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Sample records for labeling group ii

  1. Evaluation of [{sup 3}H]LY341495 for labeling group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Schmidt, Mark E.; Sultana, Abida; Schoepp, Darryle D.; Wheeler, William J.; Mozley, P. David; Laruelle, Marc

    2003-02-01

    New glutamatergic drugs are being developed as potential therapies for neurodegenerative disorders, anxiety disorders, and psychoses. The development of effective mGluR radiotracers would provide essential tools with which to probe these sites in living humans, providing critical information about certain disease processes involving the glutamaterigic system and its regulation in humans. As a first step towards this goal, the tritiated form of the high affinity group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist LY341495 [K{sub D} (mGluR{sub 2}) = 1.67{+-}0.20 nM, K{sub D} (mGluR{sub 3})=0.75{+-}0.43 nM] was evaluated to determine its potential to label mGluRs in vivo. Dissection analysis of the regional brain distribution over time of [{sup 3}H]LY341495 in male rats revealed low brain uptake and no significant demonstrable saturable binding of this tracer. A group II mGluR tracer possessing higher affinity than [{sup 3}H]LY341495 and an absence of carboxylic acid groups is likely required for in vivo PET imaging purposes.

  2. A study from the EORTC new drug development group: open label phase II study of sabarubicin (MEN-10755) in patients with progressive hormone refractory prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, W; Tchen, N; Bloch, J; Fargeot, P; Sorio, R; Vermorken, J B; Collette, L; Lacombe, D; Twelves, C

    2006-01-01

    Sabarubicin (MEN-10755), a new synthetic anthracycline analogue, was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a multicentre phase II study in patients with advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Thirty seven patients were included, of which 34 were evaluable for PSA response according to Bubley's criteria. Sabarubicin was administered as a short (30 min) intravenous infusion at a dose of 80 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. The main toxicity consisted of grade 3/4 neutropenia in 24 patients (64.9%), with grade 3/4 febrile neutropenia occurring in one patient only. Grade 3/4 cardiotoxicity was observed in 4 patients including one ineligible. Other toxicities were mild. Nine patients achieved a PSA response (26.5%), 10 patients had stable disease (29.4%) and 14 patients disease progression (41.2%). One patient (2.9%) had a PSA response that was not confirmed by repeat PSA testing. The objective response rate according to RECIST criteria was 6.7% in 15 patients with measurable disease. The median duration of PSA responses was relatively long 7.1 months (95% CI 4.9-20.7) as was the median time to treatment progression in patients with stable disease. The median overall survival was 18.7 months (95% CI 9.1-N), comparable to results recently observed in taxotere-containing regimens. To confirm and extend these results, further testing of sabarubicin in larger trials is warranted.

  3. Multi-label Image Annotation by Structural Grouping Sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yahong; Wu, Fei; Zhuang, Yueting

    We can obtain high-dimensional heterogeneous features from real-world images on photo-sharing website, for an example Flickr. Those features are implemented to describe their various aspects of visual characteristics, such as color, texture and shape etc. The heterogeneous features are often over-complete to describe certain semantic. Therefore, the selection of limited discriminative features for certain semantics is hence crucial to make the image understanding more interpretable. This chapter introduces one approach for multi-label image annotation with a regularized penalty. We call it Multi-label Image Boosting by the selection of heterogeneous features with structural Grouping Sparsity (MtBGS). MtBGS induces a (structural) sparse selection model to identify subgroups of homogeneous features for predicting a certain label. Moreover, the correlations among multiple tags are utilized in MtBGS to boost the performance of multi-label annotation. Extensive experiments on public image datasets show that the proposed approach has better multi-label image annotation performance and leads to a quite interpretable model for image understanding.

  4. Brain Extraction Using Label Propagation and Group Agreement: Pincram.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf A Heckemann

    Full Text Available Accurately delineating the brain on magnetic resonance (MR images of the head is a prerequisite for many neuroimaging methods. Most existing methods exhibit disadvantages in that they are laborious, yield inconsistent results, and/or require training data to closely match the data to be processed. Here, we present pincram, an automatic, versatile method for accurately labelling the adult brain on T1-weighted 3D MR head images. The method uses an iterative refinement approach to propagate labels from multiple atlases to a given target image using image registration. At each refinement level, a consensus label is generated. At the subsequent level, the search for the brain boundary is constrained to the neighbourhood of the boundary of this consensus label. The method achieves high accuracy (Jaccard coefficient > 0.95 on typical data, corresponding to a Dice similarity coefficient of > 0.97 and performs better than many state-of-the-art methods as evidenced by independent evaluation on the Segmentation Validation Engine. Via a novel self-monitoring feature, the program generates the "success index," a scalar metadatum indicative of the accuracy of the output label. Pincram is available as open source software.

  5. Brain Extraction Using Label Propagation and Group Agreement: Pincram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, Rolf A; Ledig, Christian; Gray, Katherine R; Aljabar, Paul; Rueckert, Daniel; Hajnal, Joseph V; Hammers, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Accurately delineating the brain on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the head is a prerequisite for many neuroimaging methods. Most existing methods exhibit disadvantages in that they are laborious, yield inconsistent results, and/or require training data to closely match the data to be processed. Here, we present pincram, an automatic, versatile method for accurately labelling the adult brain on T1-weighted 3D MR head images. The method uses an iterative refinement approach to propagate labels from multiple atlases to a given target image using image registration. At each refinement level, a consensus label is generated. At the subsequent level, the search for the brain boundary is constrained to the neighbourhood of the boundary of this consensus label. The method achieves high accuracy (Jaccard coefficient > 0.95 on typical data, corresponding to a Dice similarity coefficient of > 0.97) and performs better than many state-of-the-art methods as evidenced by independent evaluation on the Segmentation Validation Engine. Via a novel self-monitoring feature, the program generates the "success index," a scalar metadatum indicative of the accuracy of the output label. Pincram is available as open source software.

  6. Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DunnGalvin, A.; Chun-Han, C.; Crevel, R.; Grimshaw, K.; Poms, R.; Schnadt, S.; Taylor, S.L.; Turner, P.; Allen, K,J.; Austin, M.; Baka, A.; Baumert, J.L.; Baumgartner, S.; Beyer, K.; Bucchini, L; Fernández-Rivas, M.; Grinter, K.; Houben, G.F.; Hourihane, J.; Kenna, F.; Kruizinga, AG; Lack, G; Madsen, CB; Mills, EN; Papadopoulos, N.G.; Alldrick, A.; Regent, L.; Sherlock, R.; Wal, J.M.; Roberts, G.

    2015-01-01

    Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) was introduced by the food industry to help manage and communicate the possibility of reaction from the unintended presence of allergens in foods. However, in its current form, PAL is counter-productive for consumers with food allergies. This review aims to sum

  7. Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DunnGalvin, A.; Chun-Han, C.; Crevel, R.; Grimshaw, K.; Poms, R.; Schnadt, S.; Taylor, S.L.; Turner, P.; Allen, K,J.; Austin, M.; Baka, A.; Baumert, J.L.; Baumgartner, S.; Beyer, K.; Bucchini, L; Fernández-Rivas, M.; Grinter, K.; Houben, G.F.; Hourihane, J.; Kenna, F.; Kruizinga, AG; Lack, G; Madsen, CB; Mills, EN; Papadopoulos, N.G.; Alldrick, A.; Regent, L.; Sherlock, R.; Wal, J.M.; Roberts, G.

    2015-01-01

    Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) was introduced by the food industry to help manage and communicate the possibility of reaction from the unintended presence of allergens in foods. However, in its current form, PAL is counter-productive for consumers with food allergies. This review aims to

  8. Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DunnGalvin, A.; Chan, C. -H.; Crevel, R.

    2015-01-01

    Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) was introduced by the food industry to help manage and communicate the possibility of reaction from the unintended presence of allergens in foods. However, in its current form, PAL is counterproductive for consumers with food allergies. This review aims...... to summarize the perspectives of all the key stakeholders (including clinicians, patients, food industry and regulators), with the aim of defining common health protection and risk minimization goals. The lack of agreed reference doses has resulted in inconsistent application of PAL by the food industry...... and in levels of contamination that prompt withdrawal action by enforcement officers. So there is a poor relationship between the presence or absence of PAL and actual reaction risk. This has led to a loss of trust in PAL, reducing the ability of consumers with food allergies to make informed choices...

  9. Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DunnGalvin, A; Chan, C-H; Crevel, R; Grimshaw, K; Poms, R; Schnadt, S; Taylor, S L; Turner, P; Allen, K J; Austin, M; Baka, A; Baumert, J L; Baumgartner, S; Beyer, K; Bucchini, L; Fernández-Rivas, M; Grinter, K; Houben, G F; Hourihane, J; Kenna, F; Kruizinga, A G; Lack, G; Madsen, C B; Clare Mills, E N; Papadopoulos, N G; Alldrick, A; Regent, L; Sherlock, R; Wal, J-M; Roberts, G

    2015-09-01

    Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) was introduced by the food industry to help manage and communicate the possibility of reaction from the unintended presence of allergens in foods. However, in its current form, PAL is counterproductive for consumers with food allergies. This review aims to summarize the perspectives of all the key stakeholders (including clinicians, patients, food industry and regulators), with the aim of defining common health protection and risk minimization goals. The lack of agreed reference doses has resulted in inconsistent application of PAL by the food industry and in levels of contamination that prompt withdrawal action by enforcement officers. So there is a poor relationship between the presence or absence of PAL and actual reaction risk. This has led to a loss of trust in PAL, reducing the ability of consumers with food allergies to make informed choices. The result has been reduced avoidance, reduced quality of life and increased risk-taking by consumers who often ignore PAL. All contributing stakeholders agree that PAL must reflect actual risk. PAL should be transparent and consistent with rules underpinning decision-making process being communicated clearly to all stakeholders. The use of PAL should indicate the possible, unintended presence of an allergen in a consumed portion of a food product at or above any proposed action level. This will require combined work by all stakeholders to ensure everyone understands the approach and its limitations. Consumers with food allergy then need to be educated to undertake individualized risk assessments in relation to any PAL present.

  10. Butterflies II: Torsors for 2-group stacks

    CERN Document Server

    Aldrovandi, Ettore

    2009-01-01

    We study torsors over 2-groups and their morphisms. In particular, we study the first non-abelian cohomology group with values in a 2-group. Butterfly diagrams encode morphisms of 2-groups and we employ them to examine the functorial behavior of non-abelian cohomology under change of coefficients. We re-interpret the first non-abelian cohomology with coefficients in a 2-group in terms of gerbes bound by a crossed module. Our main result is to provide a geometric version of the change of coefficients map by lifting a gerbe along the ``fraction'' (weak morphism) determined by a butterfly. As a practical byproduct, we show how butterflies can be used to obtain explicit maps at the cocycle level. In addition, we discuss various commutativity conditions on cohomology induced by various degrees of commutativity on the coefficient 2-groups, as well as specific features pertaining to group extensions.

  11. Lifts of projective congruence groups, II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiming, Ian

    2014-01-01

    We continue and complete our previous paper ``Lifts of projective congruence groups'' concerning the question of whether there exist noncongruence subgroups of  that are projectively equivalent to one of the groups  or . A complete answer to this question is obtained: In case of  such noncongruence...

  12. G-Compactness and Groups II

    CERN Document Server

    Gismatullin, Jakub

    2007-01-01

    We continue investigation of G-compactness of some particular two sorted structure defined in the previous paper, i.e. N = (M,X,*), where group G is definable in M and G acts regularly on X. We also show that if a group G has NIP, then there exists the smallest invariant (over some small set) subgroup of G with bounded index (Proposition 3.2). This result extends theorem of Shelah. Our proof are based on Shelah arguments.

  13. G(A, B)-labeling of cacti over groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egarguin, Neil Jerome A.; Panopio, Rolando G.

    2016-06-01

    Let G be a group with nonempty subsets A and B. The graph G(A, B) is the simple graph obtained by deleting all loops from the graph whose vertex set is A and where vertices x and y are adjacent if and only if there is a b ∈ B such that xb = y or yb = x. In this paper, we present realizations of some cacti as G(A, B)'s.

  14. 77 FR 74827 - Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container... container labels accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired. The working group will hold its... working group to develop best practices for making information on prescription drug container...

  15. 7 CFR 205.304 - Packaged products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)).”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC...; or (ii) “Made with organic (specified food groups)”: Provided, That, the statement does not list more... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaged products labeled âmade with...

  16. Metal-nitroxyl interactions. 28. EPR studies of spin-labeled nickel(II) complexes in fluid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafid, Slimane; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    Three spin-labeled four-coordinate nickel(II) complexes were prepared. In these complexes the nickel(II) was diamagnetic and the EPR spectra in fluid solution were typical nitroxyl spectra. Coordination of pyridine or 2,2'-bipyridyl to the spin-labeled nickel(II) complexes produced high-spin nickel(II) and a disappearance of the nitroxyl EPR signal. Similarly when a spin-labeled bidentate ligang coordinated to a nickel xanthate with diamagnetic ligands, no EPR signal was observed for the six-coordinate complex in fluid solution. The nickel-nitroxyl distances in these complexes were 6 to 10 Å.

  17. U. S. groups fight James Bay II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    This article reviews the opposition program to the James Bay II hydroelectric project. The environmental costs of the first phase of James Bay, the La Grande project, have been huge, resulting in massive alterations of the environment and causing widespread mercury poisoning of fish, loss of wetlands and disruption of caribou calving grounds. Start-up of the Great Whale project is imminent, and will result in the flooding of ca 5,000 square kilometers of wilderness. The environmental costs of phases 2 and 3 will be even larger than for the first phase, with potential for significant disruption of fresh-water input into James and Hudson Bays. Drastic changes in the volume and salinity of the water will jeopardize the life patterns of many migratory birds, polar bears, beluga wales, seals and other wildlife. These, along with other social costs, are prohibitive for the Cree. The Cree have been actively opposing the project in the United States, and a groundswell of American opposition has been building. The Cree have been successful in persuading Bangor, Maine, to cancel a proposed contract with Hydro Quebec, on economic grounds. Opposition is building in Burlington, Vermont, to a contract with Hydro Quebec for the planned purchase of 15 MW of power from Hydro Quebec. Secret contracts between Hydro Quebec and thirteen multinational aluminum corporations, to supply power at below cost, have been publicized. The signing of an energy contract between New York and Quebec has been delayed for one year due to the inability of Hydro Quebec to make progress on the project in the face of opposition at home.

  18. Peer Group Effects on Moslem Consumer’s Decision To Purchase Halal Labeled Cosmetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniaty Aisyah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research are to analyze peer group effects on Moslem consumers’decision to purchase halal-labeled cosmetics directly and indirectly which is mediated by consumers’ religious behavior. This research applies Structural Equation Model and convenience random sampling with 215 samples who have bought halal-labeled cosmeticsand live in Southern Tangerang. The findings show that: first, peer groupdirectly affect consumers’ decisionto purchase halal-labeled cosmetics; second, hablumminannas behavior mediates peer group and consumers’decision to purchase halal-labeled cosmeticsindirectly, third, hablumminallah behavior has the most dominant effect on Moslem consumers’ decision to purchase halal-labeled cosmetics. Based on the findings, it could be concluded that the reason of consumers’ decision to purchase halal-labeled cosmetics is because their religious behavior are high. Therefore, it is suggested that government and related institutions need to implement the Security Act of Halal Products immediately in order to protect the consumer from consuming non-halal productsDOI: 10.15408/aiq.v7i2.1682

  19. Beyond standard model report of working group II

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, Anjan S; Roy, Probir

    1995-01-01

    Working group II at WHEPP3 concentrated on issues related to the supersymmetric standard model as well as SUSY GUTS and neutrino properties. The projects identified by various working groups as well as progress made in them since WHEPP3 are briefly reviewed.

  20. Mechanisms used for genomic proliferation by thermophilic group II introns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Mohr

    Full Text Available Mobile group II introns, which are found in bacterial and organellar genomes, are site-specific retroelements hypothesized to be evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retrotransposons in higher organisms. Most bacteria, however, contain no more than one or a few group II introns, making it unclear how introns could have proliferated to higher copy numbers in eukaryotic genomes. An exception is the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, which contains 28 closely related copies of a group II intron, constituting approximately 1.3% of the genome. Here, by using a combination of bioinformatics and mobility assays at different temperatures, we identified mechanisms that contribute to the proliferation of T. elongatus group II introns. These mechanisms include divergence of DNA target specificity to avoid target site saturation; adaptation of some intron-encoded reverse transcriptases to splice and mobilize multiple degenerate introns that do not encode reverse transcriptases, leading to a common splicing apparatus; and preferential insertion within other mobile introns or insertion elements, which provide new unoccupied sites in expanding non-essential DNA regions. Additionally, unlike mesophilic group II introns, the thermophilic T. elongatus introns rely on elevated temperatures to help promote DNA strand separation, enabling access to a larger number of DNA target sites by base pairing of the intron RNA, with minimal constraint from the reverse transcriptase. Our results provide insight into group II intron proliferation mechanisms and show that higher temperatures, which are thought to have prevailed on Earth during the emergence of eukaryotes, favor intron proliferation by increasing the accessibility of DNA target sites. We also identify actively mobile thermophilic introns, which may be useful for structural studies, gene targeting in thermophiles, and as a source of thermostable reverse transcriptases.

  1. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Truong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a "ribozyme" and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed "retrohoming". Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have

  2. Reducing Prejudice With Labels: Shared Group Memberships Attenuate Implicit Bias and Expand Implicit Group Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, W Anthony; Mackie, Diane M; Allen, Thomas J; Sherman, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-01

    In three experiments, we used a novel Implicit Association Test procedure to investigate the impact of group memberships on implicit bias and implicit group boundaries. Results from Experiment 1 indicated that categorizing targets using a shared category reduced implicit bias by increasing the extent to which positivity was associated with Blacks. Results from Experiment 2 revealed that shared group membership, but not mere positivity of a group membership, was necessary to reduce implicit bias. Quadruple process model analyses indicated that changes in implicit bias caused by shared group membership are due to changes in the way that targets are evaluated, not to changes in the regulation of evaluative bias. Results from Experiment 3 showed that categorizing Black targets into shared group memberships expanded implicit group boundaries.

  3. Adjunctive agomelatine therapy in the treatment of acute bipolar II depression: a preliminary open label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornaro M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Michele Fornaro,1 Michael J McCarthy,2,3 Domenico De Berardis,4 Concetta De Pasquale,1 Massimo Tabaton,5 Matteo Martino,6 Salvatore Colicchio,7 Carlo Ignazio Cattaneo,8 Emanuela D'Angelo,9 Pantaleo Fornaro61Department of Formative Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; 2Department of Psychiatry, Veteran's Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, 3University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; 4Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, "ASL 4", Teramo, Italy; 5Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy; 6Department of Neurosciences, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy; 7Unit of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy; 8National Health System, "ASL 13", Novara, Italy; 9National Health System, "ASL 3", Genoa, ItalyPurpose: The circadian rhythm hypothesis of bipolar disorder (BD suggests a role for melatonin in regulating mood, thus extending the interest toward the melatonergic antidepressant agomelatine as well as type I (acute or II cases of bipolar depression.Patients and methods: Twenty-eight depressed BD-II patients received open label agomelatine (25 mg/bedtime for 6 consecutive weeks as an adjunct to treatment with lithium or valproate, followed by an optional treatment extension of 30 weeks. Measures included the Hamilton depression scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Clinical Global Impression Scale–Bipolar Version, Young Mania Rating Scale, and body mass index.Results: Intent to treat analysis results demonstrated that 18 of the 28 subjects (64% showed medication response after 6 weeks (primary study endpoint, while 24 of the 28 subjects (86% responded by 36 weeks. When examining primary mood stabilizer treatment, 12 of the 17 (70.6% valproate and six of the 11 (54.5% lithium patients responded by the first endpoint. At 36 weeks, 14 valproate treated (82.4% and 10 lithium

  4. Synthesis of amino-group functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and applications as biomedical labeling probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Zhan, Yanqiang; Shen, Yaqi; Xia, Xing; Zhang, Suming; Liu, Zuli

    2011-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation technique and further functionalized with amino-group to obtain amino-group functionalized (amino-SPIO) nanoparticles. The X-ray diffraction results reveal the structure of amino-SPIO nanoparticles, from which the average iron core diameter is approximately 10 nm by calculation; while Zetasizer reveals their hydrodynamic diameter are mainly distributed in the range of 40-60 nm. These nanoparticles can be taken up by liver tissue, resulting in dramatically darkening of liver tissue under T2-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin-spin relaxivity coefficient of these nanoparticles is 179.20 mM-1 s-1 in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance system. In addition, amino-SPIO nanoparticles were conjugated to Tat (FITC) peptide and incubated with neural stem cells in vitro, the authors can detect the positive-labeling (labeled) neural stem cells showing green fluorescence, which indicates Tat (FITC) peptide-derivated amino-SPIO nanoparticles are able to enter cells. Furthermore, it was also find significant negative T2 contrast enhancement when compared with the non-nanoparticles-labeled neural stem cells in T2-weighted MRI. The amino-SPIO nanoparticles show promising potential as a new type of labeling probes, which can be used in magnetic resonance-enhanced imaging and fluorescence diagnosis.

