WorldWideScience

Sample records for laboratory experimental investigation

  1. Laboratory experimental investigation of heat transport in fractured media

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta Maria

    2017-01-01

    Low enthalpy geothermal energy is a renewable resource that is still underexploited nowadays in relation to its potential for development in society worldwide. Most of its applications have already been investigated, such as heating and cooling of private and public buildings, road defrosting, cooling of industrial processes, food drying systems or desalination. Geothermal power development is a long, risky and expensive process. It basically consists of successive development stages aimed at locating the resources (exploration), confirming the power generating capacity of the reservoir (confirmation) and building the power plant and associated structures (site development). Different factors intervene in influencing the length, difficulty and materials required for these phases, thereby affecting their cost. One of the major limitations related to the installation of low enthalpy geothermal power plants regards the initial development steps that are risky and the upfront capital costs that are huge. Most of the total cost of geothermal power is related to the reimbursement of invested capital and associated returns. In order to increase the optimal efficiency of installations which use groundwater as a geothermal resource, flow and heat transport dynamics in aquifers need to be well characterized. Especially in fractured rock aquifers these processes represent critical elements that are not well known. Therefore there is a tendency to oversize geothermal plants. In the literature there are very few studies on heat transport, especially on fractured media. This study is aimed at deepening the understanding of this topic through heat transport experiments in fractured networks and their interpretation. Heat transfer tests have been carried out on the experimental apparatus previously employed to perform flow and tracer transport experiments, which has been modified in order to analyze heat transport dynamics in a network of fractures. In order to model the obtained

  2. Numerical Investigation and Experimental Reproduction of Fermi Acceleration in Laboratory Scale

    Zhou, M.; Zhai, C.

    2015-12-01

    Fermi acceleration is widely accepted as the mechanism to explain power law of cosmic ray spectrum. Now this mechanism has been developed to first order Fermi acceleration and second order Fermi acceleration. In first order Fermi acceleration, also known as diffusive shock acceleration, particles are confined around the shock through scattering and accelerated by repeatedly crossing shock front. In second order Fermi acceleration, particles gain energy through statistical collisions with interstellar clouds. In this proposed work, we plan to carefully study these two kinds of acceleration numerically and experimentally. We first consider a single relativistic particle and investigate how it gains energy in Fermi-Ulam model and shock wave acceleration model respectively. We investigate collective behavior of particles with different kinds of wall-oscillation functions and try to find an optimal one in terms of efficiency of acceleration. Then, we plan to go further and consider a group of particles statistically, during which we borrow the correct generalization of Maxwell's velocity distribution in special relativity and compare the results with those in cases where we simply use Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. To this end, we try to provide a scheme to build an accelerator applying both laser technology and mirror effect in Laboratory to reproduce Fermi acceleration, which might be a promising source to obtain high energy particles and further study the mechanism of cosmic rays acceleration.

  3. Laboratory experimental investigations of braid theory using the rotor-oscillator flow

    Filippi, Margaux; Atis, Séverine; Allshouse, Michael; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Budišić, Marko; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Interpreting ocean surface dynamics is crucial to many areas of oceanography, ranging from marine ecology to pollution management. Motivated by this, we investigated the braid theory method to detect transport barriers bounding coherent structures in two-dimensional flows. Whereas most existing techniques rely on an extensive spatiotemporal knowledge of the flow field, we sought to identify these structures from sparse data sets involving trajectories of a few tracer particles in a two-dimensional flow. We present the results from our laboratory experiments, which were based on investigations using the rotor-oscillator flow, as a stepping stone towards oceanic applications.

  4. An experimental investigation of reacting and nonreacting coaxial jet mixing in a laboratory rocket engine

    Schumaker, Stephen Alexander

    Coaxial jets are commonly used as injectors in propulsion and combustion devices due to both the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing they provide. In liquid rocket engines it is common to use coaxial jets in the context of airblast atomization. However, interest exists in developing rocket engines using a full flow staged combustion cycle. In such a configuration both propellants are injected in the gaseous phase. In addition, gaseous coaxial jets have been identified as an ideal test case for the validation of the next generation of injector modeling tools. For these reasons an understanding of the fundamental phenomena which govern mixing in gaseous coaxial jets and the effect of combustion on these phenomena in coaxial jet diffusion flames is needed. A study was performed to better understand the scaling of the stoichiometric mixing length in reacting and nonreacting coaxial jets with velocity ratios greater than one and density ratios less than one. A facility was developed that incorporates a single shear coaxial injector in a laboratory rocket engine capable of ten atmospheres. Optical access allows the use of flame luminosity and laser diagnostic techniques such as Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). Stoichiometric mixing lengths (LS), which are defined as the distance along the centerline where the stoichiometric condition occurs, were measured using PLIF. Acetone was seeded into the center jet to provide direct PLIF measurement of the average and instantaneous mixture fraction fields for a range of momentum flux ratios for the nonreacting cases. For the coaxial jet diffusion flames, LS was measured from OH radical contours. For nonreacting cases the use of a nondimensional momentum flux ratio was found to collapse the mixing length data. The flame lengths of coaxial jet diffusion flames were also found to scale with the momentum flux ratio but different scaling constants are required which depended on the chemistry of the reaction. The

  5. Experimental methods for the simulation of supercritical CO2 injection at laboratory scale aimed to investigate capillary trapping

    Trevisan, L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Rodriguez, D.; Sakaki, T.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide in deep geologic formations is being considered as a technical option to reduce greenhouse gas loading to the atmosphere. The processes associated with the movement and stable trapping are complex in deep naturally heterogeneous formations. Three primary mechanisms contribute to trapping; capillary entrapment due to immobilization of the supercritical fluid CO2 within soil pores, liquid CO2 dissolving in the formation water and mineralization. Natural heterogeneity in the formation is expected to affect all three mechanisms. A research project is in progress with the primary goal to improve our understanding of capillary and dissolution trapping during injection and post-injection process, focusing on formation heterogeneity. It is expected that this improved knowledge will help to develop site characterization methods targeting on obtaining the most critical parameters that capture the heterogeneity to design strategies and schemes to maximize trapping. This research combines experiments at the laboratory scale with multiphase modeling to upscale relevant trapping processes to the field scale. This paper presents the results from a set of experiments that were conducted in an intermediate scale test tanks. Intermediate scale testing provides an attractive alternative to investigate these processes under controlled conditions in the laboratory. Conducting these types of experiments is highly challenging as methods have to be developed to extrapolate the data from experiments that are conducted under ambient laboratory conditions to high temperatures and pressures settings in deep geologic formations. We explored the use of a combination of surrogate fluids that have similar density, viscosity contrasts and analogous solubility and interfacial tension as supercritical CO2-brine in deep formations. The extrapolation approach involves the use of dimensionless numbers such as Capillary number (Ca) and the Bond number (Bo). A set of

  6. Experimental investigation of the wake characteristics of flow-powered and motorized laboratory-scale wind turbines

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    We present experimental data that compares the wake characteristics of a laboratory-scale vertical-axis turbine while it is either powered by the flow or by a DC motor. This distinction is relevant for laboratory experiments in which scale turbine models are used that require the use of a motor to spin the turbine blades. Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field in a two-dimensional plane normal to the axis of rotation. This velocity field is then used to compare time-averaged streamwise velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, and power of the two configurations. The results give insight into the kinematic effect of adding energy to the flow by way of the motor, and they suggest limits on the extrapolation of laboratory results to full-scale performance. This work was supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to D.B.A and funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047.

  7. An Experimental Investigation of the Role of Radiation in Laboratory Bench-Top Experiments in Thermal Physics

    Twomey, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Colm; O'Riordan, John

    2009-01-01

    A simple undergraduate experiment designed to study cooling purely by radiation and cooling by a combination of convection and radiation is described. Results indicate that the contribution from radiative cooling in normal laboratory experiments is more significant than students often realize, even in the case of forced cooling. (Contains 1…

  8. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, gives researchers access to models and simulations that predict how solid oxide fuel cells...

  9. A Laboratory Investigation of Groupthink.

    Courtright, John A.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the groupthink phenomenon under controlled, laboratory conditions. Results indicate that the presence or absence of disagreement (conflict, hostility) among members may be the best discriminator between groupthink and nongroupthink groups. (JMF)

  10. Laboratory measurements of Vp and Vs in a porosity-developed crustal rock: Experimental investigation into the effects of porosity at deep crustal pressures

    Saito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Arima, Makoto; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of porosity on the elastic properties of crustal rocks at deep crustal pressures, we performed laboratory measurements of compressional-wave (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in a porosity-developed gabbro sample up to 1.0 GPa at room temperature. Based on the measured Vp and Vs data, we evaluated the changes in velocities, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio (σ), and total porosity of the rock as a function of pressure. Compared with the 'porosity-free' intrinsic elastic values of the gabbro sample, our results suggest that the development of porosity in crustal rocks lowers their Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs, and Poisson's ratio. Deviations (ΔVp, ΔVs, ΔVp/Vs, and Δσ) of the measured values from the intrinsic values are enhanced with increasing porosity. We evaluated the ΔVp from previous experimental study on the rocks of Tanzawa plutonic complex providing constraints on interpretation of the seismic velocity profiles of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and found a large negative ΔVp (up to - 22.7%) at lower pressures. The intrinsic velocity combined with the measured velocity data at in situ pressure conditions suggest that the ranges of Vp (6.0-6.5 km/s) in the middle crust of the IBM arc reflect the presence of considerable porosity and its closure in intermediate rocks and/or the change of composition from felsic to intermediate in mid-crustal rocks.

  11. Experimental investigation of wave boundary layer

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A review is presented of experimental investigation of wave boundary layer. The review is organized in six main sections. The first section describes the wave boundary layer in a real-life environment and its simulation in the laboratory in an oscillating water tunnel and in a water tank...... with an oscillating seabed. A brief account is given of measured quantities, measurement techniques (LDA, PIV, flow visualization) and limitations/constraints in the experimental investigation of the wave boundary layer in the laboratory. The second section concentrates on uniform oscillating boundary layers...... with a smooth bed. The boundary layer process is described over the entire range of the Reynolds number (Re from practically nil to Re = O(107)), from the laminar regime to the transitional regime and to the fully developed turbulent regime. The third section focuses on the effect of the boundary roughness...

  12. Emissions from waste combustion. An application of statistical experimental design in a laboratory-scale boiler and an investigation from large-scale incineration plants

    Zhang Xiaojing

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is a study of the emissions from the combustion of household refuse. The experiments were both on a laboratory-scale boiler and on full-scale incineration plants. In the laboratory, an artificial household refuse with known composition was fed into a pilot boiler with a stationary grate. Combustion was under non-optimum conditions. Direct sampling with a Tenax adsorbent was used to measure a range of VOCs. Measurements were also made of incompletely burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen and flue gas temperature. Combustion and emission parameters were recorded continuously by a multi-point data logger. VOCs were analysed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The full-scale tests were on seven Swedish incineration plants. The data were used to evaluate the emissions from large-scale incineration plants with various type of fuels and incinerators, and were also compared with the laboratory results. The response surface model developed from the laboratory experiments was also validated. This thesis also includes studies on the gasification of household refuse pellets, estimations of particulate and soot emissions, and a thermodynamic analysis of PAHs from combustion flue gas. For pellet gasification, experiments were performed on single, well characterised refuse pellets under carefully controlled conditions. The aim was to see if the effects of pellets were different from those of untreated household refuse. The results from both laboratory and full-scale tests showed that the main contributions to emissions from household refuse are plastics and moisture. 142 refs, 82 figs, 51 tabs

  13. Extra-terrestrial sprites: laboratory investigations in planetary gas mixtures

    Dubrovin, D.; Y. Yair; Price, C; Nijdam, Sander; Clevis, T. T. J.; Veldhuizen, van, H.T.; Ebert, Ute

    2012-01-01

    We investigate streamers in gas mixtures representing the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn (H2-He) and Venus (CO2-N2). Streamer diameters, velocities, radiance and overall morphology are investigated with fast ICCD camera images. We confirm experimentally the scaling of streamer diameters in these gases by studying streamers with minimal diameters. The brightness of laboratory streamers is investigated, and a scaling model for atmospheric sprites is proposed. Fitting the scaling model with meas...

  14. Restructuring a General Microbiology Laboratory into an Investigative Experience.

    Deutch, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an investigative laboratory sequence based upon the isolation and characterization of soil bacteria to aid microbiology teachers in providing students with activities that expose them to basic techniques of microbiology as well as demonstrates the scientific process and the experimental analysis of microorganisms. (ZWH)

  15. Alfred Binet and experimental psychology at the Sorbonne laboratory.

    Nicolas, Serge; Sanitioso, Rasyid Bo

    2012-11-01

    Between 1892 and 1904, Alfred Binet (1857-1911) produced, in the psychology laboratory of the Sorbonne, a whole set of original works that still remains little known today. He integrated the laboratory, directed by the psychophysiologist Henry Beaunis (1830-1921), in 1891. We describe the circumstances that led Binet to take the direction of this laboratory in 1895 and present scientific investigations that were conducted there by Binet and his collaborators. For Binet, the laboratory was not narrowly limited to a set of rooms where experiments were conducted by means of sophisticated devices (experimental psychology), it was also a working area, regularly organized, where all the psychological documents were classified, whatever their origin (descriptive psychology). We show that Binet was a pioneer who is still little recognized in various areas of experimental psychology. Binet suffered, at the time, from the indifference of his contemporaries, but he especially regretted not being able to attract students to his laboratory due to the absence of diploma-offering programs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Experimental investigations of plasma bullets

    Mericam-Bourdet, N; Laroussi, M; Begum, A; Karakas, E, E-mail: mlarouss@odu.ed [Laser and Plasma Engineering Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States)

    2009-03-07

    Recently several investigators reported on various means of generating cold plasma jets at atmospheric pressure. More interestingly, these jets turned out to be not continuous plasmas but trains of small high velocity plasma packets/bullets. However, until now little is known of the nature of these 'bullets'. Here we present experimental insights into the physical and chemical characteristics of bullets. We show that their time of initiation, their velocity and the distance they travel are directly dependent on the value of the applied voltage. We also show that these bullets can be controlled by the application of an external electric field. Using an intensified charge coupled device camera we report on their geometrical shape, which was revealed to be 'donut' shaped, therefore giving an indication that solitary surface ionization waves may be responsible for the creation of these bullets. In addition, using emission spectroscopy, we follow the evolution of various species along the trajectory of the bullets, in this way correlating the bullet propagation with the evolution of their chemical activity.

  18. Experimental investigation of horizontal convection

    Muñoz Córdoba, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Fluid circulation driven by buoyancy forces due to a thermal gradient on a horizontal boundary, known as horizontal convection, is experimentally studied. For that purpose, a methacrylate box with inner dimensions 300x150x150 mm3 (LxWxH) whose bottom is composed by a heat exchanger and a printed circuit board is lled with water. The heat exchanger provides a uniform temperature boundary condition while the printed circuit board provides a boundary condition of uniform heat ...

  19. Epistemological Dizziness in the Psychology Laboratory: Lively Subjects, Anxious Experimenters, and Experimental Relations, 1950-1970.

    Morawski, Jill

    2015-09-01

    Since the demise of introspective techniques in the early twentieth century, experimental psychology has largely assumed an administrative arrangement between experimenters and subjects wherein subjects respond to experimenters' instructions and experimenters meticulously constrain that relationship through experimental controls. During the postwar era this standard arrangement came to be questioned, initiating reflections that resonated with Cold War anxieties about the nature of the subjects and the experimenters alike. Albeit relatively short lived, these interrogations of laboratory relationships gave rise to unconventional testimonies and critiques of experimental method and epistemology. Researchers voiced serious concerns about the honesty and normality of subjects, the politics of the laboratory, and their own experimental conduct. Their reflective commentaries record the intimacy of subject and experimenter relations and the plentiful cultural materials that constituted the experimental situation, revealing the permeable boundaries between laboratory and everyday life.

  20. Preliminary rock mechanics laboratory: Investigation plan

    Oschman, K.P.; Hummeldorf, R.G.; Hume, H.R.; Karakouzian, M.; Vakili, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This document presents the rationale for rock mechanics laboratory testing (including the supporting analysis and numerical modeling) planned for the site characterization of a nuclear waste repository in salt. This plan first identifies what information is required for regulatory and design purposes, and then presents the rationale for the testing that satisfies the required information needs. A preliminary estimate of the minimum sampling requirements for rock laboratory testing during site characterization is also presented. Periodic revision of this document is planned.

  1. Fusion of Laboratory and Textual Data for Investigative Bioforensics

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Corley, Courtney D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Wahl, Karen L.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2013-03-10

    Chemical and biological forensic programs focus on the identification of a threat and acquisition of laboratory measurements to determine how a threat agent may have been produced. However, to generate investigative leads, it might also be useful to identify institutions where the same agent has been produced by the same or a very similar process, since the producer of the agent may have learned methods at a university or similar institution. We have developed a Bayesian network framework that fuses hard and soft data sources to assign probability to production practices. It combines the results of laboratory measurements with an automatic text reader to scan scientific literature and rank institutions that had published papers on the agent of interest in order of the probability that the institution has the capability to generate the sample of interest based on laboratory data. We demonstrate the Bayesian network on an example case from microbial forensics, predicting the methods used to produce Bacillus anthracis spores based on mass spectrometric measurements and identifying institutions that have a history of growing Bacillus spores using the same or highly similar methods. We illustrate that the network model can assign a higher posterior probability than expected by random chance to appropriate institutions when trained using only a small set of manually analyzed documents. This is the first example of an automated methodology to integrate experimental and textual data for the purpose of investigative forensics.

  2. Investigating Optimal Foraging Theory in the Laboratory

    Harden, Siegfried; Grilliot, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory is a principle that is often presented in the community ecology section of biology textbooks, but also can be demonstrated in the laboratory. We introduce a lab activity that uses an interactive strategy to teach high school and/or college students about this ecological concept. The activity is ideal because it engages…

  3. The European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences

    Freda, Carmela; Funiciello, Francesca; Meredith, Phil; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Troll, Valentin R.; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2013-04-01

    Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS).The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of the EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). Despite the presence in Europe of high performance infrastructures dedicated to geosciences, there is still limited collaboration in sharing facilities and best practices. The EPOS WG6 aims to overcome this limitation by pushing towards national and trans-national coordination, efficient use of current laboratory infrastructures, and future aggregation of facilities not yet included. This will be attained through the creation of common access and interoperability policies to foster and simplify personnel mobility. The EPOS ambition is to orchestrate European laboratory infrastructures with diverse, complementary tasks and competences into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling. The WG6 is presently organizing its thematic core services within the EPOS distributed research infrastructure with the goal of joining the other EPOS communities (geologists, seismologists, volcanologists, etc...) and stakeholders (engineers, risk managers and other geosciences investigators) to: 1) develop tools and services to enhance visitor programs that will mutually benefit visitors and hosts (transnational access); 2) improve support and training activities to make facilities equally accessible to students, young researchers, and experienced users (training and dissemination); 3) collaborate in sharing technological and scientific know-how (transfer of knowledge); 4) optimize interoperability of distributed instrumentation by standardizing data collection, archive, and quality control standards (data preservation and interoperability); 5) implement a unified e-Infrastructure for data

  4. Experimental investigation of new neutron moderator materials

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daemen, Luke L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartl, Monika [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huegle, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muhrer, Guenter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In this study we present experimental investigation of thermal neutron energy spectra produced by lead and bismuth hydroxides (Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3}). The experimental energy spectra are compared with a thermal neutron energy spectrum of water measured in the same geometry. We present an MCNPX geometry model used to help with the experimental data interpretation. We demonstrate a very good reproduction of the experimental thermal neutron energy spectrum produced by the water moderator. We show a sensitivity study with the Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3} materials on different combinations of thermal neutron scattering kernels.

  5. [The 1, 2, 3 of laboratory animal experimentation].

    Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Batista-Castro, Zenia; De Lucca, Marisel; Ruano, Ana; García-Barceló, María; Rivera-Cervantes, Marta; García-Rodríguez, Julio; Sánchez-Mateos, Soledad

    2016-06-01

    The slow scientific development in Latin America in recent decades has delayed the incorporation of laboratory animal experimentation; however, this situation has started to change. Today, extraordinary scientific progress is evident, which has promoted the introduction and increased use of laboratory animals as an important tool for the advancement of biomedical sciences. In the aftermath of this boom, the need to provide the scientific community with training and guidance in all aspects related to animal experimentation has arisen. It is the responsibility of each country to regulate this practice, for both bioethical and legal reasons, to ensure consideration of the animals' rights and welfare. The following manuscript is the result of papers presented at the International Workshop on Laboratory Animal Testing held at the Technical University of Ambato, Ecuador; it contains information regarding the current state of affairs in laboratory animal testing and emphasizes critical aspects such as main species used, ethical and legal principles, and experimental and alternative designs for animal use. These works aim to ensure good practices that should define scientific work. This document will be relevant to both researchers who aim to newly incorporate animal testing into their research and those who seek to update their knowledge.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation

    Grotzinger, John P.; Crisp, Joy; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Baker, Charles J.; Barry, Robert; Blake, David F.; Conrad, Pamela; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ferdowski, Bobak; Gellert, Ralf; Gilbert, John B.; Golombek, Matt; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hassler, Donald M.; Jandura, Louise; Litvak, Maxim; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Meyer, Michael; Malin, Michael C.; Mitrofanov, Igor; Simmonds, John J.; Vaniman, David; Welch, Richard V.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-09-01

    Scheduled to land in August of 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission was initiated to explore the habitability of Mars. This includes both modern environments as well as ancient environments recorded by the stratigraphic rock record preserved at the Gale crater landing site. The Curiosity rover has a designed lifetime of at least one Mars year (˜23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. Curiosity's science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere (SAM instrument); an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity (CheMin instrument); focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color (MAHLI, MARDI, and Mastcam instruments); an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry (APXS instrument); a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals (ChemCam instrument); an active neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith (DAN instrument); a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables (REMS instrument); and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of background solar and cosmic radiation (RAD instrument). The various payload elements will work together to detect and study potential sampling targets with remote and in situ measurements; to acquire samples of rock, soil, and atmosphere and analyze them in onboard analytical instruments; and to observe the environment around the rover. The 155-km diameter Gale crater was chosen as Curiosity's field site based on several attributes: an interior mountain of ancient flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mountain show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate

  7. Open-ended versus guided laboratory activities: Impact on students' beliefs about experimental physics

    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2016-01-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the process of experimental physics. Alternatively, open-ended laboratory activities can provide a more authentic learning environment by, for example, allowing students to exercise greater autonomy in what and how physical phenomena are investigated. Engaging in authentic practices may be a critical part of improving students' beliefs around the nature of experimental physics. Here, we investigate the impact of open-ended activities in undergraduate lab courses on students' epistemologies and expectations about the nature of experimental physics, as well as their confidence and affect, as measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Ph...

  8. Laboratory investigations in cell biology. Second edition

    Bregman, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    This text contains 18 lab projects that explore the structural, biochemical, and physiological nature of eukaryotic cells. Topics are largely traditional, however, several investigations employ new methodologies. Offers extended coverage of biochemistry. Materials have been selected for availability and ease of handling: e.g. Project 4 - extraction of DNA and RNA done with calf liver, Project 9 - succinate dehydrogenase activity studied in mitochondria isolated from cauliflower. There is more procedural detail than found in most lab manuals, negating the need for constant instructional details. And a variety of methodologies is introduced, such as Cytochemistry, Spectrophotometry, Electrophoresis, Cell Fractionation, silver staining of active sites of RNA transcription, and many more. Pages are perforated for collecting and grading.

  9. Comparison of Laboratory Experimental Data to XBeach Numerical Model Output

    Demirci, Ebru; Baykal, Cuneyt; Guler, Isikhan; Sogut, Erdinc

    2016-04-01

    generating data sets for testing and validation of sediment transport relationships for sand transport in the presence of waves and currents. In these series, there is no structure in the basin. The second and third series of experiments were designed to generate data sets for development of tombolos in the lee of detached 4m-long rubble mound breakwater that is 4 m from the initial shoreline. The fourth series of experiments are conducted to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 4m-long T-head groin with the head section in the same location of the second and the third tests. The fifth series of experiments are used to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 3-m-long rubble-mound breakwater positioned 1.5 m offshore of the initial shoreline. In this study, the data collected from the above mentioned five experiments are used to compare the results of the experimental data with XBeach numerical model results, both for the "no-structure" and "with-structure" cases regarding to sediment transport relationships in the presence of only waves and currents as well as the shoreline changes together with the detached breakwater and the T-groin. The main purpose is to investigate the similarities and differences between the laboratory experimental data behavior with XBeach numerical model outputs for these five cases. References: Baykal, C., Sogut, E., Ergin, A., Guler, I., Ozyurt, G.T., Guler, G., and Dogan, G.G. (2015). Modelling Long Term Morphological Changes with XBeach: Case Study of Kızılırmak River Mouth, Turkey, European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2015, Vienna, Austria, 12-17 April 2015. Gravens, M.B. and Wang, P. (2007). "Data report: Laboratory testing of longshore sand transport by waves and currents; morphology change behind headland structures." Technical Report, ERDC/CHL TR-07-8, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS. Roelvink, D., Reniers, A., van Dongeren, A., van Thiel de

  10. Inquiry, Investigation, and Communication in the Student-Directed Laboratory.

    Janners, Martha Y.

    1988-01-01

    Describes how to organize a student-directed laboratory investigation which is based on amphibian metamorphosis, lasts for nearly a term, and involves extensive group effort. Explains the assignment, student response and opinion, formal paper, and instructor responsibilities. (RT)

  11. Characterizing the Experimental Procedure in Science Laboratories: A Preliminary Step towards Students Experimental Design

    Girault, Isabelle; d'Ham, Cedric; Ney, Muriel; Sanchez, Eric; Wajeman, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have stressed students' lack of understanding of experiments in laboratories. Some researchers suggest that if students design all or parts of entire experiment, as part of an inquiry-based approach, it would overcome certain difficulties. It requires that a procedure be written for experimental design. The aim of this paper is to…

  12. Laboratory investigation of water extraction effects on saltwater wedge displacement

    S. Noorabadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a close connection between saltwater intrusion into aquifers and groundwater extraction. Freshwater extraction in coastal aquifers is one of the most important reasons for the saltwater intrusion into these aquifers. Condition of extraction system such as well depth, discharge rate, saltwater concentration and etc. could affect this process widely. Thus, investigating different extraction conditions comprises many management advantages.  In the present study, the effects of freshwater extraction on saltwater interface displacement have been investigated in a laboratory box. Three different well depths (H were considered with combinations of 3 different extraction rates (Q and 3 saltwater concentrations (C for detailed investigation of the effects of these factors variations on saltwater displacement. SEAWAT model has been used to simulate all the scenarios to numerically study of the process. The experimental and numerical results showed that when the C and Q rates were small and the well depth was shallow, the saltwater interface wouldn’t reach the extraction well, so the extracted water remained uncontaminated. When the C and Q rates were increased and the well was deepened, the salinity of the extracted water became higher. When the Q and C rates were high enough, in the shallow well depth, the final concentration of the extracted water was low but a huge part of the porous media was contaminated by the saltwater, furthermore when the well was deepened enough, the final concentration of the extracted water was increased but a small part of the porous media was contaminated by the saltwater. Finally, the results showed that when the Q and H rates were high enough, the extraction well behaved like a barrier and didn’t allow the advancing saltwater wedge toe to be intruded beyond the wells.

  13. An Investigative, Cooperative Learning Approach to the General Microbiology Laboratory

    Seifert, Kyle; Fenster, Amy; Dilts, Judith A.; Temple, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Investigative- and cooperative-based learning strategies have been used effectively in a variety of classrooms to enhance student learning and engagement. In the General Microbiology laboratory for juniors and seniors at James Madison University, these strategies were combined to make a semester-long, investigative, cooperative learning experience…

  14. Laboratory investigation of novel oil recovery method for carbonate reservoirs

    Yousef, A.A.; Al-Saleh, S.; Al-Kaabi, A.; Al-Jawfi, M. [Saudi Aramco, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a core flooding laboratory study conducted using composite rock samples from a carbonate reservoir. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of salinity and ionic composition on oil, brine and rock interactions. Experimental parameters and procedures were designed to replicate reservoir conditions and current field injection practices. Results of the study demonstrated that alterations in the salinity and ionic composition of injected water can have a significant impact on the wettability of the rock surface. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies confirmed that injecting different salinity slugs of seawater in carbonate core samples can cause a significant alteration in the surface charges of the rock, and lead to increased interactions with water molecules. The constant reduction of pressure drop across the composite cores with the injection of different diluted versions of water also provided proof of brine, oil and rock alterations. Results of the study indicated that the driving mechanism for waterflooding recovery processes is wettability alteration, which can be triggered by alterations in carbonate rock surface charges, and improvements in the connectivity between rock pore systems that coexist in carbonate rock samples. 41 refs., 8 tabs., 16 figs.

  15. Experimental investigation of Reykjavik city footbridge

    Zivanovic, Stana; Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Pavic, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    This study describes experimental investigation of a 160 m long footbridge in Reykjavik. The bridge is a continuous post tensioned concrete beam spanning eight spans, the longest being 27.1 m. In plan, the structure has eye-catching spiral shape. Modal testing of the structure was conducted...... to identify its dynamic properties. As many as seven modes of vibration were identified in the low-frequency region up to 5 Hz. After this a series of controlled tests involving up to 38 test subjects were performed. These were designed to test vibration performance of the footbridge under various loading...

  16. Experimental investigation on the rheology of foams

    Bonilla, L. F. [Univ. Surcolombiana, Neiva, Huila (Colombia); Shah, S. N. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The rheology of foams was investigated using aqueous and gelled foams and employing a pipe-type viscometer. Surfactant at 0.5 per cent concentration was used as the foaming agent. Results indicated that foam fluid rheology can be adequately characterized by the Herschel-Bulkley model. The experimental data served as the starting point for the development of new empirical correlations to predict foam fluid apparent viscosity. The use of these new correlations is expected to provide more accurate estimates of foam fluid rheological properties. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 14 figs.

  17. Investigating intertemporal choice through experimental evolutionary robotics.

    Paglieri, Fabio; Parisi, Domenico; Patacchiola, Massimiliano; Petrosino, Giancarlo

    2015-06-01

    In intertemporal choices, subjects face a trade-off between value and delay: achieving the most valuable outcome requires a longer time, whereas the immediately available option is objectively poorer. Intertemporal choices are ubiquitous, and comparative studies reveal commonalities and differences across species: all species devalue future rewards as a function of delay (delay aversion), yet there is a lot of inter-specific variance in how rapidly such devaluation occurs. These differences are often interpreted in terms of ecological rationality, as depending on environmental factors (e.g., feeding ecology) and the physiological and morphological constraints of different species (e.g., metabolic rate). Evolutionary hypotheses, however, are hard to verify in vivo, since it is difficult to observe precisely enough real environments, not to mention ancestral ones. In this paper, we discuss the viability of an approach based on evolutionary robotics: in Study 1, we evolve robots without a metabolism in five different ecologies; in Study 2, we evolve metabolic robots (i.e., robots that consume energy over time) in three different ecologies. The intertemporal choices of the robots are analyzed both in their ecology and under laboratory conditions. Results confirm the generality of delay aversion and the usefulness of studying intertemporal choice through experimental evolutionary robotics.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Shock Wave Surfing

    Parziale, N J; Hornung, H G; Shepherd, J E

    2010-01-01

    Shock wave surfing is investigated experimentally in GALCIT's Mach 4.0 Ludwieg Tube. Shock wave surfing occurs when a secondary free-body follows the bow shock formed by a primary free-body; an example of shock wave surfing occurs during meteorite breakup. The free-bodies in the current investigation are nylon spheres. During each run in the Ludwieg tube a high speed camera is used to capture a series of schlieren images; edge tracking software is used to measure the position of each sphere. Velocity and acceleration are had from processing the position data. The radius ratio and initial orientation of the two spheres are varied in the test matrix. The variation of sphere radius ratio and initial angle between the centers of gravity are shown to have a significant effect on the dynamics of the system.

  19. Experimental Investigation of a Rectangular Airlift Pump

    I. I. Esen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic performance of an airlift pump having a rectangular cross-section 20 mm × 80 mm was investigated through an experimental program. The pump was operated at six different submergence ratios and the liquid flow rate was measured at various flowrates of air injected. The effectiveness of the pump, defined as the ratio of the mass of liquid pumped to the mass of air injected, was determined as a function of the mass of air injected for different submergence ratios. Results obtained were compared with those for circular airlift pumps using an analytical model for circular pumps. Effectiveness of the rectangular airlift pump was observed to be comparable to that of the circular pumps. Hydraulic performance of the rectangular airlift pump investigated was then described by a set of semilogarithmic empirical equations.

  20. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    Tenfelde, Jan

    2012-12-11

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion

  1. Experimental investigation of rubble mound breakwaters for wave energy conversion

    Luppa, C.; Contestabile, P.; Cavallaro, L.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes recent laboratory investigation on the breakwater integrated device named “OBREC” (Overtopping BReakwater for Energy Conversion). This technology recently appeared on the wave energy converter scene as an executive outcome of improving composite seawalls by including overtopping...... type wave energy converters [1]. Two complementary experimental campaigns were carried out, in 2012 and in 2014. Several geometries and wave conditions were examined. Preliminary comparison of hydraulic behaviour has been summarized, focusing on reflection analysis and overtopping flow rate......-by-wave measurement of couples of hydraulic head-flow rate acting on a virtual turbine inlet. Finally, the influence of draft length on overtopping discharge has been identified....

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    Kiil, Søren

    limestones of dif-ferent origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was de-veloped to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Deviations between measurements and simulations were......-scale experiments. In the theoretical part of the work, the laboratory and pilot plant observations are investigated using mathematical modelling.The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grinded limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish...... attributed primarily to the particle size distribution (PSD) measurements of the limestone particles, which were used as model inputs. The measured PSD was probably not representa-tive of a given limestone sample because of agglomeration phenomena taking place in the dis-perser, preventing a stable...

  3. Simulation and Experimentation in an Astronomy Laboratory, Part II

    Maloney, F. P.; Maurone, P. A.; Hones, M.

    1995-12-01

    The availability of low-cost, high-performance computing hardware and software has transformed the manner by which astronomical concepts can be re-discovered and explored in a laboratory that accompanies an astronomy course for non-scientist students. We report on a strategy for allowing each student to understand fundamental scientific principles by interactively confronting astronomical and physical phenomena, through direct observation and by computer simulation. Direct observation of physical phenomena, such as Hooke's Law, begins by using a computer and hardware interface as a data-collection and presentation tool. In this way, the student is encouraged to explore the physical conditions of the experiment and re-discover the fundamentals involved. The hardware frees the student from the tedium of manual data collection and presentation, and permits experimental design which utilizes data that would otherwise be too fleeting, too imprecise, or too voluminous. Computer simulation of astronomical phenomena allows the student to travel in time and space, freed from the vagaries of weather, to re-discover such phenomena as the daily and yearly cycles, the reason for the seasons, the saros, and Kepler's Laws. By integrating the knowledge gained by experimentation and simulation, the student can understand both the scientific concepts and the methods by which they are discovered and explored. Further, students are encouraged to place these discoveries in an historical context, by discovering, for example, the night sky as seen by the survivors of the sinking Titanic, or Halley's comet as depicted on the Bayeux tapestry. We report on the continuing development of these laboratory experiments. Futher details and the text for the experiments are available at the following site: http://astro4.ast.vill.edu/ This work is supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts.

  4. Numerical and experimental investigation of aeroviscoelastic systems

    Martins, Polliana C. O.; Guimarães, Thiago A. M.; Pereira, Daniel de A.; Marques, Flávio D.; Rade, Domingos A.

    2017-02-01

    Viscoelastic materials have been widely used for the purpose of passive vibration mitigation in various types of mechanical systems, including, industrial machinery, civil structures and vehicles. In this paper, the use of those materials in aeroelastic systems is investigated, with emphasis placed on the influence of the viscoelastic behavior on the flutter speeds of two-degree-of-freedom typical section models, in which viscoelastic elements are introduced in addition to elastic elements associated to heave and pitch motions. The equations of motion of the aeroelastic system are modified to account for the dependence of the viscoelastic behavior on frequency and temperature, by using the concepts of complex modulus and shift factor. The aerodynamic forces and moments in subsonic regime are modeled according to Theodorsen's method. Numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate the influence of the addition of viscoelastic elements on the flutter speed and elucidate the separated influences of stiffness and damping additions. An experimental wind tunnel setup consisting of a rigid wing supported by flexible elements in pitch and plunge motions has been modified to enable the introduction of viscoelastic elements in parallel to those flexible elements. For various configurations of viscoelastic additions, the flutter instability is characterized from vibration measurements performed for increasing flow speeds in the vicinity of the stability boundary. The experimental results are used to validate the numerical model derived for the aeroviscoelastic system and confirm both qualitatively and quantitatively the predictions of the simulations, especially the possibility of increasing the flutter speed by the inclusion of viscoelastic materials.

  5. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same......) to the aqueous phase was found to reduce the gas dissolution rate slightly. However the induction times were prolonged quite substantially upon addition of PVP.The induction time data were correlated using a newly developed induction time model based on crystallization theory also capable of taking into account...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  6. Integrating Field and Laboratory Investigations of Televised Violence and Aggression.

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    Longitudinal and intervention laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the effects of viewing televised violence on the aggressive behavior of elementary school children. In the longitudinal study 505 children were studied over a 3-year period. The measures used included peer nominated aggression, aggression anxiety and popularity,…

  7. Experimental investigation on lithium borohydride hydrolysis

    Goudon, J.P. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 5209 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); SNPE Materiaux Energetiques, Centre de Recherches du Bouchet, Laboratoire BCFB, 9 rue Lavoisier, 91710 Vert-le-Petit (France); Bernard, F. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 5209 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Renouard, J.; Yvart, P. [SNPE Materiaux Energetiques, Centre de Recherches du Bouchet, Laboratoire BCFB, 9 rue Lavoisier, 91710 Vert-le-Petit (France)

    2010-10-15

    Lithium borohydride, one of the highest energy density chemical energy carriers, is considered as an attractive potential hydrogen storage material due to its high gravimetric hydrogen density (19.6%). Belonging to borohydride compounds, it presents a real issue to overcome aims fixed by the U.S. Department of Energy in the field of energy, and so crystallizes currently attention and effort to use this material for large scale civil and military applications. However, due to its important hygroscopicity, lithium borohydride is a hazardous material which requires specific handling conditions for industrial aspects. In order to understand much more the reaction mechanism involved between LiBH{sub 4} and the water vapor which leads to the native material dehydrogenation, several experimental techniques such as X-ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) or thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) were investigated. Indeed, depending on water stoichiometric coefficient, several reactions are suggested in literature but the lithium borohydride hydrolysis way reaction scheme is still uncertain. Investigations exhibited interesting results and, highlighted the formation of lithium metaborate dihydrate LiBO{sub 2},2H{sub 2}O as hydrolysis product via such a solid-gas reaction. (author)

  8. Extra-terrestrial sprites: laboratory investigations in planetary gas mixtures

    Dubrovin, D.; Yair, Y.; Price, C.; Nijdam, S.; Clevis, T.T.J.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Ebert, U.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate streamers in gas mixtures representing the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn (H2-He) and Venus (CO2-N2). Streamer diameters, velocities, radiance and overall morphology are investigated with fast ICCD camera images. We confirm experimentally the scaling of streamer diameters in these gas

  9. Investigation of Appropriate Refractory Material for Laboratory Electritic Resistrance Furnance

    J.B Agboola

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous efforts to increase the local content of furnaces; hence the choice of appropriate refractory material for lining of locally manufactured furnaces has remained a major concern. This research work investigates the choice of appropriate local refractory material for the lining of laboratory electric resistance furnace.Electric resistance furnaces are extensively used in the laboratory for heat treatment of metals and alloys. Refractory binders such as silicon carbide were experimented upon for strength and resistance to high temperature.The results obtained showed that Kankara fireclay containing 15% SiC ( 5.70 % linear shrinkage , 46.2% apparent porosity, 1.77gkm³ Bulk density, 18 cycles of spalling tests at 1300°C, 5.253KN/m² of cold strength has appropriate properties for producing grooved bricks for lining of laboratory electric resistance Furnace.

  10. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  11. An investigative graduate laboratory course for teaching modern DNA techniques.

    de Lencastre, Alexandre; Thomas Torello, A; Keller, Lani C

    2017-02-16

    This graduate-level DNA methods laboratory course is designed to model a discovery-based research project and engages students in both traditional DNA analysis methods and modern recombinant DNA cloning techniques. In the first part of the course, students clone the Drosophila ortholog of a human disease gene of their choosing using Gateway(®) cloning. In the second part of the course, students examine the expression of their gene of interest in human cell lines by reverse transcription PCR and learn how to analyze data from quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments. The adaptability of the Gateway(®) cloning system is ideally suited for students to design and create different types of expression constructs to achieve a particular experimental goal (e.g., protein purification, expression in cell culture, and/or subcellular localization), and the genes chosen can be aligned to the research interests of the instructor and/or ongoing research in a department. Student evaluations indicate that the course fostered a genuine excitement for research and in depth knowledge of both the techniques performed and the theory behind them. Our long-term goal is to incorporate this DNA methods laboratory as the foundation for an integrated laboratory sequence for the Master of Science degree program in Molecular and Cellular Biology at Quinnipiac University, where students use the reagents and concepts they developed in this course in subsequent laboratory courses, including a protein methods and cell culture laboratory. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017.

  12. Experimental investigations on dry stone masonry walls

    2006-01-01

    Brick unreinforced masonry walls have been widely studied both from experimental and numerical point of view, but scarce experimental information is available for dry stone masonry walls that constitute the material more frequently used in the construction of ancient historical constructions. Therefore, the present work aims at increasing the insight about the behavior of typical ancient masonry walls under cyclic loading. To attain such goal, different experimental approaches are consi...

  13. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  14. An experimental investigation of hyperpycnal flow

    Boland, T. M.; Hsu, T.

    2010-12-01

    The understanding of river-borne sediment dispersal in the coastal environment is an important problem in coastal/estuarine research. While it remains difficult to quantify how river discharges sediment into the coastal environment, it has been found that there are many qualitative similarities among rivers around the world. Amid these similarities is the formation of freshwater sediment-laden plumes, positively and negatively buoyant, that extend from river mouths into the ocean. Research has been conducted to help understand how sediment is deposited from these plumes for different idealized coastal settings. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to study sediment-laden freshwater plumes within a saltwater tank. Both hyperpycnal and hypopycnal plumes were created by pumping sediment-laden freshwater with a given sediment concentration into a saltwater tank with a constant salinity of 12.5 ppt. Salinity was measured prior to each experiment with the Mannix TDS503 Pocket TDS Meter. Kaolin clay with a primary particle size of D50 = 0.2 μm was used. Freshwater and sediment were mixed in a 50 gallon barrel with fluorescent dye, which improves the visual distinction between the slurry and the ambient water. The saltwater tank is a 3 meter long, 0.15 meter wide, and 0.5 meter deep flume with an adjustable slope (four different slopes, 50, 30, 20, 10 degrees, were investigated) where the slurry enters. Four different sediment concentrations were used with each slope: 15 g/l, 20 g/l, 25 g/l, and 30 g/l, creating a total of sixteen trials for analysis. A Sony SR11 camcorder was used to capture video of the plumes as they move across the tank. Image analysis was performed using a Matlab code to measure parameters in order to describe the plumes. These include velocity, thickness, liftoff distance, and separation distance. Resultant plumes are found to depend on the initial sediment concentration of the slurry as well as the slope used at the entrance of the

  15. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  16. Experimental Investigations of Water Quality: The Bioassay.

    Havel, John E.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a bioassay laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to both acute and chronic bioassay procedures. Reinforces ecological principles and provides opportunities for students to use knowledge learned in the classroom in a realistic and ecologically-relevant situation. Contains 11 references. (JRH)

  17. Experimental Investigation on Caisson Breakwater Sliding

    Ruol, Piero; Martin, Paolo; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2014-01-01

    weight and same geometries are tested under regular and irregular waves. It is found that, under breaking conditions, the expected inaccuracy of the prediction of the force, inherent on the variability of the breaking process, induce unacceptable errors in the prediction of the sliding. This observation...... endorses other previous experimental results. Conversely, when the actual measured input force is used as input, the analytical Shimosako formula fit quite well the experimental sliding distance....

  18. Experimental researches on power plant condensers performed at ENEA laboratories

    Fabrizi, F.; Girardi, G.; Palazzi, G. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energetica

    1993-09-01

    Improvement of Italian industrial design capability is the principal aim of the ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy, New Technologies and the Environment) R&D program which is studying the thermo-hydraulic aspects of shell-and-tube condensers. The principal experimental apparatus of this project allows researchers to perform tests for investigating in detail feed-water heater (FWH) thermo-hydraulic performance. A scaled-down test section was used in significant size to reproduce condensing, de-superheating and drain cooling zones. To approach condensation phenomena occurring in the FWH, a visualization test section was also built. A new model for condensation flow, perpendicular to the tubes, was developed using the films shot through the visualization test section. All the experimental data carried out in the program were used to assess an original code, named COND. Concerning the tube-side condenser design, an analysis of the velocity field in the front end head was performed to minimize erosion phenomena.

  19. An analytical and experimental investigation of resistojet plumes

    Zana, Lynnette M.; Hoffman, David J.; Breyley, Loranell R.; Serafini, John S.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the electrothermal propulsion plume research program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, efforts have been initiated to analytically and experimentally investigate the plumes of resistojet thrusters. The method of Simons for the prediction of rocket exhaust plumes is developed for the resistojet. Modifications are made to the source flow equations to account for the increased effects of the relatively large nozzle boundary layer. Additionally, preliminary mass flux measurements of a laboratory resistojet using CO2 propellant at 298 K have been obtained with a cryogenically cooled quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). There is qualitative agreement between analysis and experiment, at least in terms of the overall number density shape functions in the forward flux region.

  20. Experimental Investigation on Hydrodynamic Behavior of the Geometric Spar Platform

    ZHANG Fan; YANG Jian-min; LI Run-pei; CHEN Gang

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, attention has been focused on the spar platform for gas and oil exploitation in deep water. With the development of offshore technology, many new spar concepts have been put forward and fully studied. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the hydrodynamic behavior of a new spar concept from Novellent Offshore LLC, USA, which is called Geometric Spar (G-spar). A new type of buoyancy can concept from the same company, viz. Integrated Buoyancy Can (IBC), is researched in the meantime. The G-spar and IBC models with a 1:70 scale are tested in the State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering at Shanghai Jiao Tong University for the global performance of the spar hull, in which the second-order wave drift force is involved, as well as the effect of heave plates on the motion characteristics and mooring force of the G-spar platform.

  1. Investigations on Experimental Impellers for Axial Blowers

    Encke, W.

    1947-01-01

    A selection of measurements obtained on experimental impellers for axial blowers will be reported. In addition to characteristic curves plotted for low and for high peripheral velocities, proportions and blade sections for six different blower models and remarks on the design of blowers will be presented.

  2. Experimental investigation on phase transformation type micropump

    2002-01-01

    The phase transformation type micropump without moving parts was experimentally studied in this note.To analyze the pumping mechanism of the micropump, a simplified physical model was presented. The experimental results indicate that the pump characteristic is mainly dependent on the heating and cooling conditions. For a given system, there exist an optimal combination of heating current and switch time with which the flow rate reaches maximum. Comparing with the natural cooling, the forced convective cooling needs larger heating current to obtain the same flow rate. In our experiments, the maximum flow rate is 33 μL/min when the inner diameter of the micropump is 200 μm, and the maximum pumping pressure reaches over 20 kPa. The theoretical analysis shows that the pumping mechanism of the micropump mainly lies in the large density difference between liquid and gas phases and the effect of gas chocking.

  3. Theoretical and experimental investigations of Chinese evacuated tubular solar collectors

    Qin, Lin; Furbo, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Four different marketed Chinese evacuated tubular solar collectors have been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The advantages of the investigated solar collectors compared to normal flat plate collectors were elucidated.......Four different marketed Chinese evacuated tubular solar collectors have been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The advantages of the investigated solar collectors compared to normal flat plate collectors were elucidated....

  4. Laboratory Investigations on Estuary Salinity Mixing: Preliminary Analysis

    F. H. Nuryazmeen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estuaries are bodies of water along the coasts that are formed when fresh water from rivers flows into and mixes with salt water from the ocean. The estuaries serve as a habitat to some aquatic lives, including mangroves. Human-induced activities such as dredging of shipping lanes along the bottom estuarine, the disposal of industrial wastes into the water system and shoreline development influence estuarine dynamics which include mixing process. These activities might contribute to salinity changes and further adversely affect the estuarine ecosystem. In order to study at the characteristics of the mixing between salt water (estuary and freshwater (river, a preliminary investigation had been done in the laboratory. Fresh water was released from one end of the flume and overflowing at weir at the other end. Meanwhile, salt water was represented by the red dye tracer released through a weir and intruded upstream as a gravity current. The isohalines are plotted to see the salinity patterns. Besides, to examine the spatial and temporal salinity profiles along the laboratory investigations, the plotted graphs have been made. The results show that the changes in salinity level along the flume due to mixing between fresh water and salt water. This showed typical salt-wedge estuary characteristics.

  5. An investigation of student understanding in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory

    Grutsch, John Leo, Jr.

    Laboratory activities in organic chemistry involve a mixture of sophisticated logic and empirical observation that requires the integration of mechanistic thought, laboratory technique, and problem-solving skills. In an effort to understand how students develop the thought processes and problem-solving skills necessary for laboratory work in organic chemistry, student understanding of how the interaction between a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), provides a result of interest (yield, selectivity, purity, etc.) for an experiment performed in the organic chemistry laboratory was investigated through the collection of responses to questions posed on pre-laboratory quizzes followed by in-depth interviews during which student volunteers discussed their responses along with their experiences in the laboratory. The conceptual change theory of learning which assumes new conceptions are understood, judged, acquired, or rejected in a conceptual context was used as a theoretical paradigm to examine students responses to questions posed on pre-laboratory quizzes and transcripts of the interviews with student volunteers. Students were found to not have developed a mechanistic understanding of how the interaction between a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), provides a result of interest (yield, selectivity, purity, etc.) for an experiment performed in the organic chemistry laboratory. However, students' prior exposure to and understanding of chemical concepts was found to simultaneously assist and hinder in their development of a partial mechanistic understanding of how a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), interact to provide a result of interest (yield

  6. Experimental investigation of quantum Simpson's paradox

    Li, Yu-Long; Tang, Jian-Shun; Wang, Yi-Tao; Wu, Yu-Chun; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can; Yu, Ying; Li, Mi-Feng; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2013-07-01

    The well-known Simpson's paradox, or Yule-Simpson (YS) effect, is often encountered in social-science and medical-science statistics. It occurs when the correlations present in different groups are reversed if the groups are combined. Simpson's paradox also exists in quantum measurements. In this Brief Report, we experimentally realized two analogous effects: the quantum-classical YS effect and the quantum-quantum YS effect in the quantum-dot system. We also compared the probability of obtaining those two effects under identical quantum measurements and found that the quantum-quantum YS effect is more likely to occur than the quantum-classical YS effect.

  7. Experimental investigation of PCM cold storage

    Butala, Vincenc; Stritih, Uros [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Askerceva 6, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-03-15

    This article presents an experimental analysis of cooling buildings using nighttime cold accumulation in a phase change material (PCM), otherwise known as the ''free-cooling principle''. Studies of the ceiling and floor free-cooling principle, as well as passive cooling, are presented. The free-cooling principle is explained and some of the types of PCMs suitable for summer cooling are listed. An experiment was conducted using paraffin with a melting point of 22 C as the PCM to store cold during the nighttime and to cool hot air during the daytime in summer. Air temperatures and heat fluxes as a function of time are presented for different air velocities and inlet temperatures. (author)

  8. Experimental investigations of active air bearings

    Santos, Ilmar; Morosi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Along with traditional oil lubrication, increasing demand for high-speed applications has renewed attention to gas bearings technology. Traditional aerostatic and aerodynamic gas lubrication has been widely used in a variety of applications, ranging from high-speed spindles to micro and meso......-scale turbomachinery. The present paper deals with experimental rotordynamic testing of a flexible rotor supported by hybrid aerostaticaerodynamic gas journal bearing equipped with an electronic radial air injection system. From a rotordynamic point of view there are two phenomena that limit the widespread...... of traditional gas lubrication: 1) Low damping makes operation across critical speed dangerous, as even low level of unbalance can generate large vibration responses. This is especially problematic for gas bearing applications, which often operate in the supercritical region. Moreover, 2) An upper bound...

