modern FP methods were high fertility desires, fear of perceived side effects and partner refusal of methods.

  14. Organochlorine pesticide residues in sediments from the Uganda side of Lake Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasswa, John; Kiremire, Bernard T; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter; Mbabazi, Jolocam; Ssebugere, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Organochlorine (OC) residues were analysed in 117 sediment samples collected from four bays of the Uganda side of Lake Victoria. The sediments were collected with a corer at a depth of 0-20 cm, and extracted for OC residues using a solid dispersion method. The extracts were cleaned using gel permeation chromatography and analysed for pesticide residues using a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with an electron capture detector. The results were confirmed using a GC equipped with a mass spectrometer (MS). A total of 16 OC residues, most of them persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were identified and quantified. The OC residue levels were expressed on an oven dry weight (d.w.) basis. Endosulphan sulphate, in the range of 0.82-5.62 μg kg⁻¹ d.w., was the most frequently detected residue. Aldrin and dieldrin were in the ranges of 0.22-15.96 and 0.94-7.18 μg kg⁻¹ d.w., respectively. DDT and its metabolites lay between 0.11-3.59 for p,p'-DDE, 0.38-4.02 for p,p'-DDD, 0.04-1.46 for p,p'-DDT, 0.07-2.72 for o,p'-DDE and 0.01-1.63 μg kg⁻¹ d.w. for o,p'-DDT. The levels of γ-HCH varied from 0.05 to 5.48 μg kg⁻¹ d.w. Heptachlor was detected only once at a level of 0.81 μg kg⁻¹ d.w., while its photo-oxidation product, heptachlor epoxide, ranged between non-detectable (ND) to 3.19 μg kg⁻¹ d.w. Chlordane ranged from ND to 0.76 μg kg⁻¹ d.w. Based on the threshold effect concentration (TEC) for fresh water ecosystems, aldrin and dieldrin were the only OCs that seemed to be a threat to the lake environment.

  15. Human impacts, climate change, and aquatic ecosystem response during the past 2000 yr at Lake Wandakara, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James M.; McCoy, S. J.; Verschuren, D.; Bessems, I.; Huang, Y.

    2009-11-01

    Analyses of carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of terrestrial leaf waxes and the carbon and nitrogen abundance, ratio, and isotopic composition of bulk sediments from Lake Wandakara, a crater lake in western Uganda, East Africa, document human and climatic controls on the aquatic system and on the surrounding terrestrial vegetation during the past two millennia. Our data indicate that Wandakara was a relatively stable, productive lake surrounded by C 3 vegetation from AD 70 to 1000. Abrupt changes in the δ 13C of terrestrial leaf waxes indicate a series of abrupt shifts in the relative abundance of C 3 and C 4 vegetation caused by a combination of climate change and human activities around Wandakara beginning at AD 1000. Abrupt shifts in bulk sediment organic geochemistry, particularly C/N ratios and δ 15N, indicate that human activities at this time caused permanent changes in the limnology of Lake Wandakara, including eutrophication. Our results suggest that the biogeochemistry of Lake Wandakara was more sensitive to shifting human impacts than to climate variations during the past millennium, highlighting the importance of understanding the intensity of pre-colonial human impacts on Africa's aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Elementary, Dear Albert

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Elementary, Dear Albert! fiction based upon every physicist's dream: have a chat with Albert Einstein. Starring theoretical physicist Alvaro de Rujula in the role of Dr. Nuts and experimental physicist Federico Antinori in the role of Albert Einstein. Directed by Silvano de Gennaro

  17. Perceptions of HIV and Safe Male Circumcision in High HIV Prevalence Fishing Communities on Lake Victoria, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Paul E; Pfeiffer, James; Kibira, Simon P S; Lubinga, Solomon J; Mukose, Aggrey; Babigumira, Joseph B

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health introduced its Safe Male Circumcision (SMC) strategy for HIV prevention with the goal of providing 4.2 million voluntary medical male circumcisions by 2015. Fishing communities, where HIV prevalence is approximately 3-5 times higher than the national average, have been identified as a key population needing targeted HIV prevention services by the National HIV Prevention Strategy. This study aimed to understand perceptions of HIV and identify potential barriers and facilitators to SMC in fishing communities along Lake Victoria. We conducted 8 focus group discussions, stratified by sex and age, with 67 purposefully sampled participants in 4 communities in Kalangala District, Uganda. There was universal knowledge of the availability of SMC services, but males reported high uptake in the community while females indicated that it is low. Improved hygiene, disease prevention, and improved sexual performance and desirability were reported facilitators. Barriers included a perceived increase in SMC recipients' physiological libido, post-surgical abstinence, lost income during convalescence, and lengthier recovery due to occupational hazards. Both males and females reported concerns about spousal fidelity during post-SMC abstinence. Reported misconceptions and community-held cultural beliefs include fear that foreskins are sold after their removal, the belief that a SMC recipient's first sexual partner after the procedure should not be his spouse, and the belief that vaginal fluids aid circumcision wound healing. Previous outreach efforts have effectively reached these remote communities, where availability and health benefits of SMC are widely understood. However, community-specific intervention strategies are needed to address the barriers identified in this study. We recommend the development of targeted counseling, outreach, and communication strategies to address barriers, misconceptions, and community-held beliefs. Interventions

  18. Perceptions of HIV and Safe Male Circumcision in High HIV Prevalence Fishing Communities on Lake Victoria, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Nevin

    Full Text Available In 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health introduced its Safe Male Circumcision (SMC strategy for HIV prevention with the goal of providing 4.2 million voluntary medical male circumcisions by 2015. Fishing communities, where HIV prevalence is approximately 3-5 times higher than the national average, have been identified as a key population needing targeted HIV prevention services by the National HIV Prevention Strategy. This study aimed to understand perceptions of HIV and identify potential barriers and facilitators to SMC in fishing communities along Lake Victoria.We conducted 8 focus group discussions, stratified by sex and age, with 67 purposefully sampled participants in 4 communities in Kalangala District, Uganda.There was universal knowledge of the availability of SMC services, but males reported high uptake in the community while females indicated that it is low. Improved hygiene, disease prevention, and improved sexual performance and desirability were reported facilitators. Barriers included a perceived increase in SMC recipients' physiological libido, post-surgical abstinence, lost income during convalescence, and lengthier recovery due to occupational hazards. Both males and females reported concerns about spousal fidelity during post-SMC abstinence. Reported misconceptions and community-held cultural beliefs include fear that foreskins are sold after their removal, the belief that a SMC recipient's first sexual partner after the procedure should not be his spouse, and the belief that vaginal fluids aid circumcision wound healing.Previous outreach efforts have effectively reached these remote communities, where availability and health benefits of SMC are widely understood. However, community-specific intervention strategies are needed to address the barriers identified in this study. We recommend the development of targeted counseling, outreach, and communication strategies to address barriers, misconceptions, and community-held beliefs

  19. Albert Nawahi Like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Warren

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Albert Nawahi Like, Hawai'i Department of Education teacher from 1927 to 1965. Albert Nawahi Like was born 1900 in Honolulu's Chinatown. When Like was eight years old, his family moved to Kalihi. After the death in 1912 of his father, Edward Like, who was editor of the Hawaiian-language newspaper "Ke…

  20. Albert Einstein: Rebellious Wunderkind

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2012-01-01

    Childhood and Schooldays: Albert Einstein, and the family members seemed to have exaggerated the story of Albert who developed slowly, learned to talk late, and whose parents thought he was abnormal. These and other stories were adopted by biographers as if they really happened in the form that Albert and his sister told them. Hence biographers were inspired by them to create a mythical public image of Albert Einstein. Albert had tendency toward temper tantrums, the young impudent rebel Einstein had an impulsive and upright nature. He rebelled against authority and refused to learn by rote. He could not easily bring himself to study what did not interest him at school, especially humanistic subjects. And so his sister told the story that his Greek professor, to whom he once submitted an especially poor paper, went so far in his anger to declare that nothing would ever become of him. Albert learned subjects in advance when it came to sciences; and during the vacation of a few months from school, Albert indepen...

  1. Wetland vegetation and nutrient retention in Nakivubo and Kirinya wetlands in the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, P.; Kansiime, F.; Mucunguzi, P.; Kateyo, E.

    Wetlands form an important part of the catchment area of the African Great Lakes and protect water resources therein. One of the most important functions is the retention of nutrients from the inflowing water from the catchment, by wetland plants which store them in their phytomass. An assessment of the capacity in storing nutrients by dominant plants ( Cyeprus papyrus, Miscanthus violaceus, Phragmites mauritianus and Colocasia C. esculenta), of Nakivubo and Kirinya wetlands at the shores of Lake Victoria in Uganda, was studied through the determination of phytomass production and nutrient concentration in the plant parts at different stages of growth. The above ground phytomass production increased rapidly during the exponential growth for C. papyrus and P. mauritianus. In all the dominant plants, nitrogen concentration was highest in juvenile plants and decreased with increasing age. The most pronounced nitrogen level occurred in the young umbels of C. papyrus during the first month of growth with total nitrogen content of 1.95% DW which dropped to 0.62% DW after the fifth month in Nakivubo wetland. Corms (tubers) of yams had the highest nitrogen content in Kirinya and Nakivubo wetlands exhibiting respective values of 4.8% DW and 3.7% DW. There is a close relationship between nutrient content and increase in phytomass. In Nakivubo and Kirinya wetlands, the rapid increase in phytomass during the third and fourth month corresponded with high nutrient levels. Since plants store significant amounts of nitrogen during their growth, periodic harvesting of above ground plant parts can remove significant amounts of nutrients (during the first five months of growth) from the wastewater flowing into the two wetlands. Wetland plant species with high phytomass productivity and well developed root systems and ability to withstand flooding are the best in nutrient removal.

  2. Signets Albert Camus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard, Poul Søren

    2010-01-01

    Liste med relevant information om den franske forfatter og Nobelprismodtager Albert Camus - fremstillet i forbindelse med 50-året for forfatterens død og i forbindelse med en konference om forfatteren på Syddansk Universitet......Liste med relevant information om den franske forfatter og Nobelprismodtager Albert Camus - fremstillet i forbindelse med 50-året for forfatterens død og i forbindelse med en konference om forfatteren på Syddansk Universitet...

  3. Signets Albert Camus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard, Poul Søren

    2010-01-01

    Liste med relevant information om den franske forfatter og Nobelprismodtager Albert Camus - fremstillet i forbindelse med 50-året for forfatterens død og i forbindelse med en konference om forfatteren på Syddansk Universitet......Liste med relevant information om den franske forfatter og Nobelprismodtager Albert Camus - fremstillet i forbindelse med 50-året for forfatterens død og i forbindelse med en konference om forfatteren på Syddansk Universitet...

  4. Cholera outbreak caused by drinking lake water contaminated with human faeces in Kaiso Village, Hoima District, Western Uganda, October 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguttu, David W; Okullo, A; Bwire, G; Nsubuga, P; Ario, A R

    2017-10-10

    On 12 October 2015, a cholera outbreak involving 65 cases and two deaths was reported in a fishing village in Hoima District, Western Uganda. Despite initial response by the local health department, the outbreak persisted. We conducted an investigation to identify the source and mode of transmission, and recommend evidence-led interventions to control and prevent cholera outbreaks in this area. We defined a suspected case as the onset of acute watery diarrhoea from 1 October to 2 November 2015 in a resident of Kaiso Village. A confirmed case was a suspected case who had Vibrio cholerae isolated from stool. We found cases by record review and active community case finding. We performed descriptive epidemiologic analysis for hypothesis generation. In an unmatched case-control study, we compared exposure histories of 61 cases and 126 controls randomly selected among asymptomatic village residents. We also conducted an environmental assessment and obtained meteorological data from a weather station. We identified 122 suspected cases, of which six were culture-confirmed, 47 were confirmed positive with a rapid diagnostic test and two died. The two deceased cases had onset of the disease on 2 October and 10 October, respectively. Heavy rainfall occurred on 7-11 October; a point-source outbreak occurred on 12-15 October, followed by continuous community transmission for two weeks. Village residents usually collected drinking water from three lakeshore points - A, B and C: 9.8% (6/61) of case-persons and 31% (39/126) of control-persons were found to usually use point A, 21% (13/61) of case-persons and 37% (46/126) of control-persons were found to usually use point B (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 0.64-5.3), and 69% (42/61) of case-persons and 33% (41/126) of control-persons were found to usually use point C (OR = 6.7; 95% CI: 2.5-17) for water collection. All case-persons (61/61) and 93% (117/126) of control-persons reportedly never treated/boiled drinking water (OR

  5. Do religion and religiosity have anything to do with alcohol consumption patterns? Evidence from two fish landing sites on Lake Victoria Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Atuyambe, Lynn; Kibira, Simon P S; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Tushemerirwe, Florence; Wagner, Glenn J

    2013-09-01

    Fish landing sites have high levels of harmful use of alcohol. This paper examines the role of religion and religiosity on alcohol consumption at two fish landing sites on Lake Victoria in Uganda. Questionnaires were administered to randomly selected people at the sites. Dependent variables included alcohol consumption during the previous 30 days, whereas the key independent variables were religion and religiosity. Bivariate and multivariate analysis techniques were applied. People reporting low religiosity were five times more likely to have consumed alcohol (95% confidence interval: 2.45-10.04) compared with those reporting low/average religiosity. Religion and religiosity are potential channels for controlling alcohol use.

  6. Integrated prevalence mapping of schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis and malaria in lakeside and island communities in Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabatereine Narcis B

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is widely advocated that integrated strategies for the control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs are cost-effective in comparison to vertical disease-specific programmes. A prerequisite for implementation of control interventions is the availability of baseline data of prevalence, including the population at risk and disease overlap. Despite extensive literature on the distribution of schistosomiasis on the mainland in Uganda, there has been a knowledge gap for the prevalence of co-infections with malaria, particularly for island communities in Lake Victoria. In this study, nine lakeshore and island districts were surveyed for the prevalence of NTDs and malaria, as well as educational and health infrastructure. Results A total of 203 communities were surveyed, including over 5000 school-age children. Varying levels of existing health infrastructure were observed between districts, with only Jinja District regularly treating people for NTDs. Community medicine distributors (CMD were identified and trained in drug delivery to strengthen capacity. Prevalence levels of intestinal schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis were assessed via Kato-Katz thick smears of stool and malaria prevalence determined by microscopy of fingerprick blood samples. Prevalence levels were 40.8%, 26.04% and 46.4%, respectively, while the prevalence of co-infection by Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium spp. was 23.5%. Socio-economic status was strongly associated as a risk factor for positive infection status with one or more of these diseases. Conclusions These results emphasise the challenges of providing wide-scale coverage of health infrastructure and drug distribution in remote lakeshore communities. The data further indicate that co-infections with malaria and NTDs are common, implying that integrated interventions for NTDs and malaria are likely to maximize cost-effectiveness and sustainability of disease control efforts.

  7. SUGAR CANE GROWING AND CATTLE GRAZING AS DRIVERS TO WETLAND DEGRADATION IN UGANDA: A case of upper river Ruizi and Iguluibi catchments Lake Victoria basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakiyemba Were, Alice; Isabirye, Moses; Mathijs, Erik; Deckers, Jozef; Poesen, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Introduction: This study was conducted with in the framework of the VLIR-OI project with the aim of making contributions to the Diagnosis and Remediation of Land Degradation Processes in the Riparian Zone of Lake Victoria Uganda in view of reducing sediment pollution of the Lake Waters with a special focus on the upper river Ruiz and Iguluibi catchments. The study seeks to investigate Sugarcane growing and cattle grazing as drivers to wetland degradation in light of the current farming systems and practices and their contributions to land degradation and pollution of the Lake Victoria waters. Vegetation especially wetlands improves the resistance to erosion. The removal of riparian vegetation tends to accelerate surface erosion as a result of human activities. Increased erosion with in the catchments due to clearing of wetlands for sugarcane growing and cattle grazing has caused adverse increased sedimentation, degraded the water quality, and reduced the water productivity of the Lake Victoria Basin. Methods: We conducted a qualitative and quantitative study to investigate Sugarcane growing and cattle grazing as drivers to wetland degradation in Uganda in light of the current farming systems and practices and their socio-economic contributions to wetland degradation and pollution of the Lake Victoria waters. Focus group discussions, key informant interviews, semi structured interviews and observations were undertaken with the relevant stakeholders in the community. Results: Findings reveal that in Iguluibi catchment, sugarcane growing is now a major activity indicating land use change since the 1990s. Community members said when planting sugarcane all vegetations including all trees are cut leaving the land bare to allow the tractor to clear the land for cultivation. This has left the land bare without any natural vegetation with increased erosion hence eventually loss of soil fertility and increased sediment pollution to the Lake Victoria waters. As a result of

  8. Albert Einstein visits Argentina

    CERN Document Server

    Gangui, A; Gangui, Alejandro; Ortiz, Eduardo L.

    2005-01-01

    This is a detailed, day by day, account of Albert Einstein's activities, both social and scientific, during his 30-day stay in Argentina in 1925, including his lectures on relativity at the various local universities and his visit to the National Academy of Sciences, as follows from his personal Diary of the trip to South-America and other contemporary documents.

  9. Albert Einstein: The Violinist

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peregrine

    2005-05-01

    To the press of his time Albert Einstein was two parts renowned scientist, one jigger pacifist and Zionist fundraiser, and a dash amateur musician. These proportions persisted during 1979, the 100th anniversary of his birth, as writers in all media jostled each other as they recounted his achievements. Relativity tended to hog the show. Relatively little space was given to Einstein the musician.

  10. Albert Einsteins Wonderjaar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieks, D.G.B.J.

    2005-01-01

    In het jaar 1905 publiceerde Albert Einstein een reeks artikelen die een omwenteling voor de wetenschap betekende. En toch bleef Einstein een kind van zijn tijd, van een eeuw die in het teken stond van dynamo’s, raderen en stoommachines.

  11. Unconventional Therapist: Albert Ellis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrach, Stephen G.

    1980-01-01

    Albert Ellis is one of counseling's most prolific authors, mostly on the topic of Rational Emotive Therapy. He has been a moving force in the cognitive behavior movement. In this interview Ellis discusses his theory and its application, and aspects of his personal and family life. (Author)

  12. Gustav Albert Stiasny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, W.

    1950-01-01

    Gustav Albert Stiasny was born in Vienna (Austria) on December 10th, 1877. After he had attended the elementary and grammar schools there and having finished a one year course of lectures in commercial enterprise, Stiasny enlisted as a volunteer with the Austro-Hungarian army. A year later he left t

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyls in sediments and fish species from the Murchison Bay of Lake Victoria, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssebugere, Patrick; Sillanpää, Mika; Wang, Pu; Li, Yingming; Kiremire, Bernard T; Kasozi, Gabriel N; Zhu, Chaofei; Ren, Daiwei; Zhu, Nali; Zhang, Haidong; Shang, Hongtao; Zhang, Qinghua; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in sediments and two fish species collected from the Murchison Bay in Lake Victoria, using high resolution gas chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer. Total PCB concentrations (Σ18PCBs) varied widely with mean values ranging from 777 to 4325pg g(-1) dry weight (dw) for sediments and 80 to 779pg g(-1) wet weight (ww) for fish. The PCB levels in the sediments were significantly higher at the station closest to Nakivubo channel, presumably due to effluents discharged by the channel, which may contain domestically produced commercial PCB mixtures. For fish, the concentrations in Nile perch (Lates niloticus) were significantly greater than those in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) at all study stations, possibly due to dietary differences among species. World Health Organization-toxic equivalents (WHO2005-TEQs) for the dioxin-like PCBs were 0.04-0.64pg g(-1) dw and 0.01-0.39pg g(-1) ww for sediments and fish, respectively. The non-ortho PCBs exhibited the highest contribution to the Σ12TEQs (>75%) compared to the mono-ortho PCBs in both fish species. The TEQs in the present study were lower than many reported worldwide in literature for fish and were within the permissible level recommended by the European Commission, implying that the fish did not pose health hazards related to PCBs to the consumers.

  14. Fish as bioindicators in aquatic environmental pollution assessment: A case study in Lake Victoria wetlands, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naigaga, I.; Kaiser, H.; Muller, W. J.; Ojok, L.; Mbabazi, D.; Magezi, G.; Muhumuza, E.

    Growing human population and industrialization have led to the pollution of most aquatic ecosystems and consequent deterioration in environmental water quality. Indicator organisms are needed to improve assessment programmes on the ecological impacts of anthropogenic activities on the aquatic environment. Fish have been widely documented as useful indicators of environmental water quality because of their differential sensitivity to pollution. This study investigated the environmental water quality of selected wetland ecosystems using fish as biological indicators. Fish community structure in relation to water quality was assessed in five wetlands along the shoreline of Lake Victoria from August 2006 to June 2008. Four urban wetlands were variedly impacted by anthropogenic activities while one rural wetland was less impacted, and served as a reference site. Fish species diversity, abundance and richness were assessed, and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to evaluate the relationship between the fish communities and environmental variables. Results revealed that urban effluent impacted negatively on water quality and consequently the fish community structure. A total of 29 fish species were recorded throughout the study with the lowest number of 15 species recorded in the most impacted site. Shannon diversity and Margalef species richness indices were highest at the references site and lowest at the most impacted site. Wetland haplochromis species dominated the reference site, while oreochromis species dominated the most impacted site. The inshore locations registered higher species diversity and low species richness than the offshore locations. Low dissolved oxygen, pH, secchi depth and high electrical conductivity, total phosphorous, and total nitrogen were strongly associated with the effluent-impacted sites and greatly influenced the fish community structure. This study recommends the use of fish as valuable biological indicators in aquatic

  15. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  16. Albert Einstein gentle genius

    CERN Document Server

    Herweck, Don

    2009-01-01

    Albert Einstein is probably the most influential scientist and greatest physicist of the twentieth century. He revolutionized our ideas about time and space, and he is best known for his theory of relativity and his equation E=mc2, which explains the relationship between energy and mass. By age 30, he was considered by many to be one of the world's greatest scientific thinkers.

  17. The diurnal activity, movement and trypanosome infection rates of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Diptera: Glossinidae)in Buvuma Island, Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONJINO M. OGWAL; ANDREW KALYEBI; JOHN B. KADDU

    2007-01-01

    The diurnal activity patterns, trypanosome infection rates and movement of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes(Diptera: Glossinidae) were investigated in Buvuma Island, Lake Victoria, Uganda. Hourly trapping of tsetse flies was undertaken to determine their activity rhythm while a capture-mark-release-recapture method was conducted to assess the movement and dispersal of tsetse flies between lakeshore, hinterland and further inland sites along a transected area. Dissection of tsetse flies was also undertaken to determine the trypanosome infection rates in salivary glands, proboscis and mid-gut. Results indicated a bimodal diurnal activity profile for G. f. fuscipes on the Island, both on the lakeshore and in the hinterland.Movement and dispersal of G. f. fuscipes tsetse flies occurred between lakeshore, hinterland and further inland sites with a greater tendency of flies to move to the lakeshore. Trypanosome infection rates of 4.32% for Trypasoma vivax and 1.15% for T. congolense were found in G. f. fuscipes.

  18. Genetically distinct Glossina fuscipes fuscipes populations in the Lake Kyoga region of Uganda and its relevance for human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echodu, Richard; Sistrom, Mark; Hyseni, Chaz; Enyaru, John; Okedi, Loyce; Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2013-01-01

    Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) are the sole vectors of Trypanosoma brucei--the agent of human (HAT) and animal (AAT) trypanosomiasis. Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Gff) is the main vector species in Uganda--the only country where the two forms of HAT disease (rhodesiense and gambiense) occur, with gambiense limited to the northwest. Gff populations cluster in three genetically distinct groups in northern, southern, and western Uganda, respectively, with a contact zone present in central Uganda. Understanding the dynamics of this contact zone is epidemiologically important as the merger of the two diseases is a major health concern. We used mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA data from Gff samples in the contact zone to understand its spatial extent and temporal stability. We show that this zone is relatively narrow, extending through central Uganda along major rivers with south to north introgression but displaying no sex-biased dispersal. Lack of obvious vicariant barriers suggests that either environmental conditions or reciprocal competitive exclusion could explain the patterns of genetic differentiation observed. Lack of admixture between northern and southern populations may prevent the sympatry of the two forms of HAT disease, although continued control efforts are needed to prevent the recolonization of tsetse-free regions by neighboring populations.

  19. Albert Einstein, Analogizer Extraordinaire

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Where does deep insight in physics come from? It is tempting to think that it comes from the purest and most precise of reasoning, following ironclad laws of thought that compel the clear mind completely rigidly. And yet the truth is quite otherwise. One finds, when one looks closely at any major discovery, that the greatest of physicists are, in some sense, the most crazily daring and irrational of all physicists. Albert Einstein exemplifies this thesis in spades. In this talk I will describe the key role, throughout Albert Einstein's fabulously creative life, played by wild guesses made by analogy lacking any basis whatsoever in pure reasoning. In particular, in this year of 2007, the centenary of 1907, I will describe how over the course of two years (1905 through 1907) of pondering, Einstein slowly came, via analogy, to understand the full, radical consequences of the equation that he had first discovered and published in 1905, arguably the most famous equation of all time: E = mc2.

  20. HIV infection in fishing communities of Lake Victoria Basin of Uganda--a cross-sectional sero-behavioral survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Opio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uganda's first AIDS case was reported in a fishing village. Thereafter, due to varying risk factors, the epidemic spread heterogeneously to all regions, with some populations more affected. Given the recent rising trends in HIV infection in Uganda, it is crucial to know the risk factors in different populations. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of HIV infection among fishing communities. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional survey of 46 fishing communities was conducted in 2010. Following written consent, 911 randomly selected respondents age 15-59 years were interviewed and gave blood for HIV testing. HIV testing was conducted in the field and central laboratory according to national algorithm. Survey protocol was approved by the Science and Ethics Committee of Uganda Virus Research Institute, and cleared by Uganda National Council for Science and Technology. Data was captured by EPIINFO and statistical analysis done in SPSS. FINDINGS: Overall HIV prevalence was 22%; there was no difference by sex (x (2 test, p>0.05. Association with HIV infection was determined by x (2 test, p<0.5. Never married respondents had lower HIV prevalence (6.2% than the ever married (24.1%. HIV prevalence was lower in younger respondents, age 15-24 years (10.8% than in age group 25 years and above (26.1%. Muslims had lower HIV prevalence (14.4% than Christians (25.2%. HIV prevalence was higher among respondents reporting 3 or more lifetime sexual partners (25.3% than in those reporting less numbers (10.8%. HIV prevalence was higher among uncircumcised men (27% than in circumcised men (11%. Multivariate analysis identified 4 risk factors for HIV infection; age, religion, ever condom use and number of lifetime sexual partners. CONCLUSIONS: HIV prevalence in the surveyed communities was three times higher than of general population. This underscores the need for tailor made HIV combination prevention interventions targeting

  1. Genetically Distinct Glossina fuscipes fuscipes Populations in the Lake Kyoga Region of Uganda and Its Relevance for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Echodu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies (Glossina spp. are the sole vectors of Trypanosoma brucei—the agent of human (HAT and animal (AAT trypanosomiasis. Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Gff is the main vector species in Uganda—the only country where the two forms of HAT disease (rhodesiense and gambiense occur, with gambiense limited to the northwest. Gff populations cluster in three genetically distinct groups in northern, southern, and western Uganda, respectively, with a contact zone present in central Uganda. Understanding the dynamics of this contact zone is epidemiologically important as the merger of the two diseases is a major health concern. We used mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA data from Gff samples in the contact zone to understand its spatial extent and temporal stability. We show that this zone is relatively narrow, extending through central Uganda along major rivers with south to north introgression but displaying no sex-biased dispersal. Lack of obvious vicariant barriers suggests that either environmental conditions or reciprocal competitive exclusion could explain the patterns of genetic differentiation observed. Lack of admixture between northern and southern populations may prevent the sympatry of the two forms of HAT disease, although continued control efforts are needed to prevent the recolonization of tsetse-free regions by neighboring populations.

  2. Uganda's eco-rebirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, D

    1991-01-01

    In 1986, the Government of Uganda established the Ministry of Environmental Protection to meet the country's socioeconomic development needs without destroying the environment. A Ministry-supported village pilot project in the Gombe region promotes self-sufficiency in potable water, food, and energy and tests means to achieve ecologically sound management of sustainable food/energy/fodder production. The Ministry also serves to sensitize the public to environmental issues by encouraging Ugandan newspapers to report more environment-related stories. A newspaper story informed the government about fishermen along a 20 km stretch of the Nile River and in Lake Victoria who used dynamite to kill fish, including juvenile and noncommercial fish. Thus, the government quickly put a halt to dynamiting. The ministry also produces films on Uganda's environmental problems. Some of these problems include the indiscriminate destruction of forests (e.g., Mabira, Mt. Elgon, Kibale, Budongo, Bwindi, and Maramagambo) and farmlands along Lake Victoria. Further, Uganda is witnessing either killing or smuggling of its elephants, rhinos, insects, birds, reptiles, and primates. In 1988, the World Bank committed about US$33.5 million to activities to protect Uganda's forests. They include planting of exotic softwoods, timber harvesting from remaining forests, and reestablishment of self-sufficiency in fuelwoods. The government hopes that forest rehabilitation will bring back tourism which before the civil war was the country's second highest foreign exchange earner. In fact, the remaining forests house the world's greatest population densities of primates (e.g., mountain gorillas in the southwest) and many rate birds. The UN Environmental Program will write Uganda's environmental protection law and helps the Ministry to promote environmental and public awareness.

  3. Albert Einstein a biography

    CERN Document Server

    Fölsing, Albrecht

    1997-01-01

    Albert Einstein's achievements are not just milestones in the history of science; decades ago they became an integral part of the twentieth-century world in which we live. Like no other modern physicist he altered and expanded our understanding of nature. Like few other scholars, he stood fully in the public eye. In a world changing with dramatic rapidity, he embodied the role of the scientist by personal example. Albrecht Folsing, relying on previously unknown sources and letters, brings Einstein's "genius" into focus. Whereas former biographies, written in the tradition of the history of science, seem to describe a heroic Einstein who fell to earth from heaven, Folsing attempts to reconstruct Einstein's thought in the context of the state of research at the turn of the century. Thus, perhaps for the first time, Einstein's surroundings come to light.

  4. Albert Einstein Centenary

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1979-01-01

    Homage to Albert Einstein, the giant of twentieth-century physics born exactly 100 years ago on 14 March 1879 in Ulm, Germany. At the height of his career, Einstein made a whole series of monumental contributions to physics, including the elaborate theories of special and general relativity which revolutionized human thought and marked a major breakthrough in our understanding to the Universe. Along with quantum mechanics, relativity is one of the twin pillars of understanding which allow us here at CERN to study the behaviour of the tiniest components of matter. The development of quantum mechanics took the combined efforts of some of the greatest scientists the world has known, while relativity was developed almost single-handed by Einstein. The scientist and his work by D. Amati and S. Fubini. A socially engaged scientist by V. F. Weisskopf. On the origin of the Einstein-Russell statement on nuclear weapon by H. S. Burhop.

  5. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  6. The Victorian and Albert Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿一铭

    2006-01-01

    London is famous for its museums—the British Museum,the Science Museum,and many more.One of the earliest museums in London is the Victorian and Albert Museum, named after Queen Victoria and her husband

  7. [Albert Bandura and his work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrin, Brigitte

    2012-03-01

    The Canadian psychologist Albert Bandura (1925) author of the concept of self-efficacy is still not much known of nurses. This article offers an outline of his biography and his work. Theories of Albert Bandura provide a positive, dynamic relationship with the agentivity human control over events that affect their existence. The concept of vicarious learning, self-efficacy and agency can enrich nursing research.

  8. Albert Einstein Centenary

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Victor Frederick; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    A socially engaged scientist by V. F. WEISSKOPF. On the origin of the Einstein-Russell statement on nuclear weapon by H. S. BURHOP. This week, we pay homage to Albert Einstein, the giant of twentieth-century physics born exactly 100 years ago on 14 March 1879 in Ulm, Germany. At the height of his career, Einstein made a whole series of monumental contributions to physics, including the elaborate theories of special and general relativity which revolutionized human thought and marked a major breakthrough in our understanding to the Universe. Along with quantum mechanics, relativity is one of the twin pillars of understanding which allow us here at CERN to study the behaviour of the tiniest components of matter. The development of quantum mechanics took the combined efforts of some of the greatest scientists the world has known, while relativity was developed almost single-handed by Einstein. The centenary of his birth is being commemorated all over the world. Exhibitions and symposia are being organized, books...

  9. Albert Einstein Centenary

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, Daniele; Weisskopf, Victor Frederick; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    The scientist and his work by D. AMATI and S. FUBINI. A socially engaged scientist by V. F. WEISSKOPF. This week, we pay homage to Albert Einstein, the giant of twentieth-century physics born exactly 100 years ago on 14 March 1879 in Ulm, Germany. At the height of his career, Einstein made a whole series of monumental contributions to physics, including the elaborate theories of special and general relativity which revolutionized human thought and marked a major breakthrough in our understanding to the Universe. Along with quantum mechanics, relativity is one of the twin pillars of understanding which allow us here at CERN to study the behaviour of the tiniest components of matter. The development of quantum mechanics took the combined efforts of some of the greatest scientists the world has known, while relativity was developed almost single-handed by Einstein. The centenary of his birth is being commemorated all over the world. Exhibitions and symposia are being organized, books published, postage stamps is...

  10. Albert Camus, un perfil personal Albert Camus, a personal profile Albert Camus, un perfil personal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Octavi Fullat

    2011-01-01

    .... ______________________________________________ Dans ce travail, le professeur Octavi Fullat (1928) offre un profil d’Albert Camus, auteur qu’il a découvert au cours d’un voyage à Paris et sur lequel...

  11. High incidence of HIV-1 infection in a general population of fishing communities around Lake Victoria, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Kiwanuka

    Full Text Available High HIV-1 incidence rates were reported among persons in fisherfolk communities (FFC in Uganda who were selected for high risk behaviour. We assessed the incidence of HIV-1 and associated risk factors in a general population FFC to determine population-wide HIV rates.A community-based cohort study was conducted among a random sample of 2191 participants aged 18-49 years. At baseline and 12 months post-baseline, data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics and risky behaviors (including number of partners, new partners, condom use, use of alcohol and illicit drug use. Venous blood was collected for HIV serological testing. HIV incidence was calculated per 100 person years at-risk (pyar and adjusted incidence rate ratios (Adj.IRR were estimated by multivariable Poisson regression.Overall follow up at 12 months was 76.9% (1685/2191 and was significantly higher among HIV uninfected persons and those with at least 1 year duration of stay in community. Overall HIV-1 incidence was 3.39/100 pyar (95% CI: 2.55-4.49. Among the 25-29 years who drank alcohol, HIV incidence was 7.67/100 pyar (95% CI;4.62-12.7 while it was 5.67/100 pyar (95% CI;3.14-10.2 for 18-24 year olds who drank alcohol. The risk of HIV infection was higher among 25-29 years (adj.IRR = 3.36; 95% CI: 1.48-7.65 and 18-24 years (adj.IRR = 2.65; 95% CI: 1.05-6.70 relative to 30+ years. Compared to non-drinkers, HIV incidence increased by frequency of alcohol drinking--occasional drinkers (adj.IRR = 3.18; 95% CI: 1.18-8.57 and regular drinkers (adj.IRR = 4.93; 95% CI: 1.91-12.8.HIV-1 incidence in general fisherfolk population along L. Victoria, Uganda, is high and is mainly associated with young age and alcohol drinking. HIV prevention and control strategies are urgently needed in this population.

  12. High Incidence of HIV-1 Infection in a General Population of Fishing Communities around Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwanuka, Noah; Ssetaala, Ali; Nalutaaya, Annet; Mpendo, Juliet; Wambuzi, Matthias; Nanvubya, Annet; Sigirenda, Simon; Kitandwe, Paul Kato; Nielsen, Leslie Elizabeth; Balyegisawa, Apolo; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Nalusiba, Josephine; Sewankambo, Nelson Kaulukusi

    2014-01-01

    Background High HIV-1 incidence rates were reported among persons in fisherfolk communities (FFC) in Uganda who were selected for high risk behaviour. We assessed the incidence of HIV-1 and associated risk factors in a general population FFC to determine population-wide HIV rates. Methods A community-based cohort study was conducted among a random sample of 2191 participants aged 18–49 years. At baseline and 12 months post-baseline, data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics and risky behaviors (including number of partners, new partners, condom use, use of alcohol and illicit drug use). Venous blood was collected for HIV serological testing. HIV incidence was calculated per 100 person years at-risk (pyar) and adjusted incidence rate ratios (Adj.IRR) were estimated by multivariable Poisson regression. Results Overall follow up at 12 months was 76.9% (1685/2191) and was significantly higher among HIV uninfected persons and those with at least 1 year duration of stay in community. Overall HIV-1 incidence was 3.39/100 pyar (95% CI: 2.55–4.49). Among the 25–29 years who drank alcohol, HIV incidence was 7.67/100pyar (95% CI;4.62–12.7) while it was 5.67/100pyar (95% CI;3.14–10.2) for 18–24 year olds who drank alcohol. The risk of HIV infection was higher among 25–29 years (adj.IRR = 3.36; 95% CI: 1.48–7.65) and 18–24 years (adj.IRR = 2.65; 95% CI: 1.05–6.70) relative to 30+ years. Compared to non-drinkers, HIV incidence increased by frequency of alcohol drinking - occasional drinkers (adj.IRR = 3.18; 95% CI: 1.18–8.57) and regular drinkers (adj.IRR = 4.93; 95% CI: 1.91–12.8). Conclusion HIV-1 incidence in general fisherfolk population along L.Victoria, Uganda, is high and is mainly associated with young age and alcohol drinking. HIV prevention and control strategies are urgently needed in this population. PMID:24866840

  13. Albert Camus” / “Albert Camus”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hopenhayn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the death of Albert Camus, occurred on January 4th 1960 because of a car accident, the author writes the following short-text, where he relates the event to others suggesting possible and curious coincidences.

  14. Reduction in the Water Level of Lake Victoria and Its Implications on Livelihoods in Rwanjaba Lakeshore Community, Uganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Semakula Henry Musoke; Boon E K

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the livelihood challenges expe- rienced in Rwanjaba Lakeshore Community during the period of low water level in Lake Victoria between 2004 and 2007 and identifies the livelihood coping strategies that were adopted to ad- dress them. A total of 55 households were randomly sampled and the data collection methods included household questionnaires and participant observations. The data were analyzed using the Statis- tical Package for Social Science (SPSS) and the results presented with the help of descriptive statistics. The livelihood challenges experienced during the low lake water level included fish shortage (34.5%), household food scarcity (23.6%), sex for fish (18.2%), family breakdown (12.7%), increased theft (7.2%) and accidents due to the exposed rocks in the lake (3.6%). The livelihood coping strategies adopted to redress the challenges included causal labour (32.7%), maize roasting (23.6%), sand mining (18.2%), selling of snacks (12.7%), selling household property (9.1%) and resorting shop and market credits (3.6%). The paper proposes a number of recommendations for improving the livelihood of the community ranging from policy reforms to the diversification of activities.

  15. 76 FR 11789 - Albert Poet: Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Albert Poet: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) permanently debarring Albert Poet, MD from...), finds that Albert Poet has been convicted of a felony under Federal law for conduct relating to...

  16. Confirmed local endemicity and putative high transmission of Schistosoma mansoni in the Sesse Islands, Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabatereine Narcis B

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Sesse Islands, in the Ugandan portion of Lake Victoria, have long been considered a low transmission zone for intestinal schistosomiasis. Based on observations of high prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni infection in the northern-most islands of this archipelago, a follow-up survey was conducted to ascertain whether transmission was endemic to this island group, combining parasitological and malacological surveys. Prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis was again observed to be high, as was intensity of infections which, combined with low reported incidence of treatment, suggests that chemotherapy-based control initiatives are not being maximally effective in this region as high levels of population movement between islands and districts are confounding. The local disease transmission was confirmed by the observations of high abundance of Biomphalaria, as well as field-caught snails shedding S. mansoni cercariae. DNA sequencing of 12 cercariae revealed common mitochondrial cox1 haplotypes, as well as, novel ones, consistent with the high genetic diversity of this parasite in Lake Victoria. Intestinal schistosomiasis is firmly endemic in parts of the Sesse Islands and more broadly, this island group provides an insight into the future challenges to be faced by the Ugandan National Control Programme in regularly reaching these rather remote, inaccessible and largely itinerant communities.