  5. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  6. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Peck, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised.

  7. COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN UNION QUALITY LABELS UTILIZATION IN VISEGRAD GROUP COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rka Velcovsk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on European Union quality system known as Protected Designation of Origin, Protected Geographical Indication and Tradional Speciality Guaranteed used in agricultural and food products sector. The aim of the paper is to analyse and compare the utilization of these labels by Visegrad group countries. Firstly, the literature review dealing with the topical area is given. Further, the European Union quality scheme is specified and the comparison of Visegrad group countries according to selected criteria is provided. Empirical part of the paper involves marketing research results analysis and discussion. Data comes from the Database of Origin and Registration. The sample consists of all 93 product names registered as Protected Designation of Origin, Protected Geographical Indication and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed in the database by Visegrad group countries to the 30th April 2013. The frequency of using the labels is analysed according to type of label, country of origin and product class. Pearsons chi-square test of independence and Pearson's and Cramer's contingency coefficients were used in order to confirm if significant differences do exist between variables.

  8. Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen–Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid Biphasic Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juin-Yih Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron (TEM microscopy, and gene and protein expression analyses. The experimental results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles did not affect the phenotype of chondrocytes after cell labeling, nor were protein and gene expression affected. The biphasic type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffold was characterized by SEM, and labeled chondrocytes showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffold after cultivation onto the polymer. Cellular phenotype remained unaltered but with increased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, as indicated by cell staining, indicating chondrogenesis. Decreased SRY-related high mobility group-box gene (Sox-9 levels of cultured chondrocytes indicated that differentiation was associated with osteogenesis. These results are encouraging for the development of techniques for trackable cartilage regeneration and osteochondral defect repair which may be applied in vivo and, eventually, in clinical trials.

  9. Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen-Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid Biphasic Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Juin-Yih; Chen, Shi-Hui; Chen, Yu-Pin; Chen, Wei-Chuan

    2017-01-04

    Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron (TEM) microscopy, and gene and protein expression analyses. The experimental results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles did not affect the phenotype of chondrocytes after cell labeling, nor were protein and gene expression affected. The biphasic type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold was characterized by SEM, and labeled chondrocytes showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffold after cultivation onto the polymer. Cellular phenotype remained unaltered but with increased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, as indicated by cell staining, indicating chondrogenesis. Decreased SRY-related high mobility group-box gene (Sox-9) levels of cultured chondrocytes indicated that differentiation was associated with osteogenesis. These results are encouraging for the development of techniques for trackable cartilage regeneration and osteochondral defect repair which may be applied in vivo and, eventually, in clinical trials.

  10. Group II intron-anchored gene deletion in Clostridium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaizhi Jia

    Full Text Available Clostridium plays an important role in commercial and medical use, for which targeted gene deletion is difficult. We proposed an intron-anchored gene deletion approach for Clostridium, which combines the advantage of the group II intron "ClosTron" system and homologous recombination. In this approach, an intron carrying a fragment homologous to upstream or downstream of the target site was first inserted into the genome by retrotransposition, followed by homologous recombination, resulting in gene deletion. A functional unknown operon CAC1493-1494 located in the chromosome, and an operon ctfAB located in the megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731 were successfully deleted by using this approach, without leaving antibiotic marker in the genome. We therefore propose this approach can be used for targeted gene deletion in Clostridium. This approach might also be applicable for gene deletion in other bacterial species if group II intron retrotransposition system is established.

  11. Growth of group II Clostridium botulinum strains at extreme temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Lindström, Miia; Selby, Katja; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-11-01

    The minimum and maximum growth temperatures and the maximum growth rates at 10, 30, 37, and 40°C were determined for 24 group II Clostridium botulinum strains. Genetic diversity of the strains was revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The minimum growth temperatures ranged from 6.2 to 8.6°C, and the maximum growth temperatures ranged from 34.7 to 39.9°C. The mean maximum growth temperatures and mean maximum growth rates of type E strains at 37°C were significantly higher than those of type B and type F strains. A significant correlation between maximum growth rates at 37°C and maximum growth temperatures was found for all strains. Some type E strains with a high minimum growth temperature also had a higher maximum growth rate at 37°C than at 30°C, which suggests that some group II C. botulinum strains are more mesophilic in their growth properties than others. We found relatively small differences between AFLP clusters, indicating that diverse genetic background among the strains was not reflected in the growth properties. The growth characteristics of group II C. botulinum and some type E strains with mesophilic growth properties may have an impact on inoculation studies and predictive modeling for assessing the safety of foods.

  12. Evolution of protoplanetary disks from their taxonomy in scattered light: Group I vs. Group II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garufi, A.; Meeus, G.; Benisty, M.; Quanz, S. P.; Banzatti, A.; Kama, M.; Canovas, H.; Eiroa, C.; Schmid, H. M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; Rigliaco, E.; Ménard, F.; Meyer, M. R.; van Boekel, R.; Dominik, C.

    2017-07-01

    Context. High-resolution imaging reveals a large morphological variety of protoplanetary disks. To date, no constraints on their global evolution have been found from this census. An evolutionary classification of disks was proposed based on their IR spectral energy distribution, with the Group I sources showing a prominent cold component ascribed to an earlier stage of evolution than Group II. Aims: Disk evolution can be constrained from the comparison of disks with different properties. A first attempt at disk taxonomy is now possible thanks to the increasing number of high-resolution images of Herbig Ae/Be stars becoming available. Methods: Near-IR images of six Group II disks in scattered light were obtained with VLT/NACO in polarimetric differential imaging, which is the most efficient technique for imaging the light scattered by the disk material close to the stars. We compare the stellar/disk properties of this sample with those of well-studied Group I sources available from the literature. Results: Three Group II disks are detected. The brightness distribution in the disk of HD 163296 indicates the presence of a persistent ring-like structure with a possible connection with the CO snowline. A rather compact (self-shadowed and compact). HD 163296 could be the primordial version of a typical Group I disk. Other Group II disks, like AK Sco and HD 142666, could be smaller counterparts of Group I unable to open cavities as large as those of Group I. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under program number 095.C-0658(A).

  13. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-09-28

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D{sub 2}O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d{sub 10}. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  14. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  15. Development of the DHQ II and C-DHQ II Nutrient & Food Group Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nutrient and food group database, created for analyzing the DHQ II, is based on a compilation of national 24-hour dietary recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) conducted in 2001-02, 2003-04, and 2005-06.

  16. Synthesis of ¹⁸O-labeled photosynthetically active chlorophylls at the 3- or 7-carbonyl group with high regioselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Hidetada; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2010-09-01

    The 3- and 7-formyl groups of chlorophyll-d (Chl-d) and bacteriochlorophyll-e (BChl-e), respectively, were regioselectively labeled with an isotopically stable oxygen-18 (¹⁸O) atom to give 3¹-¹⁸O-labeled Chl-d and 7¹-¹⁸O-labeled BChl-e (ca. 90% ¹⁸O) by exchanging the carbonyl oxygen atoms in the presence of acidic H₂ ¹⁸O (ca. 95% ¹⁸O). Another photosynthetically active chlorophyll, BChl-a possessing the 3-acetyl group was treated under similar acidic conditions to afford a trace amount of 3¹-¹⁸O-labeled BChl-a and further demetallated compound, the corresponding 3¹-¹⁸O-labeled bacteriopheophytin-a as the major product with 55% ¹⁸O-degree. The FT-IR spectra of ¹⁸O-(un)labeled chlorophylls in the solution and the solid states showed that the 3- and 7-carbonyl stretching vibration modes moved to about a 30-cm⁻¹ lower wavenumber by ¹⁸O-labeling at the 3¹- and 7¹-oxo moieties. In artificial chlorosome-like self-aggregates of BChl-e, the ¹⁸O-labeled 7-carbonyl stretching mode was completely resolved from the specially hydrogen-bonded 13-C=O stretching mode, evidently indicating no interaction of the 7-CHO with other functional groups in the supramolecules.

  17. A novel all-optical label processing for OPS networks based on multiple OOC sequences from multiple-groups OOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Kun; Zhang, Chongfu; Ling, Yun; Wang, Yibo

    2007-11-01

    This paper proposes an all-optical label processing scheme using multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS) for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) networks, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In this scheme, the multiple optical orthogonal codes (MOOC) from multiple-groups optical orthogonal codes (MGOOC) are permuted and combined to obtain the MOOCS for the optical labels, which are used to effectively enlarge the capacity of available optical codes for optical labels. The optical label processing (OLP) schemes are reviewed and analyzed, the principles of MOOCS-based optical labels for OPS networks are given, and analyzed, then the MOOCS-OPS topology and the key realization units of the MOOCS-based optical label packets are studied in detail, respectively. The performances of this novel all-optical label processing technology are analyzed, the corresponding simulation is performed. These analysis and results show that the proposed scheme can overcome the lack of available optical orthogonal codes (OOC)-based optical labels due to the limited number of single OOC for optical label with the short code length, and indicate that the MOOCS-OPS scheme is feasible.

  18. Metabolomic and mass isotopomer analysis of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle: II. Heterogeneity of metabolite labeling pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lili; Kasumov, Takhar; Kombu, Rajan S; Zhu, Shu-Han; Cendrowski, Andrea V; David, France; Anderson, Vernon E; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri

    2008-08-08

    In this second of two companion articles, we compare the mass isotopomer distribution of metabolites of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle labeled from NaH(13)CO(3) or dimethyl [1,4-(13)C(2)]succinate. The mass isotopomer distribution of intermediates reveals the reversibility of the isocitrate dehydrogenase + aconitase reactions, even in the absence of a source of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, in many cases, a number of labeling incompatibilities were found as follows: (i) glucose versus triose phosphates and phosphoenolpyruvate; (ii) differences in the labeling ratios C-4/C-3 of glucose versus (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate)/(dihydroxyacetone phosphate); and (iii) labeling of citric acid cycle intermediates in tissue versus effluent perfusate. Overall, our data show that gluconeogenic and citric acid cycle intermediates cannot be considered as sets of homogeneously labeled pools. This probably results from the zonation of hepatic metabolism and, in some cases, from differences in the labeling pattern of mitochondrial versus extramitochondrial metabolites. Our data have implications for the use of labeling patterns for the calculation of metabolic rates or fractional syntheses in liver, as well as for modeling liver intermediary metabolism.

  19. An ultra-facile and label-free immunoassay strategy for detection of copper (II) utilizing chemiluminescence self-enhancement of Cu (II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetate chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hui; Shu, Qi; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Zhenxing; Yang, Shijia; Wang, Lin; Fu, Zhifeng

    2016-11-15

    The establishment of facile, rapid, sensitive and cost-effective protocols for the detection of heavy metals is of great significance for human health and environmental monitoring. Hereby, an ultra-facile and label-free immunoassay strategy was designed for detecting heavy metal ion by using Cu (II) as the model analyte. Cu (II) reacted previously with ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) was captured by immobilized monoclonal antibody for Cu (II)-EDTA chelate. Then Cu (II) was detected based on the self-enhancing effect of Cu (II)-EDTA chelate to luminol-H2O2 chemiluminescence reaction. The CL intensity is linear relative with Cu (II) concentration in a very wide range of 1.0-1000ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.33ng/mL (S/N=3). Since the specificity of this proposed strategy relied on both the specificity of monoclonal antibody and the specificity of luminol-H2O2 system, it could avoid interference from most common ions. The proposed method was used successfully to detect Cu (II) in traditional Chinese medicine and environmental water samples with acceptable recovery values of 82-113%. This proof-of-principle work demonstrated the feasibility of the label-free immunoassay for heavy metal ions, and opened a new avenue for rapid screening and field assay for drug safety, environmental monitoring and clinical diagnosis.

  20. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Development in Group II Areas. 52.823 Section 52.823 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources...: Three groups within the State of Iowa have been classified as Group II areas for fine particulate...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... development in group II areas. 52.1423 Section 52.1423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Nebraska § 52.1423 PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state of Nebraska... classified as Group II areas for the purpose of PM10 State Implementation Plan (SIP) development....

  2. HTLV-I/II infections in Spain. The HTLV-I/II Spanish Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, V; Calderón, E; Esparza, B; Cilla, G; Aguilera, A; Gutiérrez, M; Tor, J; Pujol, E; Merino, F; Pérez-Trallero, E

    1993-08-01

    Antibodies to HTLV-I/II were investigated in sera from 7521 individuals living in Spain. They were classified in four major groups: a) subjects at high risk of retroviral infections e.g. parenteral drug addicts, homosexuals, prostitutes, and multiple-transfused individuals; b) patients suffering illness associated with HTLV-I in endemic regions; c) immigrants from endemic areas; and d) blood donors. Sera were collected from 1984 to December 1991. Repeatedly reactive ELISA was found in 211 samples (2.8%), but Western blot only confirmed the presence of HTLV-I/II antibodies in 23 samples (0.30%), corresponding to eight (0.25%) out of 3207 drug abusers, six (0.72%) out of 894 immigrants (five Africans and one South American), three (0.41%) out of 727 patients with HTLV-related diseases (one woman with HTLV-I associated myelopathy had received blood transfusions in an endemic area), four (0.54%) out of 793 prostitutes, one multiple-transfused native woman, and one (0.16%) out of 603 native seamen. The Western blot antibody pattern confirmed HTLV-II infection instead of HTLV-I in nine (39%) subjects. The remaining 14 (61%) HTLV-reactive samples were interpreted as HTLV-I seropositive, most of which were from immigrants. None of 857 blood donors analysed was reactive for HTLV antibody. These results suggest that both HTLV-I and HTLV-II are present in Spain, although at a low rate and mostly restricted to individuals coming from endemic areas, drug addicts, and prostitutes. Furthermore, diseases related to HTLV-I (particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, and subacute myelopathies) seem to be rarely associated with these viruses in Spain, a non-endemic area.

  3. Activation of both Group I and Group II metabotropic glutamatergic receptors suppress retinogeniculate transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Y-W; Sherman, S M

    2013-07-09

    Relay cells of dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) receive a Class 1 glutamatergic input from the retina and a Class 2 input from cortical layer 6. Among the properties of Class 2 synapses is the ability to activate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and mGluR activation is known to affect thalamocortical transmission via regulating retinogeniculate and thalamocortical synapses. Using brain slices, we studied the effects of Group I (dihydroxyphenylglycine) and Group II ((2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine) mGluR agonists on retinogeniculate synapses. We showed that both agonists inhibit retinogeniculate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) through presynaptic mechanisms, and their effects are additive and independent. We also found high-frequency stimulation of the layer 6 corticothalamic input produced a similar suppression of retinogeniculate EPSCs, suggesting layer 6 projection to LGN as a plausible source of activating these presynaptic mGluRs.

  4. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Ahmad, Haslina; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-01

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+, (bpy = 2,2'bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  5. IPCC Working Group II: Impacts and Adaptation Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2007-12-01

    The IPCC (as opposed to the UN Framework Convention) defines climate change as" any change in climate over time, whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity". The IPCC Working Group II (Impacts, Adaptation, Vulnerability) was charged with assessing the scientific, technical, environmental, economic, and social aspects of vulnerability to climate change, and, the negative and positive consequences for ecological systems, socio-economic sectors, and human health. The Working Group II report focused on the following issues for different sectors and regions (e.g. water, agriculture, biodiversity) and communities (coastal, island, etc.): · The role of adaptation in reducing vulnerability and impacts, · Assessment of adaptation capacity, options and constraints, and · Enhancing adaptation practice and operations. This presentation will address the following questions in the context of the results of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report WG II: · What are the barriers, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for impacts assessments? · How are decisions about adaptation being made, and what types of adaptation strategies are being undertaken? · What are good adaptation practices and how are they learned over time? Examples will be drawn from the freshwater resources, small islands and adaptation chapters to which the presenter contributed. Many lessons have been identified but few have been implemented or evaluated over time. Adaptation occurs in the context of multiple stresses. Adaptation will be important in coping with early impacts in the near-term and continue to be important as our climate changes, regardless of how that change is derived. It is important to note that unmitigated climate change could, in the long term, exceed the capacity of different natural, managed and human systems to adapt. The assessment leads to the following conclusions: · Adaptation to climate change is already taking place, but on a limited basis · Adaptation measures

  6. A label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) based on platinum (II)-oligonucleotide coordination induced gold nanoparticles aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhai, Qingfeng; Zhou, Weijun; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) was constructed for the first time. Four bases (G-G mismatch) mismatched streptavidin aptamer (MSAA) was used to protect AuNPs from salt-induced aggregation and recognize Pt (II) specifically. Only in the presence of Pt (II), coordination occurs between G-G bases and Pt (II), leading to the activation of streptavidin aptamer. Streptavidin coated magnetic beads (MBs) were used as separation agent to separate Pt (II)-coordinated MSAA. The residual less amount of MSAA could not efficiently protect AuNPs anymore and aggregation of AuNPs will produce a colorimetric product. With the addition of Pt (II), a pale purple-to-blue color variation could be observed by the naked eye. A detection limit of 150nM and a linear range from 0.6μM to 12.5μM for Pt (II) could be achieved without any amplification.

  7. Comparative analysis of the labelling of nanotechnologies across four stakeholder groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capon, Adam; Gillespie, James; Rolfe, Margaret; Smith, Wayne

    2015-08-01

    Societies are constantly challenged to develop policies around the introduction of new technologies, which by their very nature contain great uncertainty. This uncertainty gives prominence to varying viewpoints which are value laden and have the ability to drastically shift policy. The issue of nanotechnologies is a prime example. The labelling of products that contain new technologies has been one policy tool governments have used to address concerns around uncertainty. Our study develops evidence regarding opinions on the labelling of products made by nanotechnologies. We undertook a computer-assisted telephone (CATI) survey of the Australian public and those involved in nanotechnologies from the academic, business and government sectors using a standardised questionnaire. Analysis was undertaken using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. We explored reluctance to purchase as a result of labelling products which contained manufactured nanomaterials both generally and across five broad products (food, cosmetics/sunscreens, medicines, pesticides, tennis racquets/computers) which represent the broad categories of products regulated by differing government agencies in Australia. We examined the relationship between reluctance to purchase and risk perception, trust, and familiarity. We found irrespective of stakeholder, most supported the labelling of products which contained manufactured nanomaterials. Perception of risk was the main driver of reluctance to purchase, while trust and familiarity were likely to have an indirect effect through risk perception. Food is likely to be the greatest product impacted by labelling. Risk perception surrounding nanotechnologies and label `framing' on the product are key issues to be addressed in the implementation of a labelling scheme.

  8. Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen–Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid Biphasic Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Juin-Yih Su; Shi-Hui Chen; Yu-Pin Chen; Wei-Chuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron (TEM) microsco...

  9. Comparative analysis of the labelling of nanotechnologies across four stakeholder groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capon, Adam, E-mail: acap1921@uni.sydney.edu.au; Gillespie, James, E-mail: james.gillespie@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney, Menzies Centre for Health Policy, School of Public Health (Australia); Rolfe, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.rolfe@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney, University Centre for Rural Health, School of Public Health (Australia); Smith, Wayne, E-mail: wayne.smith@doh.health.nsw.gov.au [Health Protection NSW, Environmental Health Branch (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Societies are constantly challenged to develop policies around the introduction of new technologies, which by their very nature contain great uncertainty. This uncertainty gives prominence to varying viewpoints which are value laden and have the ability to drastically shift policy. The issue of nanotechnologies is a prime example. The labelling of products that contain new technologies has been one policy tool governments have used to address concerns around uncertainty. Our study develops evidence regarding opinions on the labelling of products made by nanotechnologies. We undertook a computer-assisted telephone (CATI) survey of the Australian public and those involved in nanotechnologies from the academic, business and government sectors using a standardised questionnaire. Analysis was undertaken using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. We explored reluctance to purchase as a result of labelling products which contained manufactured nanomaterials both generally and across five broad products (food, cosmetics/sunscreens, medicines, pesticides, tennis racquets/computers) which represent the broad categories of products regulated by differing government agencies in Australia. We examined the relationship between reluctance to purchase and risk perception, trust, and familiarity. We found irrespective of stakeholder, most supported the labelling of products which contained manufactured nanomaterials. Perception of risk was the main driver of reluctance to purchase, while trust and familiarity were likely to have an indirect effect through risk perception. Food is likely to be the greatest product impacted by labelling. Risk perception surrounding nanotechnologies and label ‘framing’ on the product are key issues to be addressed in the implementation of a labelling scheme.