  9. Experimental investigation of reshocked spherical gas interfaces

    Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Yang, Jiming; Luo, Xisheng

    2012-05-01

    The evolution of a spherical gas interface under reshock conditions is experimentally studied using the high-speed schlieren photography with high time resolutions. A number of experimental sets of helium or SF6 bubble surrounded by air for seven different end wall distances have been performed. Distinct flow structures are observed due to the additional vorticity and wave configuration caused by the reshock. In the air/helium case, the deformation of the reshocked bubble is dependent on the development of the penetrating air jet along the symmetry axis of the bubble. In general, two separate vortex rings can be observed, i.e., one develops slowly, and the other approaches and eventually impinges on the shock tube end wall. In the air/SF6 case, two SF6 jets moving in opposite directions are generated and the oscillation of the interface is observed for small end wall distances, while small scale vortex morphologies on the gas interface are found for large end wall distances. The physical mechanisms of the baroclinic vorticity generation and the pressure perturbation are highlighted in the interface evolution process. Based on the sequence of the schlieren images obtained during a single run for each case, the x-t diagrams of the shock and reshock interacting with the helium or SF6 bubble are plotted and the velocities estimated in linear stages are compared with those calculated from one-dimensional gas dynamics. The changes with time in the characteristic bubble sizes including the interface length, height, and vortex diameter are also measured.

  10. Experimental investigation of aerofoil tonal noise generation

    Pröbsting, S.; Serpieri, J.; Scarano, F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the mechanisms associated with tonal noise emission from a NACA 0012 aerofoil at moderate incidence (0; 1; 2 and 4 angle of attack) and with Reynolds numbers ranging from 100 000 to 270 000. Simultaneous time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) of the aeroacousti

  11. Randomized block experimental designs can increase the power and reproducibility of laboratory animal experiments.

    Festing, Michael F W

    2014-01-01

    Randomized block experimental designs have been widely used in agricultural and industrial research for many decades. Usually they are more powerful, have higher external validity, are less subject to bias, and produce more reproducible results than the completely randomized designs typically used in research involving laboratory animals. Reproducibility can be further increased by using time as a blocking factor. These benefits can be achieved at no extra cost. A small experiment investigating the effect of an antioxidant on the activity of a liver enzyme in four inbred mouse strains, which had two replications (blocks) separated by a period of two months, illustrates this approach. The widespread failure to use these designs more widely in research involving laboratory animals has probably led to a substantial waste of animals, money, and scientific resources and slowed down the development of new treatments for human and animal diseases.

  12. Using Laboratory Experimental Auctions in Marketing Research: A Case Study of New Packaging for Fresh Beef

    Elizabeth Hoffman; Menkhaus, Dale J.; Dipankar Chakravarti; Field, Ray A.; Whipple, Glen D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of laboratory experimental auctions in a pretest market research program for new products. We review the experimental auctions literature, discuss the range of auction mechanisms available and present the advantages and disadvantages of using a particular mechanism for a laboratory pretest market. We then present a step-by-step example of how a theoretically incentive compatible auction mechanism (fifth-price, sealed-bid) was used in a laboratory pretest market ...

  13. An Inquiry-Based Density Laboratory for Teaching Experimental Error

    Prilliman, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    An inquiry-based laboratory exercise is described in which introductory chemistry students measure the density of water five times using either a beaker, a graduated cylinder, or a volumetric pipet. Students are also assigned to use one of two analytical balances, one of which is purposefully miscalibrated by 5%. Each group collects data using…

  14. Rotifers as experimental tools for investigating aging

    Snell, Terry W.; Johnston, Rachel K.; Gribble, Kristin E.; Mark Welch, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative biogerontology has much to contribute to the study of aging. A broad range of aging rates have evolved to meet environmental challenges, and understanding these adaptations can produce valuable insights into aging. The supra Phylum Lophotrochozoa is particularly understudied and has several groups that have intriguing patterns of aging. Members of the Lophotrochozoan phylum Rotifera are particularly useful for aging studies because cohort life tables can be conducted with them easily, and biochemical and genomic tools are available for examining aging mechanisms. This paper reviews a variety of caloric restriction (CR) regimens, small molecule inhibitors, and dietary supplements that extend rotifer lifespan, as well as important interactions between CR and genotype, antioxidant supplements, and TOR and jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways, and the use of RNAi to identify key genes involved in modulating the aging response. Examples of how rapamycin and JNK inhibitor exposure keeps mortality rates low during the reproductive phase of the life cycle are presented, and the ease of conducting life table experiments to screen natural products from red algae for life extending effects is illustrated. Finally, experimental evolution to produce longer-lived rotifer individuals is demonstrated, and future directions to determine the genetic basis of aging are discussed. PMID:25642019

  15. Experimental investigation on flow modes of electrospinning

    Ting Si; Guang-Bin Li; Xing-Xing Chen; Rui-Jun Tian; Xie-Zhen Yin

    2012-01-01

    Electrospinning experiments are performed by using a set of experimental apparatus,a stroboscopic system is adopted for capturing instantaneous images of the conejet configuration.The cone and the jet of aqueous solutions of polyethylene oxide (PEO) are formed from an orifice of a capillary tube under the electric field.The viscoelastic constitutive relationship of the PEO solution is measured and discussed.The phenomena owing to the jet instability are described,five flow modes and corresponding structures are obtained with variations of the fluid flow rate Q,the electric potential U and the distance h from the orifice of the capillary tube to the collector.The flow modes of the cone-jet configuration involves the steady bending mode,the rotating bending mode,the swinging rotating mode,the blurring bending mode and the branching mode.Regimes in the Q-U plane of the flow modes are also obtained.These results may provide the fundamentals to predict the operating conditions expected in practical applications.

  16. Protostellar jets the best laboratories for investigating astrophysical jets

    De Gouveia dal Pino, E M

    1995-01-01

    Highly collimated supersonic jets are observed to emerge from a wide variety of astrophysical objects, ranging from Active Nuclei of Galaxies (AGN's) to Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) within our own Galaxy. Despite their different physical scales (in size, velocity, and amount of energy transported), they have strong morphological similarities. Thanks to the proximity and relatively small timescales, which permit direct observations of evolutionary changes, YSO jets are, perhaps, the best laboratories for cosmic jet investigation. In this lecture, the formation, structure, and evolution of the YSO jets are reviewed with the help of observational information, MHD and purely hydrodynamical modeling, and numerical simulations. Possible applications of the models to AGN jets are also addressed.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Heterojunction Interfaces

    1983-11-01

    Ge grown on substrates of (111), (110), and (100) GaAs have been Investigated with x-ray photoelectron spectos - copy. Observed changes in core-level...determinations were made on each interface. In all cases, measure- ment reproducibility was ɘ.01 eV and was usual- ly ɘ.005 eV; calibration uncertainties...0.01 eV and in most cases it was < ±0.005 eV. Calibration uncertainties increase the total error limits for AEg to ±0.01 eV In the table, we also list

  18. Experimental econophysics properties and mechanisms of laboratory markets

    Huang, Ji-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Experimental Econophysics describes the method of controlled human experiments, which is developed by physicists to study some problems in economics or finance, namely, stylized facts, fluctuation phenomena, herd behavior, contrarian behavior, hedge behavior, cooperation, business cycles, partial information, risk management, and stock prediction. Experimental econophysics together with empirical econophysics are two branches of the field of econophysics. The latter one has been extensively discussed in the existing books, while the former one has been seldom touched. In this book, the author will focus on the branch of experimental econophysics. Empirical econophysics is based on the analysis of data in real markets by using some statistical tools borrowed from traditional statistical physics. Differently, inspired by the role of controlled experiments and system modelling (for computer simulations and/or analytical theory) in developing modern physics, experimental econophysics specially relies on controlle...

  19. Experimental Investigation of Using Fuel Additives - Alcohol

    S.M. Fayyad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This research presents an investigation of the effects of ethanol addition to low octane numbergasoline, on the fuel octane number and on the performance of the engine. In this study, the tested gasoline(octane number = 90 is blended with five different percentages of ethanol, namely 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15% onvolume basis. Then these fuel blends, as well as the base gasoline fuel, w ere burnt in the tested engine. It isfound that the octane number of gasoline increases continuously and linearly with increasing the ethanolpercentage in gasoline. Hence, ethanol is an effective compound for increasing the value of the octane numberof gasoline. Also, it is also noticed that the best performance of the engine was obtained when 15% of ethanolwas used in the gasoline blend.

  20. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite.

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box-Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Turbine Vane Heat Transfer for Alternative Fuels

    Nix, Andrew Carl [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The focus of this program was to experimentally investigate advanced gas turbine cooling schemes and the effects of and factors that contribute to surface deposition from particulate matter found in coal syngas exhaust flows on turbine airfoil heat transfer and film cooling, as well as to characterize surface roughness and determine the effects of surface deposition on turbine components. The program was a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary collaborative effort between aero-thermal and materials faculty researchers and the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The primary technical objectives of the program were to evaluate the effects of combustion of syngas fuels on heat transfer to turbine vanes and blades in land-based power generation gas turbine engines. The primary questions to be answered by this investigation were; What are the factors that contribute to particulate deposition on film cooled gas turbine components? An experimental program was performed in a high-temperature and pressure combustion rig at the DOE NETL; What is the effect of coal syngas combustion and surface deposition on turbine airfoil film cooling? Deposition of particulate matter from the combustion gases can block film cooling holes, decreasing the flow of the film coolant and the film cooling effectiveness; How does surface deposition from coal syngas combustion affect turbine surface roughness? Increased surface roughness can increase aerodynamic losses and result in decreased turbine hot section efficiency, increasing engine fuel consumption to maintain desired power output. Convective heat transfer is also greatly affected by the surface roughness of the airfoil surface; Is there any significant effect of surface deposition or erosion on integrity of turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings (TBC) and do surface deposits react with the TBC in any way to decrease its thermal insulating capability? Spallation and erosion of TBC is a persistent problem in

  2. PLACE: an open-source python package for laboratory automation, control, and experimentation.

    Johnson, Jami L; Tom Wörden, Henrik; van Wijk, Kasper

    2015-02-01

    In modern laboratories, software can drive the full experimental process from data acquisition to storage, processing, and analysis. The automation of laboratory data acquisition is an important consideration for every laboratory. When implementing a laboratory automation scheme, important parameters include its reliability, time to implement, adaptability, and compatibility with software used at other stages of experimentation. In this article, we present an open-source, flexible, and extensible Python package for Laboratory Automation, Control, and Experimentation (PLACE). The package uses modular organization and clear design principles; therefore, it can be easily customized or expanded to meet the needs of diverse laboratories. We discuss the organization of PLACE, data-handling considerations, and then present an example using PLACE for laser-ultrasound experiments. Finally, we demonstrate the seamless transition to post-processing and analysis with Python through the development of an analysis module for data produced by PLACE automation.

  3. Experimental investigation on the structure of microcapsules

    Dobashi, Toshiaki; Yeh, F.J.; Ying, Q.; Chu, B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ichikawa, Kimio [Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., Fujinomiya (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    Newly prepared microcapsules with diameters of the order of 0.1 {mu}m have been investigated by means of static and dynamic laser light scattering, synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS ), viscosimetry, and electron microscopy. The microcapsule has a core of phosphoric acid, bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)-2,3-dichloropropyl ester, and a wall composed of polyurethane-urea. The dispersing medium (H{sub 2}O) contains copoly(vinyl alcohol-vinyl acetate) which acts as a protective colloid. Static light scattering and SAXS give the same z-average radius of gyration R{sub g} = 110 nm in the concentration range of 1 x 10{sup -5} - 5 x 10{sup -4} g/cm{sup 3} for light scattering and of 1 x 10{sup -3} - 0.14 g/cm{sup 3} for SAXS. The hydrodynamic radius R{sub h} = 143 nm as determined by dynamic light scattering is close to the viscosity radius R{sub {eta}} = 151 nm obtained from intrinsic viscosity measurements of the microcapsule suspension. By assuming the microcapsule as a solid sphere, the radius of gyration estimated from R{sub h} was R{sub g,cal} = 0.78R{sub h} = 112 nm. The agreement of R{sub g} and R{sub g,cal} as well as R{sub h} and R{sub {eta}} strongly suggests that in wet form, the protective colloid has stuck tightly onto the surface of the microcapsule. The number-average radius R{sub n} obtained from electron microscopy was 65 nm. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Experimental methods: Extra-laboratory experiments extending the reach of experimental economics

    Charness, G.; Gneezy, U.; Kuhn, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new organizing scheme for classifying types of experiments. In addition to the standard categories of laboratory and field experiments, we suggest a new category: "extra-laboratory experiments." These are experiments that have the same spirit as laboratory experiments, but are conducted

  5. Laboratory Investigation on Lightning Flashes to High Voltage Transmission Lines%Laboratory Investigation on Lightning Flashes to High Voltage Transmission Lines

    Thongchai Disyadej; Stanislaw Grzybowski

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the attractive width of high voltage transmission lines to lightning strikes. In order to design the optimal lightning protection, the estimated number of lightning flashes on the line, which is based on its attractive width, needs to be determined. The investigation was performed using experiments with model tests at the Mississippi State University High Voltage Laboratory. For laboratory experiments, a total of 2,100 negative and positive switching impulse voltages were applied to transmission line models from a conducting rod, which represented a lightning downward leader. Different tested models of transmission lines on a scale of 1:100 were used. The effects of overhead ground wires, phase conductors, tower structures, and the magnitude and polarity of lightning strokes were also studied. The attractive width increased gradually with the height of overhead ground wires and towers as well as the magnitude of the lightning stroke current. Impulse polarity had an impact on the at- tractive width, and the attractive width for negative polarity was larger than that {or positive polarity. The taller tower had more effect on flash distribution to transmission lines than the shorter one. The experimental results agree with the actual transmission line observations published in literature. The new expressions for the attractive width of transmission lines, based on the experimental results, were established. The accurate estimation of the attractive width can help electric power utilities plan transmission systems reliably and economically. The detailed description of the back- ground problem, proposed method, experimental results, and analysis are presented in this paper.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    Cagle, C.D. (comp.)

    1982-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included.

  7. Relevance of laboratory investigations in monitoring patients with psoriasis on etanercept or adalimumab

    Lumig, P.P.M. van; Driessen, R.J.B.; Roelofs-Thijssen, M.A.; Boezeman, J.B.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines concerning biological treatment of patients with psoriasis recommend different pretreatment and monitoring laboratory panels in variable frequencies to monitor treatment. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relevance of laboratory investigations in monitoring patients with psoriasi

  8. An open microcomputer-based laboratory system for perceptional experimentality

    Hamalainen, Ari

    A computer, equipped with hardware for acquiring data about the properties of a physical system and programs for processing that data, is a powerful tool for physics research and instruction. There is strong evidence that utilizing microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs) in instruction can lead to significantly improved learning. The perceptional approach is a method for physics instruction, developed at the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki. Its main arguments are that the meanings of the concepts must be learnt before their formal definitions and adoption, and that learning and research are fundamentally similar concept formation processes. Applying the perceptional approach requires the ability to perform quantitative experiments, either as students' laboratory exercises or as lecture demonstrations, and to process their results. MBL tools are essential for this. In student's laboratory exercises, they reduce the routine work and leave more time for the actual learning. In lecture demonstrations, they make it possible to perform the experiments in the tight time limits. At a previous stage of the research, a set of requirements was found that the perceptional approach places on MBL systems. The primary goal of this thesis is to build a prototype of a MBL system that would fulfil these requirements. A secondary goal is to describe technical aspects of a computerized measurement system from the standpoint of educational use. The prototype was built using mostly commercial sensors and data acquisition units. The software was written with a visual programming language, designed for instrumentation applications. The prototype system was developed and tested with a set of demonstrations of various topics in the Finnish high school physics curriculum, which were implemented according to the perceptional approach. Limited usability tests were also performed. The prototype was improved, until it could perform the test demonstrations. It was found to meet the

  9. Experimental investigation of jet pulse control on flexible vibrating structures

    Karaiskos, Grigorios; Papanicolaou, Panos; Zacharopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of applying on-line fluid jet pulses to actively control the vibrations of flexible structures subjected to harmonic and earthquake-like base excitations provided by a shake table is explored. The operating principles and capabilities of the control system applied have been investigated in a simplified small-scale laboratory model that is a mass attached at the top free end of a vertical flexible slender beam with rectangular cross-section, the other end of which is mounted on an electrodynamic shaker. A pair of opposite jets placed on the mass at the top of the cantilever beam applied the appropriate forces by ejecting pressurized air pulses controlled by on/off solenoid electro-valves via in house developed control software, in order to control the vibration caused by harmonic, periodic and random excitations at pre-selected frequency content provided by the shaker. The dynamics of the structure was monitored by accelerometers and the jet impulses by pressure sensors. The experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness and reliability of Jet Pulse Control Systems (JPCS). It was verified that the measured root mean square (RMS) vibration levels of the controlled structure from harmonic and earthquake base excitations, could be reduced by approximately 50% and 33% respectively.

  10. Choice of experimental venue matters in ecotoxicology studies: Comparison of a laboratory-based and an outdoor mesocosm experiment.

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Imrei, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The heavy application of pesticides and its potential effects on natural communities has attracted increasing attention to inadvertent impacts of these chemicals. Toxicologists conventionally use laboratory-based tests to assess lethal concentrations of pesticides. However, these tests often do not take into account indirect, interactive and long-term effects, and tend to ignore different rates of disintegration in the laboratory and under natural conditions. Our aim was to investigate the importance of the experimental venue for ecotoxicology tests. We reared tadpoles of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in the laboratory and in outdoor mesocosms and exposed them to three initial concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5 mg a.e./L glyphosate), and to the presence or absence of caged predators (dragonfly larvae). The type of experimental venue had a large effect on the outcome: The herbicide was less lethal to tadpoles reared in outdoor mesocosms than in the laboratory. Further, while the herbicide had a negative effect on development time and on body mass in the laboratory, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide in mesocosms were larger at metamorphosis and developed faster in comparison to those reared in the absence of the herbicide. The effect of the herbicide on morphological traits of tadpoles also differed between the two venues. Finally, in the presence of the herbicide, tadpoles tended to be more active and to stay closer to the bottom of laboratory containers, while tadpole behaviour shifted in the opposite direction in outdoor mesocosms. Our results demonstrate major discrepancies between results of a classic laboratory-based ecotoxicity test and outcomes of an experiment performed in outdoor mesocosms. Consequently, the use of standard laboratory tests may have to be reconsidered and their benefits carefully weighed against the difficulties of performing experiments under more natural conditions. Tests validating experimentally estimated

  11. Beslissingsprocessen van verkeersdeelnemers : covernota bij de rapporten van W.H. Janssen: "Risk compensation and the effect of an incentive : a laboratory study" (IFZ 1988 C-26), "An experimental evaluation of safety incentive schemes" (IZF 1989 C-19), en "Seat belt wearing and driving behaviour : an empirical investigation" (IZF 1991 C-15).

    Levelt, P.B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This cover note comments on the following three TNO Institute for Perception (IZF) Reports: (1) "Risk compensation and the effect of an incentive: a laboratory study"; (2) "An experimental evaluation of safety incentive schemes"; and (3) "Seat belt wearing and driving behaviour: an empirical investi

  12. Guided Inquiry in a Biochemistry Laboratory Course Improves Experimental Design Ability

    Goodey, Nina M.; Talgar, Cigdem P.

    2016-01-01

    Many biochemistry laboratory courses expose students to laboratory techniques through pre-determined experiments in which students follow stepwise protocols provided by the instructor. This approach fails to provide students with sufficient opportunities to practice experimental design and critical thinking. Ten inquiry modules were created for a…

  13. Laboratory investigation of antenna signals from dust impacts on spacecraft

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Collette, Andrew; Malaspina, David M.; Thayer, Frederick

    2016-04-01

    Electric field and plasma wave instruments act as dust detectors picking up voltage pulses induced by impacts of particulates on the spacecraft body. These signals enable the characterization of cosmic dust environments even with missions without dedicated dust instruments. For example, the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft performed the first detection of dust particles near Uranus, Neptune, and in the outer solar system [Gurnett et al., 1987, 1991, 1997]. The two STEREO spacecraft observed distinct signals at high rate that were interpreted as nano-sized particles originating from near the Sun and accelerated to high velocities by the solar wind [MeyerVernet et al, 2009a, Zaslavsky et al., 2012]. The MAVEN spacecraft is using the antennas onboard to characterize the dust environment of Mars [Andersson et al., 2014] and Solar Probe Plus will do the same in the inner heliosphere. The challenge, however, is the correct interpretation of the impact signals and calculating the mass of the dust particles. The uncertainties result from the incomplete understanding of the signal pickup mechanisms, and the variation of the signal amplitude with impact location, the ambient plasma environment, and impact speed. A comprehensive laboratory study of impact generated antenna signals has been performed recently using the IMPACT dust accelerator facility operated at the University of Colorado. Dust particles of micron and submicron sizes with velocities of tens of km/s are generated using a 3 MV electrostatic analyzer. A scaled down model spacecraft is exposed to the dust impacts and one or more antennas, connected to sensitive electronics, are used to detect the impact signals. The measurements showed that there are three clearly distinct signal pickup mechanisms due to spacecraft charging, antenna charging and antenna pickup sensing space charge from the expanding plasma cloud. All mechanisms vary with the spacecraft and antenna bias voltages and, furthermore, the latter two

  14. An Investigation into Prospective Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Laboratory Course and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Laboratory Use

    Aka, Elvan Ince

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to identify the attitudes towards the laboratory course and self-efficacy beliefs in the laboratory use of prospective teachers who are attending Gazi University Gazi Education Faculty Primary Education Science Teaching program, and to investigate the relationship between the attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs.…

  15. The hot cell laboratories for material investigations of the Institute for Safety Research

    Viehrig, H.W.

    1998-10-01

    Special facilities for handling and testing of irradiated specimens are necessary, to perform the investigation of activated material. The Institute for Safety Research has two hot cell laboratories: - the preparation laboratory and - the materials testing laboratory. This report is intended to give an overview of the available facilities and developed techniques in the laboratories. (orig.)

  16. METHODS OF EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF STEINER THEOREM IN PHYSICAL PRACTICUM AND LABORATORY WORK

    Zharilkasin Iskakov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the technique of laboratory work on experimental verification of Steiner’s Theorem in laboratory conditions is developed. To do this, specially designed experimental device was used. The main part of such device is a simple physical pendulum, swinging freely about the axis of suspension, consisting of a cylindrical disc set on a thin rod. To determine the moment of inertia of cylindrical body about the axis of vibrations, property of a physical quantity additivity was used. When processing experimental results, functional approximation by a least squares method was applied; as a result, the empirical expression of Steiner’s Theorem was achieved. Results of experimental studies were very close to the results of theoretical calculations. Laboratory work can be easily repeated for a body of arbitrary shape. The methodology used can be recommended for physical practicum in universities as an effective and easy way of experimental verification of Steiner’s theorem.

  17. An investigative laboratory course in human physiology using computer technology and collaborative writing.

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A

    2004-12-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65 second-year students in sports medicine and biology at a small private comprehensive college. The course builds on skills and abilities first introduced in an introductory investigations course and introduces additional higher-level skills and more complex human experimental models. In four multiweek experimental modules, involving neuromuscular, reflex, and cardiovascular physiology, by use of computerized hardware/software with a variety of transducers, students carry out self-designed experiments with human subjects and perform data collection and analysis, collaborative writing, and peer editing. In assessments, including standard course evaluations and the Salgains Web-based evaluation, student responses to this approach are enthusiastic, and gains in their skills and abilities are evident in their comments and in improved performance.

  18. Experimental investigation of streamer affinity for dielectric surfaces

    Trienekens, D.J.M.; Nijdam, S.; Akkermans, G.; Plompen, I.; Christen, T.; Ebert, U.

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the affinity of streamers for dielectric surfaces using stroboscopic imaging and stereo photography. Affinity of streamers for dielectric surfaces was found to depend on a wide set of parameters, including pressure, voltage, dielectric material and di

  19. A review of published quantitative experimental studies on factors affecting laboratory fume hood performance.

    Ahn, Kwangseog; Woskie, Susan; DiBerardinis, Louis; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2008-11-01

    This study attempted to identify the important factors that affect the performance of a laboratory fume hood and the relationship between the factors and hood performance under various conditions by analyzing and generalizing the results from other studies that quantitatively investigated fume hood performance. A literature search identified 43 studies that were published from 1966 to 2006. For each of those studies, information on the type of test methods used, the factors investigated, and the findings were recorded and summarized. Among the 43 quantitative experimental studies, 21 comparable studies were selected, and then a meta-analysis of the comparable studies was conducted. The exposure concentration variable from the resulting 617 independent test conditions was dichotomized into acceptable or unacceptable using the control level of 0.1 ppm tracer gas. Regression analysis using Cox proportional hazards models provided hood failure ratios for potential exposure determinants. The variables that were found to be statistically significant were the presence of a mannequin/human subject, the distance between a source and breathing zone, and the height of sash opening. In summary, performance of laboratory fume hoods was affected mainly by the presence of a mannequin/human subject, distance between a source and breathing zone, and height of sash opening. Presence of a mannequin/human subject in front of the hood adversely affects hood performance. Worker exposures to air contaminants can be greatly reduced by increasing the distance between the contaminant source and breathing zone and by reducing the height of sash opening. Many other factors can also affect hood performance. Checking face velocity by itself is unlikely to be sufficient in evaluating hood performance properly. An evaluation of the performance of a laboratory fume hood should be performed with a human subject or a mannequin in front of the hood and should address the effects of the activities

  20. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Integrated Tri-generation Systems

    Cetinkaya, Eda

    Energy demand in the world is increasing with population growth and higher living standards. Today, the need for energy requires a focus on renewable sources without abandoning fossil fuels. Efficient use of energy is one of the most important tasks in modern energy systems to achieve. In addition to the energy need, growing environmental concerns are linked with energy is emerged. Multi-purpose energy generation allows a higher efficiency by generating more outputs with the same input in the same system. Tri-generation systems are expected to provide at least three commodities, such as heating, cooling, desalination, storable fuel production and some other useful outputs, in addition to power generation. In this study, an experimental investigation of gasification is presented and two integrated tri-generation systems are proposed. The first integrated tri-generation system (System 1) utilizes solar energy as input and the outputs are power, fresh water and hot water. It consists of four sub-systems, namely solar power tower system, desalination system, Rankine cycle and organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The second integrated tri-generation system (System 2) utilizes coal and biomass as input and the outputs are power, fuel and hot water. It consists of five sub-systems: gasification plant, Brayton cycle, Rankine cycle, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis plant and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). Experimental investigation includes coal and biomass gasification, where the experimental results of synthesis gas compositions are utilized in the analysis of the second systems. To maximize efficiency, heat losses from the system should be minimized through a recovery system to make the heat a useful commodity for other systems, such as ORCs which can utilize the low-grade heat. In this respect, ORCs are first analyzed for three different configurations in terms of energy and exergy efficiencies altering working fluids to increase the power output. Among two types of coal and one type

  1. Experimental investigation of incipient shear failure in foliated rock

    Ikari, Matt J.; Niemeijer, André R.; Marone, Chris

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that rock fabric plays a key role in dictating rock strength and rheology throughout Earth's crust; however the processes and conditions under which rock fabric impacts brittle failure and frictional strength are still under investigation. Here, we report on laboratory experim

  2. Experimental and operational modal analysis of a laboratory scale model of a tripod support structure.

    Luczak, M. M.; Mucchi, E.; Telega, J.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the research is to develop a vibration-based procedure for the identification of structural failures in a laboratory scale model of a tripod supporting structure of an offshore wind turbine. In particular, this paper presents an experimental campaign on the scale model tested in two stages. Stage one encompassed the model tripod structure tested in air. The second stage was done in water. The tripod model structure allows to investigate the propagation of a circumferential representative crack of a cylindrical upper brace. The in-water test configuration included the tower with three bladed rotor. The response of the structure to the different waves loads were measured with accelerometers. Experimental and operational modal analysis was applied to identify the dynamic properties of the investigated scale model for intact and damaged state with different excitations and wave patterns. A comprehensive test matrix allows to assess the differences in estimated modal parameters due to damage or as potentially introduced by nonlinear structural response. The presented technique proves to be effective for detecting and assessing the presence of representative cracks.

  3. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Jewett, Kathy; Sandwick, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (RpiA) has many features that make it attractive as a focal point of a semester-long, advanced biochemistry laboratory for undergraduate students. The protein can easily and inexpensively be isolated from spinach using traditional purification techniques. Characterization of RpiA enzyme activity can be…

  4. Students' Written Arguments in General Chemistry Laboratory Investigations

    Choi, Aeran; Hand, Brian; Greenbowe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the written arguments developed by college freshman students using the Science Writing Heuristic approach in inquiry-based general chemistry laboratory classrooms and its relationships with students' achievement in chemistry courses. Fourteen freshman students participated in the first year of the study while 19…

  5. An Adaptable Investigative Graduate Laboratory Course for Teaching Protein Purification

    Carroll, Christopher W.; Keller, Lani C.

    2014-01-01

    This adaptable graduate laboratory course on protein purification offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of techniques while allowing the instructor the freedom to incorporate their own personal research interests. The course design involves two sequential purification schemes performed in a single semester. The first part…

  6. Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) Subsurface Containment Berm Investigation

    2015-10-01

    The former Navy Arctic Research Laboratory Airstrip Site in Barrow, Alaska, has a history of fuel spills. Various methods have been used to re- mediate ...or [− + −]) were ab- sent directly under the insulation/plywood and on the shoulder areas im- mediately adjacent to the insulation/plywood. The lack

  7. A Collaborative, Investigative Recombinant DNA Technology Course with Laboratory

    Pezzementi, Leo; Johnson, Joy F.

    2002-01-01

    A recombinant DNA technology course was designed to promote contextual, collaborative, inquiry-based learning of science where students learn from one another and have a sense of ownership of their education. The class stressed group presentations and critical reading and discussion of scientific articles. The laboratory consisted of two research…

  8. Experimental investigations of the licensing of NPIs in English

    Spenader, Jennifer; Rado, Janina; Richter, Frank; Hoeksema, Jack; Gilbers, Dicky

    2014-01-01

    In an experimental investigation of NPIs and their licensing conditions in German, Richter & Radó (2013) showed that Weak Licensors can partially license Strong NPIs. In two experiments we investigate these results for English. In Experiment 1 we empirically identify 16 Strong and 16 Weak NPIs by ex

  9. Laboratory model of the cardiovascular system for experimental demonstration of pulse wave propagation

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Nestorović, Zorica; Djurić, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikić, Dejan

    2017-03-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Here, we present a laboratory model of the cardiovascular system. We have designed an experimental setup which can help medical and nursing students to properly learn and understand basic fluid hemodynamic principles, pulse wave and the phenomenon of wave propagation in blood vessels. Demonstration of wave propagation allowed a real time observation of the formation of compression and expansion waves by students, thus enabling them to better understand the difference between the two waves, and also to measure the pulse wave velocity for different fluid viscosities. The laboratory model of the cardiovascular system could be useful as an active learning methodology and a complementary tool for understanding basic principles of hemodynamics.

  10. Application of Lean-Six Sigma Approach in a Laboratory Experimental Case Study

    Hashim Raza Rizvi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments are a conventional activity performed at academic institutions, government and private organizations. These experimental studies provide the basis for new inventions in the field of science and engineering. Laboratory experiments are conducted on the basis of provided guidelines, already established by different standard organizations like ASTM, AASHTO etc. This article is based on a case study in which the process of an experiment is examined on the basis of Value Stream Maps (VSM and potential improvement possibilities have been identified. After determining the potential waste, appropriate Lean tools are selected to implement and observe the improvements. The process is examined after application of the Lean tools and a comparison is performed. University laboratory environment can be improved considerably by applying Lean Tools. MUDA application reduced the total work time from 90.75 hours and 10-CD to 63.75 hours and 7-CD hence saving, 27 hours and 3-CD for one experiment. This is remarkable achievement of this application. Heijunka application provided the students equal workload and they performed explicitly better than they used to. 5-S tool provided the students the opportunity to manage the laboratory in an effective and clean way. Safety of the students is a very major concern at university laboratory environment. 5-S not only upgraded the laboratory overall performance, but it significantly raised the safety standards of the laboratory. More application of the Lean Tools should be exercised explored to have more effective and efficient university laboratory experimental environment.

  11. Hydraulic transportation of fly ash: a laboratory-scale investigation

    Jain, M.K.; Sastry, B.S. [Anna University, Chennai (India). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Flow behaviour of fly ash slurry is a very complex phenomenon. The present study tries to examine the relation between flow rate and pressure loss of fly ash slurry under laboratory-scale experiment set up in the light of available theoretical background. Pressure loss increases with the increase in flow rate and solid concentration but pressure losses can be saved by the addition of 2200 PPM (parts per million) concentration of polyacrylamide polymer. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Investigating Systematic Uncertainty and Experimental Design with Projectile Launchers

    Orzel, Chad; Marr, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The proper choice of a measurement technique that minimizes systematic and random uncertainty is an essential part of experimental physics. These issues are difficult to teach in the introductory laboratory, though: because most experiments involve only a single measurement technique, students are often unable to make a clear distinction between random and systematic uncertainties, or to compare the uncertainties associated with different techniques. In this paper, we describe an experiment suitable for an introductory college level (or advanced high school) course that uses velocity measurements to clearly show students the effects of both random and systematic uncertainties.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF CAVITATION IN A SUDDEN EXPANSION PIPE

    ZHANG Jian-min; YANG Qing; WANG Yu-rong; XU Wei-lin; CHEN Jian-gang

    2011-01-01

    For sudden expansion pipes, experiments were carried out to study the cavitation inception for various enlargement ratios in high speed flows.The flow velocity of the prototype reaches 50 m/s in laboratory.The relationship between the expansion ratio and the incipient cavitation number is obtained.The scale and velocity effects are revealed.It is shown that Keller's revised formula should be modified to calculate the incipient cavitation number when the forecasted velocity of the flows in the prototype exceeds the experimental velocity.

  14. A laboratory investigation of telepathy: the study of a psychic.

    Moss, T; Eveloff, H H; Chang, A F

    A series of experiments in psychic phenomena were undertaken with a 21-year-old man who claimed to have telepathic ability. An elaborate procedure was devised to render collusion between Transmitters and Receiver ineffective, if not impossible. Results tended to support the subject's claims. Several single responses are reported which seemed particularly noteworthy with respect to correlation in time and content. A Control subject, duplicating the experimental procedure, did not have the overall success rate demonstrated by the experimental subject. The authors conclude that this experiment strongly suggests the possibility of telepathy, but does not prove it.

  15. Students' Assessment of Interactive Distance Experimentation in Nuclear Reactor Physics Laboratory Education

    Malkawi, Salaheddin; Al-Araidah, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments develop students' skills in dealing with laboratory instruments and physical processes with the objective of reinforcing the understanding of the investigated subject. In nuclear engineering, where research reactors play a vital role in the practical education of students, the high cost and long construction time of research…

  16. Environmental epidemiology applied to urban atmospheric pollution: a contribution from the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory (LPAE

    André Paulo Afonso de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic investigation on the effects of human exposure to environmental pollution using scientific methodology only began in the 20th century as a consequence of several environmental accidents followed by an unexpected mortality increase above expected mortality and as a result of observational epidemiological and toxicological studies conducted on animals in developed countries. This article reports the experience of the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory at the School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, concerning the respiratory system and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in responses to exposure to pollution using toxicological and experimental procedures, complemented by observational epidemiological studies conducted in the city of São Paulo. It also describes these epidemiological studies, pointing out that air pollution is harmful to public health, not only among susceptible groups but also in the general population, even when the concentration of pollutants is below the limits set by environmental legislation. The study provides valuable information to support the political and economic decision-making processes aimed at preserving the environment and enhancing quality of life.

  17. Space Weathering in Houston: A Role for the Experimental Impact Laboratory at JSC

    Cintala, M. J.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Hoerz, F.

    2015-01-01

    The effective investigation of space weathering demands an interdisciplinary approach that is at least as diversified as any other in planetary science. Because it is a macroscopic process affecting all bodies in the solar system, impact and its resulting shock effects must be given detailed attention in this regard. Direct observation of the effects of impact is most readily done for the Moon, but it still remains difficult for other bodies in the solar system. Analyses of meteorites and precious returned samples provide clues for space weathering on asteroids, but many deductions arising from those studies must still be considered circumstantial. Theoretical work is also indispensable, but it can only go as far as the sometimes meager data allow. Experimentation, however, can permit near real-time study of myriad processes that could contribute to space weathering. This contribution describes some of the capabilities of the Johnson Space Center's Experimental Impact Laboratory (EIL) and how they might help in understanding the space weathering process.

  18. The clinical laboratory in the investigation of hemoglobin disorders

    Lais Pinto de Almeida; Annelise Corrêa Wengerkievicz; Nilceia Maria Viviani; Dulcinéia Martins Albuquerque; Maria Elizabete Mendes; Nairo Massakazu Sumita

    2011-01-01

    As alterações na síntese da hemoglobina resultam em um grupo de distúrbios hereditários, os quais podem ser classificados como hemoglobina variante, se a alteração tiver origem em uma mutação no gene da hemoglobina, produzindo cadeias anormais, ou como talassemias, se a estrutura é normal, porém a síntese ocorre em quantidade alterada. Este trabalho tem como objetivo descrever a condução do diagnóstico laboratorial de quatro casos de distúrbios da hemoglobina, a fim de ilustrar o papel do lab...

  19. Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    such that on the average a uniform pressure profile was established and gravity flow applied. Solute breakthrough curves measured at discrete points in the tank using time domain reflectometry, as well as dye tracer paths, showed that flow and transport took place in a very tortuous pattern where several grid cells were...... controlled method. The heterogeneous sand systems were established in a laboratory tank for three realizations of random distributions of the homogeneous sands comprising a system of 207 grid cells. The water flux was controlled at the upper boundary, while a suction was applied at the lower boundary...

  20. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  1. Experimental investigations of overvoltages in neutral isolated networks

    Vukelja, P.I.; Naumov, R.M.; Vucinic, M.M.; Budisin, P.B. (Electrotechnicki Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1993-09-01

    For more than a decade, the Nikola Tesla Institute has worked intensively on experimental investigations of transient voltages and currents in neutral isolated networks, usually at 6 kV. The paper presents the results of investigations of overvoltages at the instant of appearance of an earth fault and during its interruption, the earth-fault currents and overvoltages during ferroresonance. Investigations were performed on cable station service networks in hydro- and thermal-power plants, industrial and similar installations in Yugoslavia. On the basis of these investigations, some measures are suggested for improving the reliability of operation of neutral isolated networks. (author)

  2. An Experimental Investigation of Secure Communication With Chaos Masking

    Dhar, Sourav

    2007-01-01

    The most exciting recent development in nonlinear dynamics is realization that chaos can be useful. One application involves "Secure Communication". Two piecewise linear systems with switching nonlinearities have been taken as chaos generators. In the present work the phenomenon of secure communication with chaos masking has been investigated experimentally. In this investigation chaos which is generated from two chaos generators is masked with the massage signal to be transmitted, thus makes communication is more secure.

  3. An investigation into stent expansion using numerical and experimental techniques

    Toner, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Extensive finite element analyses have been carried out by researchers to investigate the difference in the mechanical loading induced in vessels stented with various different stent designs and the influence of this loading on restenosis outcome. This study investigates the experimental validation of these numerical stent expansions using compliant mock arteries. The development of this in-vitro validation test has the prospect of providing a fully validated preclinical testing tool which ca...

  4. Experimental investigation of axially aligned flow past spinning cylinders

    Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2016-11-01

    Experimental and numerical results of ongoing subsonic investigations of the flow field about axially aligned spinning cylinders with variable inter-cylinder spacing are presented. The experimental design is capable of investigating wake dynamics of the modeled system up to a Reynolds Number of 300,000 and rotation numbers up to 2. The experimental results are used to validate and confirm numerical simulations with and without the effects of swirl. The focus of the overall effort is an understanding of the dynamics of multi-body problems in a flow field, as such we relate the ongoing effort to previous studies by both the authors and the community at large and our ongoing work in developing accurate plant models for use in engineering analysis and design. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  5. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental and clinical investigations

    Hsing I Chen

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be associated with various disorders.Recent investigation has involved clinical studies in collaboration with clinical investigators and pathologists on the pathogenetic mechanisms of ALl or ARDS caused by various disorders.This literature review includes a brief historical retrospective of ALI/ARDS, the neurogenic pulmonary edema due to head injury, the long-term experimental studies and clinical investigations from our laboratory, the detrimental role of NO, the risk factors, and the possible pathogenetic mechanisms as well as therapeutic regimen for ALI/ARDS.

  6. Experimental investigation of system effects in stressed-skin elements

    Dela Stang, B.; Isaksson, T.; Hansson, M.

    What kind of behaviour can be expected from stressed-skin elements at failure? To answer this question was a primary objective of the experimental investigation presented in this report. Systems of 3 roof units, each made of 5 parallel beams, have been tested for load-carrying capacity...

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Dispersion of Liquids by Ejection Atomizers

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, S. S.; Evsevleev, M. Ya.; Zharova, I. K.; Zhukov, A. S.; Zmanovskii, S. V.; Kozlov, E. A.; Konovalenko, A. I.; Trofimov, V. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the dispersivity of liquid droplets in the spray cone of ejection atomizers. The calculational droplet size distribution function was measured by the method of low angles of the probe laser radiation scattering indicatrix on a pneumohydraulic bench under cold blow conditions. The efficiency of the proposed circuit designs of atomizers has been analyzed.

  8. Further laboratory and theoretical investigations of ammonium dinitramide

    Tulis, A.J.; Snelson, A. [IIT Research Institut, Chicago (United States); Heberlein, C.; Patel, D.L. [U.S. Army Cecom RD et E Center, NVESD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen and deuterated ammonium dinitramide have been vaporized under high vacuum and the IR matrix isolation spectra of the decomposition products obtained. Tentative vibration assignments have been made for HN(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} and DN(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} assuming a symmetrical non-planar structure in which the H or D is bonded to the central nitrogen atom. Other structures are also possible. Ab initio calculations have been made for the various structural isomers of hydrogen dinitramide. Vibration frequencies calculated for the hydrogenated and deuterated species are compared with the experimental values with the object of identifying the molecules` structure. (authors) 3 refs.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation on two-phase flow instabilities

    Ruspini, Leonardo Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Two-phase flow instabilities are experimentally and numerically studied within this thesis. In particular, the phenomena called Ledinegg instability, density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations are investigated. The most important investigations regarding the occurrence of two-phase flow instabilities are reviewed. An extensive description of the main contributions in the experimental and analytical research is presented. In addition, a critical discussion and recommendations for future investigations are presented. A numerical framework using a hp-adaptive method is developed in order to solve the conservation equations modelling general thermo-hydraulic systems. A natural convection problem is analysed numerically in order to test the numerical solver. Moreover, the description of an adaptive strategy to solve thermo-hydraulic problems is presented. In the second part of this dissertation, a homogeneous model is used to study Ledinegg, density wave and pressure drop oscillations phenomena numerically. The dynamic characteristics of the Ledinegg (flow excursion) phenomenon are analysed through the simulation of several transient examples. In addition, density wave instabilities in boiling and condensing systems are investigated. The effects of several parameters, such as the fluid inertia and compressibility volumes, on the stability limits of Ledinegg and density wave instabilities are studied, showing a strong influence of these parameters. Moreover, the phenomenon called pressure drop oscillations is numerically investigated. A discussion of the physical representation of several models is presented with reference to the obtained numerical results. Finally, the influence of different parameters on these phenomena is analysed. In the last part, an experimental investigation of these phenomena is presented. The designing methodology used for the construction of the experimental facility is described. Several simulations and a non

  10. "They Sweat for Science": The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Self-Experimentation in American Exercise Physiology.

    Johnson, Andi

    2015-08-01

    In many scientific fields, the practice of self-experimentation waned over the course of the twentieth century. For exercise physiologists working today, however, the practice of self-experimentation is alive and well. This paper considers the role of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and its scientific director, D. Bruce Dill, in legitimizing the practice of self-experimentation in exercise physiology. Descriptions of self-experimentation are drawn from papers published by members of the Harvard Fatigue Lab. Attention is paid to the ethical and practical justifications for self-experimentation in both the lab and the field. Born out of the practical, immediate demands of fatigue protocols, self-experimentation performed the long-term, epistemological function of uniting physiological data across time and space, enabling researchers to contribute to a general human biology program.

  11. Open-Ended versus Guided Laboratory Activities: Impact on Students' Beliefs about Experimental Physics

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the…

  12. Experimental Study of Drag Resistance using a Laboratory Scale Rotary Set-Up

    Weinell, Claus Erik; Olsen, Kenneth N.; Christoffersen, Martin W.;

    2003-01-01

    This work covers an experimental study of the drag resistance of different painted surfaces and simulated large-scale irregularities, viz. dry spraying, weld seams, barnacle fouling and paint remains. A laboratory scale rotary set-up was used to determine the drag resistance, and the surface...

  13. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  14. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    Sani, A. S. A.; Sousa, F. J. P.; Hamedon, Z.; Azhari, A.

    2016-02-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed.

  15. Laboratory investigations of the survivability of bacteria in hypervelocity impacts.

    Burchell, M J; Shrine, N R; Mann, J; Bunch, A W; Brandao, P; Zarnecki, J C; Galloway, J A

    2001-01-01

    It is now well established that material naturally moves around the Solar System, even from planetary surface to planetary surface. Accordingly, the idea that life is distributed throughout space and did not necessarily originate on the Earth but migrated here from elsewhere (Panspermia) is increasingly deemed worthy of consideration. If life arrived at the Earth from space, its relative speed will typically be of order many km s-1, and the resulting collision with the Earth and its atmosphere will be in the hypervelocity regime. A mechanism for the bacteria to survive such an impact is required. Therefore a programme of hypervelocity impacts in the laboratory at (4.5 +/- 0.6) km s-1 was carried out using bacteria (Rhodococcus) laden projectiles. After impacts on a variety of target materials (rock, glass and metal) attempts were made to culture Rhodococcus from the surface of the resulting craters and also from the target material ejected during crater formation. Control shots with clean projectiles yielded no evidence for Rhodococcus growth from any crater surface or ejecta. When projectiles doped with Rhodococcus were used no impact crater surface yielded colonies of Rhodococcus. However, for four shots of bacteria into rock (two on chalk and two on granite) the ejecta was afterwards found to give colonies of Rhodococcus. This was not true for shots onto glass. In addition, shots into aerogel (density 96 kg m-3) were also carried out (two with clean projectiles and two with projectiles with Rhodococcus). This crudely simulated aero-capture in a planetary atmosphere. No evidence for Rhodococcus growth was found from the projectiles captured in the aerogel from any of the four shots.

  16. Experimental investigation on thermoelectric air conditioner driven by solar cells

    Xu Lizhen; Li Yan; Qin Feng; Chen Changhe [Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Education of China, Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua Univ., BJ (China)

    2008-07-01

    The thermoelectric devices can convert solar energy into a temperature difference to act as coolers or heater with the help of PV arrays, especially in the remote area without power network. The experiment device is composed of thermoelectric refrigeration modules, fan, air channel, cooling cabinet and temperature measurement system. The thermoelectric air conditioner (TEAC) system is tested with different working electric voltage of thermopile; its operational parameters are obtained for different operational conditions. The Coefficient of Performance (COP) is analyzed in experimental ways. The factors that affect the efficiency of TEAC are discussed on the basis of experimental investigation by air-cooled thermoelectric module and water-cooled thermoelectric module. (orig.)

  17. Experimental Investigation on Breakup of Ice Floe on Waves

    WANG Yongxue; LI Chunhua; LI Guangwei; SHEN Zhaowei

    2000-01-01

    Experimental investigation of ice floe breakup on waves by use of non-refrigerated breakable materials has been carried out. The incident wave heights for breakup of ice floe with different lengths, and the influence of rigidity on reflection and transmission coefficients are discussed. The experimental results show that the ratio of the ice floe length, Li, to the wavelength, L, is one of the significant factor affecting the minimum wave height to cause fracture of ice floe, and another key factor is the ratio of the ice floethickness, hi and Li.

  18. Experimental investigation of laser-assisted thermoplastic tape consolidation

    Beyeler, E.; Phillips, W.; Guseri, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a novel approach for manufacturing of thermoplastic matrix composites, is described. The technique is based on using laser energy as the focused heat source to melt the matrix material for subsequent consolidation, and appears to be particularly suited for thermoplastic filament winding opertions. An experimental set up is defined to produce multi ply rings, and the feasibility of this technique is demonstrated by discussing several samples that were produced using Ryton AC40-60 prepreg tapes. The quality of consolidation is examined through cross-sectional micrographs. 12 references.

  19. Experimental Investigation Of Polymeric Compound Cross Section Springs

    Mayas Al-Mahasne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation of the characteristic of the compound cross section springs on models made from polymeric materials (organic glass. Two constructive variants of the compound spring sections were specified with the help of criteria of similarity. The criterion of similarity of natural and model springs was determined by the simulation method at particular spring deflection. The problem of simulation was brought to accurate determination of the magnitudes that characterize the physical and mechanical properties of materials for natural and model springs. It was experimentally proved that the use of the proposed new type of springs significantly increases the spring stiffness.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  1. Laboratory Investigation of Entrainment and Mixing in Oceanic Overflows

    Philippe, Odier; Ecke, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of a wall-bounded gravity current, motivated by characterizing natural gravity currents such as oceanic overflows. We use particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence to simultaneously measure the velocity and density fields as they evolve downstream of the initial injection from a turbulent channel flow onto a plane inclined at 10$^\\circ$ with respect to horizontal. The turbulence level of the input flow is controlled by injecting velocity fluctuations upstream of the output nozzle. The initial Reynolds number based on Taylor microscale of the flow, R$_\\lambda$, is varied between 40 and 120, and the effects of the initial turbulence level are assessed. The bulk Richardson number $Ri$ for the flow is about 0.3 whereas the gradient Richardson number $Ri_g$ varies between 0.04 and 0.25, indicating that shear dominates the stabilizing effect of stratification. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability results in vigorous vertical transport of mass and momentum. We pres...

  2. Air/water oxydesulfurization of coal: laboratory investigation

    Warzinski, R. P.; Friedman, S.; Ruether, J. A.; LaCount, R. B.

    1980-08-01

    Air/water oxidative desulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major US coal basins. This experimentation has shown that the reaction proceeds effectively for pulverized coals at temperatures of 150 to 200/sup 0/C with air at a total system pressure of 500 to 1500 psig. Above 200/sup 0/C, the loss of coal and product heating value increases due to oxidative consumption of carbon and hydrogen. The pyritic sulfur solubilization reactions are typically complete (95 percent removal) within 15 to 40 minutes at temperature; however, significant apparent organic sulfur removal requires residence times of up to 60 minutes at the higher temperatures. The principal products of the reaction are sulfuric acid, which can be neutralized with limestone, and iron oxide. Under certain conditions, especially for high pyritic sulfur coals, the precipitation of sulfur-containing compounds from the products of the pyrite reaction may cause anomalous variations in the sulfur form data. The influence of various parameters on the efficiency of sulfur removal from coal by air/water oxydesulfurization has been studied.

  3. Experimental Investigations of Generalized Predictive Control for Tiltrotor Stability Augmentation

    Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Piatak, David J.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Bennett, Richard L.; Brown, Ross K.

    2001-01-01

    A team of researchers from the Army Research Laboratory, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Bell Helicopter-Textron, Inc. have completed hover-cell and wind-tunnel testing of a 1/5-size aeroelastically-scaled tiltrotor model using a new active control system for stability augmentation. The active system is based on a generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm originally developed at NASA LaRC in 1997 for un-known disturbance rejection. Results of these investigations show that GPC combined with an active swashplate can significantly augment the damping and stability of tiltrotors in both hover and high-speed flight.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of a draft tube cone at lower runner speeds

    Bosioc, Alin I.; Tanasa, Constantin

    2016-06-01

    The variable demand on the energy market enforces that hydraulic turbine to operate at different regimes, far from the best efficiency point. An experimental test rig was developed in our laboratory in order to reproduce these regimes. As a result, the investigated flow regimes allow us to quantify the flow behavior from part load operation to full load operation. The paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of mean velocity profiles and of stagnant region developed in the centre of draft tube cone. First the numerical results are validated against experimental results. At the end a qualitative analysis of the streamline pattern is complemented, giving us an evaluation of the stagnant region from the draft tube cone at different runner speeds.

  5. Experimental Investigations on the Efficiency Coefficient of Pile Groups

    Sara Darsi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Several factors influence on behavior of piles group such as type of soil, number of piles in the group and the distance between piles. In this paper, using a small laboratory model, the influence of these factors on the behavior of piles group has been examined.For this purpose a group of piles in different distances and variable number of piles was allocated in sand under anpressure axial load. The piles are preferably metal; thus to reduce weight a hollow type has been selected.In order to calculate the coefficient of piles group efficiency, a single pile has been experimented. Experimental observations show that the number of piles in the group and the distances between piles in sand have considerable effect on bearing capacity and the coefficient of pile group efficiency and the coefficient of efficiency in this type of soil have constantly been more than 1 and limited to 1 by increasing the distance between piles.

  6. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program included....... The numerical model was, furthermore, used to identify electrochemical parameters, which are independent of concrete cover thickness and crack width and at the same time allow for determination of the corrosion current density and corrosion potential of concrete structures within an acceptable error.Very good...... comparisons between the experimentally measured and numerically simulated corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials were found for the various RC specimens. Anodic and cathodic Tafel constant between 0.01 and 0.369 V/dec and 0.01 and 0.233 V/dec, respectively, were found in the present study...