  17. PEMIKIRAN PENDIDIKAN MORAL ALBERT BANDURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qumruin Nurul Laila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Albert Bandura dilahirkan pada tanggal 4 Desember 1925 di Mundare, sebuah kota kecil di barat daya Alberta, Kanada, sekitar 50 mil sebelah timur Edmonton. Berasal dari keluarga keturunan Eropa Timur. Ayahnya dari Krakow Polandia dan ibunya dari Ukraina. Pada tahun 1952 Albert Bandura menikah dengan Virginia Varns dan dikaruniai dua orang anak, Mary dan Carol. Bandura belajar bersama Robert Sears, salah satu perintis teori belajar sosial lainnya dan mengambil gelar diplomanya dari University of British Columbia dan gelar kesarjanaan psikologinya dari University of Iowa. Karena reputasinya, pada tahun 1974 dia dipercaya menjabat sebagai Presiden Asosiasi Psikologi Amerika (APA. Sebagai ahli dibidang psikologi, dia percaya bahwa proses transfer keilmuan atau pendidikan, tak lepas dari norma-norma moral yang berlaku di masyarakat hingga nilai-nilai dari norma tersebut diejawantahkan dalam prilaku siswa sehari-hari. Atas dasar asumsi tersebut, maka teori pembelajaran Albert Bandura disebut sosial kognitif karena proses kognitif dalam diri individu memegang peranan dalam pembelajaran, sedangkan pembelajaran terjadi karena adanya pengaruh lingkungan sosial. Proses tahapan-tahapan dalam pembelajaran social kognitif meliputi: Tahap perhatian (attentional phase, Tahap penyimpanan dalam ingatan (retention phase, Tahap reproduksi (reproduction phase dan tahap motivasi (motivation phase. Teori pembelajaran sosial ini menekankan kepada proses bagaimana anak-anak belajar norma-norma kemasyarakatan. Jika pesan yang disampaikan bersifat positif, anak-anak menerimanya dengan baik dan pengaruh lainnya adalah sama positifnya, maka anak itu akan cenderung untuk membesar dengan nilai-nilai yang baik. Begitu juga sebaliknya.

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyls and hexachlorocyclohexanes in sediments and fish species from the Napoleon Gulf of Lake Victoria, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssebugere, Patrick; Sillanpää, Mika; Kiremire, Bernard T; Kasozi, Gabriel N; Wang, Pu; Sojinu, Samuel O; Otieno, Peter O; Zhu, Nali; Zhu, Chaofei; Zhang, Haidong; Shang, Hongtao; Ren, Daiwei; Li, Yingming; Zhang, Qinghua; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were analyzed in surface sediments (Napoleon Gulf on the northern shore of Lake Victoria. The analysis was done using a gas chromatograph (GC) coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer for PCBs and a GC equipped with an electron capture detector for HCHs. Total (Σ) PCBs in the muscles of fish varied widely with mean values ranging from 41 to 670 pg g(-1) lipid weight (lw). The PCB levels in L. niloticus were significantly greater than those in O. niloticus. The large variability observed in the data was attributed to differences in feeding habits and trophic levels. While O. niloticus is a filter-eating fish species feeding mainly on phytoplankton and zooplankton, L. niloticus have predatory feeding behaviors and prefer a diet of live fish and, therefore, are more prone to bio-accumulate contaminants. The mean PCB concentrations in the sediments varied from 362 to 848 pg g(-1) dry weight. Variations in PCB levels were observed from one study site to another, this was attributed to the nature and particle size of the sediments. HCH isomers were detected in fish at mean concentrations of up to 45,900 pg g(-1) lw. The PCB and HCH concentrations were lower than those from previous studies elsewhere in literature and were below the maximum residue limits set by the European Commission and FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission, implying that the fish was fit for human consumption.

  19. Albert Einstein:. Opportunity and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    The year 1905 has been called Albert Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." It was during that year that he caused revolutionary changes in man's primordial concepts about the physical world: space, time, energy, light and matter. How could a 26-year-old clerk, previously unknown, cause such profound conceptual changes, and thereby open the door to the era of modern scientific technological world? No one, of course, can answer that question. But one can, perhaps, analyze some factors that were essential to his stepping into such a historic role...

  20. Tribute: Remembering Albert Greve (1938-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Jaap

    2012-02-01

    With the sudden death of Albert Greve on 13 June 2011, caused by a massive heart attack, the radio astronomy community lost a remarkable member, and many of us a very good friend. The career of Albert was characterized by a broad array of activities, all performed at a high level of professionalism and an enduring wit.

  1. Albert Camus, un perfil personal Albert Camus, a personal profile Albert Camus, un perfil personal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavi Fullat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En aquest treball se’ns ofereix un perfil d’Albert Camus (1913-1960, que el qui signa va descobrir en un viatge a París i sobre el qual va elaborar la seva tesi doctoral defensada a la Universitat de Barcelona el 1961. Es tracta d’una reflexió personal que repassa els anys de formació, tot situant la personalitat de Camus com un referent de primer ordre en el seu univers intel·lectual. ______________________________________________ Dans ce travail, le professeur Octavi Fullat (1928 offre un profil d’Albert Camus, auteur qu’il a découvert au cours d’un voyage à Paris et sur lequel il a élaboré sa thèse de doctorat soutenue à l’Université de Barcelone en 1961. Il s’agit d’une réflexion personnelle dans laquelle l’auteur repasse ses années de formation, tout en situant la personnalité de Camus comme une référence de premier ordre dans son univers intellectuel.In this work, Professor Octavi Fullat (1928 offers us a profile of Albert Camus, the author he discovered on a trip to Paris and on whom he wrote his doctoral thesis, which he defended in the University of Barcelona in 1961. It is a personal view in which the author reviews his early years, while placing the character of Camus as a primary reference in his intellectual universe.En este trabajo el profesor Octavi Fullat (1928 nos ofrece un perfil de Albert Camus, autor que descubrió en un viaje a París y sobre el cual elaboró su tesis doctoral defendida en la Universitat de Barcelona en el año 1961. Se trata de una reflexión personal en la que el autor repasa sus años de formación, situando la personalidad de Camus como un referente de primer orden en su universo intelectual.

  2. Correcting the record on Watson, Rayner, and Little Albert: Albert Barger as "psychology's lost boy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Russell A; Digdon, Nancy; Harris, Ben; Smithson, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    In 1920, John B. Watson and Rosalie Rayner attempted to condition a phobia in a young infant named "Albert B." In 2009, Beck, Levinson, and Irons proposed that Little Albert, as he is now known, was actually an infant named Douglas Merritte. More recently, Fridlund, Beck, Goldie, and Irons (2012) claimed that Little Albert (Douglas) was neurologically impaired at the time of the experiment. They also alleged that Watson, in a severe breach of ethics, probably knew of Little Albert's condition when selecting him for the study and then fraudulently hid this fact in his published accounts of the case. In this article, we present the discovery of another individual, Albert Barger, who appears to match the characteristics of Little Albert better than Douglas Merritte does. We examine the evidence for Albert Barger as having been Little Albert and, where relevant, contrast it with the evidence for Douglas Merritte. As for the allegations of fraudulent activity by Watson, we offer comments at the end of this article. We also present evidence concerning whether Little Albert (Albert Barger) grew up with the fear of furry animals, as Watson and Rayner speculated he might.

  3. Albert Einstein and Scientific Theology

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Max L E

    2012-01-01

    In recent centuries the world has become increasingly dominated by empirical evidence and theoretic science in developing worldviews. Advances in science have dictated Roman Catholic doctrine such as the acceptance of Darwinian evolution and Big Bang cosmology. Albert Einstein created an indelible impact on the relationship between science and religion. The question is whether or not his work was deleterious for church doctrine or whether it was compatible with, or even advanced, church dogma. It's my contention that Einstein revived the relationship between science and theology and did not create a bifurcation between the two. Despite his personal religious beliefs, his work has helped to reinforce the harmonious conjunction of science with religion, which cannot be ignored by succeeding scientists and theologians.

  4. Obituary: Albert G. Petschek, 1928-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Petschek, Rolfe G.; Libersky, Larry D.

    2005-12-01

    Albert G. Petschek died suddenly 8 July 2004. He enjoyed good health and was very active professionally and personally until his death. He was highly respected, particularly in theoretical physics, for his deep, broad-ranging analytical powers, which resulted in contributions to nuclear physics, astrophysics, atmospheric physics, quantum mechanics, and quantum computing. Albert was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1928. His extended family left Czechoslovakia when its sovereignty was threatened by Germany in 1938 and settled throughout the Western Hemisphere. Albert's father, a banker, settled in Scarsdale, near New York City. Albert graduated from White Plains High School and obtained his BS from MIT in a program accelerated during World War II. While getting his masters degree at the University of Michigan, Albert met his wife, Marilyn, also a physics masters student. In 1953, Albert obtained his PhD from the University of Rochester working with Robert Marshak on aspects of nuclear theory, and joined Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Soon thereafter, Albert's younger brother, Harry, also became a PhD physicist. Harry is now well known in plasma physics for reconnection theory. At Los Alamos, Albert worked closely with Carson Mark, Marshall Rosenbluth, and Conrad Longmire designing the first thermonuclear weapons. His derivation of several radiation diffusion solutions, later published as LAMS 2421, remains a classic in its field, as does work on nuclear theory done with Baird Brandow and Hans Bethe during a sabbatical at Cornell in 1961. Bethe was a frequent visitor to Los Alamos and a close friend. A devoted family man, Albert also valued Los Alamos as a safe, stimulating environment for raising an active family. Like many of the scientists at Los Alamos, Albert enjoyed its ready access to outdoor activities such as hiking and skiing. Albert often combined his passions for intellectual activity and the outdoors

  5. Albert Camus´ "Katk" / Ott Ojamaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojamaa, Ott, 1926-1996

    2010-01-01

    Arvustus: Camus, Albert. Katk : romaan / prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Henno Rajandi ; eessõna: Ott Ojamaa. Tallinn : Ajalehtede-Ajakirjade Kirjastus, 1963. (Loomingu raamatukogu ; 1963, 43/46 (311/314))

  6. Albert Camus´ "Katk" / Ott Ojamaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojamaa, Ott, 1926-1996

    2010-01-01

    Arvustus: Camus, Albert. Katk : romaan / prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Henno Rajandi ; eessõna: Ott Ojamaa. Tallinn : Ajalehtede-Ajakirjade Kirjastus, 1963. (Loomingu raamatukogu ; 1963, 43/46 (311/314))

  7. Memorial: Albert O. Brecht (1946-2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Robert K.; Nelson, Dorothy W.; Ross, Amy A.; Gasaway, Laura N.; Aranas, Pauline M.

    2012-01-01

    Albert Brecht was born in Dallas, Texas, in 1946. He attended the University of North Texas, where he had a double major in government and sociology. His interest in government led him to the University of Houston College of Law. It was there that Albert found his calling in life. He worked part-time as a student assistant in the law library. After graduating from Houston, he enrolled in the Master of Law Librarianship program at the University of Washington.

  8. Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  9. Hunting for Conservation? The Re-introduction of Sport Hunting in Uganda Examined

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochieng, A.; Ahebwa, W.M.; Visseren-Hamakers, I.J.

    2015-01-01

    Uganda reintroduced sport hunting in 2001. The policy was piloted around Lake Mburo National Park and later replicated around other protected areas. This chapter analyses the development, implementation and impact of sport hunting policy in Uganda. We do so through literature review, document

  10. Around Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The UK is donating US$800,000 to Uganda to reduce the death rate in the western region; the number of cases of malaria there has soared because of unusually severe rains. The health ministry is recommending self-medication with drugs purchased from licensed drug shops and pharmacies (there have been cases of fake or substandard chloroquine tablets and injectable solutions). Cholera is a problem in most of the country, but patients seem reluctant to go to the hospital, even though adequate supplies of drugs are available. Because of the Rift Valley Fever outbreak in Kenya, the health ministry is monitoring movements of people in the border area and conducting a mass screening for the disease. The Mulago National Referral Hospital is receiving US$35 million to improve wards and utilities and to build a new drug quality control laboratory. A training hospital which will provide palliative care for patients with AIDS has opened recently; it is a collaborative project with Mildmay Hospital in the UK. During its regional scientific conference in Masaka, members of the Association of Surgeons of East Africa and Central Africa offered free services to patients in Masaka and Rakai districts. According to the Minister of State for Gender and Community Development, fewer Ugandan women are being circumcised; the rate has dropped by 56% since 1990, due to the efforts of government and women's groups. However, other forms of violence against women remain a problem; the Family Protection Unit of the Ugandan police list 400 reported cases of wife beating, 150 cases of rape, and 250 cases of "defilement of school girls." Police intend to work with teachers to decrease the rising rate of sexual crimes in school. Police also say 90% of street children sniff solvents.

  11. High HIV-1 prevalence, risk behaviours, and willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials in fishing communities on Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Kiwanuka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa are generalized, but high-risk subgroups exist within these epidemics. A recent study among fisher-folk communities (FFC in Uganda showed high HIV prevalence (28.8% and incidence (4.9/100 person-years. However, those findings may not reflect population-wide HIV rates in FFC since the study population was selected for high-risk behaviour. Methods: Between September 2011 and March 2013, we conducted a community-based cohort study to determine the population representative HIV rates and willingness to participate (WTP in hypothetical vaccine trials among FFC, Uganda. At baseline (September 2011–January 2012, a household enumeration census was done in eight fishing communities (one lakeshore and seven islands, after which a random sample of 2200 participants aged 18–49 years was selected from 5360 individuals. Interviewer-administered questionnaire data were collected on HIV risk behaviours and WTP, and venous blood was collected for HIV testing using rapid HIV tests with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA confirmation. Adjusted prevalence proportion ratios (adj.PPRs of HIV prevalence were determined using log-binomial regression models. Results: Overall baseline HIV prevalence was 26.7% and was higher in women than men (32.6% vs. 20.8%, p<0.0001. Prevalence was lower among fishermen (22.4% than housewives (32.1%, farmers (33.1% and bar/lodge/restaurant workers (37%. The adj.PPR of HIV was higher among women than men (adj.PPR =1.50, 95%; 1.20, 1.87 and participants aged 30–39 years (adj.PPR=1.40, 95%; 1.10, 1.79 and 40–49 years (adj.PPR=1.41, 95%; 1.04, 1.92 compared to those aged 18–24 years. Other factors associated with HIV prevalence included low education, previous marriage, polygamous marriage, alcohol and marijuana use before sex. WTP in hypothetical vaccine trials was 89.3% and was higher in men than women (91.2% vs. 87.3%, p=0.004 and among island communities compared to

  12. Solanum (Solanaceae in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. R. Bukenya

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Of the 41 species, subspecies and cultivar groups in the genus Solanum L. (Solanaceae that occur in Uganda, about 30 are indigenous. In Uganda several members of the genus are utilised as food crops while others are put to medicinal and ornamental use. Some members are notorious weeds. A key to the species and descriptions of all Solanum species occurring in Uganda are provided.

  13. 76 FR 66072 - Albert Ronald Cioffi: Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Albert Ronald Cioffi: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring Albert Cioffi, MD for 5 years from... to him (Staff Manual Guide 1410.35), finds that Albert R. Cioffi has been convicted of a...

  14. insurgents in Northern Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the rebel movements in northern Uganda, see Human Rights Watch 2003, and ... of Uganda enacted an Amnesty Act in 2000, and to date more than ten thousand ..... Amnesty Certificate, and then in theory, a package.20 In the case of former .... [H]uman rights obligations are contracted on an international level.

  15. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  16. Capital Punishment for Juveniles: Albert French's "Billy."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Sonja

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes Albert French's novel "Billy" and its exploration of the United States' use of capital punishment for young criminals. Addresses the underlying causes of Billy's execution. Discusses specific themes and issues that teachers can use for classroom discussions of capital punishment. (RS)

  17. Albert Einstein, guide spirituel du CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sandraz, Raphaël

    2005-01-01

    The year 2005, proclaimed "World year of Physics" by UNESCO, dedicates the 100th anniversary of the theory of relativity and the 50th anniversary of the death of his discoverer: Albert Einstein. The CERN in Geneva applies every day his theories (1 page)

  18. Banana (Musa spp.) Production Characteristics and Performance in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagamba, F.; Burger, C.P.J.; Tushemereirwe, W.K.

    2010-01-01

    The highland cooking banana (Musa spp., AAA-EA genome) is the most important crop in the East African Great Lakes region. In Uganda, production has expanded and productivity increased in the country’s southwest and declined in the Central region where the crop has traditional roots. Analyzing crop c

  19. Albert Einstein's Magic Mountain: An Aarau Education*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    For economic reasons, the electrotechnical factory J. Einstein & Cie. (co-owned by Albert Einstein's father Hermann) had to be closed in the summer of 1894. While Albert's parents emigrated to Italy to build a new existence, he remained in Munich to complete his studies at the Gymnasium. Left behind, however, he had a difficult time with what he considered the rigid educational practices at the Munich Luitpold-Gymnasium and quit without a diploma. The present article discusses Einstein's richly winding path to the Aargau Cantonal School (Switzerland), especially its history and educational philosophy during the time of his stay in Aarau. There, Einstein met some outstanding teachers, who could serve him as models of scholars and human beings. In spite of Einstein's distinct independence of mind, these personalities may well have had a significant influence on the alignment of his inner compass.

  20. El destino del asteroide Albert (719)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, R. B.; Melita, M. D.; Brunini, A.

    Albert is the only numbered asteroid that remains lost at present. This object has been discovered while it was making a close apporach to the Earth by Johann Palisa in the Imperial Observatory of Vienna. According to the standard procedure of the time, a number was assigned to it shortly after a preliminar orbit has been obtained and it was named after a great benefactor of Imperial Observatory, Baron Albert von Rothschild. In this work we analyze why this body could not be recovered in its subsequent approaches to the Earth. Basicaly the cause of the loss can be summarized as follows. Given the high absolute magnitude of the object it can only be observed when it is close to the Earth. But naturally, at the close approches, the uncertanty in the position in the celestial sphere is the greatest due to a parallax effect. We have estimated the uncertanty in R.A. and declination by the non-linear propagation of the initial obervational uncertanty. We have determined that, when the aparent magnitude was low enough to observe the object with the instruments available at the time, the uncertainty region exceeded noticeably the region where it was searched. Regarding its possible recovery at present, the uncertainty in its position practicaly covers the whole sky. Nevertheless, the plane of the orbit is bounded in a narrow strip for a considerable length of time, which makes its recovery posible in old plates. The causes of the loss of Albert (719) are common to all NEO's, which is distintive about it is that it was numbered after just a few obervations, while at present the standard procedure requires that the orbit should be very well established before a denomination is given. Given the almost imposibility of its systematic recovery, in the future Albert (719) might be the first asteroid whose denomination is reassigned to another object.

  1. Some Interesting Things about Albert Einstein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓军

    2010-01-01

    @@ [精彩品读]爱因斯坦,这个伟大的科学家,无人不知无人不晓,下面让我们走近这位伟人-- It is well known that Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time and he was also a really great person.Here are some interesting things about him.

  2. Uganda Mission PRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — A web-based performance reporting system that is managed by IBI that interfaces with the Mission's GIS database that supports USAID/Uganda and its implementing...

  3. Mileva Maric Einstein vivre avec Albert Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Milentijevic, Radmila

    2013-01-01

    Radmila Milentijevic n’est pas la première à écrire sur les relations entre le génial Albert Einstein et sa première épouse et précieuse collaboratrice durant ses années de recherches, la scientifique serbe Mileva Maric. Mais c’est la première fois qu’un ouvrage traite de cette idylle, puis de ce drame familial qui a duré près de cinquante années, sous une forme quasiment poétique, si rare dans l’historiographie scientifique.Professeur émérite d’histoire à l’université de New York, l’auteur propose ici une monographie riche et vivante, dévoilant une face cachée d’Albert Einstein, et faisant de sa compagne une figure historique de premier plan en même temps qu’un personnage romanesque dont le destin tragique ne laissera aucun lecteur indifférent.

  4. Liver transplantation at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mies

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present patients and results of liver transplantationperformed by the Liver Unit team at the Hospital Israelita AlbertEinstein. Methods: The medical records of all patients transplantedby the team at the Liver Unit of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein,from January 2002 to June 2005, were analyzed. Results: Duringthis period, 328 transplants were performed and 64.3% were malerecipients; 64.9% were performed with cadaveric donor; 31.1%with living donors; and 4.3% were domino liver transplants. Thethree-year survival rate was 78% with cadaveric donors, 71.1%with living donor and 46.2% with domino liver transplant. The meanseverity index according to the Child-Pugh score was 8.7 (ChildB–9 and the median was 9 (Child B-9; the mean MELD score was17.6 and the median 18. Conclusion: The Liver Unit team has thelargest number of liver transplantation cases in Latin Americawith over 850 transplants performed and outcomes similar to theworld’s best centers.

  5. Little Albert from the Viewpoint of Abnormal Psychology Textbook Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeUnes, Arnold

    1983-01-01

    Watson and Rayner's study of Little Albert and conditioned emotional reactions is unquestionably a classic in psychology. Observations are made on what authors of 27 college textbooks in abnormal psychology have to say or not to say about Little Albert. (RM)

  6. Albert Schweitzer's Legacy for Education: Reverence for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rud, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    "Albert Schweitzer's Legacy for Education" is the first book devoted to the study of the thought and deeds of Albert Schweitzer in relation to education. Schweitzer's life and work offer both inspiration and timely insights for educational thought and practice in the twenty-first century. Focusing on Schweitzer's central thought,…

  7. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  8. Policing epistemic deviance: Albert Von Schrenck-Notzing and Albert Moll(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Shortly after the death of Albert von Schrenck-Notzing (1862-1929), the doyen of early twentieth century German para psychology, his former colleague in hypnotism and sexology Albert Moll (1862-1939) published a treatise on the psychology and pathology of parapsychologists, with Schrenck-Notzing serving as a prototype of a scientist suffering from an 'occult complex'. Moll's analysis concluded that parapsychologists vouching for the reality of supernormal phenomena, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, telekinesis and materialisations, suffered from a morbid will to believe, which paralysed their critical faculties and made them cover obvious mediumistic fraud. Using Moll's treatment of Schrenck-Notzing as an historical case study of boundary disputes in science and medicine, this essay traces the career of Schrenck-Notzing as a researcher in hypnotism, sexology and parapsychology; discusses the relationship between Moll and Schrenck-Notzing; and problematises the pathologisation and defamation strategies of deviant epistemologies by authors such as Moll.

  9. Laramie in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Eve

    2011-01-01

    No matter how disturbing, it is common to hear "that's so gay" or "you're such a fag" echoing through the halls of a high school, but when the high school is an international school in Uganda, those words have a newfound potency. As an American teacher working abroad, the author often struggled over her responsibility for the…

  10. The Karimojong from Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Iva; Pereira, Vania; Gomes, Verónica

    2009-01-01

    The Karimojong, an African group from the Karamoja region of Northeast Uganda, were genetically analysed using a decaplex system for X chromosome short tandem repeats (X-STRs). A total of 255 individuals (117 males and 138 females) were genotyped for the following loci: DXS8378, DXS9898, DXS7133,...

  11. Interview with Albert Ziegler about Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Z. Leana-Tascilar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Albert Ziegler is the chair of Educational Psychology and Research on Excellence at the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg and one of the most productive and cited academicians in gifted education in Europe and also all over the world. Prof. Ziegler has contributed different theories about gifted education and education in general. One of his well-known theories is The Actiotope Model of Giftedness and the 7-Step-Cycle of Self-Regulated Learning. Since last year I had the chance to be with him and his colleagues in Germany, thus I decided to share with you the interview that we had about his theories and his recommendations for Turkey.

  12. Test of time: what if little Albert had escaped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Andy P; Nightingale, Zoë C

    2009-04-01

    Watson and Rayner's (1920) ;Little Albert' experiment has become one of the most famous studies in psychology. It is a staple of many general psychology textbooks and is part of the very fabric of the discipline's folklore. Despite this fame, the study has been widely criticized in the nearly 90 years since it was published for its lack of methodological rigour. This article attempts to evaluate the contribution of the ;little Albert' study to modern clinical psychology by speculating on what theories and treatments of child anxiety would look like in a parallel universe in which the study never took place because ;little Albert' escaped from the hospital in which Watson tested him.

  13. Mileva and Albert Einstein their love and scientific collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Krstic, Dord

    2004-01-01

    This English translation of Dord Krstic's book, Mileva & Albert Einstein: Their Love and Scientific Collaboration represents the culmination of fifty years of research on the relationship between the two physicists.

  14. Perseverance Pays Off: Albert Bowie, Doctor of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakshul, Barbra

    1997-01-01

    Describes the experiences of Albert Bowie of San Juan Pueblo, who became the first Native American to graduate from the University of New Mexico's Doctor of Pharmacy program. A sidebar discusses academic opportunities in the field of pharmacy. (TD)

  15. Albert Paltser 17. I 1931-29. I 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    In memoriam Albert Paltser, Tartu Ülikooli õppejõud, dotsent, kriminaalõiguse ja -protsessi kateedri juhataja, õigusteaduskonna dekaan, ülikooli kriminoloogialabori juhataja, üks kriminoloogia rajajaid Eestis

  16. Pere Albert: Barcelona Canon, Royal Advocate, Feudal Theorist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagay, Donald K.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the life and career of one of Catalonia's greatest medieval legists is discussed. Using notarial and court documentation, the author explores the work of Pere Albert as judge and advocate. The Customs of Catalonia and other of Pere Albert's treatises form the basis for the review of the legist's career as a theorist in feudal law. The basis for this article is the collection of documents pertaining to Pere Albert, which the author includes in an appendix.

    En este artículo se estudia la vida y la carrera de uno de los jurisconsultos medievales más importantes de Cataluña. Utilizando la documentación notarial y judicial, el autor analiza la labor de Pere Albert como juez y abogado. ElsCostums de Catalunya y otros tratados de Pere Albert constituyen la base para el estudio de la carrera del jurisconsulto, como teórico en ley feudal y real. El artículo se basa en una colección de documentos originales relativos a Pere Albert, que el autor incluye en un apéndice.

  17. Prince Albert II of Monaco visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    With a strong curiosity for the work of CERN, HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco visited CMS and the CERN Control Centre on 2 September. "The Prince is interested in and sensitive to what CERN is doing. Monaco is closely linked to France, which is an important member of CERN. He wishes to express his help to the scientific community in every trip. He wants to meet scientists and to be really personally involved," explained Francois Chantrait, Head of the Press Service of the Prince’s Palace. CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer welcomed the Prince of Monaco to Point 5 with a presentation about CERN before they descended 100 metres underground to see the CMS experiment. Although the detector was closed up for test runs, he was able to see its grand scale as well as look at some of the intricate sample parts exhibited by CMS Spokesperson, Jim Virdee. The Prince wrote in the CERN Visitors’ Book that he perceives a realisation of promisin...

  18. New Information about Albert Einstein's Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Dean

    2009-01-01

    In order to glean information about hominin (or other) brains that no longer exist, details of external neuroanatomy that are reproduced on endocranial casts (endocasts) from fossilized braincases may be described and interpreted. Despite being, of necessity, speculative, such studies can be very informative when conducted in light of the literature on comparative neuroanatomy, paleontology, and functional imaging studies. Albert Einstein's brain no longer exists in an intact state, but there are photographs of it in various views. Applying techniques developed from paleoanthropology, previously unrecognized details of external neuroanatomy are identified on these photographs. This information should be of interest to paleoneurologists, comparative neuroanatomists, historians of science, and cognitive neuroscientists. The new identifications of cortical features should also be archived for future scholars who will have access to additional information from improved functional imaging technology. Meanwhile, to the extent possible, Einstein's cerebral cortex is investigated in light of available data about variation in human sulcal patterns. Although much of his cortical surface was unremarkable, regions in and near Einstein's primary somatosensory and motor cortices were unusual. It is possible that these atypical aspects of Einstein's cerebral cortex were related to the difficulty with which he acquired language, his preference for thinking in sensory impressions including visual images rather than words, and his early training on the violin.

  19. Policing Epistemic Deviance: Albert von Schrenck-Notzing and Albert Moll1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Shortly after the death of Albert von Schrenck-Notzing (1862–1929), the doyen of early twentieth century German para psychology, his former colleague in hypnotism and sexology Albert Moll (1862–1939) published a treatise on the psychology and pathology of parapsychologists, with Schrenck-Notzing serving as a prototype of a scientist suffering from an ‘occult complex’. Moll’s analysis concluded that parapsychologists vouching for the reality of supernormal phenomena, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, telekinesis and materialisations, suffered from a morbid will to believe, which paralysed their critical faculties and made them cover obvious mediumistic fraud. Using Moll’s treatment of Schrenck-Notzing as an historical case study of boundary disputes in science and medicine, this essay traces the career of Schrenck-Notzing as a researcher in hypnotism, sexology and parapsychology; discusses the relationship between Moll and Schrenck-Notzing; and problematises the pathologisation and defamation strategies of deviant epistemologies by authors such as Moll. PMID:23002296

  20. Stable isotope variation in tooth enamel from Neogene hippopotamids: monitor of meso and global climate and rift dynamics on the Albertine Rift, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachert, Thomas Christian; Brügmann, Gerhard B.; Mertz, Dieter F.; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schrenk, Friedemann; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Ssemmanda, Immaculate; Taubald, Heinrich

    2010-10-01

    The Neogene was a period of long-term global cooling and increasing climatic variability. Variations in African-Asian monsoon intensity over the last 7 Ma have been deduced from patterns of eolian dust export into the Indian Ocean and Mediterranean Sea as well as from lake level records in the East African Rift System (EARS). However, lake systems not only depend on rainfall patterns, but also on the size and physiography of river catchment areas. This study is based on stable isotope proxy data (18O/16O, 13C/12C) from tooth enamel of hippopotamids (Mammalia) and aims in unravelling long-term climate and watershed dynamics that control the evolution of palaeolake systems in the western branch of the EARS (Lake Albert, Uganda) during the Late Neogene (7.5 Ma to recent). Having no dietary preferences with respect to wooded (C3) versus grassland (C4) vegetation, these territorial, water-dependant mammals are particularly useful for palaeoclimate analyses. As inhabitants of lakes and rivers, hippopotamid tooth enamel isotope data document mesoclimates of topographic depressions, such as the rift valleys and, therefore, changes in relative valley depth instead of exclusively global climate changes. Consequently, we ascribe a synchronous maximum in 18O/16O and 13C/12C composition of hippopotamid enamel centred around 1.5-2.5 Ma to maximum aridity and/or maximum hydrological isolation of the rift floor from rift-external river catchment areas in response to the combined effects of rift shoulder uplift and subsidence of the rift valley floor. Structural rearrangements by ~2.5 Ma within the northern segment of the Albertine Rift are well constrained by reversals in river flow, cannibalisation of catchments, biogeographic turnover and uplift of the Rwenzori horst. However, a growing rain shadow is not obvious in 18O/16O signatures of the hippopotamid teeth of the Albertine Rift. According to our interpretation, this is the result of the overriding effect of evaporation on 18

  1. [Interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Ruiz-Llanos, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) was a young and promising German who at age 29 decided to undertake the profession of Medical Doctor at the University of Strassburg after finishing a career in musical studies in Paris (1899) and obtaining in Berlin a doctoral degree in Philosophy and Theology. Surprisingly, Albert Schweitzer, despite his comfortable life in Europe, decided in 1913 to practice his medical career in a remote and small Equatorial African country. He devoted nearly 50 years of his life caring for the Black population at Lamaberene, where he built a hospital. In this paper, we attempt to develop some theoretical aspects related with interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer. We begin by considering certain sociocultural variables in hospitals that give care to patients with cultural characteristics that are substantially different from those of the health care personnel who organize, administer, and execute medical functions.

  2. The Collaboration of Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Asmodelle, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    This is a contemporary review of the involvement of Mileva Maric, Albert Einsteins first wife, in his theoretical work between the period of 1900 to 1905. Separate biographies are outlined for both Mileva and Albert, prior to their attendance at Zurich Polytechnic in 1896. Then a combined journal is described, detailing significant events. In additional to a biographical sketch, comments by various authors are compared and contrasted concerning two narratives. Firstly, the sequence of events that happened and the couples relationship at particular times. Secondly, the contents of letters from both Albert and Mileva. Some interpretations of the usage of pronouns in those letters during 1899 and 1905 are re-examined, and a different hypothesis regarding the usage of those pronouns is introduced. We examine various papers and compare the content of each subsequent paper to the work that Mileva was performing. With a different take, this treatment further suggests that the couple continued to work together much l...

  3. Phylogeography and population structure of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes in Uganda: implications for control of tsetse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon S Beadell

    appeared to receive little gene flow from populations in western or northern Uganda, supporting the feasibility of area wide control in the Lake Victoria region by the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign.

  4. Albert Hirschman e la scienza socio-morale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Trigilia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is part of the special issue of the journal, including the proceedings of the conference "Albert Hirschman scienziato sociale" held in Rome at the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei.The author discusses the "sociological" aspects of Hirschman's thought, stressing at the same time Hirschman's strong commitment to intellectual cross-fertilisation across the social sciences or, even better, the social science.JEL codes: B32, B26, N14Keywords: Albert Hirschman, market economy, individual behaviour 

  5. Modern non-pollen palynomorphs from East African Lake sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelorini, V.; Verbeken, A.; van Geel, B.; Cocquyt, C.; Verschuren, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an illustrated guide to the identification of non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs) preserved in lake-sediment archives from equatorial East Africa. Modern NPPs were recovered from recently deposited surface sediment in 20 small crater lakes in western Uganda, located along environmenta

  6. 非洲之珠--乌干达%The Pearl of Africa--Discovering Uganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏

    2004-01-01

    @@ If you think that the typical Africa countryside doesn't offer you rolling emerald1 hills, snow capped mountains,misty forests and deep, crystal dear lakes then you haven't been to Uganda. Even though Uganda is a small country, it offers all of this and a lot more-white water rafting, gorilla2tracking, game viewing and some of the best trekking in Africa. Most importantly, the friendly and relaxed locals all speak excellent English. What more could you ask for from an exotic holiday destination?

  7. Deprivation, HIV and AIDS in Northern Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: HIV & AIDS, Deprivation, Susceptibility, Vulnerability, Deaths, IDP camps, .... Uganda Peoples Defence Forces (UPDF), the Police and Local Defense .... on-going, northern Uganda is only included in the Rural Finance Service ...

  8. Shoreline vegetation distribution in relation to wave exposure and bay characteristics in a tropical great lake, Lake Victoria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azza, N.; Van de Koppel, J.; Denny, P.; Kansiime, F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the presumption that wind-wave exposure is a major regulator of vegetation distribution within lakes. Along a 675-km stretch of shore in northern Lake Victoria (Uganda), the pattern of vegetation distribution in relation to shoreline features, and the variation of shoreline swamp are

  9. Contribution of the Association »Albert Einstein« Through a 5-year Existance

    OpenAIRE

    Vojniković, Božo

    2011-01-01

    The Association »Albert Einstein« has been established as it is written in its memorandum: The Association »Albert Einstein« was established in 2005, the year of Physics and Albert Einstein, with intention to propagate Einstein’s contribution to Physics, Theory of Relativity and his humanities.

  10. Teaching, Learning and Ethical Dilemmas: Lessons from Albert Camus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Over the past half century, Albert Camus's story "The Guest" has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention. "The Guest" focuses on the ethical dilemmas faced by Daru, a school teacher in Algeria, and the two visitors he receives one day: Balducci, a gendarme, and an unnamed Arab prisoner. This paper addresses Camus's text from an educational…

  11. 15 Scientists Receive the 2006 Albert Einstein Visiting Professorship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Atotal of 15 world-renowned scholars, including six Nobel Prize laureates and one Turing Award winner, will be invited to visit CAS institutes under the prestigious program of the CAS Albert Einstein Visiting Professorship in 2006. The announcement was made recently in Beijing.

  12. Teaching, Learning and Ethical Dilemmas: Lessons from Albert Camus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Over the past half century, Albert Camus's story "The Guest" has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention. "The Guest" focuses on the ethical dilemmas faced by Daru, a school teacher in Algeria, and the two visitors he receives one day: Balducci, a gendarme, and an unnamed Arab prisoner. This paper addresses Camus's text from an educational…

  13. Affect, Albert Ellis, and Rational-Emotive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, G. Barry

    1989-01-01

    Contends affect is integral component of Rational Emotive Therapy model. Reviews affective aspect of the model in terms of theoretical constructs and therapeutic techniques. Makes references to author-observed interactions of Albert Ellis and describes his life-style to permit inferences regarding the role of affect. Includes commentary by Ellis…

  14. Let's Nuke the Transpersonalists: A Response to Albert Ellis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Responds to Albert Ellis' 1986 article which proposed to use rational-emotive therapy (RET) to save the world from religious and psychological fanatics and nuclear war. Attempts to provide a more balanced view of religion, RET, non-RET therapies, and the role of psychology in averting nuclear war. (Author/ABL)

  15. Albert Einstein and LD: An Evaluation of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marlin

    2000-01-01

    This article refutes claims that Albert Einstein had a learning disability and argues the claim derives its force not from evidence but from belief that the greatest among us suffer from some impairment and from desire to enhance the status of a marginalized group by including exceptional individuals. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  16. Albert Ellis's Theoretical Ark: Reactions of a Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, Earl J.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a brief reaction to Albert Ellis's "Postmodern Ethics for Active-Directive Counseling and Psychotherapy," which appears in this issue. Offers a condensed review of what has led up to Ellis's article. Pays special attention to the phrase "and/also" in relation to its implication for theory building and practice. (RJM)

  17. Albert Ellis's Theoretical Ark: Reactions of a Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, Earl J.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a brief reaction to Albert Ellis's "Postmodern Ethics for Active-Directive Counseling and Psychotherapy," which appears in this issue. Offers a condensed review of what has led up to Ellis's article. Pays special attention to the phrase "and/also" in relation to its implication for theory building and practice. (RJM)

  18. Albert Sidney Beckham: The First African American School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Albert Sidney Beckham was the first African American to hold the title school psychologist. This article examines the life and professional career of Beckham in the context of his contributions to the field of school psychology. It explores his graduate education, the founding of Howard University's Psychological Laboratory and his research and…

  19. The Continuing Saga of Little Albert in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Inaccuracies, especially concerning the stimulus generalization findings, in textbook descriptions of the Little Albert study have been well documented since the 1970s. However, there has not been a systematic examination of introductory psychology textbooks since the 1980s to determine whether such inaccuracies still persist. This study filled…

  20. Molecular phylogenetic investigations of the Viviparidae (Gastropoda: Caenogastropoda) in the lakes of the Rift Valley area of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Mita E; Kristensen, Thomas K; Madsen, Henry; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2009-09-01

    The freshwater gastropod family Viviparidae is nearly cosmopolitan, but absent from South America. On the African continent, two genera are recognized; the widespread Bellamya and the monotypic Neothauma, which is confined to Lake Tanganyika. Most of the African Bellamya species are confined to the major lakes of the Rift Valley area in Africa, i.e. Lake Albert, Lake Malawi, Lake Mweru, and Lake Victoria. The phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial (COI and 16S) and nuclear (H3, 18S and 28S) DNA inferred three major lake-clades; i.e. Lake Victoria/Kyoga/Albert, Lake Malawi and Lake Mweru/Bangweulu. The endemic B. rubicunda from Lake Albert and B. unicolor from Lake Kyoga were inferred to be part of the Lake Victoria clade. Bellamya capillata as identified by shell characters was polyphyletic in gene trees. The monophyletic Bellamya species radiation in Lake Malawi was most nearly related to the Lake Victoria/Kyoga/Albert-clade. Taxa from the Zambian lakes, Mweru and Bangweulu, were inferred together and placed ancestral to the other lakes. Neothauma tanganyicense was inferred as the sister-group to the Zambian Bellamya. Within the lake-clades the endemic radiations show very low genetic diversities (0-4.1% in COI), suggesting much faster morphological divergence than molecular divergence. Alternatively, Bellamya in Africa constitutes only a few species with several sub-species or eco-phenotypic morphs. The African viviparids were inferred to be the sister-group to a clade comprising Asian species, and the relatively low genetic diversity between the clades (12.6-15.5% in COI) makes a recent Miocene dispersal event from Asia to Africa much more likely than an ancient Gondwana vicarience distribution.