  10. Generic tags for Mn(ii) and Gd(iii) spin labels for distance measurements in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Gong, Yan-Jun; Litvinov, Aleksei; Liu, Hong-Kai; Yang, Feng; Su, Xun-Cheng; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2017-09-28

    High-affinity chelating tags for Gd(iii) and Mn(ii) ions that provide valuable high-resolution distance restraints for biomolecules were used as spin labels for double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements. The availability of a generic tag that can bind both metal ions and provide a narrow and predictable distance distribution for both ions is attractive owing to their different EPR-related characteristics. Herein we introduced two paramagnetic tags, 4PSPyMTA and 4PSPyNPDA, which are conjugated to cysteine residues through a stable thioether bond, forming a short and, depending on the metal ion coordination mode, a rigid tether with the protein. These tags exhibit high affinity for both Mn(ii) and Gd(iii) ions. The DEER performance of the 4PSPyMTA and 4PSPyNPDA tags, in complex with Gd(iii) or Mn(ii), was evaluated for three double cysteine mutants of ubiquitin, and the Gd(iii)-Gd(iii) and Mn(ii)-Mn(ii) distance distributions they generated were compared. All three Gd(iii) complexes of the ubiquitin-PyMTA and ubiquitin-PyNPDA conjugates produced similar and expected distance distributions. In contrast, significant variations in the maxima and widths of the distance distributions were observed for the Mn(ii) analogs. Furthermore, whereas PyNPDA-Gd(iii) and PyNPDA-Mn(ii) delivered similar distance distributions, appreciable differences were observed for two mutants with PyMTA, with the Mn(ii) analog exhibiting a broader distance distribution and shorter distances. ELDOR (electron-electron double resonance)-detected NMR measurements revealed some distribution in the Mn(ii) coordination environment for the protein conjugates of both tags but not for the free tags. The broader distance distributions generated by 4PSPyMTA-Mn(ii), as compared with Gd(iii), were attributed to the distributed location of the Mn(ii) ion within the PyMTA chelate owing to its smaller size and lower coordination number that leave the pyridine nitrogen uncoordinated. Accordingly, in

  11. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J; Cissé, Ibrahim I

    2016-10-26

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging.

  12. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J.; Cissé, Ibrahim I.

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging. PMID:27782203

  13. Interpretation of drug label instructions: A study among four immigrants groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; Blom, Lyda; Winters, Nina A.; Van Hulten, Rolf P.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Poor understanding of medical instructions or misinterpretations can be a cause for not using medication as prescribed. Previous studies reported misunderstanding of instructions and warnings on drug labels by up to 50 % of the adult population. Objective: The aim of this study was to as

  14. Henselian valued quasilocal fields with totally indivisible value groups, II

    OpenAIRE

    Chipchakov, I. D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper characterizes the quasilocal fields from the class of Henselian valued fields with totally indivisible value groups, which possess finite separable extensions of nontrivial defect. We show that, for any prime number $q$, a divisible subgroup $T$ in the multiplicative group of complex numbers is realizable as the Brauer group of such a quasilocal field of residual characteristic $q$ unless $q = 2$ and the $2$-component of T$ is trivial.

  15. Hypersurfaces in Pn with 1-parameter symmetry groups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessis, Andrew du; Wall, C.T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We assume V a hypersurface of degree d in with isolated singularities and not a cone, admitting a group G of linear symmetries. In earlier work we treated the case when G is semi-simple; here we analyse the unipotent case. Our first main result lists the possible groups G. In each case we discuss...

  16. Finite Groups with Given Quantitative Non-Nilpotent Subgroups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2014-01-01

    As an extension of Shi and Zhang's 2011 article [4], we prove that any finite group having at most 23 non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is solvable except for G ≅ A 5 or SL(2, 5), and any finite group having at most three conjugacy classes of non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is s...

  17. 40 CFR 52.935 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas. 52.935 Section 52.935 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... State implementation plan development in group II areas. On July 7, 1988, the State submitted...

  18. 40 CFR 52.881 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas. 52.881 Section 52.881 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state has submitted a committal SIP...

  19. 40 CFR 52.63 - PM10 State Implementation Plan development in group II areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM10 State Implementation Plan development in group II areas. 52.63 Section 52.63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... State Implementation Plan development in group II areas. On March 15, 1989, the State submitted...

  20. A single point mutation in a group I WW domain shifts its specificity to that of group II WW domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    1999-06-11

    WW domains can be divided into three groups based on their binding specificity. By random mutagenesis, we switched the specificity of the Yes-associated protein (YAP) WW1 domain, a Group I WW domain, to that of the FE65 WW domain, which belongs to Group II. We showed that a single mutation, leucine 190 (betaB5) to tryptophan, is required to switch from Group I to Group II. Although this single substitution in YAP WW1 domain is sufficient to precipitate the two protein isoforms of Mena, an in vivo ligand of FE65, we showed that an additional substitution, histidine 192 (betaB7) to glycine, significantly increased the ability of YAP to mimic FE65. This double mutant (L190W/H192G) precipitates eight of the nine protein bands that FE65 pulls down from rat brain protein lysates. Based on both our data and a sequence comparison between Group I and Group II WW domains, we propose that a block of three consecutive aromatic amino acids within the second beta-sheet of the domain is required, but not always sufficient, for a WW domain to belong to Group II. These data deepen our understanding of WW domain binding specificity and provide a basis for the rational design of modified WW domains with potential therapeutic applications.

  1. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  2. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  3. The Symmetric Group Defies Strong Fourier Sampling: Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Part I of this paper showed that the hidden subgroup problem over the symmetric group--including the special case relevant to Graph Isomorphism--cannot be efficiently solved by strong Fourier sampling, even if one may perform an arbitrary POVM on the coset state. In this paper, we extend these results to entangled measurements. Specifically, we show that the hidden subgroup problem on the symmetric group cannot be solved by any POVM applied to pairs of cosets states. In particular, these hidden subgroups cannot be determined by any polynomial number of one- or two-register experiments on coset states.

  4. The Geometric Invariants of Group Extensions Part II: Split Extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Koban, Nic

    2011-01-01

    We compute the {\\Omega}^1(G) invariant when 1 {\\to} H {\\to} G {\\to} K {\\to} 1 is a split short exact sequence. We use this result to compute the invariant for pure and full braid groups on compact surfaces. Applications to twisted conjugacy classes and to finite generation of commutator subgroups are also discussed.

  5. Identification of an electron transfer locus in plastocyanin by chromium(II) affinity labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1981-01-01

    Cu(II)--plastocyanin from French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) is reduced quantitatively by Cr(II)aq ions to give a substitution-inert Cr(III) adduct of Cu(I)--plastocyanin. Enzymatic proteolysis of this derivative by thermolysin led to the identification of the Cr(III) binding peptide. This contains...... in the Cr(III) adduct. That difference is interpreted as reflecting proximity and interaction between the latter metal ion and tyrosine-83. The distance between the copper center and the suggested Cr(III) binding site is approximately 12 A. The intervening region contains an array of highly invariant...

  6. Effectiveness of telemedicine and distance learning applications for patients with chronic heart failure. A protocol for prospective parallel group non-randomised open label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanagas, Giedrius; Umbrasiene, Jelena; Slapikas, Rimvydas

    2012-01-01

    Chronic heart failure in Baltic Sea Region is responsible for more hospitalisations than all forms of cancer combined and is one of the leading causes of hospitalisations in elderly patients. Frequent hospitalisations, along with other direct and indirect costs, place financial burden on healthcare systems. We aim to test the hypothesis that telemedicine and distance learning applications is superior to the current standard of home care. Prospective parallel group non-randomised open label study in patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) II-III chronic heart failure will be carried out in six Baltic Sea Region countries. The study is organised into two 6-month follow-up periods. The first 6-month period is based on active implementation of tele-education and/or telemedicine for patients in two groups (active run period) and one standard care group (passive run period). The second 6-month period of observation will be based on standard care model (passive run period) to all three groups. Our proposed practice change is based on translational research with empirically supported interventions brought to practice and aims to find the home care model that is most effective to patient needs. This study has been approved by National Bioethics Committee (2011-03-07; Registration No: BE-2-11). This study has been registered in Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) with registration number ACTRN12611000834954.

  7. Successful conversion of the Bacillus subtilis BirA Group II biotin protein ligase into a Group I ligase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henke, Sarah K; Cronan, John E

    2014-01-01

    ...: bioWAFDBI, yuiG and yhfUTS. Moreover, unlike the paradigm Group II BPL, E. coli BirA, the N-terminal DNA binding domain can be deleted from Bacillus subtilis BirA without adverse effects on its ligase function...

  8. Interneurones in pathways from group II muscle afferents in sacral segments of the feline spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, E; Riddell, J S

    1994-03-15

    1. Properties of dorsal horn interneurones that process information from group II muscle afferents in the sacral segments of the spinal cord have been investigated in the cat using both intracellular and extracellular recording. 2. The interneurones were excited by group II muscle afferents and cutaneous afferents but not by group I muscle afferents. They were most effectively excited by group II afferents of the posterior biceps, semitendinosus, triceps surae and quadriceps muscle nerves and by cutaneous afferents running in the cutaneous femoris, pudendal and sural nerves. The earliest synaptic actions were evoked monosynaptically and were very tightly locked to the stimuli. 3. EPSPs evoked monosynaptically by group II muscle afferents and cutaneous afferents of the most effective nerves were often cut short by disynaptic IPSPs. As a consequence of this negative feedback the EPSPs gave rise to single or double spike potentials and only a minority of interneurones responded with repetitive discharges. However, the neurones that did respond repetitively did so at a very high frequency of discharges (0.8-1.2 ms intervals between the first 2-3 spikes). 4. Sacral dorsal horn group II interneurones do not appear to act directly upon motoneurones because: (i) these interneurones are located outside the area within which last order interneurones have previously been found and (ii) the latencies of PSPs evoked in motoneurones by stimulation of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus, cutaneous femoris and pudendal nerves (i.e. the main nerves providing input to sacral interneurones) are compatible with a tri- but not with a disynaptic coupling. Spatial facilitation of EPSPs and IPSPs following synchronous stimulation of group II and cutaneous afferents of these nerves shows, however, that sacral interneurones may induce excitation or inhibition of motoneurones via other interneurones. 5. Comparison of the properties of group II interneurones in the sacral segments with

  9. Positioning during Group Work on a Novel Task in Algebra II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Anna F.; González, Gloriana

    2015-01-01

    Given the prominence of group work in mathematics education policy and curricular materials, it is important to understand how students make sense of mathematics during group work. We applied techniques from Systemic Functional Linguistics to examine how students positioned themselves during group work on a novel task in Algebra II classes. We…

  10. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) Complexes of Salan-Type Ligand Containing Ester Groups: Synthesis, Characterization, Electrochemical Properties, and In Vitro Biological Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Jeslin Kanaga Inba, P.; B. Annaraj; Thalamuthu, S.; Neelakantan, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    A salen ligand on reduction and N-alkylation affords a novel [N2O2] chelating ligand containing ester groups [L = diethyl-2,2′-(propane-1,3-diylbis((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzyl)azanediyl))diacetate]. The purity of the ligand was confirmed by NMR and HPLC chromatograms. Its Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized by a combination of elemental analysis, IR, NMR, UV-Vis, and mass spectral data, and thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTA). The magnetic moments, UV-Vis, ...

  11. AN H I SURVEY OF SIX LOCAL GROUP ANALOGS. II. H I PROPERTIES OF GROUP GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, D. J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnes, David G.; Kilborn, Virginia A. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Gibson, Brad K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Freeman, Ken C., E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu, E-mail: David.G.Barnes@gmail.com, E-mail: vkilborn@astro.swin.edu.au, E-mail: Lister.Staveley-Smith@icrar.org, E-mail: brad.k.gibson@gmail.com, E-mail: kcf@mso.anu.edu.au [RSAA, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2011-12-01

    We have conducted an H I 21 cm emission-line survey of six loose groups of galaxies chosen to be analogs to the Local Group. The survey was conducted using the Parkes multibeam instrument and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) over a {approx}1 Mpc{sup 2} area and covering the full depth of each group, with an M{sub HI} sensitivity of {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Our survey detected 110 sources, 61 of which are associated with the six groups. All of these sources were confirmed with ATCA observations or were previously cataloged by HIPASS. The sources all have optical counterparts and properties consistent with dwarf irregular or late-type spiral galaxies. We present here the H I properties of the groups and their galaxies. We derive an H I mass function (HIMF) for the groups that is consistent with being flatter than the equivalent field HIMF. We also derive a circular velocity distribution function, tracing the luminous dark matter halos in the groups, that is consistent with those of the Local Group and HIPASS galaxies, both of which are shallower than that of clusters or predictions from cold dark matter models of galaxy formation.

  12. An HI Survey of Six Local Group Analogs. II. HI properties of group galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Staveley-Smith, L; Gibson, B K; Kilborn, V A; Freeman, K C

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted an HI 21 cm emission-line survey of six loose groups of galaxies chosen to be analogs to the Local Group. The survey was conducted using the Parkes Multibeam instrument and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) over a ~1 Mpc^2 area and covering the full depth of each group, with a M(HI) sensitivity of ~7x10^5 M(sun). Our survey detected 110 sources, 61 of which are associated with the six groups. All of these sources were confirmed with ATCA observations or were previously cataloged by HIPASS. The sources all have optical counterparts and properties consistent with dwarf irregular or late-type spiral galaxies. We present here the HI properties of the groups and their galaxies. We derive an HI mass function for the groups that is consistent with being flatter than the equivalent field HIMF. We also derive a circular velocity distribution function, tracing the luminous dark matter halos in the groups, that is consistent with those of the Local Group and HIPASS galaxies, both of which ar...

  13. Clave de las especies de Conoderus Grupo II (Coleoptera: Elateridae Key of the species of Conoderus Group II (Coleoptera: Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E. Guzmán De Tomé

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Se presenta una reseña histórica, diagnosis y clave de identificación de 33 especies exclusivamente neotropicales, del género Conoderus Eschscholtz 1829 Grupo II, (Coleoptera, Elateridae proporcionando, datos de su distribución e ilustraciones de cuatro especies representativas de la región.ABSTRACT. An identification of 33 species of Conoderus Group II, Eschscholtz 1829 (Coleoptera, Elateridae with full diagnosis, distribution, with representative illustrations of four species of the neotropical region.

  14. TLC II. Talking, Listening, Communicating II. A Curriculum Guide for Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Carol Lou; Bormaster, Jeff

    This workbook provides affective education activities in building human relations skills in elementary and secondary school students in small discussion groups. Goals of the talking-listening-communicating (TLC) groups are: to develop positive regard for individual differences; to build a sense of belonging; to foster horizontal, nonauthoritative…

  15. Characterization of IGF-II isoforms in binge eating disorder and its group psychological treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Tasca

    Full Text Available Binge eating disorder (BED affects 3.5% of the population and is characterized by binge eating for at least 2 days a week for 6 months. Treatment options include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and pharmacotherapy which are associated with varied success. Little is known about the biology of BED. Since there is evidence that the insulin like growth factor system is implicated in regulation of body weight, insulin sensitivity and feeding behavior, we speculated it may be involved in BED.A cross-sectional comparison was made between three groups of women: overweight with BED, overweight without BED and normal weight without BED. Women were assigned to Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Blood was collected before therapy, at completion and at 6 months follow up for evaluation of IGF-II using Western blot.97 overweight women with BED contributed to the cross-sectional comparison. The two control groups comprised 53 overweight women without BED, and 50 age matched normal weight women without BED. Obese women had significantly lower Big IGF-II than normal weight women, p = .028; Overweight women with BED had higher Mature IGF-II than normal weight women, p<.05. Big IGF-II showed a significant decreasing slope from pre- to post- to six months post-group psychological treatment, unrelated to changes in BMI (p = .008.Levels of IGF-II isoforms differed significantly between overweight and normal weight women. Overweight women with BED display abnormal levels of circulating IGF-II isoforms. BED is characterized by elevated mature IGF-II, an isoform shown to carry significant bioactivity. This finding is not related to BMI or to changes in body weight. The results also provide preliminary evidence that BIG IGF-II is sensitive to change due to group psychological treatment. We suggest that abnormalities in IGF-II processing may be involved in the neurobiology of BED.

  16. Genetic variants of human T-lymphotrophic virus type II in American Indian groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggar, R J; Taylor, M E; Neel, J V; Hjelle, B; Levine, P H; Black, F L; Shaw, G M; Sharp, P M; Hahn, B H

    1996-02-01

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) is found in many New World Indian groups in North and South America and may have entered the New World from Asia with the earliest migration of ancestral Amerindians over 15,000 years ago. To characterize the phylogenetic relationships of HTLV-II strains infecting geographically diverse Indian populations, we used polymerase chain reaction to amplify HTLV-II sequences from lymphocytes of seropositive Amerindians from Brazil (Kraho, Kayapo, and Kaxuyana), Panama (Guaymi), and the United States (the Navajo and Pueblo tribes of the southwestern states and the Seminoles of Florida). Sequence analysis of a 780-base pair fragment (located between the env gene and the second exons of tax/rex) revealed that Amerindian viruses clustered in the same two genetic subtypes (IIa and IIb) previously identified for viruses from intravenous drug users. Most infected North and Central American Indians had subtype IIb, while HTLV-II infected members of three remote Amazonian tribes clustered as a distinct group within subtype IIa. These findings suggest that the ancestral Amerindians migrating to the New World brought at least two genetic subtypes, IIa and IIb. Because HTLV-II strains from Amazonian Indians form a distinct group within subtype HTLV-IIa, these Brazilian tribes are unlikely to be the source of IIa viruses in North American drug users. Finally, the near identity of viral sequences from geographically diverse populations indicate that HTLV-II is a very ancient virus of man.

  17. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings, ...

  18. The identification of group II inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites by electron probe microanalysis of perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornacki, A. S.; Wood, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique developed by Kornacki (1984) for identifying group II Ca/Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites by electron-microprobe analysis of the ZrO2 or Y2O3 content of their perovskite component is demonstrated using material from 20 Allende inclusions. The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with findings obtained by other procedures. Group II inclusions are found to have perovskites generally containing less than 0.10 wt pct ZrO2 and/or Y2O3 (average of several grains), while those of groups I, III, V, and VI have more than 0.25 wt pct ZrO2. Analysis of data on eight Allende Ca/Al-rich inclusions shows that 75 percent of the fine-grained inclusions belong to group II. The implications of these findings for fractionation processes in the primitive solar nebula are indicated.

  19. Group II introns in the Bacillus cereus group with unusual splicing properties

    OpenAIRE

    Stabell, Fredrik Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements have had, and still have an impact on the evolution of the genomes providing means for adaptation and structural organization. These elements are one of the major driving forces for the general evolution of all life forms. For the organisms and their genomes these elements are essential for development and adaptation to different environments. The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria includes the related species B. cereus (sensu stricto), B. thuringiensis, B. weihenst...

  20. Forks in the tracks: Group II introns, spliceosomes, telomeres and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rajendra Kumar; Wang, Hong-Wei; Belfort, Marlene

    2016-12-01

    Group II introns are large catalytic RNAs that form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex by binding to an intron-encoded protein (IEP). The IEP, which facilitates both RNA splicing and intron mobility, has multiple activities including reverse transcriptase. Recent structures of a group II intron RNP complex and of IEPs from diverse bacteria fuel arguments that group II introns are ancestrally related to eukaryotic spliceosomes as well as to telomerase and viruses. Furthermore, recent structural studies of various functional states of the spliceosome allow us to draw parallels between the group II intron RNP and the spliceosome. Here we present an overview of these studies, with an emphasis on the structure of the IEPs in their isolated and RNA-bound states and on their evolutionary relatedness. In addition, we address the conundrum of the free, albeit truncated IEPs forming dimers, whereas the IEP bound to the intron ribozyme is a monomer in the mature RNP. Future studies needed to resolve some of the outstanding issues related to group II intron RNP function and dynamics are also discussed.

  1. Functionality of in vitro reconstituted group II intron RmInt1-derived ribonucleoprotein particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Molina-Sánchez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3’ end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods.

