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Sample records for laboratory test panel

  1. Good Laboratory Standards for Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing Cancer Panel Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihun Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has recently emerged as an essential component of personalized cancer medicine due to its high throughput and low per-base cost. However, no sufficient guidelines for implementing NGS as a clinical molecular pathology test are established in Korea. To ensure clinical grade quality without inhibiting adoption of NGS, a taskforce team assembled by the Korean Society of Pathologists developed laboratory guidelines for NGS cancer panel testing procedures and requirements for clinical implementation of NGS. This consensus standard proposal consists of two parts: laboratory guidelines and requirements for clinical NGS laboratories. The laboratory guidelines part addressed several important issues across multistep NGS cancer panel tests including choice of gene panel and platform, sample handling, nucleic acid management, sample identity tracking, library preparation, sequencing, analysis and reporting. Requirements for clinical NGS tests were summarized in terms of documentation, validation, quality management, and other required written policies. Together with appropriate pathologist training and international laboratory standards, these laboratory standards would help molecular pathology laboratories to successfully implement NGS cancer panel tests in clinic. In this way, the oncology community would be able to help patients to benefit more from personalized cancer medicine.

  2. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  3. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  4. Laboratory panel and radiometer calibration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Deadman, AJ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available AND RADIOMETER CALIBRATION A.J Deadmana, I.D Behnerta, N.P Foxa, D. Griffithb aNational Physical Laboratory (NPL), United Kingdom bCouncil for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), South Africa ABSTRACT This paper presents the results...

  5. Proficiency testing for sensory profile panels : measuring panel performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mcewan, J.A.; Hunter, E.A.; Gemert, L.J. van; Lea, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proficiency testing in sensory analysis is an important step towards demonstrating that results from one sensory panel are consistent with the results of other sensory panels. The uniqueness of sensory analysis poses some specific problems for measuring the proficiency of the human instrument (panel

  6. Laboratory testing for von Willebrand's disease: an assessment of current diagnostic practice and efficacy by means of a multi-laboratory survey. RCPA Quality Assurance Program (QAP) in Haematology Haemostasis Scientific Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, E J; Smith, J; Petinos, P; Hertzberg, M; Koutts, J

    1999-10-01

    We report an evaluation of current laboratory practice for the diagnosis of von Willebrand's disease (VWD) by means of a multilaboratory survey. This assessment was undertaken with the RCPA Quality Assurance Program (QAP) in Haematology, which covers a wide geographic area encompassing Australia, New Zealand and Asia. A total of 25 laboratories actively involved in testing for VWD were selected to participate in a sample testing assessment exercise. Samples comprised 10 plasmas: (i) a normal plasma pool (in duplicate), (ii) this pool diluted to 50% (in duplicate), (iii) a normal individual (X1), (iv) severe Type 1 VWD (X1), (v) Type 2B VWD (x2 unrelated donors), (vi) Type 3 VWD (x1), (vii) Type 2A VWD (x1). Laboratories were asked to perform all tests available to them in order to establish a laboratory diagnosis of VWD, and then to comment on the possibility or otherwise of VWD. Overall findings indicated a wide variation in test practice, in the effectiveness of various test procedures in detecting VWD, and in the ability of various composite test panels to identify type 2 VWD subtypes. Firstly, while all laboratories (n = 25) performed tests for FVIII:C activity, von Willebrand factor 'antigen' (VWF:Ag) and a functional VWF assay [using the ristocetin cofactor assay (VWF:RCo; n = 23) and/or the collagen binding assay (VWF:CBA; n = 12)], only three laboratories carried out VWF:Multimer analysis. Secondly, for the three quantitative VWF assays, 10/25 (40%) laboratories performed all three, whereas 15/25 (60%) performed only two [VWF:Ag and VWF:RCo (n = 13); VWF:Ag and VWF:CBA (n = 2)]. Thirdly, a variety of assay methodologies were evident for VWF:Ag [ELISA, electro-immuno diffusion (EID), latex immuno-assay (LIA), and VIDAS assay] and VWF:RCo (platelet agglutination/'aggregometry' and a 'functional VWF:RCo-alternative' ELISA assay). Between method analysis for the quantitative VWF assays showed that the VWF:RCo yielded the greatest degree of inter-laboratory

  7. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  8. Would CLSI M53-A have helped in the diagnosis of HIV in Canada? Results of the performance of Canadian laboratories participating in a recent NLHRS proficiency testing panel containing HIV-1 antigen positive (antibody negative) and HIV-2 samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, K; Malloch, L; Adonsou-Hoyi, Y; Ng, D; Lavoie, S; Pulido, K; Kim, J

    2013-09-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recently published M53-A, Criteria for Laboratory Testing and Diagnosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection; Approved Guideline (2011), which includes a state of the art algorithm for identifying HIV-1 acute and HIV-2 infections. To assess the ability of Canadian laboratories to detect these sample types and the impact of M53-A, the National Laboratory for HIV Reference Services distributed a special proficiency testing panel. HIVS425-2012Nov22 was sent to 42 laboratories across Canada. It contained one HIV negative sample (B), two HIV-1 positive samples (A and E), one HIV-2 positive sample (C) and one HIV-1/2 antibody negative-HIV-1 antigen positive sample (D). Data was collected and analyzed using DigitalPT; a standardized on-line tool. Forty-one laboratories returned results. Sample B (HIV negative) was identified by 95% of laboratories (39/41) and samples A and E (HIV-1 positive) by 98% (40/41). No laboratory identified sample C as HIV-2 positive, although 85% (35/41) detected reactivity prompting a referral for further testing. The remaining laboratories identified sample C as HIV-1 positive (4), indeterminate (1) or gave no final status (1). Sample D (HIV antibody negative-antigen positive) was correctly identified by two laboratories as HIV-1 antigen positive while 78% (32/41) detected reactivity, recommending further testing. One laboratory did not provide a final status. Alarmingly, six laboratories called this sample HIV negative. Although there is a high quality of HIV testing across Canada, introduction of the M53-A guideline would further improve the ability of laboratories to diagnose HIV-1 acute and HIV-2 infection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Mechanical Testing Laboratory in Albany, OR, helps researchers investigate materials that can withstand the heat and pressure commonly found in fossil energy...

  10. One-year monitoring of an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel laboratory-developed test for bladder cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinawi-Aljundi R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rima Tinawi-Aljundi,1 Lauren King,2 Shannon T Knuth,2 Michael Gildea,2 Carrie Ng,2 Josh Kahl,2 Jacqueline Dion,2 Chris Young,2 Edward W Schervish,1 J Rene Frontera,1 Jason Hafron,1 Kenneth M Kernen,1 Robert Di Loreto,1 Joan Aurich-Costa21Michigan Institute of Urology, St Claire Shores, MI, USA; 2Cellay, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA Background: Previously, we had developed and manufactured an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization (OligoFISH probe panel based on the most clinically sensitive chromosomes found in a reference set of bladder carcinoma cases. The panel was clinically validated for use as a diagnostic and monitoring assay for bladder cancer, reaching 100% correlation with the results of the UroVysion test. After 1 year of using this probe panel, we present here the comparison of cytology, cystoscopy, and pathology findings to the OligoFISH probe panel results to calculate its clinical performance. Materials and methods: In order to calculate clinical performance, we compared the OligoFISH results to the cytology and cystoscopy/pathology findings for 147 initial diagnoses and 399 recurrence monitorings. Finally, we compared clinical performance to published values for the UroVysion test, including both low- and high-grade tumors. Results: Chromosomes 3, 6, 7, and 20 were highly involved in bladder carcinoma aneuploidy. At the initial diagnosis, we obtained 90.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.5%–94.7% accuracy, 96.8% sensitivity (95% CI: 91.0%–99.3%, 79.2% specificity (95% CI: 65.9%–87.8%, 89.2% positive predictive value (PPV; 95% CI: 81.5%–94.5%, and 93.3% negative predictive value (NPV; 95% CI: 81.7%–97.3%. When monitoring for recurrence, we obtained 85.2% accuracy (95% CI: 81.3%–88.5%, 82.0% sensitivity (95% CI: 76.0%–87.1%, 88.4% specificity (95% CI: 83.2%–92.5%, 87.7% PPV (95% CI: 82.1%–92.0%, and 83.0% NPV (95% CI: 77.3%–87.8%. When looking at low- and high-grade tumors, the test showed 100

  11. Understanding Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the development and marketing of all laboratory tests that use test kits ... are of great interest in cancer medicine because research suggests that levels of ... sequencing methods are being developed to provide gene mutation profiles ...

  12. Developing a solar panel testing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árpád Rácz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is increasingly used togenerate electricity for individual households. There isa wide variety of solar panel technologies, whichshould be tested at an individual level during theirlifetime. In this paper, the development of a testingstation at the University of Debrecen is presented. Thetesting system can be used for research andeducational purposes and for in field applicationsequally well.

  13. Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006).

  14. Wind Structural Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components...

  15. Wind Structural Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components...

  16. Metallurgical Laboratory and Components Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In the field of metallurgy, TTC is equipped to run laboratory tests on track and rolling stock components and materials. The testing lab contains scanning-electron,...

  17. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  18. TESTING MONETARY EXCHANGE RATE MODELS WITH PANEL COINTEGRATION TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The monetary exchange rate models explain the long run behaviour of the nominal exchange rate. Their central assertion is that there is a long run equilibrium relationship between the nominal exchange rate and monetary macro-fundamentals. Although these models are essential tools of international macroeconomics, their empirical validity is ambiguous. Previously, time series testing was prevalent in the literature, but it did not bring convincing results. The power of the unit root and the cointegration tests are too low to reject the null hypothesis of no cointegration between the variables. This power can be enhanced by arranging our data in a panel data set, which allows us to analyse several time series simultaneously and enables us to increase the number of observations. We conducted a weak empirical test of the monetary exchange rate models by testing the existence of cointegration between the variables in three panels. We investigated 6, 10 and 15 OECD countries during the following periods: 1976Q1-2011Q4, 1985Q1-2011Q4 and 1996Q1-2011Q4. We tested the reduced form of the monetary exchange rate models in three specifications; we have two restricted models and an unrestricted model. Since cointegration can only be interpreted among non-stationary processes, we investigate the order of the integration of our variables with IPS, Fisher-ADF, Fisher-PP panel unit root tests and the Hadri panel stationary test. All the variables can be unit root processes; therefore we analyze the cointegration with the Pedroni and Kao panel cointegration test. The restricted models performed better than the unrestricted one and we obtained the best results with the 1985Q1-2011Q4 panel. The Kao test rejects the null hypotheses – there is no cointegration between the variables – in all the specifications and all the panels, but the Pedroni test does not show such a positive picture. Hence we found only moderate support for the monetary exchange rate models.

  19. World of Forensic Laboratory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? The World of Forensic Laboratory Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... made-for-television lab scenario, real-life forensic laboratories' analyses of evidence are much slower. For example, ...

  20. New respirator fit test panels representing the current U.S. civilian work force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Bradtmiller, Bruce; Shaffer, Ronald E

    2007-09-01

    The fit test panels currently used for respirator research, design, and certification are 25-subject panels developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and are based on data from the 1967 and 1968 anthropometric surveys of U.S. Air Force personnel. Military data do not represent the great diversity in face size and shape seen in civilian populations. In addition, the demographics of the U.S. population have changed over the last 30 years. Thus, it is necessary to assess and refine the LANL fit test panels. This paper presents the development of new respirator fit test panels representative of current U.S. civilian workers based on an anthropometric survey of 3,997 respirator users conducted in 2003. One panel was developed using face length and face width (bivariate approach) and weighting subjects to match the age and race distribution of the U.S. population as determined from the 2000 census. Another panel was developed using the first two principal components obtained from a set of 10 facial dimensions (age and race adjusted). These 10 dimensions are associated with respirator fit and leakage and can predict the remaining face dimensions well. Respirators designed to fit these panels are expected to accommodate more than 95% of the current U.S. civilian workers. Both panels are more representative of the U.S. population than the existing LANL panel and may be appropriate for testing both half-masks and full-face piece respirators. Respirator manufacturers, standards development organizations, and government respirator certification bodies need to select the appropriate fit test panel for their particular needs. The bivariate panel is simpler to use than the principal component analysis (PCA) panel and is most similar to the LANL panel currently used. The inclusion of the eight additional facial measurements allows the PCA panel to provide better criteria for excluding extreme face sizes from being used. Because the boundaries of the two new panels are

  1. Laboratory Testing for Prescription Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid analgesic misuse has risen significantly over the past two decades, and these drugs now represent the most commonly abused class of prescription medications. They are a major cause of poisoning deaths in the USA exceeding heroin and cocaine. Laboratory testing plays a role in the detection of opioid misuse and the evaluation of patients with opioid intoxication. Laboratories use both immunoassay and chromatographic methods (e.g., liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection),...

  2. Space Station Freedom solar array panels plasma interaction test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald F.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Power System will make extensive use of photovoltaic (PV) power generation. The phase 1 power system consists of two PV power modules each capable of delivering 37.5 KW of conditioned power to the user. Each PV module consists of two solar arrays. Each solar array is made up of two solar blankets. Each solar blanket contains 82 PV panels. The PV power modules provide a 160 V nominal operating voltage. Previous research has shown that there are electrical interactions between a plasma environment and a photovoltaic power source. The interactions take two forms: parasitic current loss (occurs when the currect produced by the PV panel leaves at a high potential point and travels through the plasma to a lower potential point, effectively shorting that portion of the PV panel); and arcing (occurs when the PV panel electrically discharges into the plasma). The PV solar array panel plasma interaction test was conceived to evaluate the effects of these interactions on the Space Station Freedom type PV panels as well as to conduct further research. The test article consists of two active solar array panels in series. Each panel consists of two hundred 8 cm x 8 cm silicon solar cells. The test requirements dictated specifications in the following areas: plasma environment/plasma sheath; outgassing; thermal requirements; solar simulation; and data collection requirements.

  3. Laboratory testing for prescription opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    Opioid analgesic misuse has risen significantly over the past two decades, and these drugs now represent the most commonly abused class of prescription medications. They are a major cause of poisoning deaths in the USA exceeding heroin and cocaine. Laboratory testing plays a role in the detection of opioid misuse and the evaluation of patients with opioid intoxication. Laboratories use both immunoassay and chromatographic methods (e.g., liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection), often in combination, to yield high detection sensitivity and drug specificity. Testing methods for opioids originated in the workplace-testing arena and focused on detection of illicit heroin use. Analysis for a wide range of opioids is now required in the context of the prescription opioid epidemic. Testing methods have also been primarily based upon urine screening; however, methods for analyzing alternative samples such as saliva, sweat, and hair are available. Application of testing to monitor prescription opioid drug therapy is an increasingly important use of drug testing, and this area of testing introduces new interpretative challenges. In particular, drug metabolism may transform one clinically available opioid into another. The sensitivity of testing methods also varies considerably across the spectrum of opioid drugs. An understanding of opioid metabolism and method sensitivity towards different opioid drugs is therefore essential to effective use of these tests. Improved testing algorithms and more research into the effective use of drug testing in the clinical setting, particularly in pain medicine and substance abuse, are needed.

  4. In-plane shear test of fibre reinforced concrete panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Stang, Henrik; Goltermann, Per

    2008-01-01

    contributes to the investigation of fibers as reinforcement in panels with experimental results and a consistent approach to material characterization and modeling. The proposed model draws on elements from the classical yield line theory of rigid, perfectly plastic materials and the theory of fracture......The present paper concerns the investigation of polymer Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) panels subjected to in-plane shear. The use of fibers as primary reinforcement in panels is a new application of fiber reinforcement, hence test methods, design bases and models are lacking. This paper...

  5. Laboratory Tests of Chameleon Models

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    We present a cursory overview of chameleon models of dark energy and their laboratory tests with an emphasis on optical and Casimir experiments. Optical experiments measuring the ellipticity of an initially polarised laser beam are sensitive to the coupling of chameleons to photons. The next generation of Casimir experiments may be able to unravel the nature of the scalar force mediated by the chameleon between parallel plates.

  6. CAECC Software Testing Laboratory Accredited by CNAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Software Testing Laboratory of China Aerospace Engineering and Consultation Center (CAECC) is accredited by China National Accreditation Board for Laboratories (CNAL) as the first such laboratory in domestic space industry. Since CNAL is a member of International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC),software testing reports certificated to CAECC are recognized by 45 laboratory accreditation organizations in AsiaPacific region, Europe and America.

  7. A Bootstrap Cointegration Rank Test for Panels of VAR Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callot, Laurent

    functions of the individual Cointegrated VARs (CVAR) models. A bootstrap based procedure is used to compute empirical distributions of the trace test statistics for these individual models. From these empirical distributions two panel trace test statistics are constructed. The satisfying small sample...

  8. Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth: Causality Testing in Heterogenous Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Maddison; Katrin Rehdanz [Department of Economics, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-30

    Numerous papers have examined data on energy and GDP for evidence of Granger causality. Using time series techniques these analyses not infrequently reach differing conclusions concerning the existence and direction of Granger causality. This paper presents a heterogenous panel approach to Granger causality testing. This technique is used to examine a panel of data for evidence of a causal relationship between GDP and carbon emissions per capita allowing for heterogeneity in short run dynamics and even the long run cointegrating vector. This technique is compared to the standard fixed dynamic effects approach to pooling individual error correction models. In one important case the heterogenous panel test for Granger causality reaches conclusions quite different to those from conventional tests of Granger causality. Except for Asia there is strong evidence for the existence of a bidirectional causal relationship between GDP per capita and CO{sub 2} emissions per capita.

  9. Recommended test panel for differentiation of Klebsiella species on the basis of a trilateral interlaboratory evaluation of 18 biochemical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dennis S; Aucken, Hazel M; Abiola, Titi; Podschun, Rainer

    2004-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca are the two most frequently encountered Klebsiella species giving rise to infections in humans, but other Klebsiella species can also be found in clinical specimens: Klebsiella ozaenae, Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis, Klebsiella terrigena, Klebsiella planticola, Klebsiella ornithinolytica, and Enterobacter aerogenes (Klebsiella mobilis). However, many of these species are indistinguishable by the conventional methods employed routinely in the clinical microbiological laboratory. Several investigators have suggested various additional tests, but as yet there is no standardized test panel for identifying all Klebsiella species and subspecies. In the present study, performed in three national Klebsiella reference laboratories, we have evaluated a test panel consisting of 18 biochemical tests on 242 strains comprising all Klebsiella species and subspecies. The test panel was designed to identify organisms preliminarily identified as belonging to the genus Klebsiella on the basis of conventional methods or automated identification systems. With the described test panel it is possible to find one or more positive test results differentiating any Klebsiella species, except Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis, from its closest relative.

  10. Development of a national EUCAST challenge panel for antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, S; Verhaegen, J; Glupzcynski, Y; Van Eldere, J; Melin, P; Goossens, H; Piérard, D; Declercq, P; Lagrou, K; Boel, A; Cartuyvels, R; Denis, O; Vandewal, W; Saegeman, V

    2016-08-01

    A challenge panel of bacterial strains useful for clinical laboratories to validate their European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) system was established. A total of 117 strains, obtained from Belgian Reference Centres (n = 57) and from routine clinical samples (n = 60) was selected based on resistance pattern. These strains were analysed in seven different laboratories by three different automated AST systems (Vitek (n = 2), Phoenix (n = 2) and Microscan (n = 2)) and by disc diffusion from five different manufacturers (Rosco (n = 2), Becton-Dickinson (n = 2), Biomérieux (n = 1), Bio-rad (n = 1) and i2a (n = 1)). To select the challenge panel, selection criteria were set for categorical agreement between the different systems and the number of very major errors, major errors and minor errors. Very major and major errors for at least two antibiotics were observed in 43% of all strains, leading to the exclusion of these strains from the selected panel. In only 10% of all tested strains was there 100% categorical agreement for all antibiotics. Finally, 28 strains (14 Gram-positive and 14 Gram-negative) covering a wide spectrum of resistance mechanisms were selected. Pilot-testing of this challenge panel in 20 laboratories mainly confirmed the results of the validation study. Only six strains withheld for the pilot study could not be used as challenge strain due to an overall (very) major error rate of >5% for a particular antibiotic (n = 5) or for two antibiotics (n = 1). To conclude, this challenge panel should facilitate the implementation and use of EUCAST breakpoints in laboratories.

  11. The Space Station Photovoltaic Panels Plasma Interaction Test Program: Test plan and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Felder, Marian C.; Sater, Bernard L.; Staskus, John V.

    1989-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Test performed on two space station solar array panels is addressed. This includes a discussion of the test requirements, test plan, experimental set-up, and test results. It was found that parasitic current collection was insignificant (0.3 percent of the solar array delivered power). The measured arcing threshold ranged from -210 to -457 V with respect to the plasma potential. Furthermore, the dynamic response of the panels showed the panel time constant to range between 1 and 5 microsec, and the panel capacitance to be between .01 and .02 microF.

  12. The Space Station photovoltaic panels plasma interaction test program - Test plan and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Felder, Marian C.; Sater, Bernard L.; Staskus, John V.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma Interaction Test performed on two space station solar array panels is addressed. This includes a discussion of the test requirements, test plan, experimental set-up, and test results. It was found that parasitic current collection was insignificant (0.3 percent of the solar array delivered power). The measured arcing threshold ranged from -210 to -457 V with respect to the plasma potential. Furthermore, the dynamic response of the panels showed the panel time constant to range between 1 and 5 microsec, and the panel capacitance to be between .01 and .02 microF.

  13. SENSORY AND CONSUMER TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These laboratories conduct a wide range of studies to characterize the sensory properties of and consumer responses to foods, beverages, and other consumer products....

  14. Federal Security Laboratory Governance Panels: Observations and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    have been documented by laboratory managers in a recent report (NRC 2012). According to panelists, the lack of new scientists with the appropriate...nonprofit parent organization to an FFRDC run by a consortium including for-profit contractors at LANL and LLNL led to staff frustration, a...Independent Research program and Section 219. At LANL , these programs allow the director discretion to invest in long-term strategic research

  15. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.

    2016-01-01

    of a wide spectrum of epilepsies with age of onset spanning from the neonatal period to adulthood. A gene panel targeting 46 epilepsy genes was used on a cohort of 216 patients consecutively referred for panel testing. The patients had a range of different epilepsies from benign neonatal seizures...... to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease...

  16. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasseter, R. H.; Eto, J. H.; Schenkman, B.; Stevens, J.; Volkmmer, H.; Klapp, D.; Linton, E.; Hurtado, H.; Roy, J.

    2010-06-08

    CERTS Microgrid concept captures the emerging potential of distributed generation using a system approach. CERTS views generation and associated loads as a subsystem or a 'microgrid'. The sources can operate in parallel to the grid or can operate in island, providing UPS services. The system can disconnect from the utility during large events (i.e. faults, voltage collapses), but may also intentionally disconnect when the quality of power from the grid falls below certain standards. CERTS Microgrid concepts were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resynchronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults.

  17. Anthropomorphic Test Drive (ATD) Certification Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ATD Certification Laboratory consists of several test fixtures to ensure ATDs are functioning correctly and within specifications prior to use in any OP testing....

  18. Putting New Laboratory Tests Into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Putting New Laboratory Tests into Practice Share this page: Was this ... of articles that describe how different types of laboratory tests are developed, validated, and made available for ...

  19. Nonparametric test for detecting change in distribution with panel data

    CERN Document Server

    Pommeret, Denys; Ghattas, Badih

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of comparing two processes with panel data. A nonparametric test is proposed for detecting a monotone change in the link between the two process distributions. The test statistic is of CUSUM type, based on the empirical distribution functions. The asymptotic distribution of the proposed statistic is derived and its finite sample property is examined by bootstrap procedures through Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

    2009-06-18

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field

  1. Qualification test results for DOE solar photovoltaic flat panel procurement - PRDA 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve types of prototypes modules for the DOE Photovoltaic Flat Panel Procurement (PRDA 38) were subjected to qualification tests at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory according to a new specification. Environmental exposures were carried out separately and included temperature cycling, humidity, wind simulation, and hail. The most serious problems discovered were reduced insulation resistance to ground and ground continuity of the metal frames, electrical degradation, erratic power readings, and delamination. The electrical and physical characteristics of the newly received modules are also given.

  2. Panel Cointegration Testing in the Presence of Linear Time Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Hassler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of panel tests of the null hypothesis of no cointegration and cointegration. All tests under investigation rely on single-equations estimated by least squares, and they may be residual-based or not. We focus on test statistics computed from regressions with intercept only (i.e., without detrending and with at least one of the regressors (integrated of order 1 being dominated by a linear time trend. In such a setting, often encountered in practice, the limiting distributions and critical values provided for and applied with the situation “with intercept only” are not correct. It is demonstrated that their usage results in size distortions growing with the panel size N. Moreover, we show which are the appropriate distributions, and how correct critical values can be obtained from the literature.

  3. Progress and Strategies for Testing of Materials for Solar Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2017-04-25

    Accelerated testing is key to confident launch of a new product. However, for new products like solar panels, the best approach is not always clear. The challenge for materials manufacturers is that test times can be long. Also, small-coupon testing may not predict the behavior in the full-size module, but testing of the full-size module is too expensive. As a result, solar panel test standards like IEC 61215 are useful, but are not sufficient. Material manufacturers have needed to define their own test protocols. This presentation will review some historical data (e.g., data show that manufacturers are making great progress toward reducing encapsulant discoloration) and describe advances in material testing (for example, new techniques are being demonstrated on how to more quantitatively assess adhesion, detect tendency for delamination, and understand how encapsulant properties affect other properties like cracking of cells). The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force has been researching climate-specific weathering tests toward the goal of defining international standards that would simplify qualification and quality assurance testing for materials. The status of these tests and the strategies for how to organize these standards to best meet the needs of the industry will be discussed.

  4. Simulated hail impact testing of photovoltaic solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D.; Wilson, A.; Ross, R.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques used to simulate and study the effect of hail on photovoltaic solar panels are described. Simulated hail stones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity) or steel balls were applied by air guns, gravity drop, or static loading. Tests with simulated hail and steel balls yielded different results. The impact strength of 10 commercially available flat-plate photovoltaic modules was tested. It was found that none of the six panel designs incorporating clear potting silicone material as the outermost layer remained undamaged by 1-in. simulated hailstones, while a photovoltaic module equipped with a 0.188-in.-thick acrylic cover sheet would be able to withstand the impact of a 2-in.-diameter hailstone.

  5. Acceptance test report for ENRAF control panel software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.H.

    1998-03-23

    On March 5, 1998, the ENRAF Control Panel Software program was acceptance tested per HNF-1991 Revision 0. The test was performed at the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, 200 West Area, building MO-281. The test validated the functionality of the software for use by project W-320, C-1 06 Retrieval. The purpose of the test procedure was to partially verify the functionality of the ENRAF Control Panel Software. The test cycled through the majority of functions within the program. Functions not tested will be tested per Operational Test Procedure OTP-320-01 0 at a later date. The following criteria was used to determine whether the software passed or failed the test. The gauge responds correctly (as described in vendor documentation, Reference 1) to all commands sent through the program. If gauge related error codes are encountered, they may be cleared either through the PET or the program. However, the program, while running, must provide some indication of all gauge related errors encountered. If any of the pass criteria are not met and cannot be immediately resolved. If the system crashes for reasons that are clearly related to program performance and cannot be immediately resolved.

  6. Blast testing and analysis of composite steel stud wall panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesevich, J.W.; Lowak, M.J.; Hu, W.; Bingham, B.L. [Baker Engineering and Risk Consultants Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hallisy, J. [Fiberwrap Composite Technologies, Calverton, NY (United States); Calcetas, P. [Lafarge North America, Concord, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper described a novel modular blast resistant composite steel stud wall panel system. The system was manufactured by casting steel studs with thin, high-strength concrete. Ten composite panel design specimens were evaluated and tested at a shock tube test facility. Specimens included both 12 and 16 gauge 6 inch cold-formed double or single studs spaced at either 12 or 16 inches on center. Samples also included both steam and ambient cured concretes with steel or organic fibers ranging in thickness between 1 and 2 inches. A welded wire mesh within the concrete layer was used to provide composite action. Results of the blast tests showed that the composite panels achieved minimal damage levels under applied blast loads, which ranged from between 15.9 psi to 205 psi. Peak dynamic reflections ranged from between 2.75 increase to 12 inches. It was concluded that finite element models and single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analyses showed good agreement with the experimental studies.

  7. Geotechnical Design Asssisted by Laboratory Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Dysli, Michel; Head, Ken H.;

    1997-01-01

    Eurocode 7 Part 2 is intended to serve as a reference document for the use of laboratory tests for geotechnical design. It covers the execution and interpretation of the most commonly used laboratory tests. The standard aims at ensuring that adequate quality is reached in the execution...... of laboratory tests and their interpretation. Within the framework of European Standardisation, Eurocode 7 Part 1 on the design of geotechnical structures was established. Complementary, Eurocode 7 Part 3 addresses field testing....

  8. Advantages and Some Remaining Challenges in Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Panel Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Tara; Balay, Lara; Jung, Barbara

    2017-05-11

    Colorectal cancer affects 1 in 20 men and women in their lifetime. About 30% of these cases have been shown to be familial while only about 5% are associated with a highly penetrant hereditary colon cancer syndrome. In many familial cases, however, no mutation in the commonly implicated CRC genes is found. With the development of next-generation sequencing, testing laboratories are now able to offer hereditary gastrointestinal panel testing, which allows for the simultaneous sequencing of a much broader set of genes associated with CRC. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such testing to inform best clinical practice.

  9. Ageing tests study on wood-based sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo, Raquel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Composite lightweight wood panels are being increasingly used in construction in Spain. Their growing use should be accompanied by necessary guarantees based on studies of their properties. As it is prescriptive and in addition to others tests, in the present work is examinated the durability of these panels when exposed to the climatic conditions, a characteristic of great importance for wood products, according to Guide ETAG 016, the current standard defining the ageing tests to be used. However, due to the use class of this material, there are indications that the testing outlined in this Guide is inappropriate for assessing the ageing of wood-based sandwich panels. Alternative tests are here proposed that recreate rather better the real conditions under which these products are used. Covering the samples in a waterproof sheeting permeable to the outward movement of water vapour, which is in fact used in the installation, provided the best procedure for testing these panels.

    Los paneles sándwich de madera son un producto de creciente aplicación en la edificación de nuestro país. Este ascendente uso del material debe estar acompañado de las garantías necesarias avaladas por un estudio previo de sus prestaciones. Como es preceptivo y entre otros, se evalúa su durabilidad frente a las condiciones climatológicas, clave en los productos derivados de la madera, acorde a la normativa actual definida con tal fin, la Guía ETAG 016. Sin embargo, debido a la clase de uso del material, se ha detectado que dicha normativa tal y como está concebida no es capaz de valorar su envejecimiento adecuadamente. En este trabajo se proponen ensayos alternativos al establecido tras exhaustivos análisis que recrean las condiciones reales de uso y más acordes a los productos de madera. Se concluye que la incorporación de una lámina impermeable pero permeable al vapor de agua hacia el exterior, como las utilizadas en el montaje, aportan el mejor

  10. A test battery measuring auditory capabilities of listening panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghani, Jody; Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Karin

    2005-01-01

    a battery of tests covering a larger range of auditory capabilities in order to assess individual listeners. The format of all tests is kept as 'objective' as possible by using a three-alternative forced-choice paradigm in which the subject must choose which of the sound samples is different, thus keeping...... the instruction to the subjects simple and common for all tests. Both basic (e.g. frequency discrimination) and complex (e.g. profile analysis) psychoacoustic tests are covered in the battery and a threshold of discrimination or detection is obtained for each test. Data were collected on 24 listeners who had been...... recruited for participation in an expert listening panel for evaluating the sound quality of hi-fi audio systems. The test battery data were related to the actual performance of the listeners when judging the degradation in quality produced by audio codecs....

  11. Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammenzind, D.E.

    1997-05-28

    A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site`s or facility`s mission or configuration, a change in the facility`s life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct

  12. A test battery measuring auditory capabilities of listening panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghani, Jody; Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Karin

    2005-01-01

    While the literature stresses the importance of expert panels and of training in evaluating sound-quality attributes, the abilities of experts have typically only been investigated for a very limited range of tasks (e.g. naming timbral qualities). It is therefore the aim of this study to develop...... a battery of tests covering a larger range of auditory capabilities in order to assess individual listeners. The format of all tests is kept as 'objective' as possible by using a three-alternative forced-choice paradigm in which the subject must choose which of the sound samples is different, thus keeping...... the instruction to the subjects simple and common for all tests. Both basic (e.g. frequency discrimination) and complex (e.g. profile analysis) psychoacoustic tests are covered in the battery and a threshold of discrimination or detection is obtained for each test. Data were collected on 24 listeners who had been...

  13. The development of an Infrared Environmental System for TOPEX Solar Panel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, E.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental testing and flight qualification of the TOPEX/POSEIDON spacecraft solar panels were performed with infrared (IR) lamps and a control system that were newly designed and integrated. The basic goal was more rigorous testing of the costly panels' new composite-structure design without jeopardizing their safety. The technique greatly reduces the costs and high risks of testing flight solar panels.

  14. 10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver panel test requirements document solar thermal test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-25

    Testing plans for a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally, the design planned for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are presented. Testing is to include operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the panel's transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. Test hardware are described, including the pilot plant receiver, the test receiver assembly, receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and structural assembly. Requirements for the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. The safety of the system is briefly discussed, and procedures are described for assembly, installation, checkout, normal and abnormal operations, maintenance, removal and disposition. Also briefly discussed are quality assurance, contract responsibilities, and test documentation. (LEW)

  15. Concentrating Solar Power Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Michael W [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne; Miner, Kris [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

    2013-03-30

    test scale prototype receiver, off sun but at temperature, at a molten salt loop at ground level adjacent to the tower also had to be abandoned. Thus, no test facility existed for a molten salt receiver test. As a result, PWR completed the prototype receiver design and then fabricated key components for testing instead of fabricating the complete prototype receiver. A number of innovative design ideas have been developed. Key features of the receiver panel have been identified. This evaluation includes input from Solar 2, personal experience of people working on these programs and meetings with Sandia. Key components of the receiver design and key processes used to fabricate a receiver have been selected for further evaluation. The Test Plan, Concentrated Solar Power Receiver In Cooperation with the Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory was written to define the scope of the testing to be completed as well as to provide details related to the hardware, instrumentation, and data acquisition. The document contains a list of test objectives, a test matrix, and an associated test box showing the operating points to be tested. Test Objectives: 1. Demonstrate low-cost manufacturability 2. Demonstrate robustness of two different tube base materials 3. Collect temperature data during on sun operation 4. Demonstrate long term repeated daily operation of heat shields 5. Complete pinhole tube weld repairs 6. Anchor thermal models This report discusses the tests performed, the results, and implications for design improvements and LCOE reduction.

  16. Hybrid Test Bed of Wind Electric Generator with Photovoltaic Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D.Anbarasi Jebaselvi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Driven by the increasing costs of power production and decreasing fossil fuel reserves with the addition of global environmental concerns, renewable energy is now becoming significant fraction of total electricity production in the world. Advancements in the field of wind electric generator technology and power electronics help to achieve rapid progress in hybrid power system which mainly involves wind, solar and diesel energy with a good battery back-up. Here the discussion brings about the installation of real time test bed with a small electric generator and dynamic solar panels with battery backups.

  17. 21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory tests. 640.67 Section 640.67 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit...

  18. Transient Thermal Testing and Analysis of a Thermally Insulating Structural Sandwich Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Max L.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Bird, Richard K.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A core configuration was devised for a thermally insulating structural sandwich panel. Two titanium prototype panels were constructed to illustrate the proposed sandwich panel geometry. The core of one of the titanium panels was filled with Saffil(trademark) alumina fibrous insulation and the panel was tested in a series of transient thermal tests. Finite element analysis was used to predict the thermal response of the panel using one- and two-dimensional models. Excellent agreement was obtained between predicted and measured temperature histories.

  19. How Reliable Is Laboratory Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  20. Nondestructive and Strain Testing of Composite Sandwich Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyings, Ryan

    In April 2006, Sikorsky Aircraft received a contract from the United States Marine Corps (USMC) to develop a successor to their CH-53E heavy-lift helicopter. The new designation is the CH-53K "Super Stallion" and provides increased operating capabilities through the use of design revisions that incorporate extensive use of carbon fiber composites and composite sandwich panels. "The CH-53K will have five times the capability at half of the operational cost of the aircraft it's replacing. It will be the most capable helicopter ever produced. With more than twice the combat radius of the CH-53E, the CH-53K uses mature technology to deliver a fully shipboard compatible platform to meet current and future Marine Corps requirements". Upon introduction, it will be the largest rotary wing aircraft in the United States Department of Defense. The USMC will incorporate the CH-53K into the Joint Operations Concept of Full Spectrum Dominance and Sea Power 21 thereby enabling rapid, decisive operations and the early termination of conflict by projecting and sustaining forces to distant anti-access, area-denial environments. Even with an increased lift capability, the CH-53K is a slow moving, low flying helicopter susceptible to damage from small arms fire. There is no field level composite repair capability within any maintained documents published by the Department of Defense. Purdue University has developed a field level rapid repair technique capable of returning strength and integrity to damaged carbon composite structural components. The patch is made from carbon fiber weave that is applied using a field capable Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). This thesis seeks to validate, using nondestructive testing methods and strain monitoring, the manufacturing, damage, and repair process of composite sandwich panels representative of the CH-53K structural panels.

  1. Laboratory testing for platelet function disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israels, S J

    2015-05-01

    Platelet function testing is both complex and labor intensive. A stepwise approach to the evaluation of patients with suspected platelet disorders will optimize the use of laboratory resources, beginning with an appropriate clinical evaluation to determine whether the bleeding is consistent with a defect of primary hemostasis. Bleeding assessment tools, evaluation of platelet counts, and review of peripheral blood cell morphology can aid the initial assessment. For patients requiring further laboratory testing, platelet aggregometry, secretion assays, and von Willebrand factor assays are the most useful next steps and will direct further specialized testing including flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and molecular diagnostics. Guidelines and recommendations for standardizing platelet function testing, with a particular focus on light transmission aggregometry, are available and can provide a template for clinical laboratories in establishing procedures that will optimize diagnosis and assure quality results. This review outlines an approach to platelet function testing and reviews testing methods available to clinical laboratories.

  2. Test Outline for Flutter Analysis of Rectangular Panels in Rarefied Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Fred A.

    1996-01-01

    Jet plume impingement forces acting on large flexible space structures may precipitate dynamically unstable behavior during space flights. Typical operating conditions in space involve rarefied gas flow regimes which are intrinsically distinct from continuum gas flow and are normally modeled using the kinetic theory of gas flow. Docking and undocking operations of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Mir space laboratory represent a scenario in which the stability boundaries of solar panels may be of interest. Extensive literature review of research work on the dynamic stability of rectangular panels in rarefied gas flow conditions indicated the lack of published reports dealing with this phenomenon. A recently completed preliminary study for NASA JSC dealing with the mathematical analysis of the stability of two-degree-of-freedom elastically supported rigid panels under the effect of rarefied gas flow was reviewed. A test plan outline is prepared for the purpose of conducting a series of experiments on four rectangular rigid test articles in a vacuum chamber under the effect of continuous and pulsating Nitrogen jet plumes. The purpose of the test plan is to gather enough data related to a number of key parameters to allow the validation of the two-degree-of-freedom mathematical model. The hardware required careful design to select a very lightweight material while satisfying rigidity and frequency requirements within the constraints of the test environment. The data to be obtained from the vacuum chamber tests can be compared with the predicted behavior of the theoretical two-degree-of-freedom model. Using the data obtained in this study, further research can identify the limitations of the mathematical model. In addition modifications to the mathematical model can be made, if warranted, to accurately predict the behavior of rigid panels under rarefied gas flow regimes.

  3. Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium - Testing and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin; Skare, Paul; Pratt, Rob; Kim, Tom; Ellis, Abraham

    2017-05-11

    This paper highlights some of the unique testing capabilities and projects being performed at several national laboratories as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium. As part of this effort, the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium Testing Network isbeing developed to accelerate grid modernization by enablingaccess to a comprehensive testing infrastructure and creating a repository of validated models and simulation tools that will be publicly available. This work is key to accelerating thedevelopment, validation, standardization, adoption, and deployment of new grid technologies to help meet U. S. energy goals.

  4. 10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing laboratories. 431.18 Section 431.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL... supplements NIST Handbook 150, National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Procedures and...

  5. Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

  6. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ETO, J.; LASSETER, R.; SCHENKMAN, B.; STEVENS, J.; KLAPP, D.; VOLKOMMER, H.; LINTON, E.; HURTADO, H.; ROY, J.

    2010-06-08

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1 a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2 an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3 a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources.

  7. Analysing sensory panel performance in a proficiency test using the PanelCheck software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomic, O.; Luciano, G.; Nilsen, A.

    2010-01-01

    results plays an important role as this provides a time saving and efficient way of screening and investigating sensory panel performances. Most of the statistical methods used in this paper are available in the open source software PanelCheck, which may be downloaded and used for free.......Check software, a workflow is proposed that guides the user through the data analysis process. This allows practitioners and non-statisticians to get an overview over panel performances in a rapid manner without the need to be familiar with details on the statistical methods. Visualisation of data analysis...

  8. Thermal Cycling of Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) Test Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint US/Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA is currently being used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station (ISS), which will use arrays based on the same solar cells used in the MCSA. The US supplied the photovoltaic power modules (PPMs) and provided technical and programmatic oversight while Russia provided the array support structures and deployment mechanism and built and tested the array. In order to ensure that there would be no problems with the interface between US and Russian hardware, an accelerated thermal life cycle test was performed at NASA Lewis Research Center on two representative samples of the MCSA. Over an eight-month period (August 1994 - March 1995), two 15-cell MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles (+80 C to -100 C), equivalent to four years on-orbit. The test objectives, facility, procedure and results are described in this paper. Post-test inspection and evaluation revealed no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early as an artifact of the test and removed from consideration. The interesting nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell, which only occurred at elevated temperatures, is discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the US solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit).

  9. New respirator fit test panels representing the current Chinese civilian workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihong; Zhuang, Ziqing; Benson, Stacey; Du, Lili; Yu, Dan; Landsittel, Douglas; Wang, Limin; Viscusi, Dennis; Shaffer, Ronald E

    2009-04-01

    Respirator fit test panels provide an objective tool for selecting representative human test subjects based upon their facial characteristics for use in research, product development, testing and certification. Fit test panels were typically based upon anthropometric data such as the 1967-1968 survey of American military personnel. In this study, the objectives were to: (i) evaluate the applicability of the recently developed National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) respirator fit test panels for Chinese workers and (ii) develop new respirator fit test panels using the Chinese survey data. Overall, 95% of the workers in the Chinese survey fall within the NIOSH bivariate and principal component analysis (PCA) panels, suggesting that these panels would also be appropriate for the Chinese population. However, distribution of the subject across the panels was not uniform; only 6.3% of survey participants fell into five cells of the bivariate panel and only 7.2% were found within three cells of the PCA panel. Therefore, new respirator fit test panels with subject dimensions and distributions specific to Chinese workers may be beneficial for certain applications. Two new respirator fit test panels were developed with the same techniques used to create the NIOSH panels. All measurements were weighted to match age and gender distributions of the Chinese population from the 2005 census. The bivariate approach used face length and face width measurements, and the PCA panel was developed using the first two principal components obtained from a set of 10 facial dimensions. Respirators designed to fit these Chinese worker-specific panels are also likely to accommodate >95% of Chinese workers.

  10. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  11. Preemptive Panel-Based Pharmacogenetic Testing: The Time is Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Kristin W; Cavallari, Larisa H; Lesko, Lawrence J

    2017-08-01

    While recent discoveries have paved the way for the use of genotype-guided prescribing in some clinical environments, significant debate persists among clinicians and researchers about the optimal approach to pharmacogenetic testing in clinical practice. One crucial factor in this debate surrounds the timing and methodology of genotyping, specifically whether genotyping should be performed reactively for targeted genes when a single drug is prescribed, or preemptively using a panel-based approach prior to drug prescribing. While early clinical models that employed a preemptive approach were largely developed in academic health centers through multidisciplinary efforts, increasing examples of pharmacogenetic testing are emerging in community-based and primary care practice environments. However, educational and practice-based resources for these clinicians remain largely nonexistent. As such, there is a need for the health care system to shift its focus from debating about preemptive genotyping to developing and disseminating needed resources to equip frontline clinicians for clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics. Providing tools and guidance to support these emerging models of care will be essential to support the thoughtful, evidence-based use of pharmacogenetic information in diverse clinical practice environments. Specifically, the creation of efficient and accurate point-of-care resources, practice-based tools, and clinical models is needed, along with identification and dissemination of sustainable avenues for pharmacogenetic test reimbursement.