  1. Albert's test: a neglected test of perceptual neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, K J; McSherry, D; Stout, R W

    1986-02-22

    Disorders of perception are thought to be important in predicting the outcome from stroke, but their exact significance is difficult to define because of lack of standardised terminology and diagnostic methods. In a prospective study of 205 unselected stroke patients, perceptual neglect, assessed by a standardised test battery, was found in 49% of patients with lesions of the non-dominant hemisphere and in 25% with lesions of the dominant hemisphere. One component of the test battery was a simple test described by Albert in which patients cross out lines ruled in a standard fashion on a sheet of paper; this was easy to administer and related closely to neglect diagnosed by the test battery as a whole. Results of Albert's test were a significant predictor of both mortality and functional activity six months after the stroke, independent of the influence of other clinical, neurological, laboratory, and social factors. The full test battery for perceptual neglect was of no significant additional predictive value.

  2. Majority-Vote on Directed BARABÁSI-ALBERT Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    On directed Barabási-Albert networks with two and seven neighbours selected by each added site, the Ising model was seen not to show a spontaneous magnetisation. Instead, the decay time for flipping of the magnetisation followed an Arrhenius law for Metropolis and Glauber algorithms, but for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation decayed exponentially with time. On these networks the Majority-vote model with noise is now studied through Monte Carlo simulations. However, in this model, the order-disorder phase transition of the order parameter is well defined in this system. We calculate the value of the critical noise parameter qc for several values of connectivity z of the directed Barabási-Albert network. The critical exponentes β/ν, γ/ν and 1/ν were calculated for several values of z.

  3. Prince Albert Ii:座位告急

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李紫婷

    2010-01-01

    NPrince Albert Ii启航后,亚洲旅游人士日渐喜爱我们崭新的海上探险旅程。经两季额满的佳绩后,亚洲地区,尤其是中国和新加坡均获得骄人利润,而中国内地的提前预订市场为主要动力

  4. The Hamburg Humanist Albert Krantz's Use of Saxo Grammaticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Jensen, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    Albert Krantz indkorporerer Saxos lange latinske digt (ca. 1200) om Starkads død i sin Nordenshistorie (ca. 1500). Saxos tekst af digtet findes kun i én afskrift, mens Krantz' version af digtet findes både i et tryk og et håndskrift. Krantz-håndskriftet udnyttes for første gang til at rette fejl...

  5. Albert Hirschman e la scienza socio-morale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Trigilia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is part of the special issue of the journal, including the proceedings of the conference "Albert Hirschman scienziato sociale" held in Rome at the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei. The author discusses the "sociological" aspects of Hirschman's thought, stressing at the same time Hirschman's strong commitment to intellectual cross-fertilisation across the social sciences or, even better, the social science.

  6. Community perceptions, attitude, practices and treatment seeking behaviour for schistosomiasis in L. Victoria islands in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kabatereine, Narcis; Fleming, Fiona; Thuo, Wangechi; Tinkitina, Benjamin; Edridah M Tukahebwa; Fenwick, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 200,000 people, most of them infected with Schistosoma mansoni inhabit 150 islands in Lake Victoria in Uganda. Although a programme to control the disease has been ongoing since 2003, its implementation in islands is inadequate due to high transport costs on water. In 2011 and 2012, the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases (GNNTD) through Schistosomiasis Control Initiative (SCI) provided financial support to ease treatment delivery on the islands and over the period,...

  7. Wastewater treatment by a natural wetland: the Nakivubo Swamp Uganda: processes and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kansiime, F.; Nalubega, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Nakivubo swamp is located in Uganda, near its capital Kampala, and has been receiving wastewater from Kampala for over 30 years. This swamp consists of a floating root mat co-dominated by the sedges Cyperus papyrus and Miscanthidium violaceum. Tbe partially treated wastewater mostly flows beneath the floating mat into Lake Victoria via the Murchison Bay. Papyrus has a loose floating root mat which facilitates vertical mixing bebfl/een the interstitial mat water and the free water column b...

  8. [A biographical sketch of Albert Szent-Györgyi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Zoltán; Berger Salinas, Alexandra; Szánthó Pongrácz, György

    2015-08-01

    Albert Szent-Györgyi was a Hungarian biochemist and physiologist. He identified the structure and function of vitamin C, naming it as ascorbic acid. His research on cellular respiration and oxidation provided the basis for Krebs' citric acid cycle. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1937. With his collaborators, he discovered the biochemical basis of muscle contractility, isolating the basic proteins, giving them the name myosin and actin. Later on, he worked on the theory of carcinogenesis, linked to electron movements. He was one of the first researchers to describe the connection between free radicals and cancer. He lived a long, very complete life, defending always his opinion and freedom.

  9. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples.

  10. Albert Einstein, the human side glimpses from his archives

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert; Hoffmann, Banesh

    2013-01-01

    Modesty, humor, compassion, and wisdom are the traits most evident in this illuminating selection of personal papers from the Albert Einstein Archives. The illustrious physicist wrote as thoughtfully to an Ohio fifth-grader, distressed by her discovery that scientists classify humans as animals, as to a Colorado banker who asked whether Einstein believed in a personal God. Witty rhymes, an exchange with Queen Elizabeth of Belgium about fine music, and expressions of his devotion to Zionism are but some of the highlights found in this warm and enriching book.

  11. Remembering Albert deutsch, an advocate for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth J

    2011-12-01

    Albert Deutsch, journalist, advocate for the mentally ill, and honorary APA Fellow died 50 years ago. Author of The Mentally Ill in America and The Shame of the States, he believed in the obligation of individuals and institutions to advocate for patients. In 1961, he was in the midst of a vast project to assess the state of the art in psychiatric research. This article recalls aspects of Deutsch's life and work and places him in the historical context of individuals who have shown great compassion for disabled persons.

  12. [Albert Fromme (1881-1996) and his circle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpel, V

    1996-12-01

    Among Saxony's schools of surgery, Albert Fromme's in Dresden attain importance. On the basis of his work as a university professor in Göttingen for 10 years, he was able to train a large circle of surgeons in a major hospital. However, this did not detract from his clinical and scientific work. A. Fromme reached the top of German surgery and his crowning achievement was gaining the full professorship and rectorship of the Medical Academy "Carl Gustav Carus" in Dresden (today the Medical Faculty of the Technical University.

  13. The resistance councils in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Per

    in the capitals. In my dissertation I propose to change that focus. Partly by paying particular attention to rural politics, partly through a discussion of democracy in a longer-term perspective using a broader definition of democracy and finally through a discussion of democracy as effective political...... participation rather than only form al rights. I shall do so by analysing the Resistance Councils (RCs) in Uganda....

  14. Albert Camus : colonisateur de bonne volonté ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousse Allouche

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article analyse les raisons qui expliquent l'intérêt bénévole qu'Albert Camus avait démontré à l'endroit des Kabyles dans une série de reportages publiés dans Alger Républicain en juin 1939. Malgré une dénonciation franche et sincère de la souffrance dont les Kabyles étaient victimes, les écrits de Camus soulèvent des questions liées à la perception du sujet colonial. La représentation que Camus se faisait des Kabyles était entachée de préjugés et de stéréotypes coloniaux. Le présent article tentera d'établir que le contenu du reportage d'Albert Camus sur les Kabyles évoque à l'esprit l'attitude du colonisateur bienveillant.

  15. Para ver entre las sombras: la mirada de Albert Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinosa Rubio, Luciano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There are some free persons that have something like a magnetic needle, so in a dark time we need what Albert Camus offers: a living example (not a list of answers of integrity, compassion and wise judgment. He had to choose (maybe like everybody between nonsense and rebelliousness, and after between a daily attitude of fear or confidence. Finally, Camus tells us that the nature of human being and the beauty of the world must balance the historical ambitions.

    Hay algunas personas libres que tienen algo semejante a una brújula, por eso en tiempos oscuros necesitamos lo que Albert Camus ofrece: un ejemplo vivo (no una lista de respuestas de integridad, compasión y buen juicio. Tuvo que elegir (quizá como todos entre el absurdo y la rebeldía, y después entre una actitud cotidiana de miedo o confianza. Finalmente, Camus nos dice que la naturaleza del ser humano y la belleza del mundo deben equilibrar las ambiciones históricas.

  16. 'Trick', 'manipulation' and 'farce': Albert Moll's critique of occultism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffram, Heather

    2012-04-01

    In July 1925, the psychiatrist Albert Moll appeared before the district court in Berlin-Schöneberg charged with having defamed the medium Maria Vollhardt (alias Rudloff) in his 1924 book Der Spiritismus [Spiritism]. Supported by some of Berlin's most prominent occultists, the plaintiff--the medium's husband--argued that Moll's use of terms such as 'trick', 'manipulation' and 'farce' in reference to Vollhardt's phenomena had been libellous. In the three-part trial that followed, however, Moll's putative affront to the medium--of which he was eventually acquitted--was overshadowed, on the one hand, by a debate over the scientific status of parapsychology, and on the other, by the question of who--parapsychologists, occultists, psychiatrists or jurists--was entitled to claim epistemic authority over the occult. This paper will use the Rudloff-Moll trial as a means of examining Moll's critique of occultism, not only as it stood in the mid-1920s, but also as it had developed since the 1880s. It will also provide insight into the views of Germany's occultists and parapsychologists, who argued that their legitimate bid for scientific credibility was hindered by Dunkelmänner [obscurantists] such as Albert Moll.

  17. Psychology's Lost Boy: Will the Real Little Albert Please Stand Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the recent debate about the identity of psychology's lost boy-Little Albert, the infant subject in Watson and Rayner's classic experiment on fear conditioning. For decades, psychologists and psychology students have been intrigued by the mystery of Albert's fate. Now two evidentiary-based solutions to…

  18. Finding Little Albert: A Journey to John B. Watson's Infant Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Hall P.; Levinson, Sharman; Irons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In 1920, John Watson and Rosalie Rayner claimed to have conditioned a baby boy, Albert, to fear a laboratory rat. In subsequent tests, they reported that the child's fear generalized to other furry objects. After the last testing session, Albert disappeared, creating one of the greatest mysteries in the history of psychology. This article…

  19. Finding Little Albert: A Journey to John B. Watson's Infant Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Hall P.; Levinson, Sharman; Irons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In 1920, John Watson and Rosalie Rayner claimed to have conditioned a baby boy, Albert, to fear a laboratory rat. In subsequent tests, they reported that the child's fear generalized to other furry objects. After the last testing session, Albert disappeared, creating one of the greatest mysteries in the history of psychology. This article…

  20. Meet Cover Directors--Steve Albert, Rainbow School, Kahuku, Hawaii; Chuck Larson, Seagull Schools, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Profiles Chuck Larson and Steve Albert, each of whom directs a multi-site child care organization in Hawaii. Larson directs Rainbow School, dedicated to the idea that learning is a natural, joyful accomplishment of living. Albert directs Seagull School, responding to the early educational needs of Hawaii's diverse community by offering affordable,…

  1. A review of potable water accessibility and sustainability issues in developing countries - case study of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayebare, Shedrack R; Wilson, Lloyd R; Carpenter, David O; Dziewulski, David M; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-01-01

    Providing sources of sustainable and quality potable water in Uganda is a significant public health issue. This project aimed at identifying and prioritizing possible actions on how sustainable high quality potable water in Uganda's water supply systems could be achieved. In that respect, a review of both the current water supply systems and government programs on drinking water in Uganda was completed. Aspects of quantity, quality, treatment methods, infrastructure, storage and distribution of water for different water systems were evaluated and compared with the existing water supply systems in the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean, for purposes of generating feasible recommendations and opportunities for improvement. Uganda utilizes surface water, groundwater, and rainwater sources for consumption. Surface water covers 15.4% of the land area and serves both urban and rural populations. Lake Victoria contributes about 85% of the total fresh surface water. Potable water quality is negatively affected by the following factors: disposal of sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and surface run-offs during heavy rains. The total renewable groundwater resources in Uganda are estimated to be 29 million m3/year with about 20,000 boreholes, 3000 shallow-wells and 200,000 springs, serving more than 80% of the rural and slum communities. Mean annual rainfall in Uganda ranges from 500 mm to 2500 mm. Groundwater and rainwater quality is mainly affected by poor sanitation and unhygienic practices. There are significant regional variations in the accessibility of potable water, with the Northeastern region having the least amount of potable water from all sources. Uganda still lags behind in potable water resource development. Priorities should be placed mainly on measures available for improvement of groundwater and rainwater resource utilization, protection of watersheds, health education, improved water treatment methods and

  2. Integrated Co-management of Lakes through Beach Management Units

    OpenAIRE

    Goverment of Uganda; Department for International Development (DFID) of the UK Government

    2007-01-01

    Metadata only record In 1999, the Integrated Co-management of Lakes through Beach Management Units project was started in an effort to implement a new approach to the management of lake resources in Uganda. The main components of this plan involved decentralization, local community management, and improving the livelihood of the poor. In order to finance the management of these areas, the Beach Management Units (BMU's) are charging user fees to those individuals who obtain benefit from the...

  3. A TENTATIVE INTERPRETATION OF ALBERT CAMUS’THE GUEST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李汝仪

    1982-01-01

    <正> Albert Camus(1913-1960)was a noted French essayist,novelist and playwright,whose talent as a writer and an artist won him the Nobel Prize for literature in 1957.World War I bereaved him of his father and he was brought up by his mother in strai-tened circumstances.Through education,Camus was able to overstep the boundariesof his environment.Under the influence of the philosopher Jean Grenier,he deve-loped a lifelong interest in literature and philosophy.The fact that he was a victimof tuberculosis,a disease that dogged him all his life,forced him to give up half way

  4. Albert Einstein and Friedrich Dessauer: Political Views and Political Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenner, Hubert

    In this case study I compare the political views of the physicists Albert Einstein and Friedrich Dessauer between the first and second world wars, and I investigate their translation into concrete political practice. Both departed from their roles as experts in physics in favor of political engagement. The essence of Einstein's political practice seems to have been a form of political participation in exerting moral influence on people and organizations through public declarations and appeals in isolation from political mass movements. Dessauer exerted political influence both through public office (as a member of Parliament for the Catholic Center Party) and by acquiring a newspaper. The different political practice of both Einstein and Dessauer were unsuccessful in thwarting the Nazi takeover.

  5. Evolution of the western East African Rift System reflected in provenance changes of Miocene to Pleistocene synrift sediments (Albertine Rift, Uganda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sandra; Hornung, Jens; Hinderer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Miocene to Pleistocene synrift sediments in the Albertine Graben reflect the complex geodynamic evolution in the Western branch of the East African Rift System. In this study we focus on the provenance of these siliciclastic deposits to identify sediment sources and supply paths with the ultimate goal to reconstruct the exhumation history of different tectonic blocks during prolonged rifting, with specific focus on the uplift of the Rwenzori Mountains in Uganda. We present framework and heavy mineral petrographic data combined with varietal studies of detrital garnet and rutile, based on logged sediment sections on the Ugandan side of Lake Albert (Kisegi-Nyabusosi area). The analyzed sedimentary units have a feldspatho-quartzose composition and distinct variations in heavy mineral assemblages and mineral chemical composition indicating two provenance changes. The Miocene part of the stratigraphy is dominated by garnet, zircon, tourmaline and rutile, whereas Pliocene to Pleistocene sediment yields high amounts of less stable amphibole and epidote. An abrupt switch in heavy mineral assemblages occurs during the early Pliocene (~ 5.5-5.0 Ma) and clearly postdates the formation of Palaeolake Obweruka at ~ 8 Ma. Provenance signatures point to major sediment supply from the northeast and subsequently from the southeast. We interpret this first shift as transition from the pre-rift to the syn-rift stage. In this scenario, formation of Palaeolake Obweruka is due to higher humidity in the upper Miocene, rather than forced rifting. A second change of sediment composition is documented by mineral geochemistry and coincides with fragmentation of Palaeolake Obweruka starting at ~ 2.5 Ma. Detrital garnet in sediment of Miocene to Pliocene age is rich in pyrope and almandine and calculated Zr-in-rutile temperatures range between ~ 550 and 950 °C. In contrast, garnet occurring in Pleistocene sediment (Nyabusosi Formation) has a higher spessartine component and rutile thermometry

  6. Uganda National Council for Science and Technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the country is constrained by inadequate financial and human resource ... INTRODUCTION of clonal coffee material in Uganda's agricultural ... provision of improved health services. ... given to molecular and genetic aspects of.

  7. Uganda elanikud tarbivad enim alkoholi / Villu Zirnask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Zirnask, Villu, 1966-

    2007-01-01

    Maailma tervishoiuorganisatsiooni (WHO) statistika järgi tarbivad maailmas kõige enam alkoholi Uganda elanikud - aastas 17,6 liitrit puhast alkoholi vanema kui 15-aastase elaniku kohta. Lisaks tabel alkoholi tarbimise kohta maailmas

  8. Environmental interpretation in Uganda's national parks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    qualities of an interpreter, job motivation, monthly salary ... All the respondents were full time employees of the Uganda ... effective tool for managing ecotourism and conservation. ... required for interpretation is communication both verbally.

  9. Media and Mental Health in Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mental health and the guiding factors for wider media coverage of mental health issues in ... and the factors that influence media coverage of mental health issues in Uganda. ..... of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 1998;8(3):213-28.

  10. dense sweetpotato varieties to farmers in Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Uganda is among the African countries reported to be at high risk of Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) ... nurseries the plants of which are individually screened for reaction to SPVD, Alternaria blight, ... breeding and delivering a bio-fortified crop.

  11. Towards Introducing Space Science in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguma, S.; Ayikoru, J.

    This paper discusses the strategies and importance of introducing space science in Uganda. It proposes that Mbarara University, as a new university focusing on science and technology, would be ideally situated to spearhead the introduction of space science in Uganda. It is our expectation that this will have a spin-off effect to other higher institutions of learning and that consequently space science will become fully incorporated into the national teaching curriculum for all schools in Uganda. Based on the fact that the Government has a deliberate policy of popularizing science and technology to accelerate national economic development, the introduction of space science in the school system is to be enhanced by these efforts. We have charted the way forward for space science in Uganda and outlined the conceptual framework illustrating the spin-off effect into the education system.

  12. Epidemiology of cholera outbreaks and socio-economic characteristics of the communities in the fishing villages of Uganda: 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwire, Godfrey; Munier, Aline; Ouedraogo, Issaka; Heyerdahl, Leonard; Komakech, Henry; Kagirita, Atek; Wood, Richard; Mhlanga, Raymond; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe; Malimbo, Mugagga; Makumbi, Issa; Wandawa, Jennifer; Gessner, Bradford D; Orach, Christopher Garimoi; Mengel, Martin A

    2017-03-01

    The communities in fishing villages in the Great Lakes Region of Africa and particularly in Uganda experience recurrent cholera outbreaks that lead to considerable mortality and morbidity. We evaluated cholera epidemiology and population characteristics in the fishing villages of Uganda to better target prevention and control interventions of cholera and contribute to its elimination from those communities. We conducted a prospective study between 2011-15 in fishing villages in Uganda. We collected, reviewed and documented epidemiological and socioeconomic data for 10 cholera outbreaks that occurred in fishing communities located along the African Great Lakes and River Nile in Uganda. These outbreaks caused 1,827 suspected cholera cases and 43 deaths, with a Case-Fatality Ratio (CFR) of 2.4%. Though the communities in the fishing villages make up only 5-10% of the Ugandan population, they bear the biggest burden of cholera contributing 58% and 55% of all reported cases and deaths in Uganda during the study period. The CFR was significantly higher among males than females (3.2% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.02). The outbreaks were seasonal with most cases occurring during the months of April-May. Male children under age of 5 years, and 5-9 years had increased risk. Cholera was endemic in some villages with well-defined "hotspots". Practices predisposing communities to cholera outbreaks included: the use of contaminated lake water, poor sanitation and hygiene. Additional factors were: ignorance, illiteracy, and poverty. Cholera outbreaks were a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the fishing communities in Uganda. In addition to improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene, oral cholera vaccines could play an important role in the prevention and control of these outbreaks, particularly when targeted to high-risk areas and populations. Promotion and facilitation of access to social services including education and reduction in poverty should contribute to cholera

  13. Cervical cancer screening and treatment in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Nakisige

    2017-05-01

    Training of health professionals, ongoing construction of new radiotherapy bunkers, and opening of regional centers are all geared towards improving cervical cancer care in Uganda. The Uganda Cancer Institute Bill establishes the Institute as a semi-autonomous agency mandated to undertake and coordinate the prevention and treatment of cancer. Its implementation will be a milestone in cervical cancer prevention and control. However, execution will require political will and an increase in domestic and international investment.

  14. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Egypt and Uganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Egyptian-Chinese Friendship Association(ECFA) and the Uganda-China Friendship Association(UCFA),a goodwill delegation led by Wang Mingyi,vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the Henan Provincial People’s Congress and honorary president of the Henan Provincial People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries,paid a friendly visit to Egypt and Uganda from November 3 to 14,2006.

  15. Summary sensory workshop Uganda, 21 - 25 November 2005, Uganda Fisheries Laboratory in Entebbe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Icelandic International Development Agency (ICEIDA) has requested The Netherlands Institute of Fisheries Research (RIVO) to organize a sensory workshop in Uganda. ICEIDA is establishing a fisheries laboratory in Uganda in cooperation with the Ugandan government. One of the tasks within this proj

  16. Absurd ja lootus Albert Camus' lühiproosas / Aivar Kull

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kull, Aivar, 1955-

    2004-01-01

    Arvustus: Camus, Albert. Pagendus ja kuningriik : kogutud lühiproosa / prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Triinu Tamm, Krista Vogelberg, Tanel Lepsoo, Henno Rajandi. Tallinn : Varrak, 2004. Vaata ka: Kull, Aivar. Kulli pilk. - Tartu : Ilmamaa, 2005, lk. 78-79

  17. THE MYTHE NOVEL PLAGUE OF ALBERT CAMUS, ITS INSPIRATION SOURCES AND ITS EVOCATIVE SYMBOLS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fuat BOYACIOĞLU

    2012-01-01

    .... In the XXth the french writers such as Jean Giraudoux, André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus interpreted again the antique mythes in their works by making evocations to the events occured in their epoch...

  18. Absurd ja lootus Albert Camus' lühiproosas / Aivar Kull

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kull, Aivar, 1955-

    2004-01-01

    Arvustus: Camus, Albert. Pagendus ja kuningriik : kogutud lühiproosa / prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Triinu Tamm, Krista Vogelberg, Tanel Lepsoo, Henno Rajandi. Tallinn : Varrak, 2004. Vaata ka: Kull, Aivar. Kulli pilk. - Tartu : Ilmamaa, 2005, lk. 78-79

  19. [Gaston Bachelard and Albert Flocon the meeting of a philosopher and an engraver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on the collaboration between the philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard and the copper engraver Albert Flocon during the first decade after World War II. The exchange resulted in a number of books whose content is discussed.

  20. Antibodies Against Foot-and-mouth Disease (FMD) Virus in African Buffalos (Syncerus caffer) in Selected National Parks in Uganda (2001–2003)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayebazibwe, C.; Mwiine, F. N.; Balinda, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    the presence of antibodies against FMDV serotypes in wildlife in Uganda, serological studies were performed on buffalo serum samples collected between 2001 and 2003. Thirty-eight samples from African buffalos collected from Lake Mburo, Kidepo Valley, Murchison Falls and Queen Elizabeth National Parks were...... immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). High titres of antibodies (≥1 : 160) against FMDV serotypes SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 were identified. This study suggests that African buffalos in the different national parks in Uganda may play an important role in the epidemiology of SAT serotypes of FMDV....

  1. Principles for poverty alleviation among the youth in Northern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wilson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the statistical data and analysis con-cerning poverty among the young people in Uganda. The poverty is continuously ascending, with the most affected region being Northern Uganda. The major cause of poverty in Uganda has been the “South-North divide” fuelled by poor political leadership, that divides people along the lines of politics and ethnicity. Poverty has caused many young people of Northern Uganda to resort to rebellion against the government currently in power. This has led to unending political instability and civil strife most especially in Northern Uganda. In this article atten-tion is given to the conflict in Northern Uganda and attempts are made to propose some amicable resolutions. The discussion includes the current poverty scenario in Northern Uganda and possible strategies for reducing the poverty rate that has caused much damage in Northern Uganda.

  2. Albert Camus, écrivain français d’Algérie

    OpenAIRE

    Stępniak, Maria

    2000-01-01

    This study is about the Algerianity of Albert Camus, the greatest French writer of Algeria. The topic tackled has three aspects: Algeria as source of work, Camus’s Algerian political philosophy and the deterioration of his relationships with the native Algerian writers. The authoress leads to the following thesis: Albert Camus inscribes himself into the history of North African literature at the decline of the colonial age. His work is situated between a French colonial literat...

  3. Albert B. Sabin and the development of oral poliovaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horaud, F

    1993-12-01

    There are many reasons for the modern interest in viral vaccines, but there is no doubt that the key role played by viral vaccines in public health is the major factor since other prophylactic or therapeutic anti-viral products simply do not exist. Viral vaccines have a long history that has been marked by successful events and by tragic accidents. Live viral vaccines are an extraordinary category of biologicals since, despite their reputed efficacy, they were developed by empirical experiments and patient epidemiological observation. From this point of view oral polio vaccine should be considered a 'miracle' since it became a major tool for public health in the 20th century, before we were able to understand the molecular basis of polio virus neurovirulence attenuation. The first evidence that polio virus can be attenuated was provided in the early 1940s by Max Theiler, but it was Hilary Koprowsky who demonstrated further in 1952, that a rodent adapted strain was safe and able to immunise a limited number of volunteers. Koprowsky studies were confirmed later during a mass field trial in Africa. However it is undeniable that the patient and systematic work of Albert B. Sabin was primordial in developing live oral attenuated poliovaccine. The excellence of Sabin's testing of poliovirus neurovirulence in the accurate studies that he developed, enabled him to select, after the cloning of viral populations by plaque assay, the best attenuated variants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Discussions revealed that pregnant adolescents faced domestic physical violence. Furthermore .... pregnant adolescents' health care seeking, partner relations, perception of ... tings were held at the end of each day to ensure good quality data and discuss ... One may have a very harsh parent, myself 1 have a very.

  5. Uganda does what it can for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Uganda is a fertile, but poor, predominately rural country that was a British protectorate from 1894 until 1962. Uganda made significant achievements in the delivery of health care and education until the rule of Idi Amin (1971-79), when the country was plunged into chaos. The current Ugandan president enjoys broad-based support and has responded to the health care crisis by creating a national system of Resistance Councils using traditional networks to monitor local health developments. The health priorities for women in Uganda include improving maternal-child health; combating AIDS, rape, and sexual abuse; increasing use of family planning; understanding and working to change the cultural context that shapes reproductive health and sex behavior (such as "sugar daddies," older men who entice sex from young girls with presents and money); and expanding women's rights so that they can improve their health.

  6. The Burden of Cholera in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwire, Godfrey; Malimbo, Mugagga; Maskery, Brian; Kim, Young Eun; Mogasale, Vittal; Levin, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In 2010, the World Health Organization released a new cholera vaccine position paper, which recommended the use of cholera vaccines in high-risk endemic areas. However, there is a paucity of data on the burden of cholera in endemic countries. This article reviewed available cholera surveillance data from Uganda and assessed the sufficiency of these data to inform country-specific strategies for cholera vaccination. Methods The Uganda Ministry of Health conducts cholera surveillance to guide cholera outbreak control activities. This includes reporting the number of cases based on a standardized clinical definition plus systematic laboratory testing of stool samples from suspected cases at the outset and conclusion of outbreaks. This retrospective study analyzes available data by district and by age to estimate incidence rates. Since surveillance activities focus on more severe hospitalized cases and deaths, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to estimate the number of non-severe cases and unrecognized deaths that may not have been captured. Results Cholera affected all ages, but the geographic distribution of the disease was very heterogeneous in Uganda. We estimated that an average of about 11,000 cholera cases occurred in Uganda each year, which led to approximately 61–182 deaths. The majority of these cases (81%) occurred in a relatively small number of districts comprising just 24% of Uganda's total population. These districts included rural areas bordering the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, and Kenya as well as the slums of Kampala city. When outbreaks occurred, the average duration was about 15 weeks with a range of 4–44 weeks. Discussion There is a clear subdivision between high-risk and low-risk districts in Uganda. Vaccination efforts should be focused on the high-risk population. However, enhanced or sentinel surveillance activities should be undertaken to better quantify the endemic disease burden and high-risk populations

  7. The burden of cholera in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Bwire

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In 2010, the World Health Organization released a new cholera vaccine position paper, which recommended the use of cholera vaccines in high-risk endemic areas. However, there is a paucity of data on the burden of cholera in endemic countries. This article reviewed available cholera surveillance data from Uganda and assessed the sufficiency of these data to inform country-specific strategies for cholera vaccination. METHODS: The Uganda Ministry of Health conducts cholera surveillance to guide cholera outbreak control activities. This includes reporting the number of cases based on a standardized clinical definition plus systematic laboratory testing of stool samples from suspected cases at the outset and conclusion of outbreaks. This retrospective study analyzes available data by district and by age to estimate incidence rates. Since surveillance activities focus on more severe hospitalized cases and deaths, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to estimate the number of non-severe cases and unrecognized deaths that may not have been captured. RESULTS: Cholera affected all ages, but the geographic distribution of the disease was very heterogeneous in Uganda. We estimated that an average of about 11,000 cholera cases occurred in Uganda each year, which led to approximately 61-182 deaths. The majority of these cases (81% occurred in a relatively small number of districts comprising just 24% of Uganda's total population. These districts included rural areas bordering the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, and Kenya as well as the slums of Kampala city. When outbreaks occurred, the average duration was about 15 weeks with a range of 4-44 weeks. DISCUSSION: There is a clear subdivision between high-risk and low-risk districts in Uganda. Vaccination efforts should be focused on the high-risk population. However, enhanced or sentinel surveillance activities should be undertaken to better quantify the endemic disease burden and high

  8. The world-line. Albert Einstein and modern physics; Die Weltlinie. Albert Einstein und die moderne Physik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalampi, Jukka [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    This book is an entertaining and formula-free presentation of modern physics from the 19th century to present. The life of Albert Einstein and his scientific works are drawn as red fathom through the text. The author explains central terms and results of modern physics in populary-scientific form from the historical perspective. To the reader in humorous form an imagination is mediated how modern physics has been developed. We learn from the exciting effects of the ether, we hear from faraday and magnetic needles, from Maxwell's prediction of the electromagnetic waves, from heinrich Hertz and from the photoelectric effect. Was the Michelson-Morley experiment a measurement success or an unsuccess? Why has Einstein abandoned the ether? How has Einstein in the miraculous year 1905 revolutionated physics and why he has begged Newton for excusement? Exist atoms? What is motion? What is light and what is to be understood under ''now'' and ''here''? Light deviation or non-deviation? How act the tidal forces? And above all: How has Einstein answered these questions. We meet Poincare, Lorentz and Hilbert, Boltzmann and Bohr, Minkowski, Planck, de Broglie, Hubble and Weyl, Gamow, Hahn and Meitner, Kapiza and Landau, Fermi and many other famous scientists. What had Eddington against Chandrasekhar and what had Einstein against black holes? Why should space tourists and dream tourists make holiday not on the Loch Ness but on the safe side of a black hole? Why inveighed Pauli against Einstein? Is the concern with the atomic-bomb formula right? Smeared matter, big bang and cosmic background radiation, gravitational waves and double pulsars, the cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe are further themes, which keep the reader in breath and let no mental vacuum arise. [German] Das Buch ist eine unterhaltsame und formelfreie Darstellung der modernen Physik vom 19. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart. Das Leben Albert Einsteins

  9. Academic profile of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Maria Salles Carneiro-Sampaio

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: Based on data from the Medical Registryof Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE, the academic profile of 543physicians responsible for 80% of the admissions (group 1 and 315physicians hired by HIAE (group 2 was assessed; in that, 42professionals belonged to both groups, leading to a study of 816registries. RESULTS: In group 1 there was a higher concentration ofprofessionals dedicated to general surgery and surgical specialties,followed by general internist, gynecologists/obstetricians andpediatricians. In group 2 there was a predominance of generalinternists, followed by specialists in fields that support diagnosis andtreatment (Clinical Pathology, Anatomic pathology, Radiology,Endoscopy, among others, pediatricians and surgeons. Approximatelyhalf of the physicians in both groups graduated at the medical schoolsFaculdade de Medicina da USP (FMUSP and Escola Paulista deMedicina da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp/EPM. Ingroup 1, 66% of the physicians graduated in the 70’s and 80’s, whereas,in group 2, 73% graduated in the 80’s and 90’s. As to medical residence,70% of the professionals in group 2 were trained at Hospital dasClínicas, FMUSP and at Hospital São Paulo, Unifesp/EPM. Manyphysicians trained at Hospital das Clínicas graduated at other medicalschools in the State of São Paulo and in other states. RegardingMaster’s degree, 35% in group 1 and 33% in group 2 hold the title,and in 80% of the cases it was granted by FMUSP and Unifesp/EPM.Fifty-one per cent of the professionals in group 1 and 31% in group 2are PhDs – 90% of them bestowed by FMUSP and Unifesp/EPM, thetwo main public medical schools in the City of São Paulo. Taking intoaccount Master’s degree and/or PhD, 61% of the physicians in group1 and 49% in group 2 hold one or both titles. It was also observed that37% of the physicians in group 1 and 21% in group 2 were trainedabroad and/or were fellows of a foreign institution, mostly

  10. Albert Eckstein (1891-1950): modernizer of Turkey's paediatrics in exile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Nejat; Reisman, Arnold; Oral, Aysu

    2007-11-01

    This paper provides a historical perspective on Ordinarius Professor Albert Eckstein. He was the architect of modern paediatrics in Turkey. The year 2005 was the 55th anniversary of Professor Albert Eckstein's death and the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Paediatric Clinics at Ankara University, where he served for five years as the founding director while in forced exile from Nazi Germany. This is a tale of an individual caught at the crossroads and in the crossfire of history. His native land was in the throes of discarding him. His life was saved because (to him) an alien country was discarding a societal culture inherited from the Ottomans. Turkey recognized the need to modernize its society. The Nazis came to power. Albert Eckstein, a noted German paediatrician, was Jewish.

  11. Analytical estimates and proof of the scale-free character of efficiency and improvement in Barabasi-Albert trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Bermejo, B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Edificio Departamental II, Calle Tulipan S/N, 28933-Mostoles-Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: benito.hernandez@urjc.es; Marco-Blanco, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Edificio Departamental II, Calle Tulipan S/N, 28933-Mostoles-Madrid (Spain); Romance, M. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Edificio Departamental II, Calle Tulipan S/N, 28933-Mostoles-Madrid (Spain)

    2009-02-23

    Estimates for the efficiency of a tree are derived, leading to new analytical expressions for Barabasi-Albert trees efficiency. These expressions are used to investigate the dynamic behaviour of such networks. It is proved that the preferential attachment leads to an asymptotic conservation of efficiency as the Barabasi-Albert trees grow.

  12. Experiences from Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (Uganda)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2006-08-25

    Aug 25, 2006 ... Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2006. (ISSN 0850-3907) ... in turn induced new approaches designed to counteract the perceived .... BINP alone hosts about half of the world's population of the ..... Fortunately, the current national law review may include the Uganda Wildlife.

  13. Bottlenecks of blood processing in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajja, I.; Kyeyune, D.; Bimenya, G. S.; Sibinga, C. T. S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To identify where and why delays occur in Uganda blood banks. Background: The timely provision and supply of safe and efficacious blood components to hospitals depends on sound systems in the processing blood banks. Poorly managed systems lead to apparent blood shortages in hospitals and increa

  14. Tomato late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumwine, J.; Frinking, H.D.; Jeger, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    A survey on the tomato late blight situation and current practices for disease management was carried out in Uganda using an informal structured questionnaire approach. Ten districts from different agroclimatic zones were selected for the survey. Phytophthora infestans isolates from tomatoes were ob

  15. Cyber Crime in Uganda : Myth or Reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tushabe, Florence; Baryamureeba, Venansius; Ardil, C

    2005-01-01

    There is a general feeling that Internet crime is an advanced type of crime that has not yet infiltrated developing countries like Uganda. The carefree nature of the Internet in which anybody publishes anything at anytime poses a serious security threat for any nation. Unfortunately, there are no fo

  16. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Uganda And Botswana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Ministry of Local Government of Uganda and the Botswana-China Friendship Association, a 28-member Delegation of the CPAFFC, local government officials and Entrepreneurs led by CPAFFC Vice President Feng Zuoku, paid a goodwill visit to the two countries from May 27 to June 3.

  17. Seroprevalence of histoplasmosis in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Nathan C; Sarosi, George A; Meya, David B; Bohjanen, Paul R; Richer, Sarah M; Swartzentruber, Samantha; Halupnick, Ryan; Jarrett, Deidre; Wheat, L Joseph; Boulware, David R

    2016-03-01

    Histoplasmosis is endemic to the Midwestern United States, but cases have been reported nearly worldwide. A 1970 study found 3.8% skin test sensitivity to Histoplasma capsulatum in Uganda but no systemic study of histoplasmosis exposure has occurred since the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic. This study investigated the seroprevalence of H. capsulatum and sought previously undetected cases of histoplasmosis in Kampala, Uganda. Serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or urine specimens were obtained from HIV-infected persons with suspected meningitis. Specimens were tested for H. capsulatum IgG and IgM by enzyme immune assay and Histoplasma antigen. 147 of the 257 subjects who were enrolled had cryptococcal meningitis. Overall, 1.3% (2/151) of subjects were serum Histoplasma IgG positive, and zero of 151 were IgM positive. Antigen was not detected in any serum (n = 57), urine (n = 37, or CSF (n = 63) samples. Both subjects with serum Histoplasma IgG positivity had cryptococcal meningitis. Histoplasma capsulatum IgG was detected at low levels in persons with HIV/AIDS in Kampala, Uganda. Histoplasmosis is not widespread in Uganda but microfoci do exist. There appears to be no cross-reactivity between Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma antigen testing, and cryptococcosis appears to be at most, a rare cause of positive Histoplasma IgG.

  18. Technology, production and partnership innovation in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Musaazi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007 a partnership between UNHCR, the Government of Uganda and ‘MakaPads’ inventor Moses Musaazi has helped provide affordable sanitary pads for thousands of refugee girls and women while substantially reducing UNHCR’s expenditure on these essential items.

  19. Science, Technology and Innovation in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Sukhdeep; Farley, Sara E.; Hawkins, Robert; Wagner, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Science, Technology and Innovation in Uganda is part of the World Bank Studies series. These papers are published to communicate the results of the Bank's ongoing research and to stimulate public discussion. This study presents a unique methodology to view science, technology and innovation (STI) in developing countries. The study provides a set…

  20. Understanding shallow groundwater contamination in Bwaise slum, Kampala, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenje, P. M.; Havik, J.; Foppen, J. W.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater in unsewered urban areas is heavily contaminated by onsite sanitation activities and is believed to be an important source of nutrients ex-filtrating into streams and thus contributing to eutrophication of Lakes in urban areas. Currently the fate of nutrients and especially phosphorus leached into groundwater in such areas is not well known. In this study, we undertook an extensive investigation of groundwater in Bwaise slum, Kampala Uganda to understand the distribution and fate of sanitation-related nutrients N and P that are leached into groundwater. Transects of monitoring wells were installed in Bwaise slum and downstream of the slum. From these wells, water levels were measured and water quality analyses done to understand the distribution and composition of the nutrients, how they evolve downstream and the possible subsurface processes affecting their fate during transport. These findings are necessary to evaluate the risk of eutrophication posed by unsewered areas in urban cities and to design/implement sanitation systems that will effectively reduce the enrichment of these nutrients in groundwater. Key words: fate, groundwater, nutrients, processes, slums

  1. Strategies for sustainable land management and poverty reduction in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    "The government of Uganda, with help from its development partners, is designing and implementing policies and strategies to address poverty, land degradation, and declining agricultural productivity. Land degradation, especially soil erosion and depletion of soil nutrients, is widespread in Uganda and contributes to declining productivity, which in turn increases poverty. The report has four major objectives: (1) to examine the causes of land degradation in Uganda; (2) to identify the determ...