  2. Structure-activity relationships for metal-labeled blood flow tracers: comparison of keto aldehyde bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, E K; Green, M A

    1990-06-01

    Radiocopper-labeled pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II), Cu[PTSM], is under investigation as a radiopharmaceutical for evaluation of regional blood flow in the brain, heart, and kidneys because it affords relatively high levels of radioactivity in these organs upon intravenous injection, followed by prolonged tissue retention of the radiolabel. To probe and differentiate the physicochemical properties that are critical for blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration and tissue retention in complexes of this type, 17 67Cu-labeled copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) derivatives of Cu[PTSM] have been prepared and characterized, focusing on the bis(thiosemicarbazone), bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone), bis(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone), and bis(N4-ethylthiosemicarbazone) derivatives of several alkylglyoxals (R(1) = Me, Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, or Me(EtO)CH) and phenylglyoxal. The compounds studied varied in lipophilicity from log P = 0.75 to log P = 3.5 (where P is the octanol/water partition coefficient). In rat biodistribution studies the N4-methylthiosemicarbazone (R(1)TSM) and N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone (R(1)TSM2) complexes always show comparable cerebral uptake at 1 min postinjection (iv) for any given R(1) group, while the thiosemicarbazone (R(1)TS) complex always penetrates the BBB less efficiently. Comparison of the various Cu[R(1)TS] derivatives shows that their brain uptake does tend to increase with increasing lipophilicity over the range 0.75 less than log P less than 2.4, although it never reaches that of the N4-alkylated derivatives. The Cu[R(1)TS] and Cu[R(1)TSM] complexes are found to exhibit prolonged cerebral retention of activity, consistent with their known susceptibility to reductive decomposition by intracellular sulfhydryl groups, while the more inert Cu[R(1)TSM2] complexes clear from the brain relatively rapidly. Tracer clearance kinetics in the heart and kidney are similar to those observed for the brain with each of the tracers

  3. Label-free fluorescent sensor for lead ion detection based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Luo, Yanfang; Liu, Le; He, Lan; Xing, Haibo; Zhou, Pei

    2014-10-01

    A label-free fluorescent DNA sensor for the detection of lead ions (Pb(2+)) based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation is proposed in this article. A guanine (G)-rich oligonucleotide, T30695, was used as a recognition probe, and a DNA intercalator, SYBR Green I (SG), was used as a signal reporter. In the absence of Pb(2+), the SG intercalated with the single-stranded random-coil T30695 and emitted strong fluorescence. While in the presence of Pb(2+), the random-coil T30695 would fold into a G-quadruplex structure and the SG could barely show weak fluorescence, and the fluorescence intensity was inversely proportional to the involving amount of Pb(2+). Based on this, a selective lead ion sensor with a limit of detection of 3.79 ppb (parts per billion) and a detection range from 0 to 600 ppb was constructed. Because detection for real samples was also demonstrated to be reliable, this simple, low-cost, sensitive, and selective sensor holds good potential for Pb(2+) detection in real environmental samples.

  4. Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis spp. nov. to replace Candida parapsilosis groups II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavanti, Arianna; Davidson, Amanda D; Gow, Neil A R; Maiden, Martin C J; Odds, Frank C

    2005-01-01

    Two new species, Candida orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis, are proposed to replace the existing designations of C. parapsilosis groups II and III, respectively. The species C. parapsilosis is retained for group I isolates. Attempts to construct a multilocus sequence typing scheme to differentiate individual strains of C. parapsilosis instead revealed fixed DNA sequence differences between pairs of subgroups in four genes: COX3, L1A1, SADH, and SYA1. PCR amplicons for sequencing were obtained for these four plus a further seven genes from 21 group I isolates. For nine group II isolates, PCR products were obtained from only 5 of the 11 genes, and for two group III isolates PCR products were obtained from a different set of 5 genes. Three of the PCR products from group II and III isolates differed in size from the group I products. Cluster analysis of sequence polymorphisms from COX3, SADH, and SYA1, which were common to the three groups, consistently separated the isolates into three distinct sets. All of these differences, together with DNA sequence similarities orthopsilosis suggest that the former species may have evolved very recently from the latter.

  5. The MANDELA study: A multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel group trial to refine the use of everolimus after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuse, Tobias; Bara, Christoph; Barten, Markus J; Hirt, Stephan W; Doesch, Andreas O; Knosalla, Christoph; Grinninger, Carola; Stypmann, Jörg; Garbade, Jens; Wimmer, Peter; May, Christoph; Porstner, Martina; Schulz, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    In recent years a series of trials has sought to define the optimal protocol for everolimus-based immunosuppression in heart transplantation, with the goal of minimizing exposure to calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and harnessing the non-immunosuppressive benefits of everolimus. Randomized studies have demonstrated that immunosuppressive potency can be maintained in heart transplant patients receiving everolimus despite marked CNI reduction, although very early CNI withdrawal may be inadvisable. A potential renal advantage has been shown for everolimus, but the optimal time for conversion and the adequate reduction in CNI exposure remain to be defined. Other reasons for use of everolimus include a substantial reduction in the risk of cytomegalovirus infection, and evidence for inhibition of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, a major cause of graft loss. The ongoing MANDELA study is a 12-month multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study in which efficacy, renal function and safety are compared in approximately 200 heart transplant patients. Patients receive CNI therapy, steroids and everolimus or mycophenolic acid during months 3 to 6 post-transplant, and are then randomized at month 6 post-transplant (i) to convert to CNI-free immunosuppression with everolimus and mycophenolic acid or (ii) to continue reduced-exposure CNI, with concomitant everolimus. Patients are then followed to month 18 post-transplant The rationale and expectations for the trial and its methodology are described herein.

  6. Radioimmunotherapy in medullary thyroid cancer using bispecific antibody and iodine 131-labeled bivalent hapten: preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Bardet, S; Hoefnagel, C A; Vieira, M R; Vuillez, J P; Murat, A; Ferreira, T C; Bardiès, M; Ferrer, L; Resche, I; Gautherot, E; Rouvier, E; Barbet, J; Chatal, J F

    1999-10-01

    The toxicity and therapeutic efficacy of escalating doses of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen x anti-N alpha-(diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N''-tetraacetic acid)-In bispecific monoclonal antibody (F6-734) and iodine 131-labeled bivalent hapten were determined in a Phase I/II trial. A total of 26 patients with recurrences of medullary thyroid cancer documented by imaging and a rise in serum thyrocalcitonin were enrolled. Twenty to 50 mg of F6-734 and 40-100 mCi of 131I-hapten were injected 4 days apart. Quantitative scintigraphy was performed after the second injection for dosimetry estimations in eight cases. Clinical, biological, and morphological follow-up was carried out for 1 year after treatment. The mean percentage of injected activity per gram of tumor at the time of maximum uptake was 0.08% (range, 0.003-0.26%). The tumor biological half-life ranged from 3 to 95 days, and tumor doses ranged from 2.91 to 184 cGy/mCi. The estimated tumor-to-nontumor dose ratios were 43.8 x 53.4, 29.6 x 35.3, 10.9 x 13.6, and 8.4 x 10.0 for total body, red marrow, liver, and kidney, respectively. Grade III/IV hematological toxicity was observed in seven patients, most of them with bone metastases. Among the 17 evaluable patients, 4 pain reliefs, 5 minor tumor responses, and 4 biological responses with decrease of thyrocalcitonin were observed. Nine patients developed human anti-mouse antibody. Dose-limiting toxicity was hematological, and maximum tolerated activity was 48 mCi/m2 in this group of patients, most of whom had suspected bone marrow involvement. The therapeutic responses observed in patients mainly with a small tumor burden are encouraging for the performance of a Phase II trial with minimal residual disease.

  7. Demonstration of dnp groups on the draining lymph node cells of guinea pigs following skin painting with DNCB by peroxidase labelled antibody method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada,Hiroshi

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP groups in the draining lymph nodes of guinea pigs 12 h after painting the skin with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB was examined by a peroxidase labelled antibody method using antibody against DNP groups. DNP groups were detected on cells that were found mainly in the subcapsular sinus of the lymph nodes. Electron microscopic examination showed DNP groups distributed on the surface of lymphocytes. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  8. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Cordaux, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model) or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model). Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  9. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Leclercq

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model. Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  10. The preclinical properties of a novel group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imre, Gabor

    2007-01-01

    Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors reduces excessive glutamate release that is often associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. This finding encouraged the search for potent and selective agonists as potential therapeutic agents. The search led to the

  11. Genome Editing via Mobile Group-II Introns and Cre/lox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyeart, P. E.; Perutka, J.; Dao, M.; Ellington, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    Mobile group-II introns and the Cre/lox systems are combined to allow large segments of DNA to be removed or transferred within/between bacterial genomes. Planned applications include metabolic optimization and development of novel dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria.

  12. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns.

  13. Nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu KG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available K Govind Babu,1 Kumar Prabhash,2 Ashok K Vaid,3 Bhawna Sirohi,3 Ravi B Diwakar,4 Raghunadha Rao,5 Madhuchanda Kar,6 Hemant Malhotra,7 Shona Nag,8 Chanchal Goswami,9 Vinod Raina,10 Ravi Mohan111Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 2Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, 3Artemis Health Institute, Delhi, 4Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 5Nizam Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, 6B R Singh Hospital, Kolkata, 7Birla Cancer Centre, Jaipur, 8Jehangir Hospital, Pune, 9B P Poddar Hospital and Medical Research Ltd, Kolkata, 10Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi, 11King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, IndiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy (docetaxel and carboplatin versus chemotherapy alone in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer.Methods: This multicenter, open-label, Phase II study randomized 110 patients to receive nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy (nimotuzumab group or chemotherapy alone (control group, and comprised concomitant, maintenance, and follow-up phases. Nimotuzumab 200 mg was administered once weekly for 13 weeks during the first two phases with four cycles of chemotherapy and docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and carboplatin (area under the curve 5 mg/mL*min every 3 weeks for a maximum of four cycles during the concomitant phase. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (sum of complete response and partial response. Secondary endpoints, ie, overall survival and progression-free survival, were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Efficacy was evaluated on the intent-to-treat and efficacy-evaluable sets. Safety was assessed from adverse event and serious adverse event data.Results: The objective response rate was significantly higher in the nimotuzumab group than in the control group in the intent-to-treat population (54% versus 34.5%; P=0.04. A complete response and partial response were achieved in 3

  14. Electron transfer flavoprotein domain II orientation monitored using double electron-electron resonance between an enzymatically reduced, native FAD cofactor, and spin labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael A; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Majtan, Tomas; Frerman, Frank E; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2011-03-01

    Human electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) is a soluble mitochondrial heterodimeric flavoprotein that links fatty acid β-oxidation to the main respiratory chain. The crystal structure of human ETF bound to medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase indicates that the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain (αII) is mobile, which permits more rapid electron transfer with donors and acceptors by providing closer access to the flavin and allows ETF to accept electrons from at least 10 different flavoprotein dehydrogenases. Sequence homology is high and low-angle X-ray scattering is identical for Paracoccus denitrificans (P. denitrificans) and human ETF. To characterize the orientations of the αII domain of P. denitrificans ETF, distances between enzymatically reduced FAD and spin labels in the three structural domains were measured by double electron-electron resonance (DEER) at X- and Q-bands. An FAD to spin label distance of 2.8 ± 0.15 nm for the label in the FAD-containing αII domain (A210C) agreed with estimates from the crystal structure (3.0 nm), molecular dynamics simulations (2.7 nm), and rotamer library analysis (2.8 nm). Distances between the reduced FAD and labels in αI (A43C) were between 4.0 and 4.5 ± 0.35 nm and for βIII (A111C) the distance was 4.3 ± 0.15 nm. These values were intermediate between estimates from the crystal structure of P. denitrificans ETF and a homology model based on substrate-bound human ETF. These distances suggest that the αII domain adopts orientations in solution that are intermediate between those which are observed in the crystal structures of free ETF (closed) and ETF bound to a dehydrogenase (open).

  15. Serum antibody response to group II chaperonin from Methanobrevibacter oralis and human chaperonin CCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kimito; Maeda, Hiroshi; Omori, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kokeguchi, Susumu; Takashiba, Shogo

    2013-06-01

    Both group I (HSP60) and group II (CCT) chaperonins are targets of autoantibodies. Autoimmune reactions to HSP60 have been well characterized, while immune reactions to group II chaperonin have not been clarified. Methanobrevibacter oralis is a suspected periodontal pathogen with group II chaperonin. In this study, serum responses to M. oralis chaperonin, human HSP60, and CCT subunits were examined using sera from patients with periodontitis and autoimmune diseases. In comparison with healthy controls, periodontitis patients showed significantly higher responses to CCT4 and CCT8 on dot blot analysis. Signals for CCT3 and CCT8 in autoimmune disease patients were significantly higher than in controls. Significant differences were also demonstrated by Western blotting in anti-CCT4 response in both patient groups. All subjects showed strong reactivity to M. oralis chaperonin and faint signals to human HSP60. Autoantibodies were raised against CCT rather than HSP60; and CCT3, CCT4, and CCT8 were shown to be the main targets. Host immune systems may be frequently exposed to chaperonins of Archaea in various habitats. Although further studies of the cross-reactivity between M. oralis chaperonin and human CCT are required, anti-CCT autoantibodies may be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and autoimmune diseases.

  16. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III, and IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Jason; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.; van den Bos, Fédor; Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favorable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified [encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB, and gerC genes (gerX)]. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC [gerX1], ABABCB [gerX2] and ACxBBB [gerX4], and a single CA-B [gerX3] gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptor types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2, and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in dipicolinic acid release. The cortex-lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important. PMID:27840626

  17. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Brunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favourable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified (encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB and gerC genes (gerX. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC gerX1, ABABCB gerX2 and ACxBBB gerX4, and a single CA-B gerX3 gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptors types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2 and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in DPA release. The cortex lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important.

  18. Health effects of war stress on Norwegian World War II resistance groups: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Ellinor F

    2003-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which adverse long-term health effects of World War II stress exposure were present in 3 groups of resistance veterans. The groups had been exposed to different types of war stressors: concentration camp incarceration, resistance participation within the illegal press, and a secret military organization. With the differences in war stressors as a basis, we assumed that those incarcerated in a concentration camp would display more adverse health effect compared to the resistance veterans. The findings point to a relationship between the severity of war stressors and postwar health in all 3 groups.

  19. 49 CFR 173.202 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group II. 173.202 Section 173.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group II. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I or...

  20. 49 CFR 173.212 - Non-bulk packagings for solid hazardous materials in Packing Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group II. 173.212 Section 173.212 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group II. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a solid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I or...

  1. Efficacy of Rituximab in Refractory Inflammatory Myopathies Associated with Anti- Synthetase Auto-Antibodies: An Open-Label, Phase II Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Allenbach

    Full Text Available Anti-synthetase syndrome (anti-SS is frequently associated with myositis and interstitial lung disease (ILD. We evaluated prospectively, in a multicenter, open-label, phase II study, the efficacy of rituximab on muscle and lung outcomes.Patients were enrolled if they were refractory to conventional treatments (prednisone and at least 2 immunosuppressants. They received 1 g of rituximab at D0, D15, and M6. The primary endpoint was muscular improvement based on manual muscular testing (MMT10, Kendall score in 10 muscles at M12. Secondary endpoints were normalization of creatine kinase (CK level, ILD improvement based on forced vital capacity and/or diffuse capacity for carbon monoxide, and number and/or doses of associated immunosuppressants.Twelve patients were enrolled, and 10 completed the study. Only 2 patients presented an improvement of at least 4 points on at least two muscle groups (primary end-point. Overall, seven patients had an increase of at least 4 points on MMT10. CK level decreased from 399 IU/L (range, 48-11,718 to 74.5 IU/L (range, 40-47,857. Corticosteroid doses decreased from 52.5 mg/d (range, 10-70 to 9 mg/d (range, 7-65 and six patients had a decrease in the burden of their associated immunosuppressants. At baseline, all 10 patients presented with ILD. At M12, improvement of ILD was observed in 5 out of the 10 patients, stabilization in 4, and worsening in 1.This pilot study of rituximab treatment in patients with refractory anti-SS provided data on evolution of muscular and pulmonary parameters. Rituximab should now be evaluated in a larger, controlled study for this homogenous group of patients.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00774462.

  2. Recent horizontal transfer, functional adaptation and dissemination of a bacterial group II intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRoche-Johnston, Félix; Monat, Caroline; Cousineau, Benoit

    2016-10-20

    Group II introns are catalytically active RNA and mobile retroelements present in certain eukaryotic organelles, bacteria and archaea. These ribozymes self-splice from the pre-mRNA of interrupted genes and reinsert within target DNA sequences by retrohoming and retrotransposition. Evolutionary hypotheses place these retromobile elements at the origin of over half the human genome. Nevertheless, the evolution and dissemination of group II introns was found to be quite difficult to infer. We characterized the functional and evolutionary relationship between the model group II intron from Lactococcus lactis, Ll.LtrB, and Ef.PcfG, a newly discovered intron from a clinical strain of Enterococcus faecalis. Ef.PcfG was found to be homologous to Ll.LtrB and to splice and mobilize in its native environment as well as in L. lactis. Interestingly, Ef.PcfG was shown to splice at the same level as Ll.LtrB but to be significantly less efficient to invade the Ll.LtrB recognition site. We also demonstrated that specific point mutations between the IEPs of both introns correspond to functional adaptations which developed in L. lactis as a response to selective pressure on mobility efficiency independently of splicing. The sequence of all the homologous full-length variants of Ll.LtrB were compared and shown to share a conserved pattern of mutation acquisition. This work shows that Ll.LtrB and Ef.PcfG are homologous and have a common origin resulting from a recent lateral transfer event followed by further adaptation to the new target site and/or host environment. We hypothesize that Ef.PcfG is the ancestor of Ll.LtrB and was initially acquired by L. lactis, most probably by conjugation, via a single event of horizontal transfer. Strong selective pressure on homing site invasion efficiency then led to the emergence of beneficial point mutations in the IEP, enabling the successful establishment and survival of the group II intron in its novel lactococcal environment. The current

  3. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  4. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  5. Robot-assisted Versus Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Phase II Open Label Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Park, Sung Chan; Park, Ji Won; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Byung-Ho; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2017-05-25

    The phase II randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the outcomes of robot-assisted surgery with those of laparoscopic surgery in the patients with rectal cancer. The feasibility of robot-assisted surgery over laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has not been established yet. Between February 21, 2012 and March 11, 2015, patients with rectal cancer (cT1-3NxM0) were enrolled. Patients were randomized 1:1 to either robot-assisted or laparoscopic surgery, and stratified per sex and administration of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome was the quality of total mesorectal excision (TME) specimen. Secondary outcomes were the circumferential and distal resection margins, the number of harvested lymph nodes, morbidity, bowel function recovery, and quality of life. A total of 163 patients were randomly assigned to the robot-assisted (n = 81) and laparoscopic (n = 82) surgery groups, and 139 patients were eligible for the analyses (73 vs 66, respectively). One patient (1.2%) in the robot-assisted group was converted to open surgery. The TME quality did not differ between the robot-assisted and laparoscopic groups (80.3% vs 78.1% complete TME, respectively; 18.2% vs 21.9% nearly complete TME, respectively; P = 0.599). The resection margins, number of harvested lymph nodes, morbidity, and bowel function recovery also were not significantly different. On analyzing quality of life, scores of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (EORTC QLQ C30) and EORTC QLQ CR38 were similar in the 2 groups, but in the EORTC QLQ CR 38 questionnaire, sexual function 12 months postoperatively was better in the robot-assisted group than in the laparoscopic group (P = 0.03). Robot-assisted surgery in rectal cancer showed TME quality comparable with that of laparoscopic surgery, and it demonstrated similar postoperative morbidity, bowel function recovery, and quality of life.

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring of the diffusion process of deuterium-labeled molecules in wood. Part II: hardwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchikawa, Satoru; Siesler, H W

    2003-06-01

    Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) transmission spectroscopy was applied to monitor the diffusion process of deuterium-labeled molecules in hardwood (Beech). The results are compared with previous data obtained on softwood (Sitka spruce) in order to consistently understand the state of order in cellulose of wood. The saturation accessibility and diffusion rate varied characteristically with the OH groups in different states of order in the wood substance, the diffusants, and the wood species, respectively. The variation of saturation accessibility should be associated with the fundamental difference of the fine structure such as the microfibrils in the wood substance. The effect of the anatomical cellular structure on the accessibility was reflected in the variation of the diffusion rate with the wood species. The size effect of the diffusants also played an important role for the diffusion process in wood. Since the volumetric percentage of wood fibers and wood rays is relatively similar, the dichroic effects due to the anisotropy of the cellulose chains were apparently diminished. Finally, we proposed a new interpretation of the fine structure of the microfibrils in the cell wall by comparing a series of results from hardwood and softwood. Each elementary fibril in the hardwood has a more homogeneous arrangement in the microfibrils compared to that in the softwood.