  7. Experimental techniques for the investigation of coupled phenomena in geomaterials

    Romero, E.

    2010-06-01

    The paper describes different experimental setups and techniques used to investigate coupled stress, fluid (water and air) and temperature effects on geomaterials. Two temperature controlled cells are described: a) a constant volume cell in which thermal pulses can be performed under controlled hydraulic conditions to induce pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation; and b) an axisymmetric triaxial cell with controlled suction and temperature to perform drained heating and cooling paths under partially saturated states. The paper also presents an experimental setup to perform controlled flow-rate gas injection experiments on argillaceous rocks using a high-pressure triaxial cell. This cell is used to study gas migration phenomena and the conditions under which gas breakthrough processes occur. Selected test results are presented, which show the capabilities of the different experimental setups described to capture main behavioural features.

  8. Experimental techniques for the investigation of coupled phenomena in geomaterials

    Romero E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes different experimental setups and techniques used to investigate coupled stress, fluid (water and air and temperature effects on geomaterials. Two temperature controlled cells are described: a a constant volume cell in which thermal pulses can be performed under controlled hydraulic conditions to induce pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation; and b an axisymmetric triaxial cell with controlled suction and temperature to perform drained heating and cooling paths under partially saturated states. The paper also presents an experimental setup to perform controlled flow-rate gas injection experiments on argillaceous rocks using a high-pressure triaxial cell. This cell is used to study gas migration phenomena and the conditions under which gas breakthrough processes occur. Selected test results are presented, which show the capabilities of the different experimental setups described to capture main behavioural features.

  9. A Global Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network and the Experiment Service Provider Business Model and Plans

    Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827, and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global education and training market in industry and academia. The business model is based on an approach where individual experiment owners offer remote access to their high-quality laboratory facilities to users around the world. The usage can be for research, education, on-the-job training etc. The access to these facilities is offered via an independent operating company - the Experiment Service Provider. The Experiment Service Provider offers eCommerce services like booking, access control, invoicing, dispute resolution, quality control, customer evaluation services and a unified Lab Portal.

  10. Laboratory investigations of in-situ gasification; Laboruntersuchungen zur Untertagevergasung

    Dornbusch, H.

    1994-12-31

    In the framework of the ``Thermie`` research programme of the EC, an in-situ gasification experiment is going on in Andorra/Terual (Spain) 100 km south of Zaragoza. At the same time, the gasification characteristics of the hard lignite from Andorra are analyzed at the Metallurgical Institute of the RWTH Aachen. It was found that the ash contents of various seams were extremely high. The consequences for gasification are investigated in this report. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des Forschungsprogrammes `Thermie` der Europaeischen Gemeinschaft findet in Andorra/Teruel (Spanien) ca. 100 km suedoestlich von Zaragoza ein Untertagevergasungsversuch statt. Projektbegleitend wird am Institut fuer Eisenhuettenkunde der RWTH Aachen die aus Andorra stammende Hartbraunkohle in den Versuchsanlagen des Instituts in der Abteilung Untertagevergasung hinsichtlich ihrer Vergasbarkeit untersucht. Bei der Analyse der Kohle faellt auf, dass einzelne Floeze extrem hohe Gehalte an Asche beinhalten. Die Auswirkung dieser Tatsache auf das Vergasungsverhalten soll in dieser Arbeit untersucht werden. (orig.)

  11. COMPARATIVE FIELD EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF DIFFERENT FLAT PLATE SOLAR COLLECTORS

    Guangming Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Full-scale traditional metal solar collectors and solar collector specimens fabricated from polymeric materials were investigated in the present study. A polymeric collector is 67.8% lighter than a traditional metal solar collector, and a metal solar collector with transparent plastic covering is 40.3% lighter than a traditional metal solar collector. Honeycomb multichannel plates made from polycarbonate were chosen to create a polymeric solar collector. A test rig for the natural circulation of the working fluid in a solar collector was built for a comparative experimental investigation of various solar collectors operating at ambient conditions. It was shown experimentally that the efficiency of a polymeric collector is 8–15% lower than the efficiency of a traditional collector.

  12. Numerical and experimental investigation of geometric parameters in projection welding

    Kristensen, Lars; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Resistance projection welding is widely used for joining of workpieces with almost any geometric combination. This makes standardization of projection welding impossible. In order to facilitate industrial applications of projection welding, systematic investigations are carried out on the geometric...... parameters by numerical modeling and experimental studies. SORPAS, an FEM program for numerical modeling of resistance welding, is developed as a tool to help in the phase of product design and process optimization in both spot and projection welding. A systematic experimental investigation of projection...... welding a disc to a ring with a triangular ring projection has been carried out to study the influence of the geometric parameters in various metal combinations. In these studies, SORPAS has been used as a supporting tool to understand the relationship of the parameters and the phenomena occurring...

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of reacting stagnation flow

    Bergthorson, Jeff; Dimotakis, Paul

    2003-11-01

    Planar laminar premixed flames are stabilized in the stagnation flowfield of an impinging jet. These flames are studied experimentally through measurements of the axial velocity and CH radical profiles, the equivalence ratio, plate temperature, and the static (Bernoulli) pressure drop across the nozzle. The velocity measurements are performed using Particle Streak Velocimetry (PSV), a technique valuable in flame measurements due to the low particle-mass loading, high accuracy and short run times possible. The CH radical profile is measured using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), which provides a very accurate marker for the reaction zone location. The experimental results are compared to predictions by a one-dimensional simulation which incorporates full chemistry. Difficulties in performing detailed comparisons between one-dimensional simulations and finite-nozzle-diameter experiments are discussed in the context of validating chemical kinetics models. To further investigate the validity of these chemical kinetics models, global flame properties such as extinction strain-rates are also investigated.

  14. Experimental investigation of efficiency of a novel conical solar collector

    MORAVEJ, M

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods to improvement of solar-to-thermal energy conversion is the design of geometry in solar collectors. In this paper, the new solar collector which is called solar conical collector has been designed and tested. The efficiency of solar conical collector was experimentally investigated by use of ASHRAE standard. Experiments were performed with water as a working fluid in the outdoor condition of Ahvaz city in the south of Iran. The results show that the average efficiency of a ...

  15. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS ON LONGITUDINAL DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF TIDAL RIVERS

    Fan Jing-yu; Wang Dao-zeng; Zhong Bao-chang

    2003-01-01

    The longitudinal dispersion characteristics of tidal rivers are experimentally investigated in a water channel. The longitudinal dispersion features and influential factors on pollutant in various stages of a tidal period in natural rivers are studied, the value ranges and variation trends of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient are obtained by means of concentration measurement. The results can provide important parameters for establishing the water quality mathematical models in tidal rivers.

  16. Experimental investigation of the serum albumin fascia microstructure

    Buzoverya, M. E.; Shcherbak, Yu. P.; Shishpor, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of biological liquids are reported. Structural effects observed in fascias are considered with account of the molecular features of albumin and the concept of supramolecular organization of polymers. It is revealed that the morphology of human serum albumin fascias depends on the concentration and quality of the solvent. It is shown that the water-salt fascias of albumin are more structured than water solutions with the same concentration.

  17. Contract design and insurance fraud: An experimental investigation

    Lammers, Frauke; Schiller, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of insurance contract design on the behavior of filing fraudulent claims in an experimental setup. We test how fraud behavior varies for insurance contracts with full coverage, a straight deductible or variable premiums (bonus-malus contract). In our experiment, filing fraudulent claims is a dominant strategy for selfish participants, with no psychological costs of committing fraud. While some people always commit fraud, a substantial share of people only oc...

  18. Experimental Investigation on Selective Laser Melting of Glass

    Fateri, Miranda; Gebhardt, Andreas; Thuemmler, Stefan; Thurn, Laura

    Although laser-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes have been investigated extensively for use with different materials, fabrication of 3D glass objects using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology is not well developed even though it has many applications. As such an experimental investigation on the process parameters of glass powder using SLM process was conducted and the results are summarized in this paper. Multiple 3D objects were fabricated and analyzed. Lastly Scanning Electron Microcopy (SEM) of the manufactured objects as well as effect of process parameters on dimensional accuracy, surface quality, and the density of the fabricated parts are presented in this paper.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Tension Stiffening in RC Ties

    Aleksandr Sokolov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of high-performance materials in civil engineering led to the development of reinforced concrete (RC structures with reduced cross sections and increased spans. In such structures serviceability limit state often becomes the governing condition of the design. Present study investigates the deformation behaviour of high-strength RC ties reinforced with high-grade bars. Experimental investigation was carried out measuring the postcracking stiffness of the specimens at high strain levels. It was found that, despite the reduction in stiffness, a considerable part of the average tensile stresses were carried by the concrete at the advanced loading stages, thus effectively stiffening the RC member.

  20. Experimental investigation on SPS casing treatment with bias flow

    Dong Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally, casing treatment (CT is a passivity method to enhance the stall margin of fan/compressor. A novel casing treatment based on the small disturbance theory and vortex and wave interaction suggestion is a method combining passive control and active control, which has been proved effective at enhancing the stall margin of fan/compressor in experiment. In order to investigate the mechanism of this kind of casing treatment, an experimental investigation of a stall precursor-suppressed (SPS casing treatment with air suction or blowing air is conducted in the present paper. The SPS casing treatment is designed to suppressing stall precursors to realize stall margin enhancement in turbomachinery. The experimental results show that the casing treatment with blowing air of small quantity can improve the stall margin by about 8% with about 1% efficiency loss. By contrast, the SPS casing treatment with micro-bias flow does not improve the stall margin much more than that without bias flow, even worse. Meanwhile, the present investigation has also attempted to reveal the mechanism of stall margin improvement with the casing treatment. It is found that the stall margin improvements vary with the modification of the unsteady shedding flow and the unsteady wall boundary impedance. The experimental results agree fairly well with the theoretical prediction using a flow stability model of rotating stall.

  1. Experimental investigation on SPS casing treatment with bias flow

    Dong Xu; Sun Dakuna; Liu Xiaohua ba; Sun Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Generally, casing treatment (CT) is a passivity method to enhance the stall margin of fan/compressor. A novel casing treatment based on the small disturbance theory and vortex and wave interaction suggestion is a method combining passive control and active control, which has been proved effective at enhancing the stall margin of fan/compressor in experiment. In order to investigate the mechanism of this kind of casing treatment, an experimental investigation of a stall precursor-suppressed (SPS) casing treatment with air suction or blowing air is conducted in the present paper. The SPS casing treatment is designed to suppressing stall precursors to realize stall margin enhancement in turbomachinery. The experimental results show that the casing treatment with blowing air of small quantity can improve the stall margin by about 8%with about 1%effi-ciency loss. By contrast, the SPS casing treatment with micro-bias flow does not improve the stall margin much more than that without bias flow, even worse. Meanwhile, the present investigation has also attempted to reveal the mechanism of stall margin improvement with the casing treatment. It is found that the stall margin improvements vary with the modification of the unsteady shedding flow and the unsteady wall boundary impedance. The experimental results agree fairly well with the theoretical prediction using a flow stability model of rotating stall.

  2. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  3. Site Safety Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations

    Bainer, R.; Duarte, J.

    1993-07-01

    The safety policy of LLNL is to take every reasonable precaution in the performance of work to protect the environment and the health and safety of employees and the public, and to prevent property damage. With respect to hazardous agents, this protection is provided by limiting human exposures, releases to the environment, and contamination of property to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). It is the intent of this Plan to supply the broad outline for completing environmental investigations within ALARA guidelines. It may not be possible to determine actual working conditions in advance of the work; therefore, planning must allow the opportunity to provide a range of protection based upon actual working conditions. Requirements will be the least restrictive possible for a given set of circumstances, such that work can be completed in an efficient and timely fashion. Due to the relatively large size of the LLNL Site and the different types of activities underway, site-specific Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs) will be prepared to supplement activities not covered by this Plan. These site-specific OSPs provide the detailed information for each specific activity and act as an addendum to this Plan, which provides the general plan for LLNL Main Site operation.

  4. Laboratory investigation of drinking water sources of Kangra, Himachal Pradesh.

    Thakur, S D; Panda, A K

    2012-06-01

    A total of 70 drinking water sources including piped water supply (n = 36), ground water sources (n = 24, hand pumps and bore wells) and natural water sources (n = 10, springs/step-wells) from various parts of district Kangra, Himachal Pradesh were investigated for their suitability for drinking purpose by presumptive coliform test. Three samples were collected from each source during different parts of the year. Piped water sources (91.7%) were most contaminated followed by natural water sources (90%) and ground water sources (62.5%). 70.5% of the total water samples (n = 210) were positive for coliforms. All the three samples from 8.3% (n = 3), 37.5% (n = 9) and 10% (n = 1) piped water, ground water and natural sources respectively, were negative for coliform organisms. A variety of organisms including Proteus, Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pasteurella, Enterobacter and Serratia liquefaciens were isolated from water samples positive for coliforms in presumptive coliform test. Thermo-tolerant coliform organisms; Escherichia coli, Citrobacter, Klebsiella and Enterobacter were 71.2% (n = 52) of the total bacterial isolations. These findings suggest absence of adequate treatment and disinfection of the water sources supplying drinking water in district Kangra.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of ram extrusion of bread dough

    Mohammed, M. A. P.; Wanigasooriya, L.; Charalambides, M. N.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental and numerical study on ram extrusion of bread dough was conducted. A laboratory ram extrusion rig was designed and manufactured, where dies with different angles and exit radii were employed. Rate dependent behaviour was observed from tests conducted at different extrusion speeds, and higher extrusion pressure was reported for dies with decreasing exit radius. A finite element simulation of extrusion was performed using the adaptive meshing technique in Abaqus. Simulations using a frictionless contact between the billet and die wall showed that the model underestimates the response at high entry angles. On the other hand, when the coefficient of friction value was set to 0.09 as measured from friction experiments, the dough response was overestimated, i.e. the model extrusion pressure was much higher than the experimentally measured values. When a critical shear stress limit, τmax, was used, the accuracy of the model predictions improved. The results showed that higher die angles require higher τmax values for the model and the experiments to agree.

  6. Experimental investigations on fiber laser color marking of steels

    Amara, E.H., E-mail: amara@cdta.dz; Haïd, F.; Noukaz, A.

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We develop an experimental approach with the aim to bring a contribution to the comprehension of the occurring phenomena during laser color marking of steels. • We have used a home-made marking device composed of a pulsed fiber laser and galvanometric mirrors. • Both commercial and elaborated in laboratory steels have been used as samples. • The experiments have been performed for different laser beam operating parameters, under normal atmospheric conditions. • The treated samples were analyzed either by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, as well as by energy dispersion spectroscopy. - Abstract: We develop an experimental approach with the aim to bring a contribution to the comprehension of the occurring phenomena during laser color marking of steels. A home-made marking device using a pulsed fiber laser has been used to treat steel samples under different laser beam operating parameters, for different compositions of the processed steel, and at normal atmospheric conditions. The treated samples were analyzed either by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, as well as by energy dispersion spectroscopy. The results show the influence of the operating parameters on the obtained colors.

  7. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  8. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance. Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. These data currently span the period from November 10, 2012 through May 31, 2014 and are anticipated to be extended through November 2014. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  9. Poster 4: Investigating the first steps of hydrocarbon condensation in the laboratory and in Titan's atmosphere

    Biennier, Ludovic; Bourgalais, Jeremy; Benidar, Abdessamad; Le Picard, Sebastien

    2016-06-01

    Hydrocarbons formed in Titan's cold atmosphere, starting with ethane C2H6, ethylene C2H4, acetylene C2H2, propane C3H8,... up to benzene C6H6, play some role in aerosol production, cloud processes, rain generation and Titan's lakes formation. We have started to study in the laboratory the kinetics of the first steps of condensation of these hydrocarbons. Rate coefficients are very sensitive to the description of the potential interaction surfaces of the molecules involved. Combined theoretical and experimental studies at the molecular level of the homogenous nucleation of various small molecules should improve greatly our fundamental understanding. This knowledge will serve as a model for studying more complex nucleation processes actually taking places in planetary atmospheres. Here we present the first experimental kinetic study of the dimerization of two small hydrocarbons: ethane C2H6 and propane C3H8. We have performed experiments to identify the temperature and partial densities ranges over which small hydrocarbon clusters form in saturated uniform supersonic flows. Using our unique reactor based on a Laval nozzle expansions, the kinetics of the formation has also been investigated down to 23 K. The chemical species present in the reactor are probed by a time of flight mass spectrometer equipped with an electron gun for soft ionization of the neutral reagents and products. This work aims at putting some constraints on the role of small hydrocarbon condensation in the formation of haze particles in the dense atmosphere of Titan.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF FREE SURFACE VORTEX

    LI Hai-feng; CHEN Hong-xun; MA Zheng; ZHOU Yi

    2008-01-01

    An experimental model was set up to investigate the formation and evolution of the free surface vortex. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the free surface vortex flow field at different development stages. Flow visualization was used to locate the vortex position and find its structure. Empirical formulas about the critical submergence and the whole field structure were obtained. It is found that the tangential velocity distribution is similar to that of the Rankine vortex and the radial velocity changes little in the vortex functional scope. Vortex starts from the free surface and gradually intensifies to air entrainment vortex. The vortex core moves during the formation and evolution of the free surface vortex. Based on the experimental model, the vortex position and structure were predicted by numerical simulation combined with a vortex model and compared with that of the experiments, which shows satisfactory agreement.

  11. Experimental investigation on oxidation kinetics of germanium by ozone

    Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Zhiqian; Xiang, Jinjuan; Wang, Wenwu; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Chao; Ye, Tianchun

    2016-12-01

    Oxidation kinetics of germanium surface by ozone at low temperature (≤400 °C) is experimentally investigated. The growth process contains two regions: initial linear growth region and following parabolic growth region. The GeOx thickness vs. oxidation time plot obeys the well-known Deal-Grove or linear parabolic model. The linear growth region contains reaction of oxygen atoms with surface bond and back bonds of outmost Ge layer. And the activation energy is experimentally estimated to be 0.06 eV. Such small activation energy indicates that the linear growth region is nearly barrier-less. The parabolic growth region starts when the oxygen atoms diffuse into back bonds of second outmost Ge layers. And the activation energy for this process is found to be 0.54 eV. Furthermore, in the ozone oxidation it is not O3 molecules but O radicals that go through the GeOx film.

  12. Experimental investigation of cyclic hygrothermal aging of hybrid composite

    El Yagoubi, Jalal

    2013-04-05

    This work provides an experimental investigation of the cyclic hygrothermal aging of a hybrid composites. We aimed to propose a general framework in the view to further optimize polymer-based composites. It reports experimental data and relevant observations collected during an aging campaign (up to 2000 cycles) where anhydride-cured epoxy samples as well as composites samples are exposed to environmental conditions. The data gathered during the whole campaign reveals that (1) the polymer displays a non-classical sorption behavior (2) the volume change is correlated to the mass uptake (3) the elastic modulus is correlated to the glass transition temperature. Matrix and interface degradation of the hybrid composite is monitored by means of microstructural observations. © 2013 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental investigation on flow characteristics of deionized water in microtubes

    XU ShaoLiang; YUE XiangAn; HOU JiRui

    2007-01-01

    The flow characteristics of deionized water in microtubes with diameters ranging from 2 to 30 μm are investigated. The experimental results show that the flow characteristics in microtubes with diameters of 16 μm and larger ones are in agreement with the classical theory. However, as the diameters are decreased to 5 and 2 μm, the nonlinear flow characteristics prevail and the results indicate significant departure of flow characteristics from the predictions of the conventional theory, and the smaller the diameters, the larger the departure. As the Reynolds number increases, the degree of nonlinear flow characteristics decrease gradually and the experimental results are approximately equal to the theoretical expectation. The minimum Reynolds number in this study is only 2.46×10-5.

  14. The Monotonicity Puzzle: An Experimental Investigation of Incentive Structures

    Jeannette Brosig

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-monotone incentive structures, which - according to theory - are able to induce optimal behavior, are often regarded as empirically less relevant for labor relationships. We compare the performance of a theoretically optimal non-monotone contract with a monotone one under controlled laboratory conditions. Implementing some features relevant to real-world employment relationships, our paper demonstrates that, in fact, the frequency of income-maximizing decisions made by agents is higher under the monotone contract. Although this observed behavior does not change the superiority of the non-monotone contract for principals, they do not choose this contract type in a significant way. This is what we call the monotonicity puzzle. Detailed investigations of decisions provide a clue for solving the puzzle and a possible explanation for the popularity of monotone contracts.

  15. Experimentally investigate ionospheric depletion chemicals in artificially created ionosphere

    Liu Yu; Cao Jinxiang; Wang Jian; Zheng Zhe; Xu Liang; Du Yinchang [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2012-09-15

    A new approach for investigating ionosphere chemical depletion in the laboratory is introduced. Air glow discharge plasma closely resembling the ionosphere in both composition and chemical reactions is used as the artificially created ionosphere. The ionospheric depletion experiment is accomplished by releasing chemicals such as SF{sub 6}, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} into the model discharge. The evolution of the electron density is investigated by varying the plasma pressure and input power. It is found that the negative ion (SF{sub 6}{sup -}, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}{sup -}) intermediary species provide larger reduction of the electron density than the positive ion (CO{sub 2}{sup +}) intermediary species. The negative ion intermediary species are also more efficient in producing ionospheric holes because of their fast reaction rates. Airglow enhancement attributed to SF{sub 6} and CO{sub 2} releases agrees well with the published data. Compared to the traditional methods, the new scheme is simpler to use, both in the release of chemicals and in the electron density measurements. It is therefore more efficient for investigating the release of chemicals in the ionosphere.

  16. Preliminary experimental investigation of boundary layer in decelerating flow

    Příhoda J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of characteristics of turbulence inside boundary layer under decelerating flow were studied by means of constant temperature anemometer. The decelerating flow was simulated in the closed circuit wind tunnel 0.9 m × 0.5 m at IT AS CR. The free stream turbulence was either natural o risen up by square mesh plane grid. The details of experimental settings and measurement procedures of the instantaneous longitudinal velocity component are described and the distributions of intensity, skewness and kurtosis of turbulent fluctuations are discussed in the contribution.

  17. A review of experimental investigations on thermal phenomena in nanofluids.

    Thomas, Shijo; Balakrishna Panicker Sobhan, Choondal

    2011-05-09

    Nanoparticle suspensions (nanofluids) have been recommended as a promising option for various engineering applications, due to the observed enhancement of thermophysical properties and improvement in the effectiveness of thermal phenomena. A number of investigations have been reported in the recent past, in order to quantify the thermo-fluidic behavior of nanofluids. This review is focused on examining and comparing the measurements of convective heat transfer and phase change in nanofluids, with an emphasis on the experimental techniques employed to measure the effective thermal conductivity, as well as to characterize the thermal performance of systems involving nanofluids.

  18. Rail accelerators for space transportation: An experimental investigation

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.; Sturman, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted at the Lewis Research Center with the objective of investigating the technical feasibility of rail accelerators for propulsion applications. Single-stage, plasma driven rail accelerators of small (4 by 6 mm) and medium (12.5 by 12.5 mm) bores were tested at peak accelerating currents of 50 to 450 kA. Streak-camera photography was used to provide a qualitative description of plasma armature acceleration. The effects of plasma blowby and varying bore pressure on the behavior of plasma armatures were studied.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Condensation Shock in Shock Tube

    F.Marsik; P.Sopuch; 等

    1997-01-01

    The homogeneous nucleation with subsequent spontaneous condensation of water,pentanol,and ethanol vapors in a carrier gas are investigated experimentally and theoretically in the expansion part of a shock tube.The precise pressure and MCW measurements give additional information about the wetness,so that the nucleation and condensation rates which are closely coupled for stronger expansion rates are determied more accurately,Predictions of the principle of the minimum of entropy production are compared with experiments performed for water,ethanol and pentanol at different pressures.

  20. Integral Test Facility PKL: Experimental PWR Accident Investigation

    2012-01-01

    Investigations of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of pressurized water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany for many years. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at a height scale of 1 : 1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1 : 145. The experimental facility consists of 4 primary loops with circul...

  1. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Conductivity of Meat During Freezing

    Shinbayeva, A.; Arkharov, I.; Aldiyarov, A.; Drobyshev, A.; Zhubaniyazova, M.; Kurnosov, V.

    2017-04-01

    The cryogenic technologies of processing and storage of agricultural products are becoming increasingly indispensable in the food industry as an important factor of ensuring food safety. One of such technologies is the shock freezing of meat, which provides a higher degree of preservation of the quality of frozen products in comparison with traditional technologies. The thermal conductivity of meat is an important parameter influencing the energy consumption in the freezing process. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of beef. The measurements were taken by using a specially designed measurement cell, which allows covering the temperature range from 80 to 300 K.

  2. Experimental investigation of stator flow in diagonal flow fan

    Wang, Jie; Kinoue, Yoichi; Shiomi, Norimasa; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Kenji; Jin, Yingzi

    2008-12-01

    Experimental investigations were conducted for the internal flow of the stator of the diagonal flow fan. Corner separation near the hub surface and the suction surface of the stator blade are focused on. At the design flow rate, the values of the axial velocity and the total pressure at stator outlet decrease near the suction surface at around the hub surface by the influence of the corner wall. At low flow rate of 80-90 % of the design flow rate, the corner separation between the suction surface and the hub surface can be found, which become widely spread at 80 % of the design flow rate.

  3. NUMERICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FTOW OVER A SEMTCIRCULAR WEIR

    刘春嵘; 呼和敖德; 马文驹

    2002-01-01

    The water flow over a semicircular weir is investigated numericallyand experimentally in this paper. The numerical model solves the Reynolds equationfor a mean flow field with the κ-ε turbulent model. To trace the motion of the freesurface, the VOF method with geometric reconstruction is employed. The velocity ofthe flow is measured by means of LDV technique. Four types of flow patterns, theposition of the separation and reattachment point, the distribution of shear stresson the bed at downstream of the weir are presented and discussed. The numericalresults agree well with the experiment data.

  4. Experimental investigation of a rapidly rotating turbulent duct flow

    Maartensson, G.E.; Johansson, A.V. [Department of Mechanics, KTH, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Gunnarsson, J. [Bombardier Transportation, Vaesteraas (Sweden); Moberg, H. [Alfa Laval, 14780 Tumba (Sweden)

    2002-09-01

    Rapidly rotating duct flow is studied experimentally with Rotation numbers in the interval. To achieve this, in combination with relatively high Reynolds numbers (5,000-30,000 based on the hydraulic radius), water was used as the working medium. Square and rectangular duct cross-sections were used and the angle between the rotation vector and the main axis of the duct was varied. The influence of the rotation on the pressure drop in the duct was investigated and suitable scalings of this quantity were studied. (orig.)

  5. Electromagnetic (EM) earthquake precursor transmission and detection regarding experimental field and laboratory results.

    Jones, Kenneth B., II; Saxton, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Aside from understanding the animal kingdom reacting to a per-earthquake signal, a transmission source is apparent. The focus of this investigation is an electromagnetic emission approach and detection capable of becoming both practical and reliable to other plausible earthquake precursors. To better determine this method, several prototype magnetometers were devised and built with each successive version improving upon the next. Two twin (prototype #2) antennae were deployed to field settings outside the NE Texas town of Timpson, TX back in February, 2013 and very recent laboratory tests using the most refined (prototype #4) experimental antenna for detecting unconfined, granitic block fracturing. Field testing encompassed the small NE Texas town of Timpson, TX, which endured an earthquake phenomenon (May, 2012 - September, 2013). A rare sequence of events was strictly attributed to hydraulic fracturing activity in the immediate area all for hydrocarbon capture; thus, a chance to detect and record man-made earthquake activity. By swiveling two directional antennae at three locations, one mobile, the antennae could 'zero' in on a signal source until its pattern was well established and mapped, accordingly. Three signals were detected, two strong and one moderately strong, each with epicenter implications several kilometers from known seismological sites. Six months later, two M4s and a M2.4 earthquake hit over the 2013 Labor Day weekend. Hydraulic pump pressure increased deep Earth pore pressure, reduced friction, and displaced opposing tectonic stresses causing rock to fracture. This was the last earthquake sequence in the Timpson area, due to personal involvement and area citizens in contact with their state representatives. Well and drilling operations have since moved 40-50 miles SE of Timpson, TX and rare earthquake activity has now occurred there. Laboratory testing was next performed using cored granitic blocks and the latest, improved antenna with an

  6. Integral Test Facility PKL: Experimental PWR Accident Investigation

    Klaus Umminger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of pressurized water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany for many years. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a pressurized water reactor (PWR at a height scale of 1 : 1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1 : 145. The experimental facility consists of 4 primary loops with circulation pumps and steam generators (SGs arranged symmetrically around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV. The investigations carried out encompass a very broad spectrum from accident scenario simulations with large, medium, and small breaks, over the investigation of shutdown procedures after a wide variety of accidents, to the systematic investigation of complex thermal-hydraulic phenomena. This paper presents a survey of test objectives and programs carried out to date. It also describes the test facility in its present state. Some important results obtained over the years with focus on investigations carried out since the beginning of the international cooperation are exemplarily discussed.

  7. Experimental Investigation of a High Pressure Ratio Aspirated Fan Stage

    Merchant, Ali; Kerrebrock, Jack L.; Adamczyk, John J.; Braunscheidel, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The experimental investigation of an aspirated fan stage designed to achieve a pressure ratio of 3.4:1 at 1500 ft/sec is presented in this paper. The low-energy viscous flow is aspirated from diffusion-limiting locations on the blades and flowpath surfaces of the stage, enabling a very high pressure ratio to be achieved in a single stage. The fan stage performance was mapped at various operating speeds from choke to stall in a compressor facility at fully simulated engine conditions. The experimentally determined stage performance, in terms of pressure ratio and corresponding inlet mass flow rate, was found to be in good agreement with the three-dimensional viscous computational prediction, and in turn close to the design intent. Stage pressure ratios exceeding 3:1 were achieved at design speed, with an aspiration flow fraction of 3.5 percent of the stage inlet mass flow. The experimental performance of the stage at various operating conditions, including detailed flowfield measurements, are presented and discussed in the context of the computational analyses. The sensitivity of the stage performance and operability to reduced aspiration flow rates at design and off design conditions are also discussed.

  8. Analytical and experimental investigation of flutter suppression by piezoelectric actuation

    Heeg, Jennifer

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to analytically and experimentally study the capabilities of piezoelectric plate actuators for suppressing flutter. Piezoelectric materials are characterized by their ability to produce voltage when subjected to a mechanical strain. The converse piezoelectric effect can be utilized to actuate a structure by applying a voltage. For this investigation, a two-degree-of-freedom wind tunnel model was designed, analyzed, and tested. The model consisted of a rigid wing and a flexible mount system that permitted a translational and a rotational degree of freedom. The model was designed such that flutter was encountered within the testing envelope of the wind tunnel. Actuators made of piezoelectric material were affixed to leaf springs of the mount system. Command signals, applied to the piezoelectric actuators, exerted control over the damping and stiffness properties. A mathematical aeroservoelastic model was constructed by using finite element methods, laminated plate theory, and aeroelastic analysis tools. Plant characteristics were determined from this model and verified by open loop experimental tests. A flutter suppression control law was designed and implemented on a digital control computer. Closed loop flutter testing was conducted. The experimental results represent the first time that adaptive materials have been used to actively suppress flutter. They demonstrate that small, carefully placed actuating plates can be used effectively to control aeroelastic response.

  9. An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Electrostatically Coupled Cantilever Microbeams

    Ilyas, Saad

    2016-06-16

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of the static and dynamic behavior of electrostatically coupled laterally actuated silicon microbeams. The coupled beam resonators are composed of two almost identical flexible cantilever beams forming the two sides of a capacitor. The experimental and theoretical analysis of the coupled system is carried out and compared against the results of beams actuated with fixed electrodes individually. The pull-in characteristics of the electrostatically coupled beams are studied, including the pull-in time. The dynamics of the coupled dual beams are explored via frequency sweeps around the neighborhood of the natural frequencies of the system for different input voltages. Good agreement is reported among the simulation results and the experimental data. The results show considerable drop in the pull-in values as compared to single microbeam resonators. The dynamics of the coupled beam resonators are demonstrated as a way to increase the bandwidth of the resonator near primary resonance as well as a way to introduce increased frequency shift, which can be promising for resonant sensing applications. Moreover the dynamic pull-in characteristics are also studied and proposed as a way to sense the shift in resonance frequency.

  10. Experimental Investigation of a Novel Blast Wave Mitigation Device

    Zhenbi Su

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel blast wave mitigation device was investigated experimentally in this paper. The device consists of a piston-cylinder assembly. A shock wave is induced within the cylinder when a blast wave impacts on the piston. The shock wave propagates inside the device and is reflected repeatedly. The shock wave propagation process inside the device lengthens the duration of the force on the base of the device to several orders of magnitude of the duration of the blast wave, while it decreases the maximum pressure over an order of magnitude. Two types of experiments were carried out to study the blast wave mitigation device. The first type of experiments was done with honeycomb structures protected by the blast wave mitigation device. Experimental results show that the device can adequately protect the honeycomb structure. A second type of experiments was done using a Hopkinson bar to measure the pressure transmitted through the blast wave mitigation device. The experimental results agree well with results from a theoretical model.

  11. Experimental investigation of a mm-wave planar antenna

    Lambrakakis, Georgios D.

    1990-06-01

    This thesis investigates a new mm-wave Bilateral Slot Line (BSL) antenna and its relation to the Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA). The BSL antenna consists of a tapered double-sided slotline and can be viewed as two identical LTSAs sandwiched back to back. Dielectric substrates with permittivities of 2.33 and 6.0 were used to construct these antennas. The theoretical background, the design, and the performance in the frequency range 5 to 9 GHz of the new microwave integrated circuit antenna is presented. The effects of several parameters such as dielectric constant, stripline and slotline characteristic impedance, antenna structure, and transition scheme on the radiation patterns and return loss were experimentally investigated. Some relationships between the width of stripline and slotline, their characteristic impedance and the dielectric constant are reported. Guidelines are laid to design the LTSA and BSL antennas.

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Hydrogen Production from Biomass

    吕鹏梅; 常杰; 付严; 王铁军; 陈勇; 祝京旭

    2003-01-01

    In gaseous products of biomass steam gasification, there exist a lot of CO, CH4 and other hydrocarbons that can be converted to hydrogen through steam reforming reactions. There exists potential hydrogen production from the raw gas of biomass steam gasification. In the present work, the characteristics of hydrogen production from biomass steam gasification were investigated in a small-scale fluidized bed. In these experiments, the gasifying agent (air) was supplied into the reactor from the bottom of the reactor and the steam was added into the reactor above biomass feeding location. The effects of reaction temperature, steam to biomass ratio, equivalence ratio (ER) and biomass particle size on hydrogen yield and hydrogen yield potential were investigated. The experimental results showed that higher reactor temperature, proper ER, proper steam to biomass ratio and smaller biomass particle size will contribute to more hydrogen and potential hydrogen yield.

  13. Experimental investigation of transitional flow in a toroidal pipe

    Kühnen, J; Hof, B; Kuhlmann, H

    2015-01-01

    The flow instability and further transition to turbulence in a toroidal pipe (torus) with curvature (tube-to-coiling diameter) 0.049 is investigated experimentally. The flow inside the toroidal pipe is driven by a steel sphere fitted to the inner pipe diameter. The sphere is moved with constant azimuthal velocity from outside the torus by a moving magnet. The experiment is designed to investigate curved pipe flow by optical measurement techniques. Using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry and pressure drop measurements, the flow is measured for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 15000. Time- and space-resolved velocity fields are obtained and analysed. The steady axisymmetric basic flow is strongly influenced by centrifugal effects. On an increase of the Reynolds number we find a sequence of bifurcations. For Re=4075 a supercritical bifurcation to an oscillatory flow is found in which waves travel in the streamwise direction with a phase velocity slightly faster than the mean...

  14. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF EMERGENCY GATE SHUTTING FOR ORIFICE TUNNEL

    2002-01-01

    In the process of the emergence gate shutting of one orifice tunnel, a big noise and great vibration may be observed in the mid gate chamber. In order to guarantee the working safety of orifice tunnels, an experimental investiga-tion is carried out in Sichuan University. In the investigation,the fluctuation pressure along the tunnel and the wind velocity in the entry of emergency gate are measured. In the mean time, the fluid state in orifice tunnel is carefully observed and analyzed. The reasons of the noise and vibration in the mid gate chamber are found out and some countermeasures are presented in this paper. The conclusions are useful to the ori-fice tunnels with high water head and huge discharge.

  15. Experimental and three-dimensional finite element investigation of fatigue

    Bomidi, John A. R.

    Materials often fail at cyclic loads that are lower than their ultimate strength or even their yield strength due to progressive internal material degradation; commonly known as fatigue. Moreover, there is a wide scatter in observed fatigue lives of mechanical components operating under identical loading conditions. The randomness of fatigue failure is considered to be linked to basic microstructural effects such as random microstructure topology and the initiation/growth of cracks along inter/transgranular planes. Several modeling approaches have been previously presented ranging from 2D discrete element to 3D Finite Element methods with explicit representation of microstructure topology and continuum damage mechanics to capture dispersion in rolling contact fatigue life and fatigue spalling. There is, however, a need to compare the modeling approach with experimental fatigue test conditions in order to verify and as required enhance the modeling approach to capture observed fatigue failure. This dissertation presents experimental test results and three-dimensional modeling approach that capture fatigue failure. The three-dimensional modeling approach is enhanced according to the experimental observations to consider inter/trans granular failure, different modes of fatigue initiation and propagation and finally for considering effect of plasticity in fatigue of rolling contacts. The following phenomena have been investigated: (1) Fatigue of microbeams: (a )Results of fatigue life and failure from 3D modeling of intergranular fatigue in microbeams are compared with experimental observations reported in literature (2) Tensile fatigue of thin sheets: (a) A test rig with a new grip and alignment system is developed to address the challenges associated with thin sheet testing and conduct fatigue experiments. (b) The 3D fatigue model is enhanced to capture the dominant transgranular fatigue observed in the experiments. The observed and modeled fatigue life and failure

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration

    Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Danly, B.; Temkin, R.J.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-FG0291ER-40648. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration.'' This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design and fabrication of a 17GHz of photocathode gun, Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration using a 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders. This report is organized as follows. The development of an rf gun design and research progress on the picosecond laser system is summarized in Sec. 2, the status of the studies of the LBL/Haimson high gradient structure, using a 50 MW free-electron laser is summarized in Sec. 3, and theoretical research progress is described in Sec. 4. Supporting material is contained in Appendices A-G.

  17. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Using experimental design modules for process characterization in manufacturing/materials processes laboratories

    Ankenman, Bruce; Ermer, Donald; Clum, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Modules dealing with statistical experimental design (SED), process modeling and improvement, and response surface methods have been developed and tested in two laboratory courses. One course was a manufacturing processes course in Mechanical Engineering and the other course was a materials processing course in Materials Science and Engineering. Each module is used as an 'experiment' in the course with the intent that subsequent course experiments will use SED methods for analysis and interpretation of data. Evaluation of the modules' effectiveness has been done by both survey questionnaires and inclusion of the module methodology in course examination questions. Results of the evaluation have been very positive. Those evaluation results and details of the modules' content and implementation are presented. The modules represent an important component for updating laboratory instruction and to provide training in quality for improved engineering practice.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  20. Experimental investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2011-09-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using several different initial conditions and with a range of diagnostics. First, a broadband initial condition is created using a shear layer between helium+acetone and argon. The post-shocked turbulent mixing is investigated using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). The signature of turbulent mixing is present in the appearance of an inertial range in the mole fraction energy spectrum and the isotropy of the late-time dissipation structures. The distribution of the mole fraction values does not appear to transition to a homogeneous mixture, and it is possible that this effect may be slow to develop for the RMI. Second, the influence of the RMI on the kinetic energy spectrum is investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The influence of the perturbation is visible relatively far from the interface when compared to the energy spectrum of an initially flat interface. Closer to the perturbation, an increase in the energy spectrum with time is observed and is possibly due to a cascade of energy from the large length scales of the perturbation. Finally, the single mode perturbation growth rate is measured after reshock using a new high speed imaging technique. This technique produced highly time-resolved interface position measurements. Simultaneous measurements at the spike and bubble location are used to compute a perturbation growth rate history. The growth rates from several experiments are compared to a new reshock growth rate model.

  1. Diesel Engine Emission Reduction Using Catalytic Nanoparticles: An Experimental Investigation

    Ajin C. Sajeevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide being a rare earth metal with dual valance state existence has exceptional catalytic activity due to its oxygen buffering capability, especially in the nanosized form. Hence when used as an additive in the diesel fuel it leads to simultaneous reduction and oxidation of nitrogen dioxide and hydrocarbon emissions, respectively, from diesel engine. The present work investigates the effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on performance and emissions of diesel engine. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical method and techniques such as TEM, EDS, and XRD have been used for the characterization. Cerium oxide was mixed in diesel by means of standard ultrasonic shaker to obtain stable suspension, in a two-step process. The influence of nanoparticles on various physicochemical properties of diesel fuel has also been investigated through extensive experimentation by means of ASTM standard testing methods. Load test was done in the diesel engine to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on the efficiency and the emissions from the engine. Comparisons of fuel properties with and without additives are also presented.

  2. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Michal Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw and the Joint Research Centre (JRC in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  3. Experimental investigation of ice slurry heat transfer in horizontal tube

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per; Palm, Bjoern; Melinder, Aake [Department of Energy Technology, Division of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 68, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-15

    Heat transfer of ice slurry flow based on ethanol-water mixture in a circular horizontal tube has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethanol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The heat transfer tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 22% depending on test performed. Measured heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry are found to be higher than those for single phase fluid, especially for laminar flow conditions and high ice mass fractions where the heat transfer is increased with a factor 2 in comparison to the single phase flow. In addition, experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry flow were compared to the analytical results, based on the correlation by Sieder and Tate for laminar single phase regime, by Dittus-Boelter for turbulent single phase regime and empirical correlation by Christensen and Kauffeld derived for laminar/turbulent ice slurry flow in circular horizontal tubes. It was found that the classical correlation proposed by Sieder and Tate for laminar forced convection in smooth straight circular ducts cannot be used for heat transfer prediction of ice slurry flow since it strongly underestimates measured values, while, for the turbulent flow regime the simple Dittus-Boelter relation predicts the heat transfer coefficient of ice slurry flow with high accuracy but only up to an ice mass fraction of 10% and Re{sub cf} > 2300 regardless of imposed heat flux. For higher ice mass fractions and regardless of the flow regime, the correlation proposed by Christensen and Kauffeld gives good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  4. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Michal, Mathias; Keuser, Manfred; Solomos, George; Peroni, Marco; Larcher, Martin; Esteban, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw) and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  5. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-10-01

    A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

  6. The role of a laboratory of experimental psychology in the Brazilian education renewal of the 1930s.

    Cirino, Sérgio Dias; Miranda, Rodrigo Lopes

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we present the Laboratory of Experimental Psychology at the Belo Horizonte Teachers College (Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Professores de Belo Horizonte) during its early years (1929-1932). The Laboratory is examined in the context of the prevailing public discourse on primary education and its renewal in Brazil. To achieve our goal, we describe the Belo Horizonte Teachers College and its Laboratory's director, tools, and functions. In presenting these aspects, we highlight the Laboratory of Experimental Psychology as an important place that promoted contact with psychological instruments, techniques, and theories. It contributed to the training of teachers and produced psychological knowledge for elementary education in Brazil.

  7. Affine kinematics in planar fibrous connective tissues: an experimental investigation.

    Jayyosi, C; Affagard, J-S; Ducourthial, G; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Lynch, B; Bancelin, S; Ruggiero, F; Schanne-Klein, M-C; Allain, J-M; Bruyère-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2017-03-29

    The affine transformation hypothesis is usually adopted in order to link the tissue scale with the fibers scale in structural constitutive models of fibrous tissues. Thanks to the recent advances in imaging techniques, such as multiphoton microscopy, the microstructural behavior and kinematics of fibrous tissues can now be monitored at different stretching within the same sample. Therefore, the validity of the affine hypothesis can be investigated. In this paper, the fiber reorientation predicted by the affine assumption is compared to experimental data obtained during mechanical tests on skin and liver capsule coupled with microstructural imaging using multiphoton microscopy. The values of local strains and the collagen fibers orientation measured at increasing loading levels are used to compute a theoretical estimation of the affine reorientation of collagen fibers. The experimentally measured reorientation of collagen fibers during loading could not be successfully reproduced with this simple affine model. It suggests that other phenomena occur in the stretching process of planar fibrous connective tissues, which should be included in structural constitutive modeling approaches.

  8. Experimental investigation on impact performances of GLARE laminates

    Chen Qi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was carried out on the damage resistance to a concentrated quasi-static indentation force and low-velocity impact of four kinds of glass-reinforced aluminum laminates (GLARE for short. Compared with the experimental results of the CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics laminates, the performance of GLARE was determined. By means of concentrated quasi-static indentation force test, typical force–displacement response, the maximum contact force and dent depth were received. Through drop-weight low-velocity impact tests, impact force histories, indentation depths (through a new method and dissipated energy were obtained. The test results show that the force–displacement response of GLARE 4 laminates under the concentrated quasi-static indentation force has an obvious flat roof and the failure is instantaneous, which are different from CFRP laminates. The indention will be visible once the impact happens. C-scan results find that there is no delamination besides the impact area after both the concentrated quasi-static indentation and low-velocity impact. The dissipated energy approximately equals the impact energy.

  9. Experimental Investigation on Performance of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Model

    LI Qiang; FAN Wei; YAN Chuan-jun; HU Cheng-qi; YE Bin

    2007-01-01

    The PDRE test model used in these experiments utilized kerosene as the fuel, oxygen as oxidizer, and nitrogen as purge gas. The solenoid valves were employed to control intermittent supplies of kerosene, oxygen and purge gas. PDRE test model was 50 mm in inner diameter by 1.2 m long. The DDT (defiagration to detonation transition) enhancement device Shchelkin spiral was used in the test model.The effects of detonation frequency on its time-averaged thrust and specific impulse were experimentally investigated. The obtained results showes that the time-averaged thrust of PDRE test model was approximately proportional to the detonation frequency. For the detonation frequency 20 Hz, the time-averaged thrust was around 107 N, and the specific impulse was around 125 s. The nozzle experiments were conducted using PDRE test model with three traditional nozzles. The experimental results obtained demonstrated that all of those nozzles could augment the thrust and specific impulse. Among those three nozzles, the convergent nozzle had the largest increased augmentation, which was approximately 18%, under the specific condition of the experiment.

  10. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of incremental sheet forming process

    HAN Fei; MO Jian-hua

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the process of incremental sheet forming (ISF) through both experimental and numerical approaches, a three-dimensional elasto-plastic finite element model (FEM) was developed to simulate the process and the simulated results were compared with those of experiment. The results of numerical simulations, such as the strain history and distribution, the stress state and distribution, sheet thickness distribution, etc, were discussed in details, and the influences of process parameters on these results were also analyzed. The simulated results of the radial strain and the thickness distribution are in good agreement with experimental results. The simulations reveal that the deformation is localized around the tool and constantly remains close to a plane strain state. With decreasing depth step, increasing tool diameter and wall inclination angle, the axial stress reduces, leading to less thinning and more homogeneous plastic strain and thickness distribution. During ISF, the plastic strain increases stepwise under the action of the tool. Each increase in plastic strain is accompanied by hydrostatic pressure, which explains why obtainable deformation using ISF exceeds the forming limits of conventional sheet forming.

  11. Experimental in situ investigations of turbulence under high pressure.

    Song, Kwonyul; Al-Salaymeh, Ahmed; Jovanovic, Jovan; Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    In tube injection systems applied in high-pressure processing of packed biomaterials and foods, the pressure-transmitting medium is injected into the vessel to increase the pressure up to 1000 MPa, generating a submerged liquid-free jet. The presence of a turbulent-free jet during the pressurization phase and its positive influence on the homogeneity of the product treatment has already been examined by computational fluid dynamics investigations. However, no experimental data have supported the existence and properties of turbulent flow under high-pressure (HP) conditions up to 400 MPa. This contribution presents the development of two experimental setups: HP-laser Doppler anemometry and HP-hot wire anemometry. For the first time the time-averaged velocity profiles of a free jet during pressurization up to 300 MPa at different Reynolds numbers (Re) have been obtained. In this article, the dependence of the velocity profiles on the Re is discussed in detail. Moreover, the relaminarization phenomenon of the turbulent pipe flow most likely caused by the compressibility effects and viscosity changes of the pressure-transmitting medium is examined.

  12. Experimental investigation on impact performances of GLARE laminates

    Chen Qi; Guan Zhidong; Li Zengshan; Ji Zhaojie; Zhuo Yue

    2015-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out on the damage resistance to a concen-trated quasi-static indentation force and low-velocity impact of four kinds of glass-reinforced aluminum laminates (GLARE for short). Compared with the experimental results of the CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) laminates, the performance of GLARE was determined. By means of concentrated quasi-static indentation force test, typical force–displacement response, the maximum contact force and dent depth were received. Through drop-weight low-velocity impact tests, impact force histories, indentation depths (through a new method) and dissipated energy were obtained. The test results show that the force–displacement response of GLARE 4 laminates under the concentrated quasi-static indentation force has an obvious flat roof and the failure is instantaneous, which are different from CFRP laminates. The indention will be visible once the impact happens. C-scan results find that there is no delamination besides the impact area after both the concentrated quasi-static indentation and low-velocity impact. The dissipated energy approximately equals the impact energy.

  13. Experimental Investigation and Theoretical Modeling of Nanosilica Activity in Concrete

    Han-Seung Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental investigations and theoretical modeling of the hydration reaction of nanosilica blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different nanosilica replacement ratios. The developments of chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength of Portland cement control specimens and nanosilica blended specimens were measured at different ages: 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Due to the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica, the contents of calcium hydroxide in nanosilica blended pastes are considerably lower than those in the control specimens. Compared with the control specimens, the extent of compressive strength enhancement in the nanosilica blended specimens is much higher at early ages. Additionally, a blended cement hydration model that considers both the hydration reaction of cement and the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica is proposed. The properties of nanosilica blended concrete during hardening were evaluated using the degree of hydration of cement and the reaction degree of nanosilica. The calculated chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength were generally consistent with the experimental results.

  14. Experimental investigations of the functional morphology of dragonfly wings

    H.Rajabi; A.Darvizeh

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays,the importance of identifying the flight mechanisms of the dragonfly,as an inspiration for designing flapping wing vehicles,is well known.An experimental approach to understanding the complexities of insect wings as organs of flight could provide significant outcomes for design purposes.In this paper,a comprehensive investigation is carried out on the morphological and microstructural features of dragonfly wings.Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile testing are used to experimentally verify the functional roles of different parts of the wings.A number of SEM images of the elements of the wings,such as the nodus,leading edge,trailing edge,and vein sections,which play dominant roles in strengthening the whole structure,are presented.The results from the tensile tests indicate that the nodus might be the critical region of the wing that is subjected to high tensile stresses.Considering the patterns of the longitudinal corrugations of the wings obtained in this paper,it can be supposed that they increase the load-bearing capacity,giving the wings an ability to tolerate dynamic loading conditions.In addition,it is suggested that the longitudinal veins,along with the leading and trailing edges,are structural mechanisms that further improve fatigue resistance by providing higher fracture toughness,preventing crack propagation,and allowing the wings to sustain a significant amount of damage without loss of strength.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Exhaust Thermoelectric System and Application for Vehicle

    Liu, X.; Deng, Y. D.; Wang, W. S.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    In this case study, an energy harvesting system using a thermoelectric power generator (TEG) has been constructed. Experimental investigation of the hot and cold sides of the thermoelectric modules (TMs) in this system has been undertaken to assess the feasibility for automotive applications. Two test benches have been developed to analyze the TM performance and the TEG system characteristics, especially the temperature difference, open-circuit voltage, and maximum power output of the TM and TEG system. As the performance of a TM is most influenced by the applied pressure and the temperature difference, a thermostatic heater, thermostatic water tank, and clamping devices are used in our experimental apparatus, increasing the output power of the TEG system. Based on the test bench, a new system called the "four-TEGs" system was designed and assembled into a prototype vehicle called "Warrior," and the characteristics of the system such as the maximum power output have been studied in road tests. The results show great potential for application of this technology in future vehicles.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATIONS ON HORIZONTAL OIL-GAS FLOW

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the characteristics of oil-gas flow in a horizontal pipe on a large scale (with the inner diameter D = 125 mm). With the experimental data, the flow patterns were presented. Through the analyses for the flow regime transition, it was found that there was a critical superficial velocity of liquid phase for the flow regime transiting from stratified flow to slug flow. The slug flow could not occur until the superficial velocity of liquid phase was higher than the critical velocity. For the flow pattern transiting from stratified to slug flow, the transmitting velocity of gas phase decreases with the augmentation of superficial velocity of liquid phase. On the basis of the experiments, numerical simulations of different flow patterns and their transitions were performed with the use of the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) technique. The results of the computations are shown to match well with the measured data in the experiments.