  2. Over lichtemissie: Albert Einstein en de vroege geschiedenis van de Nederlandse Natuurkundige Vereniging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tauschinsky, A.; van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2008-01-01

    Op 29 april 1922 gaf Albert Einstein een lezing voor de Nederlandse Natuurkundige Vereniging op het Natuurkundig Laboratorium aan de Plantage Muidergracht te Amsterdam. Hij deed er verslag van een experiment dat hij zo’n zes maanden eerder had voorgesteld en dat zou hebben moeten uitmaken of licht u

  3. [ISO 9002 at the Center of Pediatric Intensive Care at the Albert Einstein Israeli Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gé Lacerda, D P; Rocha, M L; Santos, R P

    2000-01-01

    This study shows the process of implementation of a quality program in Pediatric Intensive Therapy Center of "Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein" which resulted in the certification of this service for the Standards ISO 9002/94. It points out the nurse's role as a leader in this process.

  4. The Gendering of Albert Einstein and Marie Curie in Children's Biographies: Some Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rachel E.; Jarrard, Amber R.; Tippins, Deborah J.

    2009-01-01

    Few twentieth century scientists have generated as much interest as Albert Einstein and Marie Currie. Their lives are centrally depicted in numerous children's biographies of famous scientists. Yet their stories reflect interesting paradoxes and tacit sets of unexplored sociocultural assumptions about gender in science education and the larger…

  5. Visions of Savage Paradise : Albert Eckhout, Court Painter in Colonial Dutch Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, Rebecca Parker

    2006-01-01

    Visions of Savage Paradise is the first major book-length study of the Dutch artist Albert Eckhout to be published since 1938. This book, which draws extensively on the author's doctoral dissertation, examines the fascinating works of art produced by Eckhout while he was court painter in Dutch Brazi

  6. In the Beginning--Albert McKinley and the Founding of "The Social Studies"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Oliver M.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the founding of "The Social Studies" by Albert E. McKinley. The author briefly introduces McKinley's life and examines the evolution of the magazine. He identifies the conflicts and struggles between the historians and social studies educators for the magazine. The author concludes that the magazine has served both history…

  7. Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2012-01-01

    Albert Einstein accepted a “special” visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation i

  8. Democracy's Champion: Albert Shanker and the International Impact of the American Federation of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Albert Shanker (1928-1997) is known mainly for his successful struggle to obtain collective bargaining for teachers, his leadership of teacher unions, and his championship of education reform. Shanker built large and powerful city, state, and national unions of teachers and other public employees that still stand as models both for union democracy…

  9. Belgia kuningas Albert II ja kuninganna Paola jõudsid Eestsse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Eestisse saabusid riigivisiidile Belgia kuningas Albert II ja kuninganna Paola. President Toomas Hendrik Ilves ja proua Evelin Ilves võtsid külalised vastu Kadriorus. Päeva ametliku osa lõpetas galaõhtusöök Mustpeade majas, kus riigipead kõne pidasid

  10. Distorting the Historical Record: One Detailed Example from the Albert Shanker Institute's Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educator, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a detailed example from the Albert Shanker Institute's report that shows the error of U.S. history textbooks and how it is distorting the historical record. One of the most glaring errors in textbooks is the treatment of the role that unions and labor activists played as key participants in the civil rights movement. The…

  11. In the Beginning--Albert McKinley and the Founding of "The Social Studies"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Oliver M.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the founding of "The Social Studies" by Albert E. McKinley. The author briefly introduces McKinley's life and examines the evolution of the magazine. He identifies the conflicts and struggles between the historians and social studies educators for the magazine. The author concludes that the magazine has served both history…

  12. Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonolla, Mauro; Storelli, Nicola; Danza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Lake Cadagno (26 ha) is a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the Swiss Alps at 1921 m asl with a maximum depth of 21 m. The presence of crystalline rocks and a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the catchment area makes the lake a typical “sulphuretum ” dominated by coupled carbon and sulphur cyc...

  13. Accessing diabetes care in rural Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannie; Bahendeka, Silver K.; Bygbjerg, Ib C.

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D) are increasing rapidly in most Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries like Uganda. Little attention has been given to how patients with T2D try to achieve treatment when the availability of public health care for their disease is limited......, as is the case in most SSA countries. In this paper we focus on the landscape of availability of care and the therapeutic journeys of patients within that landscape. Based on fieldwork in south-western Uganda including 10 case studies, we explore the diabetes treatment options in the area and what it takes...... to access the available treatment. We analyse the resources patients need to use the available treatment options, and demonstrate that the patients’ journeys to access and maintain treatment are facilitated by the knowledge and support of their therapy management groups. Patients access treatment more...

  14. Education and agricultural productivity: evidence from Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Existing evidence on the impact of education on agricultural productivity in Africa is mixed, with estimates usually insignificant although sometimes large. Analysis of the first nationally representative household survey of Uganda gives an estimate of the impact of household primary schooling on crop production comparable to the developing country average. In addition, the primary schooling of neighbouring farm workers appears to raise crop production and these external returns exceed the in...

  15. LIMNOLOGY, LAKE BASINS, LAKE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre GÂŞTESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Limnology is a border discipline between geography, hydrology and biology, and is also closely connected with other sciences, from it borrows research methods. Physical limnology (the geography of lakes, studies lake biotopes, and biological limnology (the biology of lakes, studies lake biocoenoses. The father of limnology is the Swiss scientist F.A. Forel, the author of a three-volume entitled Le Leman: monographie limnologique (1892-1904, which focuses on the geology physics, chemistry and biology of lakes. He was also author of the first textbook of limnology, Handbuch der Seenkunde: allgemeine Limnologie,(1901. Since both the lake biotope and its biohydrocoenosis make up a single whole, the lake and lakes, respectively, represent the most typical systems in nature. They could be called limnosystems (lacustrine ecosystems, a microcosm in itself, as the American biologist St.A. Forbes put it (1887.

  16. Bubonic and pneumonic plague - Uganda, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-24

    Plague is a life-threatening fleaborne disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. The most common clinical form is bubonic plague, which is characterized by high fever and regional lymphadenitis. Without treatment, infection can spread from lymph nodes to the lungs, resulting in pneumonic plague and the potential for person-to-person transmission through respiratory droplets. In November 2006, the Uganda Ministry of Health received reports of an increase in bubonic plague cases and a possible outbreak of pneumonic plague among residents in the Arua and Nebbi districts. In response, the Uganda Ministry of Health and CDC conducted a joint investigation in the two districts during November 28-December 30, 2006. Overall, 127 clinical plague cases were identified, along with evidence of a focal pneumonic outbreak in Nebbi District. Median age of the patients was 14 years (range: 2 weeks-65 years); 65 (51%) were female. Twenty-eight (22%) of the 127 patients died. Among the 102 patients with documented symptoms, 90 (88%) had bubonic plague, and 12 (12%) had pneumonic plague. The results of this investigation underscore the need to 1) continue efforts to educate residents of rural Uganda regarding the source, signs, and symptoms of plague and the life-saving importance of seeking treatment; 2) strengthen plague surveillance and diagnostic capabilities; and 3) improve emergency response and vector-control capacity, especially in remote regions of the country.

  17. Media and mental health in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigozi, F; Ssebunnya, J; Kizza, D; Ndyanabangi, S

    2010-05-01

    The media is largely regarded as an important stakeholder in health service delivery, with a great influence on public attitudes. However, little is known about its interest in mental health and the guiding factors that influence media coverage of mental health issues. This article describes the importance accorded to mental health by the media and the factors that influence media coverage of mental health issues in Uganda. Semi-structured interviews were held with representatives from six prominent media houses as part of the situational analysis of the mental health system in Uganda. Data was analyzed using Nvivo 7 qualitative data analysis software. The media was found to be interested and actively involved in health initiatives, but with little attention devoted to mental health. Coverage and interest in mental health was noted to be mainly dependent on the individual journalists' interests, and mostly for personal reasons. Low interest was largely attributed to mental health being perceived as a non-priority area, and the fact that mental illness is not a major contributor to mortality. Media coverage and reporting is guided by prioritization of the Health Department. The media in Uganda is an important stakeholder in the health care system with a key role of advocacy, publicity and mass education. Media houses however are less interested in mental health as evidenced by low coverage of mental health issues. This calls for advocacy and sensitization as a way of persuading media for more involvement in mental health initiatives.

  18. Livestock manures and compost production and use in Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under the Uganda conditions, the use of artificial fertilisers was ha~pered by their high cost ... of plant nutrients in Uganda came into light between 1903 ai1d 1924 during .... and would not be stimulated to heavy vegetative growth, as was the ...

  19. Dilemmas in Implementing Language Rights in Multilingual Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namyalo, Saudah; Nakayiza, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Even after decades of uttering platitudes about the languages of Uganda, language policy pronouncements have invariably turned out to be public relations statements rather than blueprints for action. A serious setback for the right to linguistic equality and the right to use Uganda's indigenous languages has largely hinged on the language…

  20. Assessment of Business Information Access Problems in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constant Okello-Obura

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Uganda's economy has great potential. Endowed with significant natural resources, including ample fertile land, regular rainfall, and mineral deposits, it appeared poised for rapid economic growth and development at independence. However, chronic political instability and erratic economic management produced a record of persistent economic decline that left Uganda among the world's poorest and least-developed countries (United States, Bureau of African Affairs 2007. This situation can be averted by effectively promoting the involvement of the engine of economic growth, the SMEs in national and international businesses. The international involvement of SMEs requires accurate and adequate access to relevant business information. Based on that, a study was conducted to assess the problems SMEs face in accessing business information in Uganda. The study using a descriptive design with survey research techniques among others examined the problems SMEs in northern Uganda face in accessing business information; identified problems information providers face in providing business information to the SMEs in northern Uganda and established whether SMEs in northern Uganda use public libraries in accessing business information. The paper reports on among others the proposed strategic interventions for business information to be accessed by the SMEs . The paper concludes that there is a need for Uganda and, in particular, northern Uganda to develop a strategy for business information access by the SMEs.

  1. Transitional justice and gender in Uganda: Making peace, failing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    part of normal political business. The peace process in Uganda. The formal peace negotiation process to address Northern Uganda's conflict began in 2006 after ... Women's International Cross Cultural Exchange (Isis-WICCE) who collected ... Building skills of women: The coalition built the knowledge and skills of identified.

  2. Luther and the Law in the Lutheran Church of Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-26

    May 26, 2016 ... Finally, the Lutheran Church of Uganda refers to the body of Lutherans in Uganda. .... lightning, smoke and the burning mountain, even those who claim to be righteous .... of what happened with the unfaithful Cain and Esau, and how God .... Law stay away from committing sin because the Law threatens to ...

  3. Cultural control of banana weevils in Ntungamo, southwestern Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okech, S.H.; Gold, C.S.; Bagamba, F.; Masanza, M.; Tushemereirwe, W.; Ssennyonga, J.

    2005-01-01

    The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture and the Uganda National Banana Research Programme tested and evaluated selected cultural management options for the banana weevil through on-farm farmer participatory research in Ntungamo district, Uganda between 1996 and 003. A farmer adoption stu

  4. The Prevalence of Brucellosis in Cattle, Goats and Humans in Rural Uganda: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R; Nakavuma, J L; Ssajjakambwe, P; Vudriko, P; Musisi, N; Kaneene, J B

    2016-12-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the presence of brucellosis in cattle, goats and humans in farms from south-western Uganda and identify risk factors associated with brucellosis in these three host groups. Data and serum samples were collected from 768 cattle, 315 goats and 236 humans, with 635 samples of bovine milk, from 70 farms in two different study areas in south-western Uganda. Sera from livestock were tested with the Rose Bengal Plate test, using B. abortus and B. melitensis antigens, and human sera were tested with a commercial IgG/IgM lateral flow assay. Milk samples were tested using the OIE-approved milk ring test. Screening tests for brucellosis were positive in 14% of cattle serum, 29% of bovine milk, 17% of goat serum and 11% of human serum samples. There were significant differences in the test prevalence of brucellosis by study site, with levels higher in the study area near Lake Mburo National Park than in the study area near Queen Elizabeth National Park. Multivariable regression models identified risk factors associated with increasing test positivity at the individual and farm levels for cattle, goats and humans. Positive associations were seen between increasing seropositivity of brucellosis in goats, cattle and humans. Results of multivariable analyses suggest that improvements in farm biosecurity and hygiene may reduce the risk of brucellosis on the farm and suggest a role for ticks in bovine brucellosis. Although cattle are the focus of brucellosis control in Uganda, the significant associations between seropositivity in humans and seropositivity in goats suggest that brucellosis in goats may be an important contributor to the epidemiology of the disease on the farm.

  5. Epidemiology of cholera outbreaks and socio-economic characteristics of the communities in the fishing villages of Uganda: 2011-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Issaka; Heyerdahl, Leonard; Komakech, Henry; Kagirita, Atek; Wood, Richard; Mhlanga, Raymond; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe; Malimbo, Mugagga; Makumbi, Issa; Wandawa, Jennifer; Gessner, Bradford D.; Orach, Christopher Garimoi; Mengel, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The communities in fishing villages in the Great Lakes Region of Africa and particularly in Uganda experience recurrent cholera outbreaks that lead to considerable mortality and morbidity. We evaluated cholera epidemiology and population characteristics in the fishing villages of Uganda to better target prevention and control interventions of cholera and contribute to its elimination from those communities. Methodology/Principal findings We conducted a prospective study between 2011–15 in fishing villages in Uganda. We collected, reviewed and documented epidemiological and socioeconomic data for 10 cholera outbreaks that occurred in fishing communities located along the African Great Lakes and River Nile in Uganda. These outbreaks caused 1,827 suspected cholera cases and 43 deaths, with a Case-Fatality Ratio (CFR) of 2.4%. Though the communities in the fishing villages make up only 5–10% of the Ugandan population, they bear the biggest burden of cholera contributing 58% and 55% of all reported cases and deaths in Uganda during the study period. The CFR was significantly higher among males than females (3.2% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.02). The outbreaks were seasonal with most cases occurring during the months of April-May. Male children under age of 5 years, and 5–9 years had increased risk. Cholera was endemic in some villages with well-defined “hotspots”. Practices predisposing communities to cholera outbreaks included: the use of contaminated lake water, poor sanitation and hygiene. Additional factors were: ignorance, illiteracy, and poverty. Conclusions/Significance Cholera outbreaks were a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the fishing communities in Uganda. In addition to improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene, oral cholera vaccines could play an important role in the prevention and control of these outbreaks, particularly when targeted to high-risk areas and populations. Promotion and facilitation of access to social services

  6. Albert Luthuli Municipality community-based labour-intensive IRMA infrastructure provision: Findings of an impact study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashiri, M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly describes the community-based labour-intensive construction of the Integrated Rural Mobility and Access (IRMA) transportation infrastructure projects using selected beneficiary villages in Albert Luthuli local municipality as case...

  7. ALBERT, HANS, Racionalismo crítico. Por Juan A. Estrada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Estrada

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autor: Hans Albert (2002 Editorial: Síntesis, Madrid, 238 pp.   Desde su tratado sobre la razón crítica, Albert no ha cesado de precisar su concepción filosófica, desde un diálogo constante con Popper y respondiendo a las diversas críticas de la hermenéutica y la fenomenología, de la teoría crítica y de la misma teología. En este volumen ofrece varios trabajos con el subtítulo de «Cuatro capítulos para una sátira del pensamiento ilusorio», precedida de un denso y buen prólogo de Ángeles J. Perona.

  8. Albert Memmi: retrato de un extranjero. Crisis de identidad y creación literaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Marco Vega

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Albert Memmi’s first autobiographical novel, called La statue de sel, was published in 1953. Born in a Jewish family, Memmi grows up in Tunisia at a time where this Muslim majority country was still a French protectorate. Growing up in such an exceptional environment causes him a serious identity crisis. At 35, Memmi realizes that only literature can help him understand his place in the world. In this paper, we would like to analyze the feeling of strangeness Albert Memmi grew up with, paying special attention to his books: La statue de sel and the Portrait du colonisé, an essay published in 1957 as a theoretical complement to the novel.

  9. The Loneliness of the self and the Moral immanent in Albert Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington José Santana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The world, the way we grasp, is not understandable and we do not know how the world will come to an end or what comes after. The present article analyses critically a moral based upon immanence only when man find out that the self is alone and the other is an outsider according to French Philosopher Albert Camus. God keeps far and speechless and human being and in this scenario appears the absurd that challenges all types of hope. In this regard freedom reveals itself as a blessing and curse because can lead us to nothing or to the hope of finding something more. Analysing the text of Albert Camus, one will find out that maybe there is something that is not only immanent.

  10. Ising Model Spin S = 1 ON Directed BARABÁSI-ALBERT Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    On directed Barabási-Albert networks with two and seven neighbours selected by each added site, the Ising model with spin S = 1/2 was seen not to show a spontaneous magnetisation. Instead, the decay time for flipping of the magnetisation followed an Arrhenius law for Metropolis and Glauber algorithms, but for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation decayed exponentially with time. On these networks the Ising model spin S = 1 is now studied through Monte Carlo simulations. However, in this model, the order-disorder phase transition is well defined in this system. We have obtained a first-order phase transition for values of connectivity m = 2 and m = 7 of the directed Barabási-Albert network.

  11. Analytic solutions for links and triangles distributions in finite Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo M.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-01-01

    Barabási-Albert model describes many different natural networks, often yielding sensible explanations to the subjacent dynamics. However, finite size effects may prevent from discerning among different underlying physical mechanisms and from determining whether a particular finite system is driven by Barabási-Albert dynamics. Here we propose master equations for the evolution of the degrees, links and triangles distributions, solve them both analytically and by numerical iteration, and compare with numerical simulations. The analytic solutions for all these distributions predict the network evolution for systems as small as 100 nodes. The analytic method we developed is applicable for other classes of networks, representing a powerful tool to investigate the evolution of natural networks.

  12. Parameter specification for the degree distribution of simulated Barabási-Albert graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Zaid, Fairul; Kabban, Christine M. Schubert; Deckro, Richard F.; White, Edward D.

    2017-01-01

    The degree distribution of a simulated Barabási-Albert graph under linear preferential attachment is investigated. Specifically, the parameters of the power law distribution are estimated and compared against the theoretical values derived using mean field theory. Least squares method and MLE-nonparametric method were utilized to estimate the distribution parameters on 1000 simulated Barabási-Albert graphs for edge parameter m ∈ { 2 , 4 , 6 } and size n ∈ {2k : k = 5 , 6 , … , 14 , 15 } . Goodness of fit metrics were computed on a second set of simulated graphs for the median of the estimated parameters and other hypothetical values for the distribution parameters. The results suggest that the distribution of the parameters from simulated graphs are significantly different from the theoretical distribution and is also dependent on m. Further results confirm the finding that the parameter of the power law distribution, β, increases as m increases.

  13. A Modified Earthquake Model Based on Generalized Barabási-Albert Scale-Free Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Min; WANG Gang; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2006-01-01

    A modified Olami-Feder-Christensen model of self-organized criticality on generalized Barabási-Albert (GBA) scale-free networks is investigated. We find that our model displays power-law behavior and the avalanche dynamical behavior is sensitive to the topological structure of networks. Furthermore, the exponent τ of the model depends on b, which weights the distance in comparison with the degree in the GBA network evolution.

  14. Finite-size effects on semi-directed Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M. A.; Sumour, Muneer A.; Elbitar, A. M.; Shabat, M. M.; Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-04-01

    In scale-free Barabási-Albert (BA) networks, we study the finite-size effect at different number m of neighbors. So, we investigate the effects of finite network size N for the recently developed semi-directed BA networks (SDBA1 and SDBA2) at fixed 2≤m≤300) and show and explain the gap in the distribution of the number k(i) of neighbors of the nodes i.

  15. [The blindness in the literature-Jose Saramago: blindness and Albert Bang: the blind witness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permin, H; Norn, M

    2001-01-01

    Two novels with different aspects of blindness seen through the doctors eyes. The Portuguese Nobel-prize winner José Saramago's story of a city struck by an epidemic of "white blindness", where the truth is what we cannot bear to see. The Danish author and unskilled labourer Albert Bang's (synonym with Karl E. Rasmussen) crime novel describes a blind or pretend to be blind butcher, who is a witness to a murder. Both novels are lyric, thought-provoking and insightful.

  16. Albert Hofmann and Steve Myers honoured by the University of Geneva

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann (top) and Steve Myers (bottom) receive the title of Doctor Honoris Causa from the hands of Maurice Bourquin, Rector of the University of Geneva and President of CERN Council.   In front of Geneva University's crowded auditorium, Albert Hofmann and Steve Myers received title of Doctor Honoris Causa last Friday 8 June. The two members of CERN thereby received the University's highest distinction. This honour comes in recognition of their careers in the service of accelerator physics and their essential contribution to the success of LEP. Steve Myers joined CERN in August 1972 to work as engineer-in charge of the Intersecting Storage Rings collider (ISR). He was responsible for the acceleration by phase displacement of the high intensity beams to 31 GeV/c. He also worked on many other topics, notably the beam-beam effect in the ISR. Albert Hofmann arrived at CERN from the Cambridge Electron Accelerator (CEA) near Boston, USA, in 1973 - already with an excellent reputation as accelerato...

  17. Spatiotemporal analysis of encroachment on wetlands: a case of Nakivubo wetland in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isunju, John Bosco; Kemp, Jaco

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands provide vital ecosystem services such as water purification, flood control, and climate moderation among others, which enhance environmental quality, promote public health, and contribute to risk reduction. The biggest threat to wetlands is posed by human activities which transform wetlands, often for short-term consumptive benefits. This paper aimed to classify and map recent land cover and provide a multi-temporal analysis of changes from 2002 to 2014 in the Nakivubo wetland through which wastewater from Kampala city drains to Lake Victoria in Uganda. The paper contributes through spatially congruent change maps showing site-specific land cover conversions. In addition, it gives insight into what happened to the wetlands, why it happened, how the changes in the wetlands affect the communities living in them, and how the situation could be better managed or regulated in future. The analysis is based on very high resolution (50-62 cm) aerial photos and satellite imagery, focus group discussions, and key informant interviews. Overall, the analysis of losses and gains showed a 62 % loss of wetland vegetation between 2002 and 2014, mostly attributable to crop cultivation. Cultivation in the wetland buffering the lake shore makes it unstable to anchor. The 2014 data shows large portions of the wetland calved away by receding lake waves. With barely no wetland vegetation buffer around the lake, the heavily polluted wastewater streams will lower the quality of lake water. Furthermore, with increased human activities in the wetland, exposure to flooding and pollution will be likely to have a greater impact on the health and livelihoods of vulnerable communities. This calls for a multi-faceted approach, coordination of the various stakeholders and engagement of wetland-dependent communities as part of the solution, and might require zoning out the wetland and restricting certain activities to specific zones.

  18. Medical education and health care in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, J M

    1980-10-01

    Health care and medical education in Uganda, once the best in Black Africa, have been adversely affected by the economic, political, and social upheavals in this developing country during the past decade. Crop failures, inadequate public health measures, shortage of medical equipment and essential drugs, and lack of sufficient medical school faculty have resulted in a major crisis. Substantial aid from the medical profession in developed countries will be necessary to help restore medical practice and education to the level present before the regime of Idi Amin.

  19. A dental experience with the Abayudaya community in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    If anyone told me four months ago that I would be taking out teeth and caring about the future of dental health in Uganda, the land of Idi Amin and Raid on Entebbe, I'd have told them they were crazy. I was going to Kenya for Operation Smile; a string of events led me to Samson Wamani, Medical Director for the Abayudaya community in Uganda, and helped me realize there's a huge difference between dental care here in the U.S., and what it is for fellow Jews of Uganda.

  20. Review of indigenous knowledge in Uganda: Implications for its promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabuti, John R.S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous knowledge (IK has a role to play for households and community well-being in Uganda. However, IK is undergoing significant change and is on the decline in Uganda because of factors such as acculturation or the loss of IK through exposure to external cultures. In this paper we review some of the roles of, and threats to, IK with particular reference to the local community of Kaliro District. We make some recommendations on how to conserve IK in Kaliro and elsewhere in Uganda.

  1. Milankovitch Cyclostratigraphy of Pliocene in the North Albert Basin, Uganda%乌干达Albert盆地北部上新统旋回地层学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟; 杨小丽; 李雪; 房磊; 刘钧

    2015-01-01

    乌干达Albert盆地是一个富含油气的中新生代地堑,然而目前研究程度较浅,整个盆地尚未建立统一的地层格架,盆地充填与沉积演化过程研究也不够深入.以该盆地北部上新统为研究对象,选择区内具有代表性的3口井进行米兰科维奇旋回研究.通过对GR数据进行频谱分析和连续小波变换发现,3口井中均保留了96 ka的短偏心率周期,说明该盆地北部上新统受到了短偏心率周期的控制.通过滤波分析提取出各井的短偏心率变化曲线,建立了该地区精确的天文年代标尺,在此基础上,对目的层段进行旋回划分,发现旋回个数与短偏心率周期个数基本一致.沉积速率的计算结果表明,目的层沉积速率相对稳定,主要集中于0.1~0.2 m/ka之间.本次研究对进一步深入认识Albert盆地的沉积演化特征具有重要意义.

  2. can volunteer community health workers in rural Uganda provide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Integrated community case management (iCCM) involves assessment and treatment of common ... proportions of children treated for fever, pneumonia, and diarrhoea in rural Uganda. ...... Clinical management of acute diarrhoea:.

  3. Behaviour and communication change in reducing HIV: is Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Are there lessons to learn for other countries or is Uganda unique? ... risk behaviour has decreased and analysis of Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) rates ... However, where they were built on by distinctive HIV policies, HIV prevention has ...

  4. Discourse on the values transmitted in universities Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discourse on the values transmitted in universities Uganda. ... suitability of the knowledge and values offered in African universities has been a matter ... It was found that material, social/ public, personal and religious values are transmitted to ...

  5. High proportion of mosquito vectors in Zika forest, Uganda, feeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PHOEBE

    2015-04-22

    Apr 22, 2015 ... InUganda, earlier mosquito studies from forests including. Zika focused ..... from Turdus pelios and Culex annulioris from Sus scrofa. For both ... species in the genus Coquillettidia have been reported to .... adults and pupae.

  6. Theory and Practice in Language Policy: The Case of Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theory and Practice in Language Policy: The Case of Uganda. ... Then English as a medium of instruction would be gradually extended to Science, Geography, Art, ... The role of the other 'minority' indigenous languages must also not be ...

  7. Determinants of fast food consumption in Kampala, Uganda | Ayo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    probability of consuming fast-food; and to determine the level of expenditure on ... from a sample of 300 respondents using a multi-stage sampling procedure. ... the fast-food sector to agricultural marketing and farmers' livelihoods in Uganda.

  8. Quality of midwifery care in Soroti District, Uganda | Kaye | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of midwifery care in Soroti District, Uganda. ... Objectives: To determine the quality of care provided by midwives in Soroti district; and specifically, to identify training needs, gaps in ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  9. Uganda Journal of Agricultural Sciences - Vol 9, No 1 (2004)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation in composition of macro-benthic invertebrates as an indication of water quality ... Agronomic, pests and economic factors influencing sustainability of .... Factors affecting the sustainability of tick-borne disease control in Uganda and ...

  10. genetic analysis of resistance to rice bacterial blight in uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    African Crop Science Journal, Vol. ... in Uganda and as part of strategies to develop resistant cultivars, it is ... However, the cost-effective way to control this ... the pathogen continue to evolve and overcome ..... Changes in race frequency of.

  11. Monitoring the severity of iodine deficiency disorders in Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion : USI has improved iodine intake in Uganda. ... have low iodine consumption, while others such as Luwero now have iodine excess. ... Recommendation : The national set standard of household salt iodine of 100ppm be revised.

  12. Profitability of soil erosion control technologies in eastern Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profitability of soil erosion control technologies in eastern Uganda Highlands. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Abstract. The lack of farmer awareness of costs and benefits associated with the use of sustainable land ...

  13. Experiences of orphan care in Amach, Uganda: assessing policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-05-01

    May 1, 2007 ... Experiences of orphan care in Amach, Uganda: assessing policy implications .... in local concepts, institutions and practices with relevance in an .... Data analysis: The qualitative data was analysed using the conceptual ...

  14. Outcome of patients undergoing open heart surgery at the Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Training of the superspecialties abroad is largely limited to observation with little or no opportunity ... Results: A total of 124 patients underwent open heart surgery during the study period. ..... The experience at the Uganda heart institute shows.

  15. Risk factors for road traffic accidents in Gulu municipality, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for road traffic accidents in Gulu municipality, Uganda. ... Traffic Accidents (RTA), establish the safety measures in place to protect road users to ... drivers of different categories of vehicles, motorcyclists and bicyclists locally known ...

  16. Promoting food security of low income women in central Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtvåge, Runa; Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder; Nambuanyi, Lekunze Ransom

    • Midtvåge, R., Hiranandani, V. S., & Lekunze, R. (2014). Promoting food security of low income women in central Uganda. Poster presentation, Sustainability Science Congress, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, October 22-24, 2014.......• Midtvåge, R., Hiranandani, V. S., & Lekunze, R. (2014). Promoting food security of low income women in central Uganda. Poster presentation, Sustainability Science Congress, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, October 22-24, 2014....

  17. Strategic Marketing Problems in the Uganda Maize Seed Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Larson,Donald W.; Mbowa, Swaibu

    2004-01-01

    Strategic marketing issues and challenges face maize seed marketing firms as farmers increasingly adopt hybrid varieties in a modernizing third world country such as Uganda. The maize seed industry of Uganda has changed dramatically from a government owned, controlled, and operated industry to a competitive market oriented industry with substantial private firm investment and participation. The new maize seed industry is young, dynamic, growing and very competitive. The small maize seed marke...

  18. Chikungunya in Uganda: Sometimes the Hoof Beats Really Are Zebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    Project, Kampala, Uganda 4 Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Rockville, Maryland, USA 5 Nakasero Blood Bank , Kampala, Uganda 6 Walter Reed Army...disease emerging in Latin America and the Caribbean prompting WHO to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (World Health...cycle likely involves the urban mosquito, Aedes aegypti and humans. In the Caribbean and the Americas , the transmission cycle probably involves

  19. A Scoping Study of the Mobile Telecommunications Industry in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Shinyekwa, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims at mapping out the Mobile Telecommunications Industry in Uganda with a view to identify areas for further research in a systematic and more detailed way. The economic and social upgrading/downgrading conceptual framework to guide the Capturing the Gains research agenda was used in this process. The paper briefly presents the mobile phone domains, emphasising the relevant parts for Uganda, which include; software development, sales and marketing, mobile service provision and end...

  20. MUROS ABSURDOS E CONDIÇÃO HUMANA NA OBRA DE ALBERT CAMUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Oliveira Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Albert Camus descreve a condição humana como sendo contingente, frágil e absurda, para isso ele utiliza a noção de “muros absurdos”, que são situações que enfrentamos e contra as quais não podemos escapar. Se a princípio, a morte, a velhice, a desumanidade parecem experiências banais, no pensamento camusiano, elas se revelam como possibilidade de tomada de consciência do absurdo de nossa condição. Palavras-chave: absurdo; condição humana; consciência.

  1. Evolution of egoism on semi-directed and undirected Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2015-05-01

    Through Monte Carlo simulations, we study the evolution of the four strategies: Ethnocentric, altruistic, egoistic and cosmopolitan in one community of individuals. Interactions and reproduction among computational agents are simulated on undirected and semi-directed Barabási-Albert (BA) networks. We study the Hammond-Axelrod (HA) model on undirected and semi-directed BA networks for the asexual reproduction case. With a small modification in the traditional HA model, our simulations showed that egoism wins, differently from other results found in the literature where ethnocentric strategy is common. Here, mechanisms such as reciprocity are absent.

  2. Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jeroen

    2012-06-01

    Albert Einstein accepted a "special" visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation involves a case of mistaken identity with Carl Einstein, Dadaist art, and a particular Dutch fear of revolutions. But what revolutions was one afraid of? The story of Einstein's Leiden chair throws new light on the reception of relativity and its creator in the Netherlands and in Germany.

  3. Prime matter and forma corporeitatis in Albert the Great’s physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Paz Lima

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Albert the Great’s physics is based on a matter that cannot be defined as pure potentiality as it wouldn’t be possible to explain the continuity and teleology of every substantial change. This is why, there are some indeterminate quantitative dimensions that make matter divisible and allow it to support substantial form in the natural motion. These dimensions represent the presence of a first form in matter, which is called forma corporeitatis and which makes matter become an actual reality and a reality that does not depend on substantial form.

  4. The legacy of Albert Einstein a collection of essays in celebration of the Year of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This indispensable volume contains a compendium of articles covering a vast range of topics in physics which were begun or influenced by the works of Albert Einstein: special relativity, quantum theory, statistical physics, condensed matter physics, general relativity, geometry, cosmology and unified field theory. An essay on the societal role of Einstein is included. These articles, written by some of the renowned experts, offer an insider's view of the exciting world of fundamental science. Sample Chapter(s). Chapter 1: Einstein and the Search for Unification (625 KB). Contents: Einstein and

  5. Quest for consistency, symmetry and simplicity - The legacy of Albert Tarantola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    On 6 December 2009, the distinguished Spanish-French physicist and geoscientist, Albert Tarantola, passed away at the age of 60. Born in Barcelona in 1949, he went to Paris where he lived most of his life, and worked as a professor at Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris. His extensive scientific...... production and remarkable achievements in inverse problem theory and geophysical data analysis established him as one of the most influential mathematical geoscientists of our time. He became the father of probabilistic inverse theory, a theory that he passionately defended against severe criticism...

  6. PEMBENTUKAN KARAKTER PADA ANAK: MODEL MEKANISME SANKSI DIRI DARI ALBERT BANDURA SEBAGAI REGULASI PERILAKU MORAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lestari

    2016-06-01

    being and happiness. Albert Bandura proposed self‐sanction mechanism model to regulate moral behavior by giving physical sanction and verbal reprimand. As child grows, the child need parental guiding to understand standards of conduct and to learn about social sanction. If child can function self‐sanction mechanism, child is expected be able to evaluate his conduct right or wrong. The functioning of behavior moral regulation is an important part in developing child’s character. The strength and weakness of model and the application of this model in Indonesian context will be discussed.

  7. Alterations in cortical thickness and neuronal density in the frontal cortex of Albert Einstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B; Harvey, T

    1996-06-07

    Neuronal density, neuron size, and the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortical surface area were measured in the right pre-frontal cortex of Albert Einstein and five elderly control subjects. Measurement of neuronal density used the optical dissector technique on celloidin-embedded cresyl violet-stained sections. The neurons counted provided a systematic random sample for the measurement of cell body cross-sectional area. Einstein's cortex did not differ from the control subjects in the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortex or in mean neuronal size. Because Einstein's cortex was thinner than the controls he had a greater neuronal density.

  8. Albert Einstein and his mentor Max Talmey. The seventh Charles B. Snyder Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, J G

    1997-01-01

    While he was a student at the Munich medical school, Max Talmey strongly influenced the education of Albert Einstein. Their association occurred during five years of Einstein's second decade. They lost contact for many years after each left Munich. Talmey emigrated to the United States and practiced medicine, mainly ophthalmology, in New York City. He made significant contributions to medicine, to the popularization of Einstein's work, and to the development of international languages. The relationship of Talmey and Einstein was rekindled when Einstein visited and later moved to the United States.

  9. "Long live effrontery!" Albert Einstein and the birth of Quantum Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Giulini, D

    2005-01-01

    From its very beginning, Quantum Theory developed contrary to the intentions of its creators. For Max Planck it marks the failure of a long-term research program, in which he tried to understand the 2nd law of thermodynamics deterministically in terms of mechanics and electrodynamics. For Albert Einstein it meant a refutation of his scientific credo. I describe parts of the early stages of this most remarkable development, up to Einstein's light-quantum hypotheis and its unfavourable reception by most other physicists.

  10. El lugar de la persuasión en sociedades degradadas: sobre Albert Speer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Uribe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I try to contrast the sense of the term "persuasion", as defined by Aristotle in his Rhetoric, with the sense of the term "fascination", proposed by Hannah Arendt in her Origins of Totalitarianism. I illustrate such contrast through references to the relationship between Albert Speer and Adolf Hitler. By considering the use of the two terms and the references, I reach a conclusion that shows why, in what I call "degraded social orders", there is no place for rhetoric.

  11. Las fuentes clásicas de Calígula de Albert Camus

    OpenAIRE

    Toledano Muñoz, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Este trabajo pretende rastrear las fuentes clásicas que aparecen en la obra Calígula de Albert Camus. Para ello, hemos recurrido a la perspectiva de la recepción, de tal manera que, en primer lugar, mostraremos los paralelos con las fuentes de las que se sirve (Suetonio y Dión Casio), para luego analizar la relectura que hace Camus de ellas, dando como resultado una visión nueva de la figura de Calígula, que trataremos de explicar partiendo de las propias reflexiones de C...

  12. Biohistorical materials and contemporary privacy concerns-the forensic case of King Albert I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Bekaert, Bram; Baumers, Maarten; Wenseleers, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Borry, Pascal; Decorte, Ronny

    2016-09-01

    The rapid advancement of technology in genomic analysis increasingly allows researchers to study human biohistorical materials. Nevertheless, little attention has been paid to the privacy of the donor's living relatives and the negative impact they might experience from the (public) availability of genetic results, even in cases of scientific, forensic or historical relevance. This issue has become clear during a cold case investigation of a relic attributed to Belgian King and World War I-hero Albert I who died, according to the official version, in a solo climbing accident in 1934. Authentication of the relic with blood stains assigned to the King and collected on the place where his body was discovered is recognised as one of the final opportunities to test the plausibility of various conspiracy theories on the King's demise. While the historical value and current technological developments allow the genomic analysis of this relic, publication of genetic data would immediately lead to privacy concerns for living descendants and relatives of the King, including the Belgian and British royal families, even after more than 80 years. Therefore, the authentication study of the relic of King Albert I has been a difficult exercise towards balancing public research interests and privacy interests. The identification of the relic was realised by using a strict genetic genealogical approach including Y-chromosome and mitochondrial genome comparison with living relatives, thereby limiting the analysis to genomic regions relevant for identification. The genetic results combined with all available historical elements concerning the relic, provide strong evidence that King Albert I was indeed the donor of the blood stains, which is in line with the official climbing accident hypothesis and contradicts widespread 'mise-en-scène' scenarios. Since publication of the haploid data of the blood stains has the potential to violate the privacy of living relatives, we opted for

  13. Maternal education and childbirth care in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bbaale E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGlobally, over 500,000 females die of complications relatedto pregnancy and childbirth each year, and of these, over99% of deaths occur in developing countries such asUganda. Utilisation of modern and professional care duringdelivery is important in lowering maternal mortality. Thispaper sets out to investigate the factors associated with theutilisation of modern and professional childbirth care so asto inform policy makers on the pertinent factors that needto be influenced by policy.MethodA nationally representative Uganda Demographic andHealth Survey (UDHS (2006 was used. Sampling was donein two stages. In the first stage 321 clusters were selectedfrom a list of clusters sampled in the 2005/06 UgandaNational Household Survey (UNHS, 17 clusters from the2002 Census frame from Karamoja, and 30 internallydisplaced camps (IDPs. In the second stage, the householdsin each cluster were selected as per the UNHS listing. Inaddition an additional 20 households were randomlyselected in each cluster. Questionnaires were used duringdata collection. During the analysis, a maximum likelihoodprobit technique was employed. Prior to this, a bivariateapproach was used to generate average percentages ofmothers using the childbirth care services by backgroundcharacteristics.ResultsIt is found that maternal education is the strongestpredictor, especially at post-secondary level (highestmarginal effect of 33% and p<0.01, associated with theutilisation of childbirth care. Whereas partner’s education atall levels is important, maternal education is observed toexert a much stronger association. Other factorssignificantly associated with the utilisation of professionalchildbirth care include community infrastructure,occupation, location, and regional differences, wealthstatus, religion, and age cohorts.ConclusionThese findings suggest that whereas all levels of educationare important, the effects of post-secondary education aremore pronounced. Therefore

  14. Playa Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the spatial distribution of soil units associated with playa lakes. Specific soil types have been designated by the...