  7. Synthesis of BODIPY derivatives substituted with various bioconjugatable linker groups: a construction kit for fluorescent labeling of receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisig, Fabian; Gollos, Sabrina; Freudenthal, Sven J; El-Tayeb, Ali; Iqbal, Jamshed; Müller, Christa E

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design small, functionalized green-emitting BODIPY dyes, which can readily be coupled to target molecules such as receptor ligands, or even be integrated into their pharmacophores. A simple two-step one-pot procedure starting from 2,4-dimethylpyrrole and ω-bromoalkylcarboxylic acid chlorides was used to obtain new ω-bromoalkyl-substituted BODIPY fluorophores (1a-1f) connected via alkyl spacers of different length to the 8-position of the fluorescent dye. The addition of radical inhibitors reduced the amount of side products. The ω-bromoalkyl-substituted BODIPYs were further converted to introduce various functional groups: iodo-substituted dyes were obtained by Finkelstein reaction in excellent yields; microwave-assisted reaction with methanolic ammonia led to fast and clean conversion to the amino-substituted dyes; a hydroxyl-substituted derivative was prepared by reaction with sodium ethylate, and thiol-substituted BODIPYs were obtained by reaction of 1a-1f with potassium thioacetate followed by alkaline cleavage of the thioesters. Water-soluble derivatives were prepared by introducing sulfonate groups into the 2- and 6-position of the BODIPY core. The synthesized BODIPY derivatives showed high fluorescent yields and appeared to be stable under basic, reducing and oxidative conditions. As a proof of concept, 2-thioadenosine was alkylated with bromoethyl-BODIPY 1b. The resulting fluorescent 2-substituted adenosine derivative 15 displayed selectivity for the A3 adenosine receptor (ARs) over the other AR subtypes, showed agonistic activity, and may thus become a useful tool for studying A3ARs, or a lead structure for further optimization. The new functionalized dyes may be widely used for fluorescent labeling allowing the investigation of biological targets and processes.

  8. Diversity, mobility, and structural and functional evolution of group II introns carrying an unusual 3' extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourasse Nicolas J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II introns are widespread genetic elements endowed with a dual functionality. They are catalytic RNAs (ribozymes that are able of self-splicing and they are also mobile retroelements that can invade genomic DNA. The group II intron RNA secondary structure is typically made up of six domains. However, a number of unusual group II introns carrying a unique extension of 53-56 nucleotides at the 3' end have been identified previously in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group. Methods In the present study, we conducted combined sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses of introns, host gene, plasmid and chromosome of host strains in order to gain insights into mobility, dispersal, and evolution of the unusual introns and their extension. We also performed in vitro mutational and kinetic experiments to investigate possible functional features related to the extension. Results We report the identification of novel copies of group II introns carrying a 3' extension including the first two copies in bacteria not belonging to the B. cereus group, Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 and Bacillus sp. 2_A_57_CT2, an uncharacterized species phylogenetically close to B. firmus. Interestingly, the B. pseudofirmus intron has a longer extension of 70 bases. From sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses, several possible separate events of mobility involving the atypical introns could be identified, including both retrohoming and retrotransposition events. In addition, identical extensions were found in introns that otherwise exhibit little sequence conservation in the rest of their structures, with the exception of the conserved and catalytically critical domains V and VI, suggesting either separate acquisition of the extra segment by different group II introns or a strong selection pressure acting on the extension. Furthermore, we show by in vitro splicing experiments that the 3' extension affects the splicing properties differently in

  9. Randomized open-label phase II study comparing oxycodone-naloxone with oxycodone in early return of gastrointestinal function after laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, F; Balfour, A; Nimmo, S; Foo, I; Norrie, J D; Williams, L J; Fearon, K C; Paterson, H M

    2017-01-01

    Combined oral modified-release oxycodone-naloxone may reduce opioid-induced postoperative gut dysfunction. This study examined the feasibility of a randomized trial of oxycodone-naloxone within the context of enhanced recovery for laparoscopic colorectal resection. In a single-centre open-label phase II feasibility study, patients received analgesia based on either oxycodone-naloxone or oxycodone. Primary endpoints were recruitment, retention and protocol compliance. Secondary endpoints included a composite endpoint of gut function (tolerance of solid food, low nausea/vomiting score, passage of flatus or faeces). Eighty-two patients were screened and 62 randomized (76 per cent); the attrition rate was 19 per cent (12 of 62), leaving 50 patients who received the allocated intervention with 100 per cent follow-up and retention (modified intention-to-treat cohort). Protocol compliance was more than 90 per cent. Return of gut function by day 3 was similar in the two groups: 13 (48 per cent) of 27 in the oxycodone-naloxone group and 15 (65 per cent) of 23 in the control group (95 per cent c.i. for difference -10·0 to 40·7 per cent; P = 0·264). However, patients in the oxycodone-naloxone group had a shorter time to first bowel movement (mean(s.d.) 87(38) h versus 111(37) h in the control group; 95 per cent c.i. for difference 2·3 to 45·4 h, P = 0·031) and reduced total (oral plus parenteral) opioid consumption (mean(s.d.) 78(36) versus 94(56) mg respectively; 95 per cent c.i. for difference -10·2 to 42·8 mg, P = 0·222). High participation, retention and protocol compliance confirmed feasibility. Potential benefits of oxycodone-naloxone in reducing time to bowel movement and total opioid consumption could be tested in a randomized trial. Registration number: NCT02109640 (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/). © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Bacterial group II introns in a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Mircea; Mullineaux, Lauren; Huang, Hon-Ren; Perlman, Philip S; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2002-12-01

    Group II introns are catalytic RNAs and mobile retrotransposable elements known to be present in the genomes of some nonmarine bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Here we report the discovery of group II introns in a bacterial mat sample collected from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent near 9 degrees N on the East Pacific Rise. One of the introns was shown to self-splice in vitro. This is the first example of marine bacterial introns from molecular population structure studies of microorganisms that live in the proximity of hydrothermal vents. These types of mobile genetic elements may prove useful in improving our understanding of bacterial genome evolution and may serve as valuable markers in comparative studies of bacterial communities.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of an (125)I-labeled azide prosthetic group for efficient and bioorthogonal radiolabeling of cyclooctyne-group containing molecules using copper-free click reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi Hee; Shim, Ha Eun; Nam, You Ree; Kim, Hye Rim; Kang, Jung Ae; Lee, Dong-Eun; Park, Sang Hyun; Choi, Dae Seong; Jang, Beom-Su; Jeon, Jongho

    2016-02-01

    Herein we report the radiosynthesis of a pyridine derived azide prosthetic group for iodine radioisotope labeling of dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) conjugated molecules. The radiolabeling of the stannylated precursor 2 was conducted using [(125)I]NaI and chloramine-T to give (125)I-labeled azide ([(125)I]1) with high radiochemical yield (72±8%, n=4) and radiochemical purity (>99%). Using (125)I-labeled azide ([(125)I]1), cyclic RGD peptide and near infrared fluorescent molecule were efficiently labeled with modest to good radiochemical yields. The biodistribution study and SPECT/CT images showed that [(125)I]1 underwent rapid renal clearance. These results clearly demonstrated that [(125)I]1 could be used as an useful radiotracer for in vivo pre-targeted imaging as well as efficient in vitro radiolabeling of DBCO containing molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated......Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker...

  13. Novel RNA structural features of an alternatively splicing group II intron from Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes in bacterial and organellar genomes that function as self-splicing introns and as retroelements. Previously, we reported that the group II intron C.te.I1 of Clostridium tetani alternatively splices in vivo to produce five distinct coding mRNAs. Accurate fusion of upstream and downstream reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the usual 5' GUGYG motif. This site is specified by the ribozyme through an altered intron/exon-binding site 1 (IBS1-EBS1) pairing. Here we use mutagenesis and self-splicing assays to investigate in more detail the significance of the structural features of the C.te.I1 ribozyme. The shifted 5' splice site is shown to be affected by structures in addition to IBS1-EBS1, and unlike other group II introns, C.te.I1 appears to require a spacer between IBS1 and the GUGYG motif. In addition, the mechanism of 3' exon recognition is modified from the ancestral IIB mechanism to a IIA-like mechanism that appears to be longer than the typical single base-pair interaction and may extend up to 4 bp. The novel ribozyme properties that have evolved for C.te.I1 illustrate the plasticity of group II introns in adapting new structural and catalytic properties that can be utilized to affect gene expression. © 2014 McNeil and Zimmerly; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Characterization and evolutionary implications of the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu in group II phosphopantetheinyl transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Yu-Dong; Liu, Jian-Bo; Ran, Xin-Xin; Guo, Yuan-Yang; Ren, Ni-Ni; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases), which play an essential role in both primary and secondary metabolism, are magnesium binding enzymes. In this study, we characterized the magnesium binding residues of all known group II PPTases by biochemical and evolutionary analysis. Our results suggested that group II PPTases could be classified into two subgroups, two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu and three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Glu-Glu. Mutations of two three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases and one two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTase indicate that the first and the third residues in the triads are essential to activities; the second residues in the triads are non-essential. Although variations of the second residues in the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu exist throughout the whole phylogenetic tree, the second residues are conserved in animals, plants, algae, and most prokaryotes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that: the animal group II PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may derive from horizontal gene transfer from prokaryotes.

  15. Mechanical, thermal and laser damage threshold analyses of II group metal complexes of thiourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanuskodi, S., E-mail: dhanus2k3@yahoo.com [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sabari Girisun, T.C. [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Physics, Bishop Heber College, Tiruchirappalli 620 017, Tamil Nadu (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Material Characterization Division, National Physical laboratory, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Uma, S.; Phillip, J. [Sophisticated Test and Instrumentation Center, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The role of the Group II metal ions in improving the stability is discussed. {yields} BTCC has a higher heat capacity than BTZC. {yields} Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC than BTZC. {yields} Microscopy studies confirm the damage is due to thermo-chemical ablation. {yields} BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold than BTZC. - Abstract: Single crystals of thiourea metal complexes with selected Group II metal ions, Zinc and Cadmium, have been grown by solvent evaporation technique. The crystals grown are bisthiourea zinc chloride (BTZC) and bisthiourea cadmium chloride (BTCC). Following an improved photopyroelectric technique, the thermal transport properties have been determined. It is found that BTCC has a higher heat capacity (304.09 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}) than BTZC (255.24 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}), and hence BTCC has better thermal stability. Vicker's microhardness measurements reveal that these materials have reverse indentation size effect and belong to the category of soft materials. Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC (1.57 GPa) than BTZC (0.76 GPa). The roles of the Group II metal ions in improving the mechanical and thermal stability of the metal complexes are discussed. Multi-shot laser damage studies on these materials reveal that BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold (15 GW cm{sup -2}) than BTZC (6 GW cm{sup -2}).

  16. An Open-Label, Multicenter, Randomized, Phase II Study of Pazopanib in Combination with Pemetrexed in First-Line Treatment of Patients with Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Felip, Enriqueta; Besse, Benjamin;

    2013-01-01

    This randomized open-label phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pazopanib in combination with pemetrexed compared with the standard cisplatin/pemetrexed doublet in patients with previously untreated, advanced, nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer.......This randomized open-label phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pazopanib in combination with pemetrexed compared with the standard cisplatin/pemetrexed doublet in patients with previously untreated, advanced, nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer....

  17. Off-label use of medical products in radiation therapy: summary of the report of AAPM Task Group No. 121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomadsen, Bruce R; Heaton, H Thompson; Jani, Shirish K; Masten, Jeffery P; Napolitano, Mary E; Ouhib, Zoubir; Reft, Chester S; Rivard, Mark J; Robin, T Tydings; Subramanian, Manny; Suleiman, Orhan H

    2010-05-01

    Medical products (devices, drugs, or biologics) contain information in their labeling regarding the manner in which the manufacturer has determined that the products can be used in a safe and effective manner. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves medical products for use for these specific indications which are part of the medical product's labeling. When medical products are used in a manner not specified in the labeling, it is commonly referred to as off-label use. The practice of medicine allows for this off-label use to treat individual patients, but the ethical and legal implications for such unapproved use can be confusing. Although the responsibility and, ultimately, the liability for off-label use often rests with the prescribing physician, medical physicists and others are also responsible for the safe and proper use of the medical products. When these products are used for purposes other than which they were approved, it is important for medical physicists to understand their responsibilities. In the United States, medical products can only be marketed if officially cleared, approved, or licensed by the FDA; they can be used if they are not subject to or specifically exempt from FDA regulations, or if they are being used in research with the appropriate regulatory safeguards. Medical devices are either cleared or approved by FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Drugs are approved by FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and biological products such as vaccines or blood are licensed under a biologics license agreement by FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. For the purpose of this report, the process by which the FDA eventually clears, approves, or licenses such products for marketing in the United States will be referred to as approval. This report summarizes the various ways medical products, primarily medical devices, can legally be brought to market in the United States, and includes a discussion of the

  18. Effects of leg muscle tendon vibration on group Ia and group II reflex responses to stance perturbation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Marco; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-01-01

    secondaries, and that group II afferent fibres are responsible for the production of the MLR. The decrease of MLRs but not SLRs after vibration is discussed in terms of an interaction between peripheral and central drive on group II interneurones in order to produce sufficient EMG activity to maintain a given postural set. PMID:12777449

  19. Effects of leg muscle tendon vibration on group Ia and group II reflex responses to stance perturbation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Marco; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-07-15

    secondaries, and that group II afferent fibres are responsible for the production of the MLR. The decrease of MLRs but not SLRs after vibration is discussed in terms of an interaction between peripheral and central drive on group II interneurones in order to produce sufficient EMG activity to maintain a given postural set.

  20. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......% vs 41% (P = 0·003) had an LH/FSH ratio >2 and 19% vs 41% (P = 0·04) had hirsutism and/or elevated total testosterone, free testosterone, and/or androstenedione. The non-PCOM group included significantly more women with secondary infertility. The median AMH in the non-PCOM group was 47 pmol/l, which...... was twofold lower than in the PCOM group but above the upper limit of normo-ovulatory women. CONCLUSIONS: According to a revised threshold of 25 follicles, almost half the anovulatory infertile women do not have PCOM. The characteristics of these women may be compatible with hypothalamic anovulation...

  1. The Effect of Group Reminiscence Therapy on Depression in Women With Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of psychological disorders and symptoms. Objectives This research investigated the effect of group reminiscence therapy on depression among women with type II diabetes. Patients and Methods The present study was a clinical trial study. Twenty-four patients referring to the diabetic clinic of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, Iran were selected through simple random sampling and were divided in two groups. Data were collected through a demographic questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. Group reminiscence therapy was held over eight biweekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. Finally, data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Chi-Square tests, using SPSS version 20. Results A significant difference was observed between the two groups after the intervention (P = 0.001. The rating for depression decreased significantly in the experimental group. Before the group reminiscence therapy, the highest rating for depression obtained by the experimental group was “need for consultation” (50%, whereas after the intervention, the highest rating was “no depression” (50%. One month after the intervention, the highest rating obtained for depression was “low” (50%. Conclusions Reminiscence therapy decreased depression among diabetic female patients after the intervention and one month after the intervention. It can be said that, through the reminiscence therapy, patients’ past memories were reviewed and emphasis on the positive aspects thereof in the group setting was followed by an increased sense of self-worth and a decrease in depression.

  2. Impact of tobacco-related health warning labels across socioeconomic, race and ethnic groups: results from a randomized web-based experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cantrell

    control policies that have the potential to reduce communication inequalities across groups. Policies that establish strong pictorial warning labels on tobacco packaging may be instrumental in reducing the toll of the tobacco epidemic, particularly within vulnerable communities.

  3. Sarcoidosis HLA class II genotyping distinguishes differences of clinical phenotype across ethnic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroe; Woodhead, Felix A.; Ahmad, Tariq; Grutters, Jan C.; Spagnolo, Paolo; van den Bosch, Jules M.M.; Maier, Lisa A.; Newman, Lee S.; Nagai, Sonoko; Izumi, Takateru; Wells, Athol U.; du Bois, Roland M.; Welsh, Kenneth I.

    2010-01-01

    The HLA class II (DRB1 and DQB1) associations with sarcoidosis have been studied by several groups but often without consistent results. In this paper, we consider the hypothesis that observed inconsistencies relate to distinct, genetically encoded disease phenotypes which differ in prevalence between centres. We therefore typed HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 in 340 UK, 139 Dutch and 163 Japanese sarcoidosis patients and, respectively, 354, 218 and 168 healthy controls from these populations. We applied consistent phenotyping and genotyping and investigated associations between HLA class II alleles and distinct disease phenotypes within and between ethnic groups. DRB1*01 and DQB1*0501 are protective against all manifestations of sarcoidosis. Lung-predominant sarcoidosis is associated with DRB1*12 and *14. Löfgren's syndrome is a common sarcoidosis phenotype in the Dutch and is strongly associated with the DRB1*0301 allele. This phenotype is not seen among the Japanese in whom DRB1*0301 is absent. The same allele is protective for UK uveitis. Sarcoid uveitis is common in Japan. The DRB1*04–DQB1*0301 haplotype is a risk factor for this disease manifestation in Japanese and UK subjects but protective for sarcoidosis overall. We show that distinct sarcoidosis phenotypes have similar genetic associations across ethnic groups. The disease case mix differs between centres and may be explained by different ethnic allelic frequencies. PMID:20685690

  4. Did group II intron proliferation in an endosymbiont-bearing archaeon create eukaryotes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poole Anthony M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Martin & Koonin recently proposed that the eukaryote nucleus evolved as a quality control mechanism to prevent ribosome readthrough into introns. In their scenario, the bacterial ancestor of mitochondria was resident in an archaeal cell, and group II introns (carried by the fledgling mitochondrion inserted into coding regions in the archaeal host genome. They suggest that if transcription and translation were coupled, and because splicing is expected to have been slower than translation, the effect of insertion would have been ribosome readthrough into introns, resulting in production of aberrant proteins. The emergence of the nuclear compartment would thus have served to separate transcription and splicing from translation, thereby alleviating this problem. In this article, I argue that Martin & Koonin's model is not compatible with current knowledge. The model requires that group II introns would spread aggressively through an archaeal genome. It is well known that selfish elements can spread through an outbreeding sexual population despite a substantial fitness cost to the host. The same is not true for asexual lineages however, where both theory and observation argue that such elements will be under pressure to reduce proliferation, and may be lost completely. The recent introduction of group II introns into archaea by horizontal transfer provides a natural test case with which to evaluate Martin & Koonin's model. The distribution and behaviour of these introns fits prior theoretical expectations, not the scenario of aggressive proliferation advocated by Martin & Koonin. I therefore conclude that the mitochondrial seed hypothesis for the origin of eukaryote introns, on which their model is based, better explains the early expansion of introns in eukaryotes. The mitochondrial seed hypothesis has the capacity to separate the origin of eukaryotes from the origin of introns, leaving open the possibility that the cell that engulfed the

  5. A combined phase I and II open label study on the effects of a seaweed extract nutrient complex on osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Myers

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Stephen P Myers1,2, Joan O’Connor1,2, J Helen Fitton3, Lyndon Brooks4, Margaret Rolfe4, Paul Connellan5, Hans Wohlmuth2,5,6, Phil A Cheras1,2, Carol Morris51NatMed-Research, 2Centre for Health and Wellbeing, 4Graduate Research College, 5Centre for Phytochemistry and Pharmacology, 6Medicinal Plant Herbarium, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 3Marinova Pty Ltd, Hobart, Tasmania, AustraliaBackground: Isolated fucoidans from brown marine algae have been shown to have a range of anti-inflammatory effects.Purpose: This present study tested a Maritech® extract formulation, containing a blend of extracts from three different species of brown algae, plus nutrients in an open label combined phase I and II pilot scale study to determine both acute safety and efficacy in osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients and methods: Participants (n = 12, five females [mean age, 62 ± 11.06 years] and seven males [mean age, 57.14 ± 9.20 years] with a confirmed diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee were randomized to either 100 mg (n = 5 or 1000 mg (n = 7 of a Maritech® extract formulation per day. The formulation contained Maritech® seaweed extract containing Fucus vesiculosis (85% w/w, Macrocystis pyrifera (10% w/w and Laminaria japonica (5% w/w plus vitamin B6, zinc and manganese. Primary outcome was the average comprehensive arthritis test (COAT score which is comprised of four sub-scales: pain, stiffness, difficulty with physical activity and overall symptom severity measured weekly. Safety measures included full blood count, serum lipids, liver function tests, urea, creatinine and electrolytes determined at baseline and week 12. All adverse events were recorded.Results: Eleven participants completed 12 weeks and one completed 10 weeks of the study. Using a multilevel linear model, the average COAT score was reduced by 18% for the 100 mg treatment and 52% for the 1000 mg dose at the end of the study. There was a clear dose response effect

  6. Operating Performance of the Low Group Delay Woofer Channel in PEP-II

    CERN Document Server

    Teytelman, Dmitry; Van Winkle, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    In PEP-II collider a dedicated low group-delay processing channel has been developed in order to provide high damping rates necessary to control the fast-growing longitudinal eigenmodes driven by the fundamental impedances of the RF cavities. A description of the digital processing channel operating at 9.81 MHz and capable of supporting finite impulse response (FIR) controllers with up to 32 taps will be presented. A prototype system has been successfully commissioned in the High-Energy Ring (HER) in May 2004. Operating experiences with the prototype and the newly determined limits on achievable longitudinal damping will be discussed and illustrated with experimental data.