  12. Fatigue Sensor Evaluation Program Laboratory Test Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Evaluation Program - laboratory Test Report, " by John Y. Kaufman, Design Engineer, and it was prepared for publication by Sue Bardsley, Technical Aid ...fatigue sensor as an aid to this purpose. The laboratory test effort was based on collection of data from six types of tests and thirty-three...34 ’: « •IIIS ......... li : « rtrtintr : •* M» c f M i H ::::::;:• ;:« ...j . .... ..:. •f’ ::.::::: ^::|:::: n» VH ft;; ** ViH ! * 1 - •• •-•• ; i

  13. Point-Counterpoint: Large Multiplex PCR Panels Should Be First-Line Tests for Detection of Respiratory and Intestinal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenberger, Paul C; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-10-01

    The first FDA-approved multiplex PCR panel for a large number of respiratory pathogens was introduced in 2008. Since then, other PCR panels for detection of several respiratory and gastrointestinal pathogens have been approved by the FDA and are commercially available, and more such panels are likely to become available. These assays detect 12 to 20 pathogens, and some include pathogens that typically cause different manifestations of infection, although they infect the same organ system. Some of these tests are labor-intensive, while others require little labor, and all of them are expensive, both for the laboratory and for the patient or insurer. They include a bundle of tests with limited or no options for selecting which tests will be performed. Laboratories and hospitals have adopted different strategies for offering these assays. Some have implemented strategies to limit the use of the tests, such as limiting the frequency with which patients can be tested, restricting testing to specific groups of patients (e.g., immunocompromised patients), or providing education to encourage the use of less expensive tests before using large multiplex panels. Others have offered these assays without limiting their use, either relying on the ordering provider to exercise good judgment or because such assays are thought to be appropriate for first-line diagnostic testing. In this Point-Counterpoint, Paul Schreckenberger of Loyola University Medical Center explains why his laboratory offers these assays without restriction. Alex McAdam of Boston's Children Hospital explains the concerns about the use of these assays as first-line tests and why some limitations on their use might be appropriate. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Efficient thermal cycling of solar panels in solar simulation facilities with a multi-panel test rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, P. W.; Reimann, J.

    1980-06-01

    It is shown that efficient thermal cycling tests under vacuum can be performed at reduced costs to cover the requirements for qualifications and acceptance testing of solar panels. A suitable test rig was developed which allows simultaneous testing of up to 3 solar panels with a dimension of 1.3 m x 1.7 m each. The tests can be performed in an existing solar simulation facility with a beam diameter of only 2.4 m. This means that a close simulation of orbital conditions can be achieved, including severe eclipse conditions with rapid temperature changes. Chamber dimensions, descriptions of suspension devices, and other data needed by potential users are given.

  15. [Laboratory tests for parasitic diseases in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marva, Esther; Grossman, Tamar

    2010-09-01

    Microscopic examination is still considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. In many clinical laboratories in hospitals and in health maintenance organizations ("Kupot Holim"), an excellent microscopic identification of parasites is performed. Microscopic examinations using wet mount preparations are performed for the detection of protozoan trophozoites and helmintic ova or larvae. Specific concentration techniques, including flotation and sedimentation procedures are further performed for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. However, microscopic examinations are time-consuming, non-sensitive and not always reliable. Furthermore, the diagnosis of certain infections is not always possible by searching for the parasites in host tissues or excreta since risky invasive techniques might be necessary to locate the parasites. Detection of antibodies can be very useful as an indication for infection with a specific parasite, especially in individuals with no exposure to the parasite prior to recent travel in a disease-endemic area. In addition to serology, there are other tests of high sensitivity which can be integrated with microscopy, such as antigen detection in stool and blood samples as well as the use of other molecular diagnosis methods. There are two main laboratories in Israel where parasitic diagnosis is available by integration of microscopy, serology, antigen detection and molecular methods: The Reference Laboratory for Parasitology in Jerusalem at the Central Laboratories of the Ministry of Health (MOH) and the Laboratory of Parasitology at Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva (SOR). There are also two special diagnostic units, one responsible for the identification of toxopLasma: Reference Laboratory for Toxoplasmosis, Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, Tel Aviv (Tox), and the other for the identification of Leishmaniasis: Kuvin Center, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Kuv). This article

  16. 7 CFR 75.43 - Laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory testing. 75.43 Section 75.43 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AND CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Fees and Charges § 75.43...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Subpart A of... - Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data Log Format 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Insulation Radiant Panel Test Data...

  18. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  19. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  20. Iowa Central Quality Fuel Testing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heach, Don; Bidieman, Julaine

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project is to finalize the creation of an independent quality fuel testing laboratory on the campus of Iowa Central Community College in Fort Dodge, Iowa that shall provide the exploding biofuels industry a timely and cost-effective centrally located laboratory to complete all state and federal fuel and related tests that are required. The recipient shall work with various state regulatory agencies, biofuel companies and state and national industry associations to ensure that training and testing needs of their members and American consumers are met. The recipient shall work with the Iowa Department of Ag and Land Stewardship on the development of an Iowa Biofuel Quality Standard along with the Development of a standard that can be used throughout industry.

  1. Extracting laboratory test information from biomedical text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanna Shen Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: No previous study reported the efficacy of current natural language processing (NLP methods for extracting laboratory test information from narrative documents. This study investigates the pathology informatics question of how accurately such information can be extracted from text with the current tools and techniques, especially machine learning and symbolic NLP methods. The study data came from a text corpus maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, containing a rich set of information on laboratory tests and test devices. Methods: The authors developed a symbolic information extraction (SIE system to extract device and test specific information about four types of laboratory test entities: Specimens, analytes, units of measures and detection limits. They compared the performance of SIE and three prominent machine learning based NLP systems, LingPipe, GATE and BANNER, each implementing a distinct supervised machine learning method, hidden Markov models, support vector machines and conditional random fields, respectively. Results: Machine learning systems recognized laboratory test entities with moderately high recall, but low precision rates. Their recall rates were relatively higher when the number of distinct entity values (e.g., the spectrum of specimens was very limited or when lexical morphology of the entity was distinctive (as in units of measures, yet SIE outperformed them with statistically significant margins on extracting specimen, analyte and detection limit information in both precision and F-measure. Its high recall performance was statistically significant on analyte information extraction. Conclusions: Despite its shortcomings against machine learning methods, a well-tailored symbolic system may better discern relevancy among a pile of information of the same type and may outperform a machine learning system by tapping into lexically non-local contextual information such as the document structure.

  2. 10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver-panel test-requirements document: Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-10

    Plans are presented for insolation testing of a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally the design planned for the 10 MWe pilot plant. Testing includes operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. A brief description of the pilot plant receiver subsystem is presented, followed by a detailed description of the receiver assembly to be tested at the Solar Thermal Test Facility. Major subassemblies are described, including the receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and the structural assembly. Requirements of the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. System safety measures are described. The tests, operating conditions, and expected results are presented. Quality assurance, task responsibilities, and test documentation are also discussed. (LEW)

  3. Evaluation of Precast Panels for Airfield Pavement Repair. Phase 2: Results of Accelerated Pavement Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    concrete panels for contingency rigid airfield pavement repairs. AFRL Technical Report AFRL-RX- TY-TR-2010-0095. Tyndall AFB, FL: US Air Force...will be used to further refine the design of the precast panel repair system. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Airfield repair Airfield rigid pavements ...ER D C/ G SL T R -1 3 -2 4 Evaluation of Precast Panels for Airfield Pavement Repair Phase II: Results of Accelerated Pavement Testing

  4. Performance testing of UK personal dosimetry laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, T O

    1985-01-01

    The proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations will require all UK personal dosimetry laboratories that monitor classified personnel to be approved for personal dosimetry by the Health and Safety Executive. It is suggested that these approvals should be based on general and supplementary criteria published by the British Calibration Service (BCS) for laboratory approval for the provision of personal dosimetry services. These criteria specify certain qualitative requirements and also indicate the need for regular tests of performance to be carried out to ensure constancy of dosimetric standards. This report concerns the latter. The status of the BCS criteria is discussed and the need for additional documents to cover new techniques and some modifications to existing documents is indicated. A means is described by which the technical performance of laboratories, concerned with personal monitoring for external radiations, can be assessed, both initially and ongoing. The costs to establish the scheme and operate it...

  5. Laboratory testing in disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) relies on clinical signs and symptoms, identification of the underlying disease, the results of laboratory testing, and differentiation from other pathologies. The clinical features mainly depend on the underlying cause of the DIC. The laboratory diagnosis of DIC uses a combination of tests because no single test result alone can firmly establish or rule out the diagnosis. Global tests of hemostasis may initially provide evidence of coagulation activation and later in the process provide evidence of consumption of coagulation factors, but their individual diagnostic efficiency is limited. Fibrinolytic markers, in particular D-dimer, are reflective of activation of both coagulation and fibrinolysis, so that a normal finding can be useful for ruling-out DIC. Decreased levels of the natural anticoagulants (in particular, antithrombin and protein C) are frequently observed in patients with DIC, but their measurement is not normally incorporated into standard diagnostic algorithms. New tests are being explored for utility in DIC, and some additional tests may be useful on a case-by-case basis, depending on the proposed cause of the DIC or their local availability. For example, clot waveform analysis is useful but currently limited to a single instrument. Also, procalcitonin is an inflammatory biomarker that may be useful within the context of septic DIC, and activated factor X clotting time is an emerging test of procoagulant phospholipids that also seems to hold promise in DIC.

  6. A note on Testing Environmental Kuznets Curves with Panel Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dijkgraaf (Elbert); H.R.J. Vollebergh (Herman)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper casts doubt on empirical results based on panel estimations of an "inverted-U" relationship between per capita GDP and pollution. Using a new data set for OECD countries on carbon dioxide emissions for the period 1960-1997, we find that the crucial assumption of homogeneity ac

  7. Mars Science Laboratory Rover System Thermal Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Keith S.; Kempenaar, Joshua E.; Liu, Yuanming; Bhandari, Pradeep; Dudik, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    On November 26, 2011, NASA launched a large (900 kg) rover as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to Mars. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars on August 5, 2012. Prior to launch, the Rover was successfully operated in simulated mission extreme environments during a 16-day long Rover System Thermal Test (STT). This paper describes the MSL Rover STT, test planning, test execution, test results, thermal model correlation and flight predictions. The rover was tested in the JPL 25-Foot Diameter Space Simulator Facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Rover operated in simulated Cruise (vacuum) and Mars Surface environments (8 Torr nitrogen gas) with mission extreme hot and cold boundary conditions. A Xenon lamp solar simulator was used to impose simulated solar loads on the rover during a bounding hot case and during a simulated Mars diurnal test case. All thermal hardware was exercised and performed nominally. The Rover Heat Rejection System, a liquid-phase fluid loop used to transport heat in and out of the electronics boxes inside the rover chassis, performed better than predicted. Steady state and transient data were collected to allow correlation of analytical thermal models. These thermal models were subsequently used to predict rover thermal performance for the MSL Gale Crater landing site. Models predict that critical hardware temperatures will be maintained within allowable flight limits over the entire 669 Sol surface mission.

  8. Thermal fatigue tests of a radiative heat shield panel for a hypersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Granville L.; Clark, Ronald K.; Sharpe, Ellsworth L.

    1985-01-01

    A pair of corrugation stiffened, beaded skin Rene 41 heat shield panels were exposed to 20,000 thermal cycles between room temperature and 1450 F to evaluate the thermal fatigue response of Rene 41 metallic heat shields for hypersonic cruise aircraft applications. At the conclusion of the tests, the panels retained substantial structural integrity; however, there were cracks and excessive wear in the vicinity of fastener holes and there was an 80-percent loss in ductility of the skin. Shrinkage of the panel which caused the cracks and wear must be considered in design of panels for Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) applications.

  9. 19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory testing for clean yield. 151.71 Section... Laboratory testing for clean yield. (a) Test and report by Customs laboratory. The clean yield of all general samples taken in accordance with § 151.70 shall be determined by test in a Customs laboratory, unless...

  10. How Does Asymmetry of Solar Panels Influence Constructive Component of Microacceleration Field of Inner Environment of Space Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedelnikov, A. V.; Molyavko, D. P.; Potienko, K. I.

    2017-08-01

    The following asymmetries of spacecraft solar panels are considered: mass, linear and asymmetry of points connecting big elastic elements to the spacecraft body. Micro-accelerations are shown to increase when asymmetries of the above mentioned types appear. Conclusions about the importance of geometrical symmetries for successful gravity-sensitive experiments or technological processes on board space laboratories are discussed.

  11. DTU PMU Laboratory Development - Testing and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Yang, Guang-Ya; Martin, Kenneth E.;

    2010-01-01

    This is a report of the results of phasor measurement unit (PMU) laboratory development and testing done at the Centre for Electric Technology (CET), Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Analysis of the PMU performance first required the development of tools to convert the DTU PMU data into IEEE...... standard, and the validation is done for the DTU-PMU via a validated commercial PMU. The commercial PMU has been tested from the authors' previous efforts, where the response can be expected to follow known patterns and provide confirmation about the test system to confirm the design and settings....... In a nutshell, having 2 PMUs that observe same signals provides validation of the operation and flags questionable results with more certainty. Moreover, the performance and accuracy of the DTU-PMU is tested acquiring good and precise results, when compared with a commercial phasor measurement device, PMU-1....

  12. Composite Replacement Panel Strain Survey - Test Results and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    curvature about the aircraft longitudinal axis and slight curvature about the aircraft normal. The Part Number for the demonstrator CRP is CRC-ACS-511b...number of the holes in Panel I were elongated in the transverse direction (vertical direction, perpendicular to aircraft longitudinal axis) during... aircraft longitudinal axis) but would be less effective for transverse and shear loads. Further work is required to verify that hole elongation could

  13. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  14. Stochastic optimization of laboratory test workflow at metallurgical testing centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tošenovský

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to present a way to shorten the time required to perform laboratory tests of materials in metallurgy. The paper finds a relation between the time to perform a test of materials and the number of technicians carrying out the test. The relation can be used to optimize the number of technicians. The approach is based on probability theory, as the amount of material to be tested is unknown in advance, and uses powerful modelling techniques involving the generalized estimating equations.

  15. Laboratory tests of sludge-control additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatnall, R.E. [MIC Associates, Inc., Chadds Ford, PA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Laboratory {open_quotes}jar{close_quotes} tests compared eleven different fuel oil and diesel fuel sludge-control additives. Factors studied included (1) ability to disperse and prevent buildup of sludge deposits on surfaces, (2) ability to protect steel from corrosion, (3) ability to inhibit growth and proliferation of bacteria, and (4) ability to disperse water. Results varied greatly, and it was found that many commercial products do not do what they claim. It is concluded that fuel retailers should not believe manufacturers` claims for their additive products, but rather should test such products themselves to be sure that the benefits of treatment are real. A simplified form of the procedure used here is proposed as one way for dealers to do such testing.

  16. Generation of dried tube specimen for HIV-1 viral load proficiency test panels: a cost-effective alternative for external quality assessment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Artur; Nguyen, Shon; Garcia, Albert; Subbarao, Shambavi; Nkengasong, John N; Ellenberger, Dennis

    2013-03-01

    Participation in external quality assessment programs is critical to ensure quality clinical laboratory testing. Commercially available proficiency test panels for HIV-1 virus load testing that are used commonly in external quality assessment programs remain a financial obstacle to resource-limited countries. Maintaining cold-chain transportation largely contributes to the cost of traditional liquid proficiency test panels. Therefore, we developed and evaluated a proficiency test panel using dried tube specimens that can be shipped and stored at ambient temperature. This dried tube specimens panel consisted of 20 μl aliquots of a HIV-1 stock that were added to 2 ml tubes and left uncapped for drying, as a preservation method. The stability of dried tube specimens at concentrations ranging from 10² to 10⁶·⁵ RNA copies/ml was tested at different temperatures over time, showing no viral load reduction at 37 °C and a decrease in viral load smaller than 0.5 Log₁₀ at 45 °C for up to eight weeks when compared to initial results. Eight cycles of freezing-thawing had no effect on the stability of the dried tube specimens. Comparable viral load results were observed when dried tube specimen panels were tested on Roche CAPTAQ, Abbott m2000, and Biomerieux easyMAG viral load systems. Preliminary test results of dried proficiency test panels shipped to four African countries at ambient temperature demonstrated a low inter assay variation (SD range: 0.29-0.41 Log₁₀ RNA copies/ml). These results indicated that HIV-1 proficiency test panels generated by this methodology might be an acceptable alternative for laboratories in resource-limited countries to participate in external quality assessment programs.

  17. Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual. Public draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuri, F S; Cooper, J D; Hamill, M L

    1981-10-01

    Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state-of-the-art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

  18. Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAtee, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

  19. Remotely accessible laboratory for MEMS testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mulsow, Matthew; Melinger, Aaron; Lacouture, Shelby; Dallas, Tim E.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the construction of a remotely accessible and interactive laboratory for testing microdevices (aka: MicroElectroMechancial Systems - MEMS). Enabling expanded utilization of microdevices for research, commercial, and educational purposes is very important for driving the creation of future MEMS devices and applications. Unfortunately, the relatively high costs associated with MEMS devices and testing infrastructure makes widespread access to the world of MEMS difficult. The creation of a virtual lab to control and actuate MEMS devices over the internet helps spread knowledge to a larger audience. A host laboratory has been established that contains a digital microscope, microdevices, controllers, and computers that can be logged into through the internet. The overall layout of the tele-operated MEMS laboratory system can be divided into two major parts: the server side and the client side. The server-side is present at Texas Tech University, and hosts a server machine that runs the Linux operating system and is used for interfacing the MEMS lab with the outside world via internet. The controls from the clients are transferred to the lab side through the server interface. The server interacts with the electronics required to drive the MEMS devices using a range of National Instruments hardware and LabView Virtual Instruments. An optical microscope (100 ×) with a CCD video camera is used to capture images of the operating MEMS. The server broadcasts the live video stream over the internet to the clients through the website. When the button is pressed on the website, the MEMS device responds and the video stream shows the movement in close to real time.

  20. Panel Unit Root Tests by Combining Dependent Values: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuguang Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We conduct a systematic comparison of the performance of four commonly used value combination methods applied to panel unit root tests: the original Fisher test, the modified inverse normal method, Simes test, and the modified truncated product method (TPM. Our simulation results show that under cross-section dependence the original Fisher test is severely oversized, but the other three tests exhibit good size properties. Simes test is powerful when the total evidence against the joint null hypothesis is concentrated in one or very few of the tests being combined, but the modified inverse normal method and the modified TPM have good performance when evidence against the joint null is spread among more than a small fraction of the panel units. These differences are further illustrated through one empirical example on testing purchasing power parity using a panel of OECD quarterly real exchange rates.

  1. Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software Internal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Justin D.; Lam, Danny

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) team is sending the rover, Curiosity, to Mars, and therefore is physically and technically complex. During my stay, I have assisted the MSL Flight Software (FSW) team in implementing functional test scripts to ensure that the FSW performs to the best of its abilities. There are a large number of FSW requirements that have been written up for implementation; however I have only been assigned a few sections of these requirements. There are many stages within testing; one of the early stages is FSW Internal Testing (FIT). The FIT team can accomplish this with simulation software and the MSL Test Automation Kit (MTAK). MTAK has the ability to integrate with the Software Simulation Equipment (SSE) and the Mission Processing and Control System (MPCS) software which makes it a powerful tool within the MSL FSW development process. The MSL team must ensure that the rover accomplishes all stages of the mission successfully. Due to the natural complexity of this project there is a strong emphasis on testing, as failure is not an option. The entire mission could be jeopardized if something is overlooked.

  2. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Design of an acoustic panel test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, J.; Muirhead, V. U.; Smith, H. W.; Henderson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    The design, construction, and costs of a test facility for determining the sound transmission loss characteristics of various panels and panel treatments are described. The pressurization system and electronic equipment used in experimental testing are discussed as well as the reliability of the facility and the data gathered. Tests results are compared to pertinent acoustical theories for panel behavior and minor anomalies in the data are examined. A method for predicting panel behavior in the stiffness region is also presented.

  3. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Larsen, Line H G; Johannesen, Katrine M

    2016-01-01

    -causing variant in 49 (23%) of the 216 patients. The variants were found in 19 different genes including SCN1A, STXBP1, CDKL5, SCN2A, SCN8A, GABRA1, KCNA2, and STX1B. Patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies had the highest rate of positive findings (57%). The overall yield for patients with EEs was 32%, compared...... to 17% among patients with generalized epilepsies and 16% in patients with focal or multifocal epilepsies. By the use of a gene panel consisting of 46 epilepsy genes, we were able to find a disease-causing genetic variation in 23% of the analyzed patients. The highest yield was found among patients......In recent years, several genes have been causally associated with epilepsy. However, making a genetic diagnosis in a patient can still be difficult, since extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity has been observed in many monogenic epilepsies. This study aimed to analyze the genetic basis...

  4. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Matheny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. METHODS: We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. RESULTS: A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  5. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E; Peterson, Josh F; Eden, Svetlana K; Hung, Adriana M; Speroff, Theodore; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Parr, Sharidan K; Ikizler, T Alp; Siew, Edward D

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2). Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  6. 49 CFR 199.107 - Drug testing laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug testing laboratory. 199.107 Section 199.107... § 199.107 Drug testing laboratory. (a) Each operator shall use for the drug testing required by this part only drug testing laboratories certified by the Department of Health and Human Services under...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493.1403 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  8. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  9. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  10. Design, fabrication and test of liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiulis, A.; Camarda, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich panel construction, were fabricated and tested. The designs utilize two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and potassium or sodium as the working fluid. Panels were tested by radiant heating, and the results indicate successful heat pipe operation at temperatures of approximately 922K (1200F). These panels, in addition to solving potential thermal stress problems in an Airframe-Integrated Scramjet Engine, have potential applications as cold plates for electronic component cooling, as radiators for space platforms, and as low distortion, large area structures.

  11. The study of fix composite panel and steel plates on testing stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, A.; Płaczek, M.; Wachna, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the practical possibilities of strength verification analysis of composite materials used in the manufacture of selected components of railway wagons are presented. Real laboratory stand for measurements in a scale controlled by PLC controller were made. The study of different types of connections of composite materials with sheet metal is presented. In one of the chapter of this paper principles construction of testing stand with pneumatic cylinder were presented. Mainly checking of displacements and stresses generated on the sheet as a result of pneumatic actuators load for composite boards was carried out. The use of the controller with operating panel allows to easy programming testing cycle. The user can define the force generated by the actuator by change of air pressure in cylinder. Additionally the location of acting cylinders and their jump can be changed by operator. The examination of the volume displacements was done by displacement sensor, and the tensile strain gauge. All parameters are written in CatmanEasy - data acquisition software. This article presents the study of stresses and displacements in the composite plates joined with sheet metal, in summary of this article, the authors compare the obtained results with the computer simulation results in the article: "Simulation of stresses in an innovative combination of composite with sheet".

  12. Optimizing tuberculosis testing for basic laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric; Schumacher, Samuel G; Siedner, Mark; Herrera, Beatriz; Quino, Willi; Alvarado, Jessica; Montoya, Rosario; Grandjean, Louis; Martin, Laura; Sherman, Jonathan M; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2010-10-01

    Optimal tuberculosis testing usually involves sputum centrifugation followed by broth culture. However, centrifuges are biohazardous and scarce in the resource-limited settings where most tuberculosis occurs. To optimize tuberculosis testing for these settings, centrifugation of 111 decontaminated sputum samples was compared with syringe-aspiration through polycarbonate membrane-filters that were then cultured in broth. To reduce the workload of repeated microscopic screening of broth cultures for tuberculosis growth, the colorimetric redox indicator 2,3-diphenyl-5-(2-thienyl) tetrazolium chloride was added to the broth, which enabled naked-eye detection of culture positivity. This combination of filtration and colorimetric growth-detection gave similar results to sputum centrifugation followed by culture microscopy regarding mean colony counts (43 versus 48; P = 0.6), contamination rates (0.9% versus 1.8%; P = 0.3), and sensitivity (94% versus 95%; P = 0.7), suggesting equivalency of the two methods. By obviating centrifugation and repeated microscopic screening of cultures, this approach may constitute a more appropriate technology for rapid and sensitive tuberculosis diagnosis in basic laboratories.

  13. 9 CFR 590.580 - Laboratory tests and analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory tests and analyses. 590.580... EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Laboratory § 590.580 Laboratory tests and analyses. The official plant, at their expense, shall make tests...

  14. An investigation of genetic counselors' testing recommendations: pedigree analysis and the use of multiplex breast cancer panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Meghan G; Forman, Andrea; Valverde, Kathleen; Kessler, Lisa

    2014-08-01

    Genetic testing recommendations for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer involve pedigree analysis and consultation of testing guidelines. The testing landscape for hereditary cancer syndromes is shifting as multiplex panel tests become more widely integrated into clinical practice. The purpose of the current study was to assess how genetic counselors utilize pedigrees to make recommendations for genetic testing, to determine consistency of these recommendations with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines and to explore current use of multiplex panel testing. Sixty-nine genetic counselors were recruited through the National Society of Genetic Counselors Cancer Special Interest Group's Discussion Forum. Participation involved pedigree analysis and completion of an online questionnaire assessing testing recommendations and use of multiplex panel testing. Pedigree analysis and test recommendations were scored for consistency with NCCN guidelines. The average score was 12.83/15 indicating strong consistency with NCCN guidelines. Participants were more likely to consider multiplex testing when pedigrees demonstrated highly penetrant dominant inheritance but were not indicative of a particular syndrome. Participant concerns about multiplex panel testing include limited guidelines for both testing eligibility and medical management. This study demonstrates high utilization of pedigree analysis and raises new questions about its use in multiplex genetic testing.

  15. Static and fatigue experimental tests on a full scale fuselage panel and FEM analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Sepe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A fatigue test on a full scale panel with complex loading condition and geometry configuration has been carried out using a triaxial test machine. The demonstrator is made up of two skins which are linked by a transversal butt-joint, parallel to the stringer direction. A fatigue load was applied in the direction normal to the longitudinal joint, while a constant load was applied in the longitudinal joint direction. The test panel was instrumented with strain gages and previously quasi-static tests were conducted to ensure a proper load transferring to the panel. In order to support the tests, geometric nonlinear shell finite element analyses were conducted to predict strain and stress distributions. The demonstrator broke up after about 177000 cycles. Subsequently, a finite element analysis (FEA was carried out in order to correlate failure events; due to the biaxial nature of the fatigue loads, Sines criterion was used. The analysis was performed taking into account the different materials by which the panel is composed. The numerical results show a good correlation with experimental data, successfully predicting failure locations on the panel.

  16. A panel priority rating exercise for the British Forces Germany Health Services Market test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, T O; Demicheli, V

    1995-02-01

    We report on the application to the BFG Health Services Market Testing (MT) study of the response to a users' questionnaire and panel discussions to determine in which priority and how services should be provided. The questionnaire served to inform lay and health care panel members on users' views on the relative importance of future health services and the way they will be provided. Based on the questionnaire results and data contained in the BAOR Report of Public Health for 1992/93 the panel assigned the highest priorities to emergency services, followed by routine General Practitioner services and essential hospital services. The lowest ranking were non-essential hospital services, health care for children with special needs and provision of designated transport. There was a high consistency in views between the lay and health care members of the panel.

  17. Validation of a microsatellite panel for parentage testing of locally adapted and commercial goats in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete Cristina da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian goats are generally kept in small herds and extensive rearing systems, mainly in the northeastern region of the country. Despite production improvement in recent years, the lack of pedigree control has affected genetic progress. This study aimed to validate a panel of 16 microsatellites for parentage testing in locally adapted and commercial goats breeds raised in Brazil, as well as to compare its efficiency with the panel recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supplies (MAPA in 2004. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity (He per marker ranged from four to 18, and from 0.051 to 0.831, respectively. Using all markers, 100% of parentage cases of the validation dataset were resolved with a strict confidence level of 95%. The 16 microsatellites panel showed adequate exclusion power (99.99% and identity accuracy (99.99%. Suggestions for improvement of the marker panel endorsed by MAPA are provided.

  18. Quality of HIV laboratory testing in Tanzania: a situation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfinanga, G S; Mutayoba, B; Mbogo, G; Kahwa, A; Kimaro, G; Mhame, P P; Mwangi, C; Malecela, M N; Kitua, A Y

    2007-01-01

    Tanzania is scaling up prevention, treatment, care and support of individuals affected with HIV. There is therefore a need for high quality and reliable HIV infection testing and AIDS staging. The objective of this study was to assess laboratories capacities of services in terms of HIV testing and quality control. A baseline survey was conducted from December 2004 to February 2005 in 12 laboratories which were conveniently selected to represent all the zones of Tanzania. The questionnaires comprised of questions on laboratory particulars, internal and external quality control for HIV testing and quality control of reagents. Source and level of customer satisfaction of HIV test kits supply was established. Of 12 laboratories, nine used rapid tests for screening and two used rapid tests for diagnosis. In the 12 laboratories, four used double ELISA and five used single ELISA and three did not use ELISA. Confirmatory tests observed were Western Blot in three laboratories, DNA PCR in two laboratories, CD4 counting in seven laboratories, and viral load in two laboratories. Although all laboratories conducted quality control (QC) of the HIV kits, only two laboratories had Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Internal and external quality control (EQC) was done at varied proportions with the highest frequency of 55.6% (5/9) for internal quality control (IQC) for rapid tests and EQC for ELISA, and the lowest frequency of 14.3% (1/ 7) for IQC for CD4 counting. None of the nine laboratories which conducted QC for reagents used for rapid tests and none of the five which performed IQC and EQC had SOPs. HIV kits were mainly procured by the Medical Store Department and most of laboratories were not satisfied with the delay in procurement procedures. Most of the laboratories used rapid tests only, while some used both rapid tests and ELISA method for HIV testing. In conclusion, the survey revealed inadequacy in Good Laboratory Practice and poor laboratory quality control process

  19. Subcomponent testing of trailing edge panels in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter; Haselbach, Philipp Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a static subcomponent test method designed to check the compressive strength of the trailing edge region in wind turbine blades under a simplified loading. The paper presents numerical simulations using the proposed subcomponent test method and discusses its ability to be used...... for checking the compressive strength of the trailing edge region in wind turbine blades....

  20. USING LABORATORY TESTS TO PREDICT OXIDATION IN TODAY'S ENGINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory bench tests are used to predict lubricant performance in modern engines. The evolution of ASTM (American Society of Testing and Materials) engine Sequence tests and associated laboratory bench tests is reviewed. Several oxidation screening tests are described. Correlation of oxidation screening tests with ASTM Sequence Ⅲ high temperature oxidation engine test is addressed, using both European and ASTM reference oils. Modification of the oxidation screening test methods is attempted in order to improve the correlation as the Sequence Ⅲ test method evolves.

  1. Metabolic Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The BMP checks your blood sugar, calcium, and ... as creatinine to check your kidney function. The CMP includes all of those tests, as well as ...

  2. Association testing strategy for data from dense marker panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyung Lee

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies have been usually analyzed in a univariate manner. The commonly used univariate tests have one degree of freedom and assume an additive mode of inheritance. The experiment-wise significance of these univariate statistics is obtained by adjusting for multiple testing. Next generation sequencing studies, which assay 10-20 million variants, are beginning to come online. For these studies, the strategy of additive univariate testing and multiple testing adjustment is likely to result in a loss of power due to (1 the substantial multiple testing burden and (2 the possibility of a non-additive causal mode of inheritance. To reduce the power loss we propose: a new method (1 to summarize in a single statistic the strength of the association signals coming from all not-very-rare variants in a linkage disequilibrium block and (2 to incorporate, in any linkage disequilibrium block statistic, the strength of the association signals under multiple modes of inheritance. The proposed linkage disequilibrium block test consists of the sum of squares of nominally significant univariate statistics. We compare the performance of this method to the performance of existing linkage disequilibrium block/gene-based methods. Simulations show that (1 extending methods to combine testing for multiple modes of inheritance leads to substantial power gains, especially for a recessive mode of inheritance, and (2 the proposed method has a good overall performance. Based on simulation results, we provide practical advice on choosing suitable methods for applied analyses.

  3. Tests of Flat Panels with Four Types of Stiffeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-01-01

    within one-half of 1 percent by a standard tensile test. in this test two Huggenberger tensometers with 1-inch gage lengths were used to measure the...into three equal parts by a lever arrsngement, the loads being 25-pound bags of shot. This lever system wss designed to fit all four stiffener spacings...the platens about an axis normal to the plane of the specimen was very small. In the second and third groups of tests, tensometers were also attached

  4. Measurement of Dynamic Viscoelasticity of Full-Size Wood Composite Panels Using a Vibration Testing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Lujing Zhou; Dan Feng

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic viscoelasticity of full-size wood composite panels (WCPs) under the free-free vibrational state were determined by a vibration testing method. Vibration detection tests were performed on 194 pieces of three types of full-size WCPs (particleboard, medium density fiberboard, and plywood (PW)). The dynamic viscoelasticity from smaller specimens cut from the...

  5. Laboratory tests used in US public health laboratories for sexually transmitted diseases, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Linda Webster; Mosure, Debra J; Steece, Richard; Stone, Katherine M

    2004-05-01

    Public health laboratories are a critical component of sexually transmitted disease (STD) control in the United States. The goal of this study was to describe the types and volume of STD tests performed in U.S. public health laboratories in 2000. A survey was mailed to 123 members of the Association of Public Health Laboratories. Eighty-one percent of 100 laboratories responded. Overall, 3294739 chlamydia tests and 3088142 gonorrhea tests were done; 62.4% of chlamydia tests and 63.6% of gonorrhea tests were DNA probes. Fifty-six percent of laboratories performed rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests and 55% performed Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) tests; the number of RPR tests performed was twice that of VDRL tests. Few laboratories used new technologies for bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis. Eighteen percent of laboratories performed herpes simplex virus serology; however, most used inaccurate tests. No laboratories performed human papillomavirus tests. This survey documents for the first time STD tests performed in U.S. public health laboratories.

  6. 16 CFR 305.22 - Required testing by designated laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required testing by designated laboratory...) Additional Requirements § 305.22 Required testing by designated laboratory. Upon notification by the... manufacturer's expense, no more than two of each model of each product to a laboratory, which will...

  7. Comparison of Rapid Malaria Test and Laboratory Microscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Comparison of Rapid Malaria Test and Laboratory Microscopy Investigation for ... of the low parasite density cases could escape detection, therefore, it cannot replace laboratory ..... WHO (1990): World Report of the tropical disease,.

  8. New technologies to improve laboratory testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtis, C. A.

    Several core technologies that are having, or will have, an impact on the clinical laboratory are discussed. These include instrument-related technologies such as computer technology, chemometrics, robotics, sensors, and biological technologies such as cell fusion and recombinant DNA.

  9. Testing Cross-Sectional Correlation in Large Panel Data Models with Serial Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badi H. Baltagi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of testing cross-sectional correlation in large panel data models with serially-correlated errors. It finds that existing tests for cross-sectional correlation encounter size distortions with serial correlation in the errors. To control the size, this paper proposes a modification of Pesaran’s Cross-sectional Dependence (CD test to account for serial correlation of an unknown form in the error term. We derive the limiting distribution of this test as N , T → ∞ . The test is distribution free and allows for unknown forms of serial correlation in the errors. Monte Carlo simulations show that the test has good size and power for large panels when serial correlation in the errors is present.

  10. Novel microfluidic platform for automated lab-on-chip testing of hypercoagulability panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, Sirisha; Sista, Ramakrishna; Loyola, Hugo; Trenor, Cameron C; Pamula, Vamsee K; Emani, Sitaram M

    2012-12-01

    Current methods for hypercoagulability panel testing require large blood volumes and long turn-around testing times. A novel microfluidic platform has been designed to perform automated multiplexed hypercoagulability panel testing at near patient, utilizing only a single droplet of blood sample. We test the hypothesis that this novel platform could be utilized to perform specific multiplexed ELISA-based hypercoagulability panel testing for antithrombin III, protein C, protein S and factor VIII antigens, as well as anticardiolipin/human anti-β2-glycoprotein-1 IgG antibodies--on blood samples. Sandwich ELISA was modified by utilizing magnetic beads coated with specific antibodies as the solid phase using fluorescence readout. Percentage recovery was calculated using four-parameter logistic curves. On-chip ELISA with single factors was compared with multiplex factor ELISA for known concentrations of sample. Blood samples were analyzed on-chip and compared with traditional bench-top assays. Time for multiplexed performance of hypercoagulability panel ELISA on-chip with controls is 72 min. Recovery rates (range 80-120%) for known concentrations of specific factors was not significantly different when assays were performed using a single factor vs. multiplex factor analysis. Assay results were not significantly different between individual assays performed either on bench-top or on-chip with patient blood and/or plasma. Utilizing a novel digital microfluidic platform, we demonstrate the feasibility of automated hypercoagulability panel testing on small volume of plasma and whole blood patient samples with high fidelity. Further investigation is required to test the application of this novel technology at point-of-care clinical settings.

  11. Development of a genomic DNA reference material panel for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Lisa; Tarleton, Jack; Hitch, Monica; Hegde, Madhuri; Hjelm, Nick; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Zhou, Lili; Hilbert, James E; Luebbe, Elizabeth A; Moxley, Richard T; Toji, Lorraine

    2013-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by expansion of a CTG triplet repeat in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene that encodes a serine-threonine kinase. Patients with larger repeats tend to have a more severe phenotype. Clinical laboratories require reference and quality control materials for DM1 diagnostic and carrier genetic testing. Well-characterized reference materials are not available. To address this need, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-based Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program, in collaboration with members of the genetic testing community, the National Registry of Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Patients and Family Members, and the Coriell Cell Repositories, has established and characterized cell lines from patients with DM1 to create a reference material panel. The CTG repeats in genomic DNA samples from 10 DM1 cell lines were characterized in three clinical genetic testing laboratories using PCR and Southern blot analysis. DMPK alleles in the samples cover four of five DM1 clinical categories: normal (5 to 34 repeats), mild (50 to 100 repeats), classical (101 to 1000 repeats), and congenital (>1000 repeats). We did not identify or establish Coriell cell lines in the premutation range (35 to 49 repeats). These samples are publicly available for quality control, proficiency testing, test development, and research and should help improve the accuracy of DM1 testing.

  12. Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Nigel

    2012-01-31

    The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.

  13. 7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory and quality control tests. 58.523 Section... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.523 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a) Quality control tests shall be made on samples as often as necessary to determine the shelf-life and stability...

  14. Electrical design for origami solar panels and a small spacecraft test mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewelow, James; Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    Efficient power generation is crucial to the design of spacecraft. Mass, volume, and other limitations prevent the use of traditional spacecraft support structures from being suitable for the size of solar array required for some missions. Folding solar panel / panel array systems, however, present a number of design challenges. This paper considers the electrical design of an origami system. Specifically, it considers how to provide low impedance, durable channels for the generated power and the electrical aspects of the deployment system and procedure. The ability to dynamically reconfigure the electrical configuration of the solar cells is also discussed. Finally, a small satellite test mission to demonstrate the technology is proposed, before concluding.

  15. Plasma Panel Detectors for MIP Detection for the SLHC and a Test Chamber Design

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Robert; Etzion, Erez; Friedman, Peter S; Levin, Daniel S; Moshe, Meny Ben; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Performance demands for high and super-high luminosity at the LHC (up to 10^35 cm^(-2) sec^(-1) after the 2017 shutdown) and at future colliders demand high resolution tracking detectors with very fast time response and excellent temporal and spatial resolution. We are investigating a new radiation detector technology based on Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays. The design and production of PDPs is supported by four decades of industrial development. Emerging from this television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micropattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally an array of micro-Geiger plasma discharge cells operating in a non-ageing, hermetically sealed gas mixture . We report on the PPS development program, including design of a PPS Test Cell.

  16. Adaptive support for aircraft panel testing: New method and its experimental verification on a beam structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Delf; Baschke, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic transmissibility of aircraft panels is measured in full-scale test rigs. The panels are supported at their frames. These boundary conditions do not take into account the dynamic influence of the fuselage, which is significant in the frequency range below 300 Hz. This paper introduces a new adaptive boundary system (ABS). It combines accelerometers and electrodynamic shakers with real-time signal processing. The ABS considers the dynamic effect of the fuselage on the panel. The frames are dominating the dynamic behaviour of a fuselage in the low-frequency range. Therefore, the new method is applied to a beam representing a frame of the aircraft structure. The experimental results are evaluated and the precision of the ABS is discussed. The theoretical apparent mass representing the cut-off part of a frame is calculated and compared with the apparent mass, as provided by the ABS. It is explained how the experimental set-up limits the precision of the ABS.

  17. Accuracy in HIV Rapid Testing among Laboratory and Non-laboratory Personnel in Zambia: Observations from the National HIV Proficiency Testing System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Mwangala

    Full Text Available Despite rapid task-shifting and scale-up of HIV testing services in high HIV prevalence countries, studies evaluating accuracy remain limited. This study aimed to assess overall accuracy level and factors associated with accuracy in HIV rapid testing in Zambia.Accuracy was investigated among rural and urban HIV testing sites participating in two annual national HIV proficiency testing (PT exercises conducted in 2009 (n = 282 sites and 2010 (n = 488 sites. Testers included lay counselors, nurses, laboratory personnel and others. PT panels of five dry tube specimens (DTS were issued to testing sites by the national reference laboratory (NRL. Site accuracy level was assessed by comparison of reported results to the expected results. Non-parametric rank tests and multiple linear regression models were used to assess variation in accuracy between PT cycles and between tester groups, and to examine factors associated with accuracy respectively.Overall accuracy level was 93.1% (95% CI: 91.2-94.9 in 2009 and 96.9% (95% CI: 96.1-97.8 in 2010. Differences in accuracy were seen between the tester groups in 2009 with laboratory personnel being more accurate than non-laboratory personnel, while in 2010 no differences were seen. In both PT exercises, lay counselors and nurses had more difficulties interpreting results, with more occurrences of false-negative, false-positive and indeterminate results. Having received the standard HIV rapid testing training and adherence to the national HIV testing algorithm were positively associated with accuracy.The study showed an improvement in tester group and overall accuracy from the first PT exercise to the next. Average number of incorrect test results per 1000 tests performed was reduced from 69 to 31. Further improvement is needed, however, and the national HIV proficiency testing system seems to be an important tool in this regard, which should be continued and needs to be urgently strengthened.

  18. [Theoretical patterns of the panel D-15 test in congenital dichromatic color vision defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandatsu, A; Okabe, T; Kitahara, K

    1989-12-01

    In order to study the theoretical patterns of the panel D-15 test for congenital dichromatic color vision defects, the spectral reflectance for the 16 color caps of the panel D-15 test was measured with a spectro-photometer. Then, the chromaticity-coordinates of each color cap were calculated using the spectral distribution of standard illuminant C. The theoretical patterns of the panel D-15 test for dichromats were obtained based on the confusion lines. For this procedure, the slope of the line between the color cap and the convergence point on the CIE chromaticity diagram was obtained first. Then, the order of the arrangement was decided starting with the slope having the smallest cap number and continuing progressively. For the chromaticity coordinates of the convergence points the following values were used; x = 0.7465, y = 0.2535 for protanopia, x = 1.08, y = -0.08, x = 1.40, y = -0.40, and x = 1.70, y = -0.70 for deuteranopia, and x = 0.171, y = 0.000 for tritanopia. The results show a very clear similarity between the orientation axis obtained by simulation and the actual data. Therefore, it was confirmed that dichromats arrange the color caps in the order of the slope of the line between the color cap and the convergence point, when performing the panel D-15 test. Furthermore, it was suggested that the patterns of the panel D-15 test differ by the convergence points among dichromats even of the same type.

  19. Workgroup for Hydraulic laboratory Testing and Verification of Hydroacoustic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Janice M.; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.

    2015-01-01

    An international workgroup was recently formed for hydraulic laboratory testing and verification of hydroacoustic instrumentation used for water velocity measurements. The activities of the workgroup have included one face to face meeting, conference calls and an inter-laboratory exchange of two acoustic meters among participating laboratories. Good agreement was found among four laboratories at higher tow speeds and poorer agreement at the lowest tow speed.