  17. Experimental Investigation into Magnetortheological Damper Subjected to Impact Loads

    XIANG Hengbo; FANG Qin; GONG Ziming; WU Hao

    2008-01-01

    A good mechanical model of magnetorheological damper (MRD) is essential to predict the shock isolation performance of MRD in numerical simulation.But at present,the mechanical models of MRD were all derived from the experiment subjected to harmonic vibration loads.In this paper,a commercial MRD (type RD-1005-3) manufactured by Lord Corporation was studied experimentally in order to investigate its isolation performance under the impact loads.A new mechanical model of MRD was proposed according to the data obtained by impact test.A good agreement between the numerical results and test data was observed,which showed that the model was good to simulate the dynamic properties of MRD under impact loads.It is also demonstrated that MRD can improve the acceleration and displacement response of the structure obviously under impact loads.

  18. Experimental investigation of nanoparticles precipitation in a rotating packed bed

    Yang Xiang; Guangwen Chu; Lixiong Wen; Kuang Yang; Guangting Xiao; Jianfeng Chen

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation of BaSO4 nanoparticles was studied for the first time in a specially designed rotating packed bed(RPB),which allowed sampling at different radial positions to provide better insight of the mechanism of precipitation in RPB.Particle size and morphology were characterized by TEM,while the quality of synthesized BaSO4 powders was analyzed by XRD and BET,and compared with those prepared in a stirred-tank reactor.The important role of the inlet region of the RPB in the whole precipitation process was experimentally confirmed,as a significant essence for the design of industrial RPB for the precipitation of sparingly soluble materials.The effects of different operating conditions on particle size were also investigated,showing that particle size decreases with increasing rotational speed and liquid flow rate,due to the enhancement of micromixing in the RPB.

  19. An experimental-differential investigation of cognitive complexity

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive complexity as defined by differential and experimental traditions was explored to investigate the theoretical advantage and utility of relational complexity (RC theory as a common framework for studying fluid cognitive functions. RC theory provides a domain general account of processing demand as a function of task complexity. In total, 142 participants completed two tasks in which RC was manipulated, and two tasks entailing manipulations of complexity derived from the differential psychology literature. A series of analyses indicated that, as expected, task manipulations influenced item difficulty. However, comparable changes in a psychometric index of complexity were not consistently observed. Active maintenance of information across multiple steps of the problem solving process, which entails strategic coordination of storage and processing that cannot be modelled under the RC framework was found to be an important component of cognitive complexity.

  20. Border Collision Route to Quasiperiodicity: Numerical Investigation and Experimental Confirmation

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai; Mosekilde, Erik; Maity, S.;

    2006-01-01

    Numerical studies of higher-dimensional piecewise-smooth systems have recently shown how a torus can arise from a periodic cycle through a special type of border-collision bifurcation. The present article investigates this new route to quasiperiodicity in the two-dimensional piecewise-linear normal...... form map. We have obtained the chart of the dynamical modes for this map and showed that border-collision bifurcations can lead to the birth of a stable closed invariant curve associated with quasiperiodic or periodic dynamics. In the parameter regions leading to the existence of an invariant closed...... periodicity, e.g., a period-5 focus. This article also contains a discussion of torus destruction via a homoclinic bifurcation in the piecewise-linear normal map. Using a dc–dc converter with two-level control as an example, we report the first experimental verification of the direct transition...

  1. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    Choi, B. William [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chiu, Ing L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  2. An experimental investigation of glare and restructured fiber metal laminates

    Benedict, Adelina Vanessa

    Fiber Metal Laminates (FMLs) are a group of materials fabricated by bonding glass/epoxy layers within metal layers. This class of materials can provide good mechanical properties, as well as weight savings. An FML known as Glass Laminate Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy (GLARE) was studied. An experimental investigation comprising of microscopy and tensile testing was carried out using different grades of GLARE. Microscopy revealed the construction details of GLARE, while tensile testing provided means of measuring and analyzing its stress-strain responses. Next, different metal surface pretreatment methods were explored. These included sandblasting, Phosphoric Acid Anodizing (PAA), and AC-130 Sol-Gel treatment. Woven S-2 glass, an epoxy adhesive, and aluminum alloy sheet metal were used to fabricate restructured FMLs using time and cost effective procedures. Additional microscopy and tensile testing allowed for comparisons with GLARE and aircraft grade aluminum alloys. The restructured FMLs showed similar behaviors to GLARE with potential significant improvements in fabrication efficiency.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence Specifications of Turbidity Currents

    B Firoozabadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the turbulence characteristic of turbidity current experimentally. The three-dimensional Acoustic-Doppler Velocimeter (ADV was used to measure the instantaneous velocity and characteristics of the turbulent flow. The experiments were conducted in a three-dimensional channel for different discharge flows, concentrations, and bed slopes. Results are expressed at various distances from the inlet, for all flow rates, slopes and concentrations as the distribution of turbulence energy, Reynolds stress and the turbulent intensity. It was concluded that the maximum turbulence intensity happens in both the interface and near the wall. Also, it was observed that the turbulence intensity reaches its minimum where maximum velocity occurs.

  4. Cracking in autoclaved aerated concrete: Experimental investigation and XFEM modeling

    Ferretti, D., E-mail: daniele.ferretti@unipr.it [Department of Civil, Environmental, Land Management Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, P.co Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Michelini, E. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Land Management Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, P.co Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Rosati, G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    The paper aims to investigate and model cracking development in beams and deep-beams made of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). Fracture mechanics of AAC has been first studied by performing three-point bending tests on beams, similar to those commonly used for ordinary concrete elements. In some of these tests, crack growth has been also monitored by using ESPI laser technique. In this way, it has been possible to calibrate the main parameters of a proper cohesive law by means of extended finite element inverse analysis. Subsequently, cracking tests have been also performed on deep-beams, whose behavior is more representative of full scale walls. To validate the proposed cohesive law, deep-beam experimental behavior has been finally simulated through XFEM.

  5. Experimental Investigations on Airborne Gravimetry Based on Compressed Sensing

    Yapeng Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gravity surveys are an important research topic in geophysics and geodynamics. This paper investigates a method for high accuracy large scale gravity anomaly data reconstruction. Based on the airborne gravimetry technology, a flight test was carried out in China with the strap-down airborne gravimeter (SGA-WZ developed by the Laboratory of Inertial Technology of the National University of Defense Technology. Taking into account the sparsity of airborne gravimetry by the discrete Fourier transform (DFT, this paper proposes a method for gravity anomaly data reconstruction using the theory of compressed sensing (CS. The gravity anomaly data reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be transformed into a sparse optimization problem. This paper uses the zero-norm as the objective function and presents a greedy algorithm called Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP to solve the corresponding minimization problem. The test results have revealed that the compressed sampling rate is approximately 14%, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by OMP is 0.03 mGal and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR is 56.48 dB. In contrast, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by the existing nearest-interpolation method (NIPM is 0.15 mGal and the SNR is 42.29 dB. These results have shown that the OMP algorithm can reconstruct the gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and fewer measurements.

  6. Experimental investigations on airborne gravimetry based on compressed sensing.

    Yang, Yapeng; Wu, Meiping; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang; Cai, Shaokun

    2014-03-18

    Gravity surveys are an important research topic in geophysics and geodynamics. This paper investigates a method for high accuracy large scale gravity anomaly data reconstruction. Based on the airborne gravimetry technology, a flight test was carried out in China with the strap-down airborne gravimeter (SGA-WZ) developed by the Laboratory of Inertial Technology of the National University of Defense Technology. Taking into account the sparsity of airborne gravimetry by the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), this paper proposes a method for gravity anomaly data reconstruction using the theory of compressed sensing (CS). The gravity anomaly data reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be transformed into a sparse optimization problem. This paper uses the zero-norm as the objective function and presents a greedy algorithm called Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) to solve the corresponding minimization problem. The test results have revealed that the compressed sampling rate is approximately 14%, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by OMP is 0.03 mGal and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 56.48 dB. In contrast, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by the existing nearest-interpolation method (NIPM) is 0.15 mGal and the SNR is 42.29 dB. These results have shown that the OMP algorithm can reconstruct the gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and fewer measurements.

  7. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization --- An Experimental Investigation.

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1997-11-01

    The atomization of a liquid droplet placed on a vibrating membrane starts with the development of Faraday free surface waves. As the excitation amplitude increases, the waves grow in amplitude and ultimately begin to eject smaller secondary droplets from the wave crests. The rate of droplet ejection can be large enough to completely drain the primary droplet, an event we call bursting. The evolution of the droplet ejection process depends on a coupled system dynamic between the droplet and the membrane. When droplets are ejected the resonant frequency of the system increases. This changes the acceleration felt by the droplet and, in turn, the rate of droplet ejection. Depending on the excitation frequency and amplitude, various types of bursting or droplet ejection processes may occur. In the present experiments, the high acceleration needed to attain ejection (typically 300g) is achieved by driving a light-weight membrane near its resonant frequency (nominally 1000 Hz). The resonant characteristics and the acceleration during the ejection process for various droplet sizes and excitation amplitudes are investigated using a surface-mounted microfabricated accelerometer and a laboratory computer system.

  8. Laboratory investigations of moisture conditions in wood frame walls with wood fiber insulation

    Geving, Stig; Lunde, Erik; Holme, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the moisture conditions in wood frame walls with wood fiber thermal insulation in a Nordic climate. Laboratory measurements were conducted on 15 different wall configurations. The test results showed that the wall configurations with wood fiber insulation performed rather similar as those with mineral wool, in regard to measured relative humidity at the external side of the insulation layer. The laboratory tests showed that wood fiber insu...

  9. Numerical and Experimental Investigations of a Rotating Heat Pipe

    Jankowski, Todd A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Rotating and revolving heat pipes have been used in a variety of applications including heat pipe heat exchangers, cooling of rotating electrical machines, and heat removal in high speed cutting operations. The use of heat pipes in rotating environments has prompted many analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of these devices. Past investigations, however, have been restricted to the study of straight heat pipes. In this work, a curved rotating heat pipe is studied numerically and experimentally. In certain types of rotating machines, heat generating components, which must be cooled during normal operation, are located at some radial distance from the axis of rotation. The bent heat pipe studied here is shown to have advantages when compared to the conventional straight heat pipes in these off-axis cooling scenarios. The heat pipe studied here is built so that both the condenser and evaporator sections are parallel to the axis of rotation. The condenser section is concentric with the axis of rotation while the evaporator section can be placed in contact with off-axis heat sources in the rotating machine. The geometry is achieved by incorporating an S-shaped curve between the on-axis rotating condenser section and the off-axis revolving evaporator section. Furthermore, the heat pipe uses an annular gap wick structure. Incorporating an annular gap wick structure into the heat pipe allows for operation in a non-rotating environment. A numerical model of this rotating heat pipe is developed. The analysis is based on a two-dimensional finite-difference model of the liquid flow coupled to a one-dimensional model of the vapor flow. Although the numerical model incorporates many significant aspects of the fluid flow, the flow in the actual heat pipe is expected to be threedimensional. The rotating heat pipe with the S-shaped curve is also studied experimentally to determine how well the numerical model captures the key

  10. Discrete optimization of isolator locations for vibration isolation systems: An analytical and experimental investigation

    Ponslet, E.R.; Eldred, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural Dynamics Dept.

    1996-05-17

    An analytical and experimental study is conducted to investigate the effect of isolator locations on the effectiveness of vibration isolation systems. The study uses isolators with fixed properties and evaluates potential improvements to the isolation system that can be achieved by optimizing isolator locations. Because the available locations for the isolators are discrete in this application, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used as the optimization method. The system is modeled in MATLAB{trademark} and coupled with the GA available in the DAKOTA optimization toolkit under development at Sandia National Laboratories. Design constraints dictated by hardware and experimental limitations are implemented through penalty function techniques. A series of GA runs reveal difficulties in the search on this heavily constrained, multimodal, discrete problem. However, the GA runs provide a variety of optimized designs with predicted performance from 30 to 70 times better than a baseline configuration. An alternate approach is also tested on this problem: it uses continuous optimization, followed by rounding of the solution to neighboring discrete configurations. Results show that this approach leads to either infeasible or poor designs. Finally, a number of optimized designs obtained from the GA searches are tested in the laboratory and compared to the baseline design. These experimental results show a 7 to 46 times improvement in vibration isolation from the baseline configuration.

  11. Local and Remote Laboratory User Experimentation Access using Digital Programmable Logic

    Ian A Grout

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the structure and operation of a programmable logic based experimentation arrangement that is suitable for both local and remote teaching and learning scenarios targeting electronic and microelectronic circuit design and test principles. With this experimentation arrangement, the ability to provide both local and Internet based “remote” access for the student and the teacher can provide a number of advantages where physical laboratory accessibility is limited and/or the learning experience must be undertaken with one or more of the parties remotely based. The paper concentrates on the design and example use of a system developed within the University of Limerick.

  12. An experimental investigation of pump as turbine for micro hydro application

    >N Raman, I Hussein,

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of a centrifugal pump working as turbine (PAT). An end suction centrifugal pump was tested in turbine mode at PAT experimental rig installed in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory of Universiti Tenaga Nasional. The pump with specific speed of 15.36 (m, m3/s) was used in the experiment and the performance characteristic of the PAT was determined. The experiment showed that a centrifugal pump can satisfactorily be operated as turbine without any mechanical problems. As compared to pump operation, the pump was found to operate at higher heads and discharge values in turbine mode. The best efficiency point (BEP) in turbine mode was found to be lower than BEP in pump mode. The results obtained were also compared to the work of some previous researchers.

  13. Experimental investigation of CO{sub 2} capture using sodium hydroxide particles in a fluidized bed

    Naeem, Sareh; Ghaemi, Ahad; Shahhosseini, Shahrokh [Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    CO{sub 2} capture from air using sodium hydroxide solid sorbent in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor was investigated experimentally. The influence of three parameters of temperature, inlet CO{sub 2} volume percentage and inlet air flow rate on the CO{sub 2} removal rate was studied. Experimental results showed that the optimum rate was at 25 oC when the inlet CO{sub 2} volume percentage was 1%. The results also showed that the adsorption process was reactive, and the reaction mechanism depended on the reaction temperature. In addition, empirical observation revealed only one adsorption cycle happened at low temperatures (25-30 oC). As the temperature increased, the second adsorption cycle occurred and, finally, CO{sub 2} desorption cycle took place in the range of 90-115 .deg. C.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Organic Synthesis in Hydrothermal Environments

    Shock, Everett L.

    1998-01-01

    The results of the investigation were presented at a Astrobiology Institute General Meeting. Seafloor hydrothermal systems may be the most likely locations on the early Earth for the emergence of life. Because of the disequilibrium inherent in such dynamic, mixing environments, abundant chemical energy would have been available for formation of the building blocks of life. In addition, theoretical studies suggest that organic compounds in these conditions would reach metastable states, due to kinetic barriers to the formation of stable equilibrium products (CO2 and methane). The speciation of organic carbon in metastable states is highly dependent on the oxidation state, pH, temperature, pressure and bulk composition of the system. The goal of our research is to investigate the effects of a number external variables on the formation, transformation, and stability of organic compounds at hydrothermal conditions. We have begun experimental work to attempt to control the oxidation state of simulated hydrothermal systems by using buffers composed of mineral powders and gas mixtures. We are also beginning to test the stability of organic compounds under these conditions.

  15. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    Raed Bashitialshaaer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow rate. Five geometric quantities describing the jet trajectory that are useful in the design of brine discharge systems were determined. Dimensional analysis demonstrated that the geometric jet quantities studied, if normalized with the jet exit diameter, could be related to the densimetric Froude number. Analysis of the collected data showed that this was the case for a Froude number less than 100, whereas for larger values of the Froude number the scatter in the data increased significantly. As has been observed in some previous investigations, the slope of the best-fit straight line through the data points was a function of the initial jet angle (θ, where the slope increased with θ for the maximum levels (Ym studied, but had a more complex behavior for horizontal distances.

  16. Using Experimental Methods to Investigate Discriminatory Tendencies: A Lesson Report

    Yu-Wen Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Using dictator games in experimental analysis, this lesson report demonstrates the process and results of a postgraduate class project in which university students were instructed to scientifically investigate and explore one of German society’s most hotly-contested issues: the level of discriminatory tendencies of non-Muslims towards Muslims. The results of this class project show little or no discriminatory tendencies toward Muslims. Instead, the university students under our investigation tended to act favorably, or at the very least, fairly toward Muslims. We expect that this lesson report can demonstrate how a postgraduate course can be conducted in an innovative way, empowering students to collect primary data and finishing a small scientific project during the span of a semester. Dieser Bericht stellt die Prozesse und Ergebnisse einer experimentellen Studie eines Postgraduierten-Kurses der Universität Greifswald dar. Wir zeigen, wie Studierende das Thema Migration innovativ untersuchen können, indem sie neben theoretischen Lerninhalten an experimentelle Methoden sowie die Primärforschung herangeführt werden. Anhand eines Diktatorspiels wurden die teilnehmenden Studenten angeleitet, ein in der Öffentlichkeit kontrovers debattiertes Thema wissenschaftlich zu untersuchen: Diskriminierende Tendenzen von Nicht-Muslimen gegenüber Muslimen. Die Ergebnisse dieser Studie lassen jedoch nicht auf diskriminierende Tendenzen der Studenten schließen. Stattdessen deuten sie darauf hin, dass sich die Studierenden zumindest fair gegenüber Muslimen verhalten.

  17. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization.

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    The atomization process in a mm-scale liquid droplet placed on a vibrating membrane is investigated experimentally. When the wavelength of the Faraday surface waves is smaller than the characteristic dimension of the droplet, the waves grow in amplitude as the excitation amplitude increases and ultimately begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. The high membrane acceleration needed to attain ejection (typically 300g) is achieved by driving a light-weight membrane near its resonant frequencies (nominally 1000-6000 Hz). The evolution and rate of the droplet-ejection process depend on a coupled system dynamic between the liquid droplet and the vibrating membrane. Depending on the excitation frequency and amplitude, various types of droplet-ejection processes can occur. For example, when step forcing (with prescribed frequency and amplitude) is applied, rapid atomization occurs. This event is triggered along the circumference of the droplet near the contact line by a strong azimuthal instability. In the present experiments, the droplet-ejection process and the resulting spray characteristics are investigated using high-speed video and two-frame particle tracking velocimetry.

  18. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration Induced Droplet Atomization*

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1999-11-01

    The atomization of a millimeter-scale liquid droplet placed on a vibrating diaphragm is investigated experimentally using high-speed imaging and particle-tracking techniques. Atomization is the result of the rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the wave crests of a hierarchy of forced surface waves on the primary droplet. The evolution and rate of ejection depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary droplet and the vibrating diaphragm. The present data indicate that secondary droplet ejection results from the collapse of surface craters formed during the evolution of capillary surface waves on the primary droplet. The collapse of the crater and the ensuing ejection of a momentary liquid jet are similar to ejection processes at free surfaces that are induced by the bursting of gas bubbles or the impingement of liquid droplets. The spray characteristics of the ejected droplets are investigated over a broad range of vibrating frequencies (up to 14 kHz) using particle-tracking velocimetry. * Supported by NASA Microgravity Res. Div., Grant NAG3-1949.

  19. Theoretical and experimental investigation of multispectral photoacoustic osteoporosis detection method

    Steinberg, Idan; Hershkovich, Hadas Sara; Gannot, Israel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a widespread disorder, which has a catastrophic impact on patients lives and overwhelming related to healthcare costs. Recently, we proposed a multispectral photoacoustic technique for early detection of osteoporosis. Such technique has great advantages over pure ultrasonic or optical methods as it allows the deduction of both bone functionality from the bone absorption spectrum and bone resistance to fracture from the characteristics of the ultrasound propagation. We demonstrated the propagation of multiple acoustic modes in animal bones in-vitro. To further investigate the effects of multiple wavelength excitations and of induced osteoporosis on the PA signal a multispectral photoacoustic system is presented. The experimental investigation is based on measuring the interference of multiple acoustic modes. The performance of the system is evaluated and a simple two mode theoretical model is fitted to the measured phase signals. The results show that such PA technique is accurate and repeatable. Then a multiple wavelength excitation is tested. It is shown that the PA response due to different excitation wavelengths revels that absorption by the different bone constitutes has a profound effect on the mode generation. The PA response is measured in single wavelength before and after induced osteoporosis. Results show that induced osteoporosis alters the measured amplitude and phase in a consistent manner which allows the detection of the onset of osteoporosis. These results suggest that a complete characterization of the bone over a region of both acoustic and optical frequencies might be used as a powerful tool for in-vivo bone evaluation.

  20. Simulating social interactions for the experimental investigation of joint attention.

    Caruana, Nathan; McArthur, Genevieve; Woolgar, Alexandra; Brock, Jon

    2017-03-01

    Social interactions are, by their nature, dynamic and reciprocal - your behaviour affects my behaviour, which affects your behaviour in return. However, until recently, the field of social cognitive neuroscience has been dominated by paradigms in which participants passively observe social stimuli from a detached "third person" perspective. Here we consider the unique conceptual and methodological challenges involved in adopting a "second person" approach whereby social cognitive mechanisms and their neural correlates are investigated within social interactions (Schilbach et al., 2013). The key question for researchers is how to distil a complex, intentional interaction between two individuals into a tightly controlled and replicable experimental paradigm. We explore these issues within the context of recent investigations of joint attention - the ability to coordinate a common focus of attention with another person. We review pioneering neurophysiology and eye-tracking studies that have begun to address these issues; offer recommendations for the optimal design and implementation of interactive tasks, and discuss the broader implications of interactive approaches for social cognitive neuroscience.

  1. Developing a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise to teach theories of visuomotor learning.

    Kasuga, Shoko; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a flexible motor ability to adapt their movements to changes in the internal/external environment. For example, using arm-reaching tasks, a number of studies experimentally showed that participants adapt to a novel visuomotor environment. These results helped develop computational models of motor learning implemented in the central nervous system. Despite the importance of such experimental paradigms for exploring the mechanisms of motor learning, because of the cost and preparation time, most students are unable to participate in such experiments. Therefore, in the current study, to help students better understand motor learning theories, we developed a simple finger-reaching experimental system using commonly used laptop PC components with an open-source programming language (Processing Motor Learning Toolkit: PMLT). We found that compared to a commercially available robotic arm-reaching device, our PMLT accomplished similar learning goals (difference in the error reduction between the devices, P = 0.10). In addition, consistent with previous reports from visuomotor learning studies, the participants showed after-effects indicating an adaptation of the motor learning system. The results suggest that PMLT can serve as a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise of motor learning theories with minimal time and cost for instructors.

  2. Experimental and modelling investigation of surface EMG spike analysis.

    Gabriel, David A; Christie, Anita; Inglis, J Greig; Kamen, Gary

    2011-05-01

    A pattern classification method based on five measures extracted from the surface electromyographic (sEMG) signal is used to provide a unique characterization of the interference pattern for different motor unit behaviours. This study investigated the sensitivity of the five sEMG measures during the force gradation process. Tissue and electrode filtering effects were further evaluated using a sEMG model. Subjects (N=8) performed isometric elbow flexion contractions from 0 to 100% MVC. The sEMG signals from the biceps brachii were recorded simultaneously with force. The basic building block of the sEMG model was the detection of single fibre action potentials (SFAPs) through a homogeneous, equivalent isotropic, infinite volume conduction medium. The SFAPs were summed to generate single motor unit action potentials. The physiologic properties from a well-known muscle model and motor unit recruitment and firing rate schemes were combined to generate synthetic sEMG signals. The following pattern classification measures were calculated: mean spike amplitude, mean spike frequency, mean spike slope, mean spike duration, and the mean number of peaks per spike. Root-mean-square amplitude and mean power frequency were also calculated. Taken together, the experimental data and modelling analysis showed that below 50% MVC, the pattern classification measures were more sensitive to changes in force than traditional time and frequency measures. However, there are additional limitations associated with electrode distance from the source that must be explored further. Future experimental work should ensure that the inter-electrode distance is no greater than 1cm to mitigate the effects of tissue filtering.

  3. Experimental Investigation of White Layer formation in Hard Turning

    Umbrello, D.; Rotella, G.; Crea, F.

    2011-05-01

    Hard turning with super hard cutting tools, like PCBN or Ceramics inserts, represents an interesting advance in the manufacturing industry, regarding the finishing of hardened steels. This innovative machining technique is considered an attractive alternative to traditional finish grinding operations because of the high flexibility, the ability to achieve higher metal removal rates, the possibility to operate without the use of coolants, and the capability to achieve comparable workpiece quality. However, the surface integrity effects of hard machining need to be taken into account due to their influence on the life of machined components. In particular, the formation of a usually undesirable white layer at the surface needs further investigation. Three different mechanisms have been proposed as main responsible of the white layer genesis: (i) microstructural phase transformation due to a rapid heating and quenching, (ii) severe plastic deformation resulting in a homogenous structure and/or a very fine grain size microstructure; (iii) surface reaction with the environment. In this research, an experimental campaign was carried out and several experimental techniques were used in order to analyzed the machined surface and to understand which of the above mentioned theories is the main cause of the white layer formation when AISI 52100 hardened steel is machined by PCBN inserts. In particular, the topography characterization has obtained by means of optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM) while microstructural phase composition and chemical characterization have been respectively detected using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. The results prove that the white layer is the result of microstructural alteration, i.e. the generation of a martensitic structure.

  4. Simulation and Experimentation in a Laboratory Curriculum for Non-Scientists

    Maloney, F. P.; Maurone, P. A.; Hones, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    The availability of low-cost high-performance computing hardware and software has transformed the manner by which astronomical concepts can be re-discovered and explored in a laboratory that accompanies an astronomy course for non-scientist students. We present a strategy for allowing each student to understand fundamental scientific principles by interactively confronting astronomical and physical phenomena, through direct observation and by computer simulation. Direct observation of physical phenomena, such as Hooke's Law, begins by using a computer and hardware interface as a data-collection and presentation tool. In this way, the student is encouraged to explore the physical conditions of the experiment and re-discover the fundamentals involved. The hardware frees the student from the tedium of manual data collection and presentation, and permits experimental design which utilizes data that would otherwise be too fleeting, too imprecise, or too voluminous. Computer simulation of astronomical phenomena allows the student to travel in time and space, freed from the vagaries of weather, to re-discover such phenomena as the daily and yearly cycles, the reason for the seasons, the saros, and Kepler's Laws. By integrating the knowledge gained by experimentation and simulation, the student can understand both the scientific concepts and the methods by which they are discovered and explored. We present the laboratory experiments (also available via anonymous FTP from ASTRO4.AST.VILL.EDU), and information concerning the hardware and software requirements. This work is supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts.

  5. The IAA cosmic dust laboratory: Experimental scattering matrices of clay particles

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Ramos, J. L.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results of measurements on solid particles performed at the Instituto de Astrofı´sica de Andalucı´a (IAA) cosmic dust laboratory located in Granada, Spain. The laboratory apparatus measures the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of aerosol particles. The measurements can be performed at a wavelength ( λ) of 483, 488, 520, 568, or 647 nm in the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. Results of special test experiments are presented which show that our experimental results for scattering matrices are not significantly contaminated by multiple scattering and that the sizes/shapes of the particles do not change during the measurements. Moreover, the measured scattering matrix for a sample of green clay particles is compared with measurements previously performed in the Amsterdam light scattering setup for the same sample. New measurements on a white clay sample at 488 and 647 nm are also presented. The apparatus is devoted to experimentally studying the angle dependence of scattering matrices of dust samples of astrophysical interest. Moreover, there is a great interest in similar studies of aerosols that can affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere of the Earth and other planets such as silicates, desert dust, volcanic ashes, and carbon soot particles.

  6. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance: Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Thermal and moisture problems in existing basements create a unique challenge because the exterior face of the wall is not easily or inexpensively accessible. This approach addresses thermal and moisture management from the interior face of the wall without disturbing the exterior soil and landscaping. the interior and exterior environments. This approach has the potential for improving durability, comfort, and indoor air quality. This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  7. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Copper Smelting Slags

    Starodub, Konstantin; Kuminova, Yaroslava; Dinsdale, Alan; Cheverikin, Vladimir; Filichkina, Vera; Saynazarov, Abdukahhar; Khvan, Alexandra; Kondratiev, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Effective extraction of copper from sulfide ores requires careful operation of a copper smelter, which in turn depends very much on chemistry of the feed and resulted slag and matte. For example, chemical composition of copper smelting slags has to be in a certain range to ensure that their properties are within specific limits. Disobeying these rules may lead to complications in smelting operation, poor quality of the copper products, and premature shutdown of the copper smelter. In the present paper the microstructure and phase composition of slags from the Almalyk copper flash smelter were investigated experimentally and then modeled thermodynamically to evaluate potential ways of improvement and optimization of the copper smelting process and its products. The slag samples were taken at different stages of the copper smelting process: on slag tapping, after slag transportation to a deposition site, and at the site. Experimental investigation included the XRD, XRF, and SEM techniques, which were also confirmed by the traditional wet chemistry analysis. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out using thermochemical software package MTDATA, which enables thermodynamic and physical properties of the matte, slag, and gas phases to be calculated in a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions. In addition, slag viscosities and corresponding matte settling rates were estimated using the modified Urbain and Utigard-Warczok models, and the Hadamard-Rybczynski equation, respectively. It was found that the copper content in the slags may vary significantly depending on the location of slag sampling. Cu was found to be present as sulfide particles, almost no Cu was found to be dissolved in the slag. Analysis of microstructure and phase composition showed that major phase found in the samples is fayalite, while other phases are complex spinels (based on magnetite), different sulfides, and a glass-like phase. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated the

  8. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    2010-07-01

    ... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation...

  9. Experimental Investigation on the Pressure Characteristics of Cavity Closure Region

    Yadong Wang; Xulong Yuan; Yuwen Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The most complicated component in cavitating flow and pressure distribution is the flow in the cavity closure line.The cavitating flow and pressure distribution provide critical aspects of flow field details in the region.The integral of pressure results of the hydrodynamic forces,indicate domination in the design of a supercavitating vehicle.An experiment was performed in a water tunnel to investigate the pressure characteristics of the cavity closure region.Ventilation methods were employed to generate artificial cavity,and the ventilation rate was adjusted accordingly to obtain the desired cavity length.An array of pressure transducers was laid down the cavity closure line to capture pressure distribution in this region.The experimental results show that there is a pressure peak in the cavity closure region,and the rise rate of pressure in space tends to be higher in the upwind side when the flow is non-axisymmetric.The transient pressure variations during the cavity formation procedure were also present.The method of measurement in this paper can be referenced by engineers.The result helps to study the flow pattern of cavity closure region,and it can also be used to analyze the formation of supercavitating vehicle hydrodynamics.

  10. Experimental investigation of two oil dispersion pathways by breaking waves

    Li, Cheng; Katz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    This experimental study focuses on generation and size distribution of airborne and subsurface oil droplets as breaking surface waves interact with a crude oil slick (MC252 surrogate). Experiments in a specialized wave tank investigate the effects of wave height and wave properties (e.g. spilling vs. plunging), as well as drastically reducing the oil-water interfacial tension by orders of magnitude by introducing dispersant (Coexist 9500-A). This dispersant is applied at varying dispersant-to-oil ratios either by premixing or surface spraying, the latter consistent with typical application. The data include high-speed visualizations of processes affecting the entrainment of subsurface oil and bubbles as well as airborne aerosols. High-speed digital holographic cinematography is employed to track the droplet trajectories, and quantify the droplet size distributions above and below the surface. Introduction of dispersants drastically reduces the size of subsurface droplets to micron and even submicron levels. Ahead of the wave, the 25 μm (our present resolution limit) to 2 mm airborne droplet trajectories are aligned with the wave direction. Behind the wave, these droplets reverse their direction, presumably due to the airflow above the wave. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  11. Experimental Investigation of Very Large Model Wind Turbine Arrays

    Charmanski, Kyle; Wosnik, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The decrease in energy yield in large wind farms (array losses) and associated revenue losses can be significant. When arrays are sufficiently large they can reach what is known as a fully developed wind turbine array boundary layer, or fully developed wind farm condition. This occurs when the turbulence statistics and the structure of the turbulence, within and above a wind farm, as well as the performance of the turbines remain the same from one row to the next. The study of this condition and how it is affected by parameters such as turbine spacing, power extraction, tip speed ratio, etc. is important for the optimization of large wind farms. An experimental investigation of the fully developed wind farm condition was conducted using a large array of porous disks (upstream) and realistically scaled 3-bladed wind turbines with a diameter of 0.25m. The turbines and porous disks were placed inside a naturally grown turbulent boundary layer in the 6m × 2.5m × 72m test section of the UNH Flow Physics Facility which can achieve test section velocities of up to 14 m/s and Reynolds numbers δ+ = δuτ / ν ~ 20 , 000 . Power, rate of rotation and rotor thrust were measured for select turbines, and hot-wire anemometry was used for flow measurements.

  12. Experimental investigation of sound absorbers based on microperforated panels

    Vechiatti, Nilda S.; Mendez, Antonio M.; Gimenez de Paz, Juan C.

    2002-11-01

    Microperforated panels have been studied as a good, interesting absorbing element. In previous papers the properties of high absorption obtained in a wide frequency band was demonstrated, based on the impedance of the very small perforations. The perforation area ratio, the diameter of the holes, the thickness of the panel, and the density and viscosity of the air are the terms that define the sound absorption provided by the element. The microperforated panels have a simple structure and it is possible to build single or double resonators, in order to obtain a wide band response. An orifice may be considered as a short tube. Many years ago, Rayleigh and Crandall studied the propagation of sound in small tubes, of a very short length compared to wavelength. They found a high acoustics resistance and a very small reactance. So, the microperforated panel can be used as a dissipative element. An experimental investigation was carried out on different samples of microperforated panels, in order to obtain their sound absorption coefficient and so verify the validity of the mathematical models. Microperforated panels have been developed to cover a welding cabin internally, where classical absorbents are useless. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  13. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF BUBBLE AUGMENTED WATERJET PROPULSION

    WU Xiongjun; CHOI Jin-Keun; SINGH Sowmitra; HSIAO Chao-Tsung; CHAHINE Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution presents experimental and numerical investigations of the concept jet propulsion augmentation using bubble injection.A half-3D (D-shaped cylindrical configuration to enable optimal visualizations) divergent-convergent nozzle was designed,built,and used for extensive experiments under different air injection conditions and thrust measurement schemes.The design,optimization,and analysis were conducted using numerical simulations.The more advanced model was based on a two-way coupling between an Eulerian description of the flow field and a Lagrangian tracking of the injected bubbles using our Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) model.The numerical resultscompare very favorably with nozzle experiments and both experiments and simulations validation the thrust augmentation concept.For a properly designed nozzle and air injection system,air injection produces net thrust augmentation,which increases with the rate of bubble injection.Doubling of thrust was measured for a 50% air injection rate.This beneficial effect remains at 50% after account for liquid pump additional work to overcome increased pressure by air injection.

  14. Dry vs. Cryogenic Orthogonal Hard Machining: an Experimental Investigation

    Umbrello, D.; Caruso, S.; Di Renzo, S.; Jayal, A. D.; Dillon, O. W.; Jawahir, I. S.

    2011-05-01

    Friction, and consequently heat generation in the cutting zone, significantly affects the tool life, surface integrity and dimensional accuracy, apart from other machining results. Application of a coolant in a cutting process can increase tool life and dimensional accuracy, decrease heat generation, and consequently cutting temperatures, reduce surface roughness and the amount of energy consumed in cutting process, and thus improve the productivity. Furthermore, coolant application also affects the surface microstructural alterations (i.e., white and dark layers) due to a machining operation, which have a significant influence on product performance and life. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation to determine the effects of cryogenic coolant application on tool wear, cutting forces and machined surface alterations during orthogonal machining of hardened AISI 52100 bearing steel (54±1 HRC). Experiments were performed for dry and cryogenic cutting conditions using chamfered PCBN tool inserts at varying cutting conditions (cutting speed and feed rate). For cryogenic cutting conditions the fluid was applied in the form of a liquid nitrogen jet directed on the three shear cutting zones. Cutting forces, tool wear, cutting temperatures, surface hardness modifications and microstructure alterations were studied in order to evaluate the effects of extreme in-process cooling. The results indicate that cryogenic cooling has the potential to be used for surface integrity enhancement for improved product life and more sustainable functional performance.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of PVC Polymer under Different Heating and Cooling Conditions

    Sarkawt Rostam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to a widely increasing usage of polymers in various industrial applications, there should be a continuous need in doing research investigations for better understanding of their properties. These applications require the usage of the polymer in different working environments subjecting the material to various temperature ranges. In this paper, an experimental investigation of mechanical properties of polyvinyl chloride (PVC polymer under heating and cooling conditions is presented. For this purpose standard samples are prepared and tested in laboratory using universal material testing apparatus. The samples are tested under different conditions including the room temperature environment, cooling in a refrigerator, and heating at different heating temperatures. It is observed that the strength of the tested samples decreases with the increasing of heating temperature and accordingly the material becomes softer. Meanwhile the cooling environments give a clear increasing to the strength of the material.

  16. A laboratory experimental setup for photo-absorption studies using synchrotron radiation

    Shastri, A; Saraswati, P; Sunanda, K

    2002-01-01

    The photophysics beamline, which is being installed at the 450 MeV Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Indus-l, is a medium resolution beamline useful for a variety of experiments in the VUV region viz. 500-2000 A. One of the major applications of this beamline is gas-phase photo-absorption studies. An experimental set up to be used for these experiments was designed, developed and tested in our laboratory. The setup consists of a high vacuum absorption cell, 1/4 m monochromator and detection system. For the purpose of testing, xenon and tungsten continuum sources were used and absorption spectra were recorded in the UV region. This setup was used to record the absorption spectrum of a few molecules like acetone, ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in order to evaluate the performance of the experimental system which will subsequently be used with the photophysics beamline. Details of the design, fabrication and testing of the absorption cell and experimental procedures are presented in this repor...

  17. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  18. Sprite discharges on Venus and Jupiter-like planets: a laboratory investigation.

    Dubrovin, S.; Nijdam, S.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Ebert, U.; Yair, Y.; Price, C.

    2010-01-01

    Large sprite discharges at high atmospheric altitudes have been found to be physically similar to small streamer discharges in air at sea level density. Based on this understanding, we investigate possible sprite discharges on Venus or Jupiter‐like planets through laboratory experiments on streamers

  19. Laboratory Investigation of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw fired Power Plants

    Montgomery, Melanie

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion in straw-fired power plants has been studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C metal temperature for upto 300 hours.In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was examined in ash taken from a straw...

  20. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    Taffet, M.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Oberdorfer, J.A. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA)); McIlvride, W.A. (Weiss Associates, Oakland, CA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  1. Investigation of a Chaotic Double Pendulum in the Basic Level Physics Teaching Laboratory

    Vanko, Peter

    2007-01-01

    First-year physics students at the Technical University of Budapest carry out a wide range of measurements in the Basic Level Physics Teaching Laboratory. One of the most exciting experiments is the investigation of a chaotic double pendulum by a V-scope, a powerful three-dimensional motion tracking system. After a brief introduction to the…

  2. Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Impact of Ocean Acidification on Calcareous Organisms

    Perera, Alokya P.; Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2014-01-01

    The increase in ocean acidity since preindustrial times may have deleterious consequences for marine organisms, particularly those with calcareous structures. We present a laboratory experiment to investigate this impact with general, introductory, environmental, and nonmajors chemistry students. For simplicity and homogeneity, calcite was…

  3. Cloning Yeast Actin cDNA Leads to an Investigative Approach for the Molecular Biology Laboratory

    Black, Michael W.; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the…

  4. Experimental investigation and numerical simulation on the effect of fissure water pressure in vertical sliding surface

    ZHANG; Lei; LI; Shihai; LIAN; Zhenzhong; WANG; Yuannian

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of fissure water pressure in different fractures on the critical angle of landslide by laboratory investigation and numerical simulation in order to understand the mechanisms of fissure water pressure on landslide stability. Laboratory observations show that the effect of fissure water pressure on the critical angle of landslide is little when the distance between water-holding fracture and slope toe is three times greater than the depth of fissure water. These experimental results are also simulated by a three-dimensional face-to-face contact discrete element method. This method has included the fissure water pressure and can accurately calculate the critical angle of jointed slope when fissure water pressure in vertical sliding surface exists.Numerical results are in good agreement with experimental observations. It is revealed that the location of water-holding structural surface is important to landslide stability. The ratio of the distance between water-holding fissure and slope toe to the depth of fissure water is a key parameter to justify the effect of fissure water pressure on the critical angle of landslide.

  5. Fish on Prozac: a simple, noninvasive physiology laboratory investigating the mechanisms of aggressive behavior in Betta splendens.

    Lynn, Sharon E; Egar, Joseph M; Walker, Brian G; Sperry, Todd S; Ramenofsky, Marilyn

    2007-12-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is an important regulator of aggressive behavior in vertebrates. Experimentally increasing synaptic levels of serotonin with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to reliably decrease the expression of aggressive behavior. Here, we describe a method by which fluoxetine can be noninvasively administered to male Betta splendens (an attractive model for the study of aggressive behavior) and describe a simple laboratory exercise that allows students to experimentally investigate the physiological mechanisms of aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that relatively short-term exposure (3 h) of male bettas to as little as 3 microg/ml of fluoxetine-treated aquarium water is sufficient to reduce the expression of specific aggressive behaviors. We emphasize the physiological concepts that can be addressed with this exercise, including the role of the serotonergic system in regulating aggression, and the interplay of environmental contaminants and physiology in regulating the expression of behavior. We also highlight important aspects of experimental design. This exercise can be flexibly altered to accommodate one or several laboratory periods. It is also low cost, is low impact to the animals, and requires minimal preparation time for instructors.

  6. RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE HERRING SALTING

    M. V. Shumanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To the salting process of fish many studies are devoted, both in experimental and in theoretical terms. Study of features of fish salting in historical terms can be divided into 3 groups. One group of researchers believes that osmotic pressure has a major influence during the salting process. Another group attributed this process to the influence of molecular diffusion. The third group considers that during this process takes place both osmosis and diffusion. Determination of the main characteristics (salinity, diffusion coefficients, time of salting, etc. is a very time-consuming task. This leads to the idea of searching for innovative research methods. Current state of science, in addition to theoretical solutions points to the possibility to determine the basic characteristics of salting and applying methods associated with the interaction of ultrasound and electromagnetic radiation with matter. In our studies, we have been producing laser beam scanning of salt solution and fish meat thickness. Scattered radiation is determined by the salt concentration, diffusion coefficients, the size of the diffusing particles. This method is called a photon correlation spectroscopy. It has been applied in our work. The dependence of the scattered light intensity on the concentration of sodium chloride solution (brine has been investigated. According to diffusion coefficient a diffusion in solution to herring skin a conclusion was made that salt solution obtains fractal structure and its size was determined. Also we determined diffusion coefficients depending on the temperature in the layers. The layers are brine-leather, leather, and herring meat thickness. The process of diffusion-osmotic equilibrium revealed at temperatures of 10-12 ° C. Suggested the possibility of higher quality of fish salting at low temperatures. On the basis of the selfsimilar solution of the differential diffusion equation, a formula for calculating time salting fish was obtained

  7. A State-of-the-Art Experimental Laboratory for Cloud and Cloud-Aerosol Interaction Research

    Fremaux, Charles M.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    The state of the art for predicting climate changes due to increasing greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere with high accuracy is problematic. Confidence intervals on current long-term predictions (on the order of 100 years) are so large that the ability to make informed decisions with regard to optimum strategies for mitigating both the causes of climate change and its effects is in doubt. There is ample evidence in the literature that large sources of uncertainty in current climate models are various aerosol effects. One approach to furthering discovery as well as modeling, and verification and validation (V&V) for cloud-aerosol interactions is use of a large "cloud chamber" in a complimentary role to in-situ and remote sensing measurement approaches. Reproducing all of the complex interactions is not feasible, but it is suggested that the physics of certain key processes can be established in a laboratory setting so that relevant fluid-dynamic and cloud-aerosol phenomena can be experimentally simulated and studied in a controlled environment. This report presents a high-level argument for significantly improved laboratory capability, and is meant to serve as a starting point for stimulating discussion within the climate science and other interested communities.

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  9. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    Schauer, Frantisek; Ozvoldova, Miroslava [Trnava University, Faculty of Pedagogy, Department of Physics, Trnava (Slovakia); Lustig, Frantisek; Dvorak, JirI [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Didactics of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: fschauer@ft.utb.cz

    2008-07-15

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system.

  10. The MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL): A NASA Investigator Facility

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Noble-gas isotopes are a well-established technique for providing detailed temperature-time histories of rocks and meteorites. We have established the MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL) at Marshall Space Flight Center to serve as a NASA investigator facility in the wake of the closure of the JSC laboratory formerly run by Don Bogard. The MNGRL lab was constructed to be able to measure all the noble gases, particularly Ar-Ar and I-Xe radioactive dating to find the formation age of rocks and meteorites, and Ar/Kr/Ne cosmic-ray exposure ages to understand when the meteorites were launched from their parent planets.

  11. Clandestine laboratory scene investigation and processing using portable GC/MS

    Matejczyk, Raymond J.

    1997-02-01

    This presentation describes the use of portable gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for on-scene investigation and processing of clandestine laboratories. Clandestine laboratory investigations present special problems to forensic investigators. These crime scenes contain many chemical hazards that must be detected, identified and collected as evidence. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry performed on-scene with a rugged, portable unit is capable of analyzing a variety of matrices for drugs and chemicals used in the manufacture of illicit drugs, such as methamphetamine. Technologies used to detect various materials at a scene have particular applications but do not address the wide range of samples, chemicals, matrices and mixtures that exist in clan labs. Typical analyses performed by GC/MS are for the purpose of positively establishing the identity of starting materials, chemicals and end-product collected from clandestine laboratories. Concerns for the public and investigator safety and the environment are also important factors for rapid on-scene data generation. Here is described the implementation of a portable multiple-inlet GC/MS system designed for rapid deployment to a scene to perform forensic investigations of clandestine drug manufacturing laboratories. GC/MS has long been held as the 'gold standard' in performing forensic chemical analyses. With the capability of GC/MS to separate and produce a 'chemical fingerprint' of compounds, it is utilized as an essential technique for detecting and positively identifying chemical evidence. Rapid and conclusive on-scene analysis of evidence will assist the forensic investigators in collecting only pertinent evidence thereby reducing the amount of evidence to be transported, reducing chain of custody concerns, reducing costs and hazards, maintaining sample integrity and speeding the completion of the investigative process.

  12. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  13. Bonding energy of Sylgard on fused quartz: an experimental investigation

    Liu, C.; Yeager, J. D.; Ramos, K. J.

    2015-02-01

    The bonding energy between the polymer Sylgard and fused quartz is determined experimentally using a miniature bulge test combined with three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D-DIC). Based on the experimental observation, Mindlin plate theory is used to compute the bonding energy (adhesive energy or surface energy) between the Sylgard and the fused quartz. The experimental results demonstrate that the combination of the miniature bulge test and the 3D-DIC provides a viable tool to directly measure interfacial and bonding properties.

  14. Experimental investigations of biomass gasification with carbon-dioxide

    Sircar, Indraneel

    A sustainable energy cycle may include enhanced utilization of solar energy and atmospheric CO2 to produce biomass and enhanced utilization of exhaust CO2 from power plants for synthetic gas production. The reaction of carbon with CO2 is potentially one of the important processes in a future sustainable carbon cycle. Reactions involving carbon and CO2 are also relevant to the chemical process and metal industries. Biomass char has been recognized as a present and future alternative to fossil-fuels for energy production and fuel synthesis. Therefore, biomass char gasification with CO2 recycling is proposed as a sustainable and carbon-neutral energy technology. Biomass char is a complex porous solid and its gasification involves heat and mass transfer processes within pores of multiple sizes from nanometer to millimeter scales. These processes are coupled with heterogeneous chemistry at the internal and external surfaces. Rates for the heterogeneous carbon gasification reactions are affected by inorganic content of the char. Furthermore, pore structure of the char develops with conversion and influences apparent gasification rates. Effective modeling of the gasification reactions has relied on the best available understanding of diffusion processes and kinetic rate property constants from state of the art experiments. Improvement of the influences of inorganic composition, and process parameters, such as pressure and temperature on the gasification reaction rates has been a continuous process. Economic viability of gasification relies on use of optimum catalysts. These aspects of the current status of gasification technologies have motivated the work reported in this dissertation. The reactions between biomass chars and CO2 are investigated to determine the effects of temperature and pressure on the reaction rates for large char particles of relevance to practical gasification technologies. An experimental apparatus consisting of a high-pressure fixed-bed reactor

  15. Laboratory investigations of the hydroxyl radical-initiated oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds

    Vimal, Deepali

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is one of the most important oxidants in the atmosphere, because reaction with OH is the dominant atmospheric fate of most trace atmospheric species. OH is intimately involved in a complex non-linear photochemical pathway involving anthropogenic and biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides that are emitted from vehicular exhaust and industrial emissions. This chemistry generates secondary tropospheric ozone which is an important greenhouse gas as well as a component of photochemical smog. In addition, this chemistry leads to the formation of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere which have implications for public health and climate change. The focus of this dissertation is to improve our understanding of this complex chemistry by investigating the rate-limiting elementary reactions which are part of the OH-initiated oxidation of important VOCs. Experimental (discharge flow technique coupled with resonance fluorescence and laser induced fluorescence) and theoretical studies (Density Functional Theory computations) of the kinetics of three atmospheric VOCs, acetic acid, 1,3-butadiene and methyl ethyl ketone are discussed. The acetic acid and OH reaction has been thought to undergo a hydrogen-bonded complex mediated pathway instead of a direct one leading to faster rate constants at lower temperature. Our results for the experimental investigation between 263-373 K and pressures of 2-5 Torr for the gas phase reaction of acetic acid with OH confirm the complex mediated reaction mechanism and indicate that acetic acid can play an important role especially in the oxidative chemistry of upper troposphere. The 1,3-butadiene and OH reaction is thought to undergo electrophilicaddition by OH which could display a complex pressure dependence similar to isoprene and 232-butenol as noted earlier in this laboratory. However, our results for the kinetics of the reaction between 273-423 K and a pressure range of 1

  16. - El rol de la enfermera en un departamento de Cirugía Experimental (The nurse role in an experimental surgery laboratory

    Lic. Ileana Macías Hernández

    2006-07-01

    fields of knowledge, as it is the case of investigation. Experimental surgery is a very important discipline within the biomedical sciences due to the possibilities it offers in the field of research in training future surgeons and in teaching graduates and non graduates . Personnel working here are quite important to keep the research projects, so as to solve problems related to clinics or associated with investigation. All these aspects should be kept in mind but without letting aside teaching and assistance to other departments, institutions, etc. Having this in mind it is necessary to have a nurse or more than one, if possible, depending on the number of surgeons there exist in the department or laboratory. The aim of this research is to give information on the importance of nurses as collaborators in a department or laboratory of experimental surgery. A department of experimental surgery without a nurse, as part of the staff, will never be able to carry out a good job, because they are as indispensable as surgeons, with independent and complementary functions typical of their profession.

  17. Experimental investigation of temperature fields in a synthetic jet

    Dančová Petra

    2014-01-01

    experiment presents several challenges; therefore, to ensure the best precision possible, two experimental methods were used – digital holographic interferometry (DHI and thermo-anemometry in constant current mode as an auxiliary method to verify DHI.

  18. [Some notes on the history of the experimental surgery laboratory. Reflections on its relevance in education and surgical research].

    de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel Sofía; Padilla-Sánchez, Luis; de la Garza-Aguilar, Javier; Neri-Vela, Rolando

    2007-01-01

    The progress of medicine has largely been due to research, and for surgery, in particular, the experimental surgical laboratory has been considered fundamental to the surgeon's education. In this study, a general view of experimental surgery is given in animal models based on bioethical norms as well as to design, create and apply different surgical procedures before performing in humans. Experimental surgery also facilitates surgical teaching and promotes the surgeon's scientific reasoning. Methods. This is a retrospective and descriptive study. Data were collected from direct and indirect sources of available publications on the historical, bioethical and educational aspects of medicine, focusing on surgery. The important facts corresponding to the field of experimental surgery and applicable in Mexico were selected. Concepts of experimental surgical models and of the experimental surgery laboratory were described. Bioethical considerations are emphasized for care of experimental animals. Finally, this work focuses on the importance of surgical experimentation in current and future development of the surgical researcher. Conclusions. Experimentation with animal models in a surgical laboratory is essential for surgical teaching and promotes development of the scientific thought in the surgeon. It is necessary for surgical research and is fundamental for making progress in surgery, treatment and medicine as science.