  7. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated...

  8. Ultrasensitive and rapid screening of mercury(II) ions by dual labeling colorimetric method in aqueous samples and applications in mercury-poisoned animal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi; Wang, Xin; Xue, Feng [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Zheng, Lei [School of Medical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Liu, Jian [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Yan, Feng [Applied Physics Department, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Xia, Fan, E-mail: xiafan@hust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Wei, E-mail: chenweishnu@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2015-04-08

    Highlights: • Rapid and ultrasensitive screening of mercury ions are achieved by using gold nanoparticles based colorimetric method. • Dual labeling strategy is adopted for sensing signal amplification. • The proposed method is successfully used for analysis of mercury-poisoned animal tissues. - Abstract: Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of trace heavy metal mercury(II) ions (Hg{sup 2+}) are of significant importance due to the induced serious risks for environment and human health. This presented article reports the gold nanoparticle-based dual labeling colorimetric method (Dual-COLO) for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Hg{sup 2+} using the specific thymine–Hg{sup 2+}–thymine (T–Hg{sup 2+}–T) as recognition system and the dual labeling strategy for signal amplification. Both qualitative and quantitative detections of Hg{sup 2+} are achieved successfully in aqueous samples. More importantly, the achieved detection limit of 0.005 ng mL{sup −1} (0.025 nM) without any instruments is very competitive to other rapid detection methods even ICP-MS based methods. This Dual-COLO method is also applied directly for real water sample monitoring and, more importantly, applied in analysis of mercury poisoned animal tissues and body fluidic samples, indicating a potentially powerful and promising tool for environmental monitoring and food safety control.

  9. Characterization of the molecular basis of group II intron RNA recognition by CRS1-CRM domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ido; Klipcan, Liron; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Kolton, Max; Shaya, Felix; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2008-08-22

    CRM (chloroplast RNA splicing and ribosome maturation) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain of ancient origin that has been retained in eukaryotic genomes only within the plant lineage. Whereas in bacteria CRM domains exist as single domain proteins involved in ribosome maturation, in plants they are found in a family of proteins that contain between one and four repeats. Several members of this family with multiple CRM domains have been shown to be required for the splicing of specific plastidic group II introns. Detailed biochemical analysis of one of these factors in maize, CRS1, demonstrated its high affinity and specific binding to the single group II intron whose splicing it facilitates, the plastid-encoded atpF intron RNA. Through its association with two intronic regions, CRS1 guides the folding of atpF intron RNA into its predicted "catalytically active" form. To understand how multiple CRM domains cooperate to achieve high affinity sequence-specific binding to RNA, we analyzed the RNA binding affinity and specificity associated with each individual CRM domain in CRS1; whereas CRM3 bound tightly to the RNA, CRM1 associated specifically with a unique region found within atpF intron domain I. CRM2, which demonstrated only low binding affinity, also seems to form specific interactions with regions localized to domains I, III, and IV. We further show that CRM domains share structural similarities and RNA binding characteristics with the well known RNA recognition motif domain.

  10. Galaxy interactions in compact groups - II. Abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Yun, Min S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2015-07-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star-forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of H II regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star-forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three H II regions harbour an oxygen abundance ˜0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star-forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km s-1 with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. H I observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broad-band optical images from Pan-STARRS (Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System) suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain the origin of the peculiar star-forming regions detected with WiFeS, and show that evidence points towards infalling and collapsing extraplanar gas clouds at the disc-halo interface, possibly as a consequence of long-range gravitational perturbations of HCG 91c from the other group members. As such, HCG 91c provides evidence that some of the perturbations possibly associated with the early phase of galaxy evolution in compact groups impact the star-forming disc locally, and on sub-kpc scales.

  11. Diversity of Group I and II Clostridium botulinum Strains from France Including Recently Identified Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Philippe; Popoff, Michel R

    2016-06-13

    In France, human botulism is mainly food-borne intoxication, whereas infant botulism is rare. A total of 99 group I and II Clostridium botulinum strains including 59 type A (12 historical isolates [1947-1961], 43 from France [1986-2013], 3 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), 31 type B (3 historical, 23 recent isolates, 4 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), and 9 type E (5 historical, 3 isolates, and 1 collection strain) were investigated by botulinum locus gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing analysis. Historical C. botulinum A strains mainly belonged to subtype A1 and sequence type (ST) 1, whereas recent strains exhibited a wide genetic diversity: subtype A1 in orfX or ha locus, A1(B), A1(F), A2, A2b2, A5(B2') A5(B3'), as well as the recently identified A7 and A8 subtypes, and were distributed into 25 STs. Clostridium botulinum A1(B) was the most frequent subtype from food-borne botulism and food. Group I C. botulinum type B in France were mainly subtype B2 (14 out of 20 historical and recent strains) and were divided into 19 STs. Food-borne botulism resulting from ham consumption during the recent period was due to group II C. botulinum B4. Type E botulism is rare in France, 5 historical and 1 recent strains were subtype E3. A subtype E12 was recently identified from an unusual ham contamination. Clostridium botulinum strains from human botulism in France showed a wide genetic diversity and seems to result not from a single evolutionary lineage but from multiple and independent genetic rearrangements.

  12. Genetic diversity of the flagellin genes of Clostridium botulinum groups I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudstra, Cedric; Lambert, Dominic; Anniballi, Fabrizio; De Medici, Dario; Austin, John; Fach, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by phenotypically and genetically different Clostridium species, including Clostridium botulinum and some strains of Clostridium baratii (serotype F) and Clostridium butyricum (serotype E). BoNT-producing clostridia responsible for human botulism encompass strains of group I (secreting proteases, producing toxin serotype A, B, or F, and growing optimally at 37°C) and group II (nonproteolytic, producing toxin serotype E, B, or F, and growing optimally at 30°C). Here we report the development of real-time PCR assays for genotyping C. botulinum strains of groups I and II based on flaVR (variable region sequence of flaA) sequences and the flaB gene. Real-time PCR typing of regions flaVR1 to flaVR10 and flaB was optimized and validated with 62 historical and Canadian C. botulinum strains that had been previously typed. Analysis of 210 isolates of European origin allowed the identification of four new C. botulinum flaVR types (flaVR11 to flaVR14) and one new flaVR type specific to C. butyricum type E (flaVR15). The genetic diversity of the flaVR among C. botulinum strains investigated in the present study reveals the clustering of flaVR types into 5 major subgroups. Subgroups 1, 3, and 4 contain proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, subgroup 2 is made up of nonproteolytic C. botulinum only, and subgroup 5 is specific to C. butyricum type E. The genetic variability of the flagellin genes carried by C. botulinum and the possible association of flaVR types with certain geographical areas make gene profiling of flaVR and flaB promising in molecular surveillance and epidemiology of C. botulinum.

  13. Estanilenos: organometálicos de estanho (II σ - ligados a grupos orgânicos Stannylenes: organometallic compounds of tin (II σ-bonded to organic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo M. de Lima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a short review of the chemistry of stannylenes and their derivatives, including the preparation, spectroscopic properties, molecular structure and reactivity of the various species. The organometallic chemistry of Sn(II is far less explored than that of its much more common Sn(IV counterpart. Organometallics of main group metals have become increasingly important in recent years, which prompted us to present an overview of the situation regarding the case of Sn(II.

  14. The synthesis of isotopic fluorine and iodine-labeled COX-II inhibitor and in vitro validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Gwang Gil; Lee, Tae Sub; Lee, Kyo Chul; Moon, Byung Seok; Choi, Chang Woon; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In these day, NASIDs (non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, diclofenac and ibuprofen are the most common medications used to reduce pain and inflammation. However, they act by inhibiting both COX-I and COX-II which can cause serious gastrointestinal side effects such as ulcers, stomach perforations and bleeds. COX-I produces prostaglandins believed to be responsible for the protection of the stomach lining. However, COX-II produces prostaglandins believed to be responsible for pain and inflammation. Recently, the most widely studied selective COX-II inhibitor such as celecoxib and rofecoxib' one work by inhibiting the effect of COX-II on pain and inflammation without inhibiting COX-I which protects gastrointestinal lining.

  15. Insecticide resistance status in the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci genetic groups Asia-I, Asia-II-1 and Asia-II-7 on the Indian subcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen, N. C.; Chaubey, Rahul; Kumar, Dinesh; Rebijith, K. B.; Rajagopal, Raman; Subrahmanyam, B.; Subramanian, S.

    2017-01-01

    The present study is a summary of the current level of the insecticide resistance to selected organophosphates, pyrethroids, and neonicotinoids in seven Indian field populations of Bemisia tabaci genetic groups Asia-I, Asia-II-1, and Asia-II-7. Susceptibility of these populations was varied with Asia-II-7 being the most susceptible, while Asia-I and Asia-II-1 populations were showing significant resistance to these insecticides. The variability of the LC50 values was 7x for imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, 5x for monocrotophos and 3x for cypermethrin among the Asia-I, while, they were 7x for cypermethrin, 6x for deltamethrin and 5x for imidacloprid within the Asia-II-1 populations. When compared with the most susceptible, PUSA population (Asia-II-7), a substantial increase in resistant ratios was observed in both the populations of Asia-I and Asia-II-1. Comparative analysis during 2010–13 revealed a decline in susceptibility in Asia-I and Asia-II-1 populations of B. tabaci to the tested organophosphate, pyrethroid, and neonicotinoid insecticides. Evidence of potential control failure was detected using probit analysis estimates for cypermethrin, deltamethrin, monocrotophos and imidacloprid. Our results update resistance status of B. tabaci in India. The implications of insecticide resistance management of B. tabaci on Indian subcontinent are discussed. PMID:28098188

  16. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in eukaryotic nuclear splicing-related cell compartments.

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    Rafael Nisa-Martínez

    Full Text Available Some bacterial group II introns are widely used for genetic engineering in bacteria, because they can be reprogrammed to insert into the desired DNA target sites. There is considerable interest in developing this group II intron gene targeting technology for use in eukaryotes, but nuclear genomes present several obstacles to the use of this approach. The nuclear genomes of eukaryotes do not contain group II introns, but these introns are thought to have been the progenitors of nuclear spliceosomal introns. We investigated the expression and subcellular localization of the bacterial RmInt1 group II intron-encoded protein (IEP in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. Following the expression of translational fusions of the wild-type protein and several mutant variants with EGFP, the full-length IEP was found exclusively in the nucleolus, whereas the maturase domain alone targeted EGFP to nuclear speckles. The distribution of the bacterial RmInt1 IEP in plant cell protoplasts suggests that the compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells into nucleus and cytoplasm does not prevent group II introns from invading the host genome. Furthermore, the trafficking of the IEP between the nucleolus and the speckles upon maturase inactivation is consistent with the hypothesis that the spliceosomal machinery evolved from group II introns.

  17. Marine Group II Dominates Planktonic Archaea in Water Column of the Northeastern South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haodong Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, nutrients, and salinity are among the important factors constraining the distribution and abundance of microorganisms in the ocean. Marine Group II (MGII belonging to Euryarchaeota commonly dominates the planktonic archaeal community in shallow water and Marine Group I (MGI, now is called Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in global oceans. Results of quantitative PCR (qPCR and 454 sequencing in our study, however, showed the dominance of MGII in planktonic archaea throughout the water column of the northeastern South China Sea (SCS that is characterized by strong water mixing. The abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA representing the main group of Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in the northeastern SCS was significantly lower than in other oceanic regions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the top operational taxonomic units (OTUs of the MGII occurring predominantly below 200 m depth may be unique in the northeastern SCS based on the observation that they are distantly related to known sequences (identity ranging from 90–94%. The abundance of MGII was also significantly correlated with total bacteria in the whole column, which may indicate that MGII and bacteria may have similar physiological or biochemical properties or responses to environmental variation. This study provides valuable information about the dominance of MGII over AOA in both shallow and deep water in the northeastern SCS and highlights the need for comprehensive studies integrating physical, chemical, and microbial oceanography.

  18. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedmark, K A; Mabon, P; Hayden, K L; Lambert, D; Van Domselaar, G; Austin, J W; Corbett, C R

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison.

  19. Phase transitions in Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. C.; Liu, C. Y.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    The structures and transition pressures of Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors and of a pseudobinary system (Ga/x/In/1-x/Sb) have been investigated. Results indicate that GaP, InSb, GaSb, GaAs and possible AlP assume Metallic structures at high pressures; a tetragonal, beta-Sn-like structure is adopted by only InSb and GaSb. The rocksalt phase is preferred in InP, InAs, AlSb, ZnO and ZnS. The model of Van Vechten (1973) gives transition pressures which are in good agreement with measured values, but must be refined to account for the occurrence of the ionic rocksalt structure in some compounds. In addition, discrepancies between the theoretical scaling values for volume changes at the semiconductor-to-metal transitions are observed.

  20. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

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    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  1. Genome sequence and analysis of Buzura suppressaria nucleopolyhedrovirus: a group II Alphabaculovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhu

    Full Text Available The genome of Buzura suppressaria nucleopolyhedrovirus (BusuNPV was sequenced by 454 pyrosequencing technology. The size of the genome is 120,420 bp with 36.8% G+C content. It contains 127 hypothetical open reading frames (ORFs covering 90.7% of the genome and includes the 37 conserved baculovirus core genes, 84 genes found in other baculoviruses, and 6 unique ORFs. No typical baculoviral homologous repeats (hrs were present but the genome contained a region of repeated sequences. Gene Parity Plots revealed a 28.8 kb region conserved among the alpha- and beta-baculoviruses. Overall comparisons of BusuNPV to other baculoviruses point to a distinct species in group II Alphabaculovirus.

  2. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed “The QUASAR reproducibility study”. Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87±0.95mm and rotations of 1.56±0.66°. Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4±7.5 [ml/100g/min] with a between subject standard variation SDb = 5.5 [ml/100g/min] and a within subject standard deviation SDw = 4.7 [ml/100g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies. PMID:19660557

  3. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies.

  4. Characteristic distribution of HTLV type I and HTLV type II carriers among native ethnic groups in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, T; Li, H C; Lou, H; Yashiki, S; Karino, S; Zaninovic, V; Oneegllo, S G; Camacho, M; Andrade, R; Hurtado, L V; Gomez, L H; Damiani, E; Cartier, L; Dipierri, J E; Hayami, M; Sonoda, S; Tajima, K

    1999-09-20

    To confirm the geographic and ethnic segregation of HTLV-I and HTLV-II carriers in native populations in South America, we have conducted a seroepidemiological study of native populations in South America, including HTLV-I carriers distributed among seven ethnic groups in the Andes highlands of Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, and Chile, and two ethnic groups on Chiloe Island and Easter Island; and HTLV-II carriers distributed among seven ethnic groups of the lowlands along the Atlantic coast of Colombia, Orinoco, Amazon, and Patagonia, and one ethnic group on Chiloe Island. The incidence rate of HTLV-I and HTLV-II carriers varied among the ethnic groups, ranging from 0.8 to 6.8% for HTLV-I seropositivity and from 1.4 to 57.9% for HTLV-II seropositivity. A new HTLV-I focus was found among the Peruvian Aymara (1.6%), the Bolivian Aymara (5.3%) and Quechua (4.5%), the Argentine Puna (2.3%), and the Chilean Atacama (4.1%), while on HTLV-II focus was found among the Brazilian Kayapo (57.9%), the Paraguayan Chaco (16.4%), and the Chilean Alacalf (34.8%) and Yahgan (9.1%). The distribution of HTLV-I/II foci showed a geographic clustering of HTLV-I foci in the Andes highlands and of HTLV-II foci in the lowlands of South America. It was thus suggested that South American natives might be divided into two major ethnic groups by HTLV-I and HTLV-II carrier state.

  5. Highly endemic human T-lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) infection in a Venezuelan Guahibo Amerindian group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Ponte, M; Noya, O; Bianco, N; Echeverría de Perez, G

    1996-11-01

    Sera from 166 Guahibo Indians (55% of the population) living in southwest Venezuela were screened by enzyme-linked immunoassay for antibodies to human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) I and II. Positive samples were confirmed by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Forty-one Guahibos (24.8%) were found to be seropositive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of proviral DNA in mononuclear cell lysates revealed the virus to be HTLV-II. Prevalence increased with age, and sexual contact with HTLV-II-seropositive partners was identified as a risk factor for infection. PCR amplification of a region of the pol gene, utilizing the primer pair SK110/SK111, with subsequent digestion of the 140-base-pair amplification products with HinfI and MseI restriction enzymes, showed an HTLV-II subtype-b restriction pattern in all cases. These data suggest that the substrain infecting this Guahibo community belongs to the b subtype, the most frequent among Paleo-Amerindian populations.

  6. Actions of Xanthurenic acid, a putative endogenous Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, on sensory transmission in the thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, C S; Neale, S A; Salt, T E

    2013-03-01

    Xanthurenic acid (XA), a molecule arising from tryptophan metabolism by transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine, has recently been identified as an endogenous Group II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor ligand in vitro. Impairments in Group II mGlu receptor expression and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, as have multiple steps in the kynurenine metabolism pathway. Therefore, we examined XA in vivo to further investigate its potential as a Group II mGlu receptor ligand using a preparation that has been previously demonstrated to efficiently reveal the action of other Group II mGlu receptor ligands in vivo. Extracellular single-neurone recordings were made in the rat ventrobasal thalamus (VB) in conjunction with iontophoresis of agonists, an antagonist and a positive allosteric modulator and/or intravenous (i.v.) injection of XA. We found the XA effect on sensory inhibition, when applied iontophoretically and i.v., was similar to that of other Group II mGlu receptor agonists in reducing inhibition evoked in the VB from the thalamic reticular nucleus upon physiological sensory stimulation. Furthermore, we postulate that XA may be the first potential endogenous allosteric agonist (termed 'endocoid') for the mGlu receptors. As the Group II receptors and kynurenine metabolism pathway have both been heavily implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, XA could play a pivotal role in antipsychotic research as this potential endocoid represents both a convergence within these two biological parameters and a novel class of Group II mGlu receptor ligand. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors'.

  7. 78 FR 19565 - Call for Expert Reviewers to the U.S. Government Review of the Working Group II Contribution to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... Expert Reviewers to the U.S. Government Review of the Working Group II Contribution to the Fifth... State, request expert review of the Second Order Draft of the Working Group II Contribution to the Fifth..._procedures.shtml In October 2009, the IPCC approved the outline for the Working Group II contribution to...

  8. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-07-29

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world's attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg(2+) ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species.

  9. Evaluation of Prognostic Factors Following Flow-Cytometric DNA Analysis after Cytokeratin Labelling: II. Cervical and Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Wimberger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In gynecologic oncology valid prognostic factors are necessary to define biologically similar subgroups for analysis of therapeutic efficacy. This study is the first published prospective study concerning prognostic significance of DNA ploidy and S‐phase fraction in cervical and endometrial cancer following enrichment of tumor cells by cytokeratin labelling. Epithelial cells were labeled by FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, 8, and CK 17 prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis in 91 specimens of cervical cancer and 73 samples of endometrial cancer. In cervical cancer neither DNA‐ploidy nor S‐phase fraction were relevant prognostic parameters. But CV of the G0G1‐peak showed prognostic relevance in cervical cancer cells, even in multivariate analysis. This interesting observation, however, seems to have no therapeutic consequence due to the small discrimination capacity of CV. In endometrial carcinoma, gross DNA‐aneuploidy (DNA‐index > 1.3 and a high percentage of proliferating cells (>75th percentile were univariate and multivariate highly significant prognostic factors for recurrence‐free survival. Especially DNA‐aneuploidy (DI>1.3 is one of the most important independent molecular biological prognostic factors. While diagnostic curettage we could identify risk patients even preoperatively by determination of the prognostic factors like histologic tumor type, grading, cervical involvement and DNA‐ploidy. Thereby these patients could be treated primarily in an oncologic center. In conclusion, our investigations showed that the determination of DNA‐ploidy should be done in endometrial carcinoma. In cervical cancer no clinical significance for determination of DNA‐parameters was found.

  10. Lenalidomide-bendamustine-rituximab in untreated mantle cell lymphoma > 65 years, the Nordic Lymphoma Group phase I+II trial NLG-MCL4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsson-Lindblad, Alexandra; Kolstad, Arne; Laurell, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    For elderly patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), there is no defined standard therapy. In this multicenter open-label phase I/II trial we evaluated the addition of lenalidomide (LEN) to rituximab-bendamustine (R-B) as first-line treatment to elderly MCL patients. Patients >65 years with untr......For elderly patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), there is no defined standard therapy. In this multicenter open-label phase I/II trial we evaluated the addition of lenalidomide (LEN) to rituximab-bendamustine (R-B) as first-line treatment to elderly MCL patients. Patients >65 years...