  20. AXAF-I Low Intensity-Low Temperature (LILT) Testing of the Development Verification Test (DVT) Solar Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Doug; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The planned orbit of the AXAF-I spacecraft will subject the spacecraft to both short, less than 30 minutes for solar and less than 2 hours for lunar, and long earth eclipses and lunar eclipses with combined conjunctive duration of up to 3 to 4 hours. Lack of proper Electrical Power System (EPS) conditioning prior to eclipse may cause loss of mission. To avoid this problem, for short eclipses, it is necessary to off-point the solar array prior to or at the beginning of the eclipse to reduce the battery state of charge (SOC). This yields less overcharge during the high charge currents at sun entry. For long lunar eclipses, solar array pointing and load scheduling must be tailored for the profile of the eclipse. The battery SOC, loads, and solar array current-voltage (I-V) must be known or predictable to maintain the bus voltage within acceptable range. To address engineering concerns about the electrical performance of the AXAF-I solar array under Low Intensity and Low Temperature (LILT) conditions, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers undertook special testing of the AXAF-I Development Verification Test (DVT) solar panel in September-November 1997. In the test the DVT test panel was installed in a thermal vacuum chamber with a large view window with a mechanical "flapper door". The DVT test panel was "flash" tested with a Large Area Pulse Solar Simulator (LAPSS) at various fractional sun intensities and panel (solar cell) temperatures. The testing was unique with regards to the large size of the test article and type of testing performed. The test setup, results, and lessons learned from the testing will be presented.

  1. Laboratory Tests of Small SDHW Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    1997-01-01

    A test facility for Small SDHW systems was built in 1992. In the test facility up to 10 SDHW systems can be tested side-by-side under the same realistic conditions. Since 1992 16 different systems have been tested in the facility. Both test systems and marketed systems from Danish as well...... as foreign manufacturers have been tested.The thermal performances of the systems have been measured for periods with a duration of about 1 year. In this way direct comparisons of the thermal performances of the different systems are possible.Further, measured and calculated thermal performances for all...... models the yearly thermal performances of the tested systems have been determined with the Danish Test Reference Year as the weather data. Based on calculations with the models improvements of the design of the different systems have been recommended.Experience from the operation of the different systems...

  2. Panel Unit Root Test with Nonlinear Mean Reversion and Smooth Breaks

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Chi Keung Marco; Chau, Frankie; Deesomsak, Rataporn

    2011-01-01

    This paper extends the unit root test of Christopoulos and Leòn-Ledesma (2010) to accommodate not only structural breaks and non-linear mean reversion, but also the contemporaneous cross-sectional dependence commonly found in panel dataset. The proposed test presents good finite sample properties and its applications on four major ASEAN countries’ real exchange rates show that the unit root hypothesis could be rejected, supporting their long-run Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) again...

  3. Laboratory Test Requirements for Marine Shock Isolation Seats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Program Executive Office Ships, Support Ships, Boats, and Craft Program Office (PMS 325G). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to thank Mr...laboratory before installation in a high-speed planing craft . It includes testing procedures, instrumentation system guidance, data processing requirements...or techniques are developed. . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Shock isolation seat laboratory test high-speed craft 16. SECURITY

  4. 7 CFR 58.442 - Laboratory and quality control tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory and quality control tests. 58.442 Section... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.442 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a) Chemical... Methods or by other methods giving equivalent results. (b) Weight or volume control....

  5. [Basic standards for Colombian paternity testing laboratories, 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Alejandro; Bermúdez, Antonio; Jiménez, Magda; Lizarazo, Rocio

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Accreditation and Surveillance of Laboratories Practicing DNA Paternity Tests (created by the Colombian Law 721/2001) set up sub-commission to review the current basic Colombian standards required for paternity testing laboratories and make specific recommendations re the pertinent technical aspects in Colombia, taking ISO 17025 as current reference. This document contains such recommendations for Colombia.

  6. 19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing by Customs laboratory. 151.54 Section 151.54 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance...

  7. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  8. Recent laboratory tests with elastomeric revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    A new construction method of Polyurethane (PUR)-bonded revetments has been tested successfully on various locations in Germany, in the Netherlands, in France, and in the UK. See also the presentation of Bijlsma on this ICE breakwater conference. This year a series of large scale test in the GWK-faci

  9. Advanced Laboratory Setup for Testing Offshore Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Dam; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a test setup for testing small-scale offshore foundations under realistic conditions of high pore-water pressure and high impact loads. The actuator, used for loading has enough capacity to apply sufficient force and displacement to achieve both drained and undrained failure ...

  10. Properties of fly ash and metakaolín based geopolymer panels under fire resistance tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna-Galiano, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study about the effect of fire on geopolymer paste composed of fly ashes, metakaolin and sodium silicate. 2 cm thick, 28 cm high and 18 cm wide panels were filled with the paste obtained. After 28 days of curing at 20 °C and 45% of relative humidity, different tests were carried out in the geopolymers: physico-chemical (density, water absorption, porosity, mechanical (flexural and compressive strength, fire resistance and environmental (leaching and radioactivity. The panels manufactured have been compared with other commercial panels in order to determine the recycling possibilities of fly ashes in manufacturing new fire-insulating geopolymers. The panels obtained can be utilized for the production of interior wall materials, with a good physical, mechanical, fire resistant properties without any environmental problem.Este documento presenta los resultados de un estudio sobre el efecto del fuego sobre pastas de geopolímeros compuestas de cenizas volantes, metacaolín y silicato sódico. Con la pasta obtenida se han rellenado paneles de dimensiones 2 cm de espesor, 28 cm de altura y 18 cm de ancho. Tras 28 días de curado a 20 °C y un 45% de humedad relativa, diferentes ensayos fueron realizados en los geopolímeros obtenidos: fisicoquímicos (densidad, absorción de agua, porosidad, mecánicos (resistencia a compresión y a flexión, de resistencia al fuego y medioambientales (lixiviación y radioactividad. Los paneles fabricados han sido comparados con paneles comerciales para determinar las posibilidades de reciclaje de las cenizas volantes para la fabricación de nuevos productos geopoliméricos con propiedades aislantes al fuego. Los paneles obtenidos pueden ser utilizados para la producción de paredes interiores, con buenas propiedades físicas, mecánicas y de resistencia al fuego sin ningún problema medioambiental.

  11. Inappropriate emergency laboratory test ordering: defensive or peer evidence shared based medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Descovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The laboratory overuse is widely prevalent in hospital practice, mostly in the emergency care. Reasons for excessive and inappropriate test-ordering include defensive behaviour and fear or uncertainty, lack of experience, the misuse of protocols and guidelines, “routine” and local attitudes, inadequate educational feedback and clinician’s unawareness about the cost of examinations and their related implications. AIM OF THE STUDY AND METHODS The primary target of our working group was to reduce inappropriate ordering on a urgent basis test, implementing further examinations not yet previewed in the hospital panel of the available urgencies, according to the evidence based diagnosis concept. The secondary goal was to indicate strategies of re-engineering of the processes, improving turnaround time in the laboratory management of emergencies. After evaluating, as first intervention, the more reliable sources for practice guidelines, systematic reviews and RCTs, the committee further discussed main topics with in-hospital stakeholders, selected from Emergency, Internal Medicine and Surgery Depts. The working group, in many subsequent audits, tried to obtain a systematic feed back with all involved professionals. RESULTS After reviewing literature’s evidence, the board constrained testing options by defining the basic emergency laboratory panel tests (blood type, hemogram, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolarity, CRP, bicarbonate, CPK, creatine phosphokinase-MB, myoglobin, troponin, BNP and NT-proBNP, PT-INR, PTT, D-dimer, beta- HCG, biochemical urinalysis etc.. As final result, the proposed tests reduced the overall number of inappropriate investigations and increased, with newer and updated tests, the available panel for critical patients. DISCUSSION A collegiate review of data reporting, in-hospital deepening of problems and the inter- professional discussion of the evidences

  12. Inter-laboratory proficiency tests to detect viral fish diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahns, Søren; Nicolajsen, Nicole; Skall, Helle Frank

    of the rhabdoviruses identified in order to analyse the inter-laboratory quality of sequencing results. Such results are very important for assessing how sequence data can be used in e.g. molecular tracing. Here we present results and experiences obtained from these additional studies.......An inter-laboratory proficiency test has ben provided by the European Community Laboratory (CRL) for Fish Diseases every year since 1996. The test is provided to all European National Reference Laboratories (NRLs) that are obliged to participate and to a limited number of non-European NRLs, making...... the total number of participating laboratories 35. The test is primarily designed to assess the ability of participating laboratories to identify and quantify the notifiable non-exotic fish pathogenic viruses: Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and infectious haematopietic necrosis virus (IHNV...

  13. Laboratory effectiveness testing of oil spill dispersants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.A.; Wang, Z.; Handfield, D.; Ianuzzi, D.; Ackerman, F. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-06-01

    Dispersant effectiveness tests are reviewed. Studies have been conducted of the variances among several standard regulatory tests. Three main causes of differences have been identified, oil-to-water ratio, settling time and energy. Energy can be partially compensated for in high energy tests by correcting for natural dispersion. With this correction and with high oil-to-water ratios and a settling time of at least 10 minutes, five apparatuses yield very similar results for a variety of oils and dispersants. Recent studies into the energy variation of dispersant tests show that the energy level varies in many apparatuses. The repeatability of energy levels in apparatus is largely responsible for the variation in dispersant effectiveness values in certain apparatus. Studies of analytical procedures show that traditional extraction and analysis methods cause a bias to results. Methods to overcome these difficulties are presented.

  14. Review of Urinalysis Drug Testing Program. Report by a Panel of Army and Civilian Experts in Toxicology and Drug Testing Legal Issues for the Surgeon General of the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-12

    placed on a urine sample which is drug positive by an immunoassay method, such as EMIT (or RIA), if it is also positive by a method based on completely...other laboratories visited by the Panel. The amphetamine procedure has its inherent problems due to urine interference peaks, pro- bably caused by...specific criteria for test results to assure that test results will meet scientific requirements and be considered legally sufficient to label a urine

  15. In-Situ Testing and Performance Assessment of a Redesigned WIPP Panel Closure - 13192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Thomas [URS-Professional Solutions, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Patterson, Russell [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Camphouse, Chris; Herrick, Courtney; Kirchner, Thomas; Malama, Bwalya; Zeitler, Todd [Sandia National Laboratories-Carlsbad, 4100 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Kicker, Dwayne [SM Stoller Corporation-Carlsbad, 4100 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2013-07-01

    operations and a greater understanding of the waste and the behavior of the underground salt formation, the DOE has established a revised panel closure design. This revised design meets both the short-term NMED Permit requirements for the operational period, and also the Federal requirements for long-term repository performance. This new design is simpler, easier to construct and has less of an adverse impact on waste disposal operations than the originally approved Option D design. The Panel Closure Redesign is based on: (1) the results of in-situ constructability testing performed to determine run-of-mine salt reconsolidation parameters and how the characteristics of the bedded salt formation affect these parameters and, (2) the results of air flow analysis of the new design to determine that the limit for the migration of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) will be met at the compliance point. Waste panel closures comprise a repository feature that has been represented in WIPP performance assessment (PA) since the original Compliance Certification Application of 1996. Panel closures are included in WIPP PA models principally because they are a part of the disposal system, not because they play a substantive role in inhibiting the release of radionuclides to the outside environment. The 1998 rulemaking that certified WIPP to receive transuranic waste placed conditions on the panel closure design to be implemented in the repository. The revised panel closure design, termed the Run-of-Mine (ROM) Panel Closure System (ROMPCS), is comprised of 30.48 meters of ROM salt with barriers at each end. The ROM salt is generated from ongoing mining operations at the WIPP and may be compacted and/or moistened as it is emplaced in a panel entry. The barriers consist of bulkheads, similar to those currently used in the panels as room closures. A WIPP performance assessment has been completed that incorporates the ROMPCS design into the representation of the repository, and compares

  16. Laboratory results of the AOF system testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Johann; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Arsenault, Robin; Oberti, Sylvain; Paufique, Jérôme; La Penna, Paolo; Ströbele, Stefan; Donaldson, Robert; Soenke, Christian; Suárez Valles, Marcos; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Le Louarn, Miska; Vernet, Elise; Haguenauer, Pierre; Duhoux, Philippe; Aller-Carpentier, Emmanuel; Valenzuela, Jose Javier; Guerra, Juan Carlos

    2016-07-01

    For two years starting in February 2014, the AO modules GRAAL for HAWK-I and GALACSI for MUSE of the Adaptive Optics Facility project have undergone System Testing at ESO's Headquarters. They offer four different modes: NGS SCAO, LGS GLAO in the IR, LGS GLAO and LTAO in the visible. A detailed characterization of those modes was made possible by the existence of ASSIST, a test bench emulating an adaptive VLT including the Deformable Secondary Mirror, a star simulator and turbulence generator and a VLT focal plane re-imager. This phase aimed at validating all the possible components and loops of the AO modules before installation at the actual VLT that comprises the added complexity of real LGSs, a harsher non-reproducible environment and the adaptive telescope control. In this paper we present some of the major results obtained and challenges encountered during the phase of System Tests, like the preparation of the Acquisition sequence, the testing of the Jitter loop, the performance optimization in GLAO and the offload of low-order modes from the DSM to the telescope (restricted to the M2 hexapod). The System Tests concluded with the successful acceptance, shipping, installation and first commissioning of GRAAL in 2015 as well as the acceptance and shipping of GALACSI, ready for installation and commissioning early 2017.

  17. Influence of diet on the results of laboratory tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Lis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Blood and urine laboratory tests are necessary to diagnose the state of the patient. These tests are also helpful in the assessment of diet and nutritional status of the organism. It is recommended that both blood and urine for laboratory tests be collected in the morning, from fasting patients after an overnight rest. These conditions are defined as the standard conditions for collection of material for laboratory testing. Before testing, patients should follow their natural diet and avoid physical exertion, night work, long-distance travel, as well as consumption of alcohol and drugs. They should also reduce the consumption of synthetic vitamins and herbal remedies and other dietary supplements. Medications should be limited to those that are absolutely necessary. All of these factors can affect the results of laboratory tests.

  18. Analysis and Testing of a Tapered End Connection for Laser Welded Steel Sandwich Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-15

    1951, Elastic Constants for Corrugated Core Sandwich Plates. Technical Note 2289. National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA ). 19. Lok...Assoc. Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maine (Co-I) Grant No: N00014-05-1 -0735 ATS subcontract No: UM-591 Report No. C-2004-015...RPT-04 August 15,2009 20090925154 ABSTRACT This report summarize the analysis and cyclic testing of a laser welded steel sandwich panel end

  19. Impact Testing on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Flat Panels with Ice Projectiles for the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, Michael J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Orbiter Columbia (STS-107) on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the space shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) along with ice and foam debris materials, which could shed on ascent and impact the orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.) to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: Level 1--fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic constitutive model properties of materials of interest, Level 2--subcomponent impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and Level 3--full-scale orbiter leading-edge impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This report discusses the Level 2 test program conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Ballistic Impact Laboratory with ice projectile impact tests on flat RCC panels, and presents the data observed. The Level 2 testing consisted of 54 impact tests in the NASA GRC Ballistic Impact Laboratory on 6- by 6-in. and 6- by 12-in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated three types of debris projectiles: Single-crystal, polycrystal, and "soft" ice. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile and validated the use of the ice and RCC models for use in LS-DYNA.

  20. Laboratory tests of hydraulic fracturing and swell healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunbo, Christensen Claes; Foged, Christensen Helle; Foged, Niels

    1998-01-01

    New laboratory test set-ups and test procedures are described - for testing the formation of hydraulically induced fractures as well as the potential for subsequent fracture closurefrom the relase of a swelling potential. The main purpose with the tests is to provide information on fracturing...

  1. Laboratory-scale integrated ARP filter test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. There is a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. This task attempted to simulate the entire ARP process, including multiple batches (5), washing, chemical cleaning, and blending the feed with heels and recycle streams. The objective of the tests was to determine whether one of these processes is causing excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter. The authors conducted the tests with feed solutions containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 simulant supernate with no MST.

  2. The Farley Instability: A Laboratory Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans; Petersen, P. I.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment is described that was performed in an alkali plasma (Cs) device in order to test the theory of the Farley instability. With υ E×B > Cs (the speed of sound) and νι ≳ ω cι (ν e ≪ ω ce ) wave excitation occurs, the waves traveling normal to the magnetic field B at the υ E×B speed....... The perturbations are strongly elongated along the B field lines, with λ∥ ≫ λ⊥. A comparison with theoretical predictions is given for the observed excitation conditions of the instability....

  3. Laboratory Facilities for Testing Thermal Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ruja

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an electromechanical plant through with which is realised couples different resistant, MR (0 ÷ MRN, on the gearbox shaft of internal combustion engine. The purpose is to study the plant in phase and stationary behaviour of the main technical parameters that define the engine operation such as: torque, speed, temperature, pressure, vibration, burnt gas, noise, forces. You can take measurements to determine engine performance testing and research on improving engine thermal efficiency. With the proposed plant is built by measuring the characteristic internal combustion engines (tuning characteristic and functional characteristic and determine the technical performance of interest, optimal.

  4. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493.1441 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  5. Draft Test Guideline: Generic Freshwater Microcosm Test, Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  6. Smallpox Vaccination of Laboratory Workers at US Variola Testing Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medcalf, Sharon; Bilek, Laura; Hartman, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Leuschen, Patricia; Miller, Hannah; O'Keefe, Anne; Sayles, Harlan; Smith, Philip W

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the need to revaccinate laboratory workers against smallpox, we assessed regular revaccination at the US Laboratory Response Network's variola testing sites by examining barriers to revaccination and the potential for persistence of immunity. Our data do not provide evidence to suggest prolonging the recommended interval for revaccination.

  7. Inadequate Information in Laboratory Test Requisition in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inadequate Information in Laboratory Test Requisition in a Tertiary Hospital in Benin City, ... Abstract. Aim: Laboratory investigations are important aspect of patient ... A total of 1786 (48.1%) of the request form had one or more incomplete or ...

  8. [The postcoital test: clinico-laboratory observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavov, R; Nalbanski, B; Pŭnevska, M

    1999-01-01

    The choice of optimal time, the technique and limitations of the post-coital test (PCT) have been described. They are of important significance for getting reliable information both concerning the cervical mucus, quality and migration of spermatozoa in female genital tract. It has been stressed that a negative PCT does not necessary exclude pregnancy. There are shown data for prognostic value of the PCT. The observation of more than 20 motility spermatozoa per HPF and higher frequency of pregnancy is common finding in comparison to low motility and number of spermatozoa in cervical mucus. The data support the hypothesis of "filtering" mechanism, excluding entrance of abnormal spermatozoa. Observing "shaking" phenomenon directs to searching immunological factor (local or systemic) against male gametes.

  9. Providing clinicians with information on laboratory test costs leads to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Providing clinicians with information on laboratory test costs leads to ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... For the intervention and control groups, pre- and postintervention cost and days in hospital were estimated.

  10. Immediate needs for MQA testing at state secondary calibration laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, R. [Radiation Instrument Calibration Laboratory, Springfield, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Calibration Laboratory attempts to provide services that satisfy the needs and requests for a variety of customers. New needs and requests have resulted in calibration of instrumentation outside the original laboratory designs. These tasks require several changes at the laboratory and a need for new support services, especially measurement quality assurance (MQA). The MQA tests are gamma (Cs-137) below 0.5 mrem (5{mu}Sv) per hour and x-ray kVp. Modification to the current gamma (Cs-137) MQA test is recommended because lower intensity fields are commonly measured.

  11. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  12. Imaging and laboratory testing in acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Nova L; Jahnes, Katherine; Mills, Angela M

    2011-05-01

    When discussing which laboratory tests or imaging to order in the setting of acute abdominal pain, it is practical to organize information by disease process (eg, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis). Because studies on the accuracy of diagnostic tests are of necessity related to the presence or absence of specific diagnoses, and because clinicians frequently look to tests to help them rule in or rule out specific conditions, this article is organized by region of pain and common abdominal diagnoses. It focuses on the contributions that laboratory testing and imaging make in the emergency management of abdominal complaints. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient human paternity testing with a panel of 40 short insertion-deletion polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, J R; Pena, S D J

    2010-03-30

    We developed a panel of 40 multiplexed short insertion-deletion (indel) polymorphic loci with widespread chromosomal locations and allele frequencies close to 0.50 in the European population. We genotyped these markers in 360 unrelated self-classified White Brazilians and 50 mother-child-probable father trios with proven paternity. The average heterozygosity (gene diversity) per locus was 0.48, and the combined probability of identity (matching probability) for the 40-locus set was 3.48 x 10(-17). The combined power of exclusion of the indel panel was 0.9997. The efficiency of the 40 indel set in the exclusion of falsely accused individuals in paternity casework was equivalent to the CODIS set of 13 microsatellites. The geometric mean of the paternity indices of the 50 mother-child-probable father trios was 17,607. This panel of 40 short indels was found to have excellent performance. Thus, especially because of its simplicity and low cost, and the fact that it is composed of genomic markers that have very low mutation rates, it represents a useful new tool for human paternity testing.

  14. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  15. Towards a rational antimicrobial testing policy in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Banaji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial policy for prophylactic and therapeutic use of antimicrobials in a tertiary care setting has gained importance. A hospital′s antimicrobial policy as laid down by its hospital infection control team needs to include inputs from the microbiology laboratory, besides the pharmacy and therapeutic committee. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that clinical microbiologists across India follow international guidelines and also take into account local settings, especially detection and presence of resistance enzymes. This article draws a framework for rational antimicrobial testing in our laboratories in tertiary care centers, from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. It does not address testing methodologies but suggests ways and means by which antimicrobial susceptibility reporting can be rendered meaningful not only to the treating physician but also to the resistance monitoring epidemiologist. It hopes to initiate some standardization in rational choice of antimicrobial testing in laboratories in the country pertaining to nonfastidious bacteria.

  16. Towards a rational antimicrobial testing policy in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaji, N; Oommen, S

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial policy for prophylactic and therapeutic use of antimicrobials in a tertiary care setting has gained importance. A hospital's antimicrobial policy as laid down by its hospital infection control team needs to include inputs from the microbiology laboratory, besides the pharmacy and therapeutic committee. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that clinical microbiologists across India follow international guidelines and also take into account local settings, especially detection and presence of resistance enzymes. This article draws a framework for rational antimicrobial testing in our laboratories in tertiary care centers, from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. It does not address testing methodologies but suggests ways and means by which antimicrobial susceptibility reporting can be rendered meaningful not only to the treating physician but also to the resistance monitoring epidemiologist. It hopes to initiate some standardization in rational choice of antimicrobial testing in laboratories in the country pertaining to nonfastidious bacteria.

  17. Problems and solutions in laboratory testing for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Meijer, Piet; Jennings, Ian; Sioufi, John; Bonar, Roslyn A; Kitchen, Dianne P; Kershaw, Geoffrey; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    A diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B begins with clinical assessment of the patient and is facilitated by laboratory testing. The influence of the latter on a diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B is clear-a diagnosis cannot be made without laboratory confirmation of a deficiency of factor FVIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. Moreover, the degree of hemophilia severity is specifically characterized by laboratory test results. In turn, patient management, including choice and application of therapies, is influenced by the diagnosis, as well as by identification of respective disease severity. An incorrect diagnosis may lead to inappropriate management and unnecessary therapy, and thus to adverse outcomes. Moreover, identification of factor inhibitors in hemophilia will lead to additional and differential treatments, and incorrect identification of inhibitors or inhibitor levels may also lead to inappropriate management. Problems in hemophilia diagnosis or inhibitor detection can occur at any stage in the clinical diagnosis/laboratory interface, from the "pre-preanalytical" to "preanalytical" to "analytical" to "postanalytical" to "post-postanalytical." This report outlines the various problems in laboratory testing for hemophilia and provides various strategies or solutions to overcome these challenges. Although some outlined solutions are specific to the potential errors related to hemophilia, others are general in nature and can be applied to other areas of laboratory hemostasis. Key to improvement in this area is adoption of best practice by all involved, including clinicians, phlebotomists, and laboratories. Also key is the recognition that such errors may occur, and thus that clinicians should assess laboratory test results in the context of their patient's clinical history and follow-up any potential errors, thus avoid misdiagnoses, by requesting repeat testing on a fresh sample.

  18. Component and prototype panel testing of the mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Swartz, Clifford K.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    The mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator array, a high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic array concept, is described. The three critical elements of the array concept are the Fresnel lens concentrator, the prismatic cell power cover, and the photovoltaic cell. Prototype concentrator lenses have been fabricated and tested, with optical efficiencies reaching 90 percent. Work is progressing on the design and fabrication of the panel structure. The impact of recent advances in 30 percent-efficient multijunction photovoltaic cells on array performance is also discussed. Near-term performance goals of 300 w/sq m and 100 w/kg are now feasible.

  19. Fatigue test of a fiberglass based composite panel. Increasing the lifetime of freight wagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Grabowski, Ł.; Majzner, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the XXI century transportation of goods plays a key role in the economy. Due to a good logistics the economy is able to grow fluently. Although land transportation is carried out mainly through trucks for the last several years there has been noted an increase in the percentage share of rail transport in the freight transport. The main goods transported by railways are mineral fuels, mining and quarrying products. They constitute the greater part of 70% of total transported goods. Transportation of material of such high weight, high hardness and with different shapes involves increased and accelerated wear and tear of the cargo space of the wagon. This process is also magnified by substances used to prevent overheating or goods theft. Usually they are in the form of chemical compounds powder, eg. Calcium. A very large impact on the wear of the freight wagons hull is made because of mechanical damage. Their source comes mostly from loading cargo with impetus and using heavy machines during unloading. A large number of cycles of loading and unloading during the working period causes abrasion of body and as a result after several years a wagon car qualifies for a major maintenance. Possibility of application composite panels in the process of renovating the wagons body could reduce the weight of whole train and prolong the service life between mandatory technical inspection. The Paper "Fatigue test of a fiberglass based composite panel. Increasing the lifetime of freight wagon" presents the research process and the results of the endurance test of the composite panel samples fixed to a metal plate. As a fixing method a stainless steel rivet nut and a stainless steel button head socket screws were chosen. Cyclic and multiple load were applied to test samples using a pneumatic cylinder. Such a methodology simulated the forces resulting from loading and unloading of the wagon and movement of the cargo during transport. In the study a dedicated stand equipped with a

  20. System Quality Management in Software Testing Laboratory that Chooses Accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanet Brito R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of software products will reach full maturity when executed by the scheme and provides third party certification. For the validity of the certification, the independent laboratory must be accredited for that function, using internationally recognized standards. This brings with it a challenge for the Industrial Laboratory Testing Software (LIPS, responsible for testing the products developed in Cuban Software Industry, define strategies that will permit it to offer services with a high level of quality. Therefore it is necessary to establish a system of quality management according to NC-ISO/IEC 17025: 2006 to continuously improve the operational capacity and technical competence of the laboratory, with a view to future accreditation of tests performed. This article discusses the process defined in the LIPS for the implementation of a Management System of Quality, from the current standards and trends, as a necessary step to opt for the accreditation of the tests performed.

  1. Deep Borehole Field Test Laboratory and Borehole Testing Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacKinnon, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrick, Courtney G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, W. Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jang, Je-Hun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Daley, Tom [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Freifeld, Barry M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spane, Frank A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Deep Borehole Disposal (DBD) of high-level radioactive wastes has been considered an option for geological isolation for many years (Hess et al. 1957). Recent advances in drilling technology have decreased costs and increased reliability for large-diameter (i.e., ≥50 cm [19.7”]) boreholes to depths of several kilometers (Beswick 2008; Beswick et al. 2014). These advances have therefore also increased the feasibility of the DBD concept (Brady et al. 2009; Cornwall 2015), and the current field test design will demonstrate the DBD concept and these advances. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013) specifically recommended developing a research and development plan for DBD. DOE sought input or expression of interest from States, local communities, individuals, private groups, academia, or any other stakeholders willing to host a Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT). The DBFT includes drilling two boreholes nominally 200m [656’] apart to approximately 5 km [16,400’] total depth, in a region where crystalline basement is expected to begin at less than 2 km depth [6,560’]. The characterization borehole (CB) is the smaller-diameter borehole (i.e., 21.6 cm [8.5”] diameter at total depth), and will be drilled first. The geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, geomechanical and thermal testing will take place in the CB. The field test borehole (FTB) is the larger-diameter borehole (i.e., 43.2 cm [17”] diameter at total depth). Surface handling and borehole emplacement of test package will be demonstrated using the FTB to evaluate engineering feasibility and safety of disposal operations (SNL 2016).

  2. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee F Schroeder

    Full Text Available Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda.Test types (identity and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI. AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015.Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954 of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests, moderate (33 tests, and minimal (55 tests availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83-$3.46.One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46.

  3. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Lee F; Elbireer, Ali; Jackson, J Brooks; Amukele, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda. Test types (identity) and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI). AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015. Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954) of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests), moderate (33 tests), and minimal (55 tests) availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83-$3.46). One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46.

  4. Model Testing - Bringing the Ocean into the Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Hydrodynamic model testing, the principle of bringing the ocean into the laboratory to study the behaviour of the ocean itself and the response of man-made structures in the ocean in reduced scale, has been known for centuries. Due to an insufficient understanding of the physics involved, however......, the early model tests often gave incomplete or directly misleading results.This keynote lecture deals with some of the possibilities and problems within the field of hydrodynamic and hydraulic model testing....

  5. Finding neurosyphilis without the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, S; Luger, A

    1996-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test is only 27% sensitive for diagnosing neurosyphilis. Discriminant analysis, used on 124 patients, shows that other commonly used laboratory tests can, in combination, identify 87% of patients with neurosyphilis with 94% specificity. The insensitivity of the CSF-VDRL (27% in persons with neurosyphilis) and the foreseen greater need to identify and treat neurosyphilis in the era of human immunodeficiency virus caused us to analyze the serum and cerebrospinal fluid results of 73 patients with syphilis and of 51 patients with clinically diagnosed neurosyphilis. Discriminant analysis was applied to different sets of laboratory tests to find the combination of test results best able to predict retrospectively the clinical diagnosis of syphilis or neurosyphilis, without reference to the CSF-VDRL. The predicting function averages 94% specificity and 87% sensitivity. Test result variables considered together are: CSF-FTA-ABS, serum FTA-ABS, CSF-TPHA, serum TPHA, and CSF cells. The authors conclude that clinicians or laboratories can, independently of the CSF-VDRL, compute a score showing whether the results of a set of commonly used tests suggest neurosyphilis in a patient.

  6. A Comparative Study of the Analysis, Numerical Modelling and Experimental Test on a Sandwich Panel with Plane and Profiled Facings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Hohan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich panels are remarkable products because they can be as strong as a solid material but with less weight. The analysis that is required to predict the stresses and deflections in panels with flat or lightly profiled facings is that of conventional beam theory but with the addition of shear deformation. Knowing that the profiled sheets bring an increase of the flexural stiffness, formulas showing the calculus of a panel with flat and profiled facings are established. A comparison between the results of a mathematical calculus, an experimental test and a numerical modelling is provided.

  7. Quality performance of laboratory testing in pharmacies: a collaborative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninotto, Martina; Miolo, Giorgia; Guiotto, Adriano; Marton, Silvia; Plebani, Mario

    2016-11-01

    The quality performance and the comparability between results of pharmacies point-of-care-testing (POCT) and institutional laboratories have been evaluated. Eight pharmacies participated in the project: a capillary specimen collected by the pharmacist and, simultaneously, a lithium-heparin sample drawn by a physician of laboratory medicine for the pharmacy customers (n=106) were analyzed in the pharmacy and in the laboratory, respectively. Glucose, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, were measured using: Reflotron, n=5; Samsung, n=1; Cardiocheck PA, n=1; Cholestech LDX, n=1 and Cobas 8000. The POCT analytical performance only (phase 2) were evaluated testing, in pharmacies and in the laboratory, the lithium heparin samples from a female drawn fasting daily in a week, and a control sample containing high concentrations of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. For all parameters, except triglycerides, the slopes showed a satisfactory correlation. For triglycerides, a median value higher in POCT in comparison to the laboratory (1.627 mmol/L vs. 0.950 mmol/L) has been observed. The agreement in the subjects classification, demonstrates that for glucose, 70% of the subjects show concentrations below the POCT recommended level (5.8-6.1 mmol/L), while 56% are according to the laboratory limit (pharmacies and specific criticisms in the pre- and post-analytical phases.

  8. Standard Test Method for Laboratory Aging of Sandwich Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the resistance of sandwich panels to severe exposure conditions as measured by the change in selected properties of the material after exposure. The exposure cycle to which the specimen is subjected is an arbitrary test having no correlation with natural weathering conditions. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  9. Does Gibrat’s law hold in the insurance industry of china? A test with sequential panel selection method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Guochen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies the Sequential Panel Selection Method to investigate whether the growth rate of total insurance premium is independent of their size, as postulated by Robert Gibrat’s (1931 Law of Proportionate Effects. Time-series data for the total insurance premium of 35 insurance companies in China during the December 2005 to May 2011 period are used. Since other panel-based unit root tests are joint tests of a unit root for all members of a panel and are incapable of determining the mix of I(0 and I(1 series in a panel setting, the SPSM, proposed by Georgios Chortareas and George Kapetanios (2009, classifies a whole panel into a group of stationary series and a group of non-stationary series. In doing so, we can clearly identify how many and which series in the panel are stationary processes. The empirical results from the SPSM tests unequivocally indicate that Gibrat’s Law is only valid for one of these 35 companies studied here. Our study has important policy implications for insurance regulation, insurance market construction, and policyholder protection.

  10. Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (ptests (p≤.001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency.

  11. Hereditary red cell membrane disorders and laboratory diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M-J; Zanella, A

    2013-06-01

    This overview describes two groups of nonimmune hereditary hemolytic anemias caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) represent disorders of the red cell cytoskeleton. Hereditary stomatocytoses represents disorders of cation permeability in the red cell membrane. The current laboratory screening tests for HS are the osmotic fragility test, acid glycerol lysis time test (AGLT), cryohemolysis test, and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA)-binding test. For atypical HS, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of erythrocyte membrane proteins is carried out to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis of HE/HPP is based on abnormal red cell morphology and the detection of protein 4.1R deficiency or spectrin variants using gel electrophoresis. None of screening tests can detect all HS cases. Some testing centers (a survey of 25 laboratories) use a combination of tests (e.g., AGLT and EMA). No specific screening test for hereditary stomatocytoses is available. The preliminary diagnosis is based on presenting a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature or time dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. Both the EMA-binding test and the osmotic fragility test may help in differential diagnosis of HS and hereditary stomatocytosis.

  12. Compendium of Test Results of Recent Single Event Effect Tests Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Steven S.; Allen, Gregory R.; Irom, Farokh; Scheick, Leif Z.; Adell, Philippe C.; Miyahira, Tetsuo F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports heavy ion and proton-induced single event effect (SEE) results from recent tests for a variety of microelectronic devices. The compendium covers devices tested over the last two years by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  13. Beyond BRAFV600: clinical mutation panel testing by next-generation sequencing in advanced melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroy, Alan E.; Boland, Genevieve M.; Milton, Denái R.; Roszik, Jason; Frankian, Silva; Malke, Jared; Haydu, Lauren; Prieto, Victor G.; Tetzlaff, Michael; Ivan, Doina; Wang, Wei-Lien; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Curry, Jonathan; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Broaddus, Russell; Rashid, Asif; Stewart, John; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Amaria, Rodabe N.; Patel, Sapna P.; Papadopoulos, Nicholas E.; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Hwu, Patrick; Diab, Adi; Woodman, Scott E.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Patel, Keyur P.; Shaw, Kenna R.; Mills, Gordon B.; Mendelsohn, John; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kim, Kevin B.; Routbort, Mark J.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The management of melanoma has evolved due to improved understanding of its molecular drivers. To augment the current understanding of the prevalence, patterns, and associations of mutations in this disease, the results of clinical testing of 699 advanced melanoma patients using a pan-cancer next generation sequencing (NGS) panel of hotspot regions in 46 genes were reviewed. Mutations were identified in 43 of the 46 genes on the panel. The most common mutations were BRAFV600 (36%), NRAS (21%), TP53 (16%), BRAFNon-V600 (6%), and KIT (4%). Approximately one-third of melanomas had >1 mutation detected, and the number of mutations per tumor was associated with melanoma subtype. Concurrent TP53 mutations were the most frequent event in tumors with BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. Melanomas with BRAFNon-V600 mutations frequently harbored concurrent NRAS mutations (18%), which were rare in tumors with BRAFV600 mutations (1.6%). The prevalence of BRAFV600 and KIT mutations were significantly associated with melanoma subtypes, and BRAFV600 and TP53 mutations were significantly associated with cutaneous primary tumor location. Multiple potential therapeutic targets were identified in metastatic unknown primary and cutaneous melanomas that lacked BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. These results enrich our understanding of the patterns and clinical associations of oncogenic mutations in melanoma. PMID:25148578

  14. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Tested Disposal Methods for Chemical Wastes from Academic Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, M. A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes procedures for disposing of dichromate cleaning solution, picric acid, organic azides, oxalic acid, chemical spills, and hydroperoxides in ethers and alkenes. These methods have been tested under laboratory conditions and are specific for individual chemicals rather than for groups of chemicals. (JN)

  15. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sparn, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings on August 12-17, 2012, this presentation reports on laboratory tests of 20 currently available advanced power strip products, which reduce wasteful electricity use of miscellaneous electric loads in buildings.

  16. Laboratory Test Setup for Cyclic Axially Loaded Piles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2017-01-01

    conditions for all tests. For verifications purposes six static tension tests conducted at three different vertical effective stress levels of 0, 35 and 70 kPa. The load-displacement curves showed that the test setup provides repeatable test results. A preliminary comparison between the unit shaft friction......This paper presents a comprehensive description and the considerations regarding the design of a new laboratory test setup for testing cyclic axially loaded piles in sand. The test setup aims at analysing the effect of axial one-way cyclic loading on pile capacity and accumulated displacements....... Another aim was to test a large diameter pile segment with dimensions resembling full-scale piles to model the interface properties between pile and sand correctly. The pile segment was an open-ended steel pipe pile with a diameter of 0.5 m and a length of 1 m. The sand conditions resembled the dense sand...

  17. Verification and validation of diagnostic laboratory tests in clinical virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenau, Holger F; Kessler, Harald H; Kortenbusch, Marhild; Steinhorst, Andreas; Raggam, Reinhard B; Berger, Annemarie

    2007-10-01

    This review summarizes major issues of verification and validation procedures and describes minimum requirements for verification and validation of diagnostic assays in clinical virology including instructions for CE/IVD-labeled as well as for self-developed ("home-brewed") tests or test systems. It covers techniques useful for detection of virus specific antibodies, for detection of viral antigens, for detection of viral nucleic acids, and for isolation of viruses on cell cultures in the routine virology laboratory.

  18. Development of a permeation panel to test dermal protective clothing against sprayed coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Diana M; Yost, Michael G; Whittaker, Stephen G; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn; Camp, Janice; Dills, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Design, construct, and characterize an apparatus to evaluate dermal protective clothing for resistance to polymerizing materials. Specifically, we evaluated the permeation of the most common glove material used in automotive collision repair (0.10-0.13 mm or 4-5 mil latex) with representative isocyanate-containing clear coats. Our ultimate goal is to make informed recommendations on dermal protective materials to prevent isocyanate exposures and reduce the likelihood of occupational illness in automotive collision repair and other industries. A novel permeation panel was developed to assess dermal protective clothing. With this apparatus, up to eight test materials may be evaluated under typical-spray application conditions. Solid collection media comprised of 1-(2-pyridyl)-piperazine (2-PP)-coated fiberglass filters or colorimetric SWYPE™ pads were placed behind test materials to capture permeants. The 2-PP-coated filters were subsequently analyzed using a modified OSHA42/PV2034 method. Color change in the SWYPEs provided an immediate field estimate of breakthrough time. In addition, Teflon filters were mounted proximal to the permeation cells to measure the mass of clear coat applied to the panel and to evaluate loading homogeneity. This study evaluated the permeation of isocyanates through 0.10-0.13 mm latex glove material at a fixed time (30 min post-spraying) and over a time course (6-91 min post-spraying). Monomers 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) permeated through (0.10-0.13 mm) latex glove material under typical glove use conditions (30 min). The latex glove material exhibited immediate breakthrough, with a permeation rate of 2.9 ng min(-1) cm(-2). The oligomeric forms of HDI and IPDI did not permeate the latex glove material. The spray application at 71 ± 5 °F was fairly homogeneous (33.7 ± 8 mg weight of dry clear coat per 5 cm(2)). The permeation panel is a viable method to assess dermal protective clothing

  19. Performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: In vivo measurements, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J.; Olsen, P.C.

    1990-04-01

    A study of two rounds of in vivo laboratory performance testing was undertaken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the appropriateness of the in vivo performance criteria of draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard ANSI N13.3, Performance Criteria for Bioassay.'' The draft standard provides guidance to in vivo counting facilities regarding the sensitivity, precision, and accuracy of measurements for certain categories of commonly assayed radionuclides and critical regions of the body. This report concludes the testing program by presenting the results of the Round Two testing. Testing involved two types of measurements: chest counting for radionuclide detection in the lung, and whole body counting for detection of uniformly distributed material. Each type of measurement was further divided into radionuclide categories as defined in the draft standard. The appropriateness of the draft standard criteria by measuring a laboratory's ability to attain them were judged by the results of both round One and Round Two testing. The testing determined that performance criteria are set at attainable levels, and the majority of in vivo monitoring facilities passed the criteria when complete results were submitted. 18 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. [Point-of-care-testing--the intensive care laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M M; Hackl, W; Griesmacher, A

    1999-01-01

    After successful centralization of laboratory analyses since more than 30 years, advances in biosensors, microprocessors, measurement of undiluted whole blood and miniaturization of laboratory analyzers are leading nowadays more and more to a re-decentralization in the laboratory medicine. Point-of-care-testing (POCT), which is defined as any laboratory test performed outside central or decentralized laboratories, is becoming more and more popular. The theoretical advantages of POCT are faster turn-around-times (TAT), more rapid medical decisions, avoidance of sample identification and sample transport problems and the need of only small specimen volumes. These advantages are frequently mentioned, but are not associated with a clear clinical benefit. The disadvantages of POCT such as incorrect handling and/or maintenance of the analyzers by nontrained clinical staff, inadequate or even absent calibrations and/or quality controls, lack of cost-effectiveness because of an increased number of analyzers and more expensive reagents, insufficient documentation and difficult comparability of the obtained POCT-results with routine laboratory results, are strongly evident. According to the authors' opinion the decision for the establishing of POCT has only to be made in a close co-operation between physicians and laboratorians in order to vouch for necessity and high quality of the analyses. Taking the local situation into consideration (24-h-central laboratory, etc.) the spectrum of parameters measured by means of POCT should be rigorously restricted to the vital functions. Such analytes should be: hemoglobin or hematocrit, activated whole blood clotting time, blood gases, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, creatinine, ammonia and lactate.

  1. Containment testing for occupied and unoccupied laboratory chemical hoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenley, P.L.; DiBerardinis, L.J.; Lorch, F.A.

    1999-07-01

    Containment of hazards in a laboratory chemical hood is based on the principle that air drawn through the face area of the hood is sufficient to overcome the many challenges at or near the opening. Challenges to overcome include, but are not limited to, air velocities near the hood, movement of the researcher, people walking past the hood, location of equipment inside the hood, size of the sash opening, and the shape and configuration of entrance conditions. To overcome these challenges, a sufficient face velocity must be maintained. Determining that proper face velocity must be maintained. Determining that proper face velocity for a given hood should be resolved by the system designer, facility safety officer, and researcher with these and other issues in mind. This research tests for containment at 100 feet per minute (fpm) face velocity on occupied hoods and tests the same hoods for containment at the reduced velocity of 60 fpm when unoccupied. Three laboratory chemical hoods of different sizes with several ash positions are used. The test results show that under ideal conditions in a test laboratory, an unoccupied hood (without a manikin) at 60 fpm contains as good as, if not better than, an occupied hood (with a manikin) at 100 fpm, as measured by the tracer gas tests specified in ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995, Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods (ASHRAE 1995). Further testing is needed to determine if this relationship is the same under conditions of actual use, i.e., cluttered hoods and presence of cross-drafts.