  19. Who Scared the Cat? A Molecular Crime Scene Investigation Laboratory Exercise†

    Ott, Laura E.; Carson, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    This introductory laboratory exercise gives first-year life science majors or nonmajors an opportunity to gain knowledge and experience in basic bioinformatics and molecular biology laboratory techniques and analysis in the context of a mock crime scene investigation. In this laboratory, students determine if a human (Lady) or dog (Kona) committed the fictional crime of scaring a cat. Students begin by performing in silico PCR using provided dog- and human-specific PCR primers to determine the sequences to be amplified and predict PCR amplicon sizes. They then BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) the in silico PCR results to confirm that the PCR primers are designed to amplify genomic fragments of the cardiac actin gene in both dogs and humans. Finally, they use DNA quantification techniques, PCR, and agarose gel electrophoresis to identify the culprit and they confirm results by analyzing Sanger sequencing. Student learning gains were demonstrated by successful execution of the lab and by analysis and interpretation of data in the completion of laboratory reports. The student learning gains were also demonstrated by increased performance on a post-laboratory assessment compared to the pre-assessment. A post-activity assessment also revealed that students perceived gains in the skills and conceptual knowledge associated with the student learning outcomes. Finally, assessment of this introductory molecular biology and bio-informatics activity reveals that it allows first-year students to develop higher-order data analysis and interpretation skills. PMID:28101273

  20. Who Scared the Cat? A Molecular Crime Scene Investigation Laboratory Exercise

    Laura E. Ott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This introductory laboratory exercise gives first-year life science majors or nonmajors an opportunity to gain knowledge and experience in basic bioinformatics and molecular biology laboratory techniques and analysis in the context of a mock crime scene investigation. In this laboratory, students determine if a human (Lady or dog (Kona committed the fictional crime of scaring a cat. Students begin by performing in silico PCR using provided dog- and human-specific PCR primers to determine the sequences to be amplified and predict PCR amplicon sizes. They then BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool the in silico PCR results to confirm that the PCR primers are designed to amplify genomic fragments of the cardiac actin gene in both dogs and humans. Finally, they use DNA quantification techniques, PCR, and agarose gel electrophoresis to identify the culprit and they confirm results by analyzing Sanger sequencing. Student learning gains were demonstrated by successful execution of the lab and by analysis and interpretation of data in the completion of laboratory reports. The student learning gains were also demonstrated by increased performance on a post-laboratory assessment compared to the pre-assessment. A post-activity assessment also revealed that students perceived gains in the skills and conceptual knowledge associated with the student learning outcomes. Finally, assessment of this introductory molecular biology and bioinformatics activity reveals that it allows first-year students to develop higher-order data analysis and interpretation skills.

  1. Who Scared the Cat? A Molecular Crime Scene Investigation Laboratory Exercise.

    Ott, Laura E; Carson, Susan D

    2016-12-01

    This introductory laboratory exercise gives first-year life science majors or nonmajors an opportunity to gain knowledge and experience in basic bioinformatics and molecular biology laboratory techniques and analysis in the context of a mock crime scene investigation. In this laboratory, students determine if a human (Lady) or dog (Kona) committed the fictional crime of scaring a cat. Students begin by performing in silico PCR using provided dog- and human-specific PCR primers to determine the sequences to be amplified and predict PCR amplicon sizes. They then BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) the in silico PCR results to confirm that the PCR primers are designed to amplify genomic fragments of the cardiac actin gene in both dogs and humans. Finally, they use DNA quantification techniques, PCR, and agarose gel electrophoresis to identify the culprit and they confirm results by analyzing Sanger sequencing. Student learning gains were demonstrated by successful execution of the lab and by analysis and interpretation of data in the completion of laboratory reports. The student learning gains were also demonstrated by increased performance on a post-laboratory assessment compared to the pre-assessment. A post-activity assessment also revealed that students perceived gains in the skills and conceptual knowledge associated with the student learning outcomes. Finally, assessment of this introductory molecular biology and bio-informatics activity reveals that it allows first-year students to develop higher-order data analysis and interpretation skills.

  2. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  3. The Experimental Investigation Of The Screen Operation In The Parametric Resonance Conditions

    Bąk Łukasz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the experimental studies of the screen working in the parametric resonance condition are discussed. The investigations are conducted for laboratory parametric resonance screen. The measuring test is performed for four cases of tension force values. The full sheet metal instead of the sieve is used. For each considered case the natural frequency of the plate and the parameter modulation frequency are determined. The achieved results are presented and discussed. It is shown that the highest sieve plate amplitude is obtained when the parameter modulation frequency is two times larger than natural frequency of the sieve plate. This parametric resonance vibration was observed only for tension force equal to 4000 N because of the rotational speed limits of electrical vibratos.

  4. New method of the polymeric material properties experimental investigation under powerful energy flux impact

    Demidov, B. A.; Efremov, V. P.; Kalinin, Yu G.; Kazakov, E. D.; Metelkin, S. Yu; Petrov, V. A.; Potapenko, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    Investigation of the polymeric material properties under powerfull energy flux impact is relevant as for basic research (mathematical modeling of polymeric materials behavior in extreme conditions, testing the state equations), as for practical applications (for testing of protective coatings for space research and laboratory facilities). This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the interaction of polymeric materials with a relativistic electron beam produced by a high-current electron accelerator Calamary. Calamary facility provides a wide range of electron beam parameters: diameter 10-15 mm, the voltage on the diode up to 300 kV, the current through the diode up to 30 kA. New method of beam-target interaction area measurement was developed. The original method for the mechanical kick impulse measuring based on piezoelectric vibration sensor was presented. The dependence of the kick impulse from the power flux was obtained.

  5. An investigation into the effectiveness of problem-based learning in a physical chemistry laboratory course

    Gürses, Ahmet; Açıkyıldız, Metin; Doğar, Çetin; Sözbilir, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in a physical chemistry laboratory course. The parameters investigated were students’ attitudes towards a chemistry laboratory course, scientific process skills of students and their academic achievement. The design of the study was one group pre-test post-test. Four experiments, covering the topics adsorption, viscosity, surface tension and conductivity were performed using a PBL approach in the fall semester of the 2003/04 academic year at Kazim Karabekir Education Faculty of Atatürk University. Each experiment was done over a three week period. A total of 40 students, 18 male and 22 female, participated in the study. Students took the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Concept Test (PCLCT), Attitudes towards Chemistry Laboratory (ATCL) questionnaire and Science Process Skills Test (SPST) as pre and post-tests. In addition, the effectiveness of the PBL approach was also determined through four different scales; Scales Specific to Students’ Views of PBL. A statistically significant difference between the students’ academic achievement and scientific process skills at p

  6. Laboratory test reactor for the investigation of liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx

    Peitz, D.; Bernhard, A.; Elsener, M.; Kröcher, O.

    2011-08-01

    A test reactor was designed and built for investigating liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process in the laboratory. The design of the experimental setup is described in detail and its performance was evaluated. Using a glass nebulizer, liquid reducing agents were sprayed directly onto a catalyst positioned in a heated glass reactor with a length of 250 mm and an internal diameter of 20.4 mm or 40 mm. Model exhaust gases were mixed from individual gas components and were heated up to 450 °C in a heat exchanger before entering the reactor. The off-gas was analyzed using two complimentary techniques, a multi-component online FTIR gas analysis and a liquid quench gas absorption setup, to detect higher molecular compounds and aerosols. Due to the versatility of construction, processes not related to SCR, but involving three-phase reactions with gases, liquids and a catalyst, can also be investigated.

  7. Experimental investigations on showerhead cooling on a blunt body

    Falcoz, C.; Ott, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Thermique Appliquee et de Turbomachines (LTT), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Weigand, B. [Institut fuer Thermodynamik der Luft- und Raumfahrt (ITLR), Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    In modern gas turbines, the turbine airfoil leading edge is currently protected from the hot gases by specific film cooling schemes, so-called showerhead cooling. The present paper shows an experimental study of different showerhead cooling geometries on a blunt body. For these tests, TLC (thermochromatic liquid crystals) have been used for measuring the film cooling performance and the heat transfer. Detailed experimental results for the aerodynamics, the film cooling effectiveness and the heat transfer enhancement are presented for different film cooling geometries. (author)

  8. Experimental Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Rock Salt

    Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

    2014-07-01

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  9. Experimental investigation of two-phase flow in rock salt

    Malama, Bwalya [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howard, Clifford L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  10. Experimental investigation of the role of ions in aerosol nucleation

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    rays and Earth's climate and there is thus a need to corroborate the results in a different experiment. The present results are obtained in the same laboratory, but using a new setup The experiments were conducted in a 50 L cylindrical reaction chamber made of electropolished stainless steel. Aerosols...... were grown using photochemically produced sulphuric acid and ionization levels were controlled with a Cs-137 gamma-source. An increase in nucleation was observed when the chamber was exposed to the radioactive source. The results were analyzed using a model based on the General Dynamic Equation...

  11. Experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in a low-profile, concentrated solar thermal collector

    Li, Qiyuan; Zheng, Cheng; Mesgari, Sara; Hewakuruppu, Yasitha L.; Hjerrild, Natasha; Crisostomo, Felipe; Morrison, Karl; Woffenden, Albert; Rosengarten, Gary; Scott, Jason A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies [1-3] have demonstrated that nanotechnology, in the form of nanoparticles suspended in water and organic liquids, can be employed to enhance solar collection via direct volumetric absorbers. However, current nanofluid solar collector experimental studies are either relevant to low-temperature flat plate solar collectors (100 °C) indoor laboratory-scale concentrating solar collectors [1, 5]. Moreover, many of these studies involve in thermal properties of nanofluid (such as thermal conductivity) enhancement in solar collectors by using conventional selective coated steel/copper tube receivers [6], and no full-scale concentrating collector has been tested at outdoor condition by employing nanofluid absorber [2, 6]. Thus, there is a need of experimental researches to evaluate the exact performance of full-scale concentrating solar collector by employing nanofluids absorber at outdoor condition. As reported previously [7-9], a low profile (solar thermal concentrating collector was designed and analysed which can potentially supply thermal energy in the 100-250 °C range (an application currently met by gas and electricity). The present study focuses on the design and experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in this newly designed collector. The nanofluid absorber consists of glass tubes used to contain chemically functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed in DI water. MWCNTs (average diameter of 6-13 nm and average length of 2.5-20 μm) were functionalized by potassium persulfate as an oxidant. The nanofluids were prepared with a MCWNT concentration of 50 +/- 0.1 mg/L to form a balance between solar absorption depth and viscosity (e.g. pumping power). Moreover, experimentally comparison of the thermal efficiency between two receivers (a black chrome-coated copper tube versus a MWCNT nanofluid contained within a glass tubetube) is investigated. Thermal experimentation reveals that while the collector efficiency

  12. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Instability of Iced Bridge Cable Sections

    Koss, Holger; Lund, Mia Schou Møller

    2013-01-01

    of bridge cables under wind action. This paper describes the experimental simulation of ice accretion on a real bridge cable sheet HDPE tube segment (diameter 160mm) and its effect on the aerodynamic load. Furthermore, aerodynamic instability will be estimated with quasi-steady theory using the determined...

  13. The physics and chemistry of dusty plasmas: A laboratory and theoretical investigation

    Whipple, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical work on dusty plasmas was conducted in three areas: collective effects in a dusty plasma, the role of dusty plasmas in cometary atmospheres, and the role of dusty plasmas in planetary atmospheres (particularly in the ring systems of the giant planets). Laboratory investigations consisted of studies of dust/plasma interactions and stimulated molecular excitation and infrared emission by charged dust grains. Also included is a list of current publications.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of reactive shock-accelerated flows

    Bonazza, Riccardo [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    2016-12-20

    The main goal of this program was to establish a qualitative and quantitative connection, based on the appropriate dimensionless parameters and scaling laws, between shock-induced distortion of astrophysical plasma density clumps and their earthbound analog in a shock tube. These objectives were pursued by carrying out laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to study the evolution of two gas bubbles accelerated by planar shock waves and compare the results to available astrophysical observations. The experiments were carried out in an vertical, downward-firing shock tube, 9.2 m long, with square internal cross section (25×25 cm2). Specific goals were to quantify the effect of the shock strength (Mach number, M) and the density contrast between the bubble gas and its surroundings (usually quantified by the Atwood number, i.e. the dimensionless density difference between the two gases) upon some of the most important flow features (e.g. macroscopic properties; turbulence and mixing rates). The computational component of the work performed through this program was aimed at (a) studying the physics of multi-phase compressible flows in the context of astrophysics plasmas and (b) providing a computational connection between laboratory experiments and the astrophysical application of shock-bubble interactions. Throughout the study, we used the FLASH4.2 code to run hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical simulations of shock bubble interactions on an adaptive mesh.

  15. Investigating student learning in upper-division laboratory courses on analog electronics

    Stetzer, Mackenzie

    2015-03-01

    There are many important learning goals associated with upper-division laboratory instruction; however, until recently, relatively little work has focused on assessing the impact of these laboratory-based courses on students. As part of an ongoing, in-depth investigation of student learning in upper-division laboratory courses on analog electronics, we have been examining the extent to which students enrolled in these courses develop a robust and functional understanding of both canonical electronics topics (e.g., diode, transistor, and op-amp circuits) and foundational circuits concepts (e.g., Kirchhoff's laws and voltage division). This focus on conceptual understanding is motivated in part by a large body of research revealing significant student difficulties with simple dc circuits at the introductory level and by expectations that students finish electronics courses with a level of understanding suitable for building common, practical circuits in a real-world environment. Recently, we have extended the scope of our investigation to include more laboratory-focused learning goals such as the development of (1) troubleshooting proficiency and (2) circuit chunking and design abilities. In this talk, I will highlight findings from written questions and interview tasks that have been designed to probe student understanding in sufficient depth to identify conceptual and reasoning difficulties. I will also use specific examples to illustrate the ways in which this research may inform instruction in upper-division laboratory courses on analog electronics. This work has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. DUE-1323426, DUE-1022449, DUE-0962805, and DUE-0618185.

  16. Experimental investigations on the first Townsend coefficient in pure isobutane

    Lima, I.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, 05508-000 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mangiarotti, A. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Vivaldini, T.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, 05508-000 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Goncalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, 05508-000 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo, 01303-050 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Botelho, S. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo, 01303-050 Sao Paulo (Brazil); and others

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present results of the first Townsend coefficient ({alpha}) in pure isobutane by measuring the current growth as a function of the electric field strength in a pulsed irradiation regime. A Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-like configuration was used. To validate this method, as well as to crosscheck the experimental apparatus, measurements of the {alpha} parameter were firstly carried out with pure nitrogen and the results compared to the accurate data available in the literature. The data obtained with isobutane in a field range from 145 Td up to 200 Td were well-matched to those calculated with Magboltz versions 2.7.1 and 2.8.6. The experimental consistency of these results with other published data in the range of 550-1300 Td was very good, as demonstrated by the use of the Korff parameterization.

  17. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    Andersen, Jimmy; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hvid, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    In part 1 of the present work (10.1021/ef900752a), experimental data and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling predictions for velocity field, temperatures, and major species were compared fora 50 kW axisymmetric, non-swirling natural gas Fired combustion setup, constructed to simulate...... approach with the De Soete global scheme and the combination of a skeletal combustion mechanism with the analytically reduced N scheme provided it reasonable agreement with the experimental data. Most of the tested ammonia oxidation schemes were able to qualitatively predict the trends in NO formation...... going from one operational case to the other, but the main combustion solution on which the ammonia oxidation was based proved to have a large impact on the quantitative NO prediction....

  18. A numerical and experimental investigation of electrothermal aircraft deicing

    Leffel, K.; Masiulaniec, K. C.; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained for the deicing characteristics of a stationary UH-1H helicopter blade which had been fitted with an electrothermal deicer assembly. The tests were run in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and yielded transient temperature responses for the substrate, heater and abrasion shield at selected positions around the blade. The data at the abrasion shield-ice interface clearly documented when melting, shedding or refreezing occurred. Comparisons were made between the experimental data and a one-dimensional numerical model. The agreement was generally very good, with the simulations being shown to be capable of predicting the transient temperature responses along with phase change and ice shedding. At many blade positions, the model was capable of accurately simulating the thermal response of the electrothermal deicer assembly.

  19. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Circulation in Short Cylinders

    Kageyama, A; Goodman, J; Chen, F; Shoshan, E; Kageyama, Akira; Ji, Hantao; Goodman, Jeremy; Chen, Fei; Shoshan, Ethan

    2004-01-01

    In preparation for an experimental study of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in liquid metal, we explore Couette flows having height comparable to the gap between cylinders, centrifugally stable rotation, and high Reynolds number. Experiments in water are compared with numerical simulations. Simulations show that endcaps corotating with the outer cylinder drive a strong poloidal circulation that redistributes angular momentum. Predicted azimuthal flow profiles agree well with experimental measurements. Spin-down times scale with Reynolds number as expected for laminar Ekman circulation; extrapolation from two-dimensional simulations at $Re\\le 3200$ agrees remarkably well with experiment at $Re\\sim 10^6$. This suggests that turbulence does not dominate the effective viscosity. Further detailed numerical studies reveal a strong radially inward flow near both endcaps. After turning vertically along the inner cylinder, these flows converge at the midplane and depart the boundary in a radial jet. To minimize th...

  20. Confined granular flow in silos experimental and numerical investigations

    Tejchman, Jacek

    2013-01-01

      During confined flow of bulk solids in silos some characteristic phenomena can be created, such as: —         sudden and significant increase of wall stresses, —         different flow patterns, —         formation and propagation of wall and interior shear zones, —         fluctuation of pressures and, —         strong autogenous dynamic effects. These phenomena have not been described or explained in detail yet. The main intention of the experimental and theoretical research presented in this book is to explain the above mentioned phenomena in granular bulk solids and to describe them with numerical FE models verified by experimental results.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    Andersen, J.; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Meyer, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition have been obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. The reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate-fired boiler but un...... of more advanced chemical mechanisms did not improve the prediction of the overall combustion process but did provide additional information about species (especially H(2) and radicals), which is desirable for postprocessing pollutant formation.......Experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition have been obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. The reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate-fired boiler...

  2. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Compact Dielectric Wakefield Accelerators

    2016-03-01

    photocathode laser . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.3 Experimental realization of a linearly-ramped bunch with a multifrequency linac...wakefield accelerators − a concept developed in support to high-energy particle accelerator − as path toward the realization of compact accelerator with...of 43 coth(kx,ma) cot [ky(b− a)] = ky rkx,m . (12) Therefore each discrete value of kx,m there is an infinite set of discrete ky,n values where n is

  3. Experimental investigation of unstrained diffusion flames and their instabilities

    Robert, Etienne

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, thermal-diffusive instabilities are studied experimentally in diffusion flames. The novel species injector of a recently developed research burner, consisting of an array of hypodermic needles, which allows to produce quasi one-dimensional unstrained diffusion flames has been improved. It is used in a new symmetric design with fuel and oxidizer injected through needle arrays which allows to independently choose both the magnitude and direction of the bulk flow through the flam...

  4. Investigations in Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Krennrich, Frank [Iowa State University

    2013-07-29

    We report on the work done under DOE grant DE-FG02-01ER41155. The experimental tasks have ongoing efforts at CERN (ATLAS), the Whipple observatory (VERITAS) and R&D work on dual readout calorimetry and neutrino-less double beta decay. The theoretical task emphasizes the weak interaction and in particular CP violation and neutrino physics. The detailed descriptions of the final report on each project are given under the appropriate task section of this report.

  5. Experimental investigation and modeling of diesel engine fuel spray

    Kolodnytska, R. V.; Karimi, K; Crua, C.; Heikal, M. R.; Sazhina, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    A model for spray penetration in diesel engines is suggested. It is based on momentum conservation for a realistic mass flow rate transient profile. The modelling approach is based on tracking of centre-of-fuel-mass (COFM) of injected diesel fuel. The model was validated for Bosch and Delphi injectors using the data obtained at Sir Harry Ricardo automotive centre, University of Brighton, UK. The model is shown to produce a good agreement with the experimental data until ...

  6. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    Rosenzweig, J.

    1997-10-31

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published.

  7. LATENT INHIBITION AND PSYCHOMETRICALLY DEFINED SCHIZOTYPY: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION

    Tsakanikos, Elias

    2003-01-01

    The review of the literature suggests that the interpretation of the disruption of latent inhibition within the schizophrenia continuum remains elusive due to a number of methodological and theoretical problems. This thesis adopted a personality-based approach to experimental psychopathology testing alternative interpretations of latent inhibition deficits as a function of psychotic-like features in non-clinical participants. Results from 12 Experiments are discussed in terms of a two-compone...

  8. Experimental Investigation of Catamaran Cross-Structure Slamming

    1975-09-01

    to Investigate the Three-Dimensional Effects of Slamming," NSRDC Report 3543 (Apr 1971). 8 i Carnahan, B. et al., " Applied Numerical Methods ," Chapter...Tests of Cones to Investigate the Three-Dimensional Effects of Slamming," NSRDC Report 3543 (Apr 1971) 8. Carnahan, B. et al., " Applied Numerical Methods ," Chapter

  9. Experimental investigation of micro heat pipe with extra fluid

    Mihai, Ioan; Sprinceana, Siviu

    2016-12-01

    The thermal micro pipes which were aimed to the cooling of the electrical systems, were realized until the present day in different constructive ways. If the first thermal pipes had had at the base the thermo-siphon system [1], afterwards it had been developed the thermal micro pipes [2], thanks to their increased capacity of heat dissipation of the surfaces covered by big densities of the thermal flow. The article, presents in the first part, the physical characteristics of the elements which embody a thermal micro pipe and which generates an excess of liquid. For this it has been realized an experimental setup. Measurements were taken by aid of a laser profilometer of the coverage material in two cases. The first one considered the material without being soaked in the liquid, and for the second one, the measurements were taken when the material was supersaturated with liquid. Since the setup allows for temperature monitoring, determinations were effectuated in the vaporization, adiabatic and condensation areas. The temperature field was determined along a thermal micro pipe in the case of extra fluid. The experimental determinations allowed verifying if the method proposed by Mihai and Olariu [3], for cooling of the electronic components, through a semi active method with the share of extra fluid in the vaporization area of the thermal micro pipe, works. It was studied how the temperature modifies in the vaporization and condensation areas and by the contrast of the theoretical results obtained through the evaluation with the experimental ones.

  10. FEATURES OF SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS CONDUCTED IN THE LABORATORIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER SUPPLY OF MGSU

    Nikitina Irina Nikolaevna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the work of the laboratories of the Department of Water Supply of MGSU. The laboratory of pipe-lines, pumping equipment and sanitary equipment operates in MGSU affiliated to the department of water supply. A hydraulic stand for testing and defining the the hydraulic characteristics of pressure and free-flow pipelines of water supply and sewerage systems is installed there. There are also stands for investigating the sanitary equipment of the buildings, the fire and hot water supply systems. The main research directions of the department of water supply are diverse: hydraulics of water supply systems, recon-struction of pipelines using trenchless technologies, reliable water supply and distribution systems, purification of natural water for drinking and industrial water supply, post-treatment of natural water for domestic water supply, resource conservation in domes-tic water supply systems, etc. The laboratory also has a computer lab, able to simultane-ously hold up to 30 students. In collaboration with the laboratory there operates a scien-tific circle for students and Master students, which provides a lot of interesting and useful information on the latest developments.

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigation of thermohydrologic processes in a partially saturated, fractured porous medium

    Green, R.T.; Manteufel, R.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Dodge, F.T.; Svedeman, S.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1993-07-01

    The performance of a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste will be influenced to a large degree by thermohydrologic phenomena created by the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste. The importance of these phenomena is manifest in that they can greatly affect the movement of moisture and the resulting transport of radionuclides from the repository. Thus, these phenomena must be well understood prior to a definitive assessment of a potential repository site. An investigation has been undertaken along three separate avenues of analysis: (i) laboratory experiments, (ii) mathematical models, and (iii) similitude analysis. A summary of accomplishments to date is as follows. (1) A review of the literature on the theory of heat and mass transfer in partially saturated porous medium. (2) A development of the governing conservation and constitutive equations. (3) A development of a dimensionless form of the governing equations. (4) A numerical study of the importance and sensitivity of flow to a set of dimensionless groups. (5) A survey and evaluation of experimental measurement techniques. (6) Execution of laboratory experiments of nonisothermal flow in a porous medium with a simulated fracture.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation of hydro power generator ventilation

    Jamshidi, H.; Nilsson, H.; Chernoray, V.

    2014-03-01

    Improvements in ventilation and cooling offer means to run hydro power generators at higher power output and at varying operating conditions. The electromagnetic, frictional and windage losses generate heat. The heat is removed by an air flow that is driven by fans and/or the rotor itself. The air flow goes through ventilation channels in the stator, to limit the electrical insulation temperatures. The temperature should be kept limited and uniform in both time and space, avoiding thermal stresses and hot-spots. For that purpose it is important that the flow of cooling air is distributed uniformly, and that flow separation and recirculation are minimized. Improvements of the air flow properties also lead to an improvement of the overall efficiency of the machine. A significant part of the windage losses occurs at the entrance of the stator ventilation channels, where the air flow turns abruptly from tangential to radial. The present work focuses exclusively on the air flow inside a generator model, and in particular on the flow inside the stator channels. The generator model design of the present work is based on a real generator that was previously studied. The model is manufactured taking into consideration the needs of both the experimental and numerical methodologies. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results have been used in the process of designing the experimental setup. The rotor and stator are manufactured using rapid-prototyping and plexi-glass, yielding a high geometrical accuracy, and optical experimental access. A special inlet section is designed for accurate air flow rate and inlet velocity profile measurements. The experimental measurements include Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and total pressure measurements inside the generator. The CFD simulations are performed based on the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox, and the steady-state frozen rotor approach. Specific studies are performed, on the effect of adding "pick-up" to spacers, and the effects of the

  13. Experimental infection with Paragonimus heterotremus metacercariae in laboratory animals in Manipur, India.

    Singh, T Shantikumar; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Devi, K Ranjana; Singh, L Deben; Binchai, Sutheewan; Rangsiruji, Achariya

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to find out the host-parasite relationship between Paragonimus heterotremus isolated as metacercariae from mountain crabs, Indochinamon manipurensis, in Manipur, India and laboratory animals such as puppies, albino rats, Swiss mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits, as experimental animals. The animals were fed with the metacercariae. Infected animals were sacrificed 35 to 430 days after feeding to recover worms, which were used to determine the developmental stages. Adult worms (n = 14) were recovered from 3 puppies > or = 70 days after feeding and immature worms (n = 25) were recovered from 2 other puppies 35 or 43 days after infection. The infection rate in puppies was 100%. Juvenile worms were recovered from 3 of 13 rats: 1 of 11 rats whose viscera and cavities were examined and both of two rats whose muscles were examined. Rats were not a suitable animal model for pulmonary infection with P. heterotremus. Mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits were also found to be insusceptible to pulmonary infection with P. heterotremus.

  14. The Origin of Mercury's Surface Composition, an Experimental Investigation

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Rapp, J. F.; Ross, D. K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.; Fontaine, E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Results from MESSENGER spacecraft have confirmed the reduced nature of Mercury, based on its high core/mantle ratio and its FeO-poor and S-rich surface. Moreover, high resolution images revealed large volcanic plains and abundant pyroclastic deposits, suggesting major melting stages of the Mercurian mantle. In addition, MESSENGER has provided the most precise data to date on major elemental compositions of Mercury's surface. These results revealed considerable chemical heterogeneities that suggested several stages of differentiation and re-melting processes. This interpretation was challenged by our experimental previous study, which showed a similar compositional variation in the melting products of enstatite chondrites, which are a possible Mercury analogue. However, these experimental melts were obtained over a limited range of pressure (1 bar to 1 gigapascal) and were not compared to the most recent elemental maps. Therefore, here we extend the experimental dataset to higher pressures and perform a more quantitative comparison with Mercury's surface compositions measured by MESSENGER. In particular, we test whether these chemical heterogeneities result from mixing between polybaric melts. Our experiments and models show that the majority of chemical diversity of Mercury's surface can result from melting of a primitive mantle compositionally similar to enstatite chondrites in composition at various depths and degrees of melting. The high-Mg region's composition is reproduced by melting at high pressure (3 gigapascals) (Tab. 1), which is consistent with previous interpretation as being a large degraded impact basin based on its low elevation and thin average crust. While low-Mg NVP (North Volcanic Plains) are the result of melting at low pressure (1 bar), intermediate-Mg NVP, Caloris Basin and Rachmaninoff result from mixing of a high-pressure (3 gigapascals) and low-pressure components (1 bar for Rachmaninoff and 1 gigapascal for the other regions

  15. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of an Axial Rotary Blood Pump.

    Schüle, Chan Yong; Thamsen, Bente; Blümel, Bastian; Lommel, Michael; Karakaya, Tamer; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Affeld, Klaus; Kertzscher, Ulrich

    2016-04-18

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become a standard therapy for patients with severe heart failure. As low blood trauma in LVADs is important for a good clinical outcome, the assessment of the fluid loads inside the pump is critical. More specifically, the flow features on the surfaces where the interaction between blood and artificial material happens is of great importance. Therefore, experimental data for the near-wall flows in an axial rotary blood pump were collected and directly compared to computational fluid dynamic results. For this, the flow fields based on unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations-computational fluid dynamics (URANS-CFD) of an axial rotary blood pump were calculated and compared with experimental flow data at one typical state of operation in an enlarged model of the pump. The focus was set on the assessment of wall shear stresses (WSS) at the housing wall and rotor gap region by means of the wall-particle image velocimetry technique, and the visualization of near-wall flow structures on the inner pump surfaces by a paint erosion method. Additionally, maximum WSS and tip leakage volume flows were measured for 13 different states of operation. Good agreement between CFD and experimental data was found, which includes the location, magnitude, and direction of the maximum and minimum WSS and the presence of recirculation zones on the pump stators. The maximum WSS increased linearly with pressure head. They occurred at the upstream third of the impeller blades and exceeded the critical values with respect to hemolysis. Regions of very high shear stresses and recirculation zones could be identified and were in good agreement with simulations. URANS-CFD, which is often used for pump performance and blood damage prediction, seems to be, therefore, a valid tool for the assessment of flow fields in axial rotary blood pumps. The magnitude of maximum WSS could be confirmed and were in the order of several hundred Pascal.

  16. A preliminary experimental investigation into lateral pedestrian-structure interaction

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Georgakis, Christos; Knudsen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from a preliminary experimental study on lateral human-structure dynamic interaction on footbridges using an instrumented platform. The platform has a natural frequency within the range of an average pedestrian and consists of a suspended concrete girder. With a length...... of 17 m and weight of 19.6 ton, the platform provides a realistic comparison to an actual footbridge. Based on experiments with single pedestrians walking across the platform at resonance, the fundamental dynamic load factor is determined using only the recorded acceleration signal. Furthermore, tests...

  17. Experimental investigation of transverse flow estimation using transverse oscillation

    Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound scanners can only display the blood velocity component parallel to the ultrasound beam. Introducing a laterally oscillating field gives signals from which the transverse velocity component can be estimated using 2:1 parallel receive beamformers. To yield the performance...... of the approach, this paper presents simulated and experimental results, obtained at a blood velocity angle transverse to the ultrasound beam. The Field II program is used to simulate a setup with a 128 element linear array transducer. At a depth 27 mm a virtual blood vessel of radius 2.4 mm is situated...

  18. Experimental investigation of magnetic anisotropy in spin vortex discs

    Garraud, N., E-mail: ngarraud@ufl.edu; Arnold, D. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    We present experimental 2D vector vibrating sample magnetometer measurements to demonstrate the shape anisotropy effects occurring in micrometer-diameter supermalloy spin vortex discs. Measurements made for different disc sizes and orientations confirm the out-of-plane susceptibility is several orders of magnitude smaller than the in-plane susceptibility. These results validate with a high certitude that spin vortices with high diameter to thickness ratio retain in-plane-only magnetization, even when subjected to fields in the out-of-plane direction. These results contribute to further computational simulations of the dynamics of spin vortex structures in colloidal suspensions where external fields may be applied in any arbitrary direction.

  19. Experimental Investigation on a Highly Sensitive Atomic Magnetometer

    LI Shu-Guang; XU Yun-Fei; WANG Zhao-Ying; LIU Yun-Xian; LIN Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A highly sensitive all-optical atomic magnetometer based on the magnetooptical effect which uses the advanced technique of single laser beam detection is reported and demonstrated experimentally.A sensitivityof 0.5 pT/Hz1/2 is obtained by analyzing the magnetic noise spectrum,which exceeds that of most traditional magnetometers.This kind of atomic magnetometer is very compact,has a low power consumption,and has a high theoretical sensitivity limit,which make it suitable for many applications.

  20. The experimental investigation of bounce characteristics of ACV responsive skirt

    Zhou, W. L.; Ma, T.

    This paper presents some experimental results on the bounce characteristics of the bag-finger responsive skirt and on skirt frequency response under cushion pressure excitation obtained in a large-scale box facility. The influence of some parameters on the amplitude and frequency of the skirt bounce motion and the amplitude of the cushion pressure oscillation were explored, and the corresponding bounce boundary curves are given. Some interesting nonlinear phenomena related to the skirt instability in the time domain response are presented. The mechanism for skirt bounce and the important parameters affecting skirt dynamic stability are examined, and some means for eliminating skirt bounce are introduced.

  1. RUBI -a Reference mUltiscale Boiling Investigation for the Fluid Science Laboratory

    Schweizer, Nils; Stelzer, Marco; Schoele-Schulz, Olaf; Picker, Gerold; Ranebo, Hans; Dettmann, Jan; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Winter, Josef; Tadrist, Lounes; Stephan, Peter; Grassi, Walter; di Marco, Paolo; Colin, Catherine; Piero Celata, Gian; Thome, John; Kabov, Oleg

    Boiling is a two-phase heat transfer process where large heat fluxes can be transferred with small driving temperature differences. The high performance of boiling makes the process very interesting for heat transfer applications and it is widely used in industry for example in power plants, refrigeration systems, and electronics cooling. Nevertheless, due to the large number of involved phenomena and their often highly dynamic nature a fundamental understanding and closed theoretical description is not yet accomplished. The design of systems incorporating the process is generally based on empirical correlations, which are commonly accompanied by large uncertainties and, thus, has to be verified by expensive test campaigns. Hence, strong efforts are currently made to develop applicable numerical tools for a reliable prediction of the boiling heat transfer performance and limits. In order to support and validate this development and, in particular as a precondition, to enhance the basic knowledge about boiling the comprehensive multi-scale experiment RUBI (Reference mUlti-scale Boiling Investigation) for the Fluid Science Laboratory on board the ISS is currently in preparation. The scientific objectives and requirements of RUBI have been defined by the members of the ESA topical team "Boiling and Multiphase Flow" and addresses fundamental aspects of boiling phenomena. The main objectives are the measurement of wall temperature and heat flux distribution underneath vapour bubbles with high spatial and tem-poral resolution by means of IR thermography accompanied by the synchronized high-speed observation of the bubble shapes. Furthermore, the fluid temperature in the vicinity and inside of the bubbles will be measured by a micro sensor array. Additional stimuli are the generation of an electric field above the heating surface and a shear flow created by a forced convection loop. The objective of these stimuli is to impose forces on the bubbles and investigate the

  2. High school students' enactment of chemistry knowing in open-entry laboratory investigations

    Pilane, Sentsetsa M.

    2003-10-01

    This study is an exploration of student meaning making in a non-traditional, high activity, hands-on grade 12 high school chemistry setting. The study focused on a sequence of three "open-entry" laboratory investigations (i.e., iodine clock reaction, pop-can cell and electroplating). These open-entry laboratory investigations were designed to be flexible and to take place in settings where students could make an impact. Students were responsible for devising their own problem and entry strategy, for making decisions about what reagents to use, what variables to manipulate, and how to proceed to develop the problem to a resolution acceptable to them and to the teacher. To explore students' meaning making in open-entry laboratory settings, their interactions were video taped and samples of their written laboratory reports were collected from time to time. Students were also requested to write reflective notes on their experiences of each investigation, some students were interviewed at the end of the course. This thesis consists of accounts and interpretations of what students did and said as they made meaning in these open-entry, hands-on laboratory investigations. The research uses an enactivist perspective to explore the meanings emerging from the study. From an enactivist view, cognition is seen as perceptually guided action in which a knower brings forth a world of significance with others. Enactivism suggests that students do not only express their knowing in what they say or write but also in their actions with others within this learning community. The research revealed that meaning making in these circumstances was highly complex. It involved systematic trial and error at various levels within the multiple iterative feedback loops. Students' interactions in this setting were mediated by the culture of chemistry which is embodied in the practices of the discipline. With students having to make decisions with every action, their meaning making was not only

  3. Investigating Climate Change and Reproduction: Experimental Tools from Evolutionary Biology

    Oliver Y. Martin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now generally acknowledged that climate change has wide-ranging biological consequences, potentially leading to impacts on biodiversity. Environmental factors can have diverse and often strong effects on reproduction, with obvious ramifications for population fitness. Nevertheless, reproductive traits are often neglected in conservation considerations. Focusing on animals, recent progress in sexual selection and sexual conflict research suggests that reproductive costs may pose an underestimated hurdle during rapid climate change, potentially lowering adaptive potential and increasing extinction risk of certain populations. Nevertheless, regime shifts may have both negative and positive effects on reproduction, so it is important to acquire detailed experimental data. We hence present an overview of the literature reporting short-term reproductive consequences of exposure to different environmental factors. From the enormous diversity of findings, we conclude that climate change research could benefit greatly from more coordinated efforts incorporating evolutionary approaches in order to obtain cross-comparable data on how individual and population reproductive fitness respond in the long term. Therefore, we propose ideas and methods concerning future efforts dealing with reproductive consequences of climate change, in particular by highlighting the advantages of multi-generational experimental evolution experiments.

  4. Experimental investigation on the combustion characteristics of aluminum in air

    Feng, Yunchao; Xia, Zhixun; Huang, Liya; Yan, Xiaoting

    2016-12-01

    With the aim of revealing the detailed process of aluminum combustion in air, this paper reports an experimental study on the combustion of aluminum droplets. In this work, the aluminum wires were exposed and heated by a CO2 laser to produce aluminum droplets, and then these droplets were ignited and burnt in air. The changing processes of aluminum wires, droplets and flames were directly recorded by a high-speed camera, which was equipped with a high magnification zoom lens. Meanwhile, the spectrum distribution of the flame was also registered by an optical spectrometer. Besides, burning residuals were collected and analyzed by the methods of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). Experimental results show that, during combustion, the aluminum droplet is covered by a spherical vapor-phase flame, and the diameter of this flame is about 1.4 times of the droplet diameter, statistically. In the later stages of combustion, the molten aluminum and condensed oxide products can react to generate gaseous Al and Al2O spontaneously. Little holes are found on the surface of residuals, which are the transport channels of gaseous products, namely the gaseous Al and Al2O. The combustion residuals are consisted by lots of aluminum oxide particles with diameters less than 1 μm.

  5. Control strategies for friction dampers: numerical assessment and experimental investigations.

    Coelho H.T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of friction dampers has been proposed in a wide variety of mechanical systems for which it is not possible to apply viscoelastic materials, fluid based dampers or others viscous dampers. An important example is the application of friction dampers in aircraft engines to reduce the blades vibration amplitudes. In most cases, friction dampers have been studied in a passive way, however, a significant improvement can be achieved by controlling the normal force in the dampers. The aim of this paper is to study three control strategies for friction dampers based on the hysteresis cycle. The first control strategy maximizes the energy removal in each harmonic oscillation cycle, by calculating the optimum normal force based on the last displacement peak. The second control strategy combines the first one with the maximum energy removal strategy used in the smart spring devices. Finally, is presented the strategy which homogenously modulates the friction force. Numerical studies were performed with these three strategies defining the performance metrics. The best control strategy was applied experimentally. The experimental test rig was fully identified and its parameters were used for the numerical simulations. The obtained results show the good performance for the friction damper and the selected strategy.

  6. Experimental investigation of a liquid-flooded Ericsson cycle cooler

    Hugenroth, Jason; Braun, James; Groll, Eckhard; King, Galen [Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Ray W. Herrick Laboratories, 140 South Intramural Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    An experimental test program was conducted on a novel Ericsson cycle heat pump. The concept uses liquid flooding of the compressor and expander to approach isothermal compression and expansion processes. Open drive automotive scrolls were used in the experimental system. Numerous experiments were run at various conditions using nitrogen as the refrigerant and alkyl-benzene oil as the flooding liquid. Cooling capacities of over 670 W and volumetric cooling capacities of more than 110 kJ/m{sup 3} were measured. Second law efficiencies of approximately 3% were achieved. Similar to other gas cycles, the cycle performance is very sensitive to the adiabatic efficiencies of the rotating equipment and the performance of the off-the-shelf equipment was not sufficient to achieve high cycle efficiency. In addition, large pressure drops occurred in the system due to the instrumentation used and the long and arduous flow paths. The scroll compressor and expander were found to perform well considering that they were not designed for the operating conditions encountered. (author)

  7. Experimental Investigation of Second Interface Cement Bond Evaluation

    Che Xiaohua; Qiao Wenxiao

    2007-01-01

    Cement bond model wells (1:10 scaled-down) were made with a gradually degrading cement annulus for cement bond evaluation of the first interface (between the casing and the cement annulus) and the second interface (between the cement annulus and the formation).Experimental simulation on cement bond logging was carried out with these model wells.The correlation of acoustic waveforms,casing wave energy and free casing area before and after cement bonding of the second interface was established.The experimental results showed that the arrival of the casing waves had no relationship with the cement bonding of the second interface,but the amplitude of the casing head wave decreased obviously after the second interface was bonded.So,cement bonding of the second interface had little effect on the evaluation of the cement bond quality of the first interface by using casing head wave arrivals.Strong cement annulus waves with early arrivals were observed before the second interface was bonded,while obvious "formation waves" instead of cement annulus waves were observed after the second interface was bonded.

  8. Investigation on Superior Performance by Fractional Controller for Cart-Servo Laboratory Set-Up

    Ameya Anil Kesarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an investigation is made on the superiority of fractional PID controller (PI^alpha D^beta over conventional PID for the cart-servo laboratory set-up. The designed controllers are optimum in the sense of Integral Absolute Error (IAE and Integral Square Error (ISE. The paper contributes in three aspects: 1 Acquiring nonlinear mathematical model for the cart-servo laboratory set-up, 2 Designing fractional and integer order PID for minimizing IAE, ISE, 3 Analyzing the performance of designed controllers for simulated plant model as well as real plant. The results show a significantly superior performance by PI^alpha D^beta as compared to the conventional PID controller.

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigations on shock wave induced phase transitions

    Gupta, Satish C.; Sikka, S. K.

    2001-06-01

    Shock wave loading of a material can cause variety of phase transitions, like polymorphism, amorphization, metallization and molecular dissociations. As the shocked state lasts only for a very short duration (about a few microseconds or less), in-situ microscopic measurements are very difficult. Although such studies are beginning to be possible, most of the shock-induced phase transitions are detected using macroscopic measurements. The microscopic nature of the transition is then inferred from comparison with static pressure data or interpreted by theoretical methods. For irreversible phase transitions, microscopic measurements on recovered samples, together with orientation relations determined from selected area electron diffraction and examination of the morphology of growth of the new phase can provide insight into mechanism of phase transitions. On theoretical side, the current ab initio band structure techniques based on density functional formalism provide capability for accurate computation of the small energy differences (a few mRy or smaller) between different plausible structures. Total energy calculation along the path of a phase transition can furnish estimates of activation barrier, which has implications for understanding kinetics of phase transitions. Molecular dynamics calculations, where the new structure evolves naturally, are becoming increasingly popular especially for understanding crystal to amorphous phase transitions. Illustrations from work at our laboratory will be presented.

  10. Experimental investigation on thermoelectric generator of micro hybrid power source

    Shang, Yonghong; Li, Yanqiu; Yu, Hongyun; Sun, Hongguang; Su, Bo

    2007-12-01

    The micro power system, which is composed of photovoltaic solar cell, heat conductor, thermoelectric generator (TEG) module and fin heat sink has been developed in our laboratory. A photovoltaic silicon solar cell of the P-N junction type is sensitive to radiant energy of wavelength from 5,000 Å to 12,000 Å. Radiation under and within this range is converted not only into electric energy but also into heat energy. The wavelength longer than this range is also converted into heat energy, which degrades the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. TEG produces electrical power from temperature difference via Seebeck effect that can be put under the solar cell to absorb the heat. The heat energy can be converted into electrical power. It was found that when TEG surface area was 150mm×60mm, it could generate 0.24V output voltage and 4.18mA short circuit at ambient temperature varying between 5-10°C at winter. It also could generate 1.3V output voltage and 16mA short circuit at ambient temperature varying between 30-36°C at summer. In fact we can use a dc-dc boost up converter to enlarge the output voltage to meet the requirements of wireless sensor network nodes or its recharging battery. It will be an alternative power source for many portable electronic types of equipment.

  11. Experimental investigation of the ecological hybrid refrigeration cycle

    Cyklis, Piotr; Kantor, Ryszard; Ryncarz, Tomasz; Górski, Bogusław; Duda, Roman

    2014-09-01

    The requirements for environmentally friendly refrigerants promote application of CO2 and water as working fluids. However there are two problems related to that, namely high temperature limit for CO2 in condenser due to the low critical temperature, and low temperature limit for water being the result of high triple point temperature. This can be avoided by application of the hybrid adsorption-compression system, where water is the working fluid in the adsorption high temperature cycle used to cool down the CO2 compression cycle condenser. The adsorption process is powered with a low temperature renewable heat source as solar collectors or other waste heat source. The refrigeration system integrating adsorption and compression system has been designed and constructed in the Laboratory of Thermodynamics and Thermal Machine Measurements of Cracow University of Technology. The heat source for adsorption system consists of 16 tube tulbular collectors. The CO2 compression low temperature cycle is based on two parallel compressors with frequency inverter. Energy efficiency and TEWI of this hybrid system is quite promising in comparison with the compression only systems.

  12. Experimental investigation of the ecological hybrid refrigeration cycle

    Cyklis Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The requirements for environmentally friendly refrigerants promote application of CO2 and water as working fluids. However there are two problems related to that, namely high temperature limit for CO2 in condenser due to the low critical temperature, and low temperature limit for water being the result of high triple point temperature. This can be avoided by application of the hybrid adsorption-compression system, where water is the working fluid in the adsorption high temperature cycle used to cool down the CO2 compression cycle condenser. The adsorption process is powered with a low temperature renewable heat source as solar collectors or other waste heat source. The refrigeration system integrating adsorption and compression system has been designed and constructed in the Laboratory of Thermodynamics and Thermal Machine Measurements of Cracow University of Technology. The heat source for adsorption system consists of 16 tube tulbular collectors. The CO2 compression low temperature cycle is based on two parallel compressors with frequency inverter. Energy efficiency and TEWI of this hybrid system is quite promising in comparison with the compression only systems.

  13. Exploratory experimental investigations on post-tensioned structural glass beams

    Christian Louter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding author: Dr. ir. Christian Louter, Steel Structures Laboratory (ICOM, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, GC B3 505, Station 18, Lausanne CH-1015, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 21 6932427; Fax: +41 21 6932868; E-mail: christian.louter@epfl.ch The mechanical response of post-tensioned glass beams is explored in this paper. This is done through bending experiments on post-tensioned glass beam specimens with either mechanically anchored or adhesively bonded steel tendons by which a beneficial pre-stress is inflicted on the glass beams. In addition, reference beams with identical geometry but without tendons are tested. From the results of the bending experiments it can be seen that the post-tensioned glass beams reach higher initial fracture loads than the reference glass beams. Furthermore, the post-tensioned glass beams develop a significant post-fracture reserve. From this it is concluded that post-tensioning a glass beam is a feasible concept, which provides increased initial fracture strength and enhanced post-fracture performance.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigations on reliability of air barrier on oil containment in flowing water.

    Lu, Jinshu; Xu, Zhenfeng; Xu, Song; Xie, Sensen; Wu, Haoxiao; Yang, Zhenbo; Liu, Xueqiang

    2015-06-15

    Air barriers have been recently developed and employed as a new type of oil containment boom. This paper presents systematic investigations on the reliability of air barriers on oil containments with the involvement of flowing water, which represents the commonly-seen shearing current in reality, by using both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Both the numerical and experimental investigations are carried out in a model scale. In the investigations, a submerged pipe with apertures is installed near the bottom of a tank to generate the air bubbles forming the air curtain; and, the shearing water flow is introduced by a narrow inlet near the mean free surface. The effects of the aperture configurations (including the size and the spacing of the aperture) and the location of the pipe on the effectiveness of the air barrier on preventing oil spreading are discussed in details with consideration of different air discharges and velocities of the flowing water. The research outcome provides a foundation for evaluating and/or improve the reliability of a air barrier on preventing spilled oil from further spreading.

  15. A n Experimental Investigation of Online Banking Adoption in China

    Guangying Hua

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available O nline banking, an Internet based service enabling people to do financial transactions, has been an obstacle for the development of e - commerce in China. T his paper investigates the online banking acceptance in China. We conduct ed an experiment to investigate how users’ perception about online ba n king is af fected by the perceived ease of use of website and the privacy policy provided by the online banking website. We find that both perceived ease of use and privacy policy have a significant impact on user’s adoption of online banking. In this study , we also investigate the relative importance of perceived ease of use, privacy, and security. P erceived ease of use is of less importance than privacy and security. S ecurity is the most important factor influencing user ’ s adoption. A discussion of the implications of these results and limitations are provided at the end

  16. Experimental Investigations of Ice Rubble: Shear Box and Pile Testing

    Astrup, Oda Skog

    2012-01-01

    The largest part of an ice ridge consists of unconsolidated ice rubble, whose material properties decide the load from ridges on ships and structures. Material resistance is attributed to the initial freeze-bonds and the friction and interlocking between blocks. The objective of the thesis was to investigate rubble behaviour by two tests: shear box test at NTNU and pile test at HSVA. The shear box test was aimed at investigating freeze-bond mechanisms in rubble. The pile test was aimed at sug...

  17. Experimental and analytical investigation of finger-follower cam systems

    Hsu, Wensyang

    A predictive dynamic model to compute the motions of components in cam systems, along with the experimental work to verify the model are described. The major components in finger-follower cam systems include the cam, the follower, the hydraulic lash adjuster, and the valve spring, equipped sometimes with a helical valve spring cup damper. In order to fully describe the dynamics of such a system, a lumped/distributed parameter model for the finger-follower cam system with a moving follower pivot is proposed. The valve spring is modeled as a distributed parameter element, and the adjuster is modeled as a stiff spring with viscous damping. The coulomb friction combined with viscous damping between sliding surfaces are also considered. The model predicts toss between the adjuster and the follower at 2535 rpm, and experiment indicates toss starting at 2520 rpm. It is found by simulation that designing hydraulic lash adjuster to be as rigid as possible is essential to successful high speed operation of finger-follower valve trains because a 50 percent decrease in the compliance of the adjuster could increase the maximum camshaft operating speed 150 rpm. Total elimination of the hydraulic lash adjuster is not always feasible because hydraulic lash adjusters can eliminate the clearance between components and do not need to be mechanically, manually adjusted. In order to provide a more stable and precise description on the dynamic response of the adjuster, a two-mode dynamic model for the adjuster is proposed by considering the oil compressibility in the oil chamber, as well as the oil leakage through the annular gap. Furthermore, the effect due to the oil flow from the central orifice to the oil chamber is also studied analytically and experimentally. The inertia effects of the helical valve spring can be suppressed by a cup damper. Damping between the damper and spring wire is found to depend only weakly on relative sliding velocity. The current formula in computing

  18. 21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.

    2010-04-01

    ... research animals or in vitro tests. 312.160 Section 312.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Drugs for Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312.160 Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. (a) Authorization to ship. (1)(i) A...

  19. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TURBULENT AIR-CUSHION-CASCADE

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of air-cushion-cascade were conducted and described. The SIMPLE algorithm combined with the normal k-ε turbulence model was adopted to simulate the air-phase flow. The experiment was carried out an IFA 300 anemometer. The flow field was measured for different ratios of main-stream velocity to jet velocity, different numbers of gaps and a couple of gap widths. The contur of the air-cushion was obtained, and the numerical calculations gave a closed-form result. The results show that the air-cushion thickness would increase with the increase of the jet volcoity, gap width and gap number mainly determined by the jet in the former half cascade. The possibility to achieve anti-erosion by the turbulent jet was examined and confirmed.

  20. Air-enhanced SGEMP response - An experimental and analytical investigation

    Woods, A. J.; Treadaway, M. J.; Nunan, S.; Higgins, D.

    1982-12-01

    The theoretically predicted air-enhancement of the external SGEMP response of an object has been measured on a small test body. The replacement currents flowing on the outside of a 20-cm cylinder exposed to argon puffed-gas X-rays inside a vacuum chamber were seen to increase an order of magnitude above the experiment noise level as the background gas pressure was varied from 0.0001 to 0.1 torr. The predicted vacuum response, which was strongly space-charge limited, indicates that the enhanced currents are 30 times the vacuum values at some locations on the object. Parameter variations suggest convincingly that the measured enhancements are not due to any experimental artifact or to IEMP effects. The computer models of the effects agree with the measurements to within a factor of two in the high-pressure collision-dominated electron transport regime, but show greater enhancements at lower pressures than the measurements do.