  15. Reinos y Ejércitos en la Formación de Uganda. El descontrol de la violencia (1877-1986 Reinos e Exércitos na Formación de Uganda. O descontrole da violência (1877-1986 Kingdoms and Armies in Uganda’s Formation. The uncontrol of violence (1877-1986

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Farré

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A grande densidade de população faz da região dos Grandes Lagos um lugar com tendência a processos de centralização política. Neste artigo vamos descrever a evolução dos reinos pré-coloniais em expansão durante o século XIX através da sua experiência colonial e pós-colonial no Uganda. Argumentaremos que a progressiva instauração do Estado colonial no Uganda pressupôs a consolidação de uma tendência para a exclusão política como forma habitual de manutenção do poder, o que conduziu no Uganda pós-colonial a uma crescente espiral de violência. Neste processo as instituições políticas ficaram subordinadas ao exército.The Great Lakes region, as a very densely populated region, has seen the development of some centralization process affecting its bigger kingdoms, which were in militar expansion during the 19th century. In this article we will focus on the colonial and postcolonial experience of these kingdoms inside Uganda. We will point out that the establishment of the colonial state supposed strengthen a bias to political exclusion as a way to keep power. This way of ruling sowed the seeds of the increasing political violence and civil wars experienced in postcolonial Uganda. In this process the state political institutions became subordinated to the army.

  16. Second generation plant health clinics in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Matsiko, Frank; Mutebi, Emmanuel;

    standards and procedures were in place and followed up on. Many of the observed clinic weaknesses were products of missing coordination, follow up and communication. The sustainability of plant clinics is still uncertain. Funds are limited and skilled human resources to man the clinics have yet to reach......The purpose of the present study was to assess the performance of plant clinics in Uganda and to identify system factors that are conducive or constraining to clinic performance. Our analytical framework was derived from the health system model of World Health Organisation (WHO), designed...... their leading role. A mismatch between institutional mandates/authority and allocated resources limited the scope of the actions both at district and national level. The plant clinics risk ‘falling between the two chairs’ of extension and pest and disease control. Finding a solid institutional base...

  17. The Elections in Uganda, February 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Gibb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On 18 February, Uganda conducted presidential and parliamentary elections. Incumbent president Yoweri Museveni of the National Resistance Movement (NRM won the multiparty contest for a third consecutive time. If his reign as the NRM leader during Uganda’s stint as a one-party state is counted, the February elections marked the beginning of Museveni’s fifth overall term as president. The NRM continues to dominate parliament, having won a super-majority of the contested seats. Opposition members who competed for both the presidential seat and a seat in parliament contested the results of the election, and the primary opposition candidate Kizza Besigye was placed under house arrest. International observers questioned the integrity of the results, specifically in rural areas that were poorly monitored, and opposition strongholds in urban centres suffered logistical problems. The elections reconfirmed the strength of the NRM following years of political infighting.

  18. The Development of Professional Counseling in Uganda: Current Status and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyonyi, Ruth M.; Ochieng, Lois A.; Sells, James

    2012-01-01

    Professional counseling in Uganda has foundations in traditional cultures of its peoples, guidance offered in schools, and counseling to curb the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Currently, a definitive professional counselor profile in Uganda is being established. The Uganda Counselling Association continues the process of seeking legal authority to regulate…

  19. Heinrich ZANGGER (1874-1957. El hombre que salvó la vida de Albert Einstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Montes-Santiago

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El profesor de la Universidad de Zurich, Heinrich Zangger (1874-1957, es recordado principalmente por haber sido compañero y amigo de Albert Einstein. La abundante correspondencia entre ambos revela esclarecedores aspectos del pensamiento científico de Einstein. Sin embargo, es menos conocido que en varias ocasiones salvó la vida del físico (rescatándole de una intoxicación por monóxido de carbono o suministrándole alimentos durante las penurias de la I Guerra Mundial y veló por las necesidades económicas y de salud del resto de la familia de Einstein: su primera mujer Mileva y sus hijos Hans Albert y Eduard. Pero además Zangger fue un hombre extraordinario que merece ser recordado también por sus aportaciones pioneras en el campo de las enfermedades profesionales como la silicosis o la intoxicación por plomo, sobre la Medicina de catástrofes, por sus estudios forenses y de Derecho sanitario, así como por su labor humanitaria con la Cruz Roja.

  20. Expressions of climate perturbations in western Ugandan crater lake sediment records during the last 1000 yr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mills

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial East Africa has a complex, regional patchwork of climate regimes, with multiple interacting drivers. Recent studies have focussed on large lakes and reveal signals that are smoothed in both space and time, and, whilst useful at a continental scale, are of less relevance when understanding short-term, abrupt or immediate impacts of climate and environmental changes. Smaller-scale studies have highlighted spatial complexity and regional heterogeneity of tropical palaeoenvironments in terms of responses to climatic forcing (e.g. the Little Ice Age [LIA] and questions remain over the spatial extent and synchroneity of climatic changes seen in East African records. Sediment cores from paired crater lakes in western Uganda were examined to assess ecosystem response to long-term climate and environmental change as well as testing responses to multiple drivers using redundancy analysis. These archives provide annual to sub-decadal records of environmental change. The records from the two lakes demonstrate an individualistic response to external (e.g. climatic drivers, however, some of the broader patterns observed across East Africa suggest that the lakes are indeed sensitive to climatic perturbations such as a dry Mediaeval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 1000–1200 AD and a relatively drier climate during the main phase of the LIA (1500–1800 AD; though lake levels in western Uganda do fluctuate. The relationship of Ugandan lakes to regional climate drivers breaks down c. 1800 AD, when major changes in the ecosystems appear to be a response to sediment and nutrient influxes as a result of increasing cultural impacts within the lake catchments. The data highlight the complexity of individual lake response to climate forcing, indicating shifting drivers through time. This research also highlights the importance of using multi-lake studies within a landscape to allow for rigorous testing of climate reconstructions, forcing and ecosystem response.

  1. Vulnerability of Maize Yields to Droughts in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Epule Epule

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate projections in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA forecast an increase in the intensity and frequency of droughts with implications for maize production. While studies have examined how maize might be affected at the continental level, there have been few national or sub-national studies of vulnerability. We develop a vulnerability index that combines sensitivity, exposure and adaptive capacity and that integrates agroecological, climatic and socio-economic variables to evaluate the national and spatial pattern of maize yield vulnerability to droughts in Uganda. The results show that maize yields in the north of Uganda are more vulnerable to droughts than in the south and nationally. Adaptive capacity is higher in the south of the country than in the north. Maize yields also record higher levels of sensitivity and exposure in the north of Uganda than in the south. Latitudinally, it is observed that maize yields in Uganda tend to record higher levels of vulnerability, exposure and sensitivity towards higher latitudes, while in contrast, the adaptive capacity of maize yields is higher towards the lower latitudes. In addition to lower precipitation levels in the north of the country, these observations can also be explained by poor soil quality in most of the north and socio-economic proxies, such as, higher poverty and lower literacy rates in the north of Uganda.

  2. Assessment of Business Information Access Problems in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constant Okello-Obura

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective utilization of quality business information is crucial in attaining long-term and sustainable economic growth of the Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs. It is established that SMEs in northern Uganda operate in a business environment that is characterized by fragmented and incomplete information. It is a situation where an awareness of markets, technology, policies, regulations and finance is limited because businesses fail to receive timely business information. This article reports a portion of the results of a larger study using a descriptive design with survey research and other techniques. The study examined the problems SMEs in northern Uganda face in accessing business information; identified problems information providers face in providing business information to the SMEs in the region and attempted to establish whether SMEs in northern Uganda use public libraries in accessing business information as should be expected. The study’s respondents included the SMEs, information providers and business policy makers with the response rate of 87.3%; 72% and 85% respectively. The article proposes strategic interventions for business information to be accessed by the SMEs. It concludes that there is a need for Uganda and, in particular, northern Uganda to develop a strategy for business information access by the SMEs

  3. [Albert Schweitzer's MD thesis on Criticism of the medical pathographies on Jesus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The prominent philosopher, theologian, physician, musicologist and organ soloist Albert Schweitzer (14. 1. 1875-4. 9. 1965) submitted his MD thesis Kritik der von medizinischer Seite veröffentlichten Pathographien uber Jesus (Criticism of the medical pathographies on Jesus) in 1913. Very soon he published this work under the title Die psychiatrische Beurteilung Jesu. Darstellung und Kritik (The psychiatric evaluation of Jesus. Description and criticism) in order to reach a broader audience. Schweitzer's explicit motive for selecting this topic was to influence the theological debate by means of a M. D. thesis on psychiatric pathographies on Jesus. He was confronted with a lot of reproaches. These reproaches contended that his theological opinions had been supporting tendencies to describe Jesus as a mentally ill person or a religious fanatic. In addition, some authors of pathographies on Jesus (De Loosten, Binet-Sanglé, Hirsch, Rasmussen) characterized Jesus as mentally ill, suffering from paranoia. Schweitzer intended to reject the reproaches considering himself and the postulates of the authors of the pathographies. Schweitzer combined in a transdisciplinary way theological, psychiatric and psychopathological arguments. He did this in a very convincing way. Although Schweitzer did not deal with a central or explicit psychiatric question, he implicitly postulated transdisciplinary approaches for proper retrospective pathographies on historic persons. At the age of thirty, Schweitzer decided to finish his academic career and to begin studies in medicine as a preparation for work as a physician in Africa. This decision provoked much lack of understanding in his personal environment. Therefore it may be possible that a very personal motive contributed to the selection of the topic of the MD thesis. Among psychiatric authorities, Albert Schweitzer's interest in the criticisms of psychiatric pathographies and his transdisciplinary approach to this topic encountered

  4. From the National Academies: A Tribute to the Science Education Legacy of National Academy of Sciences President Bruce Alberts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labov, Jay B.

    2005-01-01

    This column, "From the National Academies," was Bruce Alberts' idea, one of so many for improving education. As a long-standing member of the American Society for Cell Biology, the namesake for the prize that is awarded annually to cell biologists for excellence in science education, and one of the founding editors of this journal, Alberts…

  5. Self-organized Criticality in a Modified Evolution Model on Generalized Barabási-Albert Scale-Free Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Min; WANG Gang; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2007-01-01

    A modified evolution model of self-organized criticality on generalized Barabási-Albert (GBA) scale-free networks is investigated. In our model, we find that spatial and temporal correlations exhibit critical behaviors. More importantly, these critical behaviors change with the parameter b, which weights the distance in comparison with the degree in the GBA network evolution.

  6. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994. Report To Accompany S. 2104. 103D Congress, 2d Session, Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    This document contains the text of the "Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994" (S. 2104) along with related analysis. The bill establishes a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that provides them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and…

  7. Filling-In Models of Completion: Rejoinder to Kellman, Garrigan, Shipley, and Keane (2007) and Albert (2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barton L.

    2007-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in understanding the computations involved in the processes underlying visual segmentation and interpolation in conditions of occlusion. P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, T. F. Shipley, and B. P. Keane and M. K. Albert defended the view that identical contour interpolation mechanisms underlie modal and amodal…

  8. It Gets Me Upset Talking about the Royal Albert: Collaborative Analysis of the Ethics of an Oral History Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Steve

    2012-01-01

    An ongoing oral history project at the University of Cumbria seeks to uncover the lived experiences of people with learning difficulties who lived at the Royal Albert Hospital. A recently made video exposed the apparent distress this caused one of the participants. Ethical discussions about the project reached a point of being "stuck".…

  9. Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The Great Lakes region, as defined here, includes the Great Lakes and their drainage basins in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. The region also includes the portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the 21 northernmost counties of Illinois that lie in the Mississippi River drainage basin, outside the floodplain of the river. The region spans about 9º of latitude and 20º of longitude and lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole in a lowland corridor that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.The Great Lakes are the most prominent natural feature of the region (Fig. 1). They have a combined surface area of about 245,000 square kilometers and are among the largest, deepest lakes in the world. They are the largest single aggregation of fresh water on the planet (excluding the polar ice caps) and are the only glacial feature on Earth visible from the surface of the moon (The Nature Conservancy 1994a).The Great Lakes moderate the region’s climate, which presently ranges from subarctic in the north to humid continental warm in the south (Fig. 2), reflecting the movement of major weather masses from the north and south (U.S. Department of the Interior 1970; Eichenlaub 1979). The lakes act as heat sinks in summer and heat sources in winter and are major reservoirs that help humidify much of the region. They also create local precipitation belts in areas where air masses are pushed across the lakes by prevailing winds, pick up moisture from the lake surface, and then drop that moisture over land on the other side of the lake. The mean annual frost-free period—a general measure of the growing-season length for plants and some cold-blooded animals—varies from 60 days at higher elevations in the north to 160 days in lakeshore areas in the south. The climate influences the general distribution of wild plants and animals in the region and also influences the activities and distribution of the human

  10. Translating health research evidence into policy and practice in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Magnussen, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Uganda experiences a high disease burden of malaria, infectious and non-communicable diseases. Recent data shows that malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among all age groups, while HIV prevalence is on the increase and there is re-emergence of viral haemorrhagic fevers and ch...... and cholera epidemics. In order to respond to the above situation, a team of researchers, policy makers, civil society and the media was formed in order to build a collaboration that would help in discussing appropriate strategies to mitigate the high disease burden in Uganda.......Uganda experiences a high disease burden of malaria, infectious and non-communicable diseases. Recent data shows that malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among all age groups, while HIV prevalence is on the increase and there is re-emergence of viral haemorrhagic fevers...

  11. Malaria Treatment Policy Change and Implementation: The Case of Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Nanyunja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  12. Malaria treatment policy change and implementation: the case of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanyunja, Miriam; Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Kato, Frederick; Kaggwa, Mugagga; Katureebe, Charles; Saweka, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ) was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  13. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Ivana Di; Mwoka, Meggie; Kwaga, Teddy; Rukundo, Priscilla Aceng; Ernest, Dennis Ssesanga; Osaheni, Louis Aikoriogie; John, Kasibante; Shafik, Kasirye; de Sousa, Agostinho Moreira

    2015-01-01

    As a follow up to OpenCon 2014, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA) students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in Uganda which encompasses the scientific community, librarians, academia, researchers and students. The IFMSA students held the workshop with the support of: Consortium for Uganda University Libraries (CUUL), The Right to Research Coalition, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), Makerere University, International Health Sciences University (IHSU), Pan African Medical Journal (PAMJ) and the Centre for Health Human Rights and Development (CEHURD). All these organizations are based or have offices in Kampala. The event culminated in a meeting with the Science and Technology Committee of Parliament of Uganda in order to receive the support of the Ugandan Members of Parliament and to make a concrete change for Open Access in the country.

  14. International Dictatorship or International Democracy. A Discussion of Albert Camus’ 1946 Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visone Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the series Neither Victims Nor Executioners (1946 the Franco-Algerian writer Albert Camus argued for the need of a relative utopia that would allow man, who refused the logic of murder and violence, to revolt against their historical condition. To this end Camus stressed the importance of fighting for a new democratic world order that would have reversed the condition of international dictatorship immanent in the interdependent world of the 20th century. In the series of essays another reading is possible; an attempt to find a new political way after the end of the classic modern world - a system founded on the supremacy of European nation-States - and to consider such an attempt as an interesting standpoint to face current transnational challenges.

  15. Albert Camus: el arte como transfiguración de la experiencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Blanco Ilari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Albert Camus fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes de la pasada centuria. Sus trabajos artísticos, periodísticos y filosóficos han sido fundamentales para la comprensión de una época, pero han transcendido la coyuntura convirtiéndose en un clásico. En este trabajo analizaré algunos aspectos de su concepción estética. En particular, la relación entre arte y realidad, la paradoja la obra de arte (que oscila entre pertenencia y distanciación, el intento de unificar la experiencia por medio del estilo. Mi objetivo es sintetizar algunas de las reflexiones de Camus en torno al oficio de escritor, y a la transfiguración que el arte opera sobre la experiencia.

  16. Preservar la experiencia: sobre el imperativo metodológico de Albert Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Blanco Ilari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Albert Camus was one of the most important writers of the last century. In this paper, one of the central subjects of his work it´s analyzed: the need to preserve the original experience from the suffocating conceptualization and the distortion of reason. Camus’s work represents a tireless effort to retain pictures and metaphors, as well as the persons and places where he belongs. Facing the strangeness of the distant thought, Camus raises the power of art as a place of memory. This article attempts to explore some of the most relevant concepts of his work. The intention is synoptic but not exhaustive. The absurd, the rebellion, the nuptials with the Mediterranean sun, are some of the issues that articulate his work. The treatment of the artist could help us keep an almost stubborn fidelity to those things which deserve to be protected.

  17. Evolution of ethnocentrism on undirected and directed Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.; Hadzibeganovic, Tarik; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2009-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the evolution of contingent cooperation and ethnocentrism in the one-shot game. Interactions and reproduction among computational agents are simulated on undirected and directed Barabási-Albert (BA) networks. We first replicate the Hammond-Axelrod model of in-group favoritism on a square lattice and then generalize this model on undirected and directed BA networks for both asexual and sexual reproduction cases. Our simulations demonstrate that irrespective of the mode of reproduction, the ethnocentric strategy becomes common even though cooperation is individually costly and mechanisms such as reciprocity or conformity are absent. Moreover, our results indicate that the spread of favoritism towards similar others highly depends on the network topology and the associated heterogeneity of the studied population.

  18. Fordism in the hospital: Albert Kahn and the design of Old Main, 1917-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Nitin K

    2012-07-01

    The 1917-25 planning and construction at the University of Michigan of a new University Hospital, later dubbed Old Main, offers a noteworthy case study of the formal convergence of hospital and factory in early twentieth-century America. Designed by Albert Kahn, the architect responsible for Ford Motor Company's archetypal automobile plants, and located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, less than forty miles from Detroit's burgeoning factory landscape, Old Main was well positioned to reflect the values of industry in both appearance and operation. The building's outer surface represents a striking departure from the historicism that characterized several other hospitals of this period, while plans for the building's novel diagnostic unit demonstrate unique operational parallels to the assembly line model of production. Ultimately, Old Main's industrial design similarities cast it as a precociously modernist hospital, relating streamlined form to function more explicitly than many of its contemporary institutions.

  19. Les silences de l’altérité dans Agar d’Albert Memmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emira Gherib

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Agar (1955 of Albert Memmi put on stage a young couple : a Tunisian Jewish and his wife, Marie, a catholic Frenchwoman. This novel illustrates different variations of the figure of «abroad». «Selected» statute o «undergone», at some point, the protagonists are «immigrants» and they will try to sustain their love despite a lot of diffe¬rences. However, it is carried out towards inescapable conflicts leading them to be inserted in the deepest of the loneliness. We will seek to show how the communication is in the center of the problems of the book and constitutes the missing part for a happy cohabitation.

  20. Albert H. Munsell: A sense of color at the interface of art and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    The color theory conceived and commercialized by Albert H. Munsell (1858-1918) has become a universal part of the lexicon of soil science. An American painter noted for his seascapes and portraits, he had a long-standing interest in the description of color. Munsell began studies aimed at standardizing color description, using hue, value, and chroma scales, around 1898. His landmark treatise, "A Color Notation," was published in 1905. Munsell died about 30 years before his color charts came into wide-spread use in soil survey programs in the United States. Dorothy Nickerson, who began her career as secretary and laboratory assistant to Munsell's son, and later spent 37 years at USDA as a color-science specialist, did much to adapt the Munsell Color System to soil-color usage. The legacy of color research pioneered by A.H. Munsell is honored today by the Munsell Color Science Laboratory established in 1983 at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

  1. Violência e intolerância em Albert Camus e Denis Diderot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Adauto Guimarães da Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available No presente artigo abordamos alguns temas dos ensaios filosóficos, O Mito de Sísifo e O Homem revoltado, e dos romances, O Estrangeiro e A Peste, de Albert Camus (1913-1960; bem como tratamos, de maneira bastante geral, o romance Jacques, o fatalista e seu amo, de Denis Diderot (1713-1784. Buscamos explicitar o engajamento dos autores o aspecto crítico de suas obras. Identificamos uma relação entre as noções camusianas de absurdo e revolta e a defesa da dignidade humana, em oposição ao dogmatismo e ao totalitarismo. Destacamos em Diderot a liberdade de pensamento e o senso crítico, como antídotos ao fanatismo, à intolerância e à violência.

  2. La arquitectura como objeto técnico. La arquitectura industrial de Albert Kahn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guillermo Pancorbo Crespo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available La adopción del paradigma mecanicista por parte de la ciencia impulsó la revolución tecnológica e industrial, dando origen a la era de la máquina y a una nueva categoría de lo material; los objetos técnicos. El predominio generalizado del paradigma mecánico en arquitectura a partir del siglo XX, adoptando la técnica como rectora de la actividad arquitectónica, y utilizando premisas racionales y científicas en el proceso de proyecto, supuso el nacimiento de la arquitectura moderna. En esta génesis tuvo un papel destacado la obra industrial de Albert Kahn, que transporta a la arquitectura el tipo de proyecto utilizado por los ingenieros para la creación de los objetos técnicos. Esta investigación trata de pormenorizar y poner en valor esta influencia, que creemos de vital importancia y que en cambio ha tenido escasa fortuna crítica. La actual sustitución del paradigma mecánico en arquitectura, consagrado por el Movimiento Moderno, por un nuevo paradigma que podríamos denominar termodinámico, forzada por los nuevos modelos de sostenibilidad y ahorro energético, vuelve a poner en primera línea ciertas obras industriales de Albert Kahn, en las que la gestión de las condiciones ambientales juega un papel prioritario en la génesis del proyecto.

  3. Butterfly Diversity from Farmlands of Central Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Théodore Munyuli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to collect information about the diversity of butterfly communities in the mixed coffee-banana mosaic (seminatural, agricultural landscapes of rural central Uganda. Data were collected for one year (2006 using fruit-bait traps, line transect walk-and-counts, and hand nets. A total of 56,315 individuals belonging to 331 species, 95 genera, and 6 families were sampled. The most abundant species was Bicyclus safitza (14.5% followed by Acraea acerata (6.3%, Catopsilia florella (6.5% and Junonia sophia (6.1%. Significant differences in abundance, species richness, and diversity of butterflies occurred between the 26 study sites. Farmland butterflies visited a variety of habitats within and around sites, but important habitats included woodlands, fallows, hedgerows, swampy habitats, abandoned gardens, and home gardens. The highest diversity and abundance of butterflies occurred in sites that contained forest remnants. Thus, forest reserves in the surrounding of fields increased the conservation values of coffee-banana agroforestry systems for butterflies. Their protection from degradation should be a priority for policy makers since they support a species-rich community of butterflies pollinating cultivated plants. Farmers are encouraged to protect and increase on-farm areas covered by complex traditional agroforests, linear, and nonlinear seminatural habitats to provide sufficient breeding sites and nectar resources for butterflies.

  4. Expressions of climate perturbations in western Ugandan crater lake sediment records during the last 1000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, K.; Ryves, D. B.; Anderson, N. J.; Bryant, C. L.; Tyler, J. J.

    2014-08-01

    Equatorial East Africa has a complex regional patchwork of climate regimes, sensitive to climate fluctuations over a variety of temporal and spatial scales during the late Holocene. Understanding how these changes are recorded in and interpreted from biological and geochemical proxies in lake sedimentary records remains a key challenge to answering fundamental questions regarding the nature, spatial extent and synchroneity of climatic changes seen in East African palaeo-records. Using a paired lake approach, where neighbouring lakes share the same geology, climate and landscape, it might be expected that the systems will respond similarly to external climate forcing. Sediment cores from two crater lakes in western Uganda spanning the last ~1000 years were examined to assess diatom community responses to late Holocene climate and environmental changes, and to test responses to multiple drivers using redundancy analysis (RDA). These archives provide annual to sub-decadal records of environmental change. Lakes Nyamogusingiri and Kyasanduka appear to operate as independent systems in their recording of a similar hydrological response signal via distinct diatom records. However, whilst their fossil diatom records demonstrate an individualistic, indirect response to external (e.g. climatic) drivers, the inferred lake levels show similar overall trends and reflect the broader patterns observed in Uganda and across East Africa. The lakes appear to be sensitive to large-scale climatic perturbations, with evidence of a dry Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; ca. AD 1000-1200). The diatom record from Lake Nyamogusingiri suggests a drying climate during the main phase of the Little Ice Age (LIA) (ca. AD 1600-1800), whereas the diatom response from the shallower Lake Kyasanduka is more complex (with groundwater likely playing a key role), and may be driven more by changes in silica and other nutrients, rather than by lake level. The sensitivity of these two Ugandan lakes to regional

  5. An outbreak of Ebola in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okware, S I; Omaswa, F G; Zaramba, S; Opio, A; Lutwama, J J; Kamugisha, J; Rwaguma, E B; Kagwa, P; Lamunu, M

    2002-12-01

    An outbreak of Ebola disease was reported from Gulu district, Uganda, on 8 October 2000. The outbreak was characterized by fever and haemorrhagic manifestations, and affected health workers and the general population of Rwot-Obillo, a village 14 km north of Gulu town. Later, the outbreak spread to other parts of the country including Mbarara and Masindi districts. Response measures included surveillance, community mobilization, case and logistics management. Three coordination committees were formed: National Task Force (NTF), a District Task Force (DTF) and an Interministerial Task Force (IMTF). The NTF and DTF were responsible for coordination and follow-up of implementation of activities at the national and district levels, respectively, while the IMTF provided political direction and handled sensitive issues related to stigma, trade, tourism and international relations. The international response was coordinated by the World Health Organization (WHO) under the umbrella organization of the Global Outbreak and Alert Response Network. A WHO/CDC case definition for Ebola was adapted and used to capture four categories of cases, namely, the 'alert', 'suspected', 'probable' and 'confirmed cases'. Guidelines for identification and management of cases were developed and disseminated to all persons responsible for surveillance, case management, contact tracing and Information Education Communication (IEC). For the duration of the epidemic that lasted up to 16 January 2001, a total of 425 cases with 224 deaths were reported countrywide. The case fatality rate was 53%. The attack rate (AR) was highest in women. The average AR for Gulu district was 12.6 cases/10 000 inhabitants when the contacts of all cases were considered and was 4.5 cases/10 000 if limited only to contacts of laboratory confirmed cases. The secondary AR was 2.5% when nearly 5000 contacts were followed up for 21 days. Uganda was finally declared Ebola free on 27 February 2001, 42 days after the last case

  6. Bathymetry of Lake Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Michigan has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  7. Bathymetry of Lake Ontario

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Ontario has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  8. Designated Wildlife Lakes - points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This is a point shapefile of Designated Wildlife Lakes in Minnesota. This shapefile was created by converting lake polygons from the Designated Wildlife Lakes...

  9. Great Lakes Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lakes Michigan, Erie, Saint Clair, Ontario and Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and...

  10. Bathymetry of Lake Superior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Superior has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  11. Hydrography - Lakes Assessments - Attaining

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This layer shows only attaining lakes of the Integrated List. The Lakes Integrated List represents lake assessments in an integrated format for the Clean Water Act...

  12. Bathymetry of Lake Huron

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  13. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere and M...

  14. The Distribution and Conservation Status of Otters in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranga J.

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available A survey of otters in Uganda was carried from 1986 onwards, together with other mammals. The information presented here was re-checked in the last three years. All three African otters are found in Uganda: the spotted-necked otter (Lutra maculicollis. the Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis and the swamp otter or Congo clawless otter (Aonyx congica. The first two are widely distributed throughout the country with the exception of the dry North eastern region. The swamp otter has a limited distribution in the country and reaches its most easterly extension in western Uganda. Although otters are still relatively common in most of their traditional habitats, they are under pressure from hunters, fishermen, land developers and general habitat destruction. Digging up the stream bed, swamp drainage and destruction of natural vegetation has produced silting, lowered the water table and adversely affected otters in addition to other aquatic biota. The wetland, ecosystem, and therefore otter habitat, are under-represented in Uganda national parks (Baranga 1990. That leaves most of the otters numerically out of the strict conservation areas and thus exposed to potential danger. Suggestions to improve the conservation status of Ugandan otters are made in a more detailed article which will be published as part of the proceedings of the Sixth International Otter Symposium.

  15. An Arabic creole in Africa : the Nubi language of Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellens, Inneke Hilda Werner

    2003-01-01

    At present, about 25,000 Nubi live scattered over the towns of Uganda and Kenya. Their language, Nubi, has been called an Arabic creole. Nubi is Arabic, since about 90% of its vocabulary is of Arabic nature. It is termed a creole, since many of its structural and developmental features resemble thos

  16. Beyond ICT4D: new media research in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, G.

    2011-01-01

    Beyond ICT4D: New Media Research in Uganda is a collection of ethnographic reports from diverse perspectives of those living at the other end of the African ICT pyramid. Crucially, these texts refocus on the so-called "ICT4D" debate away from the standard western lens, which depicts users in the

  17. Microfinance, rural livelihoods, and women's empowerment in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakwo, A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines in what ways and to what extent microfinance services facilitate the empowerment of married rural women in Nebbi district, northwestern Uganda. In particular, it examines the gender relations inherent in the livelihood practices of the community, the changes in well-being (if any

  18. Mis ikkagi teeb Eestist Uganda? / Marja-Liisa Alop

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alop, Marja-Liisa

    2006-01-01

    Eesti üliõpilaskondade liidu juhatuse aseesimees M.-L. Alop kirjutab vastuse M. Heidmetsa artiklile 6. jaan. Eesti Päevalehes "Eestis nagu Ugandas", kus tõstatati Eestis üldise õppemaksu kehtestamise vajadus, mis vähendab vähem kindlustatute võimalusi kõrgharidust omandada

  19. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented

  20. Predictive mapping of prospectivity for orogenic gold in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbert, Stephanie; Woldai, T.; Carranza, E.J.M; van Ruitenbeek, F.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Integration of enhanced regional geo-datasets has facilitated new geological interpretation and modelling of prospectivity for orogenic gold in southwestern Uganda. The geo-datasets include historical geological maps, geological field data, digital terrain models, Landsat TM data and airborne geophy

  1. Multilingual Cultural Resources in Child-Headed Families in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazzi, Elizabeth; Kendrick, Maureen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study focusing on the use of multilingual cultural resources in child-headed households (CHHs) in Uganda's Rakai District. Using funds of knowledge and sociocultural perspectives on children's learning, we documented through ethnographic observations and interviews how children in four CHHs used multilingual…

  2. Weather variability and food consumption : Evidence from rural Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lazzaroni (Sara); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the impact of weather variations on food consumption in rural Uganda. The paper relies on two-period panel data (2005/06-2009/10) combined with data on rainfall, number of rainy days and maximum and minimum temperatures. We find that higher temperatures have an advers

  3. Gender and age disparities in adult undernutrition in northern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Stine; Kaducu, Felix Ocaka; Aas Smedemark, Siri

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of adult malnutrition and associated risk factors in a post-conflict area of northern Uganda. METHODS: A cross-sectional community survey was performed from September 2011 to June 2013. All registered residents in Gulu Health and Demographic Surveillance...

  4. Beyond ICT4D: new media research in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, G.

    2011-01-01

    Beyond ICT4D: New Media Research in Uganda is a collection of ethnographic reports from diverse perspectives of those living at the other end of the African ICT pyramid. Crucially, these texts refocus on the so-called "ICT4D" debate away from the standard western lens, which depicts users in the dev

  5. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented i

  6. Uganda pioneers ALVAC -- and informed consent. Vaccine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, H; Nsubuga, L

    1997-02-01

    Pasteur Merieux, a French pharmaceutical company, has developed a promising new experimental vaccine against AIDS. The vaccine, ALVAC VCP205, contains live, genetically engineered canaripox virus carrying several small fragments of HIV. Canaripox virus causes disease among canary birds, but not in humans. ALVAC VCP205 has already been tested on more than 100 volunteers in the US and France who have shown no ill effects. Clinical trials will start in Uganda in early 1997, at which point 40 young male volunteers in Kampala will be administered the vaccine. The volunteers are soldiers of the Ugandan army. Possibly continuing until 2005, the trials will assess the safety of ALVAC VCP205 and, if successful, lead to much larger trials involving thousands of Ugandans in 1998. Only then will scientists know whether the vaccine can protect humans against HIV infection. The need for a vaccine, the Uganda trial, and concerns over whether trial subjects are truly volunteers are discussed. There is also concern over whether the vaccine will be affordable in Uganda if it is shown to be effective and whether it will be appropriate for use by Ugandans at risk of HIV infection. ALVAC VCP205 is designed to provide the greatest level of protection against HIV-1 subtype B, the dominant strain of HIV in Europe and the US. In Uganda, strains A and D predominate.

  7. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented i

  8. Reemerging Sudan Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Trevor; Balinandi, Stephen; Campbell, Shelley; Wamala, Joseph Francis; McMullan, Laura K.; Downing, Robert; Lutwama, Julius; Mbidde, Edward; Ströher, Ute; Rollin, Pierre E.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2012-01-01

    Two large outbreaks of Ebola hemorrhagic fever occurred in Uganda in 2000 and 2007. In May 2011, we identified a single case of Sudan Ebola virus disease in Luwero District. The establishment of a permanent in-country laboratory and cooperation between international public health entities facilitated rapid outbreak response and control activities. PMID:22931687

  9. Professional integrity of teachers in Uganda : Practical action strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wabule, Alice

    2017-01-01

    The study analyses the problem of professional integrity of teachers in Uganda and explores solutions. It analyses the difficult conditions under which Ugandan teachers work, reports on the professional dilemmas that they face, and on the serious issues of failings of professional integrity. The

  10. Finance and Demand for Skill : Evidence from Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; Homanen, M.; Uras, Burak

    2016-01-01

    We explore the empirical interaction between firm growth, financing constraints and job creation. Using a novel small business survey from Uganda, we find that the extent to which small businesses expand skilled employment as their sales and profits increase depends significantly on access to extern

  11. Abolition of user fees: the Uganda paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Mugisha, Frederick; Kirunga, Christine; Macq, Jean; Criel, Bart

    2011-11-01

    Inadequate health financing is one of the major challenges health systems in low-income countries currently face. Health financing reforms are being implemented with an increasing interest in policies that abolish user fees. Data from three nationally representative surveys conducted in Uganda in 1999/2000, 2002/03 and 2005/06 were used to investigate the impact of user fee abolition on the attainment of universal coverage objectives. An increase in illness reporting was noted over the three surveys, especially among the poorer quintiles. An increase in utilization was registered in the period immediately following the abolition of user fees and was most pronounced in the poorest quintile. Overall, there was an increase in utilization in both public and private health care delivery sectors, but only at clinic and health centre level, not at hospitals. Our study shows important changes in health-care-seeking behaviour. In 2002/03, the poorest population quintile started using government health centres more often than private clinics whereas in 1999/2000 private clinics were the main source of health care. The richest quintile has increasingly used private clinics. Overall, it appears that the private sector remains a significant source of health care. Following abolition of user fees, we note an increase in the use of lower levels of care with subsequent reductions in use of hospitals. Total annual average expenditures on health per household remained fairly stable between the 1999/2000 and 2002/03 surveys. There was, however, an increase of US$21 in expenditure between the 2002/03 and 2005/06 surveys. Abolition of user fees improved access to health services and efficiency in utilization. On the negative side is the fact that financial protection is yet to be achieved. Out-of-pocket expenditure remains high and mainly affects the poorer population quintiles. A dual system seems to have emerged where wealthier population groups are switching to the private sector.

  12. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  13. O direito e o absurdo: uma análise de “O estrangeiro”, de Albert Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Bogliolo Piancastelli de Siqueira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo visa aproveitar-se da relaçãoentre o Direito e a Literatura para realizar umaanálise da obra “O Estrangeiro”, de Albert Camus.Tem como intenção levantar questionamentos éticospertinentes ao Direito por meio da narrativacamusiana. Busca analisar as proposições moraistrazidas pelo romance. Pretende também tecer críticasao funcionamento da justiça e à característicaopressora desta instituição social.The paper intends to take advantage ofthe academic interaction between Law andLiterature to analyze Albert Camus’ novel TheStranger. Within its aims is the discussion of ethicalalternatives relevant to the study of Law and theanalysis of the workings of Camus’ absurd justice.It also intends to demonstrate Camus’ critics toLaw as an oppressive and excludent institution.

  14. À propos de Pierre Brossolette, " Hommage aux morts de la France combattante ", Albert Hall de Londres, 18 juin 1943

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    En rendant un hommage passionné aux morts de la France Combattante, le 18 juin 1943 à l'Albert Hall de Londres, Pierre Brossolette s'efforce de mobiliser les " Français de Grande-Bretagne " (c'est-à-dire, rappelons-le, un auditoire qui dépasse la seule France Combattante) au service de l'entreprise gaullienne et, plus largement, de la rénovation à venir de la France (...).

  15. Ethical assessment of research protocols: the experience of the Research Ethics Committee of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Oliveira de Barros

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a review article on the origin of the ethical analysis ofresearch protocols, the Brazilian and International legislation,including the Research Ethics Committee of Hospital IsraelitaAlbert Einstein. Since 1997, when the Committee was validatedits role has been recognized as that of a consultant and educator,participating on local and national scientific events andcollaborating with researchers in order to improve their projectsand learn to recognize ethical dilemmas in their protocols.

  16. A Comparative Study on the Theme of Human Existence in the Novels of Albert Camus and F. Sionil Jose

    OpenAIRE

    F. P. A. Demeterio

    2008-01-01

    Albert Camus (1913-1960), novelist, essayist, dramatist, and recipient of the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature, is esteemed as one of the finest philosophical writers of modern France. The French existentialist philosopher, Jean-Paul Sartre wrote about him as "the latest example of that long line of moralistes whose works constitute perhaps the most original element in French letters." Camus' literary legacy includes three novels, namely L'Etranger (The Stranger) of 1942, La Peste (The Plague)...

  17. Biomass waste-to-energy valorisation technologies: a review case for banana processing in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Gumisiriza, Robert; Hawumba, Joseph Funa; Okure, Mackay; Hensel,Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Background Uganda?s banana industry is heavily impeded by the lack of cheap, reliable and sustainable energy mainly needed for processing of banana fruit into pulp and subsequent drying into chips before milling into banana flour that has several uses in the bakery industry, among others. Uganda has one of the lowest electricity access levels, estimated at only 2?3% in rural areas where most of the banana growing is located. In addition, most banana farmers have limited financial capacity to ...

  18. A literatura reengajada: notas sobre criação e engajamento em Albert Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Luiz de Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Embora não tenha sido consagrado como crítico literário, Albert Camus apresentou alguns elemen­tos básicos para a criação artística em diálogo com os intelectuais de sua época, como Jean-Paul Sartre e Roland Barthes. Para apresentar tais noções e suas mutações ao longo da carreira do escritor, o presente ar­tigo propõe explorar o ato de escrever como resistência à condição absurda, presente em “A inteligência e o cadafalso” e posto em prática em O estrangeiro. Em seguida, analisa-se como essa concepção aparece no segundo ciclo de obras do escritor, quando a noção de absurdo se estende à coletividade em A peste e em O homem revoltado.

  19. Ivan Karamazov’s rebellion in Albert Camus’ and Karl Jaspers’ interpretations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Lisowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present Albert Camus’ and Karl Jaspers’ interpretations of Ivan Karamazov’s rebellion as the diagnoses of the weakness of the human intellect in confrontation with the world and the criticism of rationalism. Therefore, in the introduction I will present those fragments of the novel that characterize Ivan’s rebellion as highly abstract and theoretical. At the same time, this common literary context serves as the ground for reconstruction and comparison of the basic philosophical assumptions of each author. The intention of the remaining part of the paper is, firstly, to reconstruct A. Camus’ and K. Jaspers’ epistemology and, secondly, to analyse the arguments against Ivan’s attitude formulated by the writers. Their criticisms of the protagonist’s excessive trust in intellect is based on their own concepts of human epistemic capacity, which are related to the problems of the absurd in A. Camus’ and transcendence in K. Jaspers’ writings. The question of nihilism demands analysis of A. Camus’ idea of the nature of rebellion as both affirmative and negative, and of K. Jaspers’ notion of faith as pre-intellectual trust. Finally, their criticisms of the slogan “If there is no God, then anything is allowed” introduces the problem of freedom, which allows the comparison of the concepts of solidarity (A. Camus and communication (K. Jaspers. In the conclusion these two philosophical attitudes are discussed together. Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

  20. Remembering Our Forebears: Albert Jan Kluyver and the Unity of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Rivers; Singleton, David R

    2017-02-01

    The Dutch microbiologist/biochemist Albert Jan Kluyver (1888-1956) was an early proponent of the idea of biochemical unity, and how that concept might be demonstrated through the careful study of microbial life. The fundamental relatedness of living systems is an obvious correlate of the theory of evolution, and modern attempts to construct phylogenetic schemes support this relatedness through comparison of genomes. The approach of Kluyver and his scientific descendants predated the tools of modern molecular biology by decades. Kluyver himself is poorly recognized today, yet his influence at the time was profound. Through lens of today however, it has been argued that the focus by Kluyver and others to create taxonomic and phylogenetic schemes using morphology and biochemistry distorted and hindered progress of the discipline of microbiology, because of a perception that the older approaches focused too much on a reductionist worldview. This essay argues that in contrast the careful characterization of fundamental microbial metabolism and physiology by Kluyver made many of the advances of the latter part of the twentieth century possible, by offering a framework which in many respects anticipated our current view of phylogeny, and by directly and indirectly training a generation of scientists who became leaders in the explosive growth of biotechnology.