  2. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    sixteen pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants and 30 variants of unknown clinical significance. Four of the pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants were found in BMPR1A in patients with unexplained familial adenomatous polyposis or atypical adenomatous polyposis, which extends the genotype......-phenotype spectrum for this gene. Nine patients had more than one variant remaining after the filtration, including three with truncating mutations in BMPR1A, PMS2 and AXIN2. CNVs were found in three patients, in upstream regions of SMAD4, MSH3 and CTNNB1, and one additional individual harbored a 24.2 kb duplication......Hereditary syndromes causing colorectal cancer include both polyposis and non-polyposis syndromes. Overlapping phenotypes between the syndromes have been recognized and this make targeted molecular testing for single genes less favorable, instead there is a gaining interest for multi-gene panel...

  3. Characterization of mudrocks: a practical application of advanced laboratory testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard J.JARDINE

    2011-01-01

    An integrated approach to geomaterial characterization is advocated that combines geology, in-situ testing, fabric studies, routine index experiments and advanced laboratory testing. It is shown that advanced laboratory testing can explore features such as kinematic yielding and anisotropy in stiffness or shear strength that would otherwise be impossible to quantify. A detailed study performed in London clay at the new Heathrow Terminal 5 site is used to illustrate the arguments made. It is shown that the London clay has strong anisotropy in stiffness, is highly non-linear over the strain range of engineering interest, has markedly anisotropic shear strength characteristics and exhibits a pronounced degree of brittleness. These features can impact significantly on the practical design and analysis of civil engineering works including shallow and deep foundations, tunnels and excavations, and the stability of slopes.

  4. Comparison of Recuperator Alloy Degradation in Laboratory and Engine Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase the efficiency of advanced microturbines, durable alloy foils are needed for their recuperators to operate at 650-700 C. Prior work has demonstrated that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr from austenitic alloys, leading to a reduction in lifetime for the thin-walled components in this application. New commercial alloy foils are being tested in both laboratory tests in humid air and in the exhaust gas of a modified 60 kW microturbine. Initial results are presented for a commercial batch of 80 {micro}m alloy 120 foil. The Cr consumption rates in laboratory testing were similar to those observed in previous testing. The initial results from the microturbine indicate a faster Cr consumption rate compared to the laboratory test, but longer term results are needed to quantify the difference. These results will help to verify a Cr consumption model for predicting lifetimes in this environment based on classical gas transport theory.

  5. Identifying the Clinical Laboratory Tests from Unspecified "Other Lab Test" Data for Secondary Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuequn; Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory results are stored in electronic health records (EHRs) as structured data coded with local or standard terms. However, laboratory tests that are performed at outside laboratories are often simply labeled "outside test" or something similar, with the actual test name in a free-text result or comment field. After being aggregated into clinical data repositories, these ambiguous labels impede the retrieval of specific test results. We present a general multi-step solution that can facilitate the identification, standardization, reconciliation, and transformation of such test results. We applied our approach to data in the NIH Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) to identify laboratory tests, map comment values to the LOINC codes that will be incorporated into our Research Entities Dictionary (RED), and develop a reference table that can be used in the EHR data extract-transform-load (ETL) process.

  6. Testing hygrometers used in cytogenetics laboratories for metaphase preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Thomas; Dun, Karen

    2011-07-01

    This protocol describes procedures for checking small laboratory hygrometers for accuracy at three relative humidity (rh) levels. The work arose out of the need to provide laboratory assessors with documentary evidence that the hygrometer used to monitor humidity in the vicinity of the laboratory where medical cytogenetics testing slides are prepared and dried in the ambient environment is reproducible and sufficiently accurate. The procedure is based upon the physicochemical principle that when water or certain saturated salt solutions are placed into a sealed environment, the humidity will equilibrate to well defined levels. We choose to check our hygrometers at three points: 95%, 75%, and 33% rh, using distilled water, saturated sodium chloride solution, and saturated magnesium chloride solution, respectively. Our results have demonstrated that the procedure is convenient and of sufficient accuracy to be fit for this annual hygrometer validation purpose. The procedure takes 24 hr per relative humidity point checked.

  7. Contamination Control and Evaluation for Manufacturing, Ground Tests, Flight Operation and Post-Retrieval Analyses of the TANPOPO Exposed Panels and Capture Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hajime; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Uchihori, Yukio; Tabata, Makoto; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Imai, Eiichi

    The TANPOPO (“dandelion” in Japanese) is Japan’s first astrobiology space experiment to be exposed on and retrieved from the ISS-Kibo Exposed Facility from the 2014-5 timeframe. During its 1-3 years of continuous exposure operation in the low earth orbit (LEO) of the Earth, it aims to test key questions consisted of the “quasi-panspermia” hypothesis, a theory for exogenesis origin of life and their precursor transports among celestial bodies The TANPOPO experiment consists of following six sub-themes (ST): 1) the first intact capture of terrestrial microbial colonies in LEO, 2) survival test of terrestrial microbes long exposed in LEO, 3) alteration tests of artificially composed “astronomical organic analogs” long exposed in LEO, 4) intact capture of organic-bearing micrometeoroids with the lowest peak temperature ever in LEO, 5) space flight verification of the world’s lowest density aerogels for intact capture of microparticles, and 6) meteoroid and orbital debris flux assessment only capable to be measured in-situ in LEO. Each will utilize one or more Capture Panel(CP) and Exposure Panel (EP) samples from various pointing faces onboard the Kibo Exposed Facility, i.e., anti-Earth pointing face(Space), leading face (East) and anti-Pressurized Facility face (North), as the ISS is an Earth gravity gradient three-axis stabilized satellite. In order to both satisfy scientific values and planetary protection policy, contamination control and evaluation protocols are implemented for the whole process of manufacturing, ground tests, flight operation and post-retrieval initial analyses of both CPs and EPs. The CPs employ blocks of 0.01g/ccultra-low dense aerogels on its to intact capture impacting solid microparticles such as organic-bearing micrometeoroids, artificial orbital debris and possible terrestrial aerosols temporally reached to the LEO, for assessing the possibility of interplanetary transport of life and its precursors. By analyzing them

  8. Oral fluid for workplace drug testing: laboratory implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christine

    2012-02-01

    As oral fluid increases in popularity for workplace testing, due to its easy and observed collection, the ability to adapt existing laboratory instrumentation without further capital investment will allow more facilities to test oral fluid. The European Workplace Drug Testing Society (EWDTS) guidelines for oral fluid testing outline the maximum cut-off concentrations acceptable under the workplace drug testing programme. The recommended cut-off values may be subject to change as advances in technology or other considerations warrant identification of these substances at different concentrations; however, the instrumentation currently exists for routine screening using immunoassay and confirmation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectral detection (LC-MS/MS) so laboratories can easily implement oral fluid analysis in their current systems. Immunoassays for the detection of the drug classes at recommended levels have been developed using various collection devices and different formats: liquid reagent chemistries and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) platforms. Immunoassays provide faster turnaround than mass spectral methods particularly when the number of specimens increases. Since the guidelines state that positive immunoassay results should not be reported without confirmation, fully validated methods using LC-MS/MS and/or GC-MS for all drugs are also widely available. All proposed concentrations are easily achievable using MS instruments currently in testing laboratories; however, the likelihood of a low number of positive specimens in workplace populations allows the test facility to screen specimens in a cost-effective manner using immunoassay, while ensuring scientific credibility and defensibility by confirming the positive results with a second test. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. 49 CFR 40.81 - What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.81 What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing? (a) As a drug testing laboratory located in the U.S., you are...

  10. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel Print A A A What's in ... Is The hepatic function panel, also known as liver function tests, is a group of seven tests ...

  11. The Relationship between Financial Freedom, Financial Depth and Mutual Funds: Panel Bounds Testing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönül YÜCE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the nexus between mutual fund assets, financial freedom, and financial depth in 54 countries from 2000 to 2011 by employing panel ARDL bounds testing approach. To examine this linkage, we use the two-step procedure from ARDL bounds testing model: In first step, we explore the long-term relationship between the variables by using ARDL test of cointegration. Secondly, we employ a dynamic error correction model to explore the short-term relationship between the variables. All results suggest that there is a positive and statistically significant evidence between central bank independence, financial freedom, and economic growth in both long and short-term. Besides, long-term empirical results refer that current period central bank independence and financial freedom are the important factors for determining the national output level. In addition, the results of the short-term dynamics are parallel with the long-term estimation results. Furthermore, because the error correction term is found negative and statistically significant, it can be said that the variables converge to equilibrium quickly, and short-term imbalances will be overcomed in the long-term.

  12. Testing Environmental Kuznets Curve in the Selected Transition Economies with Panel Smooth Transition Regression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Zortuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC introduces an inverted U-shaped relationship between environmental pollution and economic development. The inverted U-shaped curve is seen as complete pattern for developed economies. However, our study tests the EKC for developing transition economies of European Union, therefore, our results could make a significant contribution to the literature. In this paper, the relationship between carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions, gross domestic product (GDP, energy use and urban population is investigated in the Transition Economies (Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. Environmental Kuznets Curve is tested by panel smooth transition regression for these economies for 1993 – 2010 periods. As a result of study, the null hypothesis of linearity was rejected and no-remaining nonlinearity test showed that there is a smooth transition exists between two regimes (below $5176 GDP per capita is first one and above $5176 GDP per capita is second one in the related period for these economies.

  13. Inflammatory bowel diseases: from pathogenesis to laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Daniela; Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Plebani, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), which comprise the two major clinical subtypes, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, incur high morbidity and potential mortality. The present study reviews data on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of IBDs. The pathogenesis depends on complex interactions between susceptibility genes, environmental factors, and innate and adaptive immunity, the understanding of which is crucial to discovering novel laboratory biomarkers. Traditional laboratory tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of disease activity of IBDs are reported on, and the biochemical properties, pre-analytical and analytical aspects and clinical utility of the fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin are described. DNA testing and established (ASCA and pANCA) and emerging (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, OmpC) serum markers are described; a further aspect to be addressed is the clinical use of pharmacogenetics for the treatment of IBDs.

  14. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

    2007-02-01

    During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

  15. Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

  16. Analysis and Tests of Reinforced Carbon-Epoxy/Foam-Core Sandwich Panels with Cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rogers, Charles

    1996-01-01

    The results of a study of a low-cost structurally efficient minimum-gage shear-panel design that can be used in light helicopters are presented. The shear-panel design is based on an integrally stiffened syntactic-foam stabilized-skin with an all-bias-ply tape construction for stabilized-skin concept with an all-bias-ply tape construction for the skins. This sandwich concept is an economical way to increase the panel bending stiffness weight penalty. The panels considered in the study were designed to be buckling resistant up to 100 lbs/in. of shear load and to have an ultimate strength of 300 lbs/in. The panel concept uses unidirectional carbon-epoxy tape on a syntactic adhesive as a stiffener that is co-cured with the skin and is an effective concept for improving panel buckling strength. The panel concept also uses pultruded carbon-epoxy rods embedded in a syntactic adhesive and over-wrapped with a bias-ply carbon-epoxy tape to form a reinforcing beam which is an effective method for redistributing load around rectangular cutout. The buckling strength of the reinforced panels is 83 to 90 percent of the predicted buckling strength based on a linear buckling analysis. The maximum experimental deflection exceeds the maximum deflection predicted by a nonlinear analysis by approximately one panel thickness. The failure strength of the reinforced panels was two and a half to seven times of the buckling strength. This efficient shear-panel design concept exceeds the required ultimate strength requirement of 300 lbs/in by more than 100 percent.

  17. TESTING OF THE RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-02-10

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, nonelectrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. Positive results from initial deployment trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and the anticipated future potential use of RadBall throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further test, underpin, and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. The study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment were successful in that for each trial radiation tracks were visible. The deployment of RadBall can be accomplished in different ways depending on the size and characteristics of the contaminated area (e.g., a hot cell that already has a crane/manipulator available or highly contaminated room that requires the use of a remote control device with sensor and video equipment to position RadBall). This report also presents SRNL-designed RadBall accessories for future RadBall deployment (a harness, PODS, and robot).

  18. Benchmarking of Whole Exome Sequencing and Ad Hoc Designed Panels for Genetic Testing of Hereditary Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliubadaló, Lídia; Tonda, Raúl; Gausachs, Mireia; Trotta, Jean-Rémi; Castellanos, Elisabeth; López-Doriga, Adriana; Teulé, Àlex; Tornero, Eva; del Valle, Jesús; Gel, Bernat; Gut, Marta; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Menéndez, Mireia; Navarro, Matilde; Capellá, Gabriel; Gut, Ivo; Serra, Eduard; Brunet, Joan; Beltran, Sergi; Lázaro, Conxi

    2017-01-01

    Next generation sequencing panels have been developed for hereditary cancer, although there is some debate about their cost-effectiveness compared to exome sequencing. The performance of two panels is compared to exome sequencing. Twenty-four patients were selected: ten with identified mutations (control set) and fourteen suspicious of hereditary cancer but with no mutation (discovery set). TruSight Cancer (94 genes) and a custom panel (122 genes) were assessed alongside exome sequencing. Eighty-three genes were targeted by the two panels and exome sequencing. More than 99% of bases had a read depth of over 30x in the panels, whereas exome sequencing covered 94%. Variant calling with standard settings identified the 10 mutations in the control set, with the exception of MSH6 c.255dupC using TruSight Cancer. In the discovery set, 240 unique non-silent coding and canonic splice-site variants were identified in the panel genes, 7 of them putatively pathogenic (in ATM, BARD1, CHEK2, ERCC3, FANCL, FANCM, MSH2). The three approaches identified a similar number of variants in the shared genes. Exomes were more expensive than panels but provided additional data. In terms of cost and depth, panels are a suitable option for genetic diagnostics, although exomes also identify variants in non-targeted genes. PMID:28050010

  19. Concrete Flow in Diaphragm Wall Panels: A Full-Scale In-Situ Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, J.H.; Bosch, J.W.; Broere, W.

    2015-01-01

    Flow processes, taking place during the concreting of diaphragm wall panels (D-wall panels), are of great importance for the quality of the wall. During this phase, the bentonite, present in the excavated trench, should be completely replaced by concrete in a controlled way. In literature several ca

  20. LABORATORY TESTING OF LEICA AT401 LASER TRACKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Dvořáček

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes laboratory tests on a Leica AT401laser tracker. As the newer Leica AT402 model also uses the same firmware package, most of the results should also be valid for this device. First, we present the instrument’s firmware errors and the software used for testing. The ASME B89.4.19-2006 standard for testing laser trackers is briefly presented. The warm-up effect of the instrument is inspected with respect to both angle measurement and distance measurement. The absolute distance meter (ADM is compared with a laboratory interferometer on a 30-meter long rail and also on a bench with automated movement of the carriage of the reflector. A time series of measurements for determining the additive constant is evaluated. A simple test of the stability of the distance measurement in field conditions is introduced. Most of the tests were carried out at the Research Institute of Geodesy, Topography and Cartography (RIGTC and at the Faculty of Civil Engineering (FCE of the Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU.

  1. Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

  2. Evaluation of the NanoCHIP® Gastrointestinal Panel (GIP) Test for Simultaneous Detection of Parasitic and Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Fecal Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken Dror, Shifra; Pavlotzky, Elsa; Barak, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a global health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Rapid and accurate diagnosis is crucial to allow appropriate and timely treatment. Current laboratory stool testing has a long turnaround time (TAT) and demands highly qualified personnel and multiple techniques. The need for high throughput and the number of possible enteric pathogens compels the implementation of a molecular approach which uses multiplex technology, without compromising performance requirements. In this work we evaluated the feasibility of the NanoCHIP® Gastrointestinal Panel (GIP) (Savyon Diagnostics, Ashdod, IL), a molecular microarray-based screening test, to be used in the routine workflow of our laboratory, a big outpatient microbiology laboratory. The NanoCHIP® GIP test provides simultaneous detection of nine major enteric bacteria and parasites: Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Dientamoeba fragilis, and Blastocystis spp. The required high-throughput was obtained by the NanoCHIP® detection system together with the MagNA Pure 96 DNA purification system (Roche Diagnostics Ltd., Switzerland). This combined system has demonstrated a higher sensitivity and detection yield compared to the conventional methods in both, retrospective and prospective samples. The identification of multiple parasites and bacteria in a single test also enabled increased efficiency of detecting mixed infections, as well as reduced hands-on time and work load. In conclusion, the combination of these two automated systems is a proper response to the laboratory needs in terms of improving laboratory workflow, turn-around-time, minimizing human errors and can be efficiently integrated in the routine work of the laboratory. PMID:27447173

  3. The LINC-NIRVANA fringe and flexure tracker: laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremou, Evangelia; Eckart, Andreas; Horrobin, Matthew; Lindhorst, Bettina; Moser, Lydia; Rost, Steffen; Smajic, Semir; Straubmeier, Christian; Wank, Imke; Zuther, Jens; Bertram, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is the NIR homothetic imaging camera for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). In close cooperation with the Adaptive Optics systems of LINC-NIRVANA the Fringe and Flexure Tracking System (FFTS) is a fundamental component to ensure a complete and time-stable wavefront correction at the position of the science detector in order to allow for long integration times at interferometric angular resolutions. In this contribution, we present the design and the realization of the ongoing FFTS laboratory tests, taking into account the system requirements. We have to sample the large Field of View and to follow the reference source during science observations to an accuracy of less than 2 microns. In particular, important tests such as cooling tests of cryogenic components and tip - tilt test (the repeatability and the precision under the different inclinations) are presented. The system parameters such as internal flexure and precision are discussed.

  4. Evidence-based laboratory medicine - a guide for critical evaluation of in vitro laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Robert H

    2007-03-01

    Evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) is an essential part of modern laboratory medicine practice. This review presents a guide for better understanding and implementing the EBLM process. The process of EBLM begins with development of a clinically relevant question. Tools for assisting in question formulation include the Patient Intervention Comparator and Outcome (PICO) or Case Assay Predicate and Outcome (CAPO) strategies. Locating evidence that addresses the question is performed using resources available on the internet. Systematic reviews that have objectively collated evidence addressing the question can be particularly useful. The evidence collected must be critically appraised using checklists developed for this purpose. Diagnostic performance of tests is frequently stated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values, and the diagnostic odds ratio. Evaluating 95% confidence limits is important for interpretation. Likelihood ratios for tests in disease states are also important for converting pre-test probabilities to post-test probabilities using Bayes Theorem. Tools such as Receiver Operator Characteristic curves and Fagan's diagram are important analytical and visual aids. Laboratorians must give thoughtful consideration into conveying information to clinicians in a useful format. Evidence-based guidelines and collaboration with clinicians are important for development of local care paths. Auditing the effectiveness of implemented care paths is an important part of quality management. In conclusion, effective use of EBLM can benefit patients by helping laboratorians provide the best-available information in the clinically relevant time frame. Presenting the information appropriately maximizes clinical application of the best evidence.

  5. Application of flexible scope in large testing laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Di Candia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available According as the international definition of Flexible Scope, a laboratory must demonstrate face with the accreditation body that it has the knowledge, experience and competence to work within the full range of its flexible scope, as well as possessing suitable laboratory environments and equipment. The laboratory must also demonstrate that it has a management system in place that can control its proposed approach while continuing to comply with the requirements of ISO 17025:2005. In case of UKAS (Unites Kingdom Accreditation Service, prior to offering accreditation for flexible scope they must have a high degree of confidence that the staff are technically competent and that the management system controlling certain key processes as development, review, validation and authorization.LATU apply these requirements since 2004 as "Unified Tests". Until this date, LATU was doing the same type of tests in different materials departments using different equipment, personal, and testing quality control. In order to that were defined cross disciplinary groups to analyze this topic approaching in personal competence and quality control tests improvement, and resource's decrease. For example, LATU has the Unified Test Tensile Strength accredited by UKAS in: corrugated and solid fiberboard, paper board, linerboard, cork plugs, plastic bags, plastic sheeting, paper, woven fabrics, plastic woven bags and woven plastic. As a result of the Unified Tests was generated a general unified manage procedure with unified criteria's, responsibilities and actions. Was written a unique testing procedure not only with the actual flexible scope and the flexibilities limits but also the compliance requirements of ISO 17025 and the accreditations body methodology. We could decrease the amount of documentation to control. Was defined the methodology and implemented periodicaly internal inter comparisons between departments in order to valid the unified tests and has a unique

  6. The Role of Laboratory Tests in Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian

    2016-01-01

    In the past, laboratory tests were considered of limited value in Crohn’s disease (CD). In the era of biologics, laboratory tests have become essential to evaluate the inflammatory burden of the disease (C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin) since symptoms-based scores are subjective, to predict the response to pharmacological options and the risk of relapse, to discriminate CD from ulcerative colitis, to select candidates to anti-tumor necrosis factors [screening tests looking for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus status and latent tuberculosis], to assess the risk of adverse events (testing for thiopurine metabolites and thiopurine-methyltransferase activity), and to personalize and optimize therapy (therapeutic drug monitoring). Pharmacogenetics, though presently confined to the assessment of thiopurineme methyltransferase polymorphisms and hematological toxicity associated with thiopurine treatment, is a promising field that will contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the variability in response to the drugs used in CD with the attempt to expand personalized care and precision medicine strategies. PMID:27656094

  7. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  8. Laboratory testing for cobalamin deficiency in megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberley, Matthew J; Yang, David T

    2013-06-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia in Western populations. Laboratory evaluation of megaloblastic anemia frequently includes the assessment of patient cobalamin and folate status. Current total serum cobalamin measurements are performed in the clinical laboratory with competitive binding luminescence assays, whose results may not always accurately reflect actual cobalamin stores. Surrogate markers of cobalamin deficiency such as methylmalonic acid and homocysteine have been utilized to improve diagnostic accuracy; however, the specificity of these tests by themselves is rather low. Measurement of the biologically active fraction of cobalamin, holotranscobalamin, has been proposed as a replacement for current total cobalamin assays. Although holotranscobalamin measurements appear to have slighter better sensitivity, the specificity of this assay remains to be determined. The relative merits and demerits of commonly available methods to assess cobalamin deficiency in patients with suspected megaloblastic anemia are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

    2008-07-25

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

  10. Flight Test of a Technology Transparent Light Concentration Panel on SMEX/WIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.; Lyons, John

    2000-01-01

    A flight experiment has demonstrated a modular solar concentrator that can be used as a direct substitute replacement for planar photovoltaic panels in spacecraft solar arrays. The Light Concentrating Panel (LCP) uses an orthogrid arrangement of composite mirror strips to form an array of rectangular mirror troughs that reflect light onto standard, high-efficiency solar cells at a concentration ratio of approximately 3:1. The panel area, mass, thickness, and pointing tolerance has been shown to be similar to a planar array using the same cells. Concentration reduces the panel's cell area by 2/3, which significantly reduces the cost of the panel. An opportunity for a flight experiment module arose on NASA's Small Explorer / Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (SMEX/WIRE) spacecraft, which uses modular solar panel modules integrated into a solar panel frame structure. The design and analysis that supported implementation of the LCP as a flight experiment module is described. Easy integration into the existing SMEX-LITE wing demonstrated the benefits of technology transparency. Flight data shows the stability of the LCP module after nearly one year in Low Earth Orbit.

  11. Fabrication and Testing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Truss Core Sandwich Panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Wang; Linzhi Wu; Li Ma; Qiang Wang; Shanyi Du

    2009-01-01

    Truss core sandwich panels reinforced by carbon fibers were assembled with bonded laminate facesheets and carbon fiber reinforced truss cores. The top and bottom facesheets were interconnected with truss cores. Both ends of the truss cores were embedded into four layers of top and bottom facesheets. The mechanical properties of truss core sandwich panels were then investigated under out-of-plane and in-plane compression loadings to reveal the failure mechanisms of sandwich panels. Experimental results indicated that the mechanical behavior of sandwich structure under in-plane loading is dominated by the buckling and debonding of facesheets.

  12. Black holes a laboratory for testing strong gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook introduces the current astrophysical observations of black holes, and discusses the leading techniques to study the strong gravity region around these objects with electromagnetic radiation. More importantly, it provides the basic tools for writing an astrophysical code and testing the Kerr paradigm. Astrophysical black holes are an ideal laboratory for testing strong gravity. According to general relativity, the spacetime geometry around these objects should be well described by the Kerr solution. The electromagnetic radiation emitted by the gas in the inner part of the accretion disk can probe the metric of the strong gravity region and test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. With exercises and examples in each chapter, as well as calculations and analytical details in the appendix, the book is especially useful to the beginners or graduate students who are familiar with general relativity while they do not have any background in astronomy or astrophysics.

  13. How to test NISP instrument for EUCLID mission in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costille, A.; Carle, Michael; Fabron, Christophe; Prieto, Eric; Beaumont, Florent; Jessen, Niels-Christian; Jakobsen, Peter; Sørensen, Anton N.; Andersen, Michael I.; Grupp, Frank; Maciaszek, Thierry; Ealet, Anne; Gillard, William; Clemens, Jean-Claude

    2016-07-01

    The ESA mission Euclid is designed to explore the dark side of the Universe. The NISP (Near Infrared Spectro- Photometer) is one of its two instruments operating in the near-IR spectral region (0.9-2μm), that will be fully integrated and tested at Laboratory d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) under vacuum and thermal conditions. The test campaign will regroup functional tests, performance tests, calibration procedure validation and observations scenario test. One of the main objectives of the test campaign will be the measurement of the focus position of NISP with respect to the EUCLID object plane. To achieve these tests campaign, a global Ground Support Equipment (GSE) called the Verification Ground System (VGS) has to be developed. It will be a complex set of GSE integrated in ERIOS chamber made of: a telescope simulator to simulate the EUCLID telescope and to inject light into NISP, a thermal environment to be used for NISP thermal balance and verification, a sets of mechanical interfaces to align all the parts into ERIOS chamber, the NISP Electrical GSE (EGSE) to control the instrument during the test and a metrology system to measure the positions of the components during the test. We will present the preliminary design and concepts of the VGS and we will show the main difficulties we have to deal with: design of thermal environment at 80K with 4mK stability, the development of a metrology system in vacuum, knowledge of the focus position within 150μm in cold, etc. The main objectives of the NISP test will be explained and how the VGS responds to the test requirement.

  14. Assessment of apixaban plasma levels by laboratory tests: suitability of three anti-Xa assays. A multicentre French GEHT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle; Flaujac, Claire; Delavenne, Xavier; Quenet, Sara; Horellou, Marie-Hélenè; Laporte, Silvy; Siguret, V; Lecompte, T

    2014-02-01

    While laboratory monitoring is not required in patients treated with apixaban, a direct factor-Xa inhibitor, assessment of its concentration is useful in some critical situations. However, few data are available on its effect on coagulation tests and on the suitability of anti-Xa assays for its quantification. It was the objective of this study to identify laboratory tests suitable for apixaban concentration assessment. Coagulation tests - PT and aPTT- and anti-Xa assays were performed in apixaban-spiked plasma samples. To evaluate the sensitivity of PT and aPTT to apixaban, we conducted a first monocenter part, with a wide range of concentrations (50-1,000 ng/ml), a large panel of reagents (20 reagents), and two coagulometers (STAR®, Stago and ACL TOP®, IL), and a second multicenter part involving 13 laboratories using either a common PT reagent (RecombiPlastin2G®) or the local PT and aPTT reagents. In the multicentre part, five blinded apixaban-spiked plasma samples (0/100/200/400/800 ng/ml - checked by HPLC-MS/MS) were used; apixaban concentrations were measured with three anti-Xa assays, apixaban calibrators and controls (Stago). PT and aPTT tests using a large panel of reagents displayed a low sensitivity to a wide range of apixaban concentrations. The concentrations to double PT ranged from 400 to >1,000 ng/ml with the 10 reagents. With the three anti-Xa assays, inter-laboratory precision and accuracy were below 11% and 12%, respectively. In conclusion, whereas PT and aPTT tests were not sensitive enough to detect apixaban, the three anti-Xa assays tested using lyophilised apixaban calibrators and controls allowed to reliably quantify a wide range of apixaban concentrations.

  15. Digital Audio Radio Broadcast Systems Laboratory Testing Nearly Complete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the completion of phase one of the digital audio radio (DAR) testing conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. This satellite, satellite/terrestrial, and terrestrial digital technology will open up new audio broadcasting opportunities both domestically and worldwide. It will significantly improve the current quality of amplitude-modulated/frequency-modulated (AM/FM) radio with a new digitally modulated radio signal and will introduce true compact-disc-quality (CD-quality) sound for the first time. Lewis is hosting the laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes. Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes each, making a total of nine systems being tested. The nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on-channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent-channel (IBAC), and new bands. The laboratory testing was conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. Subjective assessments of the audio recordings for each of the nine systems was conducted by the Communications Research Center in Ottawa, Canada, under contract to the Electronic Industries Association. The Communications Research Center has the only CCIR-qualified (Consultative Committee for International Radio) audio testing facility in North America. The main goals of the U.S. testing process are to (1) provide technical data to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) so that it can establish a standard for digital audio receivers and transmitters and (2) provide the receiver and transmitter industries with the proper standards upon which to build their equipment. In addition, the data will be forwarded to the International Telecommunications Union to help in the establishment of international standards for digital audio receivers and transmitters, thus allowing U.S. manufacturers to compete in the

  16. Current strategies to minimize toxicity of oxaliplatin: selection of pharmacogenomic panel tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francia, Raffaele; Siesto, Raffaella Stefania; Valente, Daniela; Del Buono, Andrea; Pugliese, Sergio; Cecere, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Nasti, Guglielmo; Facchini, Gaetano; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2013-11-01

    Oxaliplatin is an anticancer drug routinely used to treat colorectal, gastroesophageal, ovarian, breast, head/neck, and genitourinary cancers. Discontinuation of oxaliplatin treatment is mostly because of peripheral neuropathy, more often than for tumor progression, potentially compromising patient benefit. Several strategies to prevent neurotoxicity have so far been investigated. To overcome this life-threatening side effect, while taking advantage of the antineoplastic activities of oxaliplatin, we describe in detail recent findings on the underlying mechanisms of genetic variants associated with toxicity and resistance to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. A comprehensive panel of eight polymorphisms, previously validated as significant markers related to oxaliplatin toxicity, is proposed and discussed. In addition, the most common available strategies or methods to prevent/minimize the toxicity were described in detail. Moreover, an early outline evaluation of the genotyping costs and methods was taken in consideration. With the availability of individual pharmacogenomic profiles, the oncologists will have new means to make treatment decisions for their patients that maximize benefit and minimize toxicity. With this purpose in mind, the clinician and lab manager should cooperate to evaluate the advantages and limitations, in terms of costs and applicability, of the most appropriate pharmacogenomic tests for routine incorporation into clinical practice.

  17. Antifungal susceptibility testing method for resource constrained laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In resource-constrained laboratories of developing countries determination of antifungal susceptibility testing by NCCLS/CLSI method is not always feasible. We describe herein a simple yet comparable method for antifungal susceptibility testing. Methods: Reference MICs of 72 fungal isolates including two quality control strains were determined by NCCLS/CLSI methods against fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and cancidas. Dermatophytes were also tested against terbinafine. Subsequently, on selection of optimum conditions, MIC was determined for all the fungal isolates by semisolid antifungal agar susceptibility method in Brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 0.5% agar (BHIA without oil overlay and results were compared with those obtained by reference NCCLS/CLSI methods. Results: Comparable results were obtained by NCCLS/CLSI and semisolid agar susceptibility (SAAS methods against quality control strains. MICs for 72 isolates did not differ by more than one dilution for all drugs by SAAS. Conclusions: SAAS using BHIA without oil overlay provides a simple and reproducible method for obtaining MICs against yeast, filamentous fungi and dermatophytes in resource-constrained laboratories.

  18. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems. Laboratory Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbauer, B. [NorthernStar Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States); Bohac, D. [NorthernStar Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States); Huelman, P. [NorthernStar Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States); Olsen, R. [NorthernStar Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States); Hewett, M. [NorthernStar Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  19. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  20. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed.

  1. Prototype dish testing and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, J. W.; Houser, R. M.; Erdman, W. W.

    1991-12-01

    During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories performed on-sun testing of several dish concentrator concepts. These tests were undertaken at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). Two of the tests were performed in support of the DOE Concentrator Receiver Development Program. The first was on-sun testing of the single-element stretched-membrane dish; this 7-meter diameter dish uses a single preformed metal membrane with an aluminized polyester optical surface and shows potential for future dish-Stirling systems. The next involved two prototype facets from the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program. These facets, representing competitive design concepts, are closest to commercialization. Five 1-meter triangular facets were tested on-sun as part of the development program for a solar dynamic system on Space Station Freedom. While unique in character, all the tests utilized the Beam Characterization System (BCS) as the main measurement tool and all were analyzed using the Sandia-developed CIRCE2 computer code. The BCS is used to capture and digitize an image of the reflected concentrator beam that is incident on a target surface. The CIRCE2 program provides a computational tool, which when given the geometry of the concentrator and target as well as other design parameters will predict the flux distribution of the reflected beam. One of these parameters, slope error, is the variable that has a major effect in determining the quality of the reflected beam. The methodology used to combine these two tools to predict uniform slope errors for the dishes is discussed in this document. As the Concentrator Development Programs continue, Sandia will test and evaluate two prototype dish systems. The first, the faceted stretched-membrane dish, is expected to be tested in 1992, followed by the full-scale single-element stretched-membrane dish in 1993. These tests will use the tools and methodology discussed in this document.

  2. Evaluation of Precast Panels for Airfield Pavement Repair. Phase 1: System Optimization and Test Section Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    panel repair system for repair of rigid airfield pavements in contingency situations. Design criteria were provided by AFCEC to assist with the...dimensions limit repair versatility, since they do not align with typical rigid airfield pavement slab sizes. The Air Force prototype system design consists...at the joint. The original Air Force panel design used 0.75-in.-wide joints that were backfilled with a rapid-setting rigid pavement repair material

  3. Diagnostic criteria and laboratory tests for disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hideo; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Hatada, Tuyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Three diagnostic criteria for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) have been established by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) and the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine. The diagnostic criteria involving global coagulation tests, such as the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare criteria and the ISTH overt diagnostic criteria, are first-generation DIC diagnostic criteria, those involving global coagulation tests and changes in these tests such as the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine criteria, are second-generation DIC diagnostic criteria, and those including non-overt DIC diagnostic criteria involving global coagulation tests, changes in these tests and hemostatic molecular markers will be the future (third-generation) DIC diagnostic criteria. There are no significant differences in the three diagnostic criteria with respect to predicting poor outcomes. Therefore, the third generation of diagnostic criteria including hemostatic molecular markers is expected to be established. Standardization and the determination of adequate cutoff values should be required for each laboratory test.

  4. A SNP panel for identity and kinship testing using massive parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandell, Ida; Samara, Raed; Tillmar, Andreas O

    2016-07-01

    Within forensic genetics, there is still a need for supplementary DNA marker typing in order to increase the power to solve cases for both identity testing and complex kinship issues. One major disadvantage with current capillary electrophoresis (CE) methods is the limitation in DNA marker multiplex capability. By utilizing massive parallel sequencing (MPS) technology, this capability can, however, be increased. We have designed a customized GeneRead DNASeq SNP panel (Qiagen) of 140 previously published autosomal forensically relevant identity SNPs for analysis using MPS. One single amplification step was followed by library preparation using the GeneRead Library Prep workflow (Qiagen). The sequencing was performed on a MiSeq System (Illumina), and the bioinformatic analyses were done using the software Biomedical Genomics Workbench (CLC Bio, Qiagen). Forty-nine individuals from a Swedish population were genotyped in order to establish genotype frequencies and to evaluate the performance of the assay. The analyses showed to have a balanced coverage among the included loci, and the heterozygous balance showed to have less than 0.5 % outliers. Analyses of dilution series of the 2800M Control DNA gave reproducible results down to 0.2 ng DNA input. In addition, typing of FTA samples and bone samples was performed with promising results. Further studies and optimizations are, however, required for a more detailed evaluation of the performance of degraded and PCR-inhibited forensic samples. In summary, the assay offers a straightforward sample-to-genotype workflow and could be useful to gain information in forensic casework, for both identity testing and in order to solve complex kinship issues.

  5. Socioeconomic inequality in health in the British household panel: Tests of the social causation, health selection and the indirect selection hypothesis using dynamic fixed effects panel models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foverskov, Else; Holm, Anders

    2016-02-01

    Despite social inequality in health being well documented, it is still debated which causal mechanism best explains the negative association between socioeconomic position (SEP) and health. This paper is concerned with testing the explanatory power of three widely proposed causal explanations for social inequality in health in adulthood: the social causation hypothesis (SEP determines health), the health selection hypothesis (health determines SEP) and the indirect selection hypothesis (no causal relationship). We employ dynamic data of respondents aged 30 to 60 from the last nine waves of the British Household Panel Survey. Household income and location on the Cambridge Scale is included as measures of different dimensions of SEP and health is measured as a latent factor score. The causal hypotheses are tested using a time-based Granger approach by estimating dynamic fixed effects panel regression models following the method suggested by Anderson and Hsiao. We propose using this method to estimate the associations over time since it allows one to control for all unobserved time-invariant factors and hence lower the chances of biased estimates due to unobserved heterogeneity. The results showed no proof of the social causation hypothesis over a one to five year period and limited support for the health selection hypothesis was seen only for men in relation to HH income. These findings were robust in multiple sensitivity analysis. We conclude that the indirect selection hypothesis may be the most important in explaining social inequality in health in adulthood, indicating that the well-known cross-sectional correlations between health and SEP in adulthood seem not to be driven by a causal relationship, but instead by dynamics and influences in place before the respondents turn 30 years old that affect both their health and SEP onwards. The conclusion is limited in that we do not consider the effect of specific diseases and causal relationships in adulthood may be

  6. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  7. Battery Test Facility- Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory (EADL) provides battery developers with reliable, independent, and unbiased performance evaluations of their...

  8. Results from laboratory and field testing of nitrate measuring spectrophotometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-01-01

    Five ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer nitrate analyzers were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) during a two-phase evaluation. In Phase I, the TriOS ProPs (10-millimeter (mm) path length), Hach NITRATAX plus sc (5-mm path length), Satlantic Submersible UV Nitrate Analyzer (SUNA, 10-mm path length), and S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5-mm path length) were evaluated in the HIF Water-Quality Servicing Laboratory to determine the validity of the manufacturer's technical specifications for accuracy, limit of linearity (LOL), drift, and range of operating temperature. Accuracy specifications were met in the TriOS, Hach, and SUNA. The stock calibration of the S::CAN required two offset adjustments before the analyzer met the manufacturer's accuracy specification. Instrument drift was observed only in the S::CAN and was the result of leaching from the optical path insert seals. All tested models, except for the Hach, met their specified LOL in the laboratory testing. The Hach's range was found to be approximately 18 milligrams nitrogen per liter (mg-N/L) and not the manufacturer-specified 25 mg-N/L. Measurements by all of the tested analyzers showed signs of hysteresis in the operating temperature tests. Only the SUNA measurements demonstrated excessive noise and instability in temperatures above 20 degrees Celsius (°C). The SUNA analyzer was returned to the manufacturer at the completion of the Phase II field deployment evaluation for repair and recalibration, and the performance of the sensor improved significantly.

  9. SINGLE EVENT EFFECTS TEST FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Dominik, Laura J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of microelectronics of ever diminishing feature size in avionics systems has led to a growing Single Event Effects (SEE) susceptibility arising from the highly ionizing interactions of cosmic rays and solar particles. Single event effects caused by atmospheric radiation have been recognized in recent years as a design issue for avionics equipment and systems. To ensure a system meets all its safety and reliability requirements, SEE induced upsets and potential system failures need to be considered, including testing of the components and systems in a neutron beam. Testing of ICs and systems for use in radiation environments requires the utilization of highly advanced laboratory facilities that can run evaluations on microcircuits for the effects of radiation. This paper provides a background of the atmospheric radiation phenomenon and the resulting single event effects, including single event upset (SEU) and latch up conditions. A study investigating requirements for future single event effect irradiation test facilities and developing options at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is summarized. The relatively new SNS with its 1.0 GeV proton beam, typical operation of 5000 h per year, expertise in spallation neutron sources, user program infrastructure, and decades of useful life ahead is well suited for hosting a world-class SEE test facility in North America. Emphasis was put on testing of large avionics systems while still providing tunable high flux irradiation conditions for component tests. Makers of ground-based systems would also be served well by these facilities. Three options are described; the most capable, flexible, and highest-test-capacity option is a new stand-alone target station using about one kW of proton beam power on a gas-cooled tungsten target, with dual test enclosures. Less expensive options are also described.

  10. Development of a High-fidelity Experimental Substructure Test Rig for Grid-scored Sandwich Panels in Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Steffen; Lund, Erik; Kühlmeier, L.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines high-fidelity experimental substructure testing of sandwich panels which constitute the aerodynamic outer shell of modern wind turbine blades. A full-scale structural experimental and numerical characterisation of a composite wind turbine blade has been conducted. The developm...... of substructure tests for composite wind turbine blades. Furthermore, recommendations on the use of grid-scored sandwich structures in wind turbine blades are presented, which outline the sensitivity in terms of quasi-static strength to the established loading conditions.......This paper outlines high-fidelity experimental substructure testing of sandwich panels which constitute the aerodynamic outer shell of modern wind turbine blades. A full-scale structural experimental and numerical characterisation of a composite wind turbine blade has been conducted...

  11. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  12. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  13. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

    2013-03-01

    Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

  14. Testing of Composite Panels Used as Components of a Freight Wagon by Thermovision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wróbel Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper research methods for detection of laminate panels damage were presented. The most common damage is: matrix cracking laminate interlayer damage to joints, connecting cracks, delamination and fiber breakage. The tested laminates will be used as assemblies and sub-assemblies of freight wagon. Other methods of modeling of machines by means of transducers are shown in Płaczek (2012, 2015 and Białas (2010. As part of the project authors were collaborated with specialists from other research centers and scientific research (Bocian and Kulisiewicz, 2013. As a part of future work the places where we will be able to replace the standard materials by parts made of laminate will be shown. Layered composites despite many advantages have also disadvantages. From last mentioned it is a relatively low resistance to transverse impact. When the laminate is used as a decorative element, its small damage is not a problem. The problems start when the composite satisfies more responsible tasks such as: is a part of the technical means for example of a railway wagon. Aspect of continuous monitoring of the technical state of the laminate is very important. Current technology provides numerous opportunities for non-destructive methods of technical inspections. In this paper method for testing of large areas, completely non-contact, based on the methods of thermography, was presented. It consists heating by using the composite tubes and examining it through a thermal imaging camera. Length of heating, and consequently the temperature to which the laminate is heated mostly were chosen experimentally. During the measurements, the camera measures the intensity of radiation, not temperature. Received thermogram is not always a precise representation of the actual temperature, because the camera does not reach only the radiation from tested object, but also reaches the radiation coming from the environment and reflected objects etc. As part of the research

  15. EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairala, Juniper C.; Durkin, Robert; Marak, Ralph J.; Sipila, Stepahnie A.; Ney, Zane A.; Parazynski, Scott E.; Thomason, Arthur H.

    2012-01-01

    As an early step in the preparation for future Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. Neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Facility to date have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the International Space Station (ISS). With the retirement of the Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial players for human transportation to space, evaluations at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) will take on a new focus. Test objectives are selected for their criticality, lack of previous testing, or design changes that justify retesting. Assembly tasks investigated are performed using procedures developed by the flight hardware providers and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance tasks are performed using a more systematic set of procedures, EVA Concept of Operations for the International Space Station (JSC-33408), also developed by the MOD. This paper describes the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated.

  16. Standard test method for laboratory evaluation of magnesium sacrificial anode test specimens for underground applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory procedure that measures the two fundamental performance properties of magnesium sacrificial anode test specimens operating in a saturated calcium sulfate, saturated magnesium hydroxide environment. The two fundamental properties are electrode (oxidation potential) and ampere hours (Ah) obtained per unit mass of specimen consumed. Magnesium anodes installed underground are usually surrounded by a backfill material that typically consists of 75 % gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), 20 % bentonite clay, and 5 % sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). The calcium sulfate, magnesium hydroxide test electrolyte simulates the long term environment around an anode installed in the gypsum-bentonite-sodium sulfate backfill. 1.2 This test method is intended to be used for quality assurance by anode manufacturers or anode users. However, long term field performance properties may not be identical to property measurements obtained using this laboratory test. Note 1—Refer to Terminology G 15 for terms used ...