  11. A novel additional group II intron distinguishes the mitochondrial rps3 gene in gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Teresa M R; Picardi, Ernesto; Lopez, Loredana; Pesole, Graziano; Quagliariello, Carla

    2005-02-01

    Comparative analysis of the ribosomal protein S3 gene (rps3) in the mitochondrial genome of Cycas with newly sequenced counterparts from Magnolia and Helianthus and available sequences from higher plants revealed that the positional clustering with the genes for ribosomal protein S19 (rps19) and L16 (rpl16) is preserved in gymnosperms. However, in contrast to the other land plant species, the rps3 gene in Cycas mitochondria is unique in possessing a second intron: rps3i2. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the transcripts generated from the rps19-rps3-rpl16 cluster in Cycas mitochondria demonstrated that the genes are cotranscribed and extensively modified by RNA editing and that both introns are efficiently spliced. Despite remarkable size heterogeneity, the Cycas rps3i1 can be shown to be homologous to the group IIA introns present within the rps3 gene of algae and land plants, including Magnolia and Helianthus. Conversely, sequences similar to the rps3i2 have not been reported previously. On the basis of conserved primary and secondary structure the second intervening sequence interrupting the Cycas rps3 gene has been classified as a group II intron. The close relationship of the rps3i2 to a group of different plant mitochondrial introns is intriguing and suggestive of a mitochondrial derivation for this novel intervening sequence. Interestingly, the rps3i2 appears to be conserved at the same gene location in other gymnosperms. Furthermore, the pattern of the rps3i2 distribution among algae and land plants provides evidence for the evolutionary acquisition of this novel intron in gymnosperms via intragenomic transposition or retrotransposition.

  12. Steroidal affinity labels of the estrogen receptor. 3. Estradiol 11 beta-n-alkyl derivatives bearing a terminal electrophilic group: antiestrogenic and cytotoxic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobaccaro, C; Pons, J F; Duchesne, M J; Auzou, G; Pons, M; Nique, F; Teutsch, G; Borgna, J L

    1997-07-04

    With the aim of developing a new series of steroidal affinity labels of the estrogen receptor, six electrophilic 11 beta-ethyl (C2), 11 beta-butyl (C4), or 11 beta-decyl (C10) derivatives of estradiol bearing an 11 beta-terminal electrophilic functionality, i.e. bromine (C4), (methylsulfonyl)oxy (C2 and C4), bromoacetamido (C2 and C4), and (p-tolylsulfonyl)oxy (C10), were synthesized. The range of their affinity constants for binding the estrogen receptor was 0.4-37% that of estradiol; the order of increasing affinity (i) relative to the 11 beta-alkyl arm was ethyl compounds, if any, was under 10%. This was in sharp contrast to results obtained using 11 beta-((tosyloxy)decyl)estradiol which labeled from 60% to 90% of the receptor hormone-binding sites with an EC50 of approximately 10 nM. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of the compounds were determined using the MVLN cell line, which was established from the estrogen-responsive mammary tumor MCF-7 cells by stable transfection of a recombinant estrogen-responsive luciferase gene. The two 11 beta-ethyl compounds were mainly estrogenic, whereas the three 11 beta-butyl and the 11 beta-decyl compounds essentially showed antiestrogenic activity. The fact that the chemical reactivities of 11 beta-ethyl and 11 beta-butyl compounds were not compromised by interaction with the estrogen receptor made the synthesized high-affinity compounds potential cytotoxic agents which might be able to exert either (i) a specific action on estrogen-regulated genes or (ii) a more general action in estrogen-target cells. Therefore the ability of the compounds (1) to irreversibly abolish estrogen-dependent expression of the luciferase gene and (2) to affect the proliferation of MVLN cells were determined. All electrophiles were able to irreversibly suppress expression of the luciferase gene; the antiestrogenic electrophiles were more potent than the estrogenic ones but less efficient than 4-hydroxytamoxifen, a classical and chemically

  13. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Zerbato

    Full Text Available Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  14. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbato, Madeleine; Holic, Nathalie; Moniot-Frin, Sophie; Ingrao, Dina; Galy, Anne; Perea, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  15. Molecular electronegativity in density functional theory (II) --Direct calculation of group electronegativity and the atomic charges in a group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠志; 沈尔忠

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of a more precise expression of the atomic effective electronegativity deduced from the density functional theory and electronegativity equalization principle, a new scheme for calculating the group electronegativity and the atomic charges in a group is proposed and programed, and various parameters of electronegativity and hardness are given for some common atoms. Through calculation, analysis and comparison of more than one hundred groups, it is shown that the results from this scheme are reasonable and may be extended.

  16. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  17. Reduction of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors during development of benzodiazepine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ritsuko; Itoh, Yoshinori; Murata, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hosoi, Masako; Mine, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged use of benzodiazepines often leads to dependence and withdrawal syndrome. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying benzodiazepine dependence have not been fully clarified. Several investigators have shown an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the pathophysiology of dependence or withdrawal. This study was performed to elucidate the role of mGluRs in benzodiazepine dependence. Withdrawal signs were precipitated in mice by flumazenil injection (25 mg/kg) after continuous subcutaneous infusion of benzodiazepines for 7 days, and the effects of several Gi-coupled receptor ligands on forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation were examined in the cerebral cortex of mice. The mRNA expression for mGluRs was determined by RT-PCR. A single injection of flumazenil precipitated typical withdrawal signs such as tail elevation and tremor in mice treated with diazepam or alprazolam, but not quazepam. The inhibitory effect of nonselective mGluR ligands on adenylate cyclase activity was diminished in mice that showed signs of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The mRNA expression levels of mGluR2 and mGluR3 were lowered in the cerebral cortex of mice pretreated with diazepam or alprazolam. Our findings suggest that the reduction in the expression of group II mGluRs subunits may be involved in the development of benzodiazepine dependence.

  18. Many independent origins of trans splicing of a plant mitochondrial group II intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yin-Long; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2004-07-01

    We examined the cis- vs. trans-splicing status of the mitochondrial group II intron nad1i728 in 439 species (427 genera) of land plants, using both Southern hybridization results (for 416 species) and intron sequence data from the literature. A total of 164 species (157 genera), all angiosperms, was found to have a trans-spliced form of the intron. Using a multigene land plant phylogeny, we infer that the intron underwent a transition from cis to trans splicing 15 times among the sampled angiosperms. In 10 cases, the intron was fractured between its 5' end and the intron-encoded matR gene, while in the other 5 cases the fracture occurred between matR and the 3' end of the intron. The 15 intron fractures took place at different time depths during the evolution of angiosperms, with those in Nymphaeales, Austrobaileyales, Chloranthaceae, and eumonocots occurring early in angiosperm evolution and those in Syringodium filiforme, Hydrocharis morsus- ranae, Najas, and Erodium relatively recently. The trans-splicing events uncovered in Austrobaileyales, eumonocots, Polygonales, Caryophyllales, Sapindales, and core Rosales reinforce the naturalness of these major clades of angiosperms, some of which have been identified solely on the basis of recent DNA sequence analyses.

  19. Extensive mis-splicing of a bi-partite plant mitochondrial group II intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elina, Helen; Brown, Gregory G

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the seed plant mitochondrial nad5 gene involves two trans-splicing events that remove fragmented group II introns and join the small, central exon c to exons b and d. We show that in both monocot and eudicot plants, extensive mis-splicing of the bi-partite intron 2 takes place, resulting in the formation of aberrantly spliced products in which exon c is joined to various sites within exon b. These mis-spliced products accumulate to levels comparable to or greater than that of the correctly spliced mRNA. We suggest that mis-splicing may result from folding constraints imposed on intron 2 by base-pairing between exon a and a portion of the bi-partite intron 3 downstream of exon c. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that mis-splicing does not occur in Oenothera mitochondria, where intron 3 is further fragmented such that the predicted base-pairing region is not covalently linked to exon c. Our findings suggest that intron fragmentation may lead to mis-splicing, which may be corrected by further intron fragmentation.

  20. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-06-14

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3(-/-) but not in mGluR2(-/-) mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity.

  1. Flagellin Diversity in Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II: a New Strategy for Strain Identification▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Twine, Susan M.; Tam, Kevin J.; Mullen, James A.; Kelly, John F.; Austin, John W.; Logan, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region. PMID:17351097

  2. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  3. Human plasma triglyceride labeling after high sucrose feeding. II. Study on triglyceride kinetics and postheparin lipolytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.H.; Shreeve, W.W.

    1975-06-01

    Kinetic studies of the very-low-density lipoprotein triglycerides (VLDL-TG) turnover by endogenous labeling with glycerol-2-/sup 3/H were performed in 13 patients in the postabsorptive state, first after 10-14 days on a low-sucrose high-starch-diet, then again after 10-14 days of isocaloric high-sucrose low-starch diet (HSD). After HSD, a significant decrease in the fractional turnover rates of VLDL-TG was observed, as well as a modest but significant increase in its pool size, but the net turn-over rates remained unchanged. Using Michaelis-Menten formulation, we have further calculated the V/sub max/ and Km's of the removal system for VLDL-TG and found that the V/sub max/ and Km's do not differ significantly between the two dietary periods. These results suggest that the removal mechanism for VLDL-TG has not changed after 10-14 days on the HSD, at least when the patients are studied in the postabsorptive state. Measurements of postheparin lipolytic activity under fed condition in 17 patients (including the 13 patients above) have shown a decrease after HSD. However, a defect in the removal of plasma-TG related to decreased activity of tissue-lipoprotein lipase in the fed state has not been conclusively uncovered by the kinetic studies performed in the postabsorptive state, and cannot contribute significantly to the expansion of VLDL-TG pool.

  4. GEO Label: User and Producer Perspectives on a Label for Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lush, V.; Lumsden, J.; Masó, J.; Díaz, P.; McCallum, I.

    2012-04-01

    One of the aims of the Science and Technology Committee (STC) of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) was to establish a GEO Label- a label to certify geospatial datasets and their quality. As proposed, the GEO Label will be used as a value indicator for geospatial data and datasets accessible through the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). It is suggested that the development of such a label will significantly improve user recognition of the quality of geospatial datasets and that its use will help promote trust in datasets that carry the established GEO Label. Furthermore, the GEO Label is seen as an incentive to data providers. At the moment GEOSS contains a large amount of data and is constantly growing. Taking this into account, a GEO Label could assist in searching by providing users with visual cues of dataset quality and possibly relevance; a GEO Label could effectively stand as a decision support mechanism for dataset selection. Currently our project - GeoViQua, - together with EGIDA and ID-03 is undertaking research to define and evaluate the concept of a GEO Label. The development and evaluation process will be carried out in three phases. In phase I we have conducted an online survey (GEO Label Questionnaire) to identify the initial user and producer views on a GEO Label or its potential role. In phase II we will conduct a further study presenting some GEO Label examples that will be based on Phase I. We will elicit feedback on these examples under controlled conditions. In phase III we will create physical prototypes which will be used in a human subject study. The most successful prototypes will then be put forward as potential GEO Label options. At the moment we are in phase I, where we developed an online questionnaire to collect the initial GEO Label requirements and to identify the role that a GEO Label should serve from the user and producer standpoint. The GEO Label Questionnaire consists of generic questions to identify whether

  5. Study of biodistribution of lipidic nanospheres charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111; Estudio de biodistribucion de nanoesferas lipidicas cargadas con cis-diaminodicloroplatino (II) y marcadas con nucleos radioactivos de Indio-111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, V.; Juarez O, C.; Medina L, A. [Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCAN-UNAM, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Perez C, E.; Garcia L, P. [Instituto nacional de cancerologia, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The general objective of the study was to evaluate the lipidic nanospheres biodistribution charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-DDP) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111 (Lip-Cis-in-111) in Wistar rats and in a tumoral model of CaCu. The conclusions were: 1. The system Lip-Cis-in-111 it presents a very fast elimination probably, to a fast recognition response of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). 2. It is planned to make modifications to the formulation to increase the quantity of the hydrophilic polymer (PEG), so that its time of residence in the blood is bigger and allow a bigger accumulation in the tumor. (Author)

  6. Proliferation of group II introns in the chloroplast genome of the green alga Oedocladium carolinianum (Chlorophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Simon Brouard

    2016-10-01

    longer and dispersed repeats are more abundant, but a smaller fraction of the Oedocladium genome is occupied by introns. Six additional group II introns are present, five of which lack ORFs and carry highly similar sequences to that of the ORF-less IIA intron shared with Oedogonium. Secondary structure analysis of the group IIA introns disclosed marked differences in the exon-binding sites; however, each intron showed perfect or nearly perfect base pairing interactions with its target site. Discussion Our results suggest that chloroplast genes rearrange more slowly in the Oedogoniales than in the Chaetophorales and raise questions as to what was the nature of the foreign coding sequences in the IR of the common ancestor of the Oedogoniales. They provide the first evidence for intragenomic proliferation of group IIA introns in the Viridiplantae, revealing that intron spread in the Oedocladium lineage likely occurred by retrohoming after sequence divergence of the exon-binding sites.

  7. Invertase-labeling gold-dendrimer for in situ amplified detection mercury(II) with glucometer readout and thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine coordination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenli; Shu, Jian; Jin, Guixiao; Xu, Mingdi; Wei, Qiaohua; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2016-03-15

    A simple, low-cost transducer with glucometer readout was designed for sensitive detection of mercury(II) (Hg(2+)), coupling with thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry and invertase-functionalized gold-dendrimer nanospheres for the signal amplification. Initially, nanogold-encapsulated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (Au DENs) were synthesized by in-situ reduction of gold(III). Thereafter, the as-prepared Au DENs were utilized for the labeling of invertase and T-rich signal DNA probe. In the presence of target Hg(2+), the functionalized Au DENs were conjugated to capture DNA probe-modified electrode via T-Hg(2+)-T coordination chemistry. Accompanying the Au DENs, the labeled invertase could hydrolyze sucrose into glucose, which could be quantitatively monitored by an external personal glucometer (PGM). The PGM signal increased with the increasing target Hg(2+) in the sample. Under the optimal conditions, our designed sensing platform exhibited good PGM responses toward target Hg(2+), and allowed the detection of Hg(2+) at a concentration as low as 4.2 pM. This sensing system also displayed remarkable specificity relative to target Hg(2+) against other competing ions, and could be applied for reliable monitoring of spiked Hg(2+) into the environmental water samples with satisfactory results. With the advantages of cost-effectiveness, simplicity, portability, and convenience, our strategy provides a tremendous potential to be a promising candidate for point-of-use monitoring of non-glucose targets by the public.

  8. A phase II Open-label Study of the Intravenous Administration of Homoharringtonine in the treatment of Myelodysplastic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daver, Naval; Vega-Ruiz, Arturo; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Estrov, Zeev; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Verstovsek, Srdan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Homoharringtonine is an alkaloid inhibitor of protein synthesis with activity in myeloid malignancies. We report a phase II pilot study of homoharringtonine in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Induction consisted of homoharringtonine at 2.5 mg/m2 via continuous infusion for seven days. Maintenance was given every 4 weeks. Nine patients were enrolled: five with refractory anaemia with excess blasts, two with refractory anaemia with excess blasts in transformation, one each with refractory anaemia and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia, respectively. Median age was 70 years (55–84) and 6 (66%) were male. Per International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) two patients were intermediate-1, five intermediate-2 and two high-risk. Median chemotherapy courses were one (1–3). One patient (11%) responded with complete hematologic and cytogenetic remission after one course. Eight patients did not respond (four had stable disease, two progressed to acute leukaemia and two died during induction - from aspergillus pneumonia and intracerebral haemorrhage, respectively). Grade 3/4 myelosuppression seen in 56% (5/9). Serious non-hematologic toxicities included one case of grade 4 left bundle branch heart block and one grade 3 nephrotoxicity. Median time between courses was 42 days (35–72 days). In conclusion homoharringtonine might have clinical activity in some patients with MDS. PMID:23701251

  9. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...

  10. Insights into the strategies used by related group II introns to adapt successfully for the colonisation of a bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Laura; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M; Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing RNAs and site-specific mobile retroelements found in bacterial and organellar genomes. The group II intron RmInt1 is present at high copy number in Sinorhizobium meliloti species, and has a multifunctional intron-encoded protein (IEP) with reverse transcriptase/maturase activities, but lacking the DNA-binding and endonuclease domains. We characterized two RmInt1-related group II introns RmInt2 from S. meliloti strain GR4 and Sr.md.I1 from S. medicae strain WSM419 in terms of splicing and mobility activities. We used both wild-type and engineered intron-donor constructs based on ribozyme ΔORF-coding sequence derivatives, and we determined the DNA target requirements for RmInt2, the element most distantly related to RmInt1. The excision and mobility patterns of intron-donor constructs expressing different combinations of IEP and intron RNA provided experimental evidence for the co-operation of IEPs and intron RNAs from related elements in intron splicing and, in some cases, in intron homing. We were also able to identify the DNA target regions recognized by these IEPs lacking the DNA endonuclease domain. Our results provide new insight into the versatility of related group II introns and the possible co-operation between these elements to facilitate the colonization of bacterial genomes.

  11. Tentative assignment of the potato serine protease inhibitor group as ß-II proteins based on their spectroscopic characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouvreau, L.A.M.; Gruppen, H.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Potato serine protease inhibitor (PSPI) is the most abundant protease inhibitor group in potato tuber. The investigated PSPI isoforms have a highly similar structure at both the secondary and the tertiary level. From the results described, PSPI is classified as a ß-II protein based on (1) the

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of mitochondrial DNA HVS-I and HVS-II in Chinese Bai ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Yin, Cai-Yong; Qian, Xiao-Qin; Fan, Han-Ting; Deng, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Meng, Hao-Tian; Shen, Chun-Mei; Yang, Chun-Hua; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Bo-Feng; Xu, Peng

    2015-03-01

    For forensic and population genetic purposes, a total of 125 unrelated volunteers' blood samples were collected from Chinese Bai ethnic minority group to analyze sequence variation of two hypervariable segments (HVS-I and HVS-II) in the mitochondrial DNA control region. Comparing the HVS-I and HVS-II sequences of the 125 Chinese Bais to the Anderson reference sequence, we found 86 polymorphic loci in HVS-I and 40 in HVS-II in mitochondrial DNA sequences of the Chinese Bai ethnic minority group, which defined 93 and 53 different haplotypes, respectively. Haplotype diversity and the mean pairwise differences were 0.992 ± 0.003 and 6.553 in HVS-I, and 0.877 ± 0.027 and 2.407 in HVS-II, respectively. We defined four macrohaplogroups R, M, N and D with the proportions ranging from 9.6% to 40.0%. With the analysis of the hypervariable domain from nucleotide 16 180-16 193 in HVS-I, our study revealed new haplotypes of sequence variations. In addition, the Fst metric, phylogenetic tree, and principal component analysis demonstrated a close genetic relationship between the Bai group and Chinese Han populations from South China, Changsha, and Guangdong. The results support that the Bai group is a multiorigin ethnic minority that has merged with the Chinese Han population. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1961-91 a total of 567,635 strains of Staphylococcus aureus from hospitalized patients in Denmark have been characterized according to their antibiotic resistance, site of isolation and phage type. Strains of phage group II (typed by the phages 3A, 3C, 55 and 71) have been...... analysed further. The occurrence of group II strains was relatively constant (approximately 16%) from 1961 until 1983. Since then the frequency of group II strains increased; in 1991 they accounted for 22.7% of all S. aureus strains isolated. Strains of group II can, on the basis of their phage types......, be divided in four subgroups: 3A, 71, 71+ and the 'rest of group II'. Furthermore, within these groups strains may differ from one another in respect to their sensitivity to phages. The increased isolation of group II strains during recent years was because of an increase in strains of subgroups 71...

  14. Metformin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Active Controlled, Parallel-Group, Randomized, Open Label Study in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahan Ara Ainuddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To assess the effect of metformin and to compare it with insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy in terms of perinatal outcome, maternal complications, additional insulin requirement, and treatment acceptability. Methods. In this randomized, open label study, 206 patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy who met the eligibility criteria were selected from the antenatal clinics. Insulin was added to metformin treatment when required, to maintain the target glycemic control. The patients were followed up till delivery. Maternal, and perinatal outcomes and pharmacotherapeutic characteristics were recorded on a proforma. Results. Maternal characteristics were comparable in metformin and insulin treated group. 84.9% patients in metformin group required add-on insulin therapy at mean gestational age of 26.58 ± 3.85 weeks. Less maternal weight gain (P24 hours in metformin group (P<0.01. Significant reduction in cost of treatment was found in metformin group. Conclusion. Metformin alone or with add-on insulin is an effective and cheap treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy. This trial is registered with clinical trial registration number: Clinical trials.gov NCT01855763.