  1. A literatura reengajada: notas sobre criação e engajamento em Albert Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Luiz de Araújo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Embora não tenha sido consagrado como crítico literário, Albert Camus apresentou alguns elemen­tos básicos para a criação artística em diálogo com os intelectuais de sua época, como Jean-Paul Sartre e Roland Barthes. Para apresentar tais noções e suas mutações ao longo da carreira do escritor, o presente ar­tigo propõe explorar o ato de escrever como resistência à condição absurda, presente em “A inteligência e o cadafalso” e posto em prática em O estrangeiro. Em seguida, analisa-se como essa concepção aparece no segundo ciclo de obras do escritor, quando a noção de absurdo se estende à coletividade em A peste e em O homem revoltado.

  2. Sexual modernity in the works of Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Albert Moll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The modern notion of sexuality took shape at the end of the nineteenth century, especially in the works of Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Albert Moll. This modernisation of sexuality was closely linked to the recognition of sexual diversity, as it was articulated in the medical-psychiatric understanding of what, at that time, was labelled as perversion. From around 1870, psychiatrists shifted the focus from immoral acts, a temporary deviation of the norm, to an innate morbid condition. In the late nineteenth century, several psychiatrists, collecting and publishing more and more case histories, classified and explained the wide range of deviant sexual behaviours they traced. The emergence of medical sexology meant that perversions could be diagnosed and discussed. Against this background both Krafft-Ebing and Moll articulated a new perspective, not only on perversion, but also on sexuality in general. Krafft-Ebing initiated and Moll elaborated a shift from a psychiatric perspective in which deviant sexuality was explained as a derived, episodic and more or less singular symptom of a more fundamental mental disorder, to a consideration of perversion as an integral part of a more general, autonomous and continuous sexual instinct. Before Sigmund Freud and others had expressed similar views, it was primarily through the writings of Krafft-Ebing and Moll that a new understanding of human sexuality emerged.

  3. Sexual science and sexual forensics in 1920s Germany: Albert Moll as (S)expert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    Using court records involving the expert testimony of the Berlin sexologist Albert Moll, my article demonstrates that during the early 1920s a shift in the 'epistemologies of justice' concerning the adjudication of sex crimes took place within German courtrooms. Namely, presiding judges considered a greater number of sexual acts as punishable, despite no change in the laws themselves. Central to my argument is the role of expert testimony in practice and its critical reception. By focusing upon the rhetorical strategies presented by attorneys, judges and expert witnesses (as well as defendants themselves and their relatives), it illustrates the functions of expert and tacit knowledge in court, which were often not mutually exclusive. Moll's stature also enabled him to translate his scientific-medical expertise into state support for his testimonies, as well as the rebuilding of an international community of sexological authorities. It was only under Moll's leadership that the First International Sexology Congress could take place in 1926, an event that marked the apex of his prestige.

  4. The powers of suggestion: Albert Moll and the debate on hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2014-03-01

    The Berlin physician Albert Moll (1862-1939) was an advocate of hypnotic suggestion therapy and a prolific contributor to the medical, legal and public discussions on hypnotism from the 1880s to the 1920s. While his work in other areas, such as sexology, medical ethics and parapsychology, has recently attracted scholarly attention, this paper for the first time comprehensively examines Moll's numerous publications on hypnotism and places them in their contemporary context. It covers controversies over the therapeutic application of hypnosis, the reception of Moll's monograph Der Hypnotismus (1889), his research on the rapport between hypnotizer and subject, his role as an expert on 'hypnotic crime', and his views on the historical influence of hypnotism on the development of psychotherapy. My findings suggest that Moll rose to prominence due to the strong late-nineteenth-century public and medical interest in the phenomena of hypnosis, but that his work was soon overshadowed by new, non-hypnotic psychotherapeutic approaches, particularly Freud's psychoanalysis.

  5. Mixed Algorithms in the Ising Model on Directed BARABÁSI-ALBERT Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    On directed Barabási-Albert networks with two and seven neighbours selected by each added site, the Ising model does not seem to show a spontaneous magnetisation. Instead, the decay time for flipping of the magnetisation follows an Arrhenius law for Metropolis and Glauber algorithms, but for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation decays exponentially with time. On these networks the magnetisation behaviour of the Ising model, with Glauber, HeatBath, Metropolis, Wolf or Swendsen-Wang algorithm competing against Kawasaki dynamics, is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the model exhibits the phenomenon of self-organisation (= stationary equilibrium) defined in Ref. 8 when Kawasaki dynamics is not dominant in its competition with Glauber, HeatBath and Swendsen-Wang algorithms. Only for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation, this phenomenon occurs after an exponentially decay of magnetisation with time. The Metropolis results are independent of competition. We also study the same process of competition described above but with Kawasaki dynamics at the same temperature as the other algorithms. The obtained results are similar for Wolff cluster flipping, Metropolis and Swendsen-Wang algorithms but different for HeatBath.

  6. Einstein's cosmos how Albert Einstein's vision transformed our understanding of space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Kaku, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Few figures loom as large as Albert Einstein in our contemporary culture. It is truly remarkable that a man from such humble beginnings, an unemployed dreamer without a future or a job, who was written off by his professors as a hopeless loser, could to dare to scale the heights he reached. In this enlightening book Michio Kaku reasseses Einstein's work by centering on his three great theories - special relativity, general relativity and the Unified Field Theory. The first yielded the equation E =mc which is now such a fixture in our culture that it is practically a ubiquitous slogan. But the subsequent theories led to the Big Bang theory and have changed irrevocably the way we perceive time and space. Michio Kaku gives a new, refreshing look at the pioneering work of Einstein, giving a more accurate portrayal of his enduring legacy than previous biographies. As today's advanced physicists continue their intense search to fulfill Einstein's most cherished dream, a 'theory of everything', he is recognised as a...

  7. Luis Albert and the first urban plans of the Provincial Council of Valencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Merlo Fuertes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will analyze the urban plans of those municipalities in the Province of Valencia that embraced the technical assistance given by the Provincial Council for the planning composition, at the time of Luis Albert Ballesteros, the provincial council architect. Those first urban plans of the Provincial Council make up a homogeneous set of documents since they respond to a unique style of urban planning that varies as much as the original core of the population does. The common element is the ground plan centrality that would be highlighted by an area or a protected green zone that will somehow link to the urban proposals connected to the city-garden model by Howard. Commencement of which began at a time characterized mainly by the co-existence of a great diversity of laws and percepts, making it so that the meaning of the term urban planning could be applied in a variety of ways. The urban plans of the Provincial Council represent the latest inheritance of the extension models and interior remodeling. In the transition to the Land Planning Act (Ley de Suelo of 1956, these plans have the interest in being, in addition to the last examples of the so-called urbanism in the municipal tradition, one of the ancestors of the current master plans of urban development (plan general de ordenación urbana.

  8. Studying scientific thought experiments in their context: Albert Einstein and electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potters, Jan; Leuridan, Bert

    2017-05-01

    This article concerns the way in which philosophers study the epistemology of scientific thought experiments. Starting with a general overview of the main contemporary philosophical accounts, we will first argue that two implicit assumptions are present therein: first, that the epistemology of scientific thought experiments is solely concerned with factual knowledge of the world; and second, that philosophers should account for this in terms of the way in which individuals in general contemplate these thought experiments in thought. Our goal is to evaluate these assumptions and their implications using a particular case study: Albert Einstein's magnet-conductor thought experiment. We will argue that an analysis of this thought experiment based on these assumptions - as John Norton (1991) provides - is, in a sense, both misguided (the thought experiment by itself did not lead Einstein to factual knowledge of the world) and too narrow (to understand the thought experiment's epistemology, its historical context should also be taken into account explicitly). Based on this evaluation we propose an alternative philosophical approach to the epistemology of scientific thought experiments which is more encompassing while preserving what is of value in the dominant view.

  9. Friedrich Albert Lange on neo-Kantianism, socialist Darwinism, and a psychology without a soul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Friedrich Albert Lange was a German philosopher, political theorist, educator, and psychologist who outlined an objective psychology in the 1860s. This article shows how some of the most important worldviews of the nineteenth century (Kantianism, Marxism, and Darwinism) were combined creatively in his thought system. He was crucial in the development of neo-Kantianism and incorporated psycho-physiological research on sensation and perception in order to defend Kant's epistemological idealism. Based on a critique of phrenology and philosophical psychology of his time, Lange developed a program of a psychology without a soul. He suggested that only those phenomena that can be observed and controlled should be studied, that psychology should focus on actions and speech, and that for each psychological event the corresponding physical or physiological processes should be identified. Lange opposed introspection and subjective accounts and promoted experiments and statistics. He also promoted Darwinism for psychology while developing a socialist progressive-democratic reading of Darwin in his social theory. The implications of socialist Darwinism on Lange's conceptualization of race are discussed and his prominence in nineteenth century philosophy and psychology is summarized.

  10. ALBERT O. HIRSCHMAN Y LA ECONOMÍA DEL DESARROLLO: LECCIONES PARA EL PRESENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Hurtado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Albert Hirschman vivió casi cinco años en Colombia, donde según él, adquirió un punto de vista. Este punto de vista le permitió formular una aproximación original al desarrollo, alejada de las grandes teorías y del mero empirismo; lo llamó una estrategia de desarrollo y, en ella, resaltaba los eslabonamientos entre sectores productivos pero, sobre todo, las habilidades, creencias y expectativas necesarias, y muchas veces inexplotadas, para hacer posible un proceso dinámico de toma de decisiones. Estaba convencido de que los individuos eran más que simples beneficiarios de las políticas de desarrollo y los veía como agentes activos de sus propios procesos. Este artículo, después de explorar su punto de vista, presenta las posibles lecciones de Hirschman a la economía del desarrollo actual, en general, y al método de experimentos sociales controlados, en particular.

  11. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreen Kerrigan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a ‘holistic’ approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four ‘Admissions Competencies’ that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1 cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2 communication skills; 3 personal and professional development; and 4 knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  12. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H; Betzler, Thomas F; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S; Levy, Adam S; Reichgott, Michael J; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a 'holistic' approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four 'Admissions Competencies' that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  13. Albert Chalmers: Perpetual honours for a prominent tropical medicine career in the Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad A

    2014-01-01

    This article starts with brief review of Albert Chalmers' early career in tropical medicine until he was appointed Director of the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories in Khartoum (WTRLK) in 1913, succeeding Andrew Balfour. Then the article explores how Chalmers faced the challenges and managed to establish a solid research base under very harsh conditions. Most of his directorship was during the First World War, with shortage of staff and increased routine work load. In spite of these constraints, Chalmers managed to establish a base for research in tropical medicine in WTRK. Chalmers' research concentrated on the taxonomy and pathogenicity of bacteria and fungi but he also worked on miscellaneous dermatological disorders and on sleeping sickness. His papers reflect a wide range of knowledge and deep understanding of the topics he was covering. His work on the classification of pathogenic fungi was widely recognized. He tried different preparations of vaccines for cerebrospinal meningitis but with the technology available at the time he could not produce a potent vaccine. Chalmers' papers reflect the tremendous effort exerted in their production. Chamers resigned from WTRLK in 1920 and died of acute infective jaundice in the same year. In 1921 his widow, gave £500 to the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (RSTMH) in memory of her husband. The RSTMH Council decided to devote this money to the foundation of the Chalmers Memorial Medal.

  14. Loss of Innocence: Albert Moll, Sigmund Freud and the Invention of Childhood Sexuality Around 1900

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz D.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses how, prior to the work of Sigmund Freud, an understanding of infant and childhood sexuality emerged during the nineteenth century. Key contributors to the debate were Albert Moll, Max Dessoir and others, as fin-de-siècle artists and writers celebrated a sexualised image of the child. By the beginning of the twentieth century, most paediatricians, sexologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and pedagogues agreed that sexuality formed part of a child’s ‘normal’ development. This paper argues that the main disagreements in discourses about childhood sexuality related to different interpretations of children’s sexual experiences. On the one hand stood an explanation that argued for a homology between children’s and adults’ sexual experiences, on the other hand was an understanding that suggested that adults and children had distinct and different experiences. Whereas the homological interpretation was favoured by the majority of commentators, including Moll, Freud, and to some extent also by C.G. Jung, the heterological interpretation was supported by a minority, including childhood psychologist Charlotte Bühler. PMID:23002291

  15. The sexologist Albert Moll--between Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigusch, Volkmar

    2012-04-01

    Albert Moll was one of the most influential sexologists during the first three decades of the twentieth century. In contrast to his rivals Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld, his achievements have not yet been recognised adequately. The author gives a comparative account of the work of these three protagonists. This shows that Moll formed some ideas which are regarded as psychoanalytical today before Freud, and that he, in contrast to Hirschfeld, was able to reflect critically on contemporary discourses, such as the debates on racial improvement through eugenics. As scientific theories, Freud's psychoanalysis represented the unconscious, fantasy, experience and latency, while Moll's sexology represented consciousness, ontological reality, behaviour and manifestation. Moll's major disagreement with Hirschfeld's sexology was his advocacy of apolitical and impartial science, whereas Hirschfeld's aim was to achieve sexual reforms politically. Added to these differences were strong personal animosities. Freud called Moll a 'beast' and 'pettifogger'; and Moll complained about Hirschfeld's 'problematic' character. When Hirschfeld escaped the Nazi terror and went to Paris, Moll denounced him in order to prevent him rebuilding a new existence in exile.

  16. Promoting Sustainable Forest Management Among Stakeholders in the Prince Albert Model Forest, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen T Hvenegaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Model Forests are partnerships for shared decision-making to support social, environmental, and economic sustainability in forest management. Relationships among sustainable forest management partners are often strained, but the Prince Albert Model Forest (PAMF represents a process of effective stakeholder involvement, cooperative relationships, visionary planning, and regional landscape management. This article seeks to critically examine the history, drivers, accomplishments, and challenges associated with the PAMF. Four key phases are discussed, representing different funding levels, planning processes, research projects, and partners. Key drivers in the PAMF were funding, urgent issues, provincial responsibility, core of committed people, evolving governance, desire for a neutral organisation, role of protected areas, and potential for mutual benefits. The stakeholders involved in the Model Forest, including the forest industry and associated groups, protected areas, Aboriginal groups, local communities, governments, and research groups, were committed to the project, cooperated on many joint activities, provided significant staffing and financial resources, and gained many benefits to their own organisations. Challenges included declining funding, changing administrative structures, multiple partners, and rotating representatives. The PAMF process promoted consultative and integrated land resource management in the region, and demonstrated the positive results of cooperation between stakeholders interested in sustainable forest management.

  17. Loss of innocence: Albert Moll, Sigmund Freud and the invention of childhood sexuality around 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz D H

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses how, prior to the work of Sigmund Freud, an understanding of infant and childhood sexuality emerged during the nineteenth century. Key contributors to the debate were Albert Moll, Max Dessoir and others, as fin-de-siècle artists and writers celebrated a sexualised image of the child. By the beginning of the twentieth century, most paediatricians, sexologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and pedagogues agreed that sexuality formed part of a child's 'normal' development. This paper argues that the main disagreements in discourses about childhood sexuality related to different interpretations of children's sexual experiences. On the one hand stood an explanation that argued for a homology between children's and adults' sexual experiences, on the other hand was an understanding that suggested that adults and children had distinct and different experiences. Whereas the homological interpretation was favoured by the majority of commentators, including Moll, Freud, and to some extent also by C.G. Jung, the heterological interpretation was supported by a minority, including childhood psychologist Charlotte Bühler.

  18. Rare regions of the susceptible-infected-susceptible model on Barabási-Albert networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ódor, Géza

    2013-04-01

    I extend a previous work to susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) models on weighted Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. Numerical evidence is provided that phases with slow, power-law dynamics emerge as the consequence of quenched disorder and tree topologies studied previously with the contact process. I compare simulation results with spectral analysis of the networks and show that the quenched mean-field (QMF) approximation provides a reliable, relatively fast method to explore activity clustering. This suggests that QMF can be used for describing rare-region effects due to network inhomogeneities. Finite-size study of the QMF shows the expected disappearance of the epidemic threshold λ(c) in the thermodynamic limit and an inverse participation ratio ~0.25, meaning localization in case of disassortative weight scheme. Contrarily, for the multiplicative weights and the unweighted trees, this value vanishes in the thermodynamic limit, suggesting only weak rare-region effects in agreement with the dynamical simulations. Strong corrections to the mean-field behavior in case of disassortative weights explains the concave shape of the order parameter ρ(λ) at the transition point. Application of this method to other models may reveal interesting rare-region effects, Griffiths phases as the consequence of quenched topological heterogeneities.

  19. 'God's ethicist': Albert Moll and his medical ethics in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2012-04-01

    In 1902, Albert Moll, who at that time ran a private practice for nervous diseases in Berlin, published his comprehensive book on medical ethics, Ärztliche Ethik. Based on the concept of a contractual relationship between doctor and client, it gave more room to the self-determination of patients than the contemporary, usually rather paternalistic, works of this genre. In the first part of the present paper this is illustrated by examining Moll's views and advice on matters such as truthfulness towards patients, euthanasia, and abortion. The second part of this article discusses how Moll engaged with the then publicly debated issues of experimentation on hospital patients and the 'trade' of foreign private patients between agents and medical consultants. In both matters Moll collected evidence of unethical practices and tried to use it to bring about change without damaging his or the profession's reputation. However, with his tactical manoeuvres, Moll made no friends for himself among his colleagues or the authorities; his book on ethics also met with a generally cool response from the medical profession and seems to have been more appreciated by lawyers than by other doctors.

  20. Using the behavioural perspective to explain the current state of horizontal collaborative purchasing the public sector in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhwezi, Moses

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The paper is part of the Doctoral research on horizontal collaborative purchasing in developing countries, and particularly in Uganda. The overall goals of the Doctoral research are tounderstand behavioural aspects in horizontal purchasing collaboration in developing countries (Uganda) an

  1. Qualitative evaluation of the Teenage Mothers Project in Uganda: a community-based empowerment intervention for unmarried teenage mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leerlooijer, J.N.; Bos, A.E.R.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Reeuwijk, van M.A.J.; Rijsdijk, E.; Nshakira, N.; Kok, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background A large proportion of unmarried teenage mothers in Uganda face physical, psychological, and social problems after pregnancy and childbirth, such as obstetric complications, lack of education, and stigmatisation in their communities. The Teenage Mothers Project (TMP) in Eastern Uganda

  2. Patterns of Human Plague in Uganda, 2008-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Apangu, Titus; Griffith, Kevin; Acayo, Sarah; Yockey, Brook; Kaggwa, John; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Schriefer, Martin; Sexton, Christopher; Ben Beard, C; Candini, Gordian; Abaru, Janet; Candia, Bosco; Okoth, Jimmy Felix; Apio, Harriet; Nolex, Lawrence; Ezama, Geoffrey; Okello, Robert; Atiku, Linda; Mpanga, Joseph; Mead, Paul S

    2017-09-01

    Plague is a highly virulent fleaborne zoonosis that occurs throughout many parts of the world; most suspected human cases are reported from resource-poor settings in sub-Saharan Africa. During 2008-2016, a combination of active surveillance and laboratory testing in the plague-endemic West Nile region of Uganda yielded 255 suspected human plague cases; approximately one third were laboratory confirmed by bacterial culture or serology. Although the mortality rate was 7% among suspected cases, it was 26% among persons with laboratory-confirmed plague. Reports of an unusual number of dead rats in a patient's village around the time of illness onset was significantly associated with laboratory confirmation of plague. This descriptive summary of human plague in Uganda highlights the episodic nature of the disease, as well as the potential that, even in endemic areas, illnesses of other etiologies might be being mistaken for plague.

  3. The Role of Astronomy in Development: The Case of Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurua, Edward

    2016-10-01

    Science and technology play a key role in economic development; and Universities have a direct stake in this process. A knowledge-based economy requires scientific and technological expertise that is strongly influenced by the strength of training in science and technology. However, in Uganda not many students opt for science subject at higher levels, and subsequently in the University. Therefore, there is need to encourage and motivate students to study science subjects in order for this to be successful. This can be achieved through introduction of stimulating subjects such as astronomy in the university curriculum. Astronomy is considered as the most appealing subject and an excellent tool for conveying scientific knowledge to young students. In this paper, the role that astronomy has played to motivate and interest students to study physics in Mbarara University of Science and Technology, in Uganda, is discussed.

  4. Participatory Indicators of Success of Community Forestry Programs in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buyinza Mukadasi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In Uganda, a large diversity of community initiated forest management systems have evolved recently in response to severe degradation of forests and grazing land and biomass shortages. Forestry professional, forest user group and farmers were organized in June 2004 to develop commonly agreed indicators of the performance of Community Forestry Program in Uganda. Indicators, such as access to fuel wood, incidence of forest fire and amount of community funds raised through the sale offorest products are commonly agreed at local level. Women participation in forestry related meetings and taste of drinking water in the watershed area are also important. Equitable benefit sharing by the community forest users serves as an indicator of better access to forest products. Socio-economic changes such as women participation in forest related decision-making, income generated from community forests, and equity of benefits from community forests also, reflect the program success.

  5. Environmental systems and local actors: decentralizing environmental policy in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterveer, Peter; Van Vliet, Bas

    2010-02-01

    In Uganda, environmental and natural resource management is decentralized and has been the responsibility of local districts since 1996. This environmental management arrangement was part of a broader decentralization process and was intended to increase local ownership and improve environmental policy; however, its implementation has encountered several major challenges over the last decade. This article reviews some of the key structural problems facing decentralized environmental policy in this central African country and examines these issues within the wider framework of political decentralization. Tensions have arisen between technical staff and politicians, between various levels of governance, and between environmental and other policy domains. This review offers a critical reflection on the perspectives and limitations of decentralized environmental governance in Uganda. Our conclusions focus on the need to balance administrative staff and local politicians, the mainstreaming of local environmental policy, and the role of international donors.

  6. Enhancing sustainable construction in the building sector in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kibwami, N; Tutesigensi, A

    2016-01-01

    To further the sustainability agenda of the building sector, recent research and practice suggest that integrating embodied carbon (EC) in the sustainability assessment of buildings is necessary. This paper presents an investigation to assess whether the consideration of EC in the development approval process (DAP) could enhance sustainable construction (SC). A recent proposal for integrating the assessment of EC in the DAP of building projects in Uganda was used. Structured interviews were u...

  7. CONSUMER CHARACTERISTICS AND PREFERENCES FOR ORGANIC PRODUCTS IN KAMPALA, UGANDA

    OpenAIRE

    Anecho, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the findings from a consumer survey that was conducted to understand the consumer characteristics and preferences for organic products in Kampala, Uganda. The survey used a mall intercept survey method to investigate consumer revealed preferences for key organic and conventional products attributes. A face-to-face interview was used to collect data on consumer preferences towards organic food attributes that reveals preference for specific organic and conventional product...

  8. Finance and Demand for Skill: Evidence from Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We explore the empirical interaction between firm growth, financing constraints and job creation. Using a novel small business survey from Uganda, we find that the extent to which small businesses expand skilled employment as their sales and profits increase depends significantly on access to external funding. The results are robust to the inclusion of various firm level controls, region and sector fixed effects. We address reverse causality concerns by providing empirical evidence using plan...

  9. Pre-Colonial political centralization and contemporary development in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The importance of pre-colonial history on contemporary African development has become an important .eld of study within development economics in recent years. In particular Gennaioli and Rainer (2007) suggest that pre-colonial political centralization has had an impact on con- temporary levels of development within Africa at the country level. We test the Gennaioli and Rainer (2007) hypothesis at the sub-national level with evidence from Uganda. Using a variety of datasets we obtain results w...

  10. Translating health research evidence into policy and practice in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Magnussen, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Background Uganda experiences a high disease burden of malaria, infectious and non-communicable diseases. Recent data shows that malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among all age groups, while HIV prevalence is on the increase and there is re-emergence of viral haemorrhagic fevers and cholera epidemics. In order to respond to the above situation, a team of researchers, policy makers, civil society and the media was formed in order to build a collaboration that would help i...

  11. CONSUMER CHARACTERISTICS AND PREFERENCES FOR ORGANIC PRODUCTS IN KAMPALA, UGANDA

    OpenAIRE

    Anecho, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the findings from a consumer survey that was conducted to understand the consumer characteristics and preferences for organic products in Kampala, Uganda. The survey used a mall intercept survey method to investigate consumer revealed preferences for key organic and conventional products attributes. A face-to-face interview was used to collect data on consumer preferences towards organic food attributes that reveals preference for specific organic and conventional product...

  12. Agglomeration, migration, and regional growth: A CGE analysis for Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Dorosh, Paul; Thurlow, James

    2009-01-01

    "Uganda has experienced rapid economic growth and poverty reduction over the past decade but has failed to significantly improve incomes in its northern regions where prolonged conflict has hindered growth. We consider three strategies to close this regional divide: (1) develop a north-south corridor to encourage regional trade, (2) accelerate growth in the southern capital city and encourage north-south migration, and (3) improve agricultural productivity in rural areas. We examine these str...

  13. The cerebral cortex of Albert Einstein: a description and preliminary analysis of unpublished photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Dean; Lepore, Frederick E; Noe, Adrianne

    2013-04-01

    Upon his death in 1955, Albert Einstein's brain was removed, fixed and photographed from multiple angles. It was then sectioned into 240 blocks, and histological slides were prepared. At the time, a roadmap was drawn that illustrates the location within the brain of each block and its associated slides. Here we describe the external gross neuroanatomy of Einstein's entire cerebral cortex from 14 recently discovered photographs, most of which were taken from unconventional angles. Two of the photographs reveal sulcal patterns of the medial surfaces of the hemispheres, and another shows the neuroanatomy of the right (exposed) insula. Most of Einstein's sulci are identified, and sulcal patterns in various parts of the brain are compared with those of 85 human brains that have been described in the literature. To the extent currently possible, unusual features of Einstein's brain are tentatively interpreted in light of what is known about the evolution of higher cognitive processes in humans. As an aid to future investigators, these (and other) features are correlated with blocks on the roadmap (and therefore histological slides). Einstein's brain has an extraordinary prefrontal cortex, which may have contributed to the neurological substrates for some of his remarkable cognitive abilities. The primary somatosensory and motor cortices near the regions that typically represent face and tongue are greatly expanded in the left hemisphere. Einstein's parietal lobes are also unusual and may have provided some of the neurological underpinnings for his visuospatial and mathematical skills, as others have hypothesized. Einstein's brain has typical frontal and occipital shape asymmetries (petalias) and grossly asymmetrical inferior and superior parietal lobules. Contrary to the literature, Einstein's brain is not spherical, does not lack parietal opercula and has non-confluent Sylvian and inferior postcentral sulci.

  14. Environmental Regulation in Uganda: Successes and Challenges - Comment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Echookit Akellol

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of environmental regulatory framework in Uganda was initiated by the national environment action planning process in 1990, as a realization that environment needed special focus. As a result of the said process environmental policy and law were developed. The 1995 constitutional of the Republic of Uganda was among the first ever such constitution in the East African region to deliberately enshrine the right to a decent environment and to provide for sustainable development, in addition to the principle that natural resources are held in trust for the people and should be responsibly managed for their benefit. Following the constitution, a number of environment legislations were enacted and others were revised to take into account environmental cardinal principles and considerations, including embedding in them environmental regulatory provisions. Hence, in addition to the framework of National Environment Act, a number of environment sect oral legislation exists and environmental management is spread throughout the respective institutions responsible for aspects of the environment. It is therefore safe to say that Uganda has developed a lot of legislation on the environment but the challenge remains that of developing more regulations under the relevant parent Acts, effective monitoring and enforcement.

  15. Helicobacter pylori and cancer among adults in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens Marilyn

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Data from Africa on infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are sparse. Therefore, as part of an epidemiological study of cancer in Uganda, we investigated the prevalence and determinants of antibodies against H. pylori among 854 people with different cancer types and benign tumours. Patients were recruited from hospitals in Kampala, Uganda, interviewed about various demographic and lifestyle factors and tested for antibodies against H. pylori. In all patients combined, excluding those with stomach cancer (which has been associated with H. pylori infection, the prevalence of antibodies was 87% (723/833 overall, but declined with increasing age (p = 0.02 and was lower among people who were HIV seropositive compared to seronegative (p H. pylori antibodies (odds ratio 0.8, 95% confidence intervals 0.2–2.9, p = 0.7; estimated using all other patients as controls, with adjustment for age, sex and HIV serostatus. No other cancer site or type was significantly associated with anti-H. pylori antibodies. The prevalence of H. pylori reported here is broadly in accord with results from other developing countries, although the determinants of infection and its' role in the aetiology of gastric cancer in Uganda remain unclear.

  16. Improved charcoal production methods using the casamance kiln in Uganda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nturanabo, F. (Makerere Univ., Kampala (Uganda), Dept. of Mechanical Engineering), e-mail: mpazi@tech.mak.ac.ug; Tumuhimbise, J. (Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development, Kampala (Uganda))

    2010-07-01

    Uganda's energy mix depicts heavy reliance on biomass for most of the country's energy needs. Woodfuel is the major source of energy for heating, cooking and lighting. According to the Uganda Energy Balance 2008, biomass resources account for 91,5 % of Uganda's net energy supply. Consumption of wood has been rising at the same rate as the country's population (3,6 % per year as of 2008). The solution to check the rampant deforestation and environmental degradation that result from over-exploitation of the forest resources lies in harvesting the wood sustainably by using more efficient methods. The purpose of this research was to promote use of the casamance kiln as an efficient and environment-friendly charcoal production method. The study aimed at establishing a simpler version of casamance that involves minimal capital investment for low-income producers to adopt easily. The results show that the casamance kiln is easy to operate, takes a shorter cycle time and produces higher quality charcoal. Its efficiency of yield was in the range of 24-28 %, compared to the traditional earth mound whose range was 12-16 %. A 20 m3 casamance kiln operating at 28 % efficiency for 30 weeks a year can save 85 tonnes of wood. (orig.)

  17. Dismantling reified African culture through localised homosexualities in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanzi, Stella

    2013-01-01

    Uganda's Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009 aimed at protecting the cherished culture of the people against emergent threats to the traditional heterosexual family. The Bill's justification, however, lay in myopic imaginings of a homogenous African-ness and pedestrian oblivion to pluralities within African sexualities. This paper revisits the debate that homosexuality is 'un-African'. Rhetoric analysis of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill exposes how dominant discourses of law, medicine, religion, geography and culture reinforce the view that homosexuality is foreign to Africa. Based on ethnography in contemporary Uganda, I explore how self-identified same-sex-loving individuals simultaneously claim their African-ness and their homosexuality. Their strategies include ethnic belonging, membership to kinship structures, making connections with pre-colonial histories of homosexuality, civic participation in democratic processes, national identity, organising of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and questioning support groups, language and nomenclature, visibility and voice in local communal activities, solidarity and adherence to cultural rituals. In present-day Uganda, same-sex-loving men, women and transgender people variously assert their African-ness.

  18. Agency relations and managed performance in public universities in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R.K. Kagaari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This article focused on the need for improved employer-employee relationships in order for public universities in Uganda to achieve their intended objectives.Research purpose: The purpose of this article was to review the need for appropriate employer-employee relationships that will ensure quality services and service delivery in public universities in Uganda.Motivation for the study: The researchers set out to examine why managers of public universities in Uganda were continuously paying less attention to the needs of the employees.Research design, approach and method: A descriptive research design was employed and 12 respondents, purposively selected from 4 public universities, were interviewed. Data were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Nvivo software. This article is based on the perspective of agency theory, and discussed the contractual relationship between management and employees. The agency theory was deemed necessary because of its contribution to organisational literature.Main findings: There is a need to create and nurture a collegial working climate that promotes quality interactions through information sharing. This results in creating and retaining motivated and committed employees, and also helps to overcome the paradox of balancing the high demand for university education whilst offering quality services.Practical/managerial implications: Managers have to continuously monitor and accommodate employee needs and demands.Contribution/value-add: The potential value of the paper is its function as a guide for public universities to have visionary managers that will introduce new approaches to managing public universities in a competitive global environment.

  19. Kuidas maikrahv uued rõivad sai. Leopold von Pezoldi "Maikrahvi sissesõit Tallinna" ja Theodor Albert Sprengeli "Reformatsiooni algus Tallinnas" avalik konserveerimine = How the May King got his new clother. Public conservation of Leopold von Pezol

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aas, Kristina, 1988-

    2015-01-01

    Ülevaade baltisaksa kunstnike Leopold von Pezoldi ja Theodor Albert Sprengeli maalidest Suurgildi hoones, nende varasematest restaureerimistest, avalikust konserveerimisest ja tehnilistest uuringutest.

  20. Kuidas maikrahv uued rõivad sai. Leopold von Pezoldi "Maikrahvi sissesõit Tallinna" ja Theodor Albert Sprengeli "Reformatsiooni algus Tallinnas" avalik konserveerimine = How the May King got his new clother. Public conservation of Leopold von Pezol

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aas, Kristina, 1988-

    2015-01-01

    Ülevaade baltisaksa kunstnike Leopold von Pezoldi ja Theodor Albert Sprengeli maalidest Suurgildi hoones, nende varasematest restaureerimistest, avalikust konserveerimisest ja tehnilistest uuringutest.

  1. Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and...

  2. THE MYTHE NOVEL PLAGUE OF ALBERT CAMUS, ITS INSPIRATION SOURCES AND ITS EVOCATIVE SYMBOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat BOYACIOĞLU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In different periods, some writers made new comments on the antique classics mhytes by readapting them in accordance with the their period. In the XVIIth the french classic playwriters such as Pierre Corneille and Jean Racine took up again the antique myths treated by the antique writers. These playwriters readapted the antique myths in their works according to the conception of their period. In the XXth the french writers such as Jean Giraudoux, André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus interpreted again the antique mythes in their works by making evocations to the events occured in their epoch. Treating and displaying the antique mythes in the theater works is a well known fact, but it is an uncommon fact in the novels. The russian novelist Dostoïevsky, the czeche Franz Kafka, the american novelists Herman Melville and William Faulkner interpreted again some mythes under different aspects in their novels. This style of myth roman caused that the american critic Stock asked the following question: Is it possible to reconcile the symbolism and the naturalism, what is the principal and formal problem? The myth roman gives answer to the question : Do the realism and naturalism giving importance the exterior appearance of the matter and things and the symbolism giving importance to the the invisible aspect of the matter and things come together in the same plane? The novel of Albert Camus, The Plague (La Peste containing both realist –naturalist and symbolist elements constitutes an typical exemple of this myth roman. In this novel, Camus relates how the epidemic disease pestilence not occured in reality according to the historical documents, but fabricated fictively by the writer, besieges the algerian city Oran and causes a chaotic situation to the inhabitants as the enemy army did, in a given date, this is to say, in1940’s and a given space. This pestilence event as epidemic disease evokes symbolically the occupation of France by the

  3. Towards reframing health service delivery in Uganda: the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy I. Schwartz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs is accelerating. Given that the capacity of health systems in LMICs is already strained by the weight of communicable diseases, these countries find themselves facing a double burden of disease. NCDs contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality, thereby playing a major role in the cycle of poverty, and impeding development. Methods: Integrated approaches to health service delivery and healthcare worker (HCW training will be necessary in order to successfully combat the great challenge posed by NCDs. Results: In 2013, we formed the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of NCDs (UINCD, a multidisciplinary research collaboration that aims to present a systems approach to integrated management of chronic disease prevention, care, and the training of HCWs. Discussion: Through broad-based stakeholder engagement, catalytic partnerships, and a collective vision, UINCD is working to reframe integrated health service delivery in Uganda.

  4. Towards reframing health service delivery in Uganda: the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeremy I; Dunkle, Ashley; Akiteng, Ann R; Birabwa-Male, Doreen; Kagimu, Richard; Mondo, Charles K; Mutungi, Gerald; Rabin, Tracy L; Skonieczny, Michael; Sykes, Jamila; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is accelerating. Given that the capacity of health systems in LMICs is already strained by the weight of communicable diseases, these countries find themselves facing a double burden of disease. NCDs contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality, thereby playing a major role in the cycle of poverty, and impeding development. Integrated approaches to health service delivery and healthcare worker (HCW) training will be necessary in order to successfully combat the great challenge posed by NCDs. In 2013, we formed the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of NCDs (UINCD), a multidisciplinary research collaboration that aims to present a systems approach to integrated management of chronic disease prevention, care, and the training of HCWs. Through broad-based stakeholder engagement, catalytic partnerships, and a collective vision, UINCD is working to reframe integrated health service delivery in Uganda.

  5. A Case Study of Cooperative Learning in Bushenyi District in Uganda: Educational Leaders' and Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujuni, John Bosco

    2015-01-01

    In 2003-2007, the government of Uganda through the Ministry of Education and Sports (MoES), under the umbrella of UPHOLD and in Partnership with USAID, introduced cooperative learning as a "student-centered teaching approach" in some selected districts and schools in Uganda. This dissertation explored the current state and practice of…

  6. The quest for treatment : the violated body of nodding syndrome in Northern Uganda.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemmel, van K.

    2016-01-01

    Nodding syndrome is an unexplained affliction that affects thousands of children in northern Uganda. It is characterised by episodes of repetitive dropping forward of the head and often accompanied by convulsions. Symptoms were first reported in Uganda around 1998, during two decades of violent conf

  7. Developing a Framework for Monitoring Child Poverty: Results from a Study in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Sophie

    2004-01-01

    In 2002 Save the Children UK carried out a study of child poverty in Uganda, as part of the on-going Uganda Participatory Poverty Assessment Programme. Using participants from all regions of the country, the researchers asked children about their perceptions of poverty and anti-poverty strategies, as well as questioning adult key informants about…

  8. The Role of Political Parties in Denmark, the United States, and Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne; Basajjabaka, Abubaker

    1996-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the role of political parties in Denmark, the USA, and Uganda on the basis of political science theories about parties, political participation and political systems.......A comparative analysis of the role of political parties in Denmark, the USA, and Uganda on the basis of political science theories about parties, political participation and political systems....

  9. Availability of Essential Medicines across Levels of Care in Gulu District, Northern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musoke, David; Sodemann, Morten

    2016-01-01

    on a monthly basis. The assessment of the availability of the medicines was carried out using the check lists that were derived from the Essential Medicines and Health Supplies List of Uganda as defined by the Ministry of Health of Uganda for the various levels of care. Seventeen (17) Health Centre level II...

  10. Post-transfusion and maternal red blood cell alloimmunization in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natukunda, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been substantial progress in the area of blood safety in Uganda. In contrast, little attention has been paid to transfusion safety in Uganda and there are gaps in laboratory and clinical transfusion practices within hospitals. Assessment of the current practice a

  11. Building Rain Water Tanks and Building Skills: A Case Study of a Women's Organization in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Deborah; Nakato, Margaret; Nabalango, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Water collection in rural areas of Uganda is left primarily to women and children. Katosi Women Development Trust, an NGO based in rural Uganda has focused on addressing the gender-linked issue of increased water sources near the home through the construction of rain water collection tanks. In an effort to improve the income of members as well as…

  12. Counteracting Fabricated Anti-Gay Public Pedagogy in Uganda with Strategic Lifelong Learning as Critical Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, André P.

    2016-01-01

    Political, cultural and social fallout following the introduction of the anti-homosexuality bill in Uganda in 2009 intensified fabrication of an anti-gay public pedagogy of negation and nemesis that fuelled the passage of the Anti-Homosexuality Act, 2014. The Government of Uganda, conventional Anglicanism and US evangelical Christianity were all…

  13. Using System Dynamics to model the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Botswana and Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howell, R.; Wesselink, O.; Pruyt, E.