  17. Laboratory Testing of Active and Passive UHF RFID Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarovszki Peter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with research of laboratory testing by active and passive UHF tags and therefore mutual coexistence of active and passive RFID technology, which is a part of automatic identification and data capture. In this article we would like to describe an identification of transport unit based on passive technology and also by active technology. We would like to specify, how this technologies can work together and in which application focuses on postal and logistics. All results are verified by measurement in our AIDC laboratory, which is located at the University of Žilina. Our research contains different types of measurements in order to point out the possible influence of these two technologies. The results of our research bring the new point of view and indicate the ways using of UHF RFID technology in postal and logistics applications. At the end of this article is characterized the utilization of the RFID technology in postal logistics chain by using both passive and active technologies.

  18. Setting up Multiplex Panels for Genetic Testing of Familial Hy¬pertrophic Cardiomyopathy Based on Linkage Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorieh SAGHAFI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding cardiac sarcomere proteins. Nowadays genetic testing of HCM plays an important role in clinical practice by contributing to the diagnosis, prognosis, and screening of high-risk individuals. The aim of this study was developing a reliable testing strategy for HCM based on linkage analysis and appropriate for Iranian population.Methods: Six panels of four microsatellite markers surrounding MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1, and MYL2 genes (24 markers in total were selected for multiplex PCR and fragment length analysis. Characteristics of markers and informativeness of the panels were evaluated in 50 unrelated Iranians. The efficacy of the strategy was verified in a family with HCM.Results: All markers were highly polymorphic. The panels were informative in 96-100% of samples. Multipoint linkage analysis excluded the linkage between the disease and all six genes by obtaining maximum LOD score ≤-2.Conclusion: This study suggests a reliable genetic testing method based on linkage analysis between 6 sarcomere genes and familial HCM. It could be applied for diagnostic, predictive, or screening testing in clinical setting. Keywords: Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic, Genetic linkage, Diagnosis 

  19. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; Del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-04

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk.

  20. Laboratory tests of oil spreading under the ice cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rytkoenen, J.; Liukkonen, S.; Riipi, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-07-01

    A laboratory study on oil spreading and drifting under ice was conducted by VTT Manufacturing Technology, Finland. The aim of the study was to find out threshold conditions for the oil movement under ice. The oil was released under ice in calm water and the spreading of the oil slick under the bottom of the ice was investigated. In the oil drifting part, oil drifting velocities under level ice in steady water flow, water flow velocities making oil to submerge from open water to under ice and water velocities making oil to escape from under ice ridges were studied. This paper describes the oil spreading part of the study. The study included four types of oil, namely the fresh and pre-altered North Sea Brent crude oil, lubrication oil and diesel fuel oil. All the measurements were taken in water under ice, thus at the temperature of zero Celcius. In the level ice studies, three different ice bottom roughnesses were tested. (author)

  1. Test and Validation of the Mars Science Laboratory Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M.; Collins, C.; Leger, P.; Kim, W.; Carsten, J.; Tompkins, V.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Florow, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Robotic Arm (RA) is a key component for achieving the primary scientific goals of the mission. The RA supports sample acquisition by precisely positioning a scoop above loose regolith or accurately preloading a percussive drill on Martian rocks or rover-mounted organic check materials. It assists sample processing by orienting a sample processing unit called CHIMRA through a series of gravity-relative orientations and sample delivery by positioning the sample portion door above an instrument inlet or the observation tray. In addition the RA facilitates contact science by accurately positioning the dust removal tool, Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) and the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) relative to surface targets. In order to fulfill these seemingly disparate science objectives the RA must satisfy a variety of accuracy and performance requirements. This paper describes the necessary arm requirement specification and the test campaign to demonstrate these requirements were satisfied.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Confidence Intervals for Laboratory Sonic Boom Annoyance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathsam, Jonathan; Christian, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Commercial supersonic flight is currently forbidden over land because sonic booms have historically caused unacceptable annoyance levels in overflown communities. NASA is providing data and expertise to noise regulators as they consider relaxing the ban for future quiet supersonic aircraft. One deliverable NASA will provide is a predictive model for indoor annoyance to aid in setting an acceptable quiet sonic boom threshold. A laboratory study was conducted to determine how indoor vibrations caused by sonic booms affect annoyance judgments. The test method required finding the point of subjective equality (PSE) between sonic boom signals that cause vibrations and signals not causing vibrations played at various amplitudes. This presentation focuses on a few statistical techniques for estimating the interval around the PSE. The techniques examined are the Delta Method, Parametric and Nonparametric Bootstrapping, and Bayesian Posterior Estimation.

  4. Evidence of sulphonamide residues by rapid laboratory test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Kaša

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the significant role in the treatment of bacterial diseases, primarily mastitis, intestinal infections and pneumonia, sulphonamides are used as fodder additives. The disadvantage of antimicrobial therapy in dairy cows is the residue presence, of biologically active substances, in milk and milk products. The purpose of this paper is to control milk for sulphonamide residues in relation to the amounts as permitted by the Regulations (OfficialGazette of the Republic of Croatia No. 39/2003. To determine sulphonamides, the laboratory test LabSULFAmilk, manufactured by Frank analab d.o.o., was used. Positive reaction to sulphonamide residues was found in 10 % of the examined samples.

  5. The use of laboratory tests in the diagnosis of SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, W

    2000-06-01

    ANA IIF is an effective screening assay in patients with clinical features of SLE and will detect most anti-ssDNA, anti-dsDNA, ENAs, and other autoantibodies. False positives are common. The clinical importance cannot be extrapolated from the ANA titre or pattern, although higher titres (> 1/160) are more likely to be important. HEp-2 cells are the most sensitive substrate for ANA detection, but this must be balanced against an increased incidence of insignificant positivity. ANA positive samples should be subjected to more specific assays for the diagnosis of SLE. A combination of ENA (Ro/La/Sm/RNP) and dsDNA assays will detect most patients with SLE as long as the characteristics of the assays used are well understood. ESR and CRP measurements provide useful additional information. Sjogren's syndrome and MCTD will produce overlapping serology with SLE, and anti-dsDNA titres are sometimes seen in autoimmune hepatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. All results should be reported in the light of the clinical details, by an experienced immunologist. A suggested diagnostic protocol is outlined in fig 1. The type of assay used crucially influences the predictive value of the tests. ELISA technology dominates routine laboratory practice, but tends to produce more false positive and true weak positive results, which may reduce the PPV of the test. This can be minimised by using IgG specific conjugates and careful assay validation. The NPV for SLE [figure: see text] is high for most assays but the PPV varies. Where necessary, laboratories should use crithidia or Farr dsDNA assays to confirm dubious ELISA dsDNA results, and ID/IB to confirm dubious ENA results. For monitoring, a precise, quantitative assay is required. It is unclear whether the detection of IgM or low affinity antibodies has a role here. A combination of anti-dsDNA, C3, C4, CRP, and ESR assays provides the most useful clinical information. Anti-ssDNA assays are likely to be useful, and are potentially more

  6. Development of lifetime test procedure for powder evacuated panel insulation. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K E; Graves, R S; Childs, K W

    1996-03-01

    This CRADA is between Appliance Research Consortium (ARC) of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) and the Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. A Powder Evacuated Panel (PEP) is a "super" thermal insulation, having a thermal resistivity (R) substantially above that of existing insulation without the environmental problems of some insulations such as Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blown foam.

  7. Impact Testing on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Flat Panels With BX-265 and PDL-1034 External Tank Foam for the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, Michael J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Orbiter Columbia (STS-107) on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the space shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) along with ice and foam debris materials, which could shed on ascent and impact the orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.) to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: Level 1-fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic constitutive model properties of materials of interest, Level 2-subcomponent impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and Level 3-full-scale orbiter leading-edge impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This report discusses the Level 2 test program conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Ballistic Impact Laboratory with external tank foam impact tests on flat RCC panels, and presents the data observed. The Level 2 testing consisted of 54 impact tests in the NASA GRC Ballistic Impact Laboratory on 6- by 6-in. and 6- by 12-in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated two types of debris projectiles: BX-265 and PDL-1034 external tank foam. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile and validated the use of the foam and RCC models for use in LS-DYNA.

  8. 75 FR 39954 - Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Change of Meeting Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting... entitled ``Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests.'' A new address is given for those attending the public... interested stakeholders to discuss the agency's oversight of laboratory developed tests. FDA announced in...

  9. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also

  10. Testing in a Random Effects Panel Data Model with Spatially Correlated Error Components and Spatially Lagged Dependent Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming He

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a random effects panel data model with both spatially correlated error components and spatially lagged dependent variables. We focus on diagnostic testing procedures and derive Lagrange multiplier (LM test statistics for a variety of hypotheses within this model. We first construct the joint LM test for both the individual random effects and the two spatial effects (spatial error correlation and spatial lag dependence. We then provide LM tests for the individual random effects and for the two spatial effects separately. In addition, in order to guard against local model misspecification, we derive locally adjusted (robust LM tests based on the Bera and Yoon principle (Bera and Yoon, 1993. We conduct a small Monte Carlo simulation to show the good finite sample performances of these LM test statistics and revisit the cigarette demand example in Baltagi and Levin (1992 to illustrate our testing procedures.

  11. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Farcal

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials (NMs display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS. Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues. The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry - hydrophilic (NM-103 and hydrophobic (NM-104, two forms of ZnO - uncoated (NM-110 and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111 and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques - precipitated (NM-200 and pyrogenic (NM-203. Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2. Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially 'weak-embryotoxic' and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as 'non-embryotoxic'. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103. This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for which TiO2

  12. Panel session: Part 1, In flux -- Science Policy and the social structure of Big Laboratories, 1964--1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)]|[CEBAF, Newport News, VA (United States)]|[Fermilab History Collaboration, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report discusses the in flux of science policy and the social structure of big laboratories during the period of 1964 to 1979 and some sociological consequences of high energy physicists` development of the standard model during the same period.

  13. Testing and thermal modeling of radiant panels systems as commissioning tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca Diaz, Nestor, E-mail: njfonseca@doct.ulg.ac.b [University of Liege Belgium, Thermodynamics Laboratory, Campus du Sart Tilman, Bat: B49, P33, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica, AA 97 Pereira (Colombia); Cuevas, Cristian [Universidad de Concepcion, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Casilla 160c Concepcion (Chile)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a study performed to develop a thermal modeling of radiant panels systems to be used in situ, as diagnosis tool in commissioning processes to determine the main operating conditions of the system in cooling or heating mode. The model considers the radiant panels as a finned heat exchanger in dry regime. By using as inputs the ceiling and room dimensions, the radiant ceiling material properties and the measurements of air and water mass flow rates and temperatures, the model is able to calculate the radiant ceiling capacity, ceiling surface average temperature, water exhaust temperature and resultant temperature as a comfort indicator. The modeling proposed considers combined convection, perforation effect and a detailed radiative heat exchange method for radiant ceiling systems. An example of each system considered in this study is shown, illustrating the validation of the model. A sensitive analysis of the model is performed.

  14. Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a

  15. Laboratory testing of a lethal ovitrap for Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, B C; Perich, M J

    1999-07-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the feasibility of making the mosquito ovitrap lethal to Aedes aegypti (L.) when they attempt to oviposit in the trap. Heavy-weight velour paper strips (2.54 x 11 cm) were used as an alternative to the wooden paddle normally provided as a substrate for mosquito oviposition. The paper strips were pretreated with insecticide solutions and allowed to dry before being used in oviposition cups of 473 ml capacity, filled with water initially to within 2.5 cm of the brim. Insecticides chosen for their quick knock-down efficacy were bendiocarb 76% WP (1.06 mg a.i./strip) and four pyrethroids: permethrin 25% WP (0.16 mg a.i./strip), deltamethin 4.75% SC (0.87 mg a.i./strip), cypermethrin 40% WP (2.81 mg a.i./strip), and cyfluthrin 20% WP (0.57 mg a.i./ strip). For experimental evaluation, two oviposition cups (one with an insecticide-treated strip and one with an untreated strip) were placed in cages (cubic 30 cm) with gravid female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes (aged 6-8 days) from a susceptible laboratory strain. Mortality-rates of female mosquitoes were 45% for bendiocarb, 47% for permethrin, 98% for deltamethrin, 100% for cypermethrin, and 100% for cyfluthrin. Young instar larvae added to the treated cups died within 2h. After water evaporation from the cups for 38 days, fresh mosquito females had access to previously submerged portions of the velour paper paddle, and mortality rates of 59% or more occurred. Cups that had water (360 ml) dripped into them, to simulate rain, produced female mosquito mortality rates of > 50% and all larvae died within 3 h of being added. These tests demonstrate that the ovitrap can be made lethal to both adults and larvae by insecticidal treatment of the ovistrip. Field efficacy trials are underway in Brazil to access the impact of this simple, low-cost, environmentally benign approach on populations of the dengue vector Ae. aegypti.

  16. Nondestructive testing of rocket engine injector panel using ultrasonic burst phase thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Cunlin; Wu, Naiming; Zeng, Zhi; Xing, Chunfei; Li, Yue; Zhao, Shibin; Ning, Tao

    2010-10-01

    As the key parts of the liquid rocket oxyhydrogen engine, the injector panel is a kind of transpiration material, which is braided and Sintered with stainless steel wire. If some hidden delaminition defects that are difficult to detect appear in the process of Sintering and rolling, a significant safety problem would occur. In this paper, we use the Ultrasonic Burst Phase Thermography (UBP) to detect the delamination defects in the injector panel, UBP is a rapid and reliable nondestructive technique derived from Ultrasonic Lock-in Thermography(ULT). It uses a controllable, adjustable ultrasonic burst as the heat source to stimulate the sample, the defects within the material are revealed through their heat generation caused by friction, clapping and thermoelastic effect, as the resulting surface temperature distribution is observed by an infrared camera. The original thermal images sequence is processed by Fast Fourier Transformation to obtain the phase information of the defects. In the experiments of the delamination sample, the UBP realized the selective heating of delamination defects in the injector panel, and the signal to noise of phase image is higher than the original thermal image because the phase information can not be disturbed by the initial conditions (such as the reflective surface of sample). However, the result of the detection of flat bottom hole transpiration panel sample reflects that UBP is not appropriate for the detection of this kind of defects, because it is difficult to induce frictional heating of flat bottom holes. As contrast, Flash Pulse Thermography is used to detect the flat bottom holes, all of the holes of different depth and sizes can be seen distinctly. The results show that PT is more appropriate for the detection of flat bottom holes defects than UBP, therefore, it is important to select the appropriate excitation method according to different defects.

  17. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and...

  18. On Laminar to Turbulent Transition of Arc-Jet Flow in the NASA Ames Panel Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Alunni, Antonella I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides experimental evidence and supporting computational analysis to characterize the laminar to turbulent flow transition in a high enthalpy arc-jet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The arc-jet test data obtained in the 20 MW Panel Test Facility include measurements of surface pressure and heat flux on a water-cooled calibration plate, and measurements of surface temperature on a reaction-cured glass coated tile plate. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed to characterize the arc-jet test environment and estimate its parameters consistent with the facility and calibration measurements. The present analysis comprises simulations of the nonequilibrium flowfield in the facility nozzle, test box, and flowfield over test articles. Both laminar and turbulent simulations are performed, and the computed results are compared with the experimental measurements, including Stanton number dependence on Reynolds number. Comparisons of computed and measured surface heat fluxes (and temperatures), along with the accompanying analysis, confirm that that the boundary layer in the Panel Test Facility flow is transitional at certain archeater conditions.

  19. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis testing practices in hospital, commercial and state laboratories in the New England states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, K A; Lobato, M N; Sosa, L E; Budnick, G E; Bernardo, J

    2011-09-01

    The mycobacterial laboratory is assuming an increasingly important role in tuberculosis (TB) control in the United States today. To assess mycobacterial laboratory capacity and practices in the New England states, USA. We surveyed 143 hospital and commercial laboratories and five of the six state public health laboratories in New England that offer testing services for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The survey captured information on types of services offered and volume of testing, use of state laboratories for testing, and promptness of reporting results to TB control programs. State laboratories perform the majority of testing services, particularly for more specialized tests. All state laboratories surveyed perform species identification of acid-fast isolates, culture and first-line drug susceptibility testing. Less than 20% of hospital and commercial laboratories offer these services, and 78.6% of hospitals and commercial laboratories refer specimens to state laboratories for culture. Surveys of M. tuberculosis testing capacities in a region can help decision makers ensure maintenance of essential services. Hospital and commercial laboratories with lower testing volume might increase efficiency by referring more specimens to state laboratories. State health departments might consider organizing regional laboratory service networks to monitor the provision of services, improve efficiency and oversee quality improvement initiatives.

  1. 78 FR 46996 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... 503 of Public Law 100-71. The ``Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs'', as... Laboratory Partnership, 245 Pall Mall Street, London, ONT, Canada N6A 1P4, 519-679-1630 Laboratory...: Centinela Hospital Airport Toxicology Laboratory) Pathology Associates Medical Laboratories, 110 West Cliff...

  2. 78 FR 39757 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... 503 of Public Law 100-71. The ``Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs'', as... Laboratory Partnership, 245 Pall Mall Street, London, ONT, Canada N6A 1P4, 519-679-1630 Laboratory...: Centinela Hospital Airport Toxicology Laboratory) Pathology Associates Medical Laboratories, 110 West Cliff...

  3. Biosolid Soil Application: Toxicity Tests under Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintya Ap. Christofoletti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A large volume of generated sewage sludge makes its disposal a problem. The usage of sludge in agriculture is highlighted by a number of advantages. However, heavy metals and other toxic compounds may exercise harmful effects to soil organisms. This study evaluated the possible toxic effects of a biosolid sample, under laboratory conditions, for 30 days, using diplopods Rhinocricus padbergi and plants Allium cepa (onion as test organisms. The data obtained demonstrated that the biosolid raw sample had genotoxic potential for Allium cepa root tip cells. In the diplopods exposed to biosolid sample, epithelium disorganization in the midgut and a reduction of the volume of the hepatic cells were observed after 7 days of exposure. After 30 days, the animals still showed a reduction of the volume of the hepatic cells, but in minor intensity. Allium cepa analysis showed genotoxicity, but this effect was reduced after 30 days of bioprocessing by diplopods. This study was important to know the effects as well as to determine how this waste could be applied concerning the soil living organisms and plants.

  4. Multi-laboratory precision of Marshall design related tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available by different laboratories. The variability was of such a degree that it would influence design decisions or could lead to conflict over product acceptance. A study was undertaken to investigate the extent and consequences of the inter-laboratory variability...

  5. 几种金属面夹芯板的耐火性能测试%Test on fire resistance performance of several metal surface sandwich panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何国山; 潘永红; 李晓增; 刘东发; 尹碧军

    2013-01-01

    The fire resistance performance of rockwool sandwich panel,EPS sandwich panel,polyurethane sandwich panel and phenolic sandwich panel with different thickness was carried out by the vertical element fire test furnace.The fire resistance test of rock wool combined with EPS or polyurethane showed that the fire resistance of 100 mm thick rock wool-EPS sandwich panel and rock wool-polyurethane sandwich panel were 85 min,90 min,respectively.The fire resistance of EPS sandwich panel and polyurethane sandwich panel was improved greatly.%用垂直构件耐火试验炉研究不同厚度的金属面岩棉夹芯板、EPS夹芯板、聚氨酯夹芯板、酚醛夹芯板的耐火性能.用岩棉与EPS、岩棉与聚氨酯进行组合进行耐火性能测试,100 mm厚的岩棉—EPS夹芯板、岩棉—聚氨酯的耐火极限分别达到85、90 min,较大提高了EPS夹芯板和聚氨酯夹芯板的耐火性能.

  6. Information comparison of the effects of drugs on laboratory tests in drug labels and Young's book

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, A.F.; Koning, F.H. de; Egberts, T.C.; Smet, P.A. de; Solinge, W.W. van

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background: The effects of drugs on laboratory tests may lead to misinterpretation of laboratory data, unnecessary tests, higher costs and missed diagnoses. This study compared the information on drug-laboratory effects (DLE) described in 200 drug labels with that in Young's book. Methods:

  7. 7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing... Charges § 91.37 Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services. (a) The standard hourly fee rate in this section for the individual laboratory analyses cover the costs of...

  8. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcal, Lucian; Torres Andón, Fernando; Di Cristo, Luisana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico; Mech, Agnieszka; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Ponti, Jessica; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Rossi, François; Oomen, Agnes; Bos, Peter; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Rocks, Louise; Fulton, Norma; Ross, Bryony; Hutchison, Gary; Tran, Lang; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Campagnolo, Luisa; Vecchione, Lucia; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS). Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues). The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry – hydrophilic (NM-103) and hydrophobic (NM-104), two forms of ZnO – uncoated (NM-110) and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111) and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques – precipitated (NM-200) and pyrogenic (NM-203). Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h) (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2). Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days) significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST) classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially ‘weak-embryotoxic’ and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as ‘non-embryotoxic’. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103). This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for

  9. A Test for Parameter Homogeneity in CO{sub 2}Panel EKC Estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, E. [Erasmus University Rotterdam and SEOR, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Vollebergh, H.R.J. [Department of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-10-15

    This paper casts doubt on empirical results based on panel estimations of an 'inverted-U' relationship between per capita GDP and pollution. Using a new dataset for OECD countries on carbon dioxide emissions for the period 1960-1997, we find that the crucial assumption of homogeneity across countries is problematic. Decisively rejected are model specifications that feature even weaker homogeneity assumptions than are commonly used. Furthermore, our results challenge the existence of an overall Environmental Kuznets Curve for carbon dioxide emissions.

  10. Standards for thyroid laboratory testing, and cognitive functions after menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Bojar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The aim of the study is to analyze the relationship between normative and non-normative thyroid tests (TSH, TT4, TT3, FT3, FT4, anti-TPO, anti-Tg, AB-TSHR and the level of cognitive functions in postmenopausal women. Material and methods: The study group consisted of 383 women from south-eastern Poland, aged 50-65 years. The cognitive functions were evaluated using a diagnostic instrument – Central Nervous System – Vital Signs (CNS-VS. Blood was collected for determination of the following parameters: TSH, TT4, TT3, FT3, FT4, anti-TPO, anti-Tg, AB-TSHR. Results: There were significant differences in NCI, executive functions, psychomotor speed, reaction time, complex attention and cognitive flexibility, depending on the normative and non-normative level of TSH. Women whose level of FT3 was at the lower limit of the normal range obtained poorer results in psychomotor speed, while subjects with levels of FT4 below the standard achieved significantly lower scores for this function. The relationship between NCI and cognitive functions, and the normative and non-normative anti-TPO results, showed significant differences in verbal memory, visual memory, processing speed and reaction time. The level of AB-TSHR reported as normal or above the norm significantly differentiated from the results of NCI, processing speed, executive functions, psychomotor speed, complex attention and cognitive flexibility. Conclusions : Concentrations of laboratory parameters assessing the thyroid function located within the upper limits of the normal range showed a different relationship with the cognitive performance than concentrations located within the lower limits of the standard.

  11. The Phillips Laboratory capillary pumped loop test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Donald F.; Kaylor, Marc C.

    1996-03-01

    An ammonia capillary pumped loop (CPL) test facility has been designed, fabricated, subject to acceptance tests, and assembled at Phillips Laboratory. Its intent is to support a wide range of Air Force programs, bringing CPL technology to flight readiness for operational systems. The facility provides a high degree of modularity and flexibility with several heating and cooling options, and capability for elevation (+/- 15 in.), tilt (+/-60°) and transport length variation. It has a 182 by 44 by 84 inch envelope, an expected heat load capability of 2500 W, and a temperature range of 0 to 50 °C. The evaporator section has two plates with four capillary pumps (CPs) each, with a starter pump on one plate. The CPs are 5/8 in., with TAG aluminum 6063-T6 casing and UHMW polyethylene wicks. The active lengths are 15 and 30 inch with both 10 and 15 micron wicks. The individual CPs have thermal and hydraulic isolation capability, and are removable. The transport section consists of stainless steel lines in a serpentine configuration, a 216 in3 free volume reservoir, and a mechanical pump. The vapor transport line contains a capillary device (which can be bypassed) for vapor blockage during startup. The condenser consists of two separately valved, parallel cold plates each with a downstream noncondensible gas trap. Cooling of up to 1500 W at -50 °C is provided by an FTS Systems chiller using Flourinert FC-72. An enclosure/exhaust system is provided for safety and emergency venting of ammonia. An ammonia charge station performs or supports the functions of proof pressure, flushing with ammonia, purging with gaseous nitrogen, evacuation of all or part of the CPL to 20 microns, and charging. Instrumentation consists of over 116 thermocouples, five of which are internal; one absolute and six differential pressure transducers; eleven watt transducers, and a reservoir load cell. The data acquisition system consists of a temperature scanner, Bernoulli drive, and two Macintosh

  12. Settling velocity of marine microplastic particles: laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isachenko, Igor; Khatmullina, Lilia; Chubarenko, Irina; Stepanova, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    An assessment of the settling velocity of different classes of microplastic particles (microplastic particles is usually outside the Stokes range (Re 105). Even for such transitional regime, the settling velocity of the particles that could be treated as more or less smooth spheres can be predicted with high accuracy by relationships available in publications. This is not the case for the non-spherical particles like fibres or flakes. There are quite a large number of quasi-theoretical or semi-empirical approaches that take into account the shape and roughness of the particles, usually in the applications to transport of natural sediments. Some engineering formulas for the settling velocity are also developed which have simpler structure along with high degree of accuracy on the set of experimental data. For marine microplastic particles, the absence of relationship between the settling velocity and the properties of the particle requires testing on the samples of marine microplastics. Besides small fragments of rigid plastic (granules, microbeads), there are also fibres and thin plastic sheets (flakes) with some degree of flexibility. The applicability of available formulae to thin and/or flexible plastic particles again requires verification by experiments. The set of laboratory experiments on settling of microplastic particles of various shapes and excess densities in homogeneous water is reported. The particles were collected in water column, bottom sediments and on the beaches of the South-Eastern Baltic. The experiments demonstrate not just different regimes of motion but different manner of the sinking of spheres, flakes and fibres. The very definition of the "settling velocity" has a specific meaning for every kind of a particle shape. The results of test measurements are compared with predictions by several published semi-empirical formulae. We conclude that there are several new questions to discuss in this regard: (i) proper definition of the meaning of

  13. The National Market for Medicare Clinical Laboratory Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Current Medicare payment policy for outpatient laboratory services is outdated. Future reforms, such as competitive bidding, should consider the characteristics of...

  14. Preference Testing as Environmental Enrichment Assessment for Laboratory Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Navakanit Sachanonta; Waridtha Sa-ngeunreung; Somchai Sa-ing-kaew; Raywadee Butraporn

    2013-01-01

      In the field of biomedical research, a wide variety of environmental enrichment items are available for laboratory mice to fulfill its physiological and behavioral needs which influence the outcome...

  15. The National Market for Medicare Clinical Laboratory Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Current Medicare payment policy for outpatient laboratory services is outdated. Future reforms, such as competitive bidding, should consider the characteristics of...

  16. Elusive antimatter formed in laboratory scientists testing nature's deepest secrets

    CERN Multimedia

    Boyd, R S

    2002-01-01

    A team of European physicists reported the creation in a Swiss laboratory of at least 50,000 atoms of antihydrogen, the first time a significant quantity of antimatter has been produced on earth (1 page).

  17. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

  18. Contact allergy to allergens of the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) has decreased modestly in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population is nearly 20%. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to monitor the development of contact allergy to allergens from the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) between 1990 and 2006. METHODS: Two random samples of adults from the general population...... of contact allergy in all male age groups and in young and middle-aged female age groups (18-55 years) whereas increasing prevalences were observed among older women (56-69 years). The diverging trend observed in women was probably explained by a cohort effect due to a change in the prevalence of nickel...

  19. Laboratory testing improves diagnosis and treatment outcomes in primary health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Y. Carter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine if use of basic laboratory tests improves diagnosis and treatment outcomes in outpatients attending rural primary health care facilities.Setting: Six rural health centres in Kenya.Design: Cross-sectional study to observe change in diagnosis and treatment made by clinical officers after laboratory testing in outpatients attending six rural health centres in Kenya.Subject: The diagnosis and treatment of 1134 patients attending outpatient services in six rural health centres were compared before and after basic laboratory testing. Essential clinical diagnostic equipment and laboratory tests were established at each health centre. Clinical officers and laboratory technicians received on-site refresher training in good diagnostic practices and laboratory procedures before the study began.Results: Laboratory tests were ordered on 704 (62.1% patients. Diagnosis and treatment were changed in 45% of tested patients who returned with laboratory results (21% of all patients attending the clinics. 166 (23.5% patients did not return to the clinician for a final diagnosis and management decision after laboratory testing. Blood slide examination for malaria parasites, wet preparations, urine microscopy and stool microscopy resulted in most changes to diagnosis. There was no significant change in drug costs after laboratory testing. The greatest changes in numbers of recorded diseases following laboratory testing was for intestinal worms (53% and malaria (21%.Conclusion: Effective use of basic laboratory tests at primary health care level significantly improves diagnosis and patient treatment. Use of laboratory testing can be readily incorporated into routine clinical practice. On-site refresher training is an effective means of improving the quality of patient care and communication between clinical and laboratory staff.

  20. Laboratory testing during critical care transport: point-of-care testing in air ambulances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Serio, Francesca; Petronelli, Maria Antonia; Sammartino, Eugenio

    2010-07-01

    Air and ground transport are used for prehospital transport of patients in acute life-threatening situations, and increasingly, critically ill patients undergo interhospital transportation. Results from clinical studies suggest that critical tests performed during the transport of critically ill patients presents a potential opportunity to improve patient care. Our project was to identify, according to the recommendations published at this time, a model of point-of-care testing (POCT) (arterial blood gases analysis and glucose, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, hematocrit/hemoglobin measurements) in air ambulances. In order to identify the key internal and external factors that are important to achieving our objective, an analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT analysis) was incorporated into our planning model prior to starting the project. To allow the entire POCT process (pre-, intra-, and post-analytic steps) to be under the control of the reference laboratory, an experimental model of information technology was applied. Real-time results during transport of critically ill patients must be considered to be an integral part of the patient care process and excellent channels of communication are needed between the intensive care units, emergency medical services and laboratories. With technological and computer advances, POCT during critical care transport will certainly increase in the future: this will be a challenge from a laboratory and clinical context.

  1. Summary report - development of laboratory tests and the stress- strain behaviour of Olkiluoto mica gneiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M.; Heikkilae, E. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Rock Engineering

    1997-05-01

    This work summarizes the project aimed at developing and qualifying a suitable combination of laboratory tests to establish a statistically reliable stress-strain behaviour of the main rock types at Posiva Oy`s detailed investigation sites for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The work includes literature study of stress-strain behaviour of brittle rock, development and qualification of laboratory tests, suggested test procedures and interpretation methods and finally testing of Olkiluoto mica gneiss. The Olkiluoto study includes over 130 loading tests. Besides the commonly used laboratory tests, direct tensile tests, damage controlled tests and acoustic emission measurements were also carried out. (orig.) (54 refs.).

  2. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 3; 8-ply Out-of-Autoclave Facesheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10 m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800B/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of the 3- by 5-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, T40-800B/5320-1 facesheets (referred to as Panel C). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear, two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D), models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength.

  3. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-09-02

    Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  4. Development of New, Low-Head Hydropower Turbine - Modeling & Laboratory Test DE-EE0005426

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krouse, Wayne [Hydro Green Energy, Westmont, IL (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Hydro Green Energy, LLC (HGE) will complete the design, fabrication and laboratory testing of a scaled, vertically stackable, low-head hydropower turbine called the Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT). HGE will also complete a summary report that includes the laboratory testing results and analysis of the tests. Project Goals: Design, model and test modular bulb turbine for installation in numerous HGE low-head hydropower projects at non-powered USACE dams. Project Results: The sub-scale prototype was tested successfully at a leading US hydraulic laboratory. Laboratory data results agreed well with predicted results from numerical modeling.

  5. PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2009-09-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in

  6. Laboratory Testing of Magnetic Tracers for Soil Erosion Measurement*1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guo-Qing; DONG Yuan-Jie; WANG Hui; QIU Xian-Kui; WANG Yan-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Soil erosion, which includes soil detachment, transport, and deposition, is one of the important dynamic land surface processes. The magnetic tracer method is a useful method for studying soil erosion processes. In this study, five types of magnetic tracers were made with fine soil, fly ash, cement, bentonite, and magnetic powder (reduced iron powder) using the method of disk granulation. The tracers were uniformly mixed with soil and tested in the laboratory using simulated rainfall and inflow experiments to simulate the interrill and rill components of soil erosion, in order to select one or more tracers which could be used to study detachment and deposition by the erosive forces of raindrops and surface flow of water on a slope. The results showed that the five types of magnetic tracers with high magnetic susceptibility and a wide range of sizes had a range of 0.99-1.29 gcm-s in bulk density. In the interrill and rill experiments, the tracers FC1 and FC2 which consisted of fly ash and cement at ratios of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, were transported in phase with soil particles since the magnetic susceptibility of sediment approximated that of the soil which was uneroded and the slopes of the regression equations between the detachment of sediment and magnetic tracers FC1 and FC2 were very close to the expected value of 20, which was the original soil/tracer ratio. The detachment and deposition on slopes could be accurately reflected by the magnetic susceptibility differences. The change in magnetic susceptibility depended on whether deposition or detachment occurred. However, the tracer FS which consisted of fine soil and the tracers FB1 and FB2 which consisted of fly ash and bentonite at ratios of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, were all unsuitable for soil erosion study since there was no consistent relationship between sediment and tracer detachment for increasing amounts of runoff. Therefore, the tracers FC1 and FC2 could be used to study soil erosion by water.

  7. Development and Challenge of HIV/AIDS Testing Laboratory Network and Quality Assurance System in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development and challenge of HIV/AIDS testing laboratory network and quality assurance system in China. At present, the HIV/AIDS testing laboratories includes three classes, the National AIDS Reference Laboratory, HIV/AIDS confirmatory laboratories and HIV/AIDS screening laboratories. All of them are accredited by the health authorities, and each class of laboratories take charge of their function strictly according to the "National Management of HIV/AIDS Detection (2006)". A complete quality assurance and quality control system for HIV/AIDS testing has been developed, which includes technical training, strict laboratory monitoring and approval,examination or proficiency testing on HIV/AIDS detection, and quality evaluation and supervision of HIV/AIDS diagnostic kits. Besides conduct the routine anti-HIV antibody test, more and more laboratories began to conduct other tests, such as CD4+ T lymphocyte cell counting, HIV viral load, HIV DNA PCR, genotyping, drug resistance, and HIV-1 recent infection test. The primary challenges faced by the HIV/AIDS testing laboratory network are in the areas of laboratory management and quality control. For example, the provincial PT program is inefficient, the internal quality control is conducted perfunctorily, personnel training can not met the needs of the workplace, which need to be improved.

  8. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing... collection to final disposition of specimens, and testing laboratories shall use appropriate cutoff levels in...

  9. 19 CFR 151.73 - Importer's request for commercial laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Importer's request for commercial laboratory test... Hair § 151.73 Importer's request for commercial laboratory test. (a) Conditions for commercial test. If the importer is dissatisfied with the results of a retest made in accordance with § 151.71(c), he...

  10. King County Metro Transit: Allison Hybrid Electric Transit Bus Laboratory Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, R. R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-09-01

    Paper summarizes chassis dynamometer testing of two 60-foot articulated transit buses, one conventional and one hybrid, at NREL's ReFUEL Laboratory. It includes experimental setup, test procedures, and results from vehicle testing performed at the NREL ReFUEL laboratory.

  11. 30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section 14.21 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... Technical Requirements § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  13. Advantages and limitations of anticipating laboratory test results from regression- and tree-based rules derived from electronic health-record data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahim Mohammad

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing is the single highest-volume medical activity, making it useful to ask how well one can anticipate whether a given test result will be high, low, or within the reference interval ("normal". We analyzed 10 years of electronic health records--a total of 69.4 million blood tests--to see how well standard rule-mining techniques can anticipate test results based on patient age and gender, recent diagnoses, and recent laboratory test results. We evaluated rules according to their positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV and area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (ROC AUCs. Using a stringent cutoff of PPV and/or NPV≥0.95, standard techniques yield few rules for sendout tests but several for in-house tests, mostly for repeat laboratory tests that are part of the complete blood count and basic metabolic panel. Most rules were clinically and pathophysiologically plausible, and several seemed clinically useful for informing pre-test probability of a given result. But overall, rules were unlikely to be able to function as a general substitute for actually ordering a test. Improving laboratory utilization will likely require different input data and/or alternative methods.

  14. Laboratory test of source encapsulation for decreasing PCB concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Markowicz, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of encapsulation of tertiary PCB sources with PERMASORB™ Adsorber Wallpaper and the surface emissions trap (cTrap) on indoor air concentration of PCBs and on the PCB content in the source. The 40 weeks long laboratory investigation shows reduction of the air...

  15. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng, E-mail: qschen@ujs.edu.cn

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  16. 78 FR 59946 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Public Law 100-71. The ``Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs,'' as amended... Partnership, 245 Pall Mall Street, London, ONT, Canada N6A 1P4, 519-679-1630. Laboratory Corporation of...: Centinela Hospital Airport Toxicology Laboratory). Pathology Associates Medical Laboratories, 110 West Cliff...

  17. Determination of basic friction angle using various laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The basic friction angle of rock is an important factor of joint shear strength and is included within most shear strength criteria. It can be measured by direct shear test, triaxial compression test and tilt test. Tilt test is mostly used because it is the simplest method. However, basic friction angles measured using tilt test for same rock type or for one sample are widely distributed and often do not show normal distribution. In this research, the basic friction angles for the Hangdeung granite form Korea and Berea sandstone from USA are measured accurately using direct shear test and triaxial compression test. Then basic friction angles are again measured using tilt tests with various conditions and are compared with those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test to determine the optimum condition of tilt test. Three types of sliding planes, such as planes cut by saw and planes polished by #100 and #600 grinding powders, are prepared. When planes are polished by #100 grinding powder, the basic friction angles measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test are very consistent and show narrow ranges. However, basic friction angles show wide ranges when planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder. The basic friction angle measured using tilt test are very close to those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test when plane is polished by #100 grinding powder. When planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder, basic friction angles measured using tilt test are slightly different. This indicates that tilt test with plane polished by #100 grinding powder can yield an accurate basic friction angle. In addition, the accurate values are obtained not only when planes are polished again after 10 times of tilt test, but values are averaged by more 30 times of tests.

  18. Bowing and expansion of natural stone panels: marble and limestone testing and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grelk, Bent

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural stone has been used as a building material for centuries. In the past, load bearing members were made of entirely of stone, but in the last 50 years new processing techniques have made the production and use of thin facade cladding a profitable venture. Unfortunately however, marble facades on buildings in Europe and elsewhere have undergone severe deterioration. The EC-financed TEAM project (2000-2005 studied the bowing observed on marble facades in both cold and warm climates. TEAM’s main objectives were to understand and explain the expansion, bowing, and strength loss mechanisms governing the decay of marble- and limestone-clad facades, and to draft new European standards to prevent the use of marble and limestone poorly suited to outdoor cladding. A survey of some 200 buildings afforded a clear picture of the geographical, geological and climatic scope of the problem. Detailed case studies of six buildings resulted in a facade assessment methodology that included a monitoring system and risk assessment. Both laboratory and field research was conducted on almost 100 different types of stone from different countries and in place in different climates. The outcome was the determination of the decay mechanisms and critical factors. Two test methods and respective precision statements, one for bowing and the other for irreversible thermal expansion in high humidity conditions, were prepared for submission to CEN TC 246.La piedra natural se ha empleado como material de construcción durante siglos. En el pasado, se solía utilizar en elementos de carga, pero en los últimos 50 años las nuevas técnicas de procesamiento han permitido que sea comercialmente rentable producir y utilizar revestimientos para fachadas de espesor reducido. Desafortunadamente, numerosas fachadas de mármol de edificios tanto en Europa como fuera de ella han sufrido graves problemas derivados del deterioro de la piedra. El proyecto TEAM (2000

  19. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 2; 6-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Meyers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Dixon, Genevieve D.

    2013-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panel types, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3- by 5-ft panel. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panels composed of 6-ply, IM7/977-3 facesheets (referred to as Panels B-1 and B-2). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional (3-D) effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  20. The rapid plasma reagin test cannot replace the venereal disease research laboratory test for neurosyphilis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Christina M; Tantalo, Lauren C; Maxwell, Clare L; Ho, Emily L; Sahi, Sharon K; Jones, Trudy

    2012-06-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test is a mainstay for neurosyphilis diagnosis, but it lacks diagnostic sensitivity and is logistically complicated. The rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test is easier to perform, but its appropriateness for use on CSF is controversial. RPR reactivity was determined for CSF from 149 individuals with syphilis using 2 methods. The CSF-RPR was performed according to the method for serum. The CSF-RPR-V was performed using the method recommended for the CSF-VDRL. Laboratory-defined neurosyphilis included reactive CSF-fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test and CSF white blood cells >20/uL. Symptomatic neurosyphilis was defined as vision loss or hearing loss. CSF-VDRL was reactive in 45 (30.2%) patients. Of these, 29 (64.4%) were CSF-RPR reactive and 37 (82.2%) were CSF-RPR-V reactive. There were no instances where the CSF-VDRL was nonreactive but the CSF-RPR or CSF-RPR-V was reactive. Among the 28 samples that were reactive in all 3 tests, CSF-VDRL titers (median [IQR], 1:4 [1:4-1:16]) were significantly higher than CSF-RPR (1:2 [1:1-1:4], P = 0.0002) and CSF-RPR-V titers (1:4 [1:2-1:8], P = 0.01). The CSF RPR and the CSF-RPR-V tests had lower sensitivities than the CSF-VDRL: 56.4% and 59.0% versus 71.8% for laboratory-diagnosed neurosyphilis and 51.5% and 57.6% versus 66.7% for symptomatic neurosyphilis. Compared with the CSF-VDRL, the CSF-RPR has a high false-negative rate, thus not improving upon this known limitation of the CSF-VDRL for neurosyphilis diagnosis. Adapting the RPR procedure to mimic the CSF-VDRL decreased, but did not eliminate, the number of false negatives and did not avoid all the logistical complications of the CSF-VDRL.

  1. A novel useful tool of computerized touch panel-type screening test for evaluating cognitive function of chronic ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Kentaro; Kono, Syoichiro; Deguchi, Shoko; Morimoto, Nobutoshi; Kurata, Tomoko; Ikeda, Yoshio; Abe, Koji

    2013-10-01

    Cognitive and affective impairments are important non-motor features of ischemic stroke (IS) related to white-matter hyperintensity, including periventricular hyperintensity (PVH). To confirm the usefulness of a novel computerized touch panel-type screening test, we investigated cognitive and affective functioning among 142 IS patients and 105 age-and gender-matched normal control subjects. Assessment using the mini-mental state examination, Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised, and frontal assessment battery revealed reduced cognitive function in IS patients, with the most severe reduction exhibited by cardiogenic embolism patients, followed by lacunar infarction patients, and atherothrombotic infarction patients. Our novel touch panel screening test revealed a similar pattern of results. In addition, PVH grading, classified using Fazekas' magnetic resonance imaging method, was also correlated with cognitive decline and touch panel screening test performance. In contrast, affective function, assessed with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, vitality index, and apathy scale, was not significantly decreased in IS, and did not correlate with touch panel screening test results or PVH, although the number of microbleeds was correlated with apathy scale results. The present findings revealed that IS and PVH grading were significantly correlated with decline in general cognitive status (mini-mental state examination and Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) and frontal lobe function (frontal assessment battery). Performance on all touch panel screening tests was correlated with IS and PVH grading, but was largely independent of depression or apathy. Touch panel screening tests were easily understood and performed by almost all patients with mild cognitive and motor dysfunction, due to visually clear images and simple methods not involving detailed manual-handling tasks such as writing. Touch panel screening tests may provide a useful tool for the early screening of cognitive

  2. Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaschl, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  3. Maintaining data quality in an environmental testing laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Roy J.