  15. Reduction of mercury(II) by tropical river humic substances (Rio Negro)-Part II. Influence of structural features (molecular size, aromaticity, phenolic groups, organically bound sulfur).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Julio Cesar; Sargentini, Ezio; Zara, Luiz Fabricio; Rosa, André Henrique; Dos Santos, Ademir; Burba, Peter

    2003-12-04

    The influence of structural features of tropical river humic substances (HS) on their capability to reduce mercury(II) in aqueous solutions was studied. The HS investigated were conventionally isolated from Rio Negro water-Amazonas State/Brazil by means of the collector XAD 8. In addition, the isolated HS were on-line fractionated by tangential-flow multistage ultrafiltration (nominal molecular-weight cut-offs: 100, 50, 30, 10, 5 kDa) and characterized by potentiometry and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The reduction of Hg(II) ions to elemental Hg by size-fractions of Rio Negro HS was assessed by cold-vapor AAS (CVAAS). UV/VIS spectrometry revealed that the fractions of high molecular-size (F(1)>100 kDa and F(2): 50-100 kDa) have a higher aromaticity compared to the fractions of small molecular-size (F(5): 5-10 kDa, F(6): F(2)>F(1)>F(3)>F(4)>F(6)). Accordingly, Hg(II) ions were preferably reduced by HS molecules having a relatively high ratio of phenolic/carboxylic groups and a small concentration of sulfur. From these results a complex 'competition' between reduction and complexation of mercury(II) by aquatic HS occurring in tropical rivers such as the Rio Negro can be suggested.

  16. Mobile group II intron based gene targeting in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Paul, Eldho; Gomathi, Sivasamy; Abhishek, Albert; Sasikumar, Sundaresan; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2016-10-01

    The usage of recombinant lactic acid bacteria for delivery of therapeutic proteins to the mucosa has been emerging. In the present study, an attempt was made to engineer a thyA mutant of Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) using lactococcal group II intron Ll.LtrB for the development of biologically contained recombinant L. plantarum for prevention of calcium oxalate stone disease. The 3 kb Ll.LtrB intron donor cassettes from the source vector pACD4C was PCR amplified, ligated into pSIP series of lactobacillus vector pLp_3050sAmyA, yielding a novel vector pLpACD4C (8.6 kb). The quantitative real-time PCR experiment shows 94-fold increased expression of Ll.LtrB intron and 14-fold increased expression of ltrA gene in recombinant L. plantarum containing pLpACD4C. In order to target the thyA gene, the potential intron RNA binding sites in the thyA gene of L. plantarum was predicted with help of computer algorithm. The insertion location 188|189s of thyA gene (lowest E-0.134) was chosen and the wild type intron Ll.LtrB was PCR modified, yielding a retargeted intron of pLpACDthyA. The retargeted intron was expressed by using induction peptide (sppIP), subsequently the integration of intron in thyA gene was identified by PCR screening and finally ThyA(-) mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) was detected. In vitro growth curve result showed that in the absence of thymidine, colony forming units of mutant ThyA18 was decreased, whereas high thymidine concentration (10 μM) supported the growth of the culture until saturation. In conclusion, ThyA(-) mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) constructed in this study will be used as a biologically contained recombinant probiotic to deliver oxalate decarboxylase into the lumen for treatment of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate stone deposition.

  17. Reclassification of the Candida haemulonii Complex as Candida haemulonii (C. haemulonii Group I), C. duobushaemulonii sp. nov. (C. haemulonii Group II), and C. haemulonii var. vulnera var. nov. : Three Multiresistant Human Pathogenic Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cendejas-Bueno, E.; Kolecka, A.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Kostrzewa, M.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Gomez-Lopez, A.; Boekhout, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Candida haemulonii species complex is currently known as C. haemulonii groups I and II. Here we describe C. haemulonii group II as a new species, Candida duobushaemulonii sp. nov., and C. haemulonii var. vulnera as new a variety of C. haemulonii group I using phenotypic and molecular methods. Th

  18. Reclassification of the Candida haemulonii Complex as Candida haemulonii (C. haemulonii Group I), C. duobushaemulonii sp. nov. (C. haemulonii Group II), and C. haemulonii var. vulnera var. nov.: Three Multiresistant Human Pathogenic Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cendejas-Bueno, E.; Kolecka, A.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Kostrzewa, M.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Gomez-Lopez, A.; Boekhout, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Candida haemulonii species complex is currently known as C. haemulonii groups I and II. Here we describe C. haemulonii group II as a new species, Candida duobushaemulonii sp. nov., and C. haemulonii var. vulnera as new a variety of C. haemulonii group I using phenotypic and molecular methods. Th

  19. Reclassification of the Candida haemulonii Complex as Candida haemulonii (C. haemulonii Group I), C. duobushaemulonii sp. nov. (C. haemulonii Group II), and C. haemulonii var. vulnera var. nov.: Three Multiresistant Human Pathogenic Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cendejas-Bueno, E.; Kolecka, A.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Kostrzewa, M.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Gomez-Lopez, A.; Boekhout, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Candida haemulonii species complex is currently known as C. haemulonii groups I and II. Here we describe C. haemulonii group II as a new species, Candida duobushaemulonii sp. nov., and C. haemulonii var. vulnera as new a variety of C. haemulonii group I using phenotypic and molecular methods.

  20. Fundamental parameters of FR II radio galaxies and their impact on groups and clusters' environments

    CERN Document Server

    Kapinska, Anna D

    2012-01-01

    Radio galaxies are among the largest and most powerful single objects known and are found at variety of redshifts, hence they are believed to have had a significant impact on the evolving Universe. Their relativistic jets inject considerable amounts of energy into the environments in which the sources reside; thus the knowledge of the fundamental properties (such as kinetic luminosities, lifetimes and ambient gas densities) of these sources is crucial for understanding AGN feedback in galaxy clusters. In this work, we explore the intrinsic and extrinsic fundamental properties of Fanaroff-Riley II (FR II) objects through the construction of multidimensional Monte Carlo simulations which use complete, flux limited radio catalogues and semi-analytical models of FR IIs' time evolution to create artificial samples of radio galaxies. This method allows us to set better limits on the confidence intervals of the intrinsic and extrinsic fundamental parameters and to investigate the total energy produced and injected t...

  1. Synthesis and luminescent properties of novel Cu (II), Zn (II) polymeric complexes based on 1,10-phenanthroline and biphenyl groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan He; Chaofan Zhong; Yu Zhou; Hailiang Zhang

    2009-07-01

    A fully conjugated ligand 4,4'-bis(1,10-phenanthroline-[5,6-d]imidazole-2-yl)-biphenyl (BPIBP) based on 1,10-phenanthroline and biphenyl groups was firstly synthesized. The corresponding polymeric complexes, BPIBP (1) with Cu(II) (2) and Zn(II) (3), were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, elemental Analysis, conductivity measurement. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra at room temperature revealed that both the polymeric complexes 2 and 3 emit blue luminescence at 453 and 452 nm (em, max) in DMSO solution and blue/green luminescence at 527 and 536 nm (em, max) in solid state respectively, and the maximum wavelengths of the polymeric complexes 2 and 3 are red shifted, compared with the ligand 1. Thermal property measurements show that they have good thermal stability.

  2. Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D; Latkowski, J; Sanz, J

    1999-06-18

    Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and SOMBRERO inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared to each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross section library.

  3. Evaluation of HYLIFE-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566-group neutron transport and activation cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Latkowski, J F; Sanz, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code allow enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross-section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared with each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross-section library.

  4. Groups II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors differentially modulate brief and prolonged nociception in primate STT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, V; Chen, P S; Willis, W D

    2000-12-01

    The heterogeneous family of G-protein-coupled metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) provides excitatory and inhibitory controls of synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in the nervous system. Eight mGluR subtypes have been cloned and are classified in three subgroups. Group I mGluRs can stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis and activate protein kinase C whereas group II (mGluR2 and 3) and group III (mGluR4, 6, 7, and 8) mGluRs share the ability to inhibit cAMP formation. The present study examined the roles of groups II and III mGluRs in the processing of brief nociceptive information and capsaicin-induced central sensitization of primate spinothalamic tract (STT) cells in vivo. In 11 anesthetized male monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), extracellular recordings were made from 21 STT cells in the lumbar dorsal horn. Responses to brief (15 s) cutaneous stimuli of innocuous (brush), marginally and distinctly noxious (press and pinch, respectively) intensity were recorded before, during, and after the infusion of group II and group III mGluR agonists into the dorsal horn by microdialysis. Different concentrations were applied for at least 20 min each (at 5 microliter/min) to obtain cumulative concentration-response relationships. Values in this paper refer to the drug concentrations in the microdialysis fibers; actual concentrations in the tissue are about three orders of magnitude lower. The agonists were also applied at 10-25 min after intradermal capsaicin injection. The group II agonists (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (LCCG1, 1 microM-10 mM, n = 6) and (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4, 6-dicarboxylate (LY379268; 1 microM-10 mM, n = 6) had no significant effects on the responses to brief cutaneous mechanical stimuli (brush, press, pinch) or on ongoing background activity. In contrast, the group III agonist L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (LAP4, 0. 1 microM-10 mM, n = 6) inhibited the responses to cutaneous mechanical stimuli in a

  5. Structure et réarrangements conformationnels au cours de l’épissage du composant ribozyme d’un intron de groupe II

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Cheng-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Group II introns are a class of RNAs best known for their ribozyme-catalyzed, self-splicing reaction. Under certain conditions, the introns can excise themselves from precursor mRNAs and ligate together their flanking exons, without the aid of proteins. Group II introns generally excise from pre-mRNA as a lariat, like the one formed by spliceosomal introns, similarities in the splicing mechanism suggest that group II introns and nuclear spliceosomal introns may share a common evolutionary anc...

  6. Phylogenetic relationships and protein modelling revealed two distinct subfamilies of group II HKT genes between crop and model grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Francki, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Molecular evolution of large protein families in closely related species can provide useful insights on structural functional relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the grass-specific group II HKT genes identified two distinct subfamilies, I and II. Subfamily II was represented in all species, whereas subfamily I was identified only in the small grain cereals and possibly originated from an ancestral gene duplication post divergence from the coarse grain cereal lineage. The core protein structures were highly analogous despite there being no more than 58% amino acid identity between members of the two subfamilies. Distinctly variable regions in known functional domains, however, indicated functional divergence of the two subfamilies. The subsets of codons residing external to known functional domains predicted signatures of positive Darwinian selection potentially identifying new domains of functional divergence and providing new insights on the structural function and relationships between protein members of the two subfamilies.

  7. Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Spagnuolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.

  8. Etoposide in malignant pleural mesothelioma : Two phase II trials of the EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahmoud, T; Postmus, PE; van Pottelsberghe, C; Mattson, K; Tammilehto, L; Splinter, TAW; Planting, AST; Sutedja, T; van Pawel, J; van Zandwijk, N; Baas, P; Roozendaal, KJ; Schrijver, M; Kirkpatrick, A; Van Glabbeke, M; Ardizzoni, A; Giaccone, G

    1997-01-01

    Intravenous and oral etoposide (VP 16-213) were tested in two sequential phase II trials in chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. In the first trial, etoposide was given intravenously (i.v.) at a dose of 150 mg/m(2) on days 1, 3 and 5 every 3 weeks. The second trial invest

  9. Recent mobility of plastid encoded group II introns and twintrons in five strains of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Mathilde Perrineau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Group II introns are closely linked to eukaryote evolution because nuclear spliceosomal introns and the small RNAs associated with the spliceosome are thought to trace their ancient origins to these mobile elements. Therefore, elucidating how group II introns move, and how they lose mobility can potentially shed light on fundamental aspects of eukaryote biology. To this end, we studied five strains of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium purpureum that surprisingly contain 42 group II introns in their plastid genomes. We focused on a subset of these introns that encode mobility-conferring intron-encoded proteins (IEPs and found them to be distributed among the strains in a lineage-specific manner. The reverse transcriptase and maturase domains were present in all lineages but the DNA endonuclease domain was deleted in vertically inherited introns, demonstrating a key step in the loss of mobility. P. purpureum plastid intron RNAs had a classic group IIB secondary structure despite variability in the DIII and DVI domains. We report for the first time the presence of twintrons (introns-within-introns, derived from the same mobile element in Rhodophyta. The P. purpureum IEPs and their mobile introns provide a valuable model for the study of mobile retroelements in eukaryotes and offer promise for biotechnological applications.

  10. Recent mobility of plastid encoded group II introns and twintrons in five strains of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrineau, Marie-Mathilde; Price, Dana C; Mohr, Georg; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are closely linked to eukaryote evolution because nuclear spliceosomal introns and the small RNAs associated with the spliceosome are thought to trace their ancient origins to these mobile elements. Therefore, elucidating how group II introns move, and how they lose mobility can potentially shed light on fundamental aspects of eukaryote biology. To this end, we studied five strains of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium purpureum that surprisingly contain 42 group II introns in their plastid genomes. We focused on a subset of these introns that encode mobility-conferring intron-encoded proteins (IEPs) and found them to be distributed among the strains in a lineage-specific manner. The reverse transcriptase and maturase domains were present in all lineages but the DNA endonuclease domain was deleted in vertically inherited introns, demonstrating a key step in the loss of mobility. P. purpureum plastid intron RNAs had a classic group IIB secondary structure despite variability in the DIII and DVI domains. We report for the first time the presence of twintrons (introns-within-introns, derived from the same mobile element) in Rhodophyta. The P. purpureum IEPs and their mobile introns provide a valuable model for the study of mobile retroelements in eukaryotes and offer promise for biotechnological applications.

  11. Enhanced group II mGluR-mediated inhibition of pain-related synaptic plasticity in the amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird Gary C

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latero-capsular part of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC is the target of the spino-parabrachio-amygdaloid pain pathway. Our previous studies showed that CeLC neurons develop synaptic plasticity and increased neuronal excitability in the kaolin/carrageenan model of arthritic pain. These pain-related changes involve presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and postsynaptic NMDA and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP1 receptors. Here we address the role of group II mGluRs. Results Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings were made from CeLC neurons in brain slices from control rats and arthritic rats (>6 h postinjection of kaolin/carrageenan into the knee. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs were evoked by electrical stimulation of afferents from the pontine parabrachial (PB area. A selective group II mGluR agonist (LY354740 decreased the amplitude of EPSCs more potently in CeLC neurons from arthritic rats (IC50 = 0.59 nM than in control animals (IC50 = 15.0 nM. The inhibitory effect of LY354740 was reversed by a group II mGluR antagonist (EGLU but not a GABAA receptor antagonist (bicuculline. LY354740 decreased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature EPSCs in the presence of TTX. No significant changes of neuronal excitability measures (membrane slope conductance and action potential firing rate were detected. Conclusion Our data suggest that group II mGluRs act presynaptically to modulate synaptic plasticity in the amygdala in a model of arthritic pain.

  12. Simultaneous detection of forbidden chemical residues in milk using dual-label time-resolved reverse competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay based on amine group functionalized surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Zhang

    Full Text Available In this study, a sensitive dual-label time-resolved reverse competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay was developed for simultaneous detection of chloramphenicol (CAP and clenbuterol (CLE in milk. The strategy was performed based on the distinction of the kinetic characteristics of horseradish peroxidase (HRP and alkaline phosphatase (ALP in chemiluminesecence (CL systems and different orders of magnitude in HRP CL value for CAP and ALP CL value for CLE in the chemiluminescent immunoassay. Capture antibodies were covalently bound to the amine group functionalized chemiluminescent microtiter plate (MTP for efficient binding of detection antibodies for the enzymes labeled CAP (HRP-CAP and CLE (ALP-CLE. The CL signals were recorded at different time points by the automatic luminometers with significant distinction in the dynamic curves. When we considered the ALP CL value (about 10(5 of CLE as background for HRP CL signal value (about 10(7 of CAP, there was no interaction from ALP CL background of CLE and the differentiation of CAP and CLE can be easily achieved. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 values of CAP and CLE in milk samples were 0.00501 µg L(-1 and 0.0128 µg L(-1, with the ranges from 0.0003 µg L(-1 to 0.0912 µg L(-1 and from 0.00385 µg L(-1 to 0.125 µg L(-1, respectively. The developed method is more sensitive and of less duration than the commercial ELISA kits, suitable for simultaneous screening of CAP and CLE.

  13. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Kumar Guha

    Full Text Available In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA small ribosomal subunit (rns gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF encoded within a group I intron (mS1247. This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase. Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2 stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2 to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase.

  14. Synthesis of [sup 14]C-labeled copolymers for drug delivery studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, S.W.; Reist, E.J. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Rock, M.T.

    1994-02-01

    [sup 14]C-labeled polyanhydride copolymers [(20:80)/1,3-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-propane (CPP):sebacic acid (SA)] were synthesized according to schemes I and II: [sup 14]C-labeled sebacic acid (2,9-[sup 14]C[sub 2]) and [sup 14]C-labeled CPP 1,3-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-propane (labeled at C-1, C-3 of the propyl group) were transformed to the corresponding mixed anhydrides as prepolymers respectively by reaction with acetic anhydride. The labeled mixed anhydride prepolymers were condensed with unlabeled counter-prepolymers to give the labeled polyanhydride copolymers. The labeled copolymers were identified and characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). (author).

  15. Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) with F-18-Labeled Compounds: the Influence of Prosthetic Groups on Tumor Uptake and Clearance Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Vincent; Wuest, Melinda; Bailey, Justin J; Bergman, Cody; Janzen, Nancy; Valliant, John F; Wuest, Frank

    2017-06-21

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an important biomarker expressed in the majority of prostate cancers. The favorable positron emission tomography (PET) imaging profile of the PSMA imaging agent 2-(3-(1-carboxy-5-[(6-[(18)F]fluoro-pyridine-3-carbonyl)-amino]-pentyl)-ureido)-pentane-dioic acid [(18)F]DCFPyL in preclinical prostate cancer models and in prostate cancer patients stimulated the development and validation of other fluorine-containing PSMA inhibitors to further enhance pharmacokinetics and simplify production methods. Here, we describe the synthesis and radiopharmacological evaluation of various F-18-labeled PSMA inhibitors which were prepared through different prosthetic group chemistry strategies. Prosthetic groups N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB), 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzaldehyde, and 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ([(18)F]FDG) were used for bioconjugation reactions to PSMA-binding lysine-urea-glutamate scaffold via acylation and oxime formation. All fluorine-containing PSMA inhibitors were tested for their PSMA inhibitory potency in an in vitro competitive binding assay in comparison to an established reference compound [(125)I]TAAG-PSMA. Tumor uptake and clearance profiles of three F-18-labeled PSMA inhibitors ([(18)F]4, [(18)F]7, and [(18)F]8) were studied with dynamic PET imaging using LNCaP tumor-bearing mice. F-18-labeled PSMA inhibitors were synthesized in 32-69 % radiochemical yields using (1) acylation reaction at the primary amino group of the lysine residue with [(18)F]SFB and (2) oxime formation with 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzaldehyde and [(18)F]FDG using the respective aminooxy-functionalized lysine residue. Compound 7 displayed an IC50 value of 6 nM reflecting very high affinity for PSMA. Compounds 4 and 8 showed IC50 values of 13 and 62 nM, respectively. The IC50 value of reference compound DCFPyL was 13 nM. Dynamic PET imaging revealed the following SUV60min for radiotracer uptake in PSMA(+) LNCaP tumors: 0

  16. Group Algebras Whose Involutory Units Commute (Dedicated to the memory of Professor I.I. Khripta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor Bovdi; Michael Dokuchaev

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a field of characteristic 2 and G a non-abelian locally finite 2-group. Let V(KG) be the group of units with augmentation 1 in the group algebra KG. An explicit list of groups is given, and it is proved that all involutions in V(KG) commute with each other if and only if G is isomorphic to one of the groups on this list. In particular, this property depends only on G and does not depend on K.

  17. The Prognostic Value of Polycomb Group Protein BMI1 in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib J.;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1) protein expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in a retrospective patient...... cohort consisting of 144 stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 expression at the invasive front of the primary tumors correlated with mismatch repair status of the tumors. Furthermore, BMI1 expression at the luminal surface correlated with T-stage, tumor location, and the histological subtypes....... Likewise, there was no association between 5-year overall survival and BMI1 expression at the invasive front (HR: 1.12; 95% CI 0.80-1.56; p = 0.46) or at the luminal surface of the tumor (HR: 1.16; 95% CI 0.86-1.60; p = 0.33). In conclusion, BMI1 expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer...

  18. Enzyme immunoassay of benzyl penicilloyl (BPO) groups using acetylcholinesterase as label. Application to the study of the BPO-binding sites on albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wal, J M; Yvon, M; Pradelles, P; Grassi, J

    1991-01-01

    Benzyl penicilloyl groups (BPO) derive from penicillin G