    2013-01-01

    Uganda and Botswana present two interesting and contrasting cases in the AIDS epidemic. System dynamics models of the AIDS epidemic in Botswana and Uganda were created to examine the future development of the virus in both countries and evaluate existing and future policy measures. The effect of exi

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 3 in long-horned Ankole calf, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhikusooka, Moses Tefula; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Namatovu, Alice; Ruhweza, Simon; Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Normann, Preben; Belsham, Graham J

    2015-01-01

    After a 16-year interval, foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 3 was isolated in 2013 from an apparently healthy long-horned Ankole calf that grazed close to buffalo in Uganda. The emergent virus strain is ≈20% different in nucleotide sequence (encoding VP1 [viral protein 1]) from its closest relatives isolated previously from buffalo in Uganda.

  15. Consumer Perceptions towards Introducing a Genetically Modified Banana (Musa spp.) in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikulwe, E.M.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Falck-Zepeda, J.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of a genetically modified (GM) banana (Musa spp.) in Uganda is not without controversy. It is likely to generate a wide portfolio of concerns as the technology of genetic engineering is still in its early stages of development in Uganda. The purpose of this study is to show how cons

  16. Information and Communication for Rural Innovation and Development: Context, Quality and Priorities in Southeast Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sseguya, Haroon; Mazur, Robert; Abbott, Eric; Matsiko, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the status and priorities for agricultural information generation, dissemination and utilization in the context of agricultural innovation systems in southeast Uganda. Design/Methodology/Approach: Group discussions were conducted with six communities in Kamuli district, southeast Uganda. The focus was on information sources and…

  17. Prevalence Estimates of Antibodies Towards Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Small Ruminants in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balinda, Sheila Nina; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Muwanika, Vincent B.;

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Uganda with control strategies focusing on vaccination of cattle, while small ruminants are largely ignored. In order for Uganda to establish effective control strategies, it is crucial that the epidemiology of the disease is fully understood. This study...

  18. Spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies with reference to indigenous cattle populations among contrasting agro-ecological zones of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabi, Fredrick; Muwanika, Vincent; Masembe, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Indigenous cattle populations exhibit various degrees of agro-ecological fitness and provide desirable opportunities for investments to improve sustainable production for better rural small-scale farmers' incomes globally. However, they could be a source of infection to their attendants and other susceptible livestock if their brucellosis status remains unknown. This study investigated the spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies among indigenous cattle populations in Uganda. Sera from a total of 925 indigenous cattle (410 Ankole Bos taurus indicus, 50 Nganda and 465 East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) - B. indicus) obtained randomly from 209 herds spread throughout Uganda were sequentially analysed for Brucella antibodies using the indirect (I) and competitive (C) enzyme linked Immuno-sorbent assays (ELISA). Recent incidences of abortion within the previous 12 months and routine hygienic practices during parturition were explored for public health risks. Brucella antibodies occurred in approximately 8.64% (80/925) and 28.70% (95% CI: 22.52, 34.89) of the sampled individual cattle and herds, respectively. Findings have shown that Ankole and EASZ cattle had similar seroprevalences. Indigenous cattle from the different study agro-ecological zones (AEZs) exhibited varying seroprevalences ranging from approximately 1.78% (95% CI: 0, 5.29) to 19.67% (95% CI: 8.99, 30.35) in the Lake Victoria Crescent (LVC) and North Eastern Drylands (NED) respectively. Significantly higher odds for Brucella antibodies occurred in the NED (OR: 3.40, 95% CI: 1.34, 8.57, p=0.01) inhabited by EASZ cattle compared to the KP (reference category) AEZ. Recent incidences of abortions within the previous 12 months were significantly (p<0.001) associated with seropositive herds. These findings add critical evidence to existing information on the widespread occurrence of brucellosis among indigenous cattle populations in Uganda and could guide allocation of meagre resources for awareness creation

  19. Lake metabolism scales with lake morphometry and catchment conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter A.; Baastrup-Spohr, Lars; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2012-01-01

    We used a comparative data set for 25 lakes in Denmark sampled during summer to explore the influence of lake morphometry, catchment conditions, light availability and nutrient input on lake metabolism. We found that (1) gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (R) decline with lake...... in lake morphometry and catchment conditions when comparing metabolic responses of lakes to human impacts....

  20. ATTRAOT Albert Einstein 诱惑爱因斯坦 技嘉g-Smart智能手机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    大科学家阿伯特·爱因斯坦(Albert Einstein)博士尽管去世已经半个世纪,但由于其在科学方面的突出成就以及其热心于社会正义和人类和平事业的优秀品格,至今仍得到全世界人民的敬仰与尊崇,作为科学家,

  1. La singularidad de Albert Sánchez Piñol: una conversación sobre su escritura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Bou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A general overview of Catalan writer Albert Sánchez Piñol’s work, serves as a prologue to excerpts of the conversation with him that took place in the Aula Magna at the Università di Bologna on October 31, 2014. Sánchez Piñol is a unique writer in the Catalan literary scene for two reasons: he writes books that are real page-turners, and he has managed to successfully introduce the fantastic in Catalan literature. More recently his interest has moved to historical novel closely related to contemporary political events.

  2. A TENTAÇÃO DE EVASÃO: IDEALISMO E ESTÉTICA NOS PRIMEIROS ESCRITOS DE ALBERT CAMUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Pérez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo propõe analisar os primeiros escritos deAlbert Camus com vista a compreender a importância que a Estéticateve na sua iniciação filosófica, procurando avalizar a influêncianela exercida pelo pensamento de Arthur Schopenhauer e entendero perfil marcadamente idealista dessa reflexão estética de juventudedo autor franco-argelino, discernindo, concomitantemente, osaspectos que serão objecto de superação por parte dodesenvolvimento posterior do pensamento filosófico camusiano.

  3. Was Lates late? A null model for the Nile perch boom in Lake Victoria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Downing

    Full Text Available Nile perch (Lates niloticus suddenly invaded Lake Victoria between 1979 and 1987, 25 years after its introduction in the Ugandan side of the lake. Nile perch then replaced the native fish diversity and irreversibly altered the ecosystem and its role to lakeshore societies: it is now a prised export product that supports millions of livelihoods. The delay in the Nile perch boom led to a hunt for triggers of the sudden boom and generated several hypotheses regarding its growth at low abundances--all hypotheses having important implications for the management of Nile perch stocks. We use logistic growth as a parsimonious null model to predict when the Nile perch invasion should have been expected, given its growth rate, initial stock size and introduction year. We find the first exponential growth phase can explain the timing of the perch boom at the scale of Lake Victoria, suggesting that complex mechanisms are not necessary to explain the Nile perch invasion or its timing. However, the boom started in Kenya before Uganda, indicating perhaps that Allee effects act at smaller scales than that of the whole Lake. The Nile perch invasion of other lakes indicates that habitat differences may also have an effect on invasion success. Our results suggest there is probably no single management strategy applicable to the whole lake that would lead to both efficient and sustainable exploitation of its resources.

  4. DNR 24K Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Medium scale lake polygons derived from the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) polygons and MnDOT Basemap lake delineations. Integrated with the DNR 24K Streams...

  5. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  6. Intestinal schistosomiasis among preschool children along the shores of Lake Victoria in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalugwa, A.; Olsen, Annette; Tukahebwa, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    interviews with a standardized pre-tested questionnaire prepared in the local language (Lusoga) were administered to each caregiver to identify risk factors associated with S. mansoni infection. An overall S. mansoni prevalence of 39.3% (95% CI: 38.0-41.1%) was estimated out of the 3058 stool samples...

  7. Fingerponds: managing nutrients and primary productivity for enhanced fish production in Lake Victoria's wetlands, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaggwa, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands are of great ecological importance and have been described as the most important zone for freshwater fisheries. They can be exploited for agriculture and aquaculture through the integration of these activities. In Sub-Saharan Africa, emphasis has been put on agriculture and this has 1ed to

  8. Patterns of Dekadal Rainfall Variation Over a Selected Region in Lake Victoria Basin, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Mugume

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding variations in rainfall in tropical regions is important due to its impacts on water resources, health and agriculture. This study assessed the dekadal rainfall patterns and rain days to determine intra-seasonal rainfall variability during the March–May season using the Mann–Kendall ( M K trend test and simple linear regression ( S L R over the period 2000–2015. Results showed an increasing trend of both dekadal rainfall amount and rain days (third and seventh dekads. The light rain days ( S L R = 0.181; M K = 0.350 and wet days ( S L R = 0.092; M K = 0.118 also depict an increasing trend. The rate of increase of light rain days and wet days during the third dekad (light rain days: S L R = 0.020; M K = 0.279 and wet days: S L R = 0.146; M K = 0.376 was slightly greater than during the seventh dekad (light rain days: S L R = 0.014; M K = 0.018 and wet days: S L R = 0.061; M K = 0.315 dekad. Seventy-four percent accounted for 2–4 consecutive dry days, but no significant trend was detected. The extreme rainfall was increasing over the third ( M K = 0.363 and seventh ( M K = 0.429 dekads. The rainfall amount and rain days were highly correlated (r: 0.43–0.72.

  9. Small Arms Proliferation and Homegrown Terrorism in the Great Lakes Region: Uganda’s Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    crime. The destabilizing presence of small arms discourages foreign investment and tourism .36 Ken Booth, in his article “A Security Regime in South...governance. For example, the resources that are identified for development of infrastructures such as schools roads, and hospitals are diverted to... tourism sector.137 The retardation of economic growth consequently creates high levels of unemployment and disgruntled groups that continue to be

  10. Fingerponds: managing nutrients and primary productivity for enhanced fish production in Lake Victoria's wetlands, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaggwa, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands are of great ecological importance and have been described as the most important zone for freshwater fisheries. They can be exploited for agriculture and aquaculture through the integration of these activities. In Sub-Saharan Africa, emphasis has been put on agriculture and this has 1ed to

  11. Lunnyu soils in the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda: Link to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Soil pH, Ca, Mg, and K were higher in topsoil compared to subsoil. Neither slope .... Plinthic Ferralsol (PF) Coniferous forest. Pure Eucalyptus on ..... t M g. (m g. /k g. ) 1.9. 2. 2.1. 2.2. 2.3. 2.4. 2.5. 2.6. L n. K. (m g. /k g. ) 0. 0.2. 0.4. 0.6. 0.8. 1. 1.2.

  12. LAKE VICTORIA BASIN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    selected satellite lakes and Mara River in Lake Victoria basin, during wet and dry seasons in. 2002. Samples ... The wet season recorded higher biomass in all satellite lakes than during the dry season (t = 2.476, DF ..... communication. Urbana ...

  13. Single versus double dose praziquantel comparison on efficacy and Schistosoma mansoni re-infection in preschool-age children in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalugwa, Allen; Nuwaha, Fred; Tukahebwa, Edridah Muheki;

    2015-01-01

    , abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. Overall re-infection rate 8 months post treatment was 44.5%. CONCLUSIONS: PZQ is efficacious and relatively safe to use in preschool-age children but there is still an unmet need to improve its formulation to suit small children. Two PZQ doses lead to significant......BACKGROUND: Schistosoma mansoni infection is proven to be a major health problem of preschool-age children in sub-Saharan Africa, yet this age category is not part of the schistosomiasis control program. The objective of this study was to compare the impact of single and double dose praziquantel...... (PZQ) treatment on cure rates (CRs), egg reduction rates (ERRs) and re-infection rates 8 months later, in children aged 1-5 years living along Lake Victoria, Uganda. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Infected children (n= 1017) were randomized to receive either a single or double dose of PZQ. Initially...

  14. Albert Einstein and Wernher von Braun - the two great German-American physicists seen in a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-04-01

    It was Albert Einstein who for the first time changed our view of the universe to be a non-euclidean curved space-time. And it was Wernher von Braun who blazed the trail to take us into this universe, leaving for the first time the gravitational field of our planet earth, with the landing a man on the moon the greatest event in human history. Both these great physicists did this on the shoulders of giants. Albert Einstein on the shoulders of his landsman, the mathematician Bernhard Riemann, and Wernher von Braun on the shoulders of Goddard and Oberth. Both Einstein and von Braun made a Faustian pact with the devil, von Braun by accepting research funds from Hitler, and Einstein by urging Roosvelt to build the atom bomb (against Hitler). Both of these great men later regretted the use of their work for the killing of innocent bystanders, even though in the end the invention of nuclear energy and space flight is for the benefit of man. Their example serves as a warning for all of us. It can be formulated as follows: ``Can I in good conscience accept research funds from the military to advance scientific knowledge, for weapons developed against an abstract enemy I never have met in person?'' Weapons if used do not differentiate between the scientist, who invented these weapons, and the non-scientist.

  15. Poetics of assembly Albert Kahn and D.W. Griffith in the birth of the Machine Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pancorbo Crespo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research seeks to establish a double parallel between cinema and modern architecture, focusing on a moment of refounding of both  disciplines, the early twentieth century. We will be based on two seminal characters: DW Griffith and Albert Kahn. We will explore a temporal and geographical parallelism in their main evolutionary lines, which run through a similar way in the beginning, from the U.S to the U.S.S.R, to return again to the place of origin. This trip was triggered by the arrival to the USSR of  the first copies of the film "Intolerance" in 1918 and the arrival of Albert  Kahn in 1928 for the realization of numerous industrial projects during the First Five-Year Plan. Furthermore, we will explore a more conceptual  parallelism, studying the use of the notion of assembly in both disciplines  during that period, using again the work of our two main characters as the basis for research, but also leaning on other essential actors for that issue, like are Eisenstein and Miliutin.

  16. Eating Behaviors and Weight Development in Obesity-Prone Children and the Importance of the Research of Albert J. Stunkard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Tanja V E

    2016-03-01

    Albert J. Stunkard, MD, was an internationally recognized leader and pioneer in the field of obesity and eating disorders research. He was also among the first scientists to study eating phenotypes and early life risk factors for childhood obesity at a time when childhood obesity prevalence rates were still comparatively low. The aim of this review is to highlight select findings from the work of Albert J. Stunkard which significantly advanced our understanding of eating traits of children with a different familial predisposition to obesity and genetic and environmental influences on weight outcomes. Collectively, Stunkard's early work on childhood obesity had a significant impact on the field of ingestive behavior and obesity research in that he was one of the first investigators who pointed to genetic influences underlying behavioral eating traits and child weight status. His work also inspired numerous subsequent investigations on the relative contributions of specific genes (e.g., polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene) on individual differences in child eating traits (e.g., satiety responsiveness, eating in the absence of hunger) and body weight.

  17. Rational Emotive Behavioural Therapy: The Evolution of a Revolution: Interview With Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis, Work Partner and Wife of Dr. Albert Ellis, the Creator of REBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Debbie Joffe; Rovira, Montse

    2015-02-01

    Recognized as one of the most influential thinkers and psychologists, Albert Ellis PhD (1913-2007) revolutionized Psychology when he created the first cognitive psychotherapy, Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy. After he passed away, Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis continues spreading his legacy around the world. Psychologist, lecturer, writer, trainer, she dedicates her life to disseminate REBT and extend it through different statements, from the social to the educational, from the academic to the clinical. In this interview, she goes through her own history and her husband's one, bringing us closer to understanding Albert Ellis as the leading figure in his field, and the oneness they experienced through their professional and personal relationship.

  18. Groundwater resources monitoring and population displacement in northern Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalikakis, K.; Hammache, Y.; Nawa, A.; Slinski, K.; Petropoulos, G.; Muteesasira, A.

    2009-04-01

    Northern Uganda has been devastated by more than 20 years of open conflict by the LRA (Lord's Resistance Army) and the Government of Uganda. This war has been marked by extreme violence against civilians, who had been gathered in protected IDP (Internally Displaced Persons) camps. At the height of the displacement in 2007, the UN office for coordination of humanitarian affairs, estimated that nearly 2.5 million people were interned into approximately 220 camps throughout Northern Uganda. With the improved security since mid-2006, the people displaced by the conflict in Northern Uganda started to move out of the overcrowded camps and return either to their villages/parishes of origin or to resettlement/transit sites. However, basic water, sanitation and hygiene infrastructure in the return areas or any new settlements sites are minimal. People returning to their villages of origin encounter a situation where in many cases there is no access to safe water. Since 1998 ACF (Action Against Hunger, part of the Action Contre la Faim International Network) activities have been concentrated in the Acholi and Lango regions of Northern Uganda. ACF's WASH (Water, sanitation and hygiene) department interventions concern sanitation infrastructure, hygiene education and promotion as well as water points implementation. To ensure safe water access, actions are focused in borehole construction and traditional spring rehabilitation, also called "protected" springs. These activities follow the guidelines as set forth by the international WASH cluster, led by UNICEF. A three year project (2008-2010) is being implemented by ACF, to monitor the available groundwater resources in Northern Uganda. The main objectives are: 1. to monitor the groundwater quality from existing water points during different hydrological seasons, 2. to identify, if any, potential risks of contamination from population concentrations and displacement, lack of basic infrastructure and land use, and finally 3. to

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of rubella viruses identified in Uganda, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namuwulya, Prossy; Abernathy, Emily; Bukenya, Henry; Bwogi, Josephine; Tushabe, Phionah; Birungi, Molly; Seguya, Ronald; Kabaliisa, Theopista; Alibu, Vincent P; Kayondo, Jonathan K; Rivailler, Pierre; Icenogle, Joseph; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas

    2014-12-01

    Molecular data on rubella viruses are limited in Uganda despite the importance of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Routine rubella vaccination, while not administered currently in Uganda, is expected to begin by 2015. The World Health Organization recommends that countries without rubella vaccination programs assess the burden of rubella and CRS before starting a routine vaccination program. Uganda is already involved in integrated case-based surveillance, including laboratory testing to confirm measles and rubella, but molecular epidemiologic aspects of rubella circulation have so far not been documented in Uganda. Twenty throat swab or oral fluid samples collected from 12 districts during routine rash and fever surveillance between 2003 and 2012 were identified as rubella virus RNA positive and PCR products encompassing the region used for genotyping were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the 20 sequences identified 19 genotype 1G viruses and 1 genotype 1E virus. Genotype-specific trees showed that the Uganda viruses belonged to specific clusters for both genotypes 1G and 1E and grouped with similar sequences from neighboring countries. Genotype 1G was predominant in Uganda. More epidemiological and molecular epidemiological data are required to determine if genotype 1E is also endemic in Uganda. The information obtained in this study will assist the immunization program in monitoring changes in circulating genotypes.

  20. African swine fever among slaughter pigs in Mubende district, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwonge, Adrian; Munang'andu, Hetron M; Kankya, Clovice; Biffa, Demelash; Oura, Chris; Skjerve, Eystein; Oloya, James

    2012-10-01

    Owing to frequent reports of suspected outbreaks and the presence of reservoir hosts and vectors (warthogs, bushpigs and O. moubata ticks), African swine fever (ASF) is believed to be an endemic disease in Uganda. There have, however, been very few studies carried out to confirm its existence in Uganda. This study was carried out to describe the prevalence of ASF based on pathologic lesions and analysis of serum samples from slaughtered pigs during a suspected outbreak in the Mubende district of Uganda. The study was based on visits to 22 slaughterhouses where individual pigs were randomly selected for a detailed ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections. Sera were also collected for laboratory analysis. A total of 997 pigs (53.7% male and 46.3% female) were examined for lesions suggestive of ASF and sero-positivity of sera for ASF antibodies. The sera were tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and positive samples were further confirmed with an immunoblot assay. The results showed that 3.8% (38/997) of the pigs examined had clinical signs and post-mortem lesions suggestive of ASF. Two of 997 (0.2%) sera analysed were positive for ASF antibodies. Of the sub-counties investigated, Bagezza (12%) and Kiyuni (11%) had the highest prevalence of lesions suggestive of ASF based on ante- and post-mortem examination results, while Mubende town council (1.7%) had the lowest. This study found a low number of pigs (3.8%) with lesions suggestive of ASF at slaughter and an even lower number of pigs (0.2%) that were seropositive at slaughter, however a significantly higher number of pigs were slaughtered during the outbreak as a strategy for farmers to avoid losses associated with mortality.

  1. Assessment of Transportation Risk of Radioactive Materials in Uganda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, Menya; Kim, Jonghyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Radioactive materials refer to any materials that spontaneously emit ionizing radiation and of which the radioactivity per gram is greater than 0.002 micro-curie. They include: spent nuclear fuel, nuclear wastes, medical sources i.e. Co-60, industrial sources i.e. Cs-137, Am-241:Be, Ra-226, and sources for research. In view of the rising reported cancer cases in Uganda, which might be as a result of radiation exposure due to constant transportation of radioactive materials i.e. industrial sources, a risk analysis was thought of and undertaken for the country's safety evaluation and improvement. It was therefore important to undertake a risk assessment of the actual and potential radiation exposure during the transportation process. This paper explains a study undertaken for transport risk assessment of the impact on the environment and the people living in it, from exposure to radioactivity during transportation of the industrial sources in Uganda. It provides estimates of radiological risks associated with visualized transport scenarios for the highway transport mode. This is done by calculating the human health impact and radiological risk from transportation of the sources along Busia transport route to Hoima. Busia is the entry port for the sources whilst Hoima, where various industrial practices that utilize sources like oil explorations are centered. During the study, a computer code RADTRAN-6 was used. The overall collective dose for population and package transport crew are 3.72E-4 and 1.69E-4 person-sievert respectively. These are less than the exemption value recommended by the IAEA and Uganda Regulatory Authority for public implying that no health effects like cancer are to be expected. Hence the rising cancer cases in the country are not as a result of increased transportation of radioactive materials in the Industrial sector.

  2. Characterising agrometeorological climate risks and uncertainties: Crop production in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubiru, Drake N.; Komutunga, Everline; Agona, Ambrose;

    2012-01-01

    Uganda is vulnerable to climate change as most of its agriculture is rain-fed; agriculture is also the backbone of the economy, and the livelihoods of many people depend upon it. Variability in rainfall may be reflected in the productivity of agricultural systems and pronounced variability may......, the number of rainy days during this critical period of crop growth is decreasing, which possibly means that crops grown in this season are prone to climatic risks and therefore in need of appropriate adaptation measures. A time-series analysis of the maximum daily temperature clearly revealed an increase...

  3. The visibility of non-communicable diseases in northern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds; Park, Sung-Joon; Odong, George;

    2015-01-01

    Background : WHO and Uganda’s Ministry of Health emphasize the need to address the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Treatment for these conditions is urgent in northern Uganda where war has negatively affected both health and the public health care system. Objectives : We aimed......, diabetes, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We checked the availability of diagnostic instruments and medicines, and interviewed health workers. Results : The four conditions were rarely diagnosed in the outpatient population. Hypertension was the most common, but still constituted...

  4. The introduction of mobile plant clinics to Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Mutebi, Emmanuel

    Four mobile (or community-based) plant health clinics were started in Uganda on a pilot basis in 2005 as an attempt to ensure better plant health advisory services for small-scale farmers.  This new way of delivering primary plant healthcare to farmers has attracted wider interest and the Ministry......, Makerere University and CABI. The purpose of this study was to gather results and lessons learned from the pilot period to inform future plant clinic interventions. The study covers issues of organisation and management, clinic operation and performance as well as clinic use and preliminary evidence...

  5. African Indigenous science in higher education in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akena Adyanga, Francis

    This study examines African Indigenous Science (AIS) in higher education in Uganda. To achieve this, I use anticolonial theory and Indigenous knowledge discursive frameworks to situate the subjugation of Indigenous science from the education system within a colonial historical context. These theories allow for a critical examination of the intersection of power relations rooted in the politics of knowledge production, validation, and dissemination, and how this process has become a systemic and complex method of subjugating one knowledge system over the other. I also employ qualitative and autoethnographic research methodologies. Using a qualitative research method, I interviewed 10 students and 10 professors from two universities in Uganda. My research was guided by the following key questions: What is African Indigenous Science? What methodology would help us to indigenize science education in Uganda? How can we work with Indigenous knowledge and anticolonial theoretical discursive frameworks to understand and challenge the dominance of Eurocentric knowledge in mainstream education? My research findings revealed that AIS can be defined in multiple ways, in other words, there is no universal definition of AIS. However, there were some common elements that my participants talked about such as: (a) knowledge by Indigenous communities developed over a long period of time through a trial and error approach to respond to the social, economic and political challenges of their society. The science practices are generational and synergistic with other disciplines such as history, spirituality, sociology, anthropology, geography, and trade among others, (b) a cumulative practice of the use, interactions with and of biotic and abiotic organism in everyday life for the continued existence of a community in its' totality. The research findings also indicate that Indigenous science is largely lacking from Uganda's education curriculum because of the influence of colonial and

  6. Detecting changes in surface water area of Lake Kyoga sub-basin using remotely sensed imagery in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsubuga, F. W. N.; Botai, Joel O.; Olwoch, Jane M.; Rautenbach, C. J. deW; Kalumba, Ahmed M.; Tsela, Philemon; Adeola, Abiodun M.; Sentongo, Ausi A.; Mearns, Kevin F.

    2017-01-01

    Detection of changes in Earth surface features, for example lakes, is important for understanding the relationships between human and natural phenomena in order to manage better the increasingly scarce natural resources. This work presents a procedure of using modified normalised difference water index (MNDWI) to detect fluctuations of lake surface water area and relate it to a changing climate. The study used radiometrically and geometrically rectified Landsat images for 1986, 1995 and 2010 encompassing the Kyoga Basin lakes of Uganda, in order to investigate the changes in surface water area between the respective years. The standard precipitation index (SPI) and drought severity index (DSI) are applied to show the relationship between variability of surface water area and climate parameters. The present analysis reveals that surface water area fluctuation is linked to rainfall variability. In particular, Lake Kyoga sub-basin lakes experienced an increase in surface water area in 2010 compared to 1986. This work has important implications to water resources management for Lake Kyoga and could be vital to water resource managers across Ugandan lakes.

  7. The topic is the Relevance of wetland economic valuation in Uganda Acase study of Kiyanja-Kaku wetland in Lwengo District-Central Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namulema, Mary Jude

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the relevance of economic valuation of wetlands in Uganda. A case study was done on Kiyanja-Kaku wetland in Lwengo District in Central Uganda using a semi-structured survey. Three objectives were examined i.e.: (i) To identify wetland ecosystem services in Uganda (ii) To identify the economic valuation methods appropriate for wetlands in Uganda (iii) To value clean water obtained from Kiyanja-Kaku wetland. The wetland ecosystem services were identified as provisioning, regulating, habitat, cultural and amenities services. The community had knowledge about 17 out of the 22 services as given by TEEB (2010). The economic valuation methods identified were, market price, efficiency price, travel cost, contingent valuation, hedonic pricing, and production function and benefit transfer methods. These were appropriate for valuation of wetlands in Uganda but only three methods i.e. market price, contingent valuation and productivity methods have been applied by researchers in Uganda so far. The economic value of clean water from Kiyanja-Kaku wetland to the nearby community was established by using the market price of clean water the National water and Sewerage Corporation charges for the water in Uganda to obtain the low value and the market price of water from the survey was used to obtain the high value. The estimated economic value of clean water service for a household ranges from UGX. 612174 to 4054733 (US 168.0-1095.0). The estimated economic value of clean water service from Kiyanja-Kaku wetland to the entire community ranges from UGX. 2,732,133,000.0 to 18,096,274,000.0 (US 775,228.0-4,885,994.0).

  8. Canadian Rheumatology Association Meeting, Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada, February 17-20, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Earl D

    2016-04-15

    The 71st Annual Meeting of The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) was held at the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada, February 17-20, 2016. The program consisted of presentations covering original research, symposia, awards, and lectures. Highlights of the meeting include the following 2016 Award Winners: Distinguished Rheumatologist, Ronald Laxer; Distinguished Investigator, Proton Rahman; Teacher-Educator, Lori Albert; Young Investigator, Nigil Haroon; Best Abstract on Basic Science Research by a Trainee, Liam O'Neil; Best Abstract on Research by a Rheumatology Resident, Valérie Leclair; Best Abstract by a Medical Student, Matthew Jessome; Best Abstract by a Post-Graduate Resident, Hyein Kim; CRA/Arthritis Research Foundation (ARF) Best Epidemiology/Health Services Research Award, Cheryl Barnabe; Summer Studentship Mentor Award, Ines Colmegna; CRA/ARF Best Paediatric Research Award, Lily Lim; CRA/ARF Best Clinical Research Award, Zahi Touma; CRA/ARF Best Basic Science Research Award, Nigil Haroon; Best Abstract on SLE Research by a Trainee - Ian Watson Award, Stephanie Nantes.

  9. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Can the quantum mechanical description of the physical reality be considered as complete?; Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Kann die quantenmechanische Beschreibung der physikalischen Realitaet als vollstaendig betrachtet werden?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Claus (ed.) [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2015-07-01

    The year 2015 marks not only the centenary anniversary around the general relativity theory, but also the octogenary anniversary around one of the most effective works of theoretical physics: The work of Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen (EPR) from the year 1935 reprinted and commented here. In the commented edition present here not only the historical context and the effect history of this work are drawn after in detail but also the effects on modern research and the still discussed theoretical foundations of quantum theory. Reprinted are beyond the German translation of the EPR work also the translation of Bohr's subsequent work with the same title from the same year as well Einstein's article for the journal Dialectica written 1948 in German.

  10. Total Economic Value of Wetlands Products and Services in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Kakuru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide food and non-food products that contribute to income and food security in Uganda. This study determined the economic value of wetland resources and their contribution to food security in the three agroecological zones of Uganda. The values of wetland resources were estimated using primary and secondary data. Market price, Productivity, and Contingent valuation methods were used to estimate the value of wetland resources. The per capita value of fish was approximately US$ 0.49 person−1. Fish spawning was valued at approximately US$ 363,815 year−1, livestock pastures at US$ 4.24 million, domestic water use at US$ 34 million year−1, and the gross annual value added by wetlands to milk production at US$ 1.22 million. Flood control was valued at approximately US$ 1,702,934,880 hectare−1 year−1 and water regulation and recharge at US$ 7,056,360 hectare−1 year−1. Through provision of grass for mulching, wetlands were estimated to contribute to US$ 8.65 million annually. The annual contribution of non-use values was estimated in the range of US$ 7.1 million for water recharge and regulation and to US$ 1.7 billion for flood control. Thus, resource investment for wetlands conservation is economically justified to create incentives for continued benefits.

  11. Total economic value of wetlands products and services in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuru, Willy; Turyahabwe, Nelson; Mugisha, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    Wetlands provide food and non-food products that contribute to income and food security in Uganda. This study determined the economic value of wetland resources and their contribution to food security in the three agroecological zones of Uganda. The values of wetland resources were estimated using primary and secondary data. Market price, Productivity, and Contingent valuation methods were used to estimate the value of wetland resources. The per capita value of fish was approximately US$ 0.49 person⁻¹. Fish spawning was valued at approximately US$ 363,815 year⁻¹, livestock pastures at US$ 4.24 million, domestic water use at US$ 34 million year⁻¹, and the gross annual value added by wetlands to milk production at US$ 1.22 million. Flood control was valued at approximately US$ 1,702,934,880 hectare⁻¹ year⁻¹ and water regulation and recharge at US$ 7,056,360 hectare⁻¹ year⁻¹. Through provision of grass for mulching, wetlands were estimated to contribute to US$ 8.65 million annually. The annual contribution of non-use values was estimated in the range of US$ 7.1 million for water recharge and regulation and to US$ 1.7 billion for flood control. Thus, resource investment for wetlands conservation is economically justified to create incentives for continued benefits.

  12. Multidistrict Outbreak of Marburg Virus Disease-Uganda, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knust, Barbara; Schafer, Ilana J; Wamala, Joseph; Nyakarahuka, Luke; Okot, Charles; Shoemaker, Trevor; Dodd, Kimberly; Gibbons, Aridth; Balinandi, Stephen; Tumusiime, Alex; Campbell, Shelley; Newman, Edmund; Lasry, Estrella; DeClerck, Hilde; Boum, Yap; Makumbi, Issa; Bosa, Henry Kyobe; Mbonye, Anthony; Aceng, Jane Ruth; Nichol, Stuart T; Ströher, Ute; Rollin, Pierre E

    2015-10-01

    In October 2012, a cluster of illnesses and deaths was reported in Uganda and was confirmed to be an outbreak of Marburg virus disease (MVD). Patients meeting the case criteria were interviewed using a standard investigation form, and blood specimens were tested for evidence of acute or recent Marburg virus infection by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total count of confirmed and probable MVD cases was 26, of which 15 (58%) were fatal. Four of 15 laboratory-confirmed cases (27%) were fatal. Case patients were located in 4 different districts in Uganda, although all chains of transmission originated in Ibanda District, and the earliest case detected had an onset in July 2012. No zoonotic exposures were identified. Symptoms significantly associated with being a MVD case included hiccups, anorexia, fatigue, vomiting, sore throat, and difficulty swallowing. Contact with a case patient and attending a funeral were also significantly associated with being a case. Average RT-PCR cycle threshold values for fatal cases during the acute phase of illness were significantly lower than those for nonfatal cases. Following the institution of contact tracing, active case surveillance, care of patients with isolation precautions, community mobilization, and rapid diagnostic testing, the outbreak was successfully contained 14 days after its initial detection.

  13. Poverty, life events and the risk for depression in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinyanda, Eugene; Woodburn, Patrick; Tugumisirize, Joshua; Kagugube, Johnson; Ndyanabangi, Sheila; Patel, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the determinants of major depression in sub-Saharan Africa is important for planning effective intervention strategies. To investigate the social and life-event determinants of major depressive disorder in the African sociocultural context of rural Uganda. A cross-section survey was carried out in 14 districts in Uganda from 1 June 2003 to 30 October 2004. 4,660 randomly selected respondents (15 years and above) were interviewed. The primary outcome was the presence of 'probable major depressive disorder' (PMDD) as assessed by the Hopkins symptom checklist. The prevalence of PMDD was 29.3% (95% confidence interval, 28.0-30.6%). Factors independently associated with depression in both genders included: the ecological factor, district; age (increase with each age category after 35 years); indices of poverty and deprivation (no formal education, having no employment, broken family, and socioeconomic classes III-V). Only a few adverse life events, notably those suggestive of a disrupted family background (death of a father in females and death of a mother in males) were associated with increased risk. Socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors, operating at both ecological and the individual level are the strongest independent determinants of depression. Adverse life events were less strongly associated with depression in this sample.

  14. Lake retention of manufactured nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Quik, J.T.K.; Velzeboer, I.

    2015-01-01

    For twenty-five world lakes and three engineered nanoparticles (ENP), lake retention was calculated using a uniformly mixed lake mass balance model. This follows similar approaches traditionally used in water quality management. Lakes were selected such that lake residence times, depths and areal hy

  15. Lake retention of manufactured nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Quik, J.T.K.; Velzeboer, I.

    2015-01-01

    For twenty-five world lakes and three engineered nanoparticles (ENP), lake retention was calculated using a uniformly mixed lake mass balance model. This follows similar approaches traditionally used in water quality management. Lakes were selected such that lake residence times, depths and areal hy

  16. El Kalevipoeg, otra epopeya ignorada / Jüri Talvet ; [inglise keelest tlk. Giselle Lázaro ja Albert Lázaro Tinaut

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Talvet, Jüri, 1945-

    2003-01-01

    Pealk. tõlge: "Kalevipoeg" - veel üks unustatud eepos. - Lisa: Fr. R. Kreutzwald. A la libertad : [Priiusele / tlk. Jüri Talvet ja Albert Lázaro Tinaut], lk. 35. Artikkel on eesti keeles ilmunud pealkirja ""Kalevipoeg" - suur Euroopa eepos" all.

  17. Investidura de doctores Honoris Causa de Albert Bandura y José del Castillo Nicolau. Universidad de Salamanca, 17 de julio de 1992

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez López, Cándido, "Candy",

    1992-01-01

    Cincuenta y siete fotografías de la ceremonia de investidura de doctores Honoris Causa de Albert Bandura y José del Castillo Nicolau. Acto celebrado en el Paraninfo de la Universidad de Salamanca el 17 de julio de 1992.

  18. [Never forget this in making your drawings and equations! A conversation with Albert Einstein on learning, teaching and the secrets of the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, A

    2009-03-01

    Albert Einstein, the genius--this aspect often has been noted. A neglected aspect is Einstein's role as student and teacher. For this reason, Einstein's notes have been looked at once again. The selected original quotes are composed into the format of a fictive dialogue. The original context and coherence of his comments have thereby been respected carefully.

  19. El Kalevipoeg, otra epopeya ignorada / Jüri Talvet ; [inglise keelest tlk. Giselle Lázaro ja Albert Lázaro Tinaut

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Talvet, Jüri, 1945-

    2003-01-01

    Pealk. tõlge: "Kalevipoeg" - veel üks unustatud eepos. - Lisa: Fr. R. Kreutzwald. A la libertad : [Priiusele / tlk. Jüri Talvet ja Albert Lázaro Tinaut], lk. 35. Artikkel on eesti keeles ilmunud pealkirja ""Kalevipoeg" - suur Euroopa eepos" all.

  20. Triumphs Show: What Makes Art History? Year 7 Exploit the Resources of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Medieval Gallery to Create and Curate Their Own Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copsey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    What do 14 Year 7 students, an art teacher, a history teacher and the Victoria and Albert Museum have in common? They are all part of the "Stronger Together" Museum Champion project run by The Langley Academy and the River & Rowing Museum and supported by Arts Council England, designed to engage students, teachers and museum staff…

  1. Salting our freshwater lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Hilary A; Bartlett, Sarah L; Burke, Samantha M; Doubek, Jonathan P; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E; Skaff, Nicholas K; Summers, Jamie C; Farrell, Kaitlin J; McCullough, Ian M; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Roberts, Derek C; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2017-04-25

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L(-1)), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.

  2. Marriage, Intimacy and Risk of HIV Infection in South West Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Recognising the compromises that couples may make to sustain their marriage is an important step towards ... Keywords: marriage; long-term relationship; HIV epidemic; Uganda. Résumé ..... The meaning of marriage as a long-term.

  3. Transnational connections of health professionals: medicoscapes and assisted reproduction in Ghana and Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hörbst, V.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Based on our comparative fieldwork in two private fertility clinics in Accra (Ghana) and Kampala (Uganda), we explore the transnational mobility of providers involved in assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) and analyze how resulting transnational networks influence the realization a

  4. Improved open-sun drying method for local swamp rice in Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Based on a work ..... determine profitability of rice businesses. ..... Government of Republic of Uganda, The ... Organization and the Japanese ... Analysis of incentives.

  5. Glossina fuscipes populations provide insights for human African trypanosomiasis transmission in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa; Galvani, Alison P; Okedi, Loyce M

    2013-08-01

    Uganda has both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT): the chronic gambiense disease in the northwest and the acute rhodesiense disease in the south. The recent spread of rhodesiense into central Uganda has raised concerns given the different control strategies the two diseases require. We present knowledge on the population genetics of the major vector species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes in Uganda with a focus on population structure, measures of gene flow between populations, and the occurrence of polyandry. The microbiome composition and diversity is discussed, focusing on their potential role on trypanosome infection outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for large-scale tsetse control programs, including suppression or eradication, being undertaken in Uganda, and potential future genetic applications.

  6. Collaboration of Art and Science in Albert Edelfelt's Portrait of Louis Pasteur: The Making of an Enduring Medical Icon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Richard E; Hansen, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Historians of medicine--and even Louis Pasteur's biographers--have paid little attention to his close relationship with the Finnish artist Albert Edelfelt. A new look at Edelfelt's letters to his mother, written in Swedish and never quoted at length in English, reveals important aspects of Pasteur's working habits and personality. By understanding the active collaboration through which this very famous portrait was made, we also discover unnoticed things in the painting itself, gain a new appreciation of its original impact on the French public's image of science, and better understand its enduring influence on the portrayal of medicine in the art and the popular culture of many countries even to the present day.

  7. Emil Rupp, Albert Einstein and the canal ray experiments on wave-particle duality: Scientific fraud and theoretical bias

    CERN Document Server

    van Dongen, Jeroen

    2007-01-01

    In 1926 Emil Rupp published a number of papers on the interference properties of light emitted by canal ray sources. These articles, particularly one paper that came into being in collaboration with Albert Einstein, drew quite some attention as they probed the wave versus particle nature of light. They also significantly propelled Rupp's career, even though that from the outset they were highly controversial. This article will review this episode, and in particular Rupp's collaboration with Einstein. Evidence that Rupp forged his results is presented and their critical reception in the socially and politically divided German physics community is discussed. These divisions fail to explain the full dynamic; the latter is attempted by turning to the role that theoretical bias on occasion has in assessing experiment. Einstein's responses in particular are analyzed in this context.