    2001-03-05

    In today's competitive and highly litigious world, it is critical that any laboratory generating data for the environmental and allied industries have a world-class Quality Assurance Program. This Plan must conform to the requirements of every agency and client with whom the lab does business. The goal of such a program is data defensibility; i.e., data validity. Data (usually qualitative analyte [compound or element] identifications and quantitative numerical results) are the end results of nearly all analytical laboratory processes, and the source of revenue. Clients pay for results. The clients expect the results to be accurate, precise, and repeatable. If their data has to go to court, the laboratory will be called upon to defend the accuracy and precision of their work. Without a strong QA program, this will be impossible. The potential implications and repercussions of non-defensible lab data are far-reaching and very costly in terms of loss of future revenues and in legal judgments.

  4. Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures Developed by EPA's Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    We develop antimicrobial testing methods and standard operating procedures to measure the effectiveness of hard surface disinfectants against a variety of microorganisms. Find methods and procedures for antimicrobial testing.

  5. FRACTIONAL CRYSALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING DL

    2007-11-29

    Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition.

  6. Beyond BRAF(V600): clinical mutation panel testing by next-generation sequencing in advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroy, Alan E; Boland, Genevieve M; Milton, Denái R; Roszik, Jason; Frankian, Silva; Malke, Jared; Haydu, Lauren; Prieto, Victor G; Tetzlaff, Michael; Ivan, Doina; Wang, Wei-Lien; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Curry, Jonathan; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Broaddus, Russell; Rashid, Asif; Stewart, John; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Amaria, Rodabe N; Patel, Sapna P; Papadopoulos, Nicholas E; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Hwu, Patrick; Diab, Adi; Woodman, Scott E; Aldape, Kenneth D; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Patel, Keyur P; Shaw, Kenna R; Mills, Gordon B; Mendelsohn, John; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kim, Kevin B; Routbort, Mark J; Lazar, Alexander J; Davies, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    The management of melanoma has evolved owing to improved understanding of its molecular drivers. To augment the current understanding of the prevalence, patterns, and associations of mutations in this disease, the results of clinical testing of 699 advanced melanoma patients using a pan-cancer next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel of hotspot regions in 46 genes were reviewed. Mutations were identified in 43 of the 46 genes on the panel. The most common mutations were BRAFV600 (36%), NRAS (21%), TP53 (16%), BRAFNon-V600 (6%), and KIT (4%). Approximately one-third of melanomas had >1 mutation detected, and the number of mutations per tumor was associated with melanoma subtype. Concurrent TP53 mutations were the most frequent events in tumors with BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. Melanomas with BRAFNon-V600mutations frequently harbored concurrent NRAS mutations (18%), which were rare in tumors with BRAFV600 mutations (1.6%). The prevalence of BRAFV600 and KIT mutations were significantly associated with melanoma subtypes, and BRAFV600 and TP53 mutations were significantly associated with cutaneous primary tumor location. Multiple potential therapeutic targets were identified in metastatic unknown primary and cutaneous melanomas that lacked BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. These results enrich our understanding of the patterns and clinical associations of oncogenic mutations in melanoma.

  7. Laboratory tests of headache disorders - dawn of a new era?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    and some secondary headaches. BACKGROUND: In this narrative review we present and discuss published tests that might be useful in phenotyping and/or diagnosis of long-lasting headache disorders such as migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, trigeminal neuralgia and persisting...... secondary headaches. AIM: The palpometer test, quantitative sensory testing, nociceptive blink reflex and autonomic tests may be valuable to phenotype and/or diagnose subforms of migraine, tension-type headache, cluster headache, trigeminal neuralgia and medication-overuse headache. Provocation tests...

  8. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-01-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  9. [Ayurvedics drugs in France. Laboratories polytherapic, a test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Cécile; Lefebvre, Thierry

    2011-02-01

    In the beginning of the thirties, Dr Jean Saidman, who has already created a rotative solarium at Aix-les-Bains, built another one in Jamnagar (India). When he was there, he discovered ayurvedic therapy. After the Second World War, with his friends Dr Rémus Krainik and the chemist René-Henri Monceaux, he set up a "néo-ayurvedic action committee", and then a pharmaceutical laboratory, "Polythérapic", to export to french colonies patents medicines inspired by indian medicine. The authors tale this experience suddenly stopped by the unexpected death of Jean Saidman, in 1949.

  10. Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.

    1996-03-01

    Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

  11. Impact of Medical School Laboratory Courses and Physician Attitude on Test Use by House Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, George D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study to assess the impact of laboratory courses in medical school on subsequent University of Iowa house staff test use, and to assess the influence of attitudinal factors on test use patterns is reported. Physician preferences for style, format, and timing of laboratory training sessions are examined. (MSE)

  12. 78 FR 22536 - Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... COMMISSION Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual, Version 2.0 AGENCY: United States Election Assistance Commission (EAC). ACTION: Notice; publication of Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual, Version 2.0, for 60 day public comment...

  13. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

  14. 75 FR 51280 - Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting... oversight of laboratory developed tests (LDTs). FDA is reopening the comment period to update comments...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the qualification...

  16. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  17. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Rodney S. (RSRead Consulting Inc. (Canada))

    2011-07-15

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  18. Reactivity of microhemagglutination, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, and venereal disease research laboratory tests in primary syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyckman, J D; Storms, S; Huber, T W

    1980-10-01

    Seroreactivity in 130 cases of primary syphilis was 91.5% by fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test, 82.3% by microhemagglutination (MHA-TP test), and 68.5% by the Venereal Disease Reseach Laboratory (VDRL) test. The MHA TP test generally became reactive earlier than the VDRL test and confirmed all reactive and most weakly reactive VDRL results.

  19. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel: Comparison of In- and Out-of-Autoclave Facesheet Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan Jorge; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Kellas, Sotiris; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle, were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration and the NASA Constellation Ares V programs. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.0 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3 ft. by 5 ft. panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections and tested under compressive loading. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3 ft. by 5 ft. panel. To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yielded good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  20. Bonding to oxide ceramics—laboratory testing versus clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Despite a huge number of published laboratory bonding studies on dental oxide ceramics clinical long-term studies on resin bonded oxide ceramic restorations are rare. The purpose of this review is to present the best available clinical evidence for successful bonding of dental oxide ceramic restorations. Clinical trials with resin-bonded restorations that had no or only limited mechanical retention and were made from alumina or zirconia ceramic were identified using an electronic search in PubMed database. Overall 10 publications with clinical trials could be identified. Their clinical outcome was compared with that laboratory bond strength studies. Clinical data provide strong evidence that air-abrasion at a moderate pressure in combination with using phosphate monomer containing primers and/or luting resins provide long-term durable bonding to glass-infiltrated alumina and zirconia ceramic under the humid and stressful oral conditions. As simple and clinically reliable bonding methods to oxide ceramics exist, the rationale for development of alternative bonding methods might be reconsidered especially when these methods are more time consuming or require rather complicated and/or technique sensitive procedures. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  2. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  3. Optimization of backfill pellet properties AASKAR DP2 - Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Linus; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    Bentonite pellets are planned to be used as a part of the backfill in the Swedish spent nuclear fuel deep repository concept KBS-3. This report describes testing and evaluation of different backfill pellet candidates. The work completed included testing of both pellet material and pellet type. The materials tested were sourced from India (ASHA), Greece (IBECO, 2 products) and Wyoming USA (MX-80 clay). The majority of the tests were completed on the ASHA clay as well as the IBECO-RWC-BF products, with only limited testing of the others. The pellets tested were manufactured using both extrusion and roller compaction techniques and had different sizes and geometries. The following tests have been performed and are presented in this report: 1. General tests. Water content, bulk density and dry density have been determined for both the pellet filling and the individual pellets. The compressibility of the pellet filling was tested with CRS-tests and the strength of the individual pellets was tested with a special compression test. The water content varied from 11.3% to 18.7% and was highest for the extruded pellets. The dry density was somewhat higher for the roller-compacted pellets and their compressibility was lower. The strength of the individual pellets was generally higher for the extruded pellets. 2. Erosion. The pellet filling will be exposed to groundwater inflow when installed in the tunnel. This flow could possibly cause significant erosion on the pellet filling. Erosion tests have been performed with comparisons in erosion resistance made on the various material- and pellet-types. The influence of variations in water salinity and flow rates was also tested. The IBECO extruded 6- and 10- mm diameter rods and the compacted Posiva spec.-A pellet filling seem to have the lowest tendency to erode. It is also the IBECO extruded pellet filling that withstands variations in water salinity and flow rates best. 3. Water storing capacity. The pellet filling

  4. Fabrication and evaluation of advanced titanium structural panels for supersonic cruise aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L.

    1977-01-01

    Flightworthy primary structural panels were designed, fabricated, and tested to investigate two advanced fabrication methods for titanium alloys. Skin-stringer panels fabricated using the weldbraze process, and honeycomb-core sandwich panels fabricated using a diffusion bonding process, were designed to replace an existing integrally stiffened shear panel on the upper wing surface of the NASA YF-12 research aircraft. The investigation included ground testing and Mach 3 flight testing of full-scale panels, and laboratory testing of representative structural element specimens. Test results obtained on full-scale panels and structural element specimens indicate that both of the fabrication methods investigated are suitable for primary structural applications on future civil and military supersonic cruise aircraft.

  5. Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O' Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2009-07-01

    A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

  6. Report of the Army Scientific Advisory Panel Ad Hoc Group on Climatic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-23

    request fron the U.S. Army Material Command, now DARCOM. Terms of Reference presented In the letter of 19 January 1976 were used as an outline for this...intemediate conditions. The Tropic Test Center is required and TOES FTED ^ mä to ti«ifl DD tJASTn M73 COITION Or INOV «SIS OBSOLETE... materials /coapooent developoent testing. General observations of test nanagenent are presetted. IK CLASSIFIED l^ More to th« point Is operation at

  7. Effectiveness of a computerized alert system based on re-testing intervals for limiting the inappropriateness of laboratory test requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Marco; Bonelli, Patrizia; Aloe, Rosalia; Balestrino, Antonio; Nardelli, Anna; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Fabi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    There is consolidated evidence that the burden of inappropriate laboratory test requests is very high, up to 70%. We describe here the function of a computerized alert system linked to the order entry, designed to limit the number of potentially inappropriate laboratory test requests. A computerized alert system based on re-testing intervals and entailing the generation of pop-up alerts when preset criteria of appropriateness for 15 laboratory tests were violated was implemented in two clinical wards of the University Hospital of Parma. The effectiveness of the system for limiting potentially inappropriate tests was monitored for 6months. Overall, 765/3539 (22%) test requests violated the preset criteria of appropriateness and generated the appearance of electronic alert. After alert appearance, 591 requests were annulled (17% of total tests requested and 77% of tests alerted, respectively). The total number of test requests violating the preset criteria of inappropriateness constantly decreased over time (26% in the first three months of implementation versus 17% in the following period; ptest withdrawn was 3387 Euros (12.8% of the total test cost) throughout the study period. The results of this study suggest that a computerized alert system may be effective to limit the inappropriateness of laboratory test requests, generating significant economic saving and educating physicians to a more efficient use of laboratory resources. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Laboratory Testing of Cyclic Laterally Loaded Pile in Cohesionless Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roesen, Hanne Ravn; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Hansen, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    Offshore wind turbines are normally founded with large diameter monopiles and placed in rough environments subjected to variable lateral loads from wind and waves. A long-term lateral loading may create rotation (tilt) of the pile by change in the pile-soil system which is critical...... in the serviceability limit state. In this paper small-scale testing of a pile subjected to cyclic, lateral loading is treated in order to investigate the effect of cyclic loading. The test setup, which is an improvement of a previous setup, is described and the first results of testing are compared with previous...

  9. Microbiological examination and proficiency testing in dairy laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teger, S G

    2001-03-01

    This paper considers the main factors in the assessment of microbiological examination of food and discusses a few points related to validation of quantitative and qualitative microbiological methods. Within the scope of accredited methods, the author defines the terms such as conform reference, equivalence of reference method, and in-house method. The paper describes evaluation of a routine method with respect to the official method based on results obtained by automatic epifluorescent microscopy using the BactoScan 8000 instrument for determination of bacteriological quality of milk and provides general guidance for the establishment of a conversion relationship between the two methods. The paper gives an overview of the quality assurance aspects involved in the application of the routine method and concludes with an example of interlaboratory proficiency study for the epifluorescent microscopic method which is regularly applied in dairy laboratories.

  10. POPOVER Review Panel report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davito, A.; Baker, C.J.; King, C.J.; Costerus, B.; Nelson, T.; Prokosch, D.; Pastrnak, J.; Grace, P.

    1996-04-10

    The POPOVER series of high explosive (HE) certification tests was conducted at the Big Explosives Experimental Facility (BEEF) in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The two primary objectives of POPOVER were to certify that: (1) BEEF meets DOE requirements for explosives facilities and is safe for personnel-occupied operations during testing of large charges of conventional HE. (2) Facility structures and equipment will function as intended when subjected to the effects of these charges. After careful analysis of test results, the POPOVER Review Panel concludes that the POPOVER series met both objectives. Further details on the Review Panel`s conclusions are included in Section 7--Findings and Recommendations.

  11. [A technical suggestion for laboratory tests in cases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio Pellacchio, M C; Celli, R

    1994-01-01

    The paper suggests completing the clinical tests carried out in cases of rape by collecting material not only from the fornix of the vagina but also from the cervical canal using cotton-wool buds, and examining any spermatozoa adhering to the cotton filaments by staining with Baecchi's method. Alternatively, the paper suggests carrying out these tests in anticipation of their possible use as forensic evidence if requested by the court.

  12. Panel Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brænder, Morten; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2014-01-01

    Based on our 2013-article, ”Does Deployment to War Affect Soldiers' Public Service Motivation – A Panel Study of Soldiers Before and After their Service in Afghanistan”, we present Panel Analysis as a methodological discipline. Panels consist of multiple units of analysis, observed at two or more...

  13. ESO adaptive optics facility progress and first laboratory test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jérome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-Francois; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Haguenauer, Pierre; Abad, Jose A.; Fischer, Gerhard; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Reyes Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan M.; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Ernstberger, Bernhard; Friedenauer, Axel

    2014-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project is completing the integration of its systems at ESO Headquarters in Garching. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM has undergone a series of tests on ASSIST in 2013 which have validated its optical performance and launched the System Test Phase of the AOF. This has been followed by the performance evaluation of the GRAAL natural guide star mode on-axis and will continue in 2014 with its Ground Layer AO mode. The GALACSI module (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO) will then be tested. The AOF has also taken delivery of the second scientific thin shell mirror and the first 22 Watt Sodium laser Unit. We will report on the system tests status, the performances evaluated on the ASSIST bench and advancement of the 4Laser Guide Star Facility. We will also present the near future plans for commissioning on the telescope and some considerations on tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  14. Seed dressing pesticides on springtails in two ecotoxicological laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Paulo Roger L; Cardoso, Elke J B N; Martines, Alexandre M; Sousa, José Paulo; Pasini, Amarildo

    2014-07-01

    Terrestrial ecotoxicological tests are powerful tools for assessing the ecological risks that pesticides pose to soil invertebrates, but they are rarely used to evaluate seed dressing pesticides. This study investigated the effects of seed dressing pesticides on survival and reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola), using standardized ecotoxicological tests (after ISO guidelines with few adaptations for tropical conditions). Commercial formulations of five seed dressing pesticides were tested individually in Tropical Artificial Soil (TAS): the insecticides imidacloprid, fipronil, thiametoxam, and the fungicides captan and carboxin+thiram. Thiametoxam, captan, and carboxin+thiram were only lethal to F. candida at the highest concentration tested (1000mg of active ingredient kg(-1) of dry soil). Imidacloprid and fipronil were lethal at lower concentrations (100 and 10mg a.i. kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively), however, these concentrations were much higher than those predicted (PEC) for soil. Imidacloprid and fipronil were the most toxic pesticides in both tests, reducing significantly collembolan reproduction (EC20=0.02 and 0.12mga.i.kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively). Further studies under more realistic conditions are needed, since imidacloprid and fipronil reduced collembolan reproduction at concentrations below or close to their respective PECs.

  15. Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of Los Alamos National Laboratory Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Jason P. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2005-09-01

    The risk of accidental detonation is present whenever any type of high explosives processing activity is performed. These activities are typically carried out indoors to protect processing equipment from the weather and to hide possibly secret processes from view. Often, highly strengthened reinforced concrete buildings are employed to house these activities. These buildings may incorporate several design features, including the use of lightweight frangible blowout panels, to help mitigate blast effects. These panels are used to construct walls that are durable enough to withstand the weather, but are of minimal weight to provide overpressure relief by quickly moving outwards and creating a vent area during an accidental explosion. In this study the behavior of blowout panels under various blast loading conditions was examined. External loadings from explosions occurring in nearby rooms were of primary interest. Several reinforcement systems were designed to help blowout panels resist failure from external blast loads while still allowing them to function as vents when subjected to internal explosions. The reinforcements were studied using two analytical techniques, yield-line analysis and modal analysis, and the hydrocode AUTODYN. A blowout panel reinforcement design was created that could prevent panels from being blown inward by external explosions. This design was found to increase the internal loading of the building by 20%, as compared with nonreinforced panels. Nonreinforced panels were found to increase the structural loads by 80% when compared to an open wall at the panel location.

  16. Buckling of a Longitudinally Jointed Curved Composite Panel Arc Segment for Next Generation of Composite Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles: Verification Testing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokh, Babak; Segal, Kenneth N.; Akkerman, Michael; Glenn, Ronald L.; Rodini, Benjamin T.; Fan, Wei-Ming; Kellas, Sortiris; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an all-bonded out-of-autoclave (OoA) curved longitudinal composite joint concept, intended for use in the next generation of composite heavy lift launch vehicles, was evaluated and verified through finite element (FE) analysis, fabrication, testing, and post-test inspection. The joint was used to connect two curved, segmented, honeycomb sandwich panels representative of a Space Launch System (SLS) fairing design. The overall size of the resultant panel was 1.37 m by 0.74 m (54 in by 29 in), of which the joint comprised a 10.2 cm (4 in) wide longitudinal strip at the center. NASTRAN and ABAQUS were used to perform linear and non-linear analyses of the buckling and strength performance of the jointed panel. Geometric non-uniformities (i.e., surface contour imperfections) were measured and incorporated into the FE model and analysis. In addition, a sensitivity study of the specimens end condition showed that bonding face-sheet doublers to the panel's end, coupled with some stress relief features at corner-edges, can significantly reduce the stress concentrations near the load application points. Ultimately, the jointed panel was subjected to a compressive load. Load application was interrupted at the onset of buckling (at 356 kN 80 kips). A post-test non-destructive evaluation (NDE) showed that, as designed, buckling occurred without introducing any damage into the panel or the joint. The jointed panel was further capable of tolerating an impact damage to the same buckling load with no evidence of damage propagation. The OoA cured all-composite joint shows promise as a low mass factory joint for segmented barrels.

  17. A LABORATORY TEST FOR THE EXAMINATION OF ALACTIC RUNNING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Kibele

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A new testing procedure is introduced to evaluate the alactic running performance in a 10s sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity. The test is performed on a motor-equipped treadmill with inverted polarity that increases mechanical resistance instead of driving the treadmill belt. As a result, a horizontal force has to be exerted against the treadmill surface in order to overcome the resistant force of the engine and to move the surface in a backward direction. For this task, subjects lean with their hands towards the front safety barrier of the treadmill railing with a slightly inclined body posture. The required skill resembles the pushing movement of bobsleigh pilots at the start of a race. Subjects are asked to overcome this mechanical resistance and to cover as much distance as possible within a time period of 10 seconds. Fifteen male students (age: 27.7 ± 4.1 years, body height: 1.82 ± 0.46 m, body mass: 78.3 ± 6.7 kg participated in a study. As the resistance force was set to 134 N, subjects ran 35.4 ± 2.6 m on the average corresponding to a mean running velocity of 3.52 ± 0.25 m·s-1. The validity of the new test was examined by statistical inference with various measures related to alactic performance including a metabolic equivalent to estimate alactic capacity (2892 ± 525 mL O2, an estimate for the oxygen debt (2662 ± 315 ml, the step test by Margaria to estimate alactic energy flow (1691 ± 171 W, and a test to measure the maximal strength in the leg extensor muscles (2304 ± 351 N. The statistical evaluation showed that the new test is in good agreement with the theoretical assumptions for alactic performance. Significant correlation coefficients were found between the test criteria and the measures for alactic capacity (r = 0.79, p < 0.01 as well as alactic power (r = 0.77, p < 0.01. The testing procedure is easy to administer and it is best suited to evaluate the alactic capacity for bobsleigh pilots as well as for

  18. Laboratory Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA- Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 17 -8 Laboratory Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA – Phase 2 G eo te ch ni...Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA – Phase 2 Johannes L. Wibowo and Bryant A. Robbins Geotechnical and...laboratory Jet Erosion Tests performed on Plexiglas tube samples obtained from the Lower American River (LAR) between River Mile (RM) 6.0 and RM

  19. Cognitive Laboratory Experiences : On Pre-testing Computerised Questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijkers, G.J.M.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the literature on questionnaire design and survey methodology, pre-testing is mentioned as a way to evaluate questionnaires (i.e. investigate whether they work as intended) and control for measurement errors (i.e. assess data quality). As the American Statistical Association puts it (ASA, 1999, p

  20. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde;

    2010-01-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  1. Panel Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brænder, Morten; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2014-01-01

    Based on our 2013-article, ”Does Deployment to War Affect Soldiers' Public Service Motivation – A Panel Study of Soldiers Before and After their Service in Afghanistan”, we present Panel Analysis as a methodological discipline. Panels consist of multiple units of analysis, observed at two or more...... in research settings where it is not possible to distribute units of analysis randomly or where the independent variables cannot be manipulated. The greatest disadvantage in regard to using panel studies is that data may be difficult to obtain. This is most clearly vivid in regard to the use of panel surveys...

  2. Laboratory longitudinal diffusion tests: 2. Parameter estimation by inverse analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Zhang, M.; Nakajima, H.; Hiratsuka, T.

    2008-04-01

    This study focuses on the verification of test interpretations for different state analyses of diffusion experiments. Part 1 of this study identified that steady, quasi-steady and equilibrium state analyses for the through- and in-diffusion tests with solution reservoirs are generally feasible where the tracer is not highly sorptive. In Part 2 we investigate parameter identifiability in transient-state analysis of reservoir concentration variation using a numerical approach. For increased generality, the analytical models, objective functions and Jacobian matrix necessary for inverse analysis of transient-state data are reformulated using unified dimensionless parameters. In these dimensionless forms, the number of unknown parameters is reduced and a single dimensionless parameter represents the sorption property. The dimensionless objective functions are evaluated for individual test methods and parameter identifiability is discussed in relation to the sorption property. The effects of multiple minima and measurement error on parameter identifiability are also investigated. The main findings are that inverse problems for inlet and outlet reservoir concentration analyses are generally unstable and well-posed, respectively. Where the tracer is sorptive, the inverse problem for the inlet reservoir concentration analysis may have multiple minima. When insufficient measurement data is collected, multiple solutions may result and this should be taken into consideration when inversely analyzing data including that of inlet reservoir concentration. Verification of test interpretation by cross-checking different state analyses is feasible where the tracer is not highly sorptive. In an actual experiment, test interpretation validity is demonstrated through consistency between theory and practice for different state analyses.

  3. Evaluation of the BYG Carba Test, a New Electrochemical Assay for Rapid Laboratory Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Sami; Massart, Marion; Huang, Te-Din; Glupczynski, Youri

    2015-01-01

    Accurate detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) constitutes a major laboratory diagnostic challenge. We evaluated an electrochemical technique (the BYG Carba test) which allows detection of CPE in less than 35 min. The BYG Carba test was first validated in triplicate against 57 collection isolates with previously characterized β-lactam resistance mechanisms (OXA-48, n = 12; KPC, n = 8; NDM, n = 8; VIM, n = 8; IMP, n = 3; GIM, n = 1; GES-6, n = 1; no carbapenemase, n = 16) and against a panel of 10 isolates obtained from the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Service (NEQAS). The test was then evaluated prospectively against 324 isolates referred to the national reference center for suspicion of CPE. The BYG Carba test results were compared with those obtained with the Carba NP test using multiplex PCR sequencing as the gold standard. Of the 57 collection and the 10 NEQAS isolates, all but one GES-6-producing isolate were correctly identified by the Carba BYG test. Among the 324 consecutive Enterobacteriaceae isolates tested prospectively, 146 were confirmed as noncarbapenemase producers by PCR while 178 harbored a carbapenemase gene (OXA-48, n = 117; KPC, n = 25; NDM, n = 23; and VIM, n = 13). Prospectively, in comparison with PCR results, the BYG Carba test displayed 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity versus 89% and 100%, respectively, for the Carba NP test. The BYG Carba test is a novel, rapid, and efficient assay based on an electro-active polymer biosensing technology discriminating between CPE and non-CPE. The precise electrochemical signal (electrochemical impedance variations) allows the establishment of real-time objective measurement and interpretation criteria which should facilitate the accreditation process of this technology. PMID:26637378

  4. Evaluation of the BYG Carba Test, a New Electrochemical Assay for Rapid Laboratory Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, Pierre; Yunus, Sami; Massart, Marion; Huang, Te-Din; Glupczynski, Youri

    2016-02-01

    Accurate detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) constitutes a major laboratory diagnostic challenge. We evaluated an electrochemical technique (the BYG Carba test) which allows detection of CPE in less than 35 min. The BYG Carba test was first validated in triplicate against 57 collection isolates with previously characterized β-lactam resistance mechanisms (OXA-48, n = 12; KPC, n = 8; NDM, n = 8; VIM, n = 8; IMP, n = 3; GIM, n = 1; GES-6, n = 1; no carbapenemase, n = 16) and against a panel of 10 isolates obtained from the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Service (NEQAS). The test was then evaluated prospectively against 324 isolates referred to the national reference center for suspicion of CPE. The BYG Carba test results were compared with those obtained with the Carba NP test using multiplex PCR sequencing as the gold standard. Of the 57 collection and the 10 NEQAS isolates, all but one GES-6-producing isolate were correctly identified by the Carba BYG test. Among the 324 consecutive Enterobacteriaceae isolates tested prospectively, 146 were confirmed as noncarbapenemase producers by PCR while 178 harbored a carbapenemase gene (OXA-48, n = 117; KPC, n = 25; NDM, n = 23; and VIM, n = 13). Prospectively, in comparison with PCR results, the BYG Carba test displayed 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity versus 89% and 100%, respectively, for the Carba NP test. The BYG Carba test is a novel, rapid, and efficient assay based on an electro-active polymer biosensing technology discriminating between CPE and non-CPE. The precise electrochemical signal (electrochemical impedance variations) allows the establishment of real-time objective measurement and interpretation criteria which should facilitate the accreditation process of this technology.

  5. Laboratory and clinical evaluation of on-site urine drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Carlsson, Sten; Tusic, Marinela; Olsson, Robert; Franzen, Lisa; Hulten, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Products for on-site urine drug testing offer the possibility to perform screening for drugs of abuse directly at the point-of-care. This is a well-established routine in emergency and dependency clinics but further evaluation of performance is needed due to inherent limitations with the available products. Urine drug testing by an on-site product was compared with routine laboratory methods. First, on-site testing was performed at the laboratory in addition to the routine method. Second, the on-site testing was performed at a dependency clinic and urine samples were subsequently sent to the laboratory for additional analytical investigation. The on-site testing products did not perform with assigned cut-off levels. The subjective reading between the presence of a spot (i.e. negative test result) being present or no spot (positive result) was difficult in 3.2% of the cases, and occurred for all parameters. The tests performed more accurately in drug negative samples (specificity 96%) but less accurately for detecting positives (sensitivity 79%). Of all incorrect results by the on-site test the proportion of false negatives was 42%. The overall agreement between on-site and laboratory testing was 95% in the laboratory study and 98% in the clinical study. Although a high degree of agreement was observed between on-site and routine laboratory urine drug testing, the performance of on-site testing was not acceptable due to significant number of false negative results. The limited sensitivity of on-site testing compared to laboratory testing reduces the applicability of these tests.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory`s photo-oxidation organic mixed waste treatment system - installation and startup testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, T.L.; Nelson, R.A.; Torres, T.; Conner, C.; Wygmans, D.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) Photo-Oxidation Organic Mixed Waste Treatment System. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in the Waste Management Facility at the ANL-E site in Argonne, Illinois. 1 fig.

  7. The Wastewater Treatment Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, S.A.; Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The Wastewater Treatment Test Facility (WTTF) contains 0.5 L/min test systems which provide a wide range of physical and chemical separation unit operations. The facility is a modified 48 foot trailer which contains all the unit operations of the ORNL`s Process Waste Treatment Plant and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant including chemical precipitation, clarification, filtration, ion-exchange, air stripping, activated carbon adsorption, and zeolite system. This facility has been used to assess treatability of potential new wastewaters containing mixed radioactive, hazardous organic, and heavy metal compounds. With the ability to simulate both present and future ORNL wastewater treatment systems, the WTTF has fast become a valuable tool in solving wastewater treatment problems at the Oak Ridge reservation.

  8. Performance of powder-filled evacuated panel insulation in a manufactured home roof cavity: Tests in the Large Scale Climate Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, T.W.; Kosny, J.; Childs, P.W.

    1996-03-01

    A full-scale section of half the top of a single-wide manufactured home has been studied in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A small roof cavity with little room for insulation at the eaves is often the case with single-wide units and limits practical ways to improve thermal performance. The purpose of the current tests was to obtain steady-state performance data for the roof cavity of the manufactured home test section when the roof cavity was insulated with fiberglass batts, blown-in rock wool insulation or combinations of these insulations and powder-filled evacuated panel (PEP) insulation. Four insulation configurations were tested: (A) a configuration with two layers of nominal R{sub US}-7 h {center_dot} ft{sup 2} {center_dot} F/BTU (R{sub SI}-1.2 m{sup 2} {center_dot} K/W) fiberglass batts; (B) a layer of PEPs and one layer of the fiberglass batts; (C) four layers of the fiberglass batts; and (D) an average 4.1 in. (10.4 cm) thick layer of blown-in rock wool at an average density of 2.4 lb/ft{sup 3} (38 kg/m{sup 3}). Effects of additional sheathing were determined for Configurations B and C. With Configuration D over the ceiling, two layers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) boards, each about the same thickness as the PEPs, were installed over the trusses instead of the roof. Aluminum foils facing the attic and over the top layer of EPS were added. The top layer of EPS was then replaced by PEPs.

  9. Lysosomal storage disorders: Molecular basis and laboratory testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filocamo Mirella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are a large group of more than 50 different inherited metabolic diseases which, in the great majority of cases, result from the defective function of specific lysosomal enzymes and, in cases, of non-enzymatic lysosomal proteins or non-lysosomal proteins involved in lysosomal biogenesis. The progressive lysosomal accumulation of undegraded metabolites results in generalised cell and tissue dysfunction, and, therefore, multi-systemic pathology. Storage may begin during early embryonic development, and the clinical presentation for LSDs can vary from an early and severe phenotype to late-onset mild disease. The diagnosis of most LSDs--after accurate clinical/paraclinical evaluation, including the analysis of some urinary metabolites--is based mainly on the detection of a specific enzymatic deficiency. In these cases, molecular genetic testing (MGT can refine the enzymatic diagnosis. Once the genotype of an individual LSD patient has been ascertained, genetic counselling should include prediction of the possible phenotype and the identification of carriers in the family at risk. MGT is essential for the identification of genetic disorders resulting from non-enzymatic lysosomal protein defects and is complementary to biochemical genetic testing (BGT in complex situations, such as in cases of enzymatic pseudodeficiencies. Prenatal diagnosis is performed on the most appropriate samples, which include fresh or cultured chorionic villus sampling or cultured amniotic fluid. The choice of the test--enzymatic and/or molecular--is based on the characteristics of the defect to be investigated. For prenatal MGT, the genotype of the family index case must be known. The availability of both tests, enzymatic and molecular, enormously increases the reliability of the entire prenatal diagnostic procedure. To conclude, BGT and MGT are mostly complementary for post- and prenatal diagnosis of LSDs. Whenever genotype

  10. An audit of serological tests carried out at clinical laboratory of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Sirajuddin Hassan; Ahmed, Ayesha; Hanif, Ruhila

    2005-01-01

    Clinical audit is an important tool for reviewing and improving the quality of service in clinical laboratories. Here we present an audit of total serology test requests and the frequency of positive tests out of these in a calendar year. This is an audit of serology tests carried out at Microbiology section of Clinical Laboratory of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. We counted all the serology test requests for the year 2004. These tests requests were grouped month wise. The frequency of positive tests out of the total test requests were calculated. The tests included Widal, Toxoplasma, Brucella, Anti DNA, Anti Nuclear factor (ANF), Rheumatoid Arthritis Factor (RAF), HIV, HBsAg, HCV, Intra Chromatographic Technique for tuberculosis (ICT-TB), Purified Protein Derivative (PPD), Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test, Anti-Streptolysin-O-test (ASOT) and pregnancy test. This audit gives a clear idea of trends of test requests in our hospital. It reflects accuracy of clinicians' judgment in some tests and failure in others, prevalence of different diseases, seasonal variation in number of test requests for some tests and impact of awareness campaigns on attitude of clinicians towards certain diseases. This will help us in planning our laboratory requirements to improve quality.

  11. Development of a novel SCADA system for laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M; Cole, G R; Pryor, T L; Wilmot, N A

    2004-07-01

    This document summarizes the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system that allows communication with, and controlling the output of, various I/O devices in the renewable energy systems and components test facility RESLab. This SCADA system differs from traditional SCADA systems in that it supports a continuously changing operating environment depending on the test to be performed. The SCADA System is based on the concept of having one Master I/O Server and multiple client computer systems. This paper describes the main features and advantages of this dynamic SCADA system, the connections of various field devices to the master I/O server, the device servers, and numerous software features used in the system. The system is based on the graphical programming language "LabVIEW" and its "Datalogging and Supervisory Control" (DSC) module. The DSC module supports a real-time database called the "tag engine," which performs the I/O operations with all field devices attached to the master I/O server and communications with the other tag engines running on the client computers connected via a local area network. Generic and detailed communication block diagrams illustrating the hierarchical structure of this SCADA system are presented. The flow diagram outlining a complete test performed using this system in one of its standard configurations is described.

  12. [Approval of ISO/IEC 17025 and quality control of laboratory testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Machii, Kenji; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2010-01-01

    First section of Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) was approved by ISO/IEC 17025 as a laboratory having an appropriate laboratory testing technique. NIHS is the first national laboratory approved by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS has also been accepted the appropriate technique and facility for the BSL3 level pathogens by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS is necessary to take an external audit almost every year. This approval is renewed every 4 years.

  13. Hydraulic laboratory testing of Sontek-IQ Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Janice M.; Kimball, Scott

    2015-11-10

    The SonTek-IQ Plus (IQ Plus) is a bottom-mounted Doppler instrument used for the measurement of water depth and velocity. Evaluation testing of the IQ Plus was performed to assess the accuracy of water depth, discharge, and velocity measurements. The IQ Plus met the manufacturer’s specifications and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) standard for depth accuracy measurement when the unit was installed, according to the manufacturer’s instructions, at 0 degrees pitch and roll. However, because of the limited depth testing conducted, the depth measurement is not recommended as a primary stage measurement. The IQ Plus was tested in a large indoor tilting flume in a 5-foot (ft) wide, approximately 2.3-ft deep section with mean velocities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 ft per second. Four IQ Plus instruments using firmware 1.52 tested for water-discharge accuracy using SonTek’s “theoretical” discharge method had a negative bias of -2.4 to -11.6 percent when compared with discharge measured with a SonTek FlowTracker and the midsection discharge method. The IQ Pluses with firmware 1.52 did not meet the manufacturer’s specification of +/-1 percent for measuring velocity. Three IQ Pluses using firmware 1.60 and SonTek’s “theoretical” method had a difference of -1.6 to -7.9 percent when compared with discharge measured with a SonTek FlowTracker and the midsection method. Mean-velocity measurements with firmware 1.60 met the manufacturer’s specification and Price Type AA meter accuracy requirements when compared with FlowTracker measurements. Because of the instrument’s velocity accuracy, the SonTek-IQ Plus with firmware 1.60 is considered acceptable for use as an index velocity instrument for the USGS. The discharge computed by the SonTek-IQ Plus during the tests had a substantial negative bias and will not be as accurate as a discharge computed with the index velocity method. The USGS does not recommend the use of undocumented computation methods, such as Son

  14. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory Guidelines for the Use of Serological Tests (excluding point-of-care tests for the Diagnosis of Syphilis in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul N Levett

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis, caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, is an infection recognized since antiquity. It was first reported at the end of the 15th century in Europe. Infections may be sexually transmitted as well as spread from an infected mother to her fetus or through blood transfusions. The laboratory diagnosis of syphilis infection is complex. Because this organism cannot be cultured, serology is used as the principal diagnostic method. Some of the issues related to serological diagnoses are that antibodies take time to appear after infection, and serology screening tests require several secondary confirmatory tests that can produce complex results needing interpretation by experts in the field. Traditionally, syphilis screening was performed using either rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests, and confirmed by treponemal tests such as MHA-TP, TPPA or FTA-Abs. Currently, that trend is reversed, ie, most of the laboratories in Canada now screen for syphilis using treponemal enzyme immunoassays and confirm the status of infection using rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests; this approach is often referred to as the reverse algorithm. This chapter reviews guidelines for specimen types and sample collection, treponemal and non-treponemal tests utilized in Canada, the current status of serological tests for syphilis in Canada, the complexity of serological diagnosis of syphilis infection and serological testing algorithms. Both traditional and reverse sequence algorithms are recommended and the algorithm used should be based on a combination of local disease epidemiology, test volumes, performance of the proposed assays and available resources.

  15. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of serological tests (excluding point-of-care tests) for the diagnosis of syphilis in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett, Paul N; Fonseca, Kevin; Tsang, Raymond Sw; Kadkhoda, Kamran; Serhir, Bouchra; Radons, Sandra M; Morshed, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis, caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, is an infection recognized since antiquity. It was first reported at the end of the 15th century in Europe. Infections may be sexually transmitted as well as spread from an infected mother to her fetus or through blood transfusions. The laboratory diagnosis of syphilis infection is complex. Because this organism cannot be cultured, serology is used as the principal diagnostic method. Some of the issues related to serological diagnoses are that antibodies take time to appear after infection, and serology screening tests require several secondary confirmatory tests that can produce complex results needing interpretation by experts in the field. Traditionally, syphilis screening was performed using either rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests, and confirmed by treponemal tests such as MHA-TP, TPPA or FTA-Abs. Currently, that trend is reversed, ie, most of the laboratories in Canada now screen for syphilis using treponemal enzyme immunoassays and confirm the status of infection using rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests; this approach is often referred to as the reverse algorithm. This chapter reviews guidelines for specimen types and sample collection, treponemal and non-treponemal tests utilized in Canada, the current status of serological tests for syphilis in Canada, the complexity of serological diagnosis of syphilis infection and serological testing algorithms. Both traditional and reverse sequence algorithms are recommended and the algorithm used should be based on a combination of local disease epidemiology, test volumes, performance of the proposed assays and available resources.

  16. [Assessment of the quality of laboratory diagnosis of intestinal parasitic diseases by the laboratories participating in the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhov, V N; Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Iu; Serdiuk, A P

    2014-01-01

    In 2010-2013, the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents ofparasitic diseases in the feces has been assessed by the specialists of the laboratories of the therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions (TPIs) and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, which are participants of the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing. Thirty-two specimens containing 16 species of human helminths and 4 species of enteric protozoa in different combinations were examined. The findings suggest that the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents of parasitic diseases is low in the laboratories of health care facilities and that the specialists of the laboratories of TPIs and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, do not not possess the knowledge and skills necessary to make a laboratory diagnosis of helminths and enteric protozoa. The average detection rates of helminths and protozoa were at a level of 64 and 36%, respectively. The correct results showed that the proportion of helminths and protozoa were 94.5 and 5.5%, respectively. According to the biological and epidemiological classification of helminths, there were higher detection rates for contact group parasites (Enterobius vermicularis and Hymenolepis nana) and geohelminths (Ascaris, Trichuris trichiura, and others). Biohelminths (Opisthorchis, tapeworms, and others) Were detectable slightly worse.

  17. Structural Tests of a Stainless Steel Wing Panel by Hydrostatic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    1940-11-01

    local puckers were visible aloa~ se~n lines, particularly at rib 2 near the wing bean and the trailing-ed~e spar. The soans in general were.sonewhat...dicatedfor future use of hydrostatic vi~g testing: .. 1. In orded to avoid,local seam ,.irregularities, lit- tle if any caulking paste should be p-dtwithin the... seam lap. Zinal watertightnes~ should he b — -.. — . —. .,-. — — . . — .-. . .s . .= -. * — NACA Technical Note No. 786 13 ., obtainei; in preference

  18. Point of care testing: diagnosis outside the virology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Christopher C; Booy, Robert; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2011-01-01

    Numerous point-of-care tests (POCTs) are available to diagnose viral infections in both hospital and community settings. The ideal POCT is rapid, sensitive, specific, and simple to perform. This chapter will describe the benefits of POCTs, factors that can influence the accuracy of POCTs and highlight some limitations of POCT strategies. The sensitivity, specificity, and turn-around time of available POCTs are included for common conditions including respiratory viral infections (e.g. influenza, RSV) and blood-borne viral infections (e.g. HIV).

  19. Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-02

    Engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL’s) Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF) are developing strategies to address two separate but equally crucial areas of research: meeting the demands of electric vehicle (EV) grid integration and minimizing fuel consumption related to vehicle climate control. Dedicated to renewable and energy-efficient solutions, the VTIF showcases technologies and systems designed to increase the viability of sustainably powered vehicles. NREL researchers instrument every class of on-road vehicle, conduct hardware and software validation for EV components and accessories, and develop analysis tools and technology for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and industry partners.

  20. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2010-01-01

    impact at different geographical areas, as well as driving and charging patterns. Electric circuit model is deployed in this work to represent the electrical properties of a lithium-ion battery. This paper reports the preliminary modeling and validation work based on manufacturer data sheet and realistic......Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  1. How to test NISP instrument for EUCLID mission in laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costille, A.; Carle, Michael; Fabron, Christophe;

    2016-01-01

    . To achieve these tests campaign, a global Ground Support Equipment (GSE) called the Verification Ground System (VGS) has to be developed. It will be a complex set of GSE integrated in ERIOS chamber made of: a telescope simulator to simulate the EUCLID telescope and to inject light into NISP, a thermal...... will present the preliminary design and concepts of the VGS and we will show the main difficulties we have to deal with: design of thermal environment at 80K with 4mK stability, the development of a metrology system in vacuum, knowledge of the focus position within 150μm in cold, etc. The main objectives...

  2. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 6, Physical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for physical testing. Covered are: properties of solutions, slurries, and sludges; rheological measurement with cone/plate viscometer; % solids determination; particle size distribution by laser scanning; penetration resistance of radioactive waste; operation of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, and high temperature DTA and DSC; sodium rod for sodium bonded fuel; filling SP-100 fuel capsules; sodium filling of BEATRIX-II type capsules; removal of alkali metals with ammonia; specific gravity of highly radioactive solutions; bulk density of radioactive granular solids; purification of Li by hot gettering/filtration; and Li filling of MOTA capsules.

  3. Performance of Different Mono- and Multiplex Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests on a Multipathogen External Quality Assessment Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loens, K.; van Loon, A. M.; Coenjaerts, F.; van Aarle, Y.; Goossens, H.; Wallace, P.; Claas, E. J. C.; Ieven, M.

    2012-01-01

    An external quality assessment (EQA) panel consisting of a total of 48 samples in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid or transport medium was prepared in collaboration with Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) (www.qcmd.org). The panel was used to assess the proficiency of the three labor

  4. Contact allergy to allergens of the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) has decreased modestly in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Johansen, J D

    2009-11-01

    The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population is nearly 20%. This study aimed to monitor the development of contact allergy to allergens from the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) between 1990 and 2006. Two random samples of adults from the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark, were invited to participate in a general health examination including patch testing. In 1990 and 2006, we patch tested and questioned 543 and 3460 adult Danes. Patch test readings were performed on day 2 only. The overall prevalence decreased significantly from 15.5% in 1990 to 10.0% in 2006, mainly as a result of a decrease in thimerosal allergy from 3.4% to 0.8%. Furthermore, the prevalence of cobalt allergy and rubber-related allergens decreased from 1.1% to 0.2% and from 1.5% to 0.2%, respectively. Stratification by sex and age group revealed decreasing prevalences of contact allergy in all male age groups and in young and middle-aged female age groups (18-55 years) whereas increasing prevalences were observed among older women (56-69 years). The diverging trend observed in women was probably explained by a cohort effect due to a change in the prevalence of nickel allergy following the Danish regulation on nickel exposure. Although the overall prevalence of contact allergy decreased in the general population, frequent contact allergens such as fragrance mix II and methyldibromo glutaronitrile were not tested. Thus, contact allergy remains prevalent in the general population.