  1. Experimental investigation of damping force of twin tube shock absorber

    Sandip K. Kadu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A shock absorber is a mechanical device to damp shock impulse and convert kinetic energy into thermal energy. The damping effect of shock absorber depends on damping force and damping force is affected by various process parameters. In this analysis three process parameters damping diameter(A, number of holes(B and suspension velocity(C were considered and their effect on damping force of shock absorber was studied and accordingly suitable orthogonal array was selected by taguchi method. Experiment conducted on servo hydraulic testing machine and after conducting experiments damping force was measured and with the help of S/N ratio, ANOVA, Regression analysis optimum parameter values can be obtained and confirmation experiments was carried out. Twin tube shock absorber was used to carry out experimentation.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Moisture Driven Fracture in Solid Wood

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Olesen, John Forbes

    2010-01-01

    , early in the drying process and close again later in the process. It can be difficult to see the closed cracks with visual grading. This may result in too high grading of the damaged material which may cause problems for customers such as building and furniture industries. Moisture content (MC) in green...... wood varies within the cross section of a timber log. The MC of heartwood, for example, is considerable lower than the MC of sapwood. Shrinkage starts at different times within different parts of the cross section, which results in a complex state of strains and stresses. The moisture related crack...... pattern in wood often becomes quite complex because of the annual ring structure and the different MC levels within heartwood and sapwood. The focus of this work represents the cross sectional behaviour of a timber log. The main aim is to accumulate experimental results and data for the development...

  3. Experimental Investigation on Heat Transfer Enhancement in Composite Porous Media

    2002-01-01

    The method of composite porous media with mini-longitudinal channels at the surface and with beads packing between plates was put foward to improve the integated performance of flow and heat transfer in porous media. The experimental results in the corresponding porous media were reported and analyzed. The experiments indicate that with proper matching of the particle diameter dp, the mini-channel width w, the channel depth d and the distance between plates δr the heat transfer in the composite porois media is enhanced and flow resistence reduced compared with those of no mini-longitudinal channels at the surface. So this is an effective method to improve the integrated performance of flow and heat transfer in porous media.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION & NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITE LEAF SPRING

    K. K. JADHAO,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Automobile Industry has shown keen interest for replacement of steel leaf spring with that of glass fiber composite leaf spring, since the composite material has high strength to weight ratio, good corrosion resistance and tailor-able properties. The objective of present study was to replace material for leaf spring. In present study the material selected was glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP and the polyester resin (NETPOL 1011 can be used which was more economical this will reduce total cost of composite leaf spring. A spring with constant width and thickness was fabricated by hand lay-up technique which was very simple and economical. The experiments were conducted on UTM and numerical analysis was done via (FEA using ANSYS software. Stresses and deflection results were verified for analytical and experimental results. Result shows that, the composite spring has stresses much lower than steel leaf spring and weight of composite spring was nearly reduced up to 85%.

  5. Experimental and CFD investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    Andersen, Jimmy

    treatment. The aim of this project is to provide validation data for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models relevant for grate firing combustion conditions. CFD modeling is a mathematical tool capable of predicting fluid flow, mixing and chemical reaction with thermal conversion and transport. Prediction......, but under well-defined conditions. Comprehensive experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition are obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. Ammonia is added to the combustion setup in order to simulate fuel...... of pollutant formation, which occurs in small concentrations with little impact on the general combustion process is in this work predicted by a post-processing step, making it less computationally expensive. A reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate fired boiler...

  6. Experimental Investigation on Terahertz Spectra of Amphetamine Type Stimulants

    SUN Jin-Hai; SHEN Jing-Ling; LIANG Lai-Shun; XU Xiao-Yu; LIU Hai-Bo; ZHANG Cun-Lin

    2005-01-01

    @@ The spectral absorption features of three amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) belonging to illicit drugs have been studied with terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the characteristic absorption spectra (fingerprint spectra) are obtained in the range from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. Fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs in terahertz band are bases to detect and to inspect nondestructively illicit drugs with terahertz technique. With fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs and strong penetrability for cloths, paper bags and leathered or plastic luggage terahertz technique would be better than other techniques in illicit drugs detection and inspection. Thus, this work would contribute to the building of corresponding fingerprint spectra database of illicit drugs and provide experimental bases for using of terahertz detection apparatus in drugs nondestructive detection and inspection in the future.

  7. Performance enhancement of solar module by cooling: An experimental investigation

    P G Nikhil, M Premalatha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates the silicone oil cooling of the solar module surface. Solar module with maximum power of 7W was employed for cooling. This paper summarizes the result of an outdoor experiment. The experiments were conducted in batch mode, with the cooling medium spread on the module surface at different thickness from 0mm to 6mm. The performance of the module, throughout the day, for different thickness of the medium is reported. The study also presents a mathematical model, predicting the variation of the maximum power when the module surface is cooled using silicone oil. The results of the equation model are compared and validated with the experimental as well as with results reported in the earlier works. The cooling contributes to appreciable improvement in the module efficiency to above 20%.

  8. Experimental Investigation on Terahertz Spectra of Amphetamine Type Stimulants

    Sun, Jin-Hai; Shen, Jing-Ling; Liang, Lai-Shun; Xu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2005-12-01

    The spectral absorption features of three amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) belonging to illicit drugs have been studied with terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the characteristic absorption spectra (fingerprint spectra) are obtained in the range from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. Fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs in terahertz band are bases to detect and to inspect nondestructively illicit drugs with terahertz technique. With fingerprint spectra of illicit drugs and strong penetrability for cloths, paper bags and leathered or plastic luggage terahertz technique would be better than other techniques in illicit drugs detection and inspection. Thus, this work would contribute to the building of corresponding fingerprint spectra database of illicit drugs and provide experimental bases for using of terahertz detection apparatus in drugs nondestructive detection and inspection in the future.

  9. Experimental Investigation on Active Cooling for Ceramic Matrix Composite

    PENG Li-na; HE Guo-qiang; LIU Pei-jin

    2009-01-01

    Compared with conventional materials, the active cooling ceramic matrix composite used in ramjet or scramjet makes their structures lighter in mass and better in performance. In this paper, an active and a passive cooling refractory composite specimens are designed and tested with an experimental facility composed of multilayer smale scale cooling penel which consists of a water cooling system and a ceramic matrix composite specimen, and a gas generator used for providing lower and higher transfer rate gases to simulate the temperatures in combustion chamber of ramjst. The active cooling specimen can continuously suffer high surface temperature of 2 000K for 30s and that of 3 000 K for 9.3 s, respectively. The experiment results show that the active cooling composite structure is available for high-temperature condition in ramjet.

  10. Experimental and CFD investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    Andersen, Jimmy

    treatment. The aim of this project is to provide validation data for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models relevant for grate firing combustion conditions. CFD modeling is a mathematical tool capable of predicting fluid flow, mixing and chemical reaction with thermal conversion and transport. Prediction...... of pollutant formation, which occurs in small concentrations with little impact on the general combustion process is in this work predicted by a post-processing step, making it less computationally expensive. A reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate fired boiler......-NO formation during grate firing biomass combustion conditions. The experimental results are in this work compared to CFD modeling. The modeling results show, that the CFD model captured the main features of the combustion process and flow patterns. The application of more advanced chemical reaction mechanisms...

  11. An Experimental Investigation of the Risk of Triggering Geological Disasters by Injection under Shear Stress

    Liu, Yixin; Xu, Jiang; Peng, Shoujian

    2016-12-01

    Fluid injection has been applied in many fields, such as hazardous waste deep well injection, forced circulation in geothermal fields, hydraulic fracturing, and CO2 geological storage. However, current research mainly focuses on geological data statistics and the dominating effects of pore pressure. There are only a few laboratory-conditioned studies on the role of drilling boreholes and the effect of injection pressure on the borehole wall. Through experimental phenomenology, this study examines the risk of triggering geological disasters by fluid injection under shear stress. We developed a new direct shear test apparatus, coupled Hydro-Mechanical (HM), to investigate mechanical property variations when an intact rock experienced step drilling borehole, fluid injection, and fluid pressure acting on the borehole and fracture wall. We tested the peak shear stress of sandstone under different experimental conditions, which showed that drilling borehole, water injection, and increased pore pressure led to the decrease in peak shear stress. Furthermore, as pore pressure increased, peak shear stress dispersion increased due to crack propagation irregularity. Because the peak shear stress changed during the fluid injection steps, we suggest that the risk of triggering geological disaster with injection under shear stress, pore, borehole, and fluid pressure should be considered.

  12. The effects of emotion regulation strategies on the pain experience: a structured laboratory investigation.

    Hampton, Amy J D; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Gagnon, Michelle M; Williams, Jaime; Clark, David

    2015-05-01

    Although emotion regulation modulates the pain experience, inconsistencies have been identified regarding the impact of specific regulation strategies on pain. Our goal was to examine the effects of emotion suppression and cognitive reappraisal on automatic (ie, nonverbal) and cognitively mediated (ie, verbal) pain expressions. Nonclinical participants were randomized into either a suppression (n = 58), reappraisal (n = 51), or monitoring control (n = 42) condition. Upon arrival to the laboratory, participants completed the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, to quantify self-reported suppression and reappraisal tendencies. Subsequently, they completed a thermal pain threshold and tolerance task. They were then provided with instructions to use, depending on their experimental condition, suppression, reappraisal, or monitoring strategies. Afterward, they were exposed to experimentally induced pain. Self-report measures of pain, anxiety, and tension were administered, and facial expressions, heart rate, and galvanic skin response were recorded. The Facial Action Coding System was used to quantify general and pain-related facial activity (ie, we defined facial actions that occurred during at least 5% of pain stimulation periods as "pain-related actions"). Reappraisal and suppression induction led to reductions in nonverbal and verbal indices of pain. Moreover, self-reported tendencies to use suppression and reappraisal (as measured by the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire) did not interact with experimental condition in the determination of participants' responses. Results suggest that consciously applying emotion regulation strategies during a painful task can moderate both cognitively mediated (e.g., verbal) and automatic (e.g., facial activity) expressions of pain.

  13. Experimental investigation of ion-ion recombination at atmospheric conditions

    A. Franchin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of laboratory measurements of the ion-ion recombination coefficient at different temperatures, relative humidities and concentrations of ozone and sulfur dioxide. The experiments were carried out using the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD chamber at CERN, the walls of which are made of conductive material, making it possible to measure small ions. We produced ions in the chamber using a 3.5 GeV c−1 beam of positively-charged pions (π+ from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS and with galactic cosmic rays, when the PS was switched off. The range of the ion production rate varied from 2 to 100 cm−3s−1, covering the typical range of ionization throughout the troposphere. The temperature ranged from −55 to 20 °C, the relative humidity from 0 to 70%, the SO2 concentration from 0 to 40 ppb, and the ozone concentration from 200 to 700 ppb. At 20 °C and 40% RH, the retrieved ion-ion recombination coefficient was (2.3 ± 0.7 × 10−6cm3s−1. We observed no dependency of the ion-ion recombination coefficient on ozone concentration and a weak variation with sulfur dioxide concentration. However, we found a strong dependency of the ion-ion recombination coefficient on temperature. We compared our results with three different models and found an overall agreement for temperatures above 0 °C, but a disagreement at lower temperatures. We observed a strong dependency of the recombination coefficient on relative humidity, which has not been reported previously.

  14. Integrating Statistical Mechanics with Experimental Data from the Rotational-Vibrational Spectrum of HCl into the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Findley, Bret R.; Mylon, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a computer exercise that bridges spectroscopy and thermodynamics using statistical mechanics and the experimental data taken from the commonly used laboratory exercise involving the rotational-vibrational spectrum of HCl. Based on the results from the analysis of their HCl spectrum, students calculate bulk thermodynamic properties…

  15. Development of an Interdisciplinary Experimental Series for the Laboratory Courses of Cell and Molecular Biology and Advance Inorganic Chemistry

    Smith, Montserrat Rabago; McAllister, Robert; Newkirk, Kiera; Basing, Alexander; Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary approach to education has become more important in the development of science and technology, which requires universities to have graduates with broad knowledge and skills and to apply these skills in solving real-world problems. An interdisciplinary experimental series has been developed for the laboratories in cell and…

  16. Experimental investigation of current free double layers in helicon plasmas

    Sahu, B. B. [Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Dronacharya College of Engineering, Gurgaon 123506 (India); Tarey, R. D. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Ganguli, A. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-02-15

    The paper presents investigations of current free double layer (CFDL) that forms in helicon plasmas. In contrast to the other work reporting on the same subject, in the present investigations the double layer (DL) forms in a mirror-like magnetic field topology. The RF compensated Langmuir probe measurements show multiple DLs, which are in connection with, the abrupt fall of densities along with potential drop of about 24 V and 18 V. The DLs strengths (e ΔV{sub p})/(k T{sub e}) are about 9.5 and 6, and the corresponding widths are about 6 and 5 D lengths. The potential drop is nearly equal to the thermal anisotropies between the two plasma regions forming the DL, which is present in the plateau region of mirror, unlike the earlier studies on the DL formation in the region of strong gradients in the magnetic field. Also, it presents a qualitative discussion on the mechanism of DL formation.

  17. Theoretical and experimental investigation of microstrip rhombic resonators

    Al-Charchafchi, S. H.; Boulkos, J.

    1990-06-01

    The resonant behavior of a novel microstrip rhombic resonator is investigated by analyzing an equivalent circuit based on transmission line modeling. Design curves showing the dependence of resonator performance on its parameters, as well as the substrate parameters, are presented. Experiments carried out showed a significant reduction in insertion loss when the rhombic resonator is dielectrically shielded. The resonator could be used as a microwave bandpass filter or a stabilization circuit for microwave oscillators in both hybrid and monolithic integrated circuits.

  18. Experimental investigation into the degradation of model superconducting windings

    Trusov, N.B.; Broitman, I.M.; Pleshchunov, N.N.; Samoilov, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation into degradation of critical current in model compound-treated windings fabricated from type KETV-2NT superconducting conductors with nonsteady stabilization. It is shown that the way in which the critical current depends on the heat-removal conditions and the rate of entry of current is determined by a mechanism of steady-state heat release occationed by plastic strain of the winding materials under the action of ponderomotive forces.

  19. Caldera collapse at near-ridge seamounts: an experimental investigation

    Coumans, Jason P.; Stix, John

    2016-10-01

    Collapse calderas are sub-circular volcanic depressions caused by subsidence of the magma reservoir roof during an eruption. Scaled physical models of caldera collapse using flat topography have been instrumental in investigating the spatial and temporal development of calderas, in particular, two distinctive sets of concentric ring faults, one reverse and one normal. More recent analog studies have investigated the effect of non-flat topography which alters the principle stress trajectories and resulting collapse structure. This work provides the basis for investigating how naturally scaled topographic loads may affect caldera collapse in relation to shallow magma reservoirs. The objective of this study is to understand how a near-ridge seamount affects caldera collapse from both a central and offset position as the seamount migrates above the magma reservoir as a result of plate motion. We utilize scaled analog models of caldera collapse in conjunction with three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to investigate caldera collapse dynamics at near-ridge seamounts. Experiments using a seamount cone positioned centrally above the magma reservoir result in (1) increased subsidence along the interior outward-dipping faults and (2) a preference to more symmetric collapse patterns as indicated by the subsidence profile and structure of the caldera relative to experiments with an offset cone. When the cone is offset, the collapse is asymmetric and trapdoor in nature, with the center of greatest subsidence displaced away from the region of largest topographic load. For these latter experiments, subsidence is focused where the roof is thinnest along an initial reverse fault, followed by a transition to an antithetic graben structure. The asymmetric collapse in the experiments results in a caldera with a tilted profile. Offset calderas at near-ridge seamounts are tilted towards the ridge axis, suggesting that they may have collapsed

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Robinson-Type Cup Anemometer

    Brevoort, M J; Joyner, U T

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests on a Robinson-type anemometer. The investigation covered force measurements on individual cups, as well as static and dynamic torque measurements and calibrations on complete cup wheels. In the tests on individual cups 5 cup forms were used and in the measurements on complete cup wheels 4 cup wheels with 3 arm lengths for each cup wheel were tested. All the results are presented in graphical form.

  1. Gait biometrics under spoofing attacks: an experimental investigation

    Hadid, Abdenour; Ghahramani, Mohammad; Kellokumpu, Vili; Feng, Xiaoyi; Bustard, John; Nixon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Gait is a relatively biometric modality which has a precious advantage over other modalities, such as iris and voice, in that it can be easily captured from a distance. Although it has recently become a topic of great interest in biometric research, there has been little investigation into gait spoofing attacks where a person tries to imitate the clothing or walking style of someone else. We recently analyzed for the first time the effects of spoofing attacks on silhouette-based gait biometric systems and showed that it was indeed possible to spoof gait biometric systems by clothing impersonation and the deliberate selection of a target that has a similar build to the attacker. To gain deeper insight into the performance of current gait biometric systems under spoofing attacks, we provide a thorough investigation on how clothing can be used to spoof a target and evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art recognition methods on a gait spoofing database recorded at the University of Southampton. Furthermore, we describe and evaluate an initial solution coping with gait spoofing attacks. The obtained results are very promising and point out interesting findings which can be used for future investigations.

  2. Experimental investigation of particulate debris spreading in a pool

    Konovalenko, A., E-mail: kono@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Basso, S., E-mail: simoneb@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Kudinov, P., E-mail: pkudinov@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) , Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Yakush, S.E., E-mail: yakush@ipmnet.ru [Institute for Problems in Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ave. Vernadskogo 101 Bldg 1, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Termination of severe accident progression by core debris cooling in a deep pool of water under reactor vessel is considered in several designs of light water reactors. However, success of this accident mitigation strategy is contingent upon the effectiveness of heat removal by natural circulation from the debris bed. It is assumed that a porous bed will be formed in the pool in the process of core melt fragmentation and quenching. Debris bed coolability depends on its properties and system conditions. The properties of the bed, including its geometry are the outcomes of the debris bed formation process. Spreading of the debris particles in the pool by two-phase turbulent flows induced by the heat generated in the bed can affect the shape of the bed and thus influence its coolability. The goal of this work is to provide experimental data on spreading of solid particles in the pool by large-scale two-phase flow. The aim is to provide data necessary for understanding of separate effects and for development and validation of models and codes. Validated codes can be then used for prediction of debris bed formation under prototypic severe accident conditions. In PDS-P (Particulate Debris Spreading in the Pool) experiments, air injection at the bottom of the test section is employed as a means to create large-scale flow in the pool in isothermal conditions. The test section is a rectangular tank with a 2D slice geometry, it has fixed width (72 mm), adjustable length (up to 1.5 m) and allows water filling to the depth of up to 1 m. Variable pool length and depth allows studying two-phase circulating flows of different characteristic sizes and patterns. The average void fraction in the pool is determined by video recording and subsequent image processing. Particles are supplied from the top of the facility above the water surface. Results of several series of PDS-P experiments are reported in this paper. The influence of the gas flow rate, pool dimensions, particle density

  3. An experimental investigation of barite formation in seawater

    Ganeshram, Raja S.; François, Roger; Commeau, Judy; Brown-Leger, Susan L.

    2003-07-01

    We report results from time-series decay and sequential leaching experiments of laboratory cultured and coastal plankton to elucidate the mechanisms controlling barite formation in seawater. Batch-cultured diatoms ( Stephanopyxis palmerina) and coccolithophorids ( Emiliania huxleyi) were let to decay in the dark for 8-10 weeks, suspended in aerated seawater. The development of barite crystals was monitored by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). A similar experiment was conducted with plankton collected during the spring-bloom in Vineyard Sound (MA). In addition to SEM, suspended particles were sequentially leached for Ba (distilled water rinse; 10% (v/v) HNO 3 rinse at room temperature; 30% (v/v) HCl at 80°C overnight; 50% (v/v) HNO 3 at 80°C overnight) immediately after collection, and after 10-week decay in seawater, in seawater poisoned with HgCl 2, and in seawater spiked with 135Ba. Both experiments showed an increase in the number of barite crystals during decay. The spring-bloom plankton had initially a large pool of labile Ba, soluble in distilled water and cold dilute HNO 3 that was lost from the plankton after 10-week decay in both axenic and nonaxenic conditions. In contrast, Ba in the decayed plankton samples was predominantly in forms extracted by hot HCl and hot HNO 3 acids, which were attributed to presence of barite Ba and refractory organic Ba respectively. The increase in barite crystal counts under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), the increase in HCl extractable Ba relative to organic carbon, and the loss of a large fraction of Ba during plankton decay suggest that living plankton consists of a relatively large pool of labile Ba, which is rapidly released during plankton decomposition and acts as the main source of Ba for barite formation in supersaturated microenvironments. Since mass balance indicates that only a small proportion (2 to 4%) of the labile-Ba pool is converted to barite, the availability of microenvironments that could

  4. Combine experimental and theoretical investigation on an alkaloid-Dimethylisoborreverine

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Karthick, T.; Agarwal, Parag; Erande, Rohan D.; Dethe, Dattatraya H.; Tandon, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    A combined experimental (FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical approach is used to study the structure and properties of antimalarial drug dimethylisoborreverine (DMIB). Conformational analysis, has been performed by plotting one dimensional potential energy curve that was computed using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-31G method and predicted conformer A1 as the most stable conformer. After full geometry optimization, harmonic wavenumbers were computed for conformer A1 at the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,P) level. A complete vibrational assignment of all the vibrational modes have been performed on the bases of the potential energy distribution (PED) and theoretical results were found to be in good agreement with the observed data. To predict the solvent effect, the UV-Vis spectra were calculated in different solvents by polarizable continuum model using TD-DFT method. Molecular docking studies were performed to test the biological activity of the sample using SWISSDOCK web server and Hex 8.0.0 software. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) was plotted to identify the reactive sites of the molecule. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was performed to get a deep insight of intramolecular charge transfer. Thermodynamical parameters were calculated to predict the direction of chemical reaction.

  5. Magnetic dynamics of ferrofluids: mathematical models and experimental investigations

    Wu, Kai; Tu, Liang; Su, Diqing; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Magnetite ferrofluids with unique magnetic behaviors are attractive for biomedical applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging. A precise nanoparticle-specific characterization by theoretical models and experiments to predict dynamics of ferrofluids and optimize their behaviors for emerging biomedical applications is necessary. In this paper, combining experiments and modeling, we have uncovered interesting magnetic dynamics of nanoparticles that are dependent on magnetic field strength, polymer coating of nanoparticles, viscosity of ferrofluid, and dipolar interactions. It is concluded that either by changing the magnitude of magnetic field or the concentrations of nanoparticles, we are able to convert the dominating relaxation process of magnetic nanoparticles from Néel to Brownian, and vice versa. Polymer coatings on nanoparticles and viscosity of ferrofluids are demonstrated to have varying degrees of influence on effective relaxation times of nanoparticles with different sizes and under different field strengths. Our theoretical models are used to predict the magnetic response of ferrofluid consisting of 35 nm magnetite nanoparticles under alternating magnetic fields, and it turns out that our theoretical data fits well with the experimental data.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Flow Structures During Insect Flight

    Badrya, Camli; Baeder, James D.

    2015-11-01

    Insect flight kinematics involves complex interplay between aerodynamics structural response and insect body control. Features such as cross-coupling kinematics, high flapping frequencies and geometrical small-scales, result in experiments being challenging to perform. In this study OVERTURNS, an in-house 3D compressible Navier-Stokes solver is utilized to simulate the simplified kinematics of an insect wing in hover and forward flight. The flapping wings simulate the full cycle of wing motion, i.e., the upstroke, downstroke, pronation and supination.The numerical results show good agreement against experimental data in predicting the lift and drag over the flapping cycle. The flow structures around the flapping wing are found to be highly unsteady and vortical. Aside from the tip vortex on the wings, the formation of a prominent leading edge vortex (LEV) during the up/down stroke portions, and the shedding of a trailing edge vortex (TEV) at end of each stroke were observed. Differences in the insect dynamics and the flow features of the LEV are observed between hover and forward flight. In hover the up and downstroke cycles are symmetric, whereas in forward flight, these up and downstroke are asymmetric and LEV strength varies as a function of the kinematics and advance ratio. This work was supported by the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) CTA at the Univer- sity of Maryland.

  7. Experimental Investigations of Micro Air Injection to Control Rotating Stall

    Chaoqun Nie; Zhiting Tong; Shaojuan Geng; Junqiang Zhu; Weiguang Huang

    2007-01-01

    Steady discrete micro air injection at the tip region in front of the first compressor rotor has been proved to be an effective method to delay the inception of rotating stall in a low speed axial compressor. Considering the practical application a new type of micro injector was designed and described in this paper, which was imbedded in the casing and could be moved along the chord. In order to verify its feasibility to other cases, such as high subsonic axial compressor or centrifugal compressor, some other cases have been studied. Experimental results of the same low speed axial compressor showed that the new injector could possess many other advantages besides successfully stabilizing the compressor. Experiments performed on a high subsonic axial compressor confirmed the effectiveness of micro air injection when the relative velocity at the blade tip is high subsonic. Meanwhile in order to explore its feasibility in centrifugal compressor, a similar micro injector was designed and tested on a low speed centrifugal compressor with vaned diffuser. The injected mass flow was a bit larger than that used in axial compressors and the results showed micro injection could also delay the onset of rotating stall in the centrifugal compressor.

  8. Experimental investigation of circular Bragg phenomenon for oblique incidence.

    Erten, Sema; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Barber, Greg D

    2015-05-01

    A 20-period-thick chiral sculptured thin film (STF) of zinc selenide was fabricated on a glass slide by thermal evaporation. A variable-angle spectroscopic system was devised and used to measure all eight of the circular remittances of the chiral STF as functions of the angle of incidence and the free-space wavelength. Thereby, the center wavelength and the bandwidth of the circular Bragg phenomenon exhibited by structurally chiral materials such as cholesteric liquid crystals and chiral STFs were comprehensively characterized for incidence angles in the range [0°,70°]. The experimental data were qualitatively compared with data calculated using a helicoidal model for the relative permittivity dyadic of the chiral STF, and assuming that all three eigenvalues of that dyadic obey the single-resonance Lorentz model. The chosen representation was found adequate to represent the blue shift of the centerwavelength with an increasing angle of incidence, but the Lorentz model requires modification to develop improved predictive capabilities.

  9. An experimental investigation of wastewater treatment using electron beam irradiation

    Emami-Meibodi, M.; Parsaeian, M. R.; Amraei, R.; Banaei, M.; Anvari, F.; Tahami, S. M. R.; Vakhshoor, B.; Mehdizadeh, A.; Fallah Nejad, N.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Mostafavi, S. J.; Mousavi, S. M. J.

    2016-08-01

    Electron beam (EB) is used for disinfection and treatment of different types of sewage and industrial wastewater. However, high capital investment required and the abundant energy consumed by this process raise doubts about its cost-effectiveness. In this paper, different wastewaters, including two textile sewages and one municipal wastewater are experimentally studied under different irradiation strategies (i.e. batch, 60 l/min and 1000 m3/day) in order to establish the reliability and the optimum conditions for the treatment process. According to the results, EB improves the efficiency of traditional wastewater treatment methods, but, for textile samples, coagulation before EB irradiation is recommended. The cost estimation of EB treatment compared to conventional methods shows that EB has been more expensive than chlorination and less expensive than activated sludge. Therefore, EB irradiation is advisable if and only if conventional methods of textile wastewater treatment are insufficient or chlorination of municipal wastewater is not allowed for health reasons. Nevertheless, among the advanced oxidation processes (AOP), EB irradiation process may be the most suitable one in industrial scale operations.

  10. Experimental investigation on a high subsonic compressor cascade flow

    Zhang Haideng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of deepening the understanding of high-speed compressor cascade flow, this paper reports an experimental study on NACA-65 K48 compressor cascade with high subsonic inlet flow. With the increase of passage pressurizing ability, endwall boundary layer behavior is deteriorated, and the transition zone is extended from suction surface to the endwall as the adverse pressure gradient increases. Cross flow from endwall to midspan, mixing of corner boundary layer and the main stream, and reversal flow on the suction surface are caused by corner separation vortex structures. Passage vortex is the main corner separation vortex. During its movement downstream, the size grows bigger while the rotating direction changes, forming a limiting circle. With higher incidence, corner separation is further deteriorated, leading to higher flow loss. Meanwhile, corner separation structure, flow mixing characteristics and flow loss distribution vary a lot with the change of incidence. Compared with low aspect-ratio model, corner separation of high aspect-ratio model moves away from the endwall and is more sufficiently developed downstream the cascade. Results obtained present details of high-speed compressor cascade flow, which is rare in the relating research fields and is beneficial to mechanism analysis, aerodynamic optimization and flow control design.

  11. Laboratory experimental simulations: Chemical evolution of the organic matter from interstellar and cometary ice analogs

    Abou Mrad, N.; Vinogradoff, V.; Duverney, F.; Danger, G.; Theulé, P.; Borget, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution addresses the different approaches that are developed in our laboratory to study the chemical evolution of organic matter in stellar or interplanetary environments. In the first approach, starting from interstellar or cometary ice analogs subjected to different energy processes (thermal, photochemical), we aim to explain the mechanism of formation of key molecules (RING project: Reactivity in INterstellar ice Grains) such as HMT, POM or amino acid precursors that are or may be detected in future space missions. In a second approach, we are interested in the detection of volatile molecules sublimating from ice analogs when these latter are heated and/or irradiated (VAHIIA project: Volatile Analysis from the Heating of Interstellar Ice Analogs) through an online experimental device coupling the simulation chamber where ices are formed to a GC-MS instrument. The objective is thus to simulate the effects of the ice material warming when a young star forms or when a comet becomes active. This project provides an inventory of molecules that can be found in hot corinos or in the gaseous phase of comets. In a third approach, we analyze the organic matter contained in the refractory residues that can be considered as cometary analogs (RAHIIA Project: Residue Analysis from the Heating of Interstellar Ice Analogs) using very high resolution mass spectrometry (VHRMS). The results of these analyses show that residues present an important molecular diversity. This technique gives also the possibility to determine the elementary composition of these residues that can be compared to the meteorite composition. These residues can then be a basic material to develop, in a specific planetary environment, a prebiotic chemistry.

  12. An experimental approach for science laboratories in the contest of science of primary education degree course

    Giacomo Bozzo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available International literature in science education has shown the importance of introducing scientific studies in primary school, in order to give pupils competences and skills necessary for their life. Consequently, prospective primary teachers need to improve their scientific knowledge and to plan new experimental activities for primary school students. In this context, we have planned an educational learning path for prospective primary teachers, focused on specific conceptual knows of kinematics. The proposed activities are based on an empirical approach, avoiding in the first step any formal introduction of the observed phenomena, which could be difficult to understand, especially for students of science of primary education degree course. In this context, the educational technologies have given a fundamental support, since they have offered to prospective teachers the possibility to focus their attention only on the involved physics concepts and principles.Un approccio sperimentale per i laboratori scientifici nei corsi di laurea in Scienze della Formazione PrimariaStudi recenti hanno evidenziato la necessità di introdurre le discipline scientifiche sin dalla scuola primaria, per consentire alle future generazioni di vivere in modo critico e consapevole nel mondo reale. I futuri insegnanti hanno, quindi, la necessità di approfondire le loro conoscenze in ambito scientifico e di progettare valide attività laboratoriali per gli alunni di scuola primaria. In questo contesto si inserisce la nostra azione formativa rivolta agli studenti di Scienze della Formazione Primaria (SFP, mirata ad affrontare alcune difficoltà nell’apprendimento della Fisica, ben note in letteratura. L’attività didattica proposta è basata sull’osservazione diretta dei fenomeni fisici, evitando, nella fase iniziale, ogni genere di introduzione formale che possa risultare di difficile comprensione per gli studenti di SFP. Il supporto delle tecnologie didattiche ha

  13. Laboratory Investigation of Contact Freezing and the Aerosol to Ice Crystal Transformation Process

    Shaw, Raymond A. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2014-10-28

    This project has been focused on the following objectives: 1. Investigations of the physical processes governing immersion versus contact nucleation, specifically surface-induced crystallization; 2. Development of a quadrupole particle trap with full thermodynamic control over the temperature range 0 to –40 °C and precisely controlled water vapor saturation ratios for continuous, single-particle measurement of the aerosol to ice crystal transformation process for realistic ice nuclei; 3. Understanding the role of ice nucleation in determining the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds, within a framework that allows bridging between laboratory and field measurements.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Stator Flow in Diagonal Flow Fan

    Jie Wang; Yoichi Kinoue; Norimasa Shiomi; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kenji Kaneko; Yingzi Jin

    2008-01-01

    perimental investigations were conducted for the internal flow of the stator of the diagonal flow fan. Comer separation near the hub surface and the suction surface of the stator blade are focused on. At the design flow rate, the values of the axial velocity and the total pressure at stator outlet decrease near the suction surface at around the hub surface by the influence of the comer wall. At low flow rate of 80-90 % of the design flow rate, the comer separation between the suction surface and the hub surface can be found, which become widely spread at 80 % of the design flow rate.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Integrated Optical Intensive Impulse Electric Field Sensors

    SUN Bao; CHEN Fu-Shen

    2009-01-01

    We design and fabricate an integrated optical electric field sensor with segmented electrode for intensive im-pulse electric field measurement. The integrated optical sensor is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with segmented electrodes. The output/input character of the sensing system is analysed and measured. The max-imal detectable electric field range (-75 kV/m to 245 kV/m) is obtained by analysing the results. As a result, the integrated optics electric field sensing system is suitable for transient intensive electric field measurement investigation.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of an Ice-slurry Generator

    洪若瑜; 董梁; 尚德义; 徐建生; Kawaji M

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility equipped with refrigerant and brine circulation systems, and a rotating-scraper ice-slurry generator was constructed to analyze the ice-slurry flow and heat transfer accompanied by phase change in an industrial generator. The axial and transverse brine temperature and ice fraction concentration profiles in the ice generator were measured. The heat transfer efficiency lower than the average was identified in the upper half of the ice generator and its cause was determined by conducting three-dimensional numerical simulation using a commercial CFD code, FLUENT. Approaches of improving the brine-side heat transfer rates were investigated by incorporating extra mixing blades from numerical simulation.

  17. Experimental Investigation of 'Transonic Resonance' with Convergent-Divergent Nozzles

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Dahl, M. D.; Bencic, T. J.; Zaman, Khairul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Convergent-divergent nozzles, when run at pressure ratios lower than the design value, often undergo a flow resonance accompanied by the emission of acoustic tones. The phenomenon, different in characteristics from conventional 'screech' tones, has been studied experimentally. Unlike screech, the frequency increases with increasing supply pressure. There is a 'staging' behavior; 'odd harmonic' stages resonate at lower pressures while the fundamental occurs in a range of higher pressures corresponding to a fully expanded Mach number (M(sub j)) around unity. The frequency (f(sub N)) variation with M(sub j) depends on the half angle-of-divergence (theta) of the nozzle. At smaller theta, the slope of f(sub N) versus M(sub j) curve becomes steeper. The resonance involves standing waves and is driven by unsteady shock/boundary layer interaction. The distance between the foot of the shock and the nozzle exit imposes the lengthscale (L'). The fundamental corresponds to a quarterwave resonance, the next stage at a lower supply pressure corresponds to a three-quarter-wave resonance, and so on. The principal trends in the frequency variation are explained simply from the characteristic variation of the length-scale L'. Based on the data, correlation equations are provided for the prediction of f(sub N). A striking feature is that tripping of the boundary layer near the nozzle's throat tends to suppress the resonance. In a practical nozzle a tendency for the occurrence of the phenomenon is thought to be a source of 'internal noise'; thus, there is a potential for noise benefit simply by appropriate boundary layer tripping near the nozzle's throat.

  18. Theoretical and experimental investigation of optically spin-injected VECSEL

    Joly, Alexandre; Frougier, Julien; Baili, Ghaya; Alouini, Mehdi; George, Jean-Marie; Sagnes, Isabelle; Dolfi, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We report theoretical and experimental analysis of spin-injected VECSELs. First, we fabricate and characterize an optically pumped (100)-oriented InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum well VECSEL. The structure is designed to allow the integration of a Metal-Tunnel-Junction ferromagnetic spin-injector for future electrical injection. We report here the control at room temperature of the VECSEL polarization using optical spin injection in the active medium. The switching between two highly circular polarization states had been demonstrated using an M-shaped extended cavity in multi-modes lasing. This first result witnesses an efficient spin-injection in the active medium of the laser. Then, we report birefringence measurements of the VECSEL in oscillating conditions. The proposed technique relies on the measurement in the microwave domain of the beatnote between the oscillating mode and the amplified spontaneous emission of the cross-polarized non-lasing field lying in the following longitudinal mode. This technique is shown to offer extremely high sensitivity and accuracy enabling to track the amount of residual birefringence according to the laser operation conditions. Finally, we discuss the compensation of the residual linear phase anisotropy by controlling the birefringence of an intracavity electro-optical crystal. A 44-fold birefringence reduction is obtained. Besides, we study the modification of the laser polarization eigen states with birefringence compensation: a rotation of the linear polarization state is observed when the total phase anisotropy is reduced. An elliptical polarization eigen state is obtained at the minimum of the birefringence into the laser cavity, more favorable for spin injection.

  19. The experimental and numerical investigation of a grooved vapor chamber

    Zhang Ming [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China); Liu Zhongliang [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China)], E-mail: liuzhl@bjut.edu.cn; Ma Guoyuan [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2009-02-15

    An effective thermal spreader can achieve more uniform heat flux distribution and thus enhance heat dissipation of heat sinks. Vapor chamber is one of highly effective thermal spreaders. In this paper, a novel grooved vapor chamber was designed. The grooved structure of the vapor chamber can improve its axial and radial heat transfer and also can form the capillary loop between condensation and evaporation surfaces. The effect of heat flux, filling amount and gravity to the performance of this vapor chamber is studied by experiment. From experiment, we also obtained the best filling amount of this grooved vapor chamber. By comparing the thermal resistance of a solid copper plate with that of the vapor chamber, it is suggested that the critical heat flux condition should be maintained to use vapor chamber as efficient thermal spreaders for electronics cooling. A two-dimensional heat and mass transfer model for the grooved vapor chamber is developed. The numerical simulation results show the thickness distribution of liquid film in the grooves is not uniform. The temperature and velocity field in vapor chamber are obtained. The thickness of the liquid film in groove is mainly influenced by pressure of vapor and liquid beside liquid-vapor interface. The thin liquid film in heat source region can enhance the performance of vapor chamber, but if the starting point of liquid film is backward beyond the heat source region, the vapor chamber will dry out easily. The optimal filling ratio should maintain steady thin liquid film in heat source region of vapor chamber. The vapor condenses on whole condensation surface, so that the condensation surface achieves great uniform temperature distribution. By comparing the experimental results with numerical simulation results, the reliability of the numerical model can be verified.

  20. Preparing side charging of PCM storage: theoretical and experimental investigation

    Tesfay, A. H.; Hagos, F. Y.; Yohannes, K. G.; Nydal, O. J.; Kahsay, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    In Ethiopia, there is an abundant source of solar energy that is estimated to 5.3 kWh/m2/day. However, more than 90% of the society uses biomass as a main source of energy for cooking due to lack of technologies to convert this energy. Replacing these cooking activities by using renewable energy resources decreases pollution and reduces deforestation significantly. Using the solar energy in day time has no problem. For night time however, the system needs some kind of back-up system to make the daytime solar energy available. This back-up should have high-density energy storage and constant working temperature to perform a specific application. Latent heat storage using phase change materials (PCM) is one way of storing thermal energy. In the current study, a latent heat storage that uses a PCM material is used to store the solar energy aimed at utilizing solar energy for cooking Injera, main staple bread in Ethiopia. The PCM is a mixture of 60% NaNO3 and 40% KNO3 that are known as solar salts. The storage has a welded parallel aluminum fins with a gap of 40 mm in between to enhance the thermal conductivity during the charging-discharging process of the storage. The fins are extruded outside of the storage container to enable a side charging technique for the PCM. A prototype was developed with a solar salt of 17.5 kg and is tested for charging-discharging. The numerical simulation done on ANSYS and experimental results show an agreement and the system registered a 41.6% efficiency.

  1. Modelling and Experimental Investigation of an Active Damper

    Rafael Luís Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation methodology of the dynamic behavior of an active viscous damper. The damper has two flexible metallic bellows connected to a rigid reservoir filled with fluid. When one of the bellows is connected to a vibrating structure a periodic flow passes through a variable internal orifice and the damping effect is produced. The size of the orifice is adjusted by a controlled linear piezoelectric actuator that positions the conical core into a conical cavity. The device finite element structural model consists of the valve body and its conical core that are assumed rigid and the flexible bellows are represented by two pistons with elastic suspensions. The flow developed inside the damper is modeled considering the fluid-structure interation, using the Lagrangean-Eulerian formulation. To validate the proposed model a prototype was constructed and experimental tests and numerical simulations are accomplished in the time domain, applying harmonic excitations. The results are compared using curves that relate the damping coefficient with the orifice size and with the input velocity applied at the bellows face. However, for the proper control design and system operation, the direct use of the finite element model becomes unviable due to its high computational time. Then, a reduced second order discrete dynamic model for the damper was developed. The model parameters are identified by analysis in the frequency domain, using impulsive excitation force, for constant and variable orifice sizes. At low excitation frequencies, the damper prototype behaves like a single degree of freedom system which damping factor changes with the orifice size A fuzzy controller was designed and it generates the orifice reference size associated to the desired damping factor. The active system presented better performance when compared to the passive one.

  2. Experimental investigation of electron beam wave interactions utilising short pulses

    Wiggins, S M

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have investigated the production of ultra-short electromagnetic pulses and their interaction with electrons in various resonant structures. Diagnostic systems used in the measurements included large bandwidth detection systems for capturing the short pulses. Deconvolution techniques have been applied to account for bandwidth limitation of the detection systems and to extract the actual pulse amplitudes and durations from the data. A Martin-Puplett interferometer has been constructed for use as a Fourier transform spectrometer. The growth of superradiant electromagnetic spikes from short duration (0.5-1.0 ns), high current (0.6-2.0 kA) electron pulses has been investigated in a Ka-band Cherenkov maser and Ka- and W-band backward wave oscillators (BWO). In the Cherenkov maser, radiation spikes were produced with a peak power = 70 ps and a bandwidth <= 19 %. It is shown that coherent spontaneous emission from the leading edge of the electron pulse drives these interactions, giving rise to self-amp...

  3. Experimental Investigation of Ventilation Efficiency in a Dentistry Surgical Room

    Oladokun Majeed Olaide

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a response to the need to provide an acceptable thermal comfort and air quality in indoor environments, various ventilation performance indicators were developed over the years. These metrics are mainly geared towards air distribution, heat and pollutant removals. Evidence exists of influencing factors on these indicators as centered on ventilation design and operations. Unlike other indoor environments, health care environment requires better performance of ventilation system to prevent an incidence of nosocomial and other hospital acquired illnesses. This study investigates, using in-situ experiments, the ventilation efficiency in a dentistry surgical room. Thermal and hygric parameters were monitored on the air terminal devices and occupied zone over a period of one week covering both occupied and unoccupied hours. The resulting time-series parameters were used to evaluate the room’s ventilation effectiveness. Also, the obtained parameters were benchmarked against ASHRAE 170 (2013 and MS1525 (2014 requirements for ventilation in health care environment and building energy efficiency respectively. The results show that the mean daily operative conditions failed to satisfy the provisions of both standards. Regarding effectiveness, the findings reveal that the surgical room ventilation is ineffective with ventilation efficiency values ranging between 0 and 0.5 indicating air distribution short-circuiting. These results suggest further investigations, through numerical simulation, on the effect of this short-circuiting on thermal comfort, infection risk assessments and possible design improvements, an endeavour that forms our next line of research inquiries.

  4. Sensorimotor incongruence and body perception: an experimental investigation

    Jens eFoell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several studies have shown that mirrored arm or leg movements are related to altered body sensations. This includes the alleviation of chronic pain using congruent mirror feedback and the induction of abnormal sensation in healthy participants using incongruent mirror feedback. Prior research has identified neuronal and conceptual mechanisms of these phenomena. With the rising application of behavior-based methods for pain relief, a structured investigation of these reported effects seems necessary.Methods: We investigated a mirror setup that included congruent and incongruent hand and arm movements in 113 healthy participants and assessed the occurrence and intensity of unusual physical experiences such as pain, the sensation of missing or additional limbs, or changes in weight or temperature. A wooden surface instead of a mirror condition served as control. Results: As reported earlier, mirrored movements led to a variety of subjective reactions in both the congruent an incongruent movement condition, with the sensation of possessing a third limb being significantly more intense and frequent in the incongruent mirror condition. Reports of illusory pain were not more frequent during mirrored than during non-mirrored movements.Conclusions: These results suggest that hand movements with and without a mirror induce abnormal body perceptions but that the experience of an extra limb is most pronounced in the incongruent mirror movement condition. The frequent sensation of having a third arm may be related to brain processes designed to integrate input from several senses in a meaningful manner.

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigations into the stability of cyclic aminals

    Edgar Sawatzky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyclic aminals are core features of natural products, drug molecules and important synthetic intermediates. Despite their relevance, systematic investigations into their stability towards hydrolysis depending on the pH value are lacking.Results: A set of cyclic aminals was synthesized and their stability quantified by kinetic measurements. Steric and electronic effects were investigated by choosing appropriate groups. Both molecular mechanics (MM and density functional theory (DFT based studies were applied to support and explain the results obtained. Rapid decomposition is observed in acidic aqueous media for all cyclic aminals which occurs as a reversible reaction. Electronic effects do not seem relevant with regard to stability, but the magnitude of the conformational energy of the ring system and pKa values of the N-3 nitrogen atom.Conclusion: Cyclic aminals are stable compounds when not exposed to acidic media and their stability is mainly dependent on the conformational energy of the ring system. Therefore, for the preparation and work-up of these valuable synthetic intermediates and natural products, appropriate conditions have to be chosen and for application as drug molecules their sensitivity towards hydrolysis has to be taken into account.

  6. Experimental investigations on single stage modified Savonius rotor

    Kamoji, M.A.; Kedare, S.B. [Energy Science and Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Powai, Mumbai - 4000 76 (India); Prabhu, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Powai, Mumbai - 4000 76 (India)

    2009-07-15

    Conventional Savonius or modified forms of the conventional Savonius rotors are being investigated in an effort to improve the coefficient of power and to obtain uniform coefficient of static torque. To achieve these objectives, the rotors are being studied with and without central shaft between the end plates. Tests in a closed jet wind tunnel on modified form of the conventional Savonius rotor with the central shaft is reported to have a coefficient of power of 0.32. In this study, modified Savonius rotor without central shaft between the two end plates is tested in an open jet wind tunnel. Investigation is undertaken to study the effect of geometrical parameters on the performance of the rotors in terms of coefficient of static torque, coefficient of torque and coefficient of power. The parameters studied are overlap ratio, blade arc angle, aspect ratio and Reynolds number. The modified Savonius rotor with an overlap ratio of 0.0, blade arc angle of 124 and an aspect ratio of 0.7 has a maximum coefficient of power of 0.21 at a Reynolds number of 1,50,000, which is higher than that of conventional Savonius rotor (0.19). Correlation is developed for a single stage modified Savonius rotor for a range of Reynolds numbers studied. (author)

  7. Experimental Investigation of Flow Boiling in Parallel Mini-channels

    Wu, Wan.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Xia, J. J.; Wen, S.-Z.; Wang, Z.-R.; He, Z.-H.; Huang, Z.-C.

    2015-07-01

    Flow boiling in micro-channels and mini-channels has received significant attention due to its capability for dissipating highflux heat, especially in the thermal management of high precision electronics. A heat sink with narrow rectangular mini-channels is designed to investigate flow boiling in the mini-channels, including the effect of gravity. It contains 14 parallel channels with a cross section, of 1×4mm 2, of which the hydraulic diameter is 1.6mm. The cooling capability, the temperature uniformity, and the temperature stability of the flow boiling in minichannels are investigated with R22, with total mass flow flux ranges from 35 to 70kg/m 2s. The results show that the cooling capability of the heat- sink is up to 340W(˜ 3.0W/cm 2), and the temperature difference is below 4 ∘C(even down to 2 ∘C) on the heat sink. The temperature uniformity isn't quite sensitive to heat flux. The instability has not been observed in the present researches.

  8. NIF laboratory astrophysics simulations investigating the effects of a radiative shock on hydrodynamic instabilities

    Angulo, A. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Kalantar, D.; MacLaren, S.; Raman, K.; Miles, A.; Trantham, Matthew; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K.; Doss, F. W.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    This poster will describe simulations based on results from ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the effects of radiative shock on hydrodynamically unstable surfaces. The experiments performed on NIF uniquely provide the necessary conditions required to emulate radiative shock that occurs in astrophysical systems. The core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars is such an example wherein the interaction between the supernova ejecta and the circumstellar medium creates a region susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. Radiative and nonradiative experiments were performed to show that R-T growth should be reduced by the effects of the radiative shocks that occur during this core-collapse. Simulations were performed using the radiation hydrodynamics code Hyades using the experimental conditions to find the mean interface acceleration of the instability and then further analyzed in the buoyancy drag model to observe how the material expansion contributes to the mix-layer growth. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under Grant Number DE-FG52-09NA29548.

  9. R-process Experimental Campaign at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    Pereira, J; Quinn, M; Aprahamian, A; Arndt, O; Becerril, A; Elliot, T; Estrade, A; Galaviz, D; Kern, L; Kessler, R; Kratz, K L; Lorusso, G; Mantica, P; Matos, M; Montes, F; Pfeiffer, B; Schatz, H; Schertz, F; Smith, E; Walters, W B; Wöhr, A

    2006-01-01

    A JINA/VISTARS r-process campaign was completed at the A1900 Fragment Separator of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory in the fall of 2005. The purpose of the campaign was the measurement of the beta-decay half-lives and beta-delayed neutron-emission probabilities of different unknown neutron-rich nuclei participating in the r-process. From these observables it will be possible to extract information about the region between the N=56 sub-shell closure at the sudden onset of deformation at N=60 in the A=100 region, and the potential new shell structures around the possible local, spherical double sub-shell closure at Z=40, N=70, which may help clarify the origin of the calculated r-process abundance deficiencies around A=110. Moreover, the region of the chart of nuclides investigated in the campaign included some important r-process waiting-point nuclei, whose beta-decay properties are crucial for understanding the r-process abundance pattern. Details of this campaign will be presented, emphasizi...

  10. Experimental investigations of fluid dynamic and thermal performance of nanofluids

    Kulkarni, Devdatta Prakash

    The goal of this research was to investigate the fluid dynamic and thermal performance of various nanofluids. Nanofluids are dispersions of metallic nanometer size particles (choice of base fluid is an ethylene or propylene glycol and water mixture in cold regions. Initially the rheological characterization of copper oxide (CuO) nanofluids in water and in propylene glycol was performed. Results revealed that higher concentrations of CuO nanoparticles (5 to 15%) in water exhibited time-independent pseudoplastic and shear-thinning behavior. Lower concentrations (1 to 6%) of CuO nanofluids in propylene glycol revealed that these nanofluids behaved as Newtonian fluids. Both nanofluids showed that viscosity decreased exponentially with increase in temperature. Subsequent correlations for viscosities as a function of volume concentration and temperature were developed. Effects of different thermophysical properties on the Prandtl number of CuO, silicon dioxide (SiO2) and aluminum oxide (A12O 3) nanofluids were investigated. Results showed that the Prandtl number increased with increasing volume concentrations, which in turn increased the heat transfer coefficients of the nanofluids. Various nanofluids were compared for their heat transfer rates based on the Mouromtseff number, which is a Figure of Merit for heat transfer fluids. From this analysis, the optimal concentrations of nanoparticles in base fluids were found for CuO-water nanofluids. Experiments were performed to investigate the convective heat transfer enhancement and pressure loss of CuO, SiO2 and A12O 3 nanofluids in the turbulent regime. The increases in heat transfer coefficient by nanofluids for various volume concentrations compared to the base fluid were determined. Pressure loss was observed to increase with nanoparticle volume concentration. It was observed that an increase in particle diameter increased the heat transfer coefficient. Calculations showed that application of nanofluids in heat

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of liquid-metal free-surface flows in spallation targets

    Batta, A., E-mail: batta@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany Hermann-von-Helmholtz-PLATZ 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Class, A.G.; Litfin, K.; Wetzel, Th. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany Hermann-von-Helmholtz-PLATZ 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Moreau, V.; Massidda, L. [CRS4 Centre for Advanced Studies, Research and Development in Sardinia, Polaris, Edificio 1, 09010 Pula, CA (Italy); Thomas, S.; Lakehal, D. [ASCOMP GmbH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Angeli, D.; Losi, G. [DIEF – Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena (Italy); Mooney, K.G. [University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Amherst (United States); Van Tichelen, K. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Experimental study of free surface for lead bismuth eutectic target. • Numerical investigation of free surface of a liquid metal target. • Advanced free surface modelling. - Abstract: Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are extensively investigated for the transmutation of high-level nuclear waste within many worldwide research programs. The first advanced design of an ADS system is currently developed in SCK• CEN, Mol, Belgium: the Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications (MYRRHA). Many European research programs support the design of MYRRHA. In the framework of the Euratom project ‘Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative nuclear Systems (THINS)’ a liquid-metal free-surface experiment is performed at the Karlsruhe Liquid Metal Laboratory (KALLA) of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The experiment investigates a full-scale model of the concentric free-surface spallation target of MYRRHA using Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) as coolant. In parallel, numerical free surface models are developed and tested which are reviewed in the article. A volume-of-fluid method, a moving mesh model, a free surface model combining the Level-Set method with Large-Eddy Simulation model and a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics approach are investigated. Verification of the tested models is based on the experimental results obtained within the THINS project and on previous water experiments performed at the University Catholic de Louvain (UCL) within the Euratom project ‘EUROpean Research Programme for the TRANSmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in Accelerator Driven System (EUROTRANS)’. The design of the target enables a high fluid velocity and a stable surface at the beam entry. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of both experimental and numerical results obtained for free surface target characterization. Without entering in technical details, the status, the major achievements and lessons for the future with respect to

  12. Experimental investigations into the physics of light emitting conjugated polymers

    Whitelegg, S A

    2001-01-01

    chloroprecursor MEH-PPV in-situ of ITO results in a reaction of the polymer with ITO, which significantly shift the emission to high energies. Electroabsorption spectroscopy is used to probe the internal electric fields within operating polymer light emitting devices. When a PPV based LED in an oxygen/water atmosphere, degradation of the device occurs whereby an electric field develops, which opposes the applied electric field. This opposing electric field subsequently decays when the device is turned to its off state. Operating lifetimes and emission efficiencies of polymer light emitting devices are now approaching values suitable for the manufacture and sale of polymer light emitting based products. However, degradation and device performance still continues to be of chief concern and in order for these to be improved the underlying physical processes have to be identified. This thesis aims to identify some of these processes. An investigation in to the optical absorption and emission properties of insolub...