  8. Bridging the knowledge gap: An analysis of Albert Einstein's popularized presentation of the equivalence of mass and energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, Shulamit

    2014-11-01

    This article presents an analysis of a scientific article written by Albert Einstein in 1946 for the general public that explains the equivalence of mass and energy and discusses the implications of this principle. It is argued that an intelligent popularization of many advanced ideas in physics requires more than the simple elimination of mathematical formalisms and complicated scientific conceptions. Rather, it is shown that Einstein developed an alternative argument for the general public that bypasses the core of the formal derivation of the equivalence of mass and energy to provide a sense of derivation based on the history of science and the nature of scientific inquiry. This alternative argument is supported and enhanced by variety of explanatory devices orchestrated to coherently support and promote the reader's understanding. The discussion centers on comparisons to other scientific expositions written by Einstein for the general public.

  9. Sexological deliberation and social engineering: Albert Moll and the sterilisation debate in late imperial and Weimar Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The physician and sexologist Albert Moll, from Berlin, was one of the main protagonists within the German discourse on the opportunities and dangers of social engineering, by eugenic interventions into human life in general, as well as into reproductive hygiene and healthcare policy in particular. One of the main sexological topics that were discussed intensively during the late-Wilhelminian German Reich and the Weimar Republic was the question of the legalisation of voluntary and compulsory sterilisations on the basis of medical, social, eugenic, economic or criminological indications. As is clear from Moll's conservative principles of medical ethics, and his conviction that the genetic knowledge required for eugenically indicated sterilisations was not yet sufficiently elaborated, he had doubts and worries about colleagues who were exceedingly zealous about these surgical sterilisations--especially Gustav Boeters from Saxony.

  10. Steven Holl事务所:整修扩建Albert Place娱乐场

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    据《建筑实录》8月12日报道,上个月纽约的Steven Holl事务所在比利时艾伯特宫娱乐场整修设计竞赛中获胜,将负责该工程的整修扩建设计。Albert Place娱乐场位于北海的度假小镇Knokke Heist上。Steven Holl是根据比利时超现实主义画家Rene Magritte的一幅作品“给美人鱼讲故事的船”而获得灵感的。

  11. Sexological Deliberation and Social Engineering: Albert Moll and the Sterilisation Debate in Late Imperial and Weimar Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The physician and sexologist Albert Moll, from Berlin, was one of the main protagonists within the German discourse on the opportunities and dangers of social engineering, by eugenic interventions into human life in general, as well as into reproductive hygiene and healthcare policy in particular. One of the main sexological topics that were discussed intensively during the late-Wilhelminian German Reich and the Weimar Republic was the question of the legalisation of voluntary and compulsory sterilisations on the basis of medical, social, eugenic, economic or criminological indications. As is clear from Moll’s conservative principles of medical ethics, and his conviction that the genetic knowledge required for eugenically indicated sterilisations was not yet sufficiently elaborated, he had doubts and worries about colleagues who were exceedingly zealous about these surgical sterilisations – especially Gustav Boeters from Saxony. PMID:23002295

  12. Drug utilization profile and monitoring of adverse reactions in pediatric patients in the Hospital Infantil Albert Sabin

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUÃÃO: A populaÃÃo pediÃtrica se ressente dos poucos estudos que relacionem o perfil de utilizaÃÃo e ocorrÃncia de reaÃÃo adversa a medicamentos (RAM) em crianÃas hospitalizadas. OBJETIVOS: Descrever e avaliar a utilizaÃÃo de medicamentos e a ocorrÃncia de reaÃÃes adversas em pacientes pediÃtricos internados no Hospital Infantil Albert Sabin na perspectiva de contribuir para a reduÃÃo dos agravos decorrentes do uso de medicamentos em crianÃas hospitalizadas. METODOLOGIA: Estudo obs...

  13. Public submissions on the Uganda national biotechnology and biosafety bill, 2012 reveal consensus for Uganda legislators to pass the bill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clet Wandui Masiga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity is an internationally binding instrument addressing issues of biosafety. Biosafety refers to the need to protect human health and the environment from the possible adverse effects of the products of modern biotechnology. Accordingly all countries to the convention are required to put in place regulatory mechanisms to enhance the safety of biotechnology in the context of the Convention’s overall goal of reducing all potential threats to biological diversity, while taking into account the risks to human health. Therefore each country party to the convention has its own procedures to enact laws to guide the safe use of biotechnology. In Uganda the process involves the drafting of the bill by the first parliamentary counsel, approval by cabinet, first reading at the parliament, committal to the responsible parliamentary sessional committee, tabling of the bill for public hearing, consultations, and final approval. In Uganda, the Committee on Science and Technology is responsible for the Biosafety Bill. In March 2013, the Committee tabled the bill for public hearing and submissions from public institutions. There were comments supporting the passage of the Bill and comments in objection.The reasons for objection are mainly due to precaution, speculation, lack of knowledge about biotechnology and biosafety, and alleged influence from biosafety entrepreneurs. This article reviews these public views, revealing controversy and possible consensus to pass the bill.

  14. 2016 Lake Michigan Lake Trout Working Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Breidert, Brian; Boyarski, David; Bronte, Charles R.; Dickinson, Ben; Donner, Kevin; Ebener, Mark P.; Gordon, Roger; Hanson, Dale; Holey, Mark; Janssen, John; Jonas, Jory; Kornis, Matthew; Olsen, Erik; Robillard, Steve; Treska, Ted; Weldon, Barry; Wright, Greg D.

    2017-01-01

    This report provides a review on the progression of lake trout rehabilitation towards meeting the Salmonine Fish Community Objectives (FCOs) for Lake Michigan (Eshenroder et. al. 1995) and the interim goal and evaluation objectives articulated in A Fisheries Management Implementation Strategy for the Rehabilitation of Lake Trout in Lake Michigan (Dexter et al. 2011); we also include data describing lake trout stocking and mortality to portray the present state of progress towards lake trout rehabilitation.

  15. Field Trials of the Prototype Pounder Rig, Uganda, 20th August - 13th November 1999.

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    A prototype low-cost drilling rig was imported to Uganda in August 1999 and handed over to Mpigi District Government. Field trials of this machine were undertaken between 20 th August and 13 th November 1999. This work was enabled through a tripartite Memorandum of Understanding between the Cranfield University/DFID Low Cost well Drilling Project, the Directorate of Water Development (DWD) of the Government of Uganda, and the local Government of Mpigi District. A total of fo...

  16. Population Growth, (Per Capita) Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction in Uganda: Theory and Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Klasen

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the link between population and per capita economic growth in Uganda. After showing that Uganda has one of the highest population growth rates in the world which, due to the inherent demographic momentum, will persist for some time to come, it then considers the impact of population growth on per capita economic growth. It finds that both theoretical considerations as well as strong empirical evidence suggest that the currently high population growth puts a considerable br...

  17. Prevention and treatment practices and implications for malaria control in Mukono District Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, A K; Bygbjerg, I C; Magnussen, P

    2008-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar Available data in Uganda indicate a resurgence of malaria morbidity and mortality countrywide. This study assessed the burden of malaria, treatment and prevention practices in order initiate a policy debate on the scaling-up of current interventions. A triangulation of methods using a cross-sectional survey and key informant interviews was used to assess self-reported malaria at a household level in Mukono District, Uganda. A total of 5583 households were surveyed,...

  18. Uganda: Perfection of Post-Conflict Stability or Ticking Time Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    usual reports. Ms. Anna Kreuss, a German freelance analyst, believes that local militias, formed in response to the huge problem of ghost soldiers... freelance journalist and PhD student), personal interview by authors, Kampala, Uganda, March 24, 2015. 16 Akuma and Achan interview. 17 Ejoyi... freelance journalist and PhD student). Interview by authors. Personal interview. Kampala, Uganda. March 24, 2015. Mapenduzi, Ojara Martin

  19. Laying foundation for energy policy making in Uganda by indicating the energy flow

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Amanda; Johansson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to support the policymakers of Uganda to develop a sustainable and environmental friendly energy system by indicating the energy flow. An analysis of the interconnections between Climate-, Land-, Water- and Energy use (CLEWs) is conducted, and the most important connection between the hydropower and agriculture’s water use is identified. In this report, the sections energy and economy are analysed, please see “…” for a further analysis of the water- and land use. Uganda is tod...

  20. An Empirical Test of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Contraceptive Use in Rural Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kiene, Susan M.; Hopwood, Sarah; Lule, Haruna; Rhoda K Wanyenze

    2013-01-01

    There is a high unmet need for contraceptives in developing countries such as Uganda, with high population growth, where efforts are needed to promote family planning and contraceptive use. Despite this high need, little research has investigated applications of health behaviour change theories to contraceptive use amongst this population. The present study tested the Theory of Planned Behaviour’s ability to predict contraceptive use-related behaviours among postpartum women in rural Uganda. ...

  1. Health and wholeness undergraduate course in Uganda: Potential public health impact and transferability

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas L Fountain; Edward Mukooza; Edward Kanyesigye

    2016-01-01

    Over 26,000 students at a major Christian University in Uganda have completed a single semester course on Health and Wholeness. While common in other higher education contexts, general education courses and health education courses in particular are uncommon in the Africa higher education context. This course therefore is a bold initiative by Uganda Christian University. The course is designed to help students in a wide range of programs understand how to promote and improve health in their o...

  2. Why the increase in under five mortality in Uganda from 1995 to 2000? A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayiga Natal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From 1995-2000 the under five mortality rate in Uganda increased from 147.3 to 151.5 deaths per 1000 live births and reasons for the increase were not clear. This study was undertaken to understand factors influencing the increase in under five mortality rate during 1995-2000 in Uganda with a view of suggesting remedial actions. Methods We performed a comparative retrospective analysis of data derived from the 1995 and the 2000 Uganda demographic and health surveys. We correlated the change of under five mortality rate in Uganda desegregated by region (central, eastern, north and western with change in major known determinants of under five mortality such social economic circumstances, maternal factors, access to health services, and level of nutrition. Results The increase in under five mortality rate only happened in western Uganda with the other 3 regions of Uganda (eastern, northern and central showing a decrease. The changes in U5MR could not be explained by changes in poverty, maternal conditions, level of nutrition, or in access to health and other social services and in the prevalence of HIV among women attending for ante-natal care. All these factors did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05 using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Conclusion In order to explain these findings, there is need to find something that happened in western Uganda (but not other parts of the country during the period 1995-2000 and has the potential to change the under five mortality by a big margin. We hypothesize that the increase in under five mortality could be explained by the severe malaria epidemic that occurred in western Uganda (but not other regions in 1997/98.

  3. Hydrography - Lakes Assessments - Non Attaining

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This layer shows only non attaining lakes of the Integrated List. The Lakes Integrated List represents lake assessments in an integrated format for the Clean Water...

  4. Boat Dwellers of Weishan Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENNIFER; LIM

    1998-01-01

    IN the south of Shandong Province, Weishan Lake is the largest freshwater lake in northern China. Under the bright blue sky, it gleams like a large mirror. "As the sun is about to set, Weishan Lake is quiet…" Humming

  5. Qualitative evaluation of the Teenage Mothers Project in Uganda: a community-based empowerment intervention for unmarried teenage mothers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leerlooijer, J.N; Bos, A.E.R; Ruiter, R.A.C; Reeuwijk, van, M.A; Rijsdijk, L.E; Nshakira, N; Kok, G

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large proportion of unmarried teenage mothers in Uganda face physical, psychological, and social problems after pregnancy and childbirth, such as obstetric complications, lack of education...

  6. High Prevalence of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Gonorrhea Among Female Sex Workers in Kampala, Uganda (2008–2009)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vandepitte, Judith; Hughes, Peter; Matovu, Godfrey; Bukenya, Justine; Grosskurth, Heiner; Lewis, David A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUNDRecent antimicrobial resistance data for Neisseria gonorrhoeae are lacking in Uganda, where, until 2010, ciprofloxacin was the nationally recommended first-line treatment of presumptive gonorrhea...

  7. Plasmodium infection and its risk factors in eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snow Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a leading cause of disease burden in Uganda, although surprisingly few contemporary, age-stratified data exist on malaria epidemiology in the country. This report presents results from a total population survey of malaria infection and intervention coverage in a rural area of eastern Uganda, with a specific focus on how risk factors differ between demographic groups in this population. Methods In 2008, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in four contiguous villages in Mulanda, sub-county in Tororo district, eastern Uganda, to investigate the epidemiology and risk factors of Plasmodium species infection. All permanent residents were invited to participate, with blood smears collected from 1,844 individuals aged between six months and 88 years (representing 78% of the population. Demographic, household and socio-economic characteristics were combined with environmental data using a Geographical Information System. Hierarchical models were used to explore patterns of malaria infection and identify individual, household and environmental risk factors. Results Overall, 709 individuals were infected with Plasmodium, with prevalence highest among 5-9 year olds (63.5%. Thin films from a random sample of 20% of parasite positive participants showed that 94.0% of infections were Plasmodium falciparum and 6.0% were P. malariae; no other species or mixed infections were seen. In total, 68% of households owned at least one mosquito although only 27% of school-aged children reported sleeping under a net the previous night. In multivariate analysis, infection risk was highest amongst children aged 5-9 years and remained high in older children. Risk of infection was lower for those that reported sleeping under a bed net the previous night and living more than 750 m from a rice-growing area. After accounting for clustering within compounds, there was no evidence for an association between infection prevalence and socio

  8. Brote de Fiebre Hemorrágica por el virus del Ébola en Uganda Hemorrhagic Fever outbreak due to Ebola virus in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MªC. Aríñez Fernández

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available En Uganda se está llevando a cabo la Misión de la Unión Europea (EUTM Somalia, en la que participan efectivos de las Fuerzas Armadas españolas. En mayo de 2011 el Ministerio de Sanidad de Uganda notificó un brote de fiebre hemorrágica por el virus del bola a 70 km de distancia de Kampala. El caso índice y único caso confirmado, fue una niña de 12 años que falleció. La investigación epidemiológica se llevó a cabo por un equipo internacional que incluyó personal del Ministerio de Sanidad de Uganda y de la OMS. Tras mantener la vigilancia del brote durante un tiempo igual a dos veces el periodo de incubación y no confirmar otros casos, fue declarado finalizado el brote el 17 de junio de 2011. Se distribuyó información sobre el brote y recomendaciones de actuación tanto a profesionales de la salud como a la población general.The European Mission (EUTM Somalia is being conducted in Uganda. Military personnel of the Spanish Armed Forces participate in that mission. On 13 May 2011, The Ministry of Health of Uganda notified a case of Ebola hemorrhagic fever in a district 70 kilometers far from Kampala. The index case and only confirmed case, was a 12-year-old girl who finally died. Epidemiologic surveillance was conducted by an international team including representatives of the Ugandan Ministry of Health and WHO. The Ministry of Health of Uganda declared the end of the outbreak on the 17 June 2011, since the epidemiological investigations, including twofold the incubation period surveillance, did not confirm new cases. Guidelines to control the outbreak and information on the disease were distributed to health professionals and general population.

  9. Availability, utilisation and quality of maternal and neonatal health care services in Karamoja region, Uganda: a health facility-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wilunda, Calistus; Oyerinde, Koyejo; Putoto, Giovanni; Lochoro, Peter; Dall?Oglio, Giovanni; Manenti, Fabio; Segafredo, Giulia; Atzori, Andrea; Criel, Bart; Panza, Alessio; Quaglio, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality is persistently high in Uganda. Access to quality emergency obstetrics care (EmOC) is fundamental to reducing maternal and newborn deaths and is a possible way of achieving the target of the fifth millennium development goal. Karamoja region in north-eastern Uganda has consistently demonstrated the nation?s lowest scores on key development and health indicators and presents a substantial challenge to Uganda?s stability and poverty eradication ambitions. The objec...

  10. Elections and landmark policies in Tanzania and Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Therkildsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Much of the relevant literature on Africa downplays the salience of elections for policy-making and implementation. Instead, the importance of factors such as clientelism, ethnicity, organized interest group and donor influence, is emphasized. We argue that, in addition, elections now motivate...... political elites to focus on policies they perceive to be able to gain votes. This is based on analyses of six landmark decisions made during the last fifteen years in the social, productive and public finance sectors in Tanzania and Uganda. Such policies share a number of key characteristics......: they are clearly identifiable with the party in power; citizens country-wide are targeted; and policy implementation aim at immediate, visible results. The influence of elections on policy making and implementation could therefore be more significant in countries where elections are more competitive than...

  11. The reversal of agricultural reform in Uganda: ownership and values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Joughin, James

    2012-01-01

    . In essence, the agricultural reform programme represented market-oriented values that were not echoed in large parts of the Ugandan polity. The eventual reversal of policy, back to government-provided extension, and to a large programme of heavily subsidised input supply, testifies to that. In addition, key......This article explores the nature of ownership in a reform of the multi-donor-funded agricultural advisory service in Uganda. We argue that although there was a long process of programme formulation in which all stakeholders were heard, ownership was not as encompassing as it first appeared...... stakeholders, notably local politicians and officials in the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry, and Fisheries (MAAIF), were shut out from the original programme and this threatened its viability. If a genuine analysis of the economic and political context had been carried out, the donors might have...

  12. Teaching with Sponsored Instructional Materials: Attitudes of Teachers in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndawula Stephen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the teachers’ attitudes towards using sponsored instructional materials provided by the Aga Khan Education Service (AES to primary schools in Uganda. The objectives of the study were: to establish teachers’ attitudes towards the AES materials in relation to the level of class taught, size of classes and the nature of subject (s taught. Data was gathered from twenty five class teachers, using interview schedules. Majority of the teachers (93% expressed positive attitude, while only 7% had negative attitudes over using the AES materials. Conclusions were drawn and recommendations focused on: sensitization of teachers on importance AES; improving on close work relationship between primary schools and AES; extending AES materials to non-project schools and; further research on other variables rather than teachers’ attitudes.

  13. Perceptions of Adolescent Pregnancy Among Teenage Girls in Rakai, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Christina; McClendon, Katherine A; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Nakyanjo, Neema; Ddaaki, William George; Serwadda, David; Nalugoda, Fred Kakaire; Wawer, Maria J; Bonnevie, Erika; Wagman, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    The leading causes of death and disability among Ugandan female adolescents aged 15 to 19 years are pregnancy complications, unsafe abortions, and childbirth. Despite these statistics, our understanding of how girls perceive adolescent pregnancy is limited. This qualitative study explored the social and contextual factors shaping the perceptions of adolescent pregnancy and childbirth among a sample of 12 currently pregnant and 14 never pregnant girls living in the rural Rakai District of Uganda. Interviews were conducted to elicit perceived risk factors for pregnancy, associated community attitudes, and personal opinions on adolescent pregnancy. Findings indicate that notions of adolescent pregnancy are primarily influenced by perceptions of control over getting pregnant and readiness for childbearing. Premarital pregnancy was perceived as negative whereas postmarital pregnancy was regarded as positive. Greater understanding of the individual and contextual factors influencing perceptions can aid in development of salient, culturally appropriate policies and programs to mitigate unintended adolescent pregnancies.

  14. Returning home: resettlement of formerly abducted children in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Joanne N

    2008-06-01

    This exploratory qualitative study considers the subjective resettlement experiences of children forced into armed conflict in Northern Uganda from the perspectives of 11 former child combatants and 11 adult community members. A thematic analysis was performed on the narrative data. The bioecological model was used to provide a conceptual framework for key themes. Major findings included the overarching impact of ongoing armed conflict on returnees' lives, the important role of the family in supporting children's resettlement, the harassment of former child soldiers by community members, and the community's inability to support systematically the returning children in tangible ways. This study recommends that humanitarian services at all levels strengthen the capacity of families to care for the material and psychoemotional needs of former child soldiers within their communities.

  15. El Legado de Albert Schweitzer - RESUMEN DE VOCABULARIO DE LA SENSIBILIDAD PROFUNDA Y SUPERFICIAL

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    Alberto Cardenas Escovar

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Octubre, 1989

    ALBERT SCHWEITZER(1875-1965 descuella en nuestro tiempo como ejemplo del verdadero humanismo. La vida entera de este alsaciano fue una extraordinaria aventura, entregada al servicio de sus semejantes. Su espíritu estuvo sin cesar colmado por una diversidad de estudios y tareas, a los cuales se sometió con pasión y profundidad, dando siempre lo mejor de sí mismo. Su actividad lo llevó a través de los campos de la teología, la religión, los estudios clásicos y la música, y en todas estas disciplinas alcanzó la excelencia. Con justicia es aclamado por su labor docente, su predicación, sus libros sobre teología, sobre la “Búsqueda de Jesús Histórico”, sobre Johann Sebastian Bach, los órganos y su construcción.

    Al leer su libro autobiográfico “De mi vida y de mi Pensamiento”, se comprende cómo contribuyeron múltiples factores afortunados, especialmente herencia, tradición, vida familiar, ambiente cultural y, sobre todo, esos impulsos individuales que los creyentes reconocemos como llamamientos de Dios para cumplir una misión específica, a través de la coherencia de la propia vida, para estructurar la personalidad de Schweitzer.

    Tanto su padre como su abuelo materno fueron pastores evangélicos.

    Su abuelo paterno fue maestro de escuela y organista. Schweitzer tenía apenas cinco años cuando comenzó a recibir de su padre lecciones de música, y ocho cuando comenzó a tocar el órgano. Atribuía su pasión por este instrumento a la herencia de su abuelo materno. A los nueve años tomó por primera vez el lugar del organista en un servicio, en Günsbach.

    Pero quizás el aspecto más conocido de la vida de Schweitzer es su carrera médica en Estrasburgo (1905-1912, la que emprendió cuando había cumplido los treinta años, después de renunciar su cargo de principal en el Colegio Teológico de Santo Tomás, contra las opiniones de la mayoría de sus

  16. Bartonella species in invasive rats and indigenous rodents from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Sarah A; Borchert, Jeff N; Atiku, Linda A; Mpanga, Joseph T; Gage, Kenneth L; Kosoy, Michael Y

    2014-03-01

    The presence of bartonellae in invasive rats (Rattus rattus) and indigenous rodents (Arvicanthis niloticus and Cricetomys gambianus) from two districts in Uganda, Arua and Zombo, was examined by PCR detection and culture. Blood from a total of 228 R. rattus, 31 A. niloticus, and 5 C. gambianus was screened using genus-specific primers targeting the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. Furthermore, rodent blood was plated on brain heart infusion blood agar, and isolates were verified as Bartonella species using citrate synthase gene- (gltA) specific primers. One hundred and four fleas recovered from R. rattus were also tested for the presence of Bartonella species using the same gltA primer set. An overall prevalence of 1.3% (three of 228) was obtained in R. rattus, whereas 61.3% of 31 A. niloticus and 60% of five C. gambianus were positive for the presence of Bartonella species. Genotypes related to Bartonella elizabethae, a known zoonotic pathogen, were detected in three R. rattus and one C. gambianus. Bartonella strains, similar to bacteria detected in indigenous rodents from other African countries, were isolated from the blood of A. niloticus. Bartonellae, similar to bacteria initially cultured from Ornithodorus sonrai (soft tick) from Senegal, were found in two C. gambianus. Interestingly, bartonellae detected in fleas from invasive rats were similar to bacteria identified in indigenous rodents and not their rat hosts, with an overall prevalence of 6.7%. These results suggest that if fleas are competent vectors of these bartonellae, humans residing in these two districts of Uganda are potentially at greater risk for exposure to Bartonella species from native rodents than from invasive rats. The low prevalence of bartonellae in R. rattus was quite surprising, in contrast, to the detection of these organisms in a large percentage of Rattus species from other geographical areas. A possible reason for this disparity is discussed.

  17. Stakeholder perceptions of mental health stigma and poverty in Uganda

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    Kizza Dorothy

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background World wide, there is plentiful evidence regarding the role of stigma in mental illness, as well as the association between poverty and mental illness. The experiences of stigma catalyzed by poverty revolve around experiences of devaluation, exclusion, and disadvantage. Although the relationship between poverty, stigma and mental illness has been documented in high income countries, little has been written on this relationship in low and middle income countries. The paper describes the opinions of a range of mental health stakeholders regarding poverty, stigma, mental illness and their relationship in the Ugandan context, as part of a wider study, aimed at exploring policy interventions required to address the vicious cycle of mental ill-health and poverty. Methods Semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions (FGDs were conducted with purposefully selected mental health stakeholders from various sectors. The interviews and FGDs were audio-recorded, and transcriptions were coded on the basis of a pre-determined coding frame. Thematic analysis of the data was conducted using NVivo7, adopting a framework analysis approach. Results Most participants identified a reciprocal relationship between poverty and mental illness. The stigma attached to mental illness was perceived as a common phenomenon, mostly associated with local belief systems regarding the causes of mental illness. Stigma associated with both poverty and mental illness serves to reinforce the vicious cycle of poverty and mental ill-health. Most participants emphasized a relationship between poverty and internalized stigma among people with mental illness in Uganda. Conclusion According to a range of mental health stakeholders in Uganda, there is a strong interrelationship between poverty, stigma and mental illness. These findings re-affirm the need to recognize material resources as a central element in the fight against stigma of mental illness, and the

  18. Kerosene lighting contributes to household air pollution in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyanja, D; Allen, J G; Vallarino, J; Valeri, L; Kakuhikire, B; Bangsberg, D R; Christiani, D C; Tsai, A C; Lai, P S

    2017-09-01

    The literature on the contribution of kerosene lighting to indoor air particulate concentrations is sparse. In rural Uganda, kitchens are almost universally located outside the main home, and kerosene is often used for lighting. In this study, we obtained longitudinal measures of particulate matter 2.5 microns or smaller in size (PM2.5 ) from living rooms and kitchens of 88 households in rural Uganda. Linear mixed-effects models with a random intercept for household were used to test the hypotheses that primary reported lighting source and kitchen location (indoor vs outdoor) are associated with PM2.5 levels. During initial testing, households reported using the following sources of lighting: open-wick kerosene (19.3%), hurricane kerosene (45.5%), battery-powered (33.0%), and solar (1.1%) lamps. During follow-up testing, these proportions changed to 29.5%, 35.2%, 18.2%, and 9.1%, respectively. Average ambient, living room, and kitchen PM2.5 levels were 20.2, 35.2, and 270.0 μg/m(3) . Living rooms using open-wick kerosene lamps had the highest PM2.5 levels (55.3 μg/m(3) ) compared to those using solar lighting (19.4 μg/m(3) ; open wick vs solar, P=.01); 27.6% of homes using open-wick kerosene lamps met World Health Organization indoor air quality standards compared to 75.0% in homes using solar lighting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Small changes in climate can profoundly alter the dynamics and ecosystem services of tropical crater lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Émilie Saulnier-Talbot

    Full Text Available African tropical lakes provide vital ecosystem services including food and water to some of the fastest growing human populations, yet they are among the most understudied ecosystems in the world. The consequences of climate change and other stressors on the tropical lakes of Africa have been informed by long-term analyses, but these studies have largely focused on the massive Great Rift Valley lakes. Our objective was to evaluate how recent climate change has altered the functioning and services of smaller tropical lakes, which are far more abundant on the landscape. Based on a paired analysis of 20 years of high-resolution water column data and a paleolimnological record from a small crater lake in western Uganda, we present evidence that even a modest warming of the air (∼0.9°C increase over 20 years and changes in the timing and intensity of rainfall can have significant consequences on the dynamics of this common tropical lake type. For example, we observed a significant nonlinear increase (R(2 adj  = 0.23, e.d.f. = 7, p<0.0001 in thermal stability over the past 20 years. This resulted in the expansion of anoxic waters and consequent deterioration of fish habitat and appears to have abated primary production; processes that may impair ecosystem services for a vulnerable human population. This study on a system representative of small tropical crater lakes highlights the far-reaching effects of global climatic change on tropical waters. Increased research efforts into tropical aquatic ecosystem health and the development of sound management practices are necessary in order to strengthen adaptive capabilities in tropical regions.

  20. Great Lakes Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ron

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reservoirs of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. They are also a magnificent resource for the teachers of Ontario. Study of the Great Lakes can bring to life the factors that shape the ecology…

  1. Marine lakes of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, Leontine Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to obtain insight into the processes that play a role in biodiversity patterns of tropical marine species by using marine lakes as a model. Marine lakes are landlocked water bodies that maintain a marine character through narrow submarine connections to the sea. Two

  2. The Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasons, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reserviors of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. These lakes and their relationship with people of Canada and the United States can be useful as a subject for teaching the impact of human…

  3. Marine lakes of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, Leontine Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to obtain insight into the processes that play a role in biodiversity patterns of tropical marine species by using marine lakes as a model. Marine lakes are landlocked water bodies that maintain a marine character through narrow submarine connections to the sea. Two

  4. Agreement between diagnoses of childhood lymphoma assigned in Uganda and by an international reference laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orem J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jackson Orem,1–3 Sven Sandin,1 Caroline E Weibull,1 Michael Odida,4 Henry Wabinga,4 Edward Mbidde,2,3 Fred Wabwire-Mangen,5 Chris JLM Meijer,6 Jaap M Middeldorp,6 Elisabete Weiderpass1,7,81Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Uganda Cancer Institute, 3School of Medicine, 4School of Biomedical Sciences, 5School of Public Health, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda; 6Department of Pathology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 7Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo; Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 8Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, FinlandBackground: Correct diagnosis is key to appropriate treatment of cancer in children. However, diagnostic challenges are common in low-income and middle-income countries. The objective of the present study was to assess the agreement between a clinical diagnosis of childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL assigned in Uganda, a pathological diagnosis assigned in Uganda, and a pathological diagnosis assigned in The Netherlands.Methods: The study included children with suspected NHL referred to the Mulago National Referral Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, between 2004 and 2008. A clinical diagnosis was assigned at the Mulago National Referral Hospital, where tissue samples were also obtained. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were used for histological diagnosis in Uganda, and were re-examined in a pathology laboratory in The Netherlands, where additional pathological, virological and serological testing was also carried out. Agreement between diagnostic sites was compared using kappa statistics.Results: Clinical and pathological diagnoses from Uganda and pathological diagnosis from The Netherlands was available for 118 children. The agreement between clinical and pathological diagnoses of NHL assigned in Uganda was 91% (95% confidence interval [CI] 84–95; kappa 0.84; P < 0

  5. Contribution of Wetland Resources to Household Incomes of Riparian Communities of Katonga Wetland in Mpigi District, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kateyo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Katonga wetland which lies to the western part of Lake Victoria covers an area of 237.4 km2. Although the wetland is known to contain flora and fauna that support livelihoods, there has been lack of information on the economic value of these resources and their contribution to livelihoods particularly of the rural riparian communities. The objective of the study was to generate information on the vital wetland resources, the economic value and contribution of these resources to riparian community livelihoods. The study was carried out in Nkozi and Kituntu sub-counties in Mpigi District-Uganda; it covered six parishes through which the wetland runs and involved 120 respondents. The study established that resources in the wetland are collected for subsistence and direct commercial extraction. The most important resource derived from the wetland for subsistence use was water for rural domestic use with each household using an average of 188l per day (23l per person and was estimated at an annual economic value of Uganda shillings (Ushs 490,191 (U$ 233.4 per person per year. Fisheries were the most important commercial activities undertaken in these parts of the wetland involving 36% of respondents collecting an average of 119kg per week with an estimated annual value of Ushs. 3,991,367 (U$ 1,900.6 per person. These activities particularly collection of water and fuel wood are undertaken throughout the year, while harvesting of craft materials is mainly done during the dry season (January-March and June-August. Fishing is done mainly in the wet season (March-May and September-November. he wetland is a source of income for at least 74% of the respondents. The majority of respondents, 57.5%, were among low income groups earning up to Ushs 600,000 per respondent annually. Fishing provides the highest gross incomes per respondent Ushs 200,000 per month hence the high value of the wetland to its riparian communities. It was noted that 30% of respondents

  6. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Stephen C.; Binder, Thomas; Wattrus, Nigel J.; Faust, Matthew D.; Janssen, John; Menzies, John; Marsden, J. Ellen; Ebener, Mark P.; Bronte, Charles R.; He, Ji X.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Hansen, Michael J.; Thompson, Henry T.; Muir, Andrew M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of spawning lake trout Salvelinus namaycush near Drummond Island in northern Lake Huron indicate that lake trout use drumlins, landforms created in subglacial environments by the action of ice sheets, as a primary spawning habitat. From these observations, we generated a hypothesis that may in part explain locations chosen by lake trout for spawning. Most salmonines spawn in streams where they rely on streamflows to sort and clean sediments to create good spawning habitat. Flows sufficient to sort larger sediment sizes are generally lacking in lakes, but some glacial bedforms contain large pockets of sorted sediments that can provide the interstitial spaces necessary for lake trout egg incubation, particularly if these bedforms are situated such that lake currents can penetrate these sediments. We hypothesize that sediment inclusions from glacial scavenging and sediment sorting that occurred during the creation of bedforms such as drumlins, end moraines, and eskers create suitable conditions for lake trout egg incubation, particularly where these bedforms interact with lake currents to remove fine sediments. Further, these bedforms may provide high-quality lake trout spawning habitat at many locations in the Great Lakes and may be especially important along the southern edge of the range of the species. A better understanding of the role of glacially-derived bedforms in the creation of lake trout spawning habitat may help develop powerful predictors of lake trout spawning locations, provide insight into the evolution of unique spawning behaviors by lake trout, and aid in lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

  7. Lake metabolism scales with lake morphometry and catchment conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter A.; Baastrup-Spohr, Lars; Jensen, Kaj Sand;

    2012-01-01

    We used a comparative data set for 25 lakes in Denmark sampled during summer to explore the influence of lake morphometry, catchment conditions, light availability and nutrient input on lake metabolism. We found that (1) gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (R) decline with lake...... area, water depth and drainage ratio, and increase with algal biomass (Chl), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorus (TP); (2) all lakes, especially small with less incident light, and forest lakes with high DOC, have negative net ecosystem production (NEP ... decreases with lake area and water depth as a consequence of lower input of nutrients and organic matter per unit water volume; (4) the influence of benthic processes on free water metabolic measures declines with increasing lake size; and (5) with increasing lake size, lake metabolism decreases...

  8. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associated risk factors in Uganda (FRESH AIR Uganda) : a prospective cross-sectional observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, Frederik; Kirenga, Bruce; Chavannes, Niels; Kamya, Moses; Luzige, Simon; Musinguzi, Patrick; Turyagaruka, John; Jones, Rupert; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Williams, Sian; de Jong, Corina; van der Molen, Thys

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the damage to respiratory health caused by biomass smoke and tobacco smoke. We assessed the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and related risk factors in a rural region of Uganda. METHODS: We did this prospective obser

  9. Oil industry in Uganda: The socio-economic effects on the people of Kabaale Village, Hoima, and Bunyoro region in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyomugasho, Miriam

    This thesis examines the socio-economic effects of oil industry on the people of Kabaale Village, Hoima, and Bunyoro region in Uganda. The thesis analyses the current political economy of Uganda and how Uganda is prepared to utilize the proceeds from the oil industry for the development of the country and its people. In addition, the research examines the effects of industry on the people of Uganda by analyzing how the people of Kabaale in Bunyoro region were affected by the plans to construct oil refinery in their region. This field research was done using qualitative methods and the Historical Materialism theoretical framework guided the study. The major findings include; displacement of people from land especially women, lack of accountability from the leadership, and less citizen participation in the policy formulation and oil industry. Ugandans, East Africans and the wider Pan-African world need to re-organize their socio-economic structure to enable people own means of production; participate and form labor organizations. Additionally, there is a need for oil producing African countries to unite and setup and oil fund for resources and investment instead of relying on foreign multinationals or become rentier states.

  10. The IMF-World Bank's economic stabilisation and structural adjustment policies and the Uganda economy, 1981-1989

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabudere, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    This research report traces all the main developments in IMF-World Bank policies in Uganda. Most of the material concerns the three IMF standby arrangements with Uganda for 1981-1984 and the World Bank Group's Structural Adjustment Programmes. These programmes introduced two contradictory policies a

  11. Budget Planning and the Quality of Educational Services in Uganda Public Universities: A Case Study of Kyambogo University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheka, Benon C.; Nabwire, Addah

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between budget planning and the quality of educational services at Kyambogo University in Uganda. We argue that the manner in which the university's budget planning activities are conducted determines in a significant way (by 76.8%) the quality of the services offered by public universities in Uganda. The…

  12. Exploring Differences in National and International Poverty Estimates: Is Uganda on Track to Halve Poverty by 2015?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores causes of differences in estimates of poverty incidence in Uganda since the early 1990s as measured by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics and the World Bank. While both sets of estimates from the two organisations show a declining trend in poverty incidence there are important differences in the levels of poverty, the speed of the…

  13. The IMF-World Bank's economic stabilisation and structural adjustment policies and the Uganda economy, 1981-1989

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabudere, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    This research report traces all the main developments in IMF-World Bank policies in Uganda. Most of the material concerns the three IMF standby arrangements with Uganda for 1981-1984 and the World Bank Group's Structural Adjustment Programmes. These programmes introduced two contradictory policies

  14. Exploring Differences in National and International Poverty Estimates: Is Uganda on Track to Halve Poverty by 2015?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores causes of differences in estimates of poverty incidence in Uganda since the early 1990s as measured by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics and the World Bank. While both sets of estimates from the two organisations show a declining trend in poverty incidence there are important differences in the levels of poverty, the speed of the…

  15. Public Discourse on HIV and AIDS: An Archival Analysis of National Newspaper Reporting in Uganda, 1996-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagone, Elizabeth; Mathur, Sanyukta; Nakyanjo, Neema; Nalugoda, Fred; Santelli, John

    2014-01-01

    Uganda is recognised as an early success story in the HIV epidemic at least in part due to an open and vigorous national dialogue about HIV prevention. This study examined the national discourse about HIV, AIDS, and young people in New Vision, Uganda's leading national newspaper between 1996 and 2011, building from a previous archival analysis of…

  16. Qualitative evaluation of the Teenage Mothers Project in Uganda: a community-based empowerment intervention for unmarried teenage mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leerlooijer, J.N.; Bos, A.E.R.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Reeuwijk, van M.A.J.; Rijsdijk, E.; Nshakira, N.; Kok, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background A large proportion of unmarried teenage mothers in Uganda face physical, psychological, and social problems after pregnancy and childbirth, such as obstetric complications, lack of education, and stigmatisation in their communities. The Teenage Mothers Project (TMP) in Eastern Uganda empo

  17. The Urgent Need to Train Teachers for Multigrade Pedagogy in African Schooling Contexts: Lessons from Uganda and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Our research project funded by the British Council on multigrade teaching capacity building in Uganda and Zambia found that Uganda does not have a single higher education institution training teachers in multigrade pedagogy and Zambia has only one located at Serenje village in rural Zambia. Yet the research found that in both countries many…

  18. The Northern Uganda Social Action Fund : Community Reconciliation and Conflict Management Empower Communities in a Post-Conflict Setting

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The five year Northern Uganda Social Action Fund (NUSAF), being implemented since 2003 is meant to assist government in its efforts to tackle poverty and bring about development that utilizes and builds on community value systems As part of the broader efforts to reconstruct Northern Uganda, NUSAF, as a project, and through direct grants to communities, is intended to: overcome underdevelo...

  19. Benefits, Costs, and Consumer Perceptions of the Potential Introduction of a Fungus-Resistant Banana in Uganda and Policy Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikulwe, E.M.; Birol, E.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Falck-Zepeda, J.

    2013-01-01

    Banana is a staple crop in Uganda. Ugandans have the highest per capita consumption of cooking bananas in the world (Clarke 2003). However, banana production in Uganda is limited by several productivity constraints, such as insects, diseases, soil depletion, and poor agronomic practices. To address

  20. Benefit Incidence Analysis of Government Spending on Public-Private Partnership Schooling under Universal Secondary Education Policy in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokadala, J.; Barungi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The study establishes whether government spending on private universal secondary education (USE) schools is equitable across quintiles disaggregated by gender and by region in Uganda. The study employs benefit incidence analysis tool on the Uganda National Panel Survey (UNPS 2009/10) data to establish the welfare impact of public subsidy on…