  5. NREL Highlight: Truck Platooning Testing; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-21

    NREL's fleet test and evaluation team assesses the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning of line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics. Platooning reduces aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and safely decreasing the distance between them via electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. In 2014, the team conducted track testing of three SmartWay tractor - two platooned tractors and one control tractor—at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights. While platooning improved fuel economy at all speeds, travel at 55 mph resulted in the best overall miles per gallon. The lead truck demonstrated fuel savings up to 5.3% while the trailing truck saved up to 9.7%. A number of conditions impact the savings attainable, including ambient temperature, distance between lead and trailing truck, and payload weight. Future studies may look at ways to optimize system fuel efficiency and emissions reductions.

  6. Laboratory testing of novel sealant for leaky wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibic, O. [EnCana Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Polikar, M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Boyd, J. [Seal-MastR Systems Ltd., Clagary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Abandoned gas wells in western Canada often leak gas to the surface. An experimental study was conducted in order to determine the possibility of using an asphalt-in-water emulsion as sealant for abandoned leaky wells. This is considered a more efficient and cost-effective method to the conventional cement grout barrier. The study objective was to test this new sealant technology proposed by Seal-MastR and to examine the effect of those parameters affecting the placement and fixing of an emulsion in the near well bore matrix, thereby hindering the flow of water or gas. Two types of experiments were conducted as part of this study. The mechanism of the emulsion penetration into the porous matrix was studied making observations of the process in a transparent core holder. The process was investigated using a steel core holder that allows injection of the emulsion at actual well pressures. It was concluded that the asphalt-in-water emulsion technology can be used with success for sealing abandoned gas-leaking wells or water-producing formations. The study also proposed recommendations for field application and suggested areas for further research to improve the process, such as finding the optimum concentration for the surfactant solution pre-flush that would yield the highest penetration, and testing the emulsion in oil-wet or partially oil-wet formation. 4 refs., 3 tabs., 19 figs.

  7. The application of data from proficiency testing to laboratory accreditation according to ISO 17025

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    Current methods of testing laboratories for their proficiency in reporting correct measurement results are liable to substantial errors of the 2nd kind. This means that laboratories with deflated uncertainties are accepted as proficient, even though their reported measurement results pave the way...

  8. Sensitivity of BRCA1/2 testing in high-risk breast/ovarian/male breast cancer families: little contribution of comprehensive RNA/NGS panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Helen; Wallis, Yvonne; van Veen, Elke M; Lalloo, Fiona; Reay, Kim; Smith, Philip; Wallace, Andrew J; Bowers, Naomi; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth

    2016-11-01

    The sensitivity of testing BRCA1 and BRCA2 remains unresolved as the frequency of deep intronic splicing variants has not been defined in high-risk familial breast/ovarian cancer families. This variant category is reported at significant frequency in other tumour predisposition genes, including NF1 and MSH2. We carried out comprehensive whole gene RNA analysis on 45 high-risk breast/ovary and male breast cancer families with no identified pathogenic variant on exonic sequencing and copy number analysis of BRCA1/2. In addition, we undertook variant screening of a 10-gene high/moderate risk breast/ovarian cancer panel by next-generation sequencing. DNA testing identified the causative variant in 50/56 (89%) breast/ovarian/male breast cancer families with Manchester scores of ≥50 with two variants being confirmed to affect splicing on RNA analysis. RNA sequencing of BRCA1/BRCA2 on 45 individuals from high-risk families identified no deep intronic variants and did not suggest loss of RNA expression as a cause of lost sensitivity. Panel testing in 42 samples identified a known RAD51D variant, a high-risk ATM variant in another breast ovary family and a truncating CHEK2 mutation. Current exonic sequencing and copy number analysis variant detection methods of BRCA1/2 have high sensitivity in high-risk breast/ovarian cancer families. Sequence analysis of RNA does not identify any variants undetected by current analysis of BRCA1/2. However, RNA analysis clarified the pathogenicity of variants of unknown significance detected by current methods. The low diagnostic uplift achieved through sequence analysis of the other known breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes indicates that further high-risk genes remain to be identified.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ULTRA-350 Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, D J; Wulff, T A; Carlisle, K

    2001-04-10

    LLNL has many in-house designed high precision machine tools. Some of these tools include the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) [1], Diamond Turning Machine No.3 (DTM-3) and two Precision Engineering Research Lathes (PERL-I and PERL-II). These machines have accuracy in the sub-micron range and in most cases position resolution in the couple of nanometers range. All of these machines are built with similar underlying technologies. The machines use capstan drive technology, laser interferometer position feedback, tachometer velocity feedback, permanent magnet (PM) brush motors and analog velocity and position loop servo compensation [2]. The machine controller does not perform any servo compensation it simply computes the differences between the commanded position and the actual position (the following error) and sends this to a D/A for the analog servo position loop. LLNL is designing a new high precision diamond turning machine. The machine is called the ULTRA 350 [3]. In contrast to many of the proven technologies discussed above, the plan for the new machine is to use brushless linear motors, high precision linear scales, machine controller motor commutation and digital servo compensation for the velocity and position loops. Although none of these technologies are new and have been in use in industry, applications of these technologies to high precision diamond turning is limited. To minimize the risks of these technologies in the new machine design, LLNL has established a test bed to evaluate these technologies for application in high precision diamond turning. The test bed is primarily composed of commercially available components. This includes the slide with opposed hydrostatic bearings, the oil system, the brushless PM linear motor, the two-phase input three-phase output linear motor amplifier and the system controller. The linear scales are not yet commercially available but use a common electronic output format. As of this writing, the final

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ULTRA-350 Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, D J; Wulff, T A; Carlisle, K

    2001-04-10

    LLNL has many in-house designed high precision machine tools. Some of these tools include the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) [1], Diamond Turning Machine No.3 (DTM-3) and two Precision Engineering Research Lathes (PERL-1 and PERL-11). These machines have accuracy in the sub-micron range and in most cases position resolution in the couple of nanometers range. All of these machines are built with similar underlying technologies. The machines use capstan drive technology, laser interferometer position feedback, tachometer velocity feedback, permanent magnet (PM) brush motors and analog velocity and position loop servo compensation [2]. The machine controller does not perform any servo compensation it simply computes the differences between the commanded position and the actual position (the following error) and sends this to a D/A for the analog servo position loop. LLNL is designing a new high precision diamond turning machine. The machine is called the ULTRA 350 [3]. In contrast to many of the proven technologies discussed above, the plan for the new machine is to use brushless linear motors, high precision linear scales, machine controller motor commutation and digital servo compensation for the velocity and position loops. Although none of these technologies are new and have been in use in industry, applications of these technologies to high precision diamond turning is limited. To minimize the risks of these technologies in the new machine design, LLNL has established a test bed to evaluate these technologies for application in high precision diamond turning. The test bed is primarily composed of commercially available components. This includes the slide with opposed hydrostatic bearings, the oil system, the brushless PM linear motor, the two-phase input three-phase output linear motor amplifier and the system controller. The linear scales are not yet commercially available but use a common electronic output format. As of this writing, the final

  11. MODERN APPROACHES IN COMPLEX LABORATORY TESTING FOR DIPHTHERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kraeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The criteria of reliable validation of population protection against diphtheria on the base of two indices including quantity of antitoxic antibodies to diphtheria and avidity index have been established. For this purposes it was proposed to use the modified variant of ELISA allowed to detect both indices simultaneously. The formula of probable development of diphtheria in case of the close contact with patients or Corynebacterium diphtheriae bacteria carriers as well as determination of revaccination time have been proposed. The authors developed “The algorithm of population immunity control and assessment of non-susceptibility to diphtheria” and “The algorithm of micro biological testing of clinical samples for C. diphtheriae”.

  12. Wood-Based Paneling as Thermal Barriers,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Forest Panelingi as Products Laboratory Research Thermal Barriers Paper ’> FPL 408 10 C-D Li-J _ LzstZibutio iOse flh SQe.it s V 82 1012 048 |stract...this paper, a small scale horizontal exposure furnace test for testing thermal barriers over a calcium silicate board was added to the Uniform Building...Results," by Robert H. White. United States Department of - a eArclueWood-Based Agriculture Forest Paneling as Products Laboratory, Par Thermal Barriers PaperFPL

  13. Screening for Saponins Using the Blood Hemolysis Test. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotheeswaran, Subramaniam

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment for undergraduate chemistry laboratories involving a chemical found in plants and some sea animals. Discusses collection and identification of material, a hemolysis test, preparation of blood-coated agar plates, and application of samples. (CW)

  14. Laboratory testing and analysis Dorris Dam Modoc National Wildlife Refuge May 24 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report presents the results of laboratory testing and stability analyses conducted for Dorris Dam located within the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge, Modoc...

  15. 78 FR 60898 - Regulation on Definition and Requirements for a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Regulation on Definition and Requirements for a Nationally..., ``definition and requirements for a nationally recognized testing laboratory'' (The Regulation). The Regulation... place all submissions, including any personal information provided, in the public docket...

  16. Laboratory testing on infiltration in single synthetic fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Li, Jiawei; Giasi, Concetta I.; Li, Ling

    2017-04-01

    An understanding of infiltration phenomena in unsaturated rock fractures is extremely important in many branches of engineering for numerous reasons. Sectors such as the oil, gas and water industries are regularly interacting with water seepage through rock fractures, yet the understanding of the mechanics and behaviour associated with this sort of flow is still incomplete. An apparatus has been set up to test infiltration in single synthetic fractures in both dry and wet conditions. To simulate the two fracture planes, concrete fractures have been moulded from 3D printed fractures with varying geometrical configurations, in order to analyse the influence of aperture and roughness on infiltration. Water flows through the single fractures by means of a hydraulic system composed by an upstream and a downstream reservoir, the latter being subdivided into five equal sections in order to measure the flow rate in each part to detect zones of preferential flow. The fractures have been set at various angles of inclination to investigate the effect of this parameter on infiltration dynamics. The results obtained identified that altering certain fracture parameters and conditions produces relevant effects on the infiltration process through the fractures. The main variables influencing the formation of preferential flow are: the inclination angle of the fracture, the saturation level of the fracture and the mismatch wavelength of the fracture.

  17. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  18. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  19. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparn, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jin, X. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Earle, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses. The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  20. Role of the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test in the detection of syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggory, P

    1983-02-01

    Of 9733 consecutive serological samples received by Portsmouth and Southampton Public Health Laboratories (PHL) and tested for syphilis, 190 (140 from men and 50 from women) gave positive results. Thirty new cases of syphilis were identified. Most sera were tested initially by both a specific antibody test (the Treponema pallidum haemaglutination (TPHA) test) and a cardiolipin test (the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test). Among the 14 patients whose sera gave VDRL-positive but TPHA-negative results, 12 sera gave false-positive results. The sera of 90 patients gave TPHA-positive but VDRL-negative results; sera from only seven of these patients gave false-positive results. The VDRL test is very unlikely to identify a new case of syphilis where a TPHA test has failed to do so. The results of the survey suggest that the VDRL test should be withdrawn from initial testing for syphilis except where early primary disease is suspected.

  1. 20 CFR 404.1519k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized tests, such as pulmonary function... tests, and other services. 404.1519k Section 404.1519k Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... Standards for the Type of Referral and for Report Content § 404.1519k Purchase of medical examinations...

  2. 20 CFR 416.919k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized tests, such as pulmonary function... tests, and other services. 416.919k Section 416.919k Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... for the Type of Referral and for Report Content § 416.919k Purchase of medical examinations...

  3. Laboratory and field tests of corrosion inhibitors for an offshore application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjerve, Sofie; Fuhr, Geir Gundersen; Haldogaard, Geir

    2006-03-15

    Statoil started a R and D-project in 2002 where the goal was to implement environmental friendly corrosion control at a Statoil operated oil producing field. In this project the following tasks have been addressed: 1) Reduction of the chemical consumption. 2) Documentation of the discharge level of the corrosion inhibitor. 3) Documentation of the environmental impact. 4) Development of new environmentally friendly acceptable corrosion inhibitors. 5) Laboratory and field testing of new corrosion inhibitors. This paper describes laboratory and field tests of corrosion inhibitors for this project. The field tests were carried out on an offshore oil producing installation in the North Sea. Five corrosion inhibitor suppliers with totally eleven products were taking part in this test. All the products were tested in the laboratory. The four most promising products from the laboratory tests were tested in the field during a fourteen days offshore test. Only one of the tested products gave satisfactory results from the corrosion field test. Corrosion measurements were performed both with a Zero Resistance Ammetry (ZRA) probe installed directly into a flow line and with two side streams units. One side stream unit was connected upstream the test separator and the other unit was connected downstream the test separator. (author) (tk)

  4. Laboratory Tests of the Inverse Square Law of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamminger, Stephan

    2010-02-01

    Newton's inverse square force law of gravity follows directly from the fact that we live in a 3-dimensional world. For sub-millimeter length scales there may be undiscovered, extra dimensions. Such extra dimensions can be detected with inverse square law tests accessible to torsion balances. I will present an overview of two experiments that are being conducted at the University of Washington to search for gravitational-strength deviations from the inverse square law for extra dimension length scales smaller than 50 micrometers. One experiment is designed to measure the distance dependent force between closely spaced masses, whereas the second experiment is a null experiment and is only sensitive to a deviation from the inverse square law of gravity. The first experiment consists of a torsion pendulum that is suspended above a continuously rotating attractor. The attractor and the pendulum are disks with azimuthal sectors of alternating high and a low density. The torque on the pendulum disk varies as a function of the attractor angle with a 3 degree period. The amplitude of the torque signal is analyzed as a function of the separation between the pendulum and the attractor. The second experiment consists of a plate pendulum that is suspended parallel to a larger vertical plate attractor. The pendulum plate has an internal density asymmetry with a dense inlay on one half facing the attractor and another inlay on the other half on the side away from the attractor. If the inverse square law holds, the gravitational field of the attractor is uniform and the torque on the pendulum is independent of the gap between pendulum and attractor. The attractor position is modulated between a near and far position and the torque difference on the pendulum is recorded and analyzed for a possible inverse square law violation. )

  5. F-15B in on ramp with close-up of test panels covered with advanced spray-on foam insulation materia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.

  6. Assessment of Damage Containment Features of a Full-Scale PRSEUS Fuselage Panel Through Test and Teardown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2012-01-01

    An area that shows promise in enhancing structural integrity of aircraft and aerospace structures is the integrally stitched composite technology. The most recent generation of this technology is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept developed by Boeing Research and Technology and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A joint test program on the assessment of damage containment capabilities of the PRSEUS concept for curved fuselage structures was conducted recently at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. The panel was subjected to axial tension, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure load conditions up to fracture, with a through-the-thickness, two-bay notch severing the central stiffener. For the purpose of future progressive failure analysis development and verification, extensive post failure nondestructive and teardown inspections were conducted. Detailed inspections were performed directly ahead of the notch tip where stable damage progression was observed. These examinations showed: 1) extensive delaminations developed ahead of the notch tip, 2) the extent and location of damage, 3) the typical damage mechanisms observed in composites, and 4) the role of stitching and warp-knitting in the failure mechanisms. The objective of this paper is to provide a summary of results from these posttest inspections.

  7. Unnecessary repeat requesting of tests: an audit in a government hospital immunology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, J; Jones, B

    2005-05-01

    Unnecessary repeat requesting of tests can make up a large proportion of a laboratory's workload. This audit set out to establish the size of this problem and to identify the circumstances under which these repeat requests were made in a government tertiary hospital immunology laboratory. The numbers of tests for immunoglobulin measurement, common autoantibodies, and tumour markers that were repeated over a 12 month period were analysed by interrogating the Delphic laboratory computer system using a management information system for raw data enquiry protocol. Repeat requests within 12 weeks of a previous request made up 16.78% of the total workload. The total cost of the tests was estimated at 132 151 US dollars. The waste of technician time and reagents as a result of unnecessary repeat testing is excessive. Many of these tests might be eliminated with the use of interventions such as computerised reminders.

  8. Evaluation of a laboratory test to detect resistance to closantel in Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J B; Fitzgibbon, C C; Barchia, I

    2000-10-01

    To evaluate a laboratory test for closantel resistance in Haemonchus contortus. Field isolates of H contortus, known to be resistant to closantel, were tested in the assay. In addition, mixtures of closantel-susceptible and closantel-resistant laboratory reference strains were tested to develop a method of predicting the proportion of resistant worms in a sample from the field. The assay correctly identified as resistant all of the closantel-resistant field isolates of H contortus. It also identified one isolate with an in vivo efficacy of 98% as having emerging resistance. Testing of the mixtures of laboratory reference strains revealed that an isolate would be classified as resistant when it consists of about 25% or more resistant worms. Test samples that are not fully susceptible yet contain less than 25% resistant worms may be classified as emerging resistance. The in vitro migration assay is a sensitive method of detecting closantel resistance in H contortus.

  9. Laboratory Diagnosis of Syphilis: A Survey to Examine the Range of Tests Used in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond SW. Tsang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis has undergone major changes in the past decade with the introduction of immunoassays and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigens as screening tools for syphilis infection. To address this change in laboratory practice, a national syphilis laboratory working group was established with members from the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial public health laboratories across the country as well as sexually transmitted infection researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists. This working group aims to examine how the use of newer immunoassays will affect syphilis diagnosis, surveillance and disease management. To provide a baseline for this work, an e-mail survey was conducted in the fall of 2009 to determine current laboratory practices for syphilis diagnosis in Canada. The most commonly used tests were rapid plasma reagin, enzyme immunoassay, T pallidum passive particle agglutination, venereal disease research laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, line immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction with 92%, 36%, 32%, 20%, 12%, 12% and 12% of the responding laboratories reporting using these tests, respectively. The ultimate goal of this working group will be to update laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of syphilis, and to identify syphilis surveillance and research priorities in Canada.

  10. Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis: A survey to examine the range of tests used in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Raymond Sw; Radons, Sandra Michelle; Morshed, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis has undergone major changes in the past decade with the introduction of immunoassays and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigens as screening tools for syphilis infection. To address this change in laboratory practice, a national syphilis laboratory working group was established with members from the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial public health laboratories across the country as well as sexually transmitted infection researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists. This working group aims to examine how the use of newer immunoassays will affect syphilis diagnosis, surveillance and disease management. To provide a baseline for this work, an e-mail survey was conducted in the fall of 2009 to determine current laboratory practices for syphilis diagnosis in Canada. The most commonly used tests were rapid plasma reagin, enzyme immunoassay, T pallidum passive particle agglutination, venereal disease research laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, line immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction with 92%, 36%, 32%, 20%, 12%, 12% and 12% of the responding laboratories reporting using these tests, respectively. The ultimate goal of this working group will be to update laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of syphilis, and to identify syphilis surveillance and research priorities in Canada.

  11. Direct Susceptibility Testing with Positive BacT/Alert Blood Cultures by Using MicroScan Overnight and Rapid Panels

    OpenAIRE

    Waites, Ken B.; Brookings, E S; Moser, S. A.; Zimmer, B. L.

    1998-01-01

    Studies were conducted on a method of direct inoculation of MicroScan dried overnight and of rapid panels with positive aerobic blood cultures obtained from the BacT/Alert to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities. Inocula were limited to specimens that appeared unimicrobic on Gram stain. Results were compared to those obtained from panels inoculated following subculture. For 133 gram-negative bacilli, there were 94.7 and 93.5% categorical agreements between direct and standard methods for ...

  12. Laboratory tests in the detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamase production: National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS screening test, the E-test, the double disk confirmatory test, and cefoxitin susceptibility testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. d'Azevedo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL production by Klebsiella sp. and E. coli is an emerging problem. In this study, 107 clinical isolates (53 E. coli, 47 K. pneumoniae and 7 K. oxytoca screened as ESBL producers by the NCCLS disk diffusion procedure were submitted to a double disk confirmatory test (DDT and to the E-test double strip for confirmation of ESBL production by demonstration of clavulanic acid inhibition effect (CAIE. Only 72/107 (67% of the isolates were confirmed as ESBL producers by DDT, with diverse results among species. By the E-test, 58/107 (54% isolates were confirmed as ESBL producers, and 18/107 (17% were not determinable. Susceptibility to cefoxitin was found in 57/68 (83% of strains that did not show CAIE. ESBL detection remains a controversial issue and clinical laboratories are in need of a simple and effective way to recognize strains with this kind of resistance.

  13. Blood Test: Lipid Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide individual results for your good and bad cholesterol and triglycerides.Good (HDL) cholesterol: Your body needs good cholesterol to lower your ... of heart disease. Your doctor will prescribe a cholesterol medicine based ... and health history.Triglycerides: 150 md/dL or less is considered normal, ...

  14. A New Panel Test Facility for Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurements up to 1,650°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Gerald; Gross, Ulrich; Wulf, Rhena

    2007-10-01

    A new steady-state panel test facility is presented which has been designed and constructed for effective thermal-conductivity measurements of insulations in the temperature range between 300 and 1,650°C following ASTM C201-93 and DIN V ENV-1094. Square-shaped samples (length of 400 mm) are used, heated from above and settled on a water-cooled calorimeter system to obtain a one-dimensional steady-state temperature field. The heat is supplied by electrical heating elements freely hanging inside a furnace which is completely constructed from ceramic components to withstand temperatures up to about 1,800°C. The calorimeter system consists of a square central measuring zone (length of 100 mm) surrounded by guard loops to avoid heat losses in all directions. The samples, e.g., a number of fiber mats, one on top of the other up to a maximum height of 110 mm, are open to ambient pressure and atmosphere (air). Measurements include the heat flow rate (taken in the central calorimeter), temperature differences across individual layers of the sample (measured by a series of thermocouples which regularly have to be calibrated), and the thickness of the respective layers (before and after the experiment). The thermal conductivities range from 0.025 to 2 W · m-1 · K-1, and both isotropic and non-isotropic materials can be investigated due to the one-dimensional characteristic of the temperature field. Measurements for alumina fiber mats are presented, and good agreement is found with respective results from other methods and test facilities.

  15. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific genetic defects. This is particularly true of Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) where more than 12 different ... receptors. Looking to the Future Newborn screening for severe T-cell immunodeficiency is now recommended by the Secretary of the ...

  16. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... evaluation of large parts of or the entire genetic code for an individual at relatively low cost. These ... of personalized medicine based on an individual’s unique genetic code, but when this will become reality at a ...

  17. The laboratory test rig with miniature jet engine to research aviation fuels combustion process

    OpenAIRE

    Gawron Bartosz; Białecki Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    This article presents laboratory test rig with a miniature turbojet engine (MiniJETRig – Miniature Jet Engine Test Rig), that was built in the Air Force Institute of Technology. The test rig has been developed for research and development works aimed at modelling and investigating processes and phenomena occurring in full scale jet engines. In the article construction of a test rig is described, with a brief discussion on the functionality of each of its main components. Additionally examples...

  18. Conformity assessment of the measurement accuracy in testing laboratories using a software application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniţă, A.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a method for assessing the accuracy of the measurements obtained at different tests conducted in laboratories by implementing the interlaboratory comparison method (organization, performance and evaluation of measurements of tests on the same or similar items by two or more laboratories under predetermined conditions). The program (independent software application), realised by the author and described in this paper, analyses the measurement accuracy and performance of testing laboratory by comparing the results obtained from different tests, using the modify Youden diagram, helping identify different types of errors that can occur in measurement, according to ISO 13528:2015, Statistical methods for use in proficiency testing by interlaboratory comparison. A case study is presented in the article by determining the chemical composition of identical samples from five different laboratories. The Youden diagram obtained from this study case was used to identify errors in the laboratory testing equipment. This paper was accepted for publication in Proceedings after double peer reviewing process but was not presented at the Conference ROTRIB’16

  19. CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-23

    The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of

  20. 40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065.15 Section 1065.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General Provisions §...

  1. Harmonization of antimicrobial susceptibility testing among veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the five Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hofshagen, Merete

    2003-01-01

    , whereas for Enterococcus spp., two laboratories had less than 90 % concordant results. Susceptibility testing of Salmonella to fluoroquinolones gave rise to almost 0.5% nonconcordant results and susceptibility testing of S. aureus to vancomycin resulted in that 1.8% of the strains were incorrectly...

  2. Laboratory and field testing for utilization of an excavated soil as landfill liner material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozbey, Ilknur; Guler, Erol

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using a silty soil excavated in highway construction as landfill liner material. The tests were conducted both at laboratory and in situ scales, and the soil was tested in pure and lime treated forms. Different levels of compaction energy were used. For the field study, a test pad was constructed and in situ hydraulic conductivity experiments were conducted by sealed double ring infiltrometers (SDRI). Laboratory testing revealed that while lime treatment improved the shear strength, it resulted in higher hydraulic conductivity values compared to pure soil. It was observed that leachate permeation did not change the hydraulic conductivity of the pure and lime treated samples. Laboratory hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-9) m/s and met the 1.0E-08 m/s criterion in the Turkish regulations, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value allowed in most developed countries. SDRI testing, which lasted for 6 mo, indicated that lime treatment increased the hydraulic conductivity of pure soil significantly in the field scale tests. In situ hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 1E-08 and 1E-07 m/s, and exceeded the allowable value in the Turkish regulations. Undisturbed samples collected from the test pad were not representative of field hydraulic conductivities. Contrary to laboratory findings, higher compaction efforts did not result in lower hydraulic conductivities in field scales. The study verified the importance of in situ hydraulic conductivity testing in compacted liners.

  3. Coal-water-slurry evaluation. Volume 2. Laboratory and combustion test results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, R.D.; Farthing, G.A.; Vecci, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    This is the second of three volumes describing a multi-phase coal-water slurry (CWS) test program. This volume presents the results of laboratory, atomization, and combustion tests which were performed on six slurries and their parent coals. The objectives of these tests was to establish laboratory test procedures for evaluating CWS fuels, to investigate relationships between laboratory properties and CWS combustion and handling characteristics and to develop preliminary guidelines for CWS specifications. These tests showed that the preparation processes and chemical additives used by the slurry manufacturers had a significant effect on viscosity and atomization properties. The most important factor for good combustion performance was droplet size, but droplet size did not correlate with viscosity measured at low shear rates in the laboratory tests. It was also found that some slurries had greater fouling potential than their parent coals due to the use of sodium-containing additives. Tests were also conducted to determine whether the slurries could be transported and stored without coal settling. These tests showed that little settling occurred during either transportation or storage for at least three weeks. 98 figures, 27 tables.

  4. ALDS 1978 panel review. [PNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, D.L. (ed.)

    1979-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is examining the analysis of large data sets (ALDS). After one year's work, a panel was convened to evaluate the project. This document is the permanent record of that panel review. It consists of edited transcripts of presentations made to the panel by the PNL staff, a summary of the responses of the panel to these presentations, and PNL's plans for the development of the ALDS project. The representations of the PNL staff described various aspects of the project and/or the philosophy surrounding the project. Supporting materials appear in appendixes. 20 figures, 4 tables. (RWR)

  5. The effect of a test ordering software intervention on the prescription of unnecessary laboratory tests - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carlos Manuel Silva; da Costa Teixeira, Andreia Sofia; de Azevedo, Luís Filipe Ribeiro; Sá, Luísa Maria Barbosa; Santos, Paulo Alexandre Azevedo Pereira; do Couto, Maria Luciana Gomes Domingues; da Costa Pereira, Altamiro Manuel Rodrigues; Hespanhol, Alberto Augusto Oliveira Pinto; da Costa Santos, Cristina Maria Nogueira

    2017-02-20

    The way software for electronic health records and laboratory tests ordering systems are designed may influence physicians' prescription. A randomised controlled trial was performed to measure the impact of a diagnostic and laboratory tests ordering system software modification. Participants were family physicians working and prescribing diagnostic and laboratory tests. The intervention group had a modified software with a basic shortcut menu changes, where some tests were withdrawn or added, and with the implementation of an evidence-based decision support based on United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations. This intervention group was compared with usual software (control group). The outcomes were the number of tests prescribed from those: withdrawn from the basic menu; added to the basic menu; marked with green dots (USPSTF's grade A and B); and marked with red dots (USPSTF's grade D). Comparing the monthly average number of tests prescribed before and after the software modification, from those tests that were withdrawn from the basic menu, the control group prescribed 33.8 tests per 100 consultations before and 30.8 after (p = 0075); the intervention group prescribed 31.3 before and 13.9 after (p < 0001). Comparing the tests prescribed between both groups during the intervention, from those tests that were withdrawn from the basic menu, the intervention group prescribed a monthly average of 14.0 vs. 29.3 tests per 100 consultations in the control group (p < 0.001). From those tests that are USPSTF's grade A and B, intervention group prescribed 66.8 vs. 74.1 tests per 100 consultations in the control group (p = 0.070). From those tests categorised as USPSTF grade D, the intervention group prescribed an average of 9.8 vs. 11.8 tests per 100 consultations in the control group (p = 0.003). Removing unnecessary tests from a quick shortcut menu of the diagnosis and laboratory tests ordering system had a significant

  6. Laboratory reporting accuracy of polymerase chain reaction testing for avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Brenna; Olsen, Geoff; Speer, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays are available for detection of birds infected with avian polyomavirus (APV). Several laboratories offer this diagnostic assay in the United States, but little information is available regarding assay sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. In this study, known APV-positive and APV-negative samples (each n = 10, 5 undiluted and 5 diluted) were sent to 5 commercial laboratories. A significant difference in reporting accuracy was found among laboratories, most notably for dilute APV-positive samples. Two out of 5 laboratories provided 100% accurate results, 1 had an accuracy of 90%, and 2 reported 80% and 75% accuracy, respectively. The accuracies of the last 2 laboratories were negatively affected by test sensitivities of 60% and 50%, respectively. These findings show that although accurate results were reported by most laboratories, both false-positive and false-negative results were reported by at least 3 laboratories, and false-negative results reported for dilute APV-positive samples predominated. These study findings illustrate a need for veterinary diagnostic laboratories to institute improved voluntary quality control measures.

  7. Compliance to HIV treatment monitoring guidelines can reduce laboratory costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Cassim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Panel tests are a predetermined group of tests commonly requested together to provide a comprehensive and conclusive diagnosis, for example, liver function test (LFT. South African HIV antiretroviral treatment (ART guidelines recommend individual tests for toxicity monitoring over panel tests. In 2008, the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS request form was redesigned to list individual tests instead of panel tests and removed the ‘other tests’ box option to facilitate efficient ART laboratory monitoring.Objectives: This study aimed to demonstrate changes in laboratory expenditure, for individual and panel tests, for ART toxicity monitoring.Method: NHLS Corporate Data Warehouse (CDW data were extracted for HIV conditional grant accounts to assess ART toxicity monitoring laboratory expenditure between 2010/2011 and 2014/2015. Data were classified based on the tests requested, as either panel (LFT or urea and electrolytes or individual (alanine transaminase or creatinine tests.Results: Expenditure on panel tests reduced from R340 million in 2010/2011 to R140m by 2014/2015 (reduction of R204m and individual test expenditure increased from R34m to R76m (twofold increase. A significant reduction in LFT panel expenditure was noted, reducing from R322m in 2010/2011 to R130m in 2014/2015 (60% reduction.Conclusion: Changes in toxicity monitoring guidelines and the re-engineering of the NHLS request form successfully reduced expenditure on panel tests relative to individual tests. The introduction of order entry systems could further reduce unnecessary laboratory expenditure.Keywords: HIV;ART;Toxicity Monitoring;Expenditure

  8. The laboratory test rig with miniature jet engine to research aviation fuels combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawron Bartosz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents laboratory test rig with a miniature turbojet engine (MiniJETRig – Miniature Jet Engine Test Rig, that was built in the Air Force Institute of Technology. The test rig has been developed for research and development works aimed at modelling and investigating processes and phenomena occurring in full scale jet engines. In the article construction of a test rig is described, with a brief discussion on the functionality of each of its main components. Additionally examples of measurement results obtained during the realization of the initial tests have been included, presenting the capabilities of the test rig.

  9. Transferability and inter-laboratory variability assessment of the in vitro bovine oocyte fertilization test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessaro, Irene; Modina, Silvia C; Crotti, Gabriella; Franciosi, Federica; Colleoni, Silvia; Lodde, Valentina; Galli, Cesare; Lazzari, Giovanna; Luciano, Alberto M

    2015-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the number of animals required for reproductive toxicity testing imposes the validation of alternative methods to reduce the use of laboratory animals. As we previously demonstrated for in vitro maturation test of bovine oocytes, the present study describes the transferability assessment and the inter-laboratory variability of an in vitro test able to identify chemical effects during the process of bovine oocyte fertilization. Eight chemicals with well-known toxic properties (benzo[a]pyrene, busulfan, cadmium chloride, cycloheximide, diethylstilbestrol, ketoconazole, methylacetoacetate, mifepristone/RU-486) were tested in two well-trained laboratories. The statistical analysis demonstrated no differences in the EC50 values for each chemical in within (inter-runs) and in between-laboratory variability of the proposed test. We therefore conclude that the bovine in vitro fertilization test could advance toward the validation process as alternative in vitro method and become part of an integrated testing strategy in order to predict chemical hazards on mammalian fertility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  11. Comparative Laboratory-Scale Testing of Dispersant Effectiveness of 23 Crude Oils Using Four Different Testing Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    A controlled laboratory study was conducted to measure the dispersion effectiveness of Corexit 9500 on 20 different crude oils. This study was a part of a larger project initiated by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) testing 20 oils to compare the predict...

  12. Performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: In vitro measurements (urinalysis): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J.; Fisher, D.R.

    1988-03-01

    This report provides results of the two-round nationwide in vitro bioassay intercomparison study. Conclusions were based on analyses by 35 bioassay laboratories of nearly 1400 artificial urine samples containing known quantities of radionuclides. The test radionuclides were H, /sup 89/Sr, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 60/Co, and natural uranium. The data reported included background count rates, total samples counts, counting times, counting efficiencies, sample yields, and estimated errrors of the determinations. The measurement data were evaluated according to statistical methods presented in the November 1985 version of the draft ANSI Standard N13.30. If a laboratory failed a performance test for any one of the three criteria, the laboratory was considered to have failed the test for that category. 22 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs

  13. Testing sediment biological effects with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: the gap between laboratory and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feiyue; Goulet, Richard R; Chapman, Peter M

    2004-12-01

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in laboratory sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. However, its responses in the laboratory are probably very different from those in the field. A review of the literature indicates that in its natural habitat this species complex is primarily epibenthic, derives little nutrition from the sediments, and responds primarily to contaminants in the overlying water column (including water and food), not sediment or porewater. In laboratory sediment toxicity tests H. azteca is deprived of natural food sources such as algal communities on or above the sediments, and is subjected to constant light without any cover except that afforded by burial into the sediments. Under these constraining laboratory conditions, H. azteca has been reported to respond to sediment or porewater contamination. In nature, contamination of overlying water from sediment is less likely than in the laboratory because of the large, generally non-static sink of natural surface water. H. azteca does not appear to be the most appropriate test species for direct assessments of the bioavailability and toxicity of sediment contaminants, though it is probably appropriate for testing the toxicity of surface waters. Toxic and non-toxic responses will be highly conservative, though the latter are probably the most persuasive given the exposure constraints. Thus H. azteca is probably a suitable surrogate species for determining sediments that are likely not toxic to field populations; however, it is not suitable for determining sediments that are likely toxic to field populations.

  14. The changing face of hemostasis testing in modern laboratories: consolidation, automation, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2015-04-01

    The reality of laboratory diagnostics as a whole, and hemostasis testing in particular, is evolving under new paradigms of efficiency. The driving forces of health care and laboratory diagnostics in the third millennium are mainly represented by macro- and microeconomics. In a world with limited resources, shattered by an unprecedented economic crisis, laboratory diagnostics is undergoing a substantial reorganization, with emergence of new models under the imperative of terms, such as bedside testing, consolidation, and networking. The paradigms under which these changes are being developed include a variety of environment, preanalytical, technological, professional, and health-care aspects. The maintenance of continued quality is indeed the major challenge to be faced in the foreseeable future. In fact, some challenges prepotently emerge during a consolidation process, which basically involve delayed testing, centrifugation, transportation, and stability of the specimens, as well as the potential mismatch of sample matrix. This article is aimed to provide an overview of the current economic scenario of laboratory diagnostics and discuss the changing face of hemostasis testing in modern laboratories, providing a synthetic overview about potential drawbacks of actualized solutions.

  15. Detection of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida tropicalis in a High-Sugar Medium by a Metal Oxide Sensor-Based Electronic Nose and Comparison with Test Panel Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huxuan; Hu, Zhongqiu; Long, Fangyu; Guo, Chunfeng; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-11-01

    Osmotolerant yeasts are primarily responsible for spoilage of sugar-rich foods. In this work, an electronic nose (e-nose) was used to diagnose contamination caused by two osmotolerant yeast strains (Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida tropicalis) in a high-sugar medium using test panel evaluation as the reference method. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to determine the evolution of the volatile organic compound fingerprint in the contaminated samples during yeast growth. Principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis revealed that the e-nose could identify contamination after 48 h, corresponding to the total yeast levels of 3.68 (Z. rouxii) and 3.09 (C. tropicalis) log CFU/ml. At these levels, the test panel could not yet diagnose the spoilage, indicating that the e-nose approach was more sensitive than the test panel evaluation. Loading analysis indicated that sensors 8 and 6 were the most important for detection of these two yeasts. Based on the result obtained with the e-nose, the incubation time and total yeast levels could be accurately predicted by established multiple regression models with a correlation of greater than 0.97. In the sensory evaluation, spoilage was diagnosed after 72 h in samples contaminated with C. tropicalis and after 48 to 72 h for samples contaminated with Z. rouxii. GC-MS revealed that compounds such as acetaldehyde, acetone, ethyl acetate, alcohol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol contributed to spoilage detection by the e-nose after 48 h. In the high-sugar medium, the e-nose was more sensitive than the test panel evaluation for detecting contamination with these test yeast strains. This information could be useful for developing instruments and techniques for rapid scanning of sugar-rich foods for contamination with osmotolerant yeasts before such spoilage could be detected by the consumer.

  16. Laboratory tests to assess patients with rheumatoid arthritis: advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Theodore; Sokka, Tuulikki

    2009-11-01

    Laboratory tests provide the most definitive information for diagnosing and managing many diseases, and most patients look to laboratory tests as the most important information from a medical visit. Most patients who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a positive test for rheumatoid factor and anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies, as well as an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). More than 30% 40% of patients with RA, however, have negative tests for rheumatoid factor or anti-CCP antibodies or a normal ESR or CRP. More than 30% of patients with RA, however, have negative tests for rheumatoid factor or anti-CCP antibodies, and 40% have a normal ESR or CRP. These observations indicate that, although they can be helpful to monitor certain patients, laboratory measures cannot serve as a gold standard for diagnosis and management in all individual patients with RA or any rheumatic disease. Physicians and patients would benefit from an improved understanding of the limitations of laboratory tests in diagnosis and management of patients with RA.

  17. Panel Session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege

    2004-01-01

    In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach.......In this panel session, four researchers will discuss the role of a theoretical foundation, in particular AT, in the design of information technology based artefacts. The general discussion will take of from a specific examination of the ActAD approach....

  18. Point-Counterpoint: The FDA Has a Role in Regulation of Laboratory-Developed Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Angela M; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-04-01

    Since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its draft guidance on the regulation of laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) in October 2014, there has been a flurry of responses from commercial and hospital-based laboratory directors, clinicians, professional organizations, and diagnostic companies. The FDA defines an LDT as an "in vitrodiagnostic device that is intended for clinical use and is designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory." The draft guidance outlines a risk-based approach, with oversight of high-risk and moderate-risk tests being phased in over 9 years. High-risk tests would be regulated first and require premarket approval. Subsequently, moderate-risk tests would require a 510(k) premarket submission to the FDA and low-risk tests would need only to be registered. Oversight discretion would be exercised for LDTs focused on rare diseases (defined as fewer than 4,000 tests, not cases, per year nationally) and unmet clinical needs (defined as those tests for which there is no alternative FDA-cleared or -approved test). There was an open comment period followed by a public hearing in early January of 2015, and we are currently awaiting the final decision regarding the regulation of LDTs. Given that LDTs have been developed by many laboratories and are essential for the diagnosis and monitoring of an array of infectious diseases, changes in their regulation will have far-reaching implications for clinical microbiology laboratories. In this Point-Counterpoint, Angela Caliendo discusses the potential benefits of the FDA guidance for LDTs whereas Kim Hanson discusses the concerns associated with implementing the guidance and why these regulations may not improve clinical care.

  19. Radiation Testing at Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia – JPL Collaboration for Europa Lander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Ion Beam Lab.; Olszewska-Wasiolek, Maryla Aleksandra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gamma Irradiation Facility

    2017-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is assisting Jet Propulsion Laboratory in undertaking feasibility studies and performance assessments for the Planetary Protection aspect of the Europa Lander mission. The specific areas of interest for this project are described by task number. This white paper presents the evaluation results for Task 2, Radiation Testing, which was stated as follows: Survey SNL facilities and capabilities for simulating the Europan radiation environment and assess suitability for: A. Testing batteries, electronics, and other component and subsystems B. Exposing biological organisms to assess their survivability metrics.

  20. Laboratory testing of TiB/sub 2/-based cathodes for electrolytic production of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, C.H.

    1988-07-01

    Experimental research was performed to evaluate TiB/sub 2/-based cathodes, which may be used for retrofitting existing commercial Hall-Heroult cells. Candidate cathode materials and retrofit designs were analyzed in laboratory-scale electrolysis tests and nonpolarized immersion tests in molten Al. The cathode materials and cathode attachment designs were selected based on a literature review (Schilling, Hagen, and Hart 1987) and previous experimental research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Hart et al. 1987). 40 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Occurrence of sea spider Endeis mollis Carpenter (Arthropoda: Pycnogonida on the test panels submerged in Gulf of Mannar, southeast coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Satheesh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea spiders (Pycnogonids are exclusively marine arthropods with worldwide distribution. Pycnogonida remains one of the poorly investigated groups encountered in fouling communities. In the present study, distribution pycnogonid species Endeis mollis associated with the fouling community developed on test panels submerged at Kudankulam coast, Gulf of Mannar was studied for a period of two years. Throughout the period of investigation, Endeis mollis was observed on the test panels. A maximum of 55 individuals per square dm was observed during pre-monsoon season and a minimum of 9 individuals per square dm during monsoon season. Results of this study on seasonal distribution are of considerable interest because so little has been documented on the ecology of Pycnogonids in India.

  2. Multi-laboratory testing of a screening method for world trade center (WTC) collapse dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Jacky A; Bern, Amy M; Willis, Robert D; Blanchard, Fredrick T; Conner, Teri L; Kahn, Henry D; Friedman, David

    2008-02-15

    The September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) covered a large area of downtown New York City with dust and debris. This paper describes the testing of an analytical method designed to evaluate whether sampled dust contains dust that may have originated from the collapse of the WTC. Using dust samples collected from locations affected and not affected (referred to as 'background' locations) by the collapse, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis method was developed to screen for three materials that are believed to be present in large quantities in WTC dusts: slag wool, concrete, and gypsum. An inter-laboratory evaluation of the method was implemented by having eight laboratories analyze a number of 'blind' dust samples, consisting of confirmed background dust and confirmed background dust spiked with varying amounts of dust affected by the WTC collapse. The levels of gypsum and concrete in the spiked samples were indistinguishable from the levels in the background samples. Measurements of slag wool in dust demonstrated potential for distinguishing between spiked and background samples in spite of considerable within and between laboratory variability. Slag wool measurements appear to be sufficiently sensitive to distinguish dust spiked with 5% WTC-affected dust from 22 out of 25 background dust samples. Additional development work and inter-laboratory testing of the slag wool component will be necessary to improve the precision and accuracy of the method and reduce inter- and intra-laboratory variability from levels observed in the inter-laboratory evaluation.