  13. Experimental investigation of surface roughness in electrical discharge turning process

    Gohil, Vikas; Puri, Y. M.

    2016-10-01

    In the present study the effects of machining parameters on the average surface roughness (Ra) in electrical discharge turning (EDT) is investigated. EDT is a new machining process in which a rotary spindle is added to a conventional die-sinking EDM machine in order to produce cylindrical components. In this method a new process parameter (spindle rotation) along with pulse on time and current is introduced to study its effect on Ra. This has been done by means of full factorial design (21 × 32) of experiments. A mathematical model has been developed for Ra by regression analysis and factor effects were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Signal-to-noise ratio analysis is used to find the optimal condition.

  14. Experimental investigation on a pulsating heat pipe with hydrogen

    Deng, H. R.; Liu, Y. M.; Ma, R. F.; Han, D. Y.; Gan, Z. H.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The pulsating heat pipe (PHP) has been increasingly studied in cryogenic application, for its high transfer coefficient and quick response. Compared with Nb3Sn and NbTi, MgB2 whose critical transformation temperature is 39 K, is expected to replace some high-temperature superconducting materials at 25 K. In order to cool MgB2, this paper designs a Hydrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe, which allows a study of applied heat, filling ratio, turn number, inclination angle and length of adiabatic section on the thermal performance of the PHP. The thermal performance of the hydrogen PHP is investigated for filling ratios of 35%, 51%, 70% at different heat inputs, and provides information regarding the starting process is received at three filling ratios.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Paraglider Wing

    Mashud, Mohammad; Umemura, Akira

    The fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of a paraglider’s canopy are investigated in wind tunnel experiments using an inflatable cell model designed to represent the dynamic behaviors of each cell comprising the canopy. At attack angles greater than a few degrees, the cell model inflates fully. To characterize its aerodynamic characteristics, we focus our attention on the flow around the inflated cell model at the plane of symmetry of the model. The cross-sectional profile of the inflated cell model, streamline pattern, internal air pressure and external surface pressure distribution are measured at various attack angles in order to identify the function of air intake and to obtain the lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil with an open air intake. The results reveal the mechanism of how the cell inflates into a stable wing shape and bears the buckling force caused by the cables suspending a pay load.

  16. Experimental Investigation on Complex Structures Machining by Electrochemical Micromachining Technology

    Liu Yong; Zhu Di; Zeng Yongbin; Huang Shaofu; Yu Hongbing

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical micromachining(EMM)technology for fabricating micro structures is presented in this article.By applying ultra short pulses,dissolution of a workpiece can be restricted to the region very close to the electrode.First,an EMM system for meeting the requirements of the EMM process is established.Second,sets of experiments is carried out to investigate the influence of some of the predominant electrochemical process parameters such as electrical parameters,feed rate,electrode geometry features and electrolyte composition on machining quality,especially the influences of pulse on time on shape precision and working end shape of electrode on machined surface quality.Finally,after the preliminary experiments,a complex microstructure with good shape precision and surface quality is successfully obtained.

  17. Experimental investigation of active machine tool vibration control

    Rojas, J.; Liang, Chen; Geng, Zheng J.

    1996-05-01

    The successful vibration reduction of machine tools during machining process can improve productivity, increase quality, and reduce tool wear. This paper will present our initial investigation in the application of smart material technologies in machine tool vibration control using magnetostrictive actuators and electrorheological elastomer dampers on an industrial Sheldon horizontal lathe. The dynamics of the machining process are first studied, which reveals the complexity in the machine tool vibration response and the challenge to the active control techniques. The active control experiment shows encouraging results. The use of electrorheological elastomer damping device for active/passive vibration control provides significant vibration reduction in the high frequency range and great improvement in the workpiece surface finishing. The research presented in this paper demonstrates that the combination of active and active/passive vibration control techniques is very promising for successful machine tool vibration control.

  18. Experimental Investigation on Power Output in Aged Wind Turbines

    N. Murugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the power output on effect of tower height with same diameter of rotor was conducted in a wind turbine site. As the wind acceleration is varying with height, 3 levels were selected according to the availability of tower. The responses of power output with respect to variation of wind speed are changing for the tower heights of 30, 40, and 50 m. The study showed that the actual ideal power output and measured real power output follow the same trend within range of operating wind speed. The empirical model used for calculation of actual ideal power output was compared with real power output and the overall concepts in power output also had been analysed.

  19. Experimental investigation of flash pyrolysis oil droplet combustion

    Ibrahim, Norazana; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and compare the combustion behaviour of a single droplet of pyrolysis oil derived from wheat straw and heavy fossil oil in a single droplet combustion chamber. The initial oil droplet diameters were in between 500 μm to 2500 μm. The experiments were performed...... at a temperature ranging between 1000 and 1400°C with an initial gas velocity of 1.6 m/s and oxygen concentration of 3%. The evolution of combustion of bio-oil droplets was recorded by a digital video camera. It was observed that the combustion behaviour of pyrolysis oil droplet differ from the heavy oil in terms...... both of ignition, devolatilisation and char oxidation. The pyrolysis oil is more difficult to ignite and has a shorter devolatilisation time and a longer char oxidation time. Copyright © 2013, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l....

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of wave ferrofluid convection

    Bozhko, A.A. [Department of Physics, Perm State University, Bukirev Str. 15, 614990 Perm (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: bozhko@psu.ru; Putin, G.F. [Department of Physics, Perm State University, Bukirev Str. 15, 614990 Perm (Russian Federation); Tynjaelae, T. [Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Lappeenranta Univeristy of Technology, P.O. Box 20, Lappeenranta 53851 (Finland); Sarkomaa, P. [Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Lappeenranta Univeristy of Technology, P.O. Box 20, Lappeenranta 53851 (Finland)

    2007-09-15

    The stability of buoyancy-driven shear flow in an inclined layer of a ferrocolloid is investigated for different values of inclinations and homogeneous longitudinal magnetic fields. Near the onset of Rayleigh convection of ferrofluid layer inclined with respect to gravity, the wave oscillatory regimes were observed in experiments and numerical simulations. Visualization of convection patterns is provided by a temperature-sensitive liquid crystal film. As experiments testify, the origin of traveling wave regimes in ferrofluid is due to concentration gradients caused by gravity sedimentation of the magnetic particles. To study the effects of initial concentration gradient of particles, on convective instabilities, finite volume numerical simulations using a two-phase mixture model were carried out for the same setup. The most fascinating effect in ferrofluid convection is spontaneous formation of localized states, those where the convection chaotically focuses in confined regions and is absent in the remainder of cavity.

  1. An experimental investigation of the normality of irrational algebraic numbers

    Nielsen, Johan Sejr Brinch; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the distribution of digits of large prefixes of the expansion of irrational algebraic numbers to different bases. We compute 2.318 bits of the binary expansions (corresponding to 2.33.108 decimals) of the 39 least Pisot-Vijayaraghavan numbers, the 47 least known Salem numbers...... blocks for each number to bases 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10, as well as the maximum relative frequency deviation from perfect equidistribution. We use the two statistics to perform tests at significance level α = 0.05, respectively, maximum deviation threshold α = 0.05. Our results suggest that if Borel......'s conjecture-that all irrational algebraic numbers are normal-is true, then it may have an empirical base: The distribution of digits in algebraic numbers appears close to equidistribution for large prefixes of their expansion. Of the 121 algebraic numbers studied, all numbers passed the maximum relative...

  2. Experimental investigations of graded sediment transport under unsteady flow hydrographs

    Le Wang; Alan J.S. Cuthbertson; Gareth Pender; Zhixian Cao

    2015-01-01

    Natural fluvial channels can experience significant variations in sediment transport rates under unsteady flow conditions, especially during flood hydrograph events. At present, however, there is a distinct lack of understanding of the interaction between unsteady hydrograph flow properties and temporal variability in graded sediment transport rates. In the current study, a series of parametric experiments were conducted to investigate the response of two-graded sediment beds to a range of different unsteady hydrograph flow conditions. Investigations of the total and fractional bed-load sediment transport rates revealed strong temporal variations in transport over the hydrographs, with size-dependent temporal lag effects observed between peak flow conditions and peak bed-load transport rates. Specifically, coarse gravels had increased mobility during the rising limb of the hydrographs, attaining their peak bed-load transport rate either prior to, or near, peak flow conditions. By contrast, the finer grades tended to have enhanced mobility during the receding limb of the hydrographs, with peak transport rates measured after peak flow conditions had passed. Grain size distributions measured from the collected bed-load samples also indicated material coarsening over the rising limb and fining during the receding limb, while corresponding image analysis measurements of bed surface composition showed only marginal variation over the hydrographs. Computation of total and fractional sediment yields revealed that the bimodal sediment mixture tested was transported at significantly higher rates than the uni-modal mixture over all hydrograph conditions tested. This finding indicated that the uni-modal sediment bed was inherently more stable than the bimodal bed due to the increased abundance of medium-sized gravels present in the uni-modal sediment grade. The parametric dependences established in the study have clear implications for improved understanding of fractional

  3. A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment

    D. Kocman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4–417 μg g−1 and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, regulating three major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature, soil moisture and solar radiation. MEFs ranged from less than 2 to 530 ng m−2 h−1, with the highest emissions from contaminated alluvial soils and soils near the mining district in the town of Idrija. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. The results revealed a strong positive effect of all three parameters investigated on momentum MEF. The light-induced flux was shown to be independent of the soil temperature, while the soil aqueous phase seems to be responsible for recharging the pool of mercury in the soil available for both the light- and thermally-induced flux. The overall flux response to simulated environmental conditions depends greatly on the form of Hg in the soil. Higher activation energies are required for the overall process to occur in soils where insoluble cinnabar prevails compared to soils where more mobile Hg forms and forms available for transformation processes are dominant.

  4. Experimental investigation on underwater trajectory deviation of high-speed projectile with different nose shape

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, Yafei; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yubo

    2017-01-01

    The investigation on free-surface impact of projectiles has last for more than one hundred years due to its noticeable significance on improving defensive weapon technology. Laboratory-scaled water entry experiments for trajectory stability had been performed with four kinds of projectiles at a speed range of 20˜200 m/s. The nose shapes of the cylindrical projectiles were designed into flat, ogive, hemi-sphere and cone to make comparisons on the trajectory deviation when they were launched into water at a certain angle of 0˜20°. Two high-speed cameras positioned orthogonal to each other and normal to the water tank were employed to capture the entire process of projectiles' penetration. From the experimental results, the consecutive images in two planes were presented to display the general process of the trajectory deviation. Compared with the effect of impact velocities and nose shape on trajectory deviation, it merited conclude that flat projectiles had a better trajectory stability, while ogival projectiles experienced the largest attitude change. The characteristics of pressure waves were also investigated.

  5. Experimental investigation of small-scale gasification of woody biomass

    Barrio, Maria

    2002-05-01

    A small-scale stratified down draft gasifier has been built and operated under stable conditions using wood pellets as fuel and air as gasification agent. The problems observed during the preliminary experiments have been described and explained; they are mainly related to the stability of the process. The stable operation of the gasifier has been characterised by the gas composition and the product gas tar and particle content. The biomass feeding rate has varied between 4,5 and 6,5 kg/h. The CO content of the product gas (23-26 % vol.) is higher than in similar gasifiers and the H{sub 2} content has been found to vary between 14 and 16 % vol. The tar content in the product gas (Ca. 3 g/Nm{sup 3}) is rather high compared with similar gasifiers. The temperature profile, together with other relevant parameters like the air-excess ratio, the air to fuel ratio and gas to fuel ratio have been calculated. The experiments show that the air excess ratio is rather constant, varying between 0,25 and 0,3. Experiments have been conducted with a gas engine using mixtures of CH{sub 4}, CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} as a fuel. NO{sub x} and CO emissions are analysed. The char gasification process has been studied in detail by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis. The study comprises the chemical kinetics of the gasification reactions of wood char in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, including the inhibition effect of CO and H{sub 2}. A kinetic model based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics has been found which relates the mass loss rate to the temperature, gas composition and degree of conversion for each reaction. The ratio CO/CO{sub 2} has been found to be a relevant parameter for reactivity. The gasification experiments in mixtures of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O give reasons to believe that the rate of desorption for the complex C(O) varies depending on the gas mixture surrounding the char. It has been found that if the experimental data are obtained from separate H{sub 2}O/N{sub 2

  6. Standardisation of environmental enrichment for laboratory mice and rats: Utilisation, practicality and variation in experimental results

    Baumans, V.; Loo, P.L.P. van; Pham, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Rats and mice are the most commonly used species as laboratory animal models of diseases in biomedical research. Environmental factors such as cage size, number of cage mates and cage structure such as environmental enrichment can affect the physiology and behavioural development of laboratory anima

  7. Inter-laboratory evaluation of instrument platforms and experimental workflows for quantitative accuracy and reproducibility assessment

    Percy, Andrew J.; Tamura-Wells, Jessica; Albar, Juan Pablo; Aloria, Kerman; Amirkhani, Ardeshir; Araujo, Gabriel D T; Arizmendi, Jesus M.; Blanco, Francisco J.; Canals, Francesc; Cho, Jin Young; Colomé-Calls, Núria; Corrales, Fernando J.; Domont, Gilberto; Espadas, Guadalupe; Fernandez-Puente, Patricia; Gil, Concha; Haynes, Paul A.; Hernáez, Maria Luisa; Kim, Jin Young; Kopylov, Arthur; Marcilla, Miguel; McKay, Mathew J.; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Molloy, Mark P.; Ohlund, Leanne B.; Paik, Young Ki; Paradela, Alberto; Raftery, Mark; Sabidó, Eduard; Sleno, Lekha; Wilffert, Daniel; Wolters, Justina C.; Yoo, Jong Shin; Zgoda, Victor; Parker, Carol E.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2015-01-01

    The reproducibility of plasma protein quantitation between laboratories and between instrument types was examined in a large-scale international study involving 16 laboratories and 19 LC-MS/MS platforms, using two kits designed to evaluate instrument performance and one kit designed to evaluate the

  8. A Simple and Low-Cost Monitoring System to Investigate Environmental Conditions in a Biological Research Laboratory.

    Akshay Gurdita

    Full Text Available Basic equipment such as incubation and refrigeration systems plays a critical role in nearly all aspects of the traditional biological research laboratory. Their proper functioning is therefore essential to ensure reliable and repeatable experimental results. Despite this fact, in many academic laboratories little attention is paid to validating and monitoring their function, primarily due to the cost and/or technical complexity of available commercial solutions. We have therefore developed a simple and low-cost monitoring system that combines a "Raspberry Pi" single-board computer with USB-connected sensor interfaces to track and log parameters such as temperature and pressure, and send email alert messages as appropriate. The system is controlled by open-source software, and we have also generated scripts to automate software setup so that no background in programming is required to install and use it. We have applied it to investigate the behaviour of our own equipment, and present here the results along with the details of the monitoring system used to obtain them.

  9. A Simple and Low-Cost Monitoring System to Investigate Environmental Conditions in a Biological Research Laboratory.

    Gurdita, Akshay; Vovko, Heather; Ungrin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Basic equipment such as incubation and refrigeration systems plays a critical role in nearly all aspects of the traditional biological research laboratory. Their proper functioning is therefore essential to ensure reliable and repeatable experimental results. Despite this fact, in many academic laboratories little attention is paid to validating and monitoring their function, primarily due to the cost and/or technical complexity of available commercial solutions. We have therefore developed a simple and low-cost monitoring system that combines a "Raspberry Pi" single-board computer with USB-connected sensor interfaces to track and log parameters such as temperature and pressure, and send email alert messages as appropriate. The system is controlled by open-source software, and we have also generated scripts to automate software setup so that no background in programming is required to install and use it. We have applied it to investigate the behaviour of our own equipment, and present here the results along with the details of the monitoring system used to obtain them.

  10. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Low-Solubility Radionuclides: A Field, Experimental, and Modeling Investigation

    Kersting, A B; Reimus, P W; Abdel-Fattah, A; Allen, P G; Anghel, I; Benedict, F C; Esser, B K; Lu, N; Kung, K S; Nelson, J; Neu, M P; Reilly, S D; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Ware, S D; Warren, RG; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2003-02-01

    rate of Pu transport. Currently, the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of low-solubility radionuclides is not understood well enough to effectively model contaminant transport. A fundamental understanding of the role that colloids may or may not play in the transport of low-solubility radionuclides is needed in order to predict contaminant transport, design remediation strategies and provide risk assessments. Ryan and Elimelech (1996) have argued that in order to evaluate the potential for colloids to transport radionuclides, several criteria must be met: (1) colloids must exist and be stable, (2) radionuclides must have a high sorption affinity for the colloids, and (3) colloids must be transported. Only then can we understand the conditions where colloids can and will facilitate transport of radionuclides. In this report we compile the results from a series of field, laboratory and modeling studies funded by the UGTA program in order to evaluate the potential for colloids to transport low-solubility radionuclides at the NTS. The studies presented in this report fall under three general areas of investigation: Characterization of natural colloids in groundwater at NTS, Pu sorption/desorption experiments on colloid minerals identified in NTS groundwater, and Transport of Pu-doped colloids through fractured rock core. Chapter 1 is a background review of our current understanding of colloids and their role in facilitating contaminant transport. Chapters 2, and 3 are field studies that focused on characterizing natural colloids at different hydrologic environments at the NTS and address Ryan and Elimelech's (1996) first criteria regarding the existence and stability of colloids. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 are laboratory experimental studies that investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of Pu and other low-solubility radionuclides on colloid minerals observed in NTS groundwater. These studies evaluate Ryan and Elimelech's (1996) second criteria that the

  11. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Dynamic Seat Comfort in Aircrafts

    Ciloglu, Hakan

    This research focuses on the dynamic seat comfort in aircrafts specifically during takeoff, landing and cruise through turbulence flight conditions. The experiments are performed using a multi axis shaker table in the Automotive Centre of Excellence (ACE) at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology subjected to sample takeoff, landing and cruise vibration recordings obtained onboard of an actual flight. The input vibrations introduced to the aircraft seats during actual flight conditions and during the experiments in the ACE are compared and it is concluded that the given flight conditions were successfully replicated for the interest of this thesis. The experiments are conducted with two different aircraft seats, economy class and business class. Furthermore, to investigate the importance of seat cushion characteristics in addition to economy and business class seat cushions, three laboratory made cushions were included in the investigation as well. Moreover, the effect of passenger weight is also discussed by conducting the experiments with 1 and 2 identical dummies. It is concluded that static seat properties play a significant role in the comfort perception level as well as flight conditions. Among the three flight condition, landing appeared to be the most uncomfortable case comparing to takeoff and cruise. In addition to experimental work, a numerical study to simulate the flight conditions is undertaken with the initial work of CAD modelling. The simulated responses of the seat is partially matching with experimental results due to unknown parameters of the cushion and the connections of the aircraft seat that cannot be created in the CAD model due to unknown manufacturing processes.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE FAILURE OF CASCADE LANDSLIDE DAMS

    NIU Zhi-pan; XU Wei-lin; LI Nai-wen; XUE Yang; CHEN Hua-yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper preseuts results of model tests for the landslide dam failure of a single dam and cascade dams in a sloping channel.The dams were designed to be regular trapezoid with fine sand.A new measuring method named the labeled line locating method was used to digitalize the captured instantaneous pictures.Under two differem inflow discharges,the morphological evolution and the flow patterns during one dam failure and the failure of cascade dams were investigated.The results indicate that when the inflow discharge is large,the deformation pattern of the downstream dam is similar to that of the upstream dam,and both dams are characterized with the overtopping scour throughout the dam failure process.When the inflow discharge is small,the upstream dam is scoured mainly through a sluice slot formed by the longitudinal incision,and the downstream dam is characterized with the overtopping scour.The data set presented in this paper can be used for the validation of numerical models and provide a reference for the flood risk management of cascade landslide dams.

  13. Experimental investigations of the wettability of clays and shales

    Borysenko, Artem; Clennell, Ben; Sedev, Rossen; Burgar, Iko; Ralston, John; Raven, Mark; Dewhurst, David; Liu, Keyu

    2009-07-01

    Wettability in argillaceous materials is poorly understood, yet it is critical to hydrocarbon recovery in clay-rich reservoirs and capillary seal capacity in both caprocks and fault gouges. The hydrophobic or hydrophilic nature of clay-bearing soils and sediments also controls to a large degree the movement of spilled nonaqueous phase liquids in the subsurface and the options available for remediation of these pollutants. In this paper the wettability of hydrocarbons contacting shales in their natural state and the tendencies for wettability alteration were examined. Water-wet, oil-wet, and mixed-wet shales from wells in Australia were investigated and were compared with simplified model shales (single and mixed minerals) artificially treated in crude oil. The intact natural shale samples (preserved with their original water content) were characterized petrophysically by dielectric spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, plus scanning electron, optical and fluorescence microscopy. Wettability alteration was studied using spontaneous imbibition, pigment extraction, and the sessile drop method for contact angle measurement. The mineralogy and chemical compositions of the shales were determined by standard methods. By studying pure minerals and natural shales in parallel, a correlation between the petrophysical properties, and wetting behavior was observed. These correlations may potentially be used to assess wettability in downhole measurements.

  14. Tactile device utilizing a single magnetorheological sponge: experimental investigation

    Kim, Soomin; Kim, Pyunghwa; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    In the field of medicine, several new areas have been currently introduced such as robot-assisted surgery. However, the major drawback of these systems is that there is no tactile communication between doctors and surgical sites. When the tactile system is brought up, telemedicine including telerobotic surgery can be enhanced much more than now. In this study, a new tactile device is designed using a single magnetorhological (MR) sponge cell to realize the sensation of human organs. MR fluids and an open celled polyurethane foam are used to propose the MR sponge cell. The viscous and elastic sensational behaviors of human organs are realized by the MR sponge cell. Before developing the tactile device, tactile sensation according to touch of human fingers are quantified in advance. The finger is then treated as a reduced beam bundle model (BBM) in which the fingertip is comprised of an elastic beam virtually. Under the reduced BBM, when people want to sense an object, the fingertip is investigated by pushing and sliding. Accordingly, while several magnitudes of magnetic fields are applied to the tactile device, normal and tangential reaction forces and bending moment are measured by 6-axis force/torque sensor instead of the fingertip. These measured data are used to compare with soft tissues. It is demonstrated that the proposed MR sponge cell can realize any part of the organ based on the obtained data.

  15. The experimental investigation of microcracks nucleation in typical tectonics

    2000-01-01

    The evolution and nucleation of microcracks in typical tectonics are investigated in the experiment of fracture of marble specimen. The change of state during nucleation of microcracks is observed. The controlling effect of tectonics on evolution of microcracks is analyzed by using the damage mechanics theory. These characteristics can be analogized to kilometer meters as the first effect of earthquake precursors. These studies may be helpful to interpret the foreshock or general foreshock in the moderate or short stage before strong earthquakes. The other physical precursors are second or third effect. The local density of microcracks increasing abruptly may be helpful to interpret the phenomenon that part precursor records appear catastrophic jump. The part out of nucleation where some microcracks heal and the density change reversibly may be helpful to interpret the phenomenon that some precursors records appear reverse change. The area difference of microcracks accumulation and evolution in different part of typical tectonics is studied. This difference may be helpful to interpret the characteristics (including the area) of earthquake preparation of different tectonics, and further to interpret the difference of the precursors between plate edge and intraplate. These differences may be introduced by the scholars with different points of view as to discuss about the existence of precursors before earthquakes. However, when the precursor records are studied, one must notice the geology background in different areas.

  16. Experimental investigation of drift instabilities in E×B discharges

    Gascon, Nicolas; Young, Chris V.; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Ito, Tsuyohito; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2014-10-01

    Drift plasma instabilities are characterized in three E×B discharges operating on noble gases: two Hall-type plasma thrusters with insulating channel walls (70 mm outer diameter, 20 mm long, and 90 mm outer diameter, 80 mm long), and a small magnetron discharge (5 mm diameter). Plasma instabilities in the E×B discharges are investigated using arrays of electrostatic probes. The signals from the probes arrays are processed with wavelet filtering, and frequency-wavelength dispersion analysis tools. Results are compared to hybrid PIC-fluid axial azimuthal simulations and analyzed in light of recent theories of gradient-driven drift instabilities, in an effort to better understand the relation between drift instabilities and anomalous electron transport in these discharges. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Aerosols Produced by Cosmic Rays

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Marsh, N.D.;

    Satellite observations have shown that the Earth’s cloud cover is strongly correlated with the galactic cosmic ray flux. While this correlation is indicative of a possible physical connection, there is currently no confirmation that a physical mechanism exists. We are therefore setting up an expe...... to control the number of ions present. This will enable experiments to be performed both with and without the presence of ions, thus providing information as to the potential role of ions in aerosol processes....... an experiment in order to investigate the underlying microphysical processes. The results of this experiment will help to understand whether ionisation from cosmic rays, and by implication the related processes in the universe, has a direct influence on Earth’s atmosphere and climate. Since any physical...... mechanism linking cosmic rays to clouds and climate is currently speculative, there have been various suggestions of the role atmospheric ions may play; these involve any one of a number of processes from the nucleation of aerosols up to the collection processes of cloud droplets.We have chosen to start our...

  18. Experimental investigation of observation error in anuran call surveys

    McClintock, B.T.; Bailey, L.L.; Pollock, K.H.; Simons, T.R.

    2010-01-01

    Occupancy models that account for imperfect detection are often used to monitor anuran and songbird species occurrence. However, presenceabsence data arising from auditory detections may be more prone to observation error (e.g., false-positive detections) than are sampling approaches utilizing physical captures or sightings of individuals. We conducted realistic, replicated field experiments using a remote broadcasting system to simulate simple anuran call surveys and to investigate potential factors affecting observation error in these studies. Distance, time, ambient noise, and observer abilities were the most important factors explaining false-negative detections. Distance and observer ability were the best overall predictors of false-positive errors, but ambient noise and competing species also affected error rates for some species. False-positive errors made up 5 of all positive detections, with individual observers exhibiting false-positive rates between 0.5 and 14. Previous research suggests false-positive errors of these magnitudes would induce substantial positive biases in standard estimators of species occurrence, and we recommend practices to mitigate for false positives when developing occupancy monitoring protocols that rely on auditory detections. These recommendations include additional observer training, limiting the number of target species, and establishing distance and ambient noise thresholds during surveys. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  19. Experimental investigation and constitutive model for lime mudstone.

    Wang, Junbao; Liu, Xinrong; Zhao, Baoyun; Song, Zhanping; Lai, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanical properties of lime mudstone, conventional triaxial compression tests under different confining pressures (0, 5, 15 and 20 MPa) are performed on lime mudstone samples. The test results show that, from the overall perspective of variation law, the axial peak stress, axial peak strain and elastic modulus of lime mudstone tend to gradually increase with increasing confining pressure. In the range of tested confining pressure, the variations in axial peak stress and elastic modulus with confining pressure can be described with linear functions; while the variation in axial peak strain with confining pressure can be reflected with a power function. To describe the axial stress-strain behavior in failure process of lime mudstone, a new constitutive model is proposed, with the model characteristics analyzed and the parameter determination method put forward. Compared with Wang' model, only one parameter n is added to the new model. The comparison of predicted curves from the model and test data indicates that the new model can preferably simulate the strain softening property of lime mudstone and the axial stress-strain response in rock failure process.

  20. Laboratory investigation of constitutive property up-scaling in volcanic tuffs

    Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

    1996-08-01

    One of the critical issues facing the Yucca Mountain site characterization and performance assessment programs is the manner in which property up-scaling is addressed. Property up-scaling becomes an issue whenever heterogeneous media properties are measured at one scale but applied at another. A research program has been established to challenge current understanding of property up-scaling with the aim of developing and testing improved models that describe up-scaling behavior in a quantitative manner. Up-scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of suites of gas-permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. To date, up-scaling studies have been performed on a series of tuff and sandstone (used as experimental controls) blocks. Samples include a welded, anisotropic tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, upper cliff microstratigraphic unit), and a moderately welded tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Caprock microstratigraphic unit). A massive fluvial sandstone (Berea Sandstone) was also investigated as a means of evaluating the experimental program and to provide a point of comparison for the tuff data. Because unsaturated flow is of prime interest to the Yucca Mountain Program, scoping studies aimed at investigating the up-scaling of hydraulic properties under various saturated conditions were performed to compliment these studies of intrinsic permeability. These studies focused on matrix sorptivity, a constitutive property quantifying the capillarity of a porous medium. 113 refs.

  1. Experimental investigation of interactions between proteins and carbon nanomaterials

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar

    The global market for nanomaterials based products is forecasted to reach $1 trillion per annum per annum for 2015. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties with potential to impact diverse aspects of society through applications in electronics, renewable energy, and medicine. While the research and proposed applications of ENMs continue to grow rapidly, the health and safety of ENMs still remains a major concern to the public as well as to policy makers and funding agencies. It is now widely accepted that focused efforts are needed for identifying the list of physicochemical descriptors of ENM before they can be evaluated for nanotoxicity and biological response. This task is surprisingly challenging, as many physicochemical properties of ENMs are closely inter related and cannot be varied independently (e.g. increasing the size of an ENM can introduce additional defects). For example, varying toxic response may ensue due to different methods of nanomaterial preparation, dissimilar impurities and defects. Furthermore, the inadvertent coating of proteins on ENM surface in any biological milieu results in the formation of the so-called "protein/bio-corona" which can in turn alter the fate of ENMs and their biological response. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide are widely used ENMs. It is now known that defects in CNMs play an important role not only in materials properties but also in the determination of how materials interact at the nano-bio interface. In this regard, this work investigates the influence of defect-induced hydrophilicity on the bio-corona formation using micro Raman, photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the interaction of proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with CNMs is strongly influenced by charge transfer between them, inducing protein unfolding which enhances conformational entropy and

  2. Experimental investigation of Mars meandering rivers: Chemical precipitation process

    Kim, W.; Lim, Y.; Cleveland, J.; Reid, E.; Jew, C.

    2014-12-01

    On Earth, meandering streams occur where the banks are resistant to erosion, which enhances narrow and deep channels. Often this is because the stream banks are held firm by vegetation. The ancient, highly sinuous channels with cutoffs found on Mars are enigmatic because vegetation played no role in providing bank cohesion and enhancing fine sediment deposition. Possible causes of the meandering therefore include ice under permafrost conditions and chemical processes. We conducted carbonate flume experiments to investigate possible mechanisms creating meandering channels other than vegetation. The experiment includes a tank that dissolves limestone by adding CO2 gas and produces artificial spring water, peristaltic pumps to drive water through the system, a heater to control the temperature of the spring water, and a flume where carbonate sediment deposits. Spring water containing dissolved calcium and carbonate ions moves through a heater to increase temperature, and then into the flume. The flume surface is open to the air to allow CO2 degassing, decrease temperature, and increase pH, which promotes carbonate precipitation. A preliminary experiment was done and successfully created a meander pattern that evolved over a 3-day experiment. The experiment showed lateral migration of the bend and avulsion of the stream, similar to a natural meander. The lateral variation in flow speed increased the local residence time of water, thus increasing the degassing of CO2 on the two sides of the flow and promoting more precipitation. This enhanced precipitation on the sides provided a mechanism to build levees along the channel and created a stream confined in a narrow path. This mechanism also potentially applies to Earthly single thread and/or meandering rivers developed and recorded before vegetation appeared on Earth's surface.

  3. Personalized News Recommendation: A Review and an Experimental Investigation

    Lei Li; Ding-Ding Wang; Shun-Zhi Zhu; Tao Li

    2011-01-01

    Online news articles,as a new format of press releases,have sprung up on the Internet.With its convenience and recency,more and more people prefer to read news online instead of reading the paper-format press releases.However,a gigantic amount of news events might be released at a rate of hundreds,even thousands per hour.A challenging problem is how to efficiently select specific news articles from a large corpus of newly-published press releases to recommend to individual readers,where the selected news items should match the reader's reading preference as much as possible.This issue refers to personalized news recommendation.Recently,personalized news recommendation has become a promising research direction as the Internet provides fast access to real-time information from multiple sources around the world.Existing personalized news recommendation systems strive to adapt their services to individual users by virtue of both user and news content information.A variety of techniques have been proposed to tackle personalized news recommendation,including content-based,collaborative filtering systems and hybrid versions of these two.In this paper,we provide a comprehensive investigation of existing personalized news recommenders.We discuss several essential issues underlying the problem of personalized news recommendation,and explore possible solutions for performance improvement.Further,we provide an empirical study on a collection of news articles obtained from various news websites,and evaluate the effect of different factors for personalized news recommendation.We hope our discussion and exploration would provide insights for researchers who are interested in personalized news recommendation.

  4. An experimental investigation of chemical communication in the polar bear

    Owen, Megan A.; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Slocomb, C.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, George M.; Simac, Kristin; Pessier, Allan P.

    2015-01-01

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus), with its wide-ranging movements, solitary existence and seasonal reproduction, is expected to favor chemosignaling over other communication modalities. However, the topography of its Arctic sea ice habitat is generally lacking in stationary vertical substrates routinely used for targeted scent marking in other bears. These environmental constraints may have shaped a marking strategy, unique to polar bears, for widely dispersed continuous dissemination of scent via foot pads. To investigate the role of chemical communication, pedal scents were collected from free-ranging polar bears of different sex and reproductive classes captured on spring sea ice in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas, and presented in a controlled fashion to 26 bears in zoos. Results from behavioral bioassays indicated that bears, especially females, were more likely to approach conspecific scent during the spring than the fall. Male flehmen behavior, indicative of chemosignal delivery to the vomeronasal organ, differentiated scent donor by sex and reproductive condition. Histologic examination of pedal skin collected from two females indicated prominent and profuse apocrine glands in association with large compound hair follicles, suggesting that they may produce scents that function as chemosignals. These results suggest that pedal scent, regardless of origin, conveys information to conspecifics that may facilitate social and reproductive behavior, and that chemical communication in this species has been adaptively shaped by environmental constraints of its habitat. However, continuously distributed scent signals necessary for breeding behavior may prove less effective if current and future environmental conditions cause disruption of scent trails due to increased fracturing of sea ice.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of the Fast-SAGD process

    Shin, Hyundon

    The SAGD process has been tested in the field, and is now in a commercial stage in Western Canadian oil sands areas. The Fast-SAGD method can partly solve the drilling difficulty and reduce costs in a SAGD operation requiring paired parallel wells one above the other. This method also enhances the thermal efficiency in the reservoir. In this research, the reservoir parameters and operating conditions for the SAGD and Fast-SAGD processes are investigated by numerical simulation in the three Alberta oil sands areas. Scaled physical model experiments, which are operated by an automated process control system, are conducted under high temperature and high pressure conditions. The results of the study indicate that the shallow Athabasca-type reservoir, which is thick with high permeability (high kxh), is a good candidate for SAGD application, whereas Cold Lake- and Peace River-type reservoirs, which are thin with low permeability, are not as good candidates for conventional SAGD implementation. The simulation results indicate improved energy efficiency and productivity in most cases for the Fast-SAGD process; in those cases, the project economics were enhanced compared to the SAGD process. Both Cold Lake- and Peace River-type reservoirs are good candidates for a Fast-SAGD application rather than a conventional SAGD application. This new process demonstrates improved efficiency and lower costs for extracting heavy oil from these important reservoirs. A new economic indicator, called simple thermal efficiency parameter (STEP), was developed and validated to evaluate the performance of a SAGD project. STEP is based on cumulative steam-oil ratio (CSOR), calendar day oil rate (CDOR) and recovery factor (RF) for the time prior to the steam-oil ratio (SOR) attaining 4. STEP can be used as a financial metric quantitatively as well as qualitatively for this type of thermal project. An automated process control system was set-up and validated, and has the capability of

  6. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow over a permeable rough wall

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Permeable walls are encountered in a variety of geophysical flows, including alluvial river beds, canopies and urban environments. Permeable walls possess very different boundary conditions as compared to classic impermeable walls (i.e. the slip condition and penetration of flow into the bed). Permeability allows flow interactions across the wall interface, resulting in notable mass, momentum and energy exchange. Such exchange takes place in the so-called transition layer and often occurs through turbulent flow mechanisms. It is increasingly recognized that turbulence plays a key role in a number of important natural functions, including biogeochemical as well as geomorphological processes. However, the flow physics of the transition layer are still poorly understood due to a lack of quantitative investigation of these permeable systems within which physical and optical access are severely compromised. This is particularly true for state-of-the-art flow measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that require unaberrated optical access to the measurement locations. To overcome optical limitations, a refractive index matching (RIM) technique was employed herein to gain full optical access to the transition layer. Sodium Iodide aqueous solution (63% by weight and RI ~ 1.496 at 20°C) served as a working fluid, and an acrylic resin (RI ~ 1.499) was chosen for fabricating wall models. Measurements were performed using high-resolution planar PIV in different configurations to characterize the turbulent boundary layer and the transition layer. The wall models comprised uniform spheres packed in a cubic arrangement, and two cases were modeled - impermeable and permeable walls that were both rough. To eliminate the effect of roughness, and thus isolate the effect of permeability, the surface roughness of the two wall models was kept identical. This allowed us to obtain a more meaningful comparison and highlight the impact of wall permeability in natural

  7. Experimental and numerical investigations of hydroerosive grinding for injection components

    Iben, Uwe; Weickert, Mathias [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Diesel injection injectors are very complicated hydraulic systems which contain among other things small throttles and small sized blow holes in order to inject the fuel precisely into the combustion chamber. Due to the extremely strong exhaust laws, the geometrical forms and tolerances of the hydraulic components have to be maintained. The hydroerosive grinding process (HE process) is used for manufacturing of small holes using in Diesel injection components. A mixture of oil and small sized particles are used to form the final geometrical shapes of the throttles and the blow holes. Simulation models help to understand the underlying physical process and to optimize the manufacturing parameters for an efficient production process. This paper presents an Euler-Euler approach for the numerical simulation of the HE process. It describes a two-phase slurry flow consisting of a liquid and a dispersed solid phase which causes wear at walls of devices. The continuous fluid phase is solved using a finite volume scheme in which the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model is applied to resolve large-scale turbulent structures. The solid phase is disperse and treated as a second continuum in which drag and lift forces as well as added mass, pressure and history force are taken into account. Considering particle-particle interactions, the granular model from Gidaspow is used for particle volume concentrations over 1%. Investigations of erosion processes proofed that non-spherically shaped particles as well as harder particles increase the wear on devices significantly. Consequently, non-spherical particles are utilized for the hydroerosive grinding. Their steady drag, unsteady drag and lift coefficients, depending on the particle Reynolds number, are determined by a direct numerical simulation via an in-house LES Lattice-Boltzmann solver. This Lattice-Boltzmann method was presented for laminar flows by Hoelzer. In this work, interpolating functions of these coefficients are

  8. Experimental investigation of cryogenic flame dynamics under transverse acoustic modulations

    Méry, Yoann; Hakim, Layal; Scouflaire, Philippe; Vingert, Lucien; Ducruix, Sébastien; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation is focused on high-frequency combustion instabilities coupled by transverse acoustic modes. This phenomenon has been observed during the development of many liquid rocket engines and other high performance devices. Such instabilities induce an unsteady heat release which leads in many cases to a rapid intensification of heat fluxes to the thrust chamber walls, causing fatal damage and a spectacular destruction of the propulsion system. One central objective of this effort is to observe and understand the physical processes leading the coupling between acoustics and combustion, and resulting in the growth of such instabilities. Experiments carried out on the Mascotte testbed at ONERA serve to identify the main processes involved and bring forth mechanisms taking place when an engine becomes unstable. Hot fire experiments are carried out in a model scale combustor reproducing many of the conditions prevailing in unstable rocket engines. Subcritical and transcritical cryogenic jets are injected in a multiple injector combustion chamber (MIC). This system is fed with LOx and methane through five injection units. The flames formed in this configuration are modulated by an acoustic wave with an amplitude of several bars. This is obtained with a new Very Large Amplitude Modulator (VHAM) capable of generating acoustic mode amplitudes representative of those found in actual engine undergoing HF instabilities. It is shown first that the strength of the acoustic field and the frequency range of oscillation (1 kHz-3.5 kHz) are consistent with rocket instability observations. Conditions where a feedback of the flame on the acoustic field occurs are obtained. High speed diagnostics indicates that the velocity field dramatically enhances the atomization process. The liquid core length is strongly reduced. At moderate amplitudes, the liquid jets are flattened in the spanwise direction and heat release takes place in two sheets neighboring the dense core

  9. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

  10. Experimental investigation for cavity dimensions of highly porous small bodies

    Okamoto, T.; Nakamura, A.; Hasegawa, S.

    2014-07-01

    Small bodies were probably very porous during the formation of the solar system. In order to understand the surface evolution of highly porous bodies, it is necessary to investigate the impact process for targets with such high porosity. In this study, impact experiments with sintered glass-bead targets of 87 and 94 % porosities were conducted. Growth of cavities with time and the final cavity dimensions were analyzed and compared with previous studies of porous targets. Impact experiments were conducted using a two-stage light-gas gun at ISAS, Japan. The projectiles of a few millimeters were composed of titanium, aluminum, nylon, and basalt. The impact velocities ranged from 1.8 to 7.2 km s^{-1}. In order to observe the inside of the targets, we used a flash X-ray system and a micro-X-ray tomography instrument. The track shape was found to be divided into two types, elongated 'carrot' shape and short 'bulb' shape [1]. The figures on the left and right present a transmission image of the bulb shape track and a sketch of a cross section of the cavity, respectively. The results of the final maximum diameter, D_max and the final entrance-hole diameter, D_ent show that both dimensions tend to increase with impact velocity and decrease with target porosity. We adopted the scaling law of crater diameter [2] for our analysis of D_max and D_ent. The following empirical relations are obtained for targets with porosity ≥ 87 %: {D_max}/{d_p}(ρ_t/ρ_p)^{0.4} =10^{-1.52±0.27} ({Y}/ρ_t{v_0^2})^{-0.49 ± 0.07}, {D_ent}/{d_p}(ρ_t/ρ_p)^{0.4} =10^{-2.12±0.39} ({Y}/ρ_t{v_0^2})^{-0.53 ± 0.11}, where d_p, ρ_t, ρ_p, Y, and v_0 are the projectile diameter, target density, projectile density, target compressive strength, and the impact velocity, respectively. The results of the depth from the entrance hole to the maximum diameter of the cavity, L_max, shows that L_max decreases with impact velocity and increases with target porosity. If we assume that a projectile decelerates

  11. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    2016-06-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0277 Experimental Investigation of Turbulence- Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE [U] Experimental investigation of turbulence- chemistry interaction in high-Reynolds-number 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER turbulent...flames. Mixture fraction is an important variable in understanding and modeling turbulent mixing and turbulence- chemistry interaction, two key

  12. Laboratory And Lysimeter Experimentation And Transport Modeling Of Neptunium And Strontium In Savannah River Site Sediments

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Powell, B. A.; Miller, Todd J.

    2012-09-24

    existing data sets. The first data set used laboratory generated Np sorption data as a function of concentration (three orders of magnitude) and as a function of pH (four orders of magnitude of proton concentration). In this modeling exercise, a very simple solution was identified by assuming that all sorption occurred only to the iron oxides in the sediment and that all the added NpO{sub 4}{sup -} remained in the oxidized state and was not reduced to the Np(IV) state (as occurs rapidly with Pu(V)). With rather limited input data, very good agreement between experimental and modeling results was observed. This modeling approach would be easy to add to the PA with little additional data requirements. This model would be useful in a system where pH is expected to change greatly, such as directly beneath a grout or concrete structure. The second model discussed in the report was to derive strontium K{sub d} values from data collected in an 11-year-old field transport study. In this controlled lysimeter study, a sensitivity analysis was conducted of hydrological and chemical processes that influence contaminant transport, including diffusion coefficients, seepage velocity, and K{sub d} value. The best overall K{sub d} derived from the model fit to the data was 32 L kg{sup -1}, which was the same value that was previously measured in traditional laboratory batch sorption studies. This was an unexpected result given the differences in experimental conditions between the batch test and the lysimeter flow through test, in particular the differences between strontium adsorption and desorption processes occurring in the latter test and not in the former. There were some trends in the lysimeter strontium data that were not predicted by the K{sub d} model, which suggest that other geochemical processes are likely also controlling strontium transport. Strontium release and cation exchange are being evaluated. These results suggest that future modeling efforts (e.g., PAs) could be

  13. Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16)

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maner, James [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Over the past five years the Used Fuel Campaign has investigated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) at higher heat loads (up to 300°C) and pressure (150 bar). This past year experimental work was hindered due to a revamping of the hydrothermal lab. Regardless, two experiments were run this past year, EBS-18 and EBS-19. EBS-18 was run using Low Carbon Steel (LCS) and opalinus clay in addition to the bentonite and opalinus brine. Many of the past results were confirmed in EBS-18, such as the restriction of illite formation due to the bulk chemistry, pyrite degradation, and zeolite formation dependent on the bentonite and opalinus clay. The LCS show vast amounts of pit corrosion (over 100μm of corrosion in six weeks), leading a corrosion rate of 1083 μm/year. In addition, a mineral goethite, an iron-bearing hydroxide, formed in the pits of the LCS. Preliminary results from EBS-19 water chemistry are included but SEM imaging, micro probe and XRD are still needed for further results. Copper corrosion was investigated further and over 850 measurements were taken. It was concluded that pitting and pyrite degradation drastically increase the corrosion rate from 0.12 to 0.39 μm/day. However, the growth of a layer of the mineral chalcocite is thought to subdue the corrosion rate to 0.024 μm/day as observed in the EBS-13, a sixth month experiment. This document presents the findings of this past year.

  14. Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16)

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maner, James [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Over the past five years the Used Fuel Campaign has investigated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) at higher heat loads (up to 300°C) and pressure (150 bar). This past year experimental work was hindered due to a revamping of the hydrothermal lab. Regardless, two experiments were run this past year, EBS-18 and EBS-19. EBS-18 was run using Low Carbon Steel (LCS) and opalinus clay in addition to the bentonite and opalinus brine. Many of the past results were confirmed in EBS-18 such as the restriction of illite formation due to the bulk chemistry, pyrite degradation, and zeolite formation dependent on the bentonite and opalinus clay. The LCS show vast amounts of pit corrosion over 100μm of corrosion in six weeks, leading a corrosion rate of 1083 μm/year. In addition, a mineral goethite, an iron bearing hydroxide, formed in the pits of the LCS. Preliminary results from EBS-19 water chemistry are included but SEM imaging, micro probe and XRD are still needed for further results. Copper corrosion was investigated further and over 850 measurements were taken. It was concluded that pitting and pyrite degradation drastically increase the corrosion rate from 0.12 to 0.39 μm/day. However, the growth of a layer of the mineral chalcocite is thought to subdue the corrosion rate to 0.024 μm/day as observed in the EBS-13 a sixth month experiment. This document presents the findings of this past year.

  15. A laboratory investigation of thermally induced pore pressures in the Callovo-Oxfordian Claystone

    Mohajerani, Mehrdokht; Sulem, Jean; Monfared, Mohammad; Tang, Anh-Minh; Gatmiri, Behrouz

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of research into radioactive waste disposal, it was decided to investigate the thermally induce pore pressure occurring in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, a possible host rock in which the ANDRA underground laboratory of Bure (East of France) has been excavated. Thermal pore pressures appear in low permeability soils and rocks because the thermal expansion coefficient of water is significantly higher than that of the solid grains (Campanella and Mitchell; 1968 [1], Ghabezloo and Sulem; 2009 [2]). This phenomenon has clearly been observed in various in-situ heating tests conducted in Opalinus claystone in the Mont-Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Switzerland (HE-D test) and in Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) claystone in the Bure URL in France (TER test, Wileveau and Su; 2007 [3]) The processes of coring, transportation, storage and specimen trimming induce some desaturation in the sample. Due to the very low permeability (10-20 m2) of the COx claystone, a long period of time is necessa...

  16. Should hydraulic tomography data be interpreted using geostatistical inverse modeling? A laboratory sandbox investigation

    Illman, Walter A.; Berg, Steven J.; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2015-05-01

    The robust performance of hydraulic tomography (HT) based on geostatistics has been demonstrated through numerous synthetic, laboratory, and field studies. While geostatistical inverse methods offer many advantages, one key disadvantage is its highly parameterized nature, which renders it computationally intensive for large-scale problems. Another issue is that geostatistics-based HT may produce overly smooth images of subsurface heterogeneity when there are few monitoring interval data. Therefore, some may question the utility of the geostatistical inversion approach in certain situations and seek alternative approaches. To investigate these issues, we simultaneously calibrated different groundwater models with varying subsurface conceptualizations and parameter resolutions using a laboratory sandbox aquifer. The compared models included: (1) isotropic and anisotropic effective parameter models; (2) a heterogeneous model that faithfully represents the geological features; and (3) a heterogeneous model based on geostatistical inverse modeling. The performance of these models was assessed by quantitatively examining the results from model calibration and validation. Calibration data consisted of steady state drawdown data from eight pumping tests and validation data consisted of data from 16 separate pumping tests not used in the calibration effort. Results revealed that the geostatistical inversion approach performed the best among the approaches compared, although the geological model that faithfully represented stratigraphy came a close second. In addition, when the number of pumping tests available for inverse modeling was small, the geological modeling approach yielded more robust validation results. This suggests that better knowledge of stratigraphy obtained via geophysics or other means may contribute to improved results for HT.

  17. Experimental facility for investigation of gaseous pollutants removal process stimulated by electron beam and microwave energy

    Zimek, Z.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Bulka, S.; Roman, K.; Licki, J. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory unit for the investigation of toxic gases removal from flue gases based on an ILU 6 accelerator has been built at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. This installation was provided with independent pulsed and continuous wave (c.w.) microwave generators to create electrical discharge and another pulsed microwave generator for plasma diagnostics. This allows to investigate a combined removal process based on the simultaneous use of the electron beam and streams of microwave energy in one reaction vessel. Two heating furnaces, each of them being a water-tube boiler with 100 kW thermal power, were applied for the production of combustion gas with flow rates 5-400 Nm{sup 3}/h. Proper composition of the flue gas was obtained by introducing such components as SO{sub 2}, NO and NH{sub 3} to the gas stream. The installation consists of: inlet system (two boilers - house heating furnace, boiler pressure regulator, SO{sub 2}, NO and NH{sub 3} dosage system, analytical equipment); reaction vessel where the electron beam from ILU 6 accelerator and microwave streams from the pulse and c.w. generators can be introduced simultaneously or separately and plasma diagnostic pulsed microwave stream can be applied; outlet system (retention chamber, filtration unit, fan, off-take duct of gas, analytical equipment). The experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to investigate the removal process in the presence of NH{sub 3} by separate or simultaneous application of the electron beam and of microwave energy streams under stable experimental conditions. (author). 15 refs, 26 figs, 5 tabs.

  18. Durability investigation on torque control of a magneto-rheological brake: experimental work

    Kim, Wan Ho; Park, Jhin Ha; Kim, Gi-Woo; Shin, Cheol Soo; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2017-03-01

    This study experimentally investigates the torque control durability of a disc brake featuring a magneto-rheological (MR) fluid. An appropriate size of MR disc brake is designed based on a mathematical model, and a prototype is manufactured. A small-scale laboratory-scale test bed is then developed using a DC motor, in-line torque sensor, and the MR brake. S45C and S20C steels are inserted into a tapered hole on the surface of the brake disc. After 105 cycles of operation in shear mode, the wear properties of the MR brake are characterized by average surface roughness measurements, scanning electron microscope images, and energy dispersive x-ray spectra. The torque control performances before and after the operation cycles are examined using open-loop control and closed-loop proportional-integral-derivative control. As expected, the control performance degraded after 105 cycles of operation in the open-loop case, but not in the closed-loop case. This aspect is demonstrated by the sinusoidal torque-tacking control performance before and after the operation cycles.