  3. Establishing benchmarks and metrics for disruptive technologies, inappropriate and obsolete tests in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechle, Frederick L; Arcenas, Rodney C; Rogers, Linda C

    2014-01-01

    Benchmarks and metrics related to laboratory test utilization are based on evidence-based medical literature that may suffer from a positive publication bias. Guidelines are only as good as the data reviewed to create them. Disruptive technologies require time for appropriate use to be established before utilization review will be meaningful. Metrics include monitoring the use of obsolete tests and the inappropriate use of lab tests. Test utilization by clients in a hospital outreach program can be used to monitor the impact of new clients on lab workload. A multi-disciplinary laboratory utilization committee is the most effective tool for modifying bad habits, and reviewing and approving new tests for the lab formulary or by sending them out to a reference lab. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inter-laboratory evaluation of the EUROFORGEN Global ancestry-informative SNP panel by massively parallel sequencing using the Ion PGM™

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eduardoff, M; Gross, T E; Santos, C

    2016-01-01

    The EUROFORGEN Global ancestry-informative SNP (AIM-SNPs) panel is a forensic multiplex of 128 markers designed to differentiate an individual's ancestry from amongst the five continental population groups of Africa, Europe, East Asia, Native America, and Oceania. A custom multiplex of AmpliSeq™ ...

  5. Pre-operative laboratory testing: A prospective study on comparison and cost analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh H Keshavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims : Pre-operative investigations are performed before any surgical intervention under anaesthesia. Many are considered as routine. However, there are no clear guidelines regarding these in India. We aim to look at the relevance of the laboratory investigations ordered routinely and their cost implications compared with the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE guidelines. Methods: This prospective study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital. A total of 163 patients scheduled for elective surgical procedures were included in this study. Neither the surgeons nor anaesthesiologists involved in the case were aware of the study. The laboratory investigations of the patients who underwent surgery were noted. All values were categorised as normal or abnormal and they were assessed as indicated or unindicated based on NICE guidelines. Results: One hundred and sixty-three patients were subjected to a total of 984 tests. Forty three patients (26% were subjected to tests as per NICE guidelines. Of the 984 tests, 515 tests were unindicated (52%. Out of the 515 unindicated tests, 7 (1.3% were abnormal. None of these seven tests required any intervention or change of anaesthetic plan. The most common unindicated tests done were cardiac echocardiography and chest X-ray (92.5% and 93% respectively. The additional cost incurred towards unindicated tests was 63% of the total cost for the tests. Conclusion: Pre-operative laboratory investigations add to cost significantly. Patient premorbid conditions and surgical grade should guide the clinician to request for the relevant laboratory tests.

  6. Comparison between field and laboratory steam oxidation testing on aluminide coatings on P92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agueero, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Gutierrez, M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Ctra. Ajalvir Km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz (Spain); Knoedler, R.; Straub, S. [Alstom Power Systems GmbH, Boveristrasse 22, 68309 Mannheim (Germany); Muelas, R. [Ingenieria y Servicios Aeroespaciales, P Pintor Rosales 34, 28008 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Steam oxidation has become an important issue for steam power plants as operating temperatures increase from the current 550 to 600-650 C. For the last 10 years several groups have been carrying out steam oxidation testing of both uncoated substrates and coatings in the laboratory. On the other hand, field testing results are very scarce. In this paper, a comparison of laboratory steam oxidation testing with field test results carried out by Alstom at the Kraftwerk Westfalen power station located in Hamm, Germany will be presented. Both slurry deposited aluminide coatings and uncoated P92 steel have been included in the study. Under steam (atmospheric pressure) and isothermal conditions in the laboratory at 650 C, spallation of oxides formed on ferritic steels occurs after significantly longer time when compared to exposure to real operating conditions. Oxide spallation results in serious damage in steam power plants by obstructing heat exchanger tubes, erosion of valves and turbine blades, etc. Moreover, the thickness of the oxide scales formed under field testing conditions is significantly higher after similar exposure. On the other hand, aluminide coated P92, which exhibit thickness through cracks, have shown to be stable in the laboratory for up to 60 000 h at 650 C under steam, without evidence of crack propagation. However, field test results indicate that some degree of crack propagation occurs but without causing substrate attack up to 21 700 h of exposure. Moreover, the aluminium oxide observed in both laboratory and field tested specimens is different. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Testing the Causal Links between School Climate, School Violence, and School Academic Performance: A Cross-Lagged Panel Autoregressive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbenishty, Rami; Astor, Ron Avi; Roziner, Ilan; Wrabel, Stephani L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the causal link between school climate, school violence, and a school's general academic performance over time using a school-level, cross-lagged panel autoregressive modeling design. We hypothesized that reductions in school violence and climate improvement would lead to schools' overall improved academic performance.…

  8. Analytical performances of food microbiology laboratories - critical analysis of 7 years of proficiency testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Massih, M; Planchon, V; Polet, M; Dierick, K; Mahillon, J

    2016-02-01

    Based on the results of 19 food microbiology proficiency testing (PT) schemes, this study aimed to assess the laboratory performances, to highlight the main sources of unsatisfactory analytical results and to suggest areas of improvement. The 2009-2015 results of REQUASUD and IPH PT, involving a total of 48 laboratories, were analysed. On average, the laboratories failed to detect or enumerate foodborne pathogens in 3·0% of the tests. Thanks to a close collaboration with the PT participants, the causes of outliers could be identified in 74% of the cases. The main causes of erroneous PT results were either pre-analytical (handling of the samples, timing of analysis), analytical (unsuitable methods, confusion of samples, errors in colony counting or confirmation) or postanalytical mistakes (calculation and encoding of results). PT schemes are a privileged observation post to highlight analytical problems, which would otherwise remain unnoticed. In this perspective, this comprehensive study of PT results provides insight into the sources of systematic errors encountered during the analyses. This study draws the attention of the laboratories to the main causes of analytical errors and suggests practical solutions to avoid them, in an educational purpose. The observations support the hypothesis that regular participation to PT, when followed by feed-back and appropriate corrective actions, can play a key role in quality improvement and provide more confidence in the laboratory testing results. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Altitude Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested. For each pressure altitude test point conducted the ambient static temperature was predicted using a NASA engine icing risk computer model for the given ambient static pressure while maintaining the engine speed.

  10. Bottom-up laboratory testing of the DKIST Visible Broadband Imager (VBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferayorni, Andrew; Beard, Andrew; Cole, Wes; Gregory, Scott; Wöeger, Friedrich

    2016-08-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is a 4-meter solar observatory under construction at Haleakala, Hawaii [1]. The Visible Broadband Imager (VBI) is a first light instrument that will record images at the highest possible spatial and temporal resolution of the DKIST at a number of scientifically important wavelengths [2]. The VBI is a pathfinder for DKIST instrumentation and a test bed for developing processes and procedures in the areas of unit, systems integration, and user acceptance testing. These test procedures have been developed and repeatedly executed during VBI construction in the lab as part of a "test early and test often" philosophy aimed at identifying and resolving issues early thus saving cost during integration test and commissioning on summit. The VBI team recently completed a bottom up end-to-end system test of the instrument in the lab that allowed the instrument's functionality, performance, and usability to be validated against documented system requirements. The bottom up testing approach includes four levels of testing, each introducing another layer in the control hierarchy that is tested before moving to the next level. First the instrument mechanisms are tested for positioning accuracy and repeatability using a laboratory position-sensing detector (PSD). Second the real-time motion controls are used to drive the mechanisms to verify speed and timing synchronization requirements are being met. Next the high-level software is introduced and the instrument is driven through a series of end-to-end tests that exercise the mechanisms, cameras, and simulated data processing. Finally, user acceptance testing is performed on operational and engineering use cases through the use of the instrument engineering graphical user interface (GUI). In this paper we present the VBI bottom up test plan, procedures, example test cases and tools used, as well as results from test execution in the laboratory. We will also discuss the benefits realized

  11. Semipermeable-membrane devices as an in situ and laboratory testing chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle, Seqium, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.

    1995-12-31

    The use of semipermeable-membrane devices (SPMDs) to measure the bioavailability of dissolved (< 10{angstrom}) hydrophobic-organic-compounds has recently been established. These low-density polyethylene bags are effective and relatively easy in situ devices for evaluating bioaccumulation potentials of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and dioxins. The authors believe SPMDs may also be effective in situ and laboratory testing chambers for evaluating dissolved contaminant effects on sensitive life stages of freshwater/marine fish and invertebrates. Applications may include dissolved contaminant toxicity of effluents, porewater, water-column, and surface microlayer. In laboratory tests, the applicability of SPMD-testing chambers was explored with marine bivalve larvae (Mytilus galloprovincialis). Test solutions were filtered seawater, dissolved copper, ammonia, and an elutriate preparation that included both organic and inorganic contaminants. SPMDs were filled with seawater, immersed in test solutions for 24-h, then spiked with fertilized M. galloprovincialis embryos. Following 48-h exposures, >90% survival and normal development was observed in the controls, indicating that incubation in the SPMDs did not adversely affect larval development. Incubation in test treatments resulted in slight, but not significantly different, reductions in normal development, relative to the controls. The authors believe longer SPMD immersion prior to testing will likely be required to allow SPMD contents to reach equilibrium with test solutions before eliciting a significant toxicological response. While this may limit the application of SPMDs for short term in situ exposures, they may be used for field/laboratory exposures of a week or more or for collecting equilibrated field samples for laboratory testing.

  12. Laboratory test result interpretation for primary care doctors in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanker, Naadira; Faull, Norman H B

    2017-01-01

    Challenges and uncertainties with test result interpretation can lead to diagnostic errors. Primary care doctors are at a higher risk than specialists of making these errors, due to the range in complexity and severity of conditions that they encounter. This study aimed to investigate the challenges that primary care doctors face with test result interpretation, and to identify potential countermeasures to address these. A survey was sent out to 7800 primary care doctors in South Africa. Questionnaire themes included doctors' uncertainty with interpreting test results, mechanisms used to overcome this uncertainty, challenges with appropriate result interpretation, and perceived solutions for interpreting results. Of the 552 responses received, the prevalence of challenges with result interpretation was estimated in an average of 17% of diagnostic encounters. The most commonly-reported challenges were not receiving test results in a timely manner (51% of respondents) and previous results not being easily available (37%). When faced with diagnostic uncertainty, 84% of respondents would either follow-up and reassess the patient or discuss the case with a specialist, and 67% would contact a laboratory professional. The most useful test utilisation enablers were found to be: interpretive comments (78% of respondents), published guidelines (74%), and a dedicated laboratory phone line (72%). Primary care doctors acknowledge uncertainty with test result interpretation. Potential countermeasures include the addition of patient-specific interpretive comments, the availability of guidelines or algorithms, and a dedicated laboratory phone line. The benefit of enhanced test result interpretation would reduce diagnostic error rates.

  13. Generation of a recombinant Gag virus-like-particle panel for the evaluation of p24 antigen detection by diagnostic HIV tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice N Vetter

    Full Text Available Detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen permits early identification of primary HIV infection and timely intervention to limit further spread of the infection. Principally, HIV screening should equally detect all viral variants, but reagents for a standardised test evaluation are limited. Therefore, we aimed to create an inexhaustible panel of diverse HIV-1 p24 antigens.We generated a panel of 43 recombinantly expressed virus-like particles (VLPs, containing the structural Gag proteins of HIV-1 subtypes A-H and circulating recombinant forms (CRF CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, CRF12_BF, CRF20_BG and group O. Eleven 4th generation antigen/antibody tests and five antigen-only tests were evaluated for their ability to detect VLPs diluted in human plasma to p24 concentrations equivalent to 50, 10 and 2 IU/ml of the WHO p24 standard. Three tests were also evaluated for their ability to detect p24 after heat-denaturation for immune-complex disruption, a pre-requisite for ultrasensitive p24 detection.Our VLP panel exhibited an average intra-clade p24 diversity of 6.7%. Among the 4th generation tests, the Abbott Architect and Siemens Enzygnost Integral 4 had the highest sensitivity of 97.7% and 93%, respectively. Alere Determine Combo and BioRad Access were least sensitive with 10.1% and 40.3%, respectively. Antigen-only tests were slightly more sensitive than combination tests. Almost all tests detected the WHO HIV-1 p24 standard at a concentration of 2 IU/ml, but their ability to detect this input for different subtypes varied greatly. Heat-treatment lowered overall detectability of HIV-1 p24 in two of the three tests, but only few VLPs had a more than 3-fold loss in p24 detection.The HIV-1 Gag subtype panel has a broad diversity and proved useful for a standardised evaluation of the detection limit and breadth of subtype detection of p24 antigen-detecting tests. Several tests exhibited problems, particularly with non-B subtypes.

  14. Tests and analyses on the laboratory equipment in fuel-fabrication mockup test facility (Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, T.; Gunji, Y.; Kikumo, H.; Okamoto, N.; Murakami, T.; Sato, S. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-11-01

    A rotary press has been manufactured for trial use of fabricating nuclear-fuel pellets, which is compact and superior in processing capacity compared to conventional reciprocating presses, and its performance tests were done. Tests include (1) finding out of problems in the equipment maintenance, (2) a comparative test of rotary and reciprocating presses in pellet fabrication, (3) an injection test of dry-recovered fuel powders, and (4) a confirmation test for process holdup of the fuel powders in the equipment. To evaluate the applicability to MOX (uranium and plutonium mixed oxide) fuel fabrication, 0 - 40 weight % of dry-recovered powders obtained from sintered uranium pellets was added to the raw materials of uranium powders to make the pellets. Some recommendations based on the present testing results in designing large scale MOX fuel fabricating machines are given. (S. Ohno)

  15. Evaluation of the proficiency of trained non-laboratory health staffs and laboratory technicians using a rapid and simple HIV antibody test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukoyama Yumi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Cambodia, nearly half of pregnant women attend antenatal care (ANC, which is an entry point of services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT. However, most of ANC services are provided in health centres or fields, where laboratory services by technicians are not available. In this study, those voluntary confidential counselling and testing (VCCT counsellors involved in PMTCT were trained by experienced laboratory technicians in our centre on HIV testing using Determine (Abbot Laboratories HIV1/2 test kits through a half-day training course, which consisted of use of a pipette, how to process whole blood samples, and how to read test result. The trained counsellors were midwives working for ANC and delivery ward in our centre without any experience on laboratory works. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of the training by evaluating the proficiency of the trained non-laboratory staffs. The trained counsellors withdrew blood sample after pre-test counselling following ANC, and performed the rapid test. Laboratory technicians routinely did the same test and returned reports of the test results to counsellors. Reports by the counsellors and the laboratory technicians were compared, and discordant reports in two groups were re-tested with the same rapid test kit using the same blood sample. Cause of discordance was detected in discussion with both groups. Of 563 blood samples tested by six trained VCCT counsellors and three laboratory technicians, 11 samples (2.0% were reported positive in each group, however four discordant reports (0.7% between the groups were observed, in which two positive reports and two negative reports by the counsellors were negative and positive by the laboratory technicians, respectively. Further investigation confirmed that all the reports by the counsellors were correct, and that human error in writing reports in the laboratory was a cause of these discordant

  16. Reproducibility of pop-ins in laboratory testing of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berejnoi C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The pop-in phenomenon, quite common in fracture mechanics tests of welded joints, corresponds to a brittle crack initiation grown from a local brittle zone (LBZ that is arrested in reaching the higher toughness material that surrounds this LBZ. A methodology to obtain a high percentage of pop-in occurrence in laboratory testing is necessary to study the pop-in significance. Such a method is introduced in this work and includes the consumable combination and welding procedures for the SMAW welding process to generate artificial LBZ. In order to find out the influence of the loading state upon the pop-in phenomenon, laboratory CTOD tests were performed using two specimen configurations: some single edge-notched specimens were loaded on a three-point bending (SE(B fixture while others were tested in tensile load (SE(T. A higher frequency of pop-in occurrence was observed in the SE(B geometry.

  17. The financial imperative of physicians to control demand of laboratory testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, R K J

    2012-02-01

    It is an integral component of doctor\\'s duty of care to understand the significant impact laboratory testing has on the expense an ultimate quality of healthcare patients receive, yet the costs of these tests are poorly perceived. Utilising semi-structured interviews and questionnaires, we assessed surgeon\\'s perceived costs of two commonly encountered clinical scenarios requiring out of hours laboratory testing. Of the 35 participants only 23.3% (n = 7) accurately estimated the overall cost. The most expensive test was "Type and Screen" at Euro 83, with 77.3% (n = 17) underestimating the cost. Non-consultant hospital doctors qualified for 3 years were more likely to underestimate on-call costs (p = 0.042). It is of utmost importance to improve the knowledge of all surgeons of the financial implications of investigations. Through education we can potentially reduce un-warranted costs and fulfill our duty of care in the most cost efficient manner.

  18. Radiation Protection Report of the First Hot Test at China Reprocessing and Radiochemistry Laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Yang; LIU; Ning; JIAO; Xiao-yan; XU; Xin; MA; Hao-ran; WANG; Xiang-li

    2015-01-01

    The first hot test has been completed at China Reprocessing and Radiochemistry Laboratory in September to December 2015.In order to ensure the safety of personal,facility and environment,security group wrote safety management regulation,drew up the specialized radiation monitoring plan and organized emergency exercise.

  19. Present knowledge about Laboratory Testing of Axial Loading on Suction Caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzotti, E.; Vaitkunaite, Evelina; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    on the structure is resisted by push-pull loads on the vertical axis of each suction caisson. Relevant works where this situation is examined by means of laboratory testing are summarized in this article, then different conclusions are followed by discussion and comparison. In the initial theoretical section...

  20. Laboratory evaluation of the improved tube test detection limits for β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Laboratory evaluation of the improved tube test ... method, which could be used for qualitative identification of residues in ... particular commonly utilised in lactating animals (Mandell ... boiled in a waterbath for 10 min before being used in Nutrient agar ... Adulterated samples as well as normal control samples were.

  1. 76 FR 39110 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... classified (NOC)'' code but that would otherwise meet the criteria set forth in section 3113 for being a... Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code other than a not otherwise classified (NOC) code under such Coding... for diagnostic laboratory tests defined in section 3113(a)(2) but currently billed using NOC...

  2. Subjective Evaluation of Clothing Comfort and Their Correlation with Laboratory Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽英; 张渭源

    2003-01-01

    A series of polyester, cotton, and polyester/cotton blend fabrics were evaluated in a subjective wear.Subjective trial data were correlated with the results of in-house laboratory tests with the regression methods. Experimental results indicate that clothingcomfort assessment by human perception provides a sound basis for comparison of apparel garments under combined microclimates and human-activity levels of normal.

  3. Bridging the gap between clinical failure and laboratory fracture strength tests using a fractographic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze and to compare the fracture type and the stress at failure of clinically fractured zirconia-based all ceramic restorations with that of morphologically similar replicas tested in a laboratory setup. Methods: Replicas of the same shape and dimensions we

  4. 77 FR 39501 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Current List of Laboratories... Testing for Federal Agencies AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS... thereafter. This notice is also available on the Internet at http://www.workplace.samhsa.gov and http://www...

  5. 75 FR 67749 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Current List of Laboratories... Testing for Federal Agencies AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS... thereafter. This notice is also available on the Internet at http://www.workplace.samhsa.gov and http://www...

  6. 77 FR 5037 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Current List of Laboratories... Testing for Federal Agencies AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS... thereafter. This notice is also available on the Internet at http://www.workplace.samhsa.gov and http://www...

  7. 76 FR 31969 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Current List of Laboratories... Testing for Federal Agencies AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS... thereafter. This notice is also available on the Internet at http://www.workplace.samhsa.gov and http://www...

  8. Bridging the gap between clinical failure and laboratory fracture strength tests using a fractographic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze and to compare the fracture type and the stress at failure of clinically fractured zirconia-based all ceramic restorations with that of morphologically similar replicas tested in a laboratory setup. Methods: Replicas of the same shape and dimensions

  9. Design of a laboratory hydraulic device for testing of hydraulic pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Máchal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution deals with solves problem of research of testing device to monitor of hydrostatic pumps durability about dynamic loading under laboratory conditions. When carrying out the design of testing device are based on load characteristics of tractor hydraulic circuit, the individual characteristics of hydraulic components and performed calculations. Load characteristics on the tractors CASE IH Magnum 310, JOHN DEERE 8100, ZETOR FORTERRA 114 41 and Fendt 926 Vario were measured. Design of a hydraulic laboratory device is based on the need for testing new types of hydraulic pumps or various types of hydraulic fluids. When creating of hydraulic device we focused on testing hydraulic pumps used in agricultural and forestry tractors. Proportional pressure control valve is an active member of the hydraulic device, which provides change of a continuous control signal into relative pressure of operating fluid. The advantage of a designed hydraulic system is possibility of simulation of dynamic operating loading, which is obtained by measurement under real conditions, and thereby creates laboratory conditions as close to real conditions as possible. The laboratory device is constructed at the Department of Transport and Handling, Faculty of Engineering, Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra.

  10. Low-molecular-weight heparin as a multipurpose anticoagulant for laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, T; Hiino, M; Takubo, T; Tatsumi, N

    2000-06-01

    The availability of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for use as an anti-coagulant for laboratory testing was studied. Hematology and chemistry tests were performed with an automated hematology analyzer and an automated chemistry analyzer, respectively. The results of hematology tests of LMWH-treated blood were similar to those obtained for blood treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-2K, except for platelet count. The platelet count of LMWH-treated blood was lower than that of EDTA-treated blood, and the decrease in platelet count in the former was due to platelet aggregation. Prothrombin time tests could be performed with plasma prepared from LMWH-treated blood, although with such blood the prothrombin time was prolonged. Chemistry tests could be performed for all 18 parameters. These results suggest that LMWH is a candidate for use for hematology testing (with the exception of platelet count), coagulation testing, and chemistry tests.

  11. Announcement: Guidance for U.S. Laboratory Testing for Zika Virus Infection: Implications for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-25

    CDC has released updated guidance online for U.S. laboratory testing for Zika virus infection. The guidance is available at https://www.cdc.gov/zika/laboratories/lab-guidance.html. Frequently asked questions are addressed at https://www.cdc.gov/zika/laboratories/lab-guidance-faq.html. This guidance updates recommendations for testing of specimens by U.S. laboratories for possible Zika virus infection. Major updates to the guidance with clinical implications for health care providers include the following.

  12. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. Laboratory test of a prototype heat storage module based on stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Kong, Weiqiang; Fan, Jianhua;

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory test of a long term heat storage module utilizing the principle of stable supercooling of 199.5 kg of sodium acetate water mixture has been carried out. Avoiding phase separation of the incongruently melting salt hydrate by using the extra water principle increased the heat storage...... the supercooled sodium acetate water mixture was 194 kJ/kg of sodium acetate water mixture in the first test cycles dropping to 179 kJ/kg in the later test cycles. Instability of the supercooling occurred when the charging periods were short and in the last test cycles where the tube connecting the module...

  14. Results of Laboratory and Industrial Tests of Periodic-Type Gas Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, I. N.; P‧yanykh, K. E.; Antoshchuk, T. A.; Lysenko, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Results of laboratory and industrial tests of periodic-type gas generators burning various solid biofuels have been presented. The tests were carried out with the aim of obtaining producer gas which could totally or partly replace natural gas in power equipment burning gaseous fuel. The energy and environmental characteristics of a boiler unit burning a mixture of producer gas and natural gas have been assessed.

  15. AN AUTOMATED TESTING NETWORK SYSTEM FOR PAPER LABORATORY BASED ON CAN BUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianhui Yi; Dongbo Yan; Huanbin Liu; Jigeng Li

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an automated testing network system for paper laboratory based on CAN bus. The overall architecture, hardware interface and software function are discussed in detail. It is indicated through experiment that the system can collect,analyze and store the test results from the various measuring instruments in the paper lab automatically.The simple, reliable, low-cost measuring automation system will have a prosperous application in the future paper industry.

  16. AN AUTOMATED TESTING NETWORK SYSTEM FOR PAPER LABORATORY BASED ON CAN BUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XianhuiYi; DongboYan; HuanbinLi; JigengLi

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an automated testing network system for paper laboratory based on CAN bus. The overall architecture, hardware interface and software function are discussed in detail. It is indicated through experiment that the system can collect, analyze and store the test results from the various measuring instruments in the paper lab automatically. The simple, reliable, low-cost measuring automation system will have a prosperous application in the future paper industry.

  17. Comparison of Point-of-Care Versus Laboratory Troponin Testing in an Emergency Department Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Michael; Wason, Courtney

    2017-07-01

    There have been concerns regarding troponin results accuracy between point-of-care (POC) testing preformed in an emergency department (ED) setting and laboratory testing. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of cardiac troponin I testing as concerns POC testing and laboratory analysis as a way to show that these results are interchangeable. A retrospective chart review was performed from October 2012 through September 2013 to identify all patients who presented to the ED that received both a POC and laboratory troponin associated with the same blood draw. A total of 189 patients met inclusion criteria. Three laboratory samples were hemolyzed and not available for comparison. Of the remaining 186 samples, when a positive cutoff value of 0.034 ng/mL was used: 37 POC tests were positive and 149 POC tests were negative, sensitivity 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.94), specificity 0.98 (95% CI = 0.94-0.99), positive predictive value 91.9% (95% CI = 77-97.9%), and negative predictive value 96% (95% CI = 91.1-98.4%). When a POC troponin positive cutoff value of 0.12 ng/mL was used: 20 POC tests were positive and 164 were negative: sensitivity 1.0 (95% CI = 0.8-1.0), specificity 0.99 (95% CI = 0.95-1.0), positive predictive value 91% (95% CI = 69-98.4%), and negative predictive value 100% (95% CI = 97.1-100%). In an ED setting; POC testing is accurate and correlates well with laboratory testing. Considering that the POC analysis takes a fraction of time to yield results, the validity of its data is important. The results of this study show that the POC system is a suitable test for rapid evaluation of patients presenting to the ED. This correlation increased with a higher testing positive cutoff value (0.12 versus 0.034 ng/mL). These data can assist the emergency physician with rapid identification of evidence of cardiac injury and be assured that the results are accurate. POC lab testing should be considered whenever possible to provide the

  18. Development and characterization of a human antibody reference panel against erythropoietin suitable for the standardization of ESA immunogenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytych, Daniel T; Barger, Troy E; King, Chadwick; Grauer, Stephanie; Haldankar, Raj; Hsu, Eric; Wu, Michelle Min; Shiwalkar, Mukta; Sanchez, Sergio; Kuck, Andrew; Civoli, Francesca; Sun, Jilin; Swanson, Steven J

    2012-08-31

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) has been used therapeutically for more than two decades in the treatment of anemia. Although EPO is generally well tolerated, in rare cases, patients have developed anti-EPO antibodies that can negatively impact safety and efficacy. Therefore, the detection of antibodies against EPO is a regulatory requirement during clinical development and post-approval. Although it is a rare phenomenon, antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a serious complication than can result from antibodies that develop and neutralize EPO as well as endogenous erythropoietin. Currently, there are no universally accepted analytical methods to detect the full repertoire of binding and neutralizing anti-EPO antibodies. A number of different methods that differ in terms of antibodies detected and assay sensitivities are used by different manufacturers. There is also a lack of antibody reference reagents, and therefore no consistent basis for detecting and measuring anti-EPO antibodies. Reference reagents, with established ranges, are essential to monitor the safety and efficacy of all erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) structurally related to human erythropoietin. This is the first report of the development and characterization of a panel of fully human antibodies against EPO suitable as reference reagents. The characteristics of antibodies within the panel were selected based on the prevalence of non-neutralizing IgG and IgM antibodies in non-PRCA patients and neutralizing IgG antibodies, including IgG1 and IgG4, in antibody-mediated PRCA subjects. The reference panel includes antibodies of high- and low-affinity with binding specificity to neutralizing and non-neutralizing erythropoietin epitopes. The subclass of human antibodies in this reference panel includes an IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4, as well as an IgM isotype. This antibody panel could help select appropriate immunogenicity assays, guide validation, and monitor assay performance

  19. Laboratory testing of the in-well vapor-stripping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, T.J.; Francois, O.

    1996-03-01

    The Volatile organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) was implemented by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Technology Development to develop and test new technologies for the remediation of organic chemicals in the subsurface. One of the technologies being tested under the VOC-Arid ID is the in-well vapor-stripping system. The in-well vapor-stripping concept was initially proposed by researchers at Stanford University and is currently under development through a collaboration between workers at Stanford University and DOE`s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The project to demonstrate the in-well vapor-stripping technology is divided into three phases: (1) conceptual model and computer simulation, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) field demonstration. This report provides the methods and results of the laboratory testing in which a full-scale replica was constructed and tested above ground in a test facility located at DOE`s Hanford Site, Washington. The system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase.

  20. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jared A.; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability. PMID:27556464

  1. Field and laboratory tests on acute toxicity of cadmium to freshwater crayfish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    Environmental regulatory standards for cadmium (EPA 1980), like those for most pollutants, are based on acute, laboratory toxicity tests of single species. Such tests can be conducted rapidly and inexpensively in comparison to acute or chronic field studies, but their validity has often been questioned. Laboratory-based criteria are subject to two criticisms: (1) chemical and physical conditions differ greatly in degree and variability from laboratory to field, and (2) species are not isolated, but live in an ecosystem of interacting taxa and biofeedback. To investigate the validity of basing field toxicity standards on laboratory data, the authors subjected the freshwater crayfish Orconectes immunis for 96 h to various levels of cadmium in laboratory aquaria and experimental ponds. The study was designed to evaluate in part the first criticism of lab-based criteria. The studies were conducted concurrently with similar short-term experiments on the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and coincided with studies of chronic cadmium stress on fathead minnows in experimental ponds.

  2. Laboratory Scale Seismic Surface Wave Testing for the Determination of Soil Elastic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziman Madun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Seismic surface wave testing is well-adapted to the study of elastic parameters and, hence, the elastic profile of soils in the field.  Knowledge of a ground’s stiffness profile enables the prediction of ground movement and, thus, the quality of the foundation.  The stiffness parameter obtained in this research corresponds to the measurement of the seismic surface wave phase velocity of materials, which relates to the very small strain shear modulus.  This paper describes a methodology for performing surface wave testing in the laboratory.  In comparison with field tests, a laboratory-scale experiment offers the advantage of allowing the process of data collection to be calibrated, and analytical studies can be carried out as the properties of the material under test are controllable and known a priori.  In addition, a laboratory scale experiment offers insight into the interaction between the seismic surface wave, the soil, the boundary and, hence, the constraints associated with the seismic surface wave technique.  Two simplified models of different sizes were developed using homogeneous remoulded Oxford Clay (from Midlands region of the UK.  The laboratory experimental methodology demonstrated that the seismic surface wave equipment used in the laboratory was directly influenced by the clay properties as well as the size of the test model.  The methodology also showed that the arrangement of the seismic source and the receivers had an impact on the range of reliable frequencies and wavelengths obtained.

  3. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Seongchae; Seo, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  4. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Bo Kyung, E-mail: goldrain99@kaist.ac.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-21

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 µm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 µm×100 µm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  5. A field assessment of long-term laboratory sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Wang, Ning; Hayward, Jeannie M. R.; Jones, John R.; Jones, Susan B.; Ireland, D. Scott

    2005-01-01

    Response of the amphipod Hyalella azteca exposed to contaminated sediments for 10 to 42 d in laboratory toxicity tests was compared to responses observed in controlled three-month invertebrate colonization exposures conducted in a pond. Sediments evaluated included a sediment spiked with dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) or dilutions of a field sediment collected from the Grand Calumet River (GCR) in Indiana (USA) (contaminated with organic compounds and metals). Consistent effects were observed at the highest exposure concentrations (400 ??g DDD/goc [DDD concentrations normalized to grams of organic carbon (goc) in sedimentl or 4% GCR sediment) on survival, length, and reproduction of amphipods in the laboratory and on abundance of invertebrates colonizing sediments in the field. Effect concentrations for DDD observed for 10-d length and 42-d reproduction of amphipods (e.g., chronic value [ChV] of 66 ??g DDD/goc and 25% inhibition concentration [IC25] of 68 ??g DDD/goc for reproduction) were similar to the lowest effect concentrations for DDD measured on invertebrates colonizing sediment the field. Effect concentrations for GCR sediment on 28-d survival and length and 42-d reproduction and length of amphipods (i.e., ChVs of 0.20-0.66% GCR sediment) provided more conservative effect concentrations compared to 10-d survival or length of amphipods in the laboratory or the response of invertebrates colonizing sediment in the field (e.g., ChVs of 2.2% GCR sediment). Results of this study indicate that use of chronic laboratory toxicity tests with H. azteca and benthic colonization studies should be used to provide conservative estimates of impacts on benthic communities exposed to contaminated sediments. Bioaccumulation of DDD by oligochaetes colonizing the DDD-spiked sediment was similar to results of laboratory sediment tests previously conducted with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegates, confirming that laboratory exposures can be used to estimate

  6. Laboratory Test of a Cylindrical Heat Storage Module with Water and Sodium Acetate Trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Kong, Weiqiang; Johansen, Jakob Berg;

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrical heat storage modules with internal heat exchangers have been tested in a laboratory. The modules were filled with water and sodium acetate trihydrate with additives. The testing focused on the heat content of the storage material and the heat exchange capacity rate during charge...... of the module. For the tests with the phase change materials, the focus was furthermore on the stability of supercooling and cycling stability. Testing the module with sodium acetate trihydrate and 6.4% extra water showed that phase separation increased and the heat released after solidification of supercooled...... phase change material was reduced over 17 test cycles. The heat released after solidification of the supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate with thickening agent and graphite was stable over the test cycles. Stable supercooling was obtained in 7 out of 17 test cycles with the module with sodium acetate...

  7. The link between inflammation and coagulation: influence on the interpretation of diagnostic laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Teresa; Mathews, Karol; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony; Wood, Darren

    2011-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the complex relationship between inflammation and coagulation and a review of routinely available laboratory and point-of-care tests for the detection of inflammation and coagulopathies. In the management of cases requiring ongoing laboratory and clinical evaluation, examination of these two major pathologic processes may assist with diagnosis and improve outcome. Early identification of a pathologic inflammatory process may allow prevention of its progression to syndromes carrying a poorer prognosis, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  8. Solving the molecular diagnostic testing conundrum for Mendelian disorders in the era of next-generation sequencing: single-gene, gene panel, or exome/genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Ankala, Arunkanth; Wilcox, William R; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing is changing the paradigm of clinical genetic testing. Today there are numerous molecular tests available, including single-gene tests, gene panels, and exome sequencing or genome sequencing. As a result, ordering physicians face the conundrum of selecting the best diagnostic tool for their patients with genetic conditions. Single-gene testing is often most appropriate for conditions with distinctive clinical features and minimal locus heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing-based gene panel testing, which can be complemented with array comparative genomic hybridization and other ancillary methods, provides a comprehensive and feasible approach for heterogeneous disorders. Exome sequencing and genome sequencing have the advantage of being unbiased regarding what set of genes is analyzed, enabling parallel interrogation of most of the genes in the human genome. However, current limitations of next-generation sequencing technology and our variant interpretation capabilities caution us against offering exome sequencing or genome sequencing as either stand-alone or first-choice diagnostic approaches. A growing interest in personalized medicine calls for the application of genome sequencing in clinical diagnostics, but major challenges must be addressed before its full potential can be realized. Here, we propose a testing algorithm to help clinicians opt for the most appropriate molecular diagnostic tool for each scenario.

  9. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  10. Reliability of KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer patients across five laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feigelson Heather

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the KRAS gene are associated with poor response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Factors influencing KRAS test results in tumor specimens include: tumor heterogeneity, sample handling, slide preparation, techniques for tumor enrichment, DNA preparation, assay design and sensitivity. We evaluated comparability and consistency of KRAS test results among five laboratories currently being used to determine KRAS mutation status of metastatic colorectal cancer specimens in a large, multi-center observational study. Findings Twenty formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer samples from colon resections previously tested for KRAS mutations were selected based on mutation status (6 wild type, 8 codon 12 mutations, and 6 codon 13 mutations. We found good agreement across laboratories despite differences in mutation detection methods. Eighteen of twenty samples (90% were concordant across all five labs. Discordant results are likely not due to laboratory error, but instead to tumor heterogeneity, contamination of the tumor sample with normal tissue, or analytic factors affecting assay sensitivity. Conclusions Our results indicate commercial and academic laboratories provide reliable results for the common KRAS gene mutations at codons 12 and 13 when an adequate percentage of tumor cells is present in the sample.

  11. Whole-blood hemagglutination inhibition test for venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M P; Baughn, R E

    2000-09-01

    Nontreponemal antibody tests such as the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test are carried out on serum and widely used as screening tests for syphilis. The aim of the present study was to develop a screening test for syphilis making use of whole blood and VDRL liposomes. Antibody to human red blood cells was conjugated to VDRL liposomes and reacted with a diluted sample of patient whole blood. A total of 951 samples were tested by the new test and the VDRL tube test. All 49 VDRL samples positive by the VDRL test showed inhibition of hemagglutination in the whole-blood test (sensitivity, 100%). Of 902 samples with negative results by the VDRL test, 901 caused hemagglutination when tested with the liposomes (specificity, 99.9%). The hemagglutination inhibition method tests for syphilis in a simple one-step procedure in which whole blood is added to a tube containing liposomes. The new test has potential for point-of-care testing in developing countries.

  12. HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

  13. Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Stoots; J O' Brien; T Cable

    2009-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  14. International on Workshop Advances in Laboratory Testing & Modelling of Soils and Shales

    CERN Document Server

    Laloui, Lyesse

    2017-01-01

    In this spirit, the ATMSS International Workshop “Advances in Laboratory Testing & Modelling of Soils and Shales” (Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland; 18-20 January 2017) has been organized to promote the exchange of ideas, experience and state of the art among major experts active in the field of experimental testing and modelling of soils and shales. The Workshop has been organized under the auspices of the Technical Committees TC-101 “Laboratory Testing”, TC-106 “Unsaturated Soils” and TC-308 “Energy Geotechnics” of the International Society of Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. This volume contains the invited keynote and feature lectures, as well as the papers that have been presented at the Workshop. The topics of the lectures and papers cover a wide range of theoretical and experimental research, including unsaturated behaviour of soils and shales, multiphysical testing of geomaterials, hydro–mechanical behaviour of shales and stiff clays, the geomechanical behaviour of the ...

  15. Large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) performed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Summary report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuss, R.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Noy, D.J. (British Geological Survey (United Kingdom))

    2010-02-15

    This report describes the set-up, operation and observations from the first 1,385 days (3.8 years) of the large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) experiment conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. During this time the bentonite buffer has been artificially hydrated and has given new insight into the evolution of the buffer. After 2 years (849 days) of artificial hydration a canister filter was identified to perform a series of hydraulic and gas tests, a period that lasted 268 days. The results from the gas test showed that the full-scale bentonite buffer behaved in a similar way to previous laboratory experiments. This confirms the up-scaling of laboratory observations with the addition of considerable information on the stress responses throughout the deposition hole. During the gas testing stage, the buffer was continued to artificially hydrate. Hydraulic results, from controlled and uncontrolled events, show that the buffer continues to mature and has yet to reach full maturation. Lasgit has yielded high quality data relating to the hydration of the bentonite and the evolution in hydrogeological properties adjacent to the deposition hole. The initial hydraulic and gas injection tests confirm the correct working of all control and data acquisition systems. Lasgit has been in successful operation for in excess of 1,385 days

  16. Laboratory shake flask batch tests can predict field biodegradation of aniline in the Rhine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toräng, Lars; Reuschenbach, Peter; Müller, Britta; Nyholm, Niels

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare degradation rates of aniline in laboratory shake flask simulation tests with field rates in the river Rhine. The combined events of a low flow situation in the Rhine and residual aniline concentrations in the effluent from the BASF treatment plant in Ludwigshafen temporarily higher than normal, made it possible to monitor aniline at trace concentrations in the river water downstream the wastewater outlet by means of a sensitive GC headspace analytical method. Aniline was analyzed along a downstream gradient and the dilution along the gradient was calculated from measurements of conductivity, sulfate and a non-readily biodegradable substance, 1,4-dioxane. Compensating dilution, field first-order degradation rate constants downstream the discharge of BASF were estimated at 1.8 day(-1) for two different dates with water temperatures of 21.9 and 14.7 degrees C, respectively. This field rate estimate was compared with results from 38 laboratory shake flask batch tests with Rhine water which averaged 1.5 day(-1) at 15 degrees C and 2.0 day(-1) at 20 degrees C. These results indicate that laboratory shake flask batch tests with low concentrations of test substance can be good predictors of degradation rates in natural water bodies--at least as ascertained here for short duration tests with readily degradable compounds among which aniline is a commonly used reference.

  17. Panel 4: Report of the Microbiology Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenkamp, Stephen J.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Hakansson, Anders P.; Heikkinen, Terho; King, Samantha; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Novotny, Laura A.; Patel, Janak A.; Pettigrew, Melinda; Swords, W. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Objective To perform a comprehensive review of the literature from July 2011 until June 2015 on the virology and bacteriology of otitis media in children. Data Sources PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Review Methods Two subpanels comprising experts in the virology and bacteriology of otitis media were created. Each panel reviewed the relevant literature in the fields of virology and bacteriology and generated draft reviews. These initial reviews were distributed to all panel members prior to meeting together at the Post-symposium Research Conference of the 18th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media, National Harbor, Maryland, in June 2015. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by all panel members. Conclusions Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing our understanding of the microbiology of otitis media. Numerous advances were made in basic laboratory studies, in animal models of otitis media, in better understanding the epidemiology of disease, and in clinical practice. Implications for Practice (1) Many viruses cause acute otitis media without bacterial coinfection, and such cases do not require antibiotic treatment. (2) When respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, and influenza virus peak in the community, practitioners can expect to see an increase in clinical otitis media cases. (3) Biomarkers that predict which children with upper respiratory tract infections will develop otitis media may be available in the future. (4) Compounds that target newly identified bacterial virulence determinants may be available as future treatment options for children with otitis media. PMID:28372529

  18. Assessing the prevalence distribution of abnormal laboratory tests in patients with simple febrile seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Abbasian, Ladan; Pakniyat, Abdol Ghader

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizure is an important issue in pediatric practice. Even some pediatricians do not have a proper approach to febrile seizure, making the sick child undergo complex laboratory tests or invasive procedures or even long-term treatment with anticonvulsant drugs. In spite of multiple studies, many controversies have still remained about the significance of febrile seizure. The goal of this study is to assess the prevalence distribution of routinely requested laboratory tests results in simple febrile seizure. In a descriptive study, 549 patients with simple febrile seizure were studied. The routine lab tests including complete blood count, electrolyte, urine analysis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis had already been performed for all patients and the results had been recorded in their medical data. These results were collected and statistically analyzed through SPSS software. About 58.7% of our cases were male. Most of the cases were 12-24 months old and the mean body temperature of them was 38.2°C. 99.3% of blood sugar tests, 98% of blood calcium tests, 100% and 99.5% of sodium, and potassium tests, respectively, 100% of blood creatinine, 96.9% of blood urea nitrogen, and 99.1% of urine analysis tests were normal. CSF analysis was done in only 49 cases and the results were normal in all of them. The percentage of abnormal laboratory test results was not statistically significant in febrile seizure and shows that performing all these tests in all patients with simple febrile seizure as routine is not necessary.

  19. Assessing the prevalence distribution of abnormal laboratory tests in patients with simple febrile seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsa Yousefichaijan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Febrile seizure is an important issue in pediatric practice. Even some pediatricians do not have a proper approach to febrile seizure, making the sick child undergo complex laboratory tests or invasive procedures or even long-term treatment with anticonvulsant drugs. In spite of multiple studies, many controversies have still remained about the significance of febrile seizure. The goal of this study is to assess the prevalence distribution of routinely requested laboratory tests results in simple febrile seizure. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive study, 549 patients with simple febrile seizure were studied. The routine lab tests including complete blood count, electrolyte, urine analysis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis had already been performed for all patients and the results had been recorded in their medical data. These results were collected and statistically analyzed through SPSS software. Results: About 58.7% of our cases were male. Most of the cases were 12-24 months old and the mean body temperature of them was 38.2°C. 99.3% of blood sugar tests, 98% of blood calcium tests, 100% and 99.5% of sodium, and potassium tests, respectively, 100% of blood creatinine, 96.9% of blood urea nitrogen, and 99.1% of urine analysis tests were normal. CSF analysis was done in only 49 cases and the results were normal in all of them. Conclusion: The percentage of abnormal laboratory test results was not statistically significant in febrile seizure and shows that performing all these tests in all patients with simple febrile seizure as routine is not necessary.

  20. 21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... research animals or in vitro tests. 312.160 Section 312.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Drugs for Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312.160 Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. (a) Authorization to ship. (1)(i) A...