  19. An experimental investigation of evolutionary dynamics in the Rock-Paper-Scissors game.

    Hoffman, Moshe; Suetens, Sigrid; Gneezy, Uri; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-03-06

    Game theory describes social behaviors in humans and other biological organisms. By far, the most powerful tool available to game theorists is the concept of a Nash Equilibrium (NE), which is motivated by perfect rationality. NE specifies a strategy for everyone, such that no one would benefit by deviating unilaterally from his/her strategy. Another powerful tool available to game theorists are evolutionary dynamics (ED). Motivated by evolutionary and learning processes, ED specify changes in strategies over time in a population, such that more successful strategies typically become more frequent. A simple game that illustrates interesting ED is the generalized Rock-Paper-Scissors (RPS) game. The RPS game extends the children's game to situations where winning or losing can matter more or less relative to tying. Here we investigate experimentally three RPS games, where the NE is always to randomize with equal probability, but the evolutionary stability of this strategy changes. Consistent with the prediction of ED we find that aggregate behavior is far away from NE when it is evolutionarily unstable. Our findings add to the growing literature that demonstrates the predictive validity of ED in large-scale incentivized laboratory experiments with human subjects.

  20. Thermal Hydraulic Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Deformed Fuel Assemblies

    Mays, Brian [AREVA Federal Services, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Jackson, R. Brian [TerraPower, Bellevue, WA (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The project, Toward a Longer Life Core: Thermal Hydraulic CFD Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Deformed Fuel Assemblies, DOE Project code DE-NE0008321, was a verification and validation project for flow and heat transfer through wire wrapped simulated liquid metal fuel assemblies that included both experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulations of those experiments. This project was a two year collaboration between AREVA, TerraPower, Argonne National Laboratory and Texas A&M University. Experiments were performed by AREVA and Texas A&M University. Numerical simulations of these experiments were performed by TerraPower and Argonne National Lab. Project management was performed by AREVA Federal Services. The first of a kind project resulted in the production of both local point temperature measurements and local flow mixing experiment data paired with numerical simulation benchmarking of the experiments. The project experiments included the largest wire-wrapped pin assembly Mass Index of Refraction (MIR) experiment in the world, the first known wire-wrapped assembly experiment with deformed duct geometries and the largest numerical simulations ever produced for wire-wrapped bundles.

  1. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-05

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB’s)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB’s] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  2. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Investigating sea level rise due to global warming in the teaching laboratory using Archimedes’ principle

    Hughes, Stephen; Pearce, Darren

    2015-11-01

    A teaching laboratory experiment is described that uses Archimedes’ principle to precisely investigate the effect of global warming on the oceans. A large component of sea level rise is due to the increase in the volume of water due to the decrease in water density with increasing temperature. Water close to 0 °C is placed in a beaker and a glass marble hung from an electronic balance immersed in the water. As the water warms, the weight of the marble increases as the water is less buoyant due to the decrease in density. In the experiment performed in this paper a balance with a precision of 0.1 mg was used with a marble 40.0 cm3 and mass of 99.3 g, yielding water density measurements with an average error of -0.008 ± 0.011%.

  4. Laboratory Investigation of Rivers State Clay Samples for Drilling Mud Preparation

    Nmegbu, Chukwuma Godwin Jacob

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drilling fluids are an integral part of any oil and gas industry, providing the ease to which wells are drilled to access subsurface reservoir fluids. Certain rheology and mineralogical properties of the clay material used for drilling mud preparation must be critically investigated since clay deposits in different location exhibits different characteristics. Clay samples were collected from three different geographical locations namely; Egbamini (Emolga, Afam Street (Port Harcourt and Oboboru (onelga local government areas in Rivers state. Their rheological and wall building properties were measured in the laboratory to determine their suitability for drilling mud formulation. Results showed that in their respective native states, they proved unsuitable for drilling mud preparation when compared to standard Bentonite because they were observed to show responses far below the required API standards for mud formulation.

  5. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Soil Heterogeneity around Landmines in Natural Soil

    Wallen, B.; Smits, K. M.; Howington, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The environment in which landmines are placed is oftentimes highly heterogeneous. These heterogeneities such as differences in soil type, packing and moisture, combined with changes in surface and climate conditions can oftentimes mask the presence of the mine. Understanding the impact of heterogeneity on heat and mass transfer behavior in the vicinity of landmines is paramount to properly identifying landmine locations for demining operations. This study investigates the impact of soil heterogeneity on soil moisture and temperature distributions around buried objects with the goal of increasing our ability to model and predict the environmental conditions that are most dynamic to mine detection performance. A ten-day field experiment was conducted in which two anti-personnel landmines at different depths and a limestone block of comparable size were buried. The site was instrumented with a series of sensors, monitoring atmospheric, surface and subsurface conditions to include measurements of soil moisture, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, vapor concentration, and meteorological conditions such as wind speed and net radiation. Infrared thermal imaging was used to provide continuous profiles of surface temperature conditions. The soil was well characterized in the laboratory to provide good understanding of field conditions for numerical modeling efforts. Experimental results demonstrate the strongest thermal contrast between shallow landmine emplacement and the surrounding soil occurring as the sun approaches its zenith and two hours after sunset until the sun directly impacts the soil above the landmine. A finite-element model of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is compared against experimental observations, capturing the diurnal variation. A validated model, like this one, offers the opportunity to improve landmine detection probabilities and reduce false alarms caused by environmental variability.

  6. Spanish participation in the Haw Project: Laboratory investigations on Gamma irradiation effects in rock salt

    Cuevas, C. de las; Miralles, L.; Teixidor, P.; Garcia Veigas, J.; Dies, X.; Ortega, X.; Pueyo, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    In order to prove the safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HAW) in salt rock, a five years test disposal of thirty highly radioactive radiation sources is planned in the Asse salt mine, in the Federal Republic of Germany. The thirty radiation sources consist of steel canisters containing the vitrified radionuclides Caesium 137 and Strontium 90 in quantities sufficient to cover the bandwidth of heat generation and gamma radiation of real HAW. The radiation sources will be emplaced in six boreholes located in two galleries at the 800 m level. Two electrical heater tests were already started in November 1988 and are continuosly surveyed in respect of the rock mass. Also the handling system necessary for the emplacement of the radioactive canisters was developed and succesfully tested. A laboratory investigation programme on radiation effects in salt is being performed in advance to the radioactive canister emplacement. This programme includes the investigation of thermally and radiolytically induced water and gas release from the rock salt and the radiolytical decomposition of salt minerals. Part of this programme has been carried out since 1988 at the University of Barcelona, basically what refers to colloidal sodium determinations by light absorption measurements and microstructural studies on irradiated salt samples. For gamma dose and dose rate measurements in the test field, measuring systems consisting of ionisation chambers as well as solid state dosemeters were developed and tested. Thermomechanical computer code validation is performed by calculational predictions and parallel investigation of the stress and displacement fields in the underground test field.

  7. LABEXNET: un Laboratorio de Economía Experimental en Internet. [LABEXNET: Internet-based laboratory for experimental Economics

    Galán Ordax, José Manuel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Economists have designed over the years a wide range of scientific experiments that can be usefully employed nowadays as teaching aids. The interactive and participatory nature of such experiments serves as a motivation to students, stimulates their own thinking, and enhances their insights into the forces that drive economic markets: the aggregate interactions of economic agents within a market institution. Economic classroom games have been recognised as useful teaching tools for decades, and they have often produced surprising results and better understanding of market dynamics and institutions. Nowadays the new information technologies can be brought into play to conduct and analyse experimental games in unprecedented ways: using Internet-based tools, the design, execution and analysis of classroom games can be made considerably easier than traditionally. In this paper we introduce LABEXNET, a program designed to conduct Internet-based economic classroom games. LABEXNET is freely available to the academic community.. La Economía Experimental ha desarrollado diferentes experimentos que pueden ser aprovechados como una actividad docente en la enseñanza de la Economía. Su naturaleza activa y participativa motiva a los alumnos y estimula la reflexión y la mejor comprensión de algunos fenómenos económicos como el funcionamiento de los mercados, donde los resultados individuales dependen del conjunto de las decisiones de los agentes y de sus interacciones. Los experimentos económicos tienen ya una larga tradición, y han proporcionado resultados espectaculares y conclusiones ampliamente admitidas sobre la dinámica de mercados y el efecto de las instituciones económicas. Las nuevas tecnologías facilitan la realización y el análisis de estos experimentos. En este artículo presentamos LABEXNET, un programa informático para la realización de experimentos económicos por Internet puesto a libre disposición de la comunidad

  8. Virtual Laboratories

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  9. Theoretical and experimental investigation of shock wave stressing of metal powders by an explosion

    Lukyanov Ya.L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint theoretical and experimental investigations have allowed to realize an approach with use of mathematical and physical modeling of processes of a shock wave loading of powder materials. Hugoniot adiabats of the investigated powder have been measured with a noncontact electromagnetic method. The mathematical model of elastic-plastic deformation of the powder media used in the investigation has been validated. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation and experimental assembly deformation has been performed.

  10. The laboratory investigation of surface envelope solitons: reflection from a vertical wall and collisions of solitons

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Klein, Marco; Clauss, Günther F.

    2016-04-01

    Envelope soliton solutions are key elements governing the nonlinear wave dynamics within a simplified theory for unidirectional weakly modulated weakly nonlinear wave groups on the water surface. Within integrable models the solitons preserve their structure in collisions with other waves; they do not disperse and can carry energy infinitively long. Steep and short soliton-like wave groups have been shown to exist in laboratory tests [1] and, even earlier, in numerical simulations [2, 3]. Thus, long-living wave groups may play important role in the dynamics of intense sea waves and wave-structure interactions. The solitary wave groups may change the wave statistics and can be taken into account when developing approaches for the deterministic forecasting of dangerous waves, including so-called rogue waves. An experimental campaign has been conducted in the wave basin of the Technical University of Berlin on simulations of intense solitary wave groups. The first successful experimental observation of intense envelope solitons took place in this facility [1]. The new experiments aimed at following main goals: 1) to reproduce intense envelope solitons with different carrier wave lengths; 2) to estimate the rate of envelope soliton dissipation; 3) to consider the reflection of envelope solitons on a vertical wall; 4) to consider head-on collisions of envelope solitons, and 5) to consider overtaking interactions of envelope solitons. Up to 9 wave gauges were used in each experimental run, which enabled registration of the surface movement at different distances from the wavemaker, at different locations across the wave flume and near the wall. Besides surface displacements, the group envelope shapes were directly recorded, with use of phase shifts applied to the modulated waves generated by the wavemaker. [1] A. Slunyaev, G.F. Clauss, M. Klein, M. Onorato, Simulations and experiments of short intense envelope solitons of surface water waves. Phys. Fluids 25, 067105

  11. Effect of Humic Acid on Migration, Distribution and Remediation of Dense Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: A laboratory investigation

    Cheng, Z.; Wu, J.; Xu, H.; Gao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decades, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) contamination in the subsurface increases with the rapid development of oil industry and becomes the focus of many studies. The migration, distribution and remediation efficiency of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment are greatly affected by the solution chemistry besides the physical heterogeneities of aquifers. Humic acid (HA), which is ubiquitous in natural environments, is a surface active substance exhibiting solubility enhancement behavior for hydrophobic organic compounds such as DNAPLs. Here we reported a laboratory investigation to study the effects of HA on the infiltration, immobilization and subsequent recovery of DNAPL in porous media. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was selected as the representative DNAPL in this study. Two-dimensional (2-D) sandbox experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of different HA concentrations on the transport, distribution of PCE and the remediation of PCE using surfactant (Tween 80) flushing in a saturated porous media system. The surfactant flushing of PCE was performed after the PCE transport and distribution had reached equilibrium. A light transmission visualization method with charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was adopted to visualize PCE distribution and quantify its saturation. In addition, the experiments were also designed to gather data for the validation of multiphase flow models. Effluent samples were collected to determine dissolved PCE concentrations. PCE solubilization and PCE-water interfacial tension were experimentally determined in aqueous solutions of varying HA concentrations. The experimental results showed that the presence of HA can have a dramatic impact on PCE flow and entrapment, and significantly improved the recovery of PCE during surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR). The findings are of use for better understanding of the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs and developing of SEAR technology.

  12. Potential effect of fiddler crabs on organic matter distribution: A combined laboratory and field experimental approach

    Natálio, Luís F.; Pardo, Juan C. F.; Machado, Glauco B. O.; Fortuna, Monique D.; Gallo, Deborah G.; Costa, Tânia M.

    2017-01-01

    Bioturbators play a key role in estuarine environments by modifying the availability of soil elements, which in turn may affect other organisms. Despite the importance of bioturbators, few studies have combined both field and laboratory experiments to explore the effects of bioturbators on estuarine soils. Herein, we assessed the bioturbation potential of fiddler crabs Leptuca leptodactyla and Leptuca uruguayensis in laboratory and field experiments, respectively. We evaluated whether the presence of fiddler crabs resulted in vertical transport of sediment, thereby altering organic matter (OM) distribution. Under laboratory conditions, the burrowing activity by L. leptodactyla increased the OM content in sediment surface. In the long-term field experiment with areas of inclusion and exclusion of L. uruguayensis, we did not observe influence of this fiddler crab in the vertical distribution of OM. Based on our results, we suggest that small fiddler crabs, such as the species used in these experiments, are potentially capable of alter their environment by transporting sediment and OM but such effects may be masked by environmental drivers and spatial heterogeneity under natural conditions. This phenomenon may be related to the small size of these species, which affects how much sediment is transported, along with the way OM interacts with biogeochemical and physical processes. Therefore, the net effect of these burrowing organisms is likely to be the result of a complex interaction with other environmental factors. In this sense, we highlight the importance of performing simultaneous field and laboratory experiments in order to better understanding the role of burrowing animals as bioturbators.

  13. Experimental Bleaching of a Reef-Building Coral Using a Simplified Recirculating Laboratory Exposure System

    Determining stressor-response relationships in reef building corals is a critical need for researchers because of global declines in coral reef ecosystems. A simplified recirculating coral exposure system for laboratory testing of a diversity of species and morphologies of reef b...

  14. Experimental Population Genetics in the Introductory Genetics Laboratory Using "Drosophila" as a Model Organism

    Johnson, Ronald; Kennon, Tillman

    2009-01-01

    Hypotheses of population genetics are derived and tested by students in the introductory genetics laboratory classroom as they explore the effects of biotic variables (physical traits of fruit flies) and abiotic variables (island size and distance) on fruit fly populations. In addition to this hypothesis-driven experiment, the development of…

  15. Saliva specimen: a new laboratory tool for diagnostic and basic investigation.

    Chiappin, Silvia; Antonelli, Giorgia; Gatti, Rosalba; De Palo, Elio F

    2007-08-01

    The assay of saliva is an increasing area of research with implications for basic and clinical purposes. Although this biological fluid is easy to manipulate and collect, careful attention must be directed to limit variation in specimen integrity. Recently, the use of saliva has provided a substantial addition to the diagnostic armamentarium as an investigative tool for disease processes and disorders. In addition to its oral indications, the analysis of saliva provides important information about the functioning of various organs within the body. In this respect, endocrine research certainly occupies a central role. The present review considers the laboratory aspects of salivary assays with respect to the different analytes including ions, drugs and various non-protein/protein compounds such as hormones and immunoglobulins. This review also examines the consequences of preanalytical variation with respect to collection strategy and subsequent storage conditions. It is likely that the use of saliva in assays will continue to expand thus providing a new instrument of investigation for physiologic as well as pathophysiologic states.

  16. Cultural Resource Investigations for a Multipurpose Haul Road on the Idaho National Laboratory

    Brenda R. Pace; Cameron Brizzee; Hollie Gilbert; Clayton Marler; Julie Braun Williams

    2010-08-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a multipurpose haul road to transport materials and wastes between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and other Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site facilities. The proposed road will be closed to the public and designed for limited year-round use. Two primary options are under consideration: a new route south of the existing T-25 power line road and an upgrade to road T-24. In the Spring of 2010, archaeological field surveys and initial coordination and field reconnaissance with representatives from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes were completed to identify any resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed road construction and to develop recommendations to protect any listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The investigations showed that 24 archaeological resources and one historic marker are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation south of the T-25 powerline road and 27archaeological resources are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation along road T-24. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both road corridors. This report outlines recommendations for additional investigations and protective measures that can be implemented to minimize adverse impacts to the identified resources.

  17. Laboratory investigation and phylogenetic analysis of an imported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus case in Greece.

    Athanasios Kossyvakis

    Full Text Available Rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis of persons suspected of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV infection is important for timely implementation of infection control practices and disease management. In addition, monitoring molecular changes in the virus can help elucidate chains of transmission and identify mutations that might influence virus transmission efficiency. This was illustrated by a recent laboratory investigation we conducted on an imported MERS-CoV case in Greece. Two oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected on the 1st and 2nd day of patient hospitalization and tested using two real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR assays targeting the UpE and Orf-1a regions of the MERS-CoV genome and RT-PCR and partial sequencing of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and nucleocapsid genes. Serum specimens were also collected and serological test were performed. Results from the first swab sample were inconclusive while the second swab was strongly positive for MERS-CoV RNA by rRT-PCR and confirmed positive by RT-PCR and partial gene sequencing. Positive serologic test results further confirmed MERS-CoV infection. Full-length nucleocapsid and spike gene coding sequences were later obtained from the positive swab sample. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus was closely related to recent human-derived MERS-CoV strains obtained in Jeddah and Makkah, Saudi Arabia, in April 2014 and dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. These findings were consistent with the patient's history. We also identified a unique amino acid substitution in the spike receptor binding domain that may have implications for receptor binding efficiency. Our initial inconclusive rRT-PCR results highlight the importance of collecting multiple specimens from suspect MERS-CoV cases and particularly specimens from the lower respiratory tract.

  18. Experimental innovations in surface science a guide to practical laboratory methods and instruments

    Yates, John T

    2015-01-01

    This book is a new edition of a classic text on experimental methods and instruments in surface science. It offers practical insight useful to chemists, physicists, and materials scientists working in experimental surface science. This enlarged second edition contains almost 300 descriptions of experimental methods. The more than 50 active areas with individual scientific and measurement concepts and activities relevant to each area are presented in this book. The key areas covered are: Vacuum System Technology, Mechanical Fabrication Techniques, Measurement Methods, Thermal Control, Delivery of Adsorbates to Surfaces, UHV Windows, Surface Preparation Methods, High Area Solids, Safety. The book is written for researchers and graduate students.

  19. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Low-Solubility Radionuclides: A Field, Experimental, and Modeling Investigation

    Kersting, A B; Reimus, P W; Abdel-Fattah, A; Allen, P G; Anghel, I; Benedict, F C; Esser, B K; Lu, N; Kung, K S; Nelson, J; Neu, M P; Reilly, S D; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Ware, S D; Warren, RG; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2003-02-01

    rate of Pu transport. Currently, the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of low-solubility radionuclides is not understood well enough to effectively model contaminant transport. A fundamental understanding of the role that colloids may or may not play in the transport of low-solubility radionuclides is needed in order to predict contaminant transport, design remediation strategies and provide risk assessments. Ryan and Elimelech (1996) have argued that in order to evaluate the potential for colloids to transport radionuclides, several criteria must be met: (1) colloids must exist and be stable, (2) radionuclides must have a high sorption affinity for the colloids, and (3) colloids must be transported. Only then can we understand the conditions where colloids can and will facilitate transport of radionuclides. In this report we compile the results from a series of field, laboratory and modeling studies funded by the UGTA program in order to evaluate the potential for colloids to transport low-solubility radionuclides at the NTS. The studies presented in this report fall under three general areas of investigation: Characterization of natural colloids in groundwater at NTS, Pu sorption/desorption experiments on colloid minerals identified in NTS groundwater, and Transport of Pu-doped colloids through fractured rock core. Chapter 1 is a background review of our current understanding of colloids and their role in facilitating contaminant transport. Chapters 2, and 3 are field studies that focused on characterizing natural colloids at different hydrologic environments at the NTS and address Ryan and Elimelech's (1996) first criteria regarding the existence and stability of colloids. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 are laboratory experimental studies that investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of Pu and other low-solubility radionuclides on colloid minerals observed in NTS groundwater. These studies evaluate Ryan and Elimelech's (1996) second criteria that the

  20. Detailed investigation of a vaporising fuel spray. Part 1: Experimental investigation of time averaged spray

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Boulderstone, R.; Ungut, A.; Felton, P. G.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser tomographic light scattering technique provides rapid and accurate high resolution measurements of droplet sizes, concentrations, and vaporization. Measurements using a computer interfaced thermocouple are presented and it is found that the potential exists for separating gas and liquid temperature measurements and diagnosing local spray density by in situ analysis of the response characteristics of the thermocouple. The thermocouple technique provides a convenient means for measuring mean gas velocity in both hot and cold two phase flows. The experimental spray is axisymmetric and has carefully controlled initial and boundary conditions. The flow is designed to give relatively insignificant transfer of momentum and mass from spray to air flow. The effects of (1) size-dependent droplet dispersion by the turbulence, (2) the initial spatial segregation of droplet sizes during atomization, and (3) the interaction between droplets and coherent large eddies are diagnosed.

  1. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    Timothy Q.Duong; Lora T.Watts

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation of an air to air supersonic ejector for propulsion of a small supersonic wind tunnel

    Kracík Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental and numerical investigation of an air to air supersonic ejector with twelve primary nozzles. The ejector is supposed to be used for propulsion of a small experimental supersonic wind tunnel which is situated in laboratories of Technical University of Liberec. A novel arrangement with 12 primary nozzles is used. The nozzles are placed at the periphery of the mixing chamber. The secondary stream enters the ejector through the free centre of the mixing chamber and is sucked into the space between the primary nozzles. Moreover the declination of the primary nozzles towards to ejector axis is 8.2° and the shape of the mixing chamber and diffuser walls is given by normal cubic spline function, which was investigated in previous work. The declination of the primary nozzles is supposed to eliminate reversal flow in the centre of the mixing chamber. Experimental results for different numbers of simultaneously activated primary nozzles are carried out. Experimental results are compared to the numerical simulation made with the help of Ansys Fluent software.

  3. Inter-laboratory evaluation of instrument platforms and experimental workflows for quantitative accuracy and reproducibility assessment

    Andrew J. Percy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reproducibility of plasma protein quantitation between laboratories and between instrument types was examined in a large-scale international study involving 16 laboratories and 19 LC–MS/MS platforms, using two kits designed to evaluate instrument performance and one kit designed to evaluate the entire bottom-up workflow. There was little effect of instrument type on the quality of the results, demonstrating the robustness of LC/MRM-MS with isotopically labeled standards. Technician skill was a factor, as errors in sample preparation and sub-optimal LC–MS performance were evident. This highlights the importance of proper training and routine quality control before quantitation is done on patient samples.

  4. Lecture Meets Laboratory - Experimental Experiences for Large Audiences: Concept and Implementation

    Katrin Temmen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lecture courses are an integral part of academia with a long tradition. The efficiency of such courses can be notably increased by active participation of students in the learning process. This article will elaborate on a re-structuring of an engineering lecture attended by more than 400 students; during the course, laboratory experiments are integrated directly into the lecture, allowing students to gain their own practical experience.

  5. Multi-scale Laboratory Experimentation in Hydrologic Sciences- Challenges and Opportunities.

    Illangasekare, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Problems of water sustainability to meet the increasing needs of a growing world population, further exacerbated by climate change, will continually challenge hydrologists and other earth and environmental scientists. Significant theoretical, modeling, and computational advances, and technology developments for improved observations, monitoring, and characterization that have taken place during the last several decades have helped to meet some of these challenges. In parallel, field and laboratory studies for conceptualization, hypothesis testing, and model improvements have continued to advance hydrologic sciences. However, the data to study some of the problems in hydrology cannot always be obtained from field studies where many factors contribute to the uncertainty of measurements and parameter estimates. The primary thesis of this talk is that laboratory experiments conducted at multiple test scales will play an important role by providing new insights into complex processes and accurate data for model improvement, leading to increased accuracy and reliability of predictions. However, performing such controlled experiments poses many challenges such as acquiring data at different observational scales, capturing relevant features of geologic heterogeneity, mimicking field specific pressure and temperature dependent phase interactions in the laboratory, and simulating climate drivers, among others. Focusing on the subsurface and using examples from multiphase systems, coastal aquifer salinization, and land/atmospheric interactions, I will show how to design and implement theory-driven experiments to address some of these challenges. I will make the case that addressing problems in hydrology requires continuous interaction among laboratory and field studies and modeling. It is imperative that hydrologists work at the disciplinary interfaces related to earth, water, energy, and the environment to address current and emerging problems that are of global importance.

  6. Experimental Bleaching of a Reef-Building Coral Using a Simplified Recirculating Laboratory Exposure System

    Barron, Mace G.; Cheryl J. McGill; Courtney, Lee A.; Marcovich, Dragoslav T

    2010-01-01

    Determining stressor-response relationships in reef building corals continues to be a critical research need due to global declines in coral reef ecosystems and projected declines for the future. A simplified recirculating coral exposure system was coupled to a solar simulator to allow laboratory testing of a diversity of species and morphologies of reef building corals under ecologically relevant conditions of temperature and solar radiation. Combinations of lamps and attenuating filters al...

  7. A Preliminary Clinical Laboratory Investigation of Endemic Spiking Mortality Syndrome of Broiler Chickens in Nepal

    Tika Ram Neupane

    Full Text Available During the period of March-April-May 2008 first time a sudden and unexpected jump in mortality in Broiler of 8 to 16 days of age was reported from broiler farms from Chitwan and Kathmandu valley in Nepal.Affected birds become recumbent, depressed and often go into a star-gazing spasm. Those signs included, huddling of the birds, trembling, blindness, loud chirping, litter eating, ataxia, comatose, birds dead with breast down and feet and legs straight out behind birds. Death within two to six hours after the onset of the symptoms Postmortem Lesions found with this syndrome include hemorrhages in the liver with necrosis of liver cells, regressed thymus, regression of the bursa of Fabricius, dehydration with the accumulation of kidney urates, fluid in the crop, fluid in the lower gut and watery contents of the ceca.Yellow elastic shanks swollen joints. Molted appearance of brain. . The mortality lasted for three to five days, after which, the mortality patterns return to a relatively normal level. When treated with liquid toxin binders like toxol,toxolivum,livertonic like hepatocare,naturaliv, immunomodulaters like immunocare,promin,pentasol and antibiotics there was check in mortality but the body weight recovery was not satisfactory only half as in comparison of in other illness. During this period laboratory culture of total 298 tissue specimen from dead bird was conducted which revealed growth of fungus spp like Aspergillus and Penicillium in 182 specimen while mixed E.coli and Staphylococcus were recovered in 68 specimen 24 specimen revealed the growth of Salmonella spp of bacteria and 24 samples were turn out to be negative while the attempt to isolate the Avian encephalomyelitis virus as it might be the cause suspected also turnout negative. On the basis of all laboratory findings and response to the treatment attempted finding of this preliminary investigation work is suggestive that the above syndrome indicates that mycosis emerging as

  8. Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale

    Vincena, S.; Gekelman, W.

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale. Theoretical investigations, in situ spacecraft and rocket missions, and laboratory studies form an essential triad for understanding the variety of current sheet phenomena found in space plasmas. In the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA, the formation dynamics, equilibrium state, and wave-mediated disruptions of current sheets can be studied with great spatial and temporal resolution using a variety of probes as well as non-invasive laser induced fluorescence and other optical diagnostics. The LAPD is aptly suited for studying current sheets flowing in a magnetized background plasma which is capable of supporting Alfvén waves. The cylindrical device is 20m long and one meter in diameter with a solenoidal magnetic field as high as 3000 Gauss. For the parameters in this experiment, the plasma column is ten shear Alfvén wavelengths along the field and 100 electron inertial lengths (δe) (or 200 ρi) in the perpendicular direction. An electron current sheet is created in the plasma by placing a thin copper plate in the plasma column at one end of the device and pulsing this plate positive with respect to the chamber wall. The current sheet extends for the length of the device and has an initial cross-field size of roughly 45 δe by 0.5δe. A parallel flow of ions is observed with similar dimensions and moves in the same direction as the electrons in the current sheet with a velocity of 0.2 times the ion sound speed. A much weaker sheared perpendicular flow is also measured. Cross-sections of the ion flow are measured at several axial locations over a distance of six meters. Second, as the ion flow increases in magnitude, a much broader (8ρi) density depletion (n=0.25nO) develops around the flow. The gradient scale length of the depletion shortens until the spontaneous growth of drift waves occurs. This disrupts the electron current and ion flow, and leads to cross-field transport of

  9. Curation of Laboratory Experimental Data as Part of the Overall Data Lifecycle

    Jeremy Frey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The explosion in the production of scientific data in recent years is placing strains upon conventional systems supporting integration, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of data and thus constraining the whole scientific process. Support for handling large quantities of diverse information can be provided by e-Science methodologies and the cyber-infrastructure that enables collaborative handling of such data. Regard needs to be taken of the whole process involved in scientific discovery. This includes the consideration of the requirements of the users and consumers further down the information chain and what they might ideally prefer to impose on the generators of those data. As the degree of digital capture in the laboratory increases, it is possible to improve the automatic acquisition of the ‘context of the data’ as well as the data themselves. This process provides an opportunity for the data creators to ensure that many of the problems they often encounter in later stages are avoided. We wish to elevate curation to an operation to be considered by the laboratory scientist as part of good laboratory practice, not a procedure of concern merely to the few specialising in archival processes. Designing curation into experiments is an effective solution to the provision of high-quality metadata that leads to better, more re-usable data and to better science.

  10. Influence of Experimental Conditions on the Outcome of Laboratory Investigations Using Natural Coastal Seawaters

    2010-01-01

    handling and storing natural coastal seawater, particularly methods for deaeration over time, influenced the chemistry and microflora . Bubbling nitrogen...or abstract) ( X ) Journal article (refereed) ( ) Oral Presentation, published ( ) Other, explain ( ) Abstract only, not...published ( ) Book chapter ( ) Conference Proceedings (not refereed) ( ) Multimedia report ) Journal article (not refereed) ) Oral

  11. Experimental state of n-n correlation function for Borromean halo nuclei investigation

    Petrascu, M.; Constantinescu, A.; Cruceru, I.; Duma, M.; Giurgiu, M.; Isbasescu, A.; Petrascu, H.; Serban, S.; Stoica, V.; Bordeanu, C.; Tanihata, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Famiano, M. A.; Ieki, K.

    2007-06-01

    The present experimental and theoretical state of Cnn correlation function for Borromean halo nuclei investigation is reviewed. Some of the consequences of a recently appeared new theory of Cnn, [M.T. Yamashita, T. Frederico, and L. Tomio, Phys. Rev. C 72 (2005) 011601] together with the experimental possibilities to test this theory will be presented in this contribution.

  12. Protocol for further laboratory investigations into the distribution of infectivity of Atypical BSE

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Information on the pathogenesis and tissue distribution of Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE in cattle through the study of field cases and experimental transmission studies is lacking. The latter are limited to transmission of Atypical BSE through intracerebral (i.c. inoculation of cattle. All data currently available relate to the presence or absence of PrPSc, but do not quantify relative amounts of PrPSc or levels of infectivity. A laboratory protocol for further studies is recommended, to allow the assessment of the relative infectious titre, PrPSc accumulation and prion seeding activity in the tissues of cattle that developed H-BSE or L-BSE (using posterior brainstem as a reference. Tissues to be covered by those studies are categorised in three priorities, based on their inclusion in the list of specific risk material in cattle, on the presence of infectivity, or PrPSc presence, demonstrated in Atypical BSEs or other Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs in ruminants, and on the importance in terms of input into the food chain in the EU. The protocol provides details in terms of the minimum number of animals to be tested, processing and preparation of tissues, and methods to be used to identify abnormal PrP and quantify infectivity, also depending on the expected level of infectivity and amount of tissue available for analysis. It is recommended that, through the implementation of the protocol, information should also be obtained on the performance of currently validated rapid tests for TSE active surveillance in cattle/bioassay for detecting H-BSE and L-BSE agents.

  13. Design theory and experimental investigation of the low frequency and high power rare earth magnetostrictive flextensional transducer (II). Experimental part

    HE Xiping; LI Bin; SUN Jincai

    2002-01-01

    Vibrating modes of the manufactured flextensional transducer and its shell are experimentally investigated. The result are consistent with the theoretical calculations. The acoustical performances for the transducer are measured: resonance frequency is 1.16 kHz in the underwater, bandwidth is 680 Hz, mechanical quality factor is 1.71, transmitting currant response is 186.1 dB, electromechanical efficiency is 13.1%.

  14. Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1, Text: Environmental Restoration Program

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 4 is located south of the main facility along Lagoon Road. WAG 4 consists of three separate areas: Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land-burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; an experimental Pilot Pit Area, which includes a pilot-scale testing pit; and sections of two abandoned underground pipelines used for transporting liquid, low-level, radioactive waste. SWSA 4 is the largest site at WAG 4, covering approximately 23 acres. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low- and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data, collected during monitoring of the tributary to White Oak Creek as part of WAG 2 investigations as well as during previous studies conducted at WAG 4, indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk (DOE 1993). With recent corrective measures the proportion of the release has increased in 1995. A detailed discussion of the site history and previous investigations is presented in the WAG 4 Preliminary Assessment Report, ORNL/ER-271 (Energy Systems 1994b). In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation was initiated to pinpoint those trenches that are the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources.

  15. Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. WAG 4 is located along Lagoon Road south of the main facility at ORNL. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low-and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk. In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation is being implemented to locate the trenches containing the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources. This investigation has been designed to gather site-specific data to confirm the locations of {sup 90}Sr sources responsible for most off-site releases, and to provide data to be used in evaluating potential interim remedial alternatives prepared to direct the site investigation of the SWSA 4 area at WAG 4.

  16. Comparative analysis of hospital and forensic laboratory ethanol concentrations: A 15 month investigation of antemortem specimens.

    Saitman, Alec; Estrada, Julio; Fitzgerald, Robert L; McIntyre, Iain M

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative serum alcohol concentrations from regional hospitals (from specimens collected at time of hospital admission) were compared to results from whole blood (from specimens collected at the time of hospital admission) concentrations measured at the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office (SDCMEO). Over a 15 month period (January 2012 to March 2013), the postmortem forensic toxicology laboratory analyzed a total of 2,321 cases. Of these, 280 were hospital cases (antemortem) representing 12% of the overall Medical Examiner toxicology casework. 59 of the 280 hospital cases (or 21%) screened positive for alcohol (ethanol). 39 of these 59 cases were included in the study based on available specimens for quantitative analyses. This investigation indicated that serum hospital ethanol concentrations correlated well (R(2) = 0.942) with ethanol values determined at SDCMEO (generally measured in whole blood). There was an observed negative bias with an average of -14.1%. A paired t-test was applied to the data and it was shown that this observed bias is statistically significant. These differences in ethanol concentrations could result from differences in specimen, analytical techniques, and/or calibration. The potential for specimen contamination is also discussed.

  17. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  18. Raman Investigation of Temperature Profiles of Phospholipid Dispersions in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Craig, Norman C.

    2015-06-01

    The temperature dependence of self-assembled, cell-like dispersions of phospholipids is investigated with Raman spectroscopy in the biochemistry laboratory. Vibrational modes in the hydrocarbon interiors of phospholipid bilayers are strongly Raman active, whereas the vibrations of the polar head groups and the water matrix have little Raman activity. From Raman spectra increases in fluidity of the hydrocarbon chains can be monitored with intensity changes as a function of temperature in the CH-stretching region. The experiment uses detection of scattered 1064-nm laser light (Nicolet NXR module) by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Nicolet 6700). A thermoelectric heater-cooler device (Melcor) gives convenient temperature control from 5 to 95°C for samples in melting point capillaries. Use of deuterium oxide instead of water as the matrix avoids some absorption of the exciting laser light and interference with intensity observations in the CH-stretching region. Phospholipids studied range from dimyristoylphosphotidyl choline (C14, transition T = 24°C) to dibehenoylphosphotidyl choline (C22, transition T = 74°C).

  19. Laboratory Investigation of Conventional Asphalt Mix Using Shell Thiopave for Indian Roads

    Jayaprakash B

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic performance of asphalt pavement always depends on the properties of bitumen, volumetric properties of asphalt mixtures. Bitumen is visco– elastic material where the temperature and rate of load application have a great influence on its behavior. There are different solutions to reduce the pavement distress such as using Thiopave (binder extender and asphalt mixture modifier in the mix design. Thiopave can significantly alter the performance properties of the mix and it is helpful to extend the life span of pavement. In this study, investigating use of thiopave and the change in the performance properties is dependent both on the percentage of virgin binder using VG-30 bitumen that is substituted with thiopave with different percentages. The study indicated that 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% replacement of binder was done with thiopave. The most notable impact of the addition of thiopave to a bituminous mixture is an increase in the stiffness of the mixture for better resistance to fatigue cracking and rutting. Thiopave materials can have a positive impact on laboratory mixture performance. The addition of thiopave has been shown to significantly increase Marshall Stability. From this study it is observed that thiopave can be utilized up to 30% to 40% as replacement to bitumen.

  20. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  1. Workplace investigation of increased diagnosis of malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Moore, D.H. II; Patterson, H.W.; Hatch, F.; Discher, D.; Schneider, J.S.; Bennett, D.

    1994-08-01

    Based on rates for the surrounding communities, the diagnosis rate of malignant melanoma for employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 1972 to 1977 was three to four times higher than expected. In 1984 Austin and Reynolds concluded, as a result of a case-control study, that five occupational factors were {open_quotes}causally associated{close_quotes} with melanoma risk at LLNL. These factors were: (1) exposure to radioactive materials, (2) work at Site 300, (3) exposure to volatile photographic chemicals, (4) presence at the Pacific Test Site, and (5) chemist duties. Subsequent reviews of the Austin and Reynolds report concluded that the methods used were appropriate and correctly carried out. These reports did determine, however, that Austin and Reynolds` conclusion concerning a causal relationship between occupational factors and melanoma among employees was overstated. There is essentially no supporting evidence linking the occupational factors with melanoma from animal studies or human epidemiology. Our report summarizes the results of further investigation of potential occupational factors.

  2. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS

    Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid, E-mail: cesar.contreras@nasa.gov, E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust.

  3. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and effectiveness in corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles

    Kılıç, Bayram; İpek, Osman

    2017-02-01

    In this study, heat transfer rate and effectiveness of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were investigated experimentally. Chevron angles of plate heat exchangers are β = 30° and β = 60°. For this purpose, experimentally heating system used plate heat exchanger was designed and constructed. Thermodynamic analysis of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were carried out. The heat transfer rate and effectiveness values are calculated. The experimental results are shown that heat transfer rate and effectiveness values for β = 60° is higher than that of the other. Obtained experimental results were graphically presented.

  4. The quality management system at the European tritium handling experimental laboratory

    Dizadji, F.; Ferrario, L. (Commission of the European Communities, Inst. for Safety Technology, JRC-Ispra Establishment, I-21020 Ispra (IT))

    1992-03-01

    The main limitations of conventional Quality Assurance (QA) are discussed with reference to the operational phase of a radio-chemical research laboratory. The paper suggests a broader approach utilizing a Quality Management System (QMS) which focuses on the operational efficiency of a R D organization in terms of reliability, reproducibility, cost effectiveness and safety. The management's role is presented with particular reference to the best fit of managerial style to the organization's mission, culture, personnel and surrounding environment. Qt. QMS policies and QA criteria are suggested for ETHEL to replace conventional QA requirements. Finally, guidelines for designing the ETHEL organizational structure are discussed.

  5. An Experimental Investigation of the Responses of Classic Spar Platform Subjected to Bi-directional Waves

    V.J. Kurian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the bi-directional short-crested waves on the dynamic motion responses of the moored classic spar is demonstrated from the results of the models test in this study. Practically in the design of offshore structures, long-crested or 2-dimensional wave properties that propagated to one direction are considered. Even though such long-crested wave is widely used for the design purposes, it is hardly determined in the real sea. The wind generated sea state in the real sea conditions are indeed well represented by the short-crested waves. Short-crested waves are defined as linear summation of long-crested wave series that propagated to different directions. Hence, the motions of the model were investigated experimentally by conducting the wave tank tests in the wave tank of Offshore Laboratory of Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS. Five groups of bi-directional wave series were defined and exerted on the classic spar model, which fabricated by using steel with scaling factor of 1:100. From the results measured, it was found that similar trends of the responses in term of Response Amplitude Operator (RAO for surge, heave and pitch motions were obtained. Maximum responses of surge, heave and pitch were found due to wave crossing angle 90°, while minimum response was found due to wave crossing angle 135°, respectively. It could be concluded that the wave crossing angle 90° (BD3 gives the widest spreading for short crested waves, while the wave crossing angle 135° (BD4 gives the narrowest spreading for short crested waves.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of the effect of basaltic dykes on transient saltwater intrusion

    Abdoulhalik, Antoifi; Ahmed, Ashraf; Hamill, Gerrard

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneity in porous media is one of the major factors that control mixing zone and saltwater wedge dynamics. Basaltic dykes are natural geological structures that can significantly affect groundwater flow and solute transport in coastal aquifers. Few recent studies have investigated the effects of heterogeneity on the freshwater-saltwater mixing zone. However, most of these studies have focused on steady-state conditions. Furthermore, as per our knowledge no one has so far completed experiments to study the impact of basaltic dykes on transient saltwater intrusion. In this study, we have performed experiments in a laboratory-scale aquifer model to study saltwater intrusion process under different heterogeneous settings; a dyke was set at different locations and several values of thickness and permeability were tested. Using a variable-head groundwater system, a head difference was imposed across the porous media and images of the transient saltwater-wedge were recorded at thirty second intervals. The experimental data sets were simulated using the MODFLOW-family variable density flow code SEAWAT. The results show that under intruding-wedge conditions, the width of the mixing zone is almost two orders of magnitude larger in the presence of the dyke than it is in the homogeneous case, while it is more than ten times larger under receding-wedge conditions. A slight increase of the toe length was observed (around nine percent) in the presence of the dyke under intruding-wedge and receding-wedge conditions. When the permeability of the dyke is further reduced, it acts as an impervious barrier that almost prevents the progression of the saltwater wedge. Thus, saltwater is accumulated along the side boundary, and then forced to drain along the bottom boundary. The results highlight the significant effects of macroscopic variations in aquifer properties (such as volcanic dykes) in the temporal evolution of mixing zone dynamics (widening and narrowing) and the

  7. Laboratory and numerical investigations of air sparging using MTBE as a tracer

    Mortensen, A. P.; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Sonnenborg, T. O.

    2000-01-01

    , the experiments were simulated using the numerical multiphase flow code T2VOC, and the results compared to those obtained in the laboratory. The experiments with fine sand were simulated well, while for coarser sand types the volatilization was highly overestimated. The differences between model and laboratory...

  8. Investigating Affective Experiences in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Students' Perceptions of Control and Responsibility

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Malakpa, Zoebedeh; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2016-01-01

    Meaningful learning requires the integration of cognitive and affective learning with the psychomotor, i.e., hands-on learning. The undergraduate chemistry laboratory is an ideal place for meaningful learning to occur. However, accurately characterizing students' affective experiences in the chemistry laboratory can be a very difficult task. While…

  9. Solving an Ethical Issue Involved in Experimentation with Animals in a Brazilian Teaching Laboratory

    Loureiro, Natalia I. V.; Viana, Henrique V.; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Silva, Thais D. N.; Cardoso, Fernanda Serpa; Santos, Dilvani Oliveira; Castro, Helena C.

    2004-01-01

    Changes are occurring within Brazilian institutes of higher education; currently several universities are reviewing their course offerings and teaching approaches to determine if they meet the needs of today's undergraduate students. When changes are made to the curriculum of experimental courses, there should be an understood guarantee that all…

  10. An Experimental Study of Laboratory Hybrid Power System with the Hydrogen Technologies

    Daniel Minarik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents very small laboratory hybrid photovoltaic-hydrogen power system. The system was primarily assembled to verify the operability of the control algorithms and practical deployment of available commercial hydrogen technologies that are directly usable for storage of electricity produced from renewable energy sources in a small island system. This energetic system was installed and tested in Laboratory of fuel cells that is located in the university campus of VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. The energetic system consists of several basic components: a photovoltaic field, accumulators bank, water commercial electrolyzer and compact fuel cell system. The weather conditions recorded in two different weeks as model weather and solar conditions are used as case studies to test the energetic system and the results for two different cases are compared each other. The results show and illustrate selected behaviour curves of the power system and also average energy storage efficiency for accumulation subsystem based on hydrogen technologies or at the energetic system embedded components. On the basis of real measurement and its evaluation the ideal parameters of the photovoltaic field were calculated as well as the hydrogen technologies for supposed purpose and the power requirements.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    Carl M. Stoots; James E. O' Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2008-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  12. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  13. Experimental and computational investigations of heat and mass transfer of intensifier grids

    Kobzar, Leonid; Oleksyuk, Dmitry; Semchenkov, Yuriy [Nuclear Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The paper discusses experimental and numerical investigations on intensification of thermal and mass exchange which were performed by National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'' over the past years. Recently, many designs of heat mass transfer intensifier grids have been proposed. NRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' has accomplished a large scope of experimental investigations to study efficiency of intensifier grids of various types. The outcomes of experimental investigations can be used in verification of computational models and codes. On the basis of experimental data, we derived correlations to calculate coolant mixing and critical heat flux mixing in rod bundles equipped with intensifier grids. The acquired correlations were integrated in subchannel code SC-INT.

  14. Experimental investigation of the thermal hydraulics in lead bismuth eutectic-helium experimental loop of an accelerator-driven system

    Xi, Wenxuan; Wang, Yong Wei; Li, Xun Feng; Huai, Xiulan; Cal, Jun [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2016-10-15

    The heat transfer characteristics between liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) and helium are of great significance for the two-loop cooling system based on an accelerator-driven system (ADS). This paper presents an experimental study on the resistance characteristics and heat transfer performance in a LBE-helium experimental loop of ADS. Pressure drops in the LBE loop, the main heat transfer, and the coupled heat transfer characteristics between LBE and helium are investigated experimentally. The temperature of LBE has a significant effect on the LBE thermo-physical properties, and is therefore considered in the prediction of pressure drops. The results show that the overall heat transfer coefficient increases with the increasing helium flow rate and the decreasing inlet temperature of helium. Increasing the LBE Reynolds number and LBE inlet temperature promotes the heat transfer performance of main heat transfer and thus the overall heat transfer coefficient. The experimental results give an insight into the flow and heat transfer properties in a LBE-helium heat exchanger and are helpful for the optimization of an ADS system design.

  15. A Laboratory Investigation of the Suspension, Transport, and Settling of Silver Carp Eggs Using Synthetic Surrogates.

    Garcia, Tatiana; Zuniga Zamalloa, Carlo; Jackson, P Ryan; Murphy, Elizabeth A; Garcia, Marcelo H

    2015-01-01

    Asian carp eggs are semi-buoyant and must remain suspended in the water to survive, supported by the turbulence of the flow, until they hatch and develop the ability to swim. Analysis of the transport and dispersal patterns of Asian carp eggs will facilitate the development and implementation of control strategies to target the early life stages. Experimenting with Asian carp eggs is complicated due to practical issues of obtaining eggs in close proximity to experimental facilities and extensive handling of eggs tends to damage them. Herein, we describe laboratory experiments using styrene beads (4.85 mm diameter) as synthetic surrogate eggs to mimic the physical properties of water-hardened silver carp eggs. The first set of experiments was completed in a rectangular vertical column filled with salt water. The salinity of the water was adjusted in an iterative fashion to obtain a close approximation of the fall velocity of the styrene beads to the mean fall velocity of silver carp water-hardened eggs. The terminal fall velocity of synthetic eggs was measured using an image processing method. The second set of experiments was performed in a temperature-controlled recirculatory flume with a sediment bed. The flume was filled with salt water, and synthetic eggs were allowed to drift under different flow conditions. Drifting behavior, suspension conditions, and settling characteristics of synthetic eggs were observed. At high velocities, eggs were suspended and distributed through the water column. Eggs that touched the sediment bed were re-entrained by the flow. Eggs saltated when they touched the bed, especially at moderate velocities and with a relatively flat bed. At lower velocities, some settling of the eggs was observed. With lower velocities and a flat bed, eggs were trapped near the walls of the flume. When bedforms were present, eggs were trapped in the lee of the bedforms in addition to being trapped near the flume walls. Results of this research study

  16. A Laboratory Investigation of the Suspension, Transport, and Settling of Silver Carp Eggs Using Synthetic Surrogates.

    Tatiana Garcia

    Full Text Available Asian carp eggs are semi-buoyant and must remain suspended in the water to survive, supported by the turbulence of the flow, until they hatch and develop the ability to swim. Analysis of the transport and dispersal patterns of Asian carp eggs will facilitate the development and implementation of control strategies to target the early life stages. Experimenting with Asian carp eggs is complicated due to practical issues of obtaining eggs in close proximity to experimental facilities and extensive handling of eggs tends to damage them. Herein, we describe laboratory experiments using styrene beads (4.85 mm diameter as synthetic surrogate eggs to mimic the physical properties of water-hardened silver carp eggs. The first set of experiments was completed in a rectangular vertical column filled with salt water. The salinity of the water was adjusted in an iterative fashion to obtain a close approximation of the fall velocity of the styrene beads to the mean fall velocity of silver carp water-hardened eggs. The terminal fall velocity of synthetic eggs was measured using an image processing method. The second set of experiments was performed in a temperature-controlled recirculatory flume with a sediment bed. The flume was filled with salt water, and synthetic eggs were allowed to drift under different flow conditions. Drifting behavior, suspension conditions, and settling characteristics of synthetic eggs were observed. At high velocities, eggs were suspended and distributed through the water column. Eggs that touched the sediment bed were re-entrained by the flow. Eggs saltated when they touched the bed, especially at moderate velocities and with a relatively flat bed. At lower velocities, some settling of the eggs was observed. With lower velocities and a flat bed, eggs were trapped near the walls of the flume. When bedforms were present, eggs were trapped in the lee of the bedforms in addition to being trapped near the flume walls. Results of this

  17. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  18. Attending to experimental physics practices and lifelong learning skills in an introductory laboratory course

    Gandhi, Punit R.; Livezey, Jesse A.; Zaniewski, Anna M.; Reinholz, Daniel L.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.

    2016-09-01

    We have designed an introductory laboratory course that engaged first-year undergraduate students in two complementary types of iteration: (1) iterative improvement of experiments through cycles of modeling systems, designing experiments, analyzing data, and refining models and designs; and (2) iterative improvement of self through cycles of reflecting on progress, soliciting feedback, and implementing changes to study habits and habits of mind. The course consisted of three major activities: a thermal expansion activity, which spanned the first half of the semester; final research projects, which spanned the second half of the semester; and guided student reflections, which took place throughout the duration of the course. We describe our curricular designs and report examples of student work that demonstrate students' iterative improvements in multiple contexts.

  19. Experimental study of subcritical laboratory magnetized collisionless shocks using a laser-driven magnetic piston

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Winske, D.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles have successfully generated subcritical magnetized collisionless shocks, allowing new laboratory studies of shock formation relevant to space shocks. The characteristics of these shocks are compared with new data in which no shock or a pre-shock formed. The results are consistent with theory and 2D hybrid simulations and indicate that the observed shock or shock-like structures can be organized into distinct regimes by coupling strength. With additional experiments on the early time parameters of the laser plasma utilizing Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, and fast-gate filtered imaging, these regimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical shock formation criteria.

  20. Laboratory and Field Investigations of Dynamic Effects in Soil Water Retention Curve

    Chiu, Yung-Chia; Tseng, Yen-Huiang; Ye, Jiun-Yan

    2015-04-01

    The unsaturated soil is a multi-phase system and the embedded physical mechanisms and chemical reactions are very complicated. The characteristics of groundwater flow and mechanisms of mass transport are still ambiguous so far. In order to fully understand the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone, the soil water retention curve plays an important role in description of water flow. However, the measurements and calculations of soil water retention curve are usually obtained under the static condition or steady state (equilibrium), in which the dynamic effects (non-equilibrium) are not considered, and the obtained relationship between capillary pressure and saturation is skeptical. Therefore, the sandbox experiments and field tests will be conducted to discuss the dynamic effects in the soil water retention curve and hysteresis effect in this study. In the laboratory, the relations between capillary pressure, saturation, the rate of change of water content, and dynamic constant are evaluated through different setting of boundary conditions and different sizes of particles. In the field, the tests are conducted to describe the soil water retention curve through the rain simulator and artificial evaporation. Besides, the dynamic dewpoint potentiameter is used to analyze the hysteresis effect of soil samples, and its results are compared with the results obtained from sandbox and field experiments. Finally, through a series of experiments, the relationship between capillary pressure and saturation under the dynamic effects is established, and the associated theories and mechanisms are discussed. The works developed in this study can provide as reference tools for the hydrogeological investigation and contaminated site remediation in the future. Keywords: capillary pressure, saturation, soil water retention curve, hysteresis, sandbox experiment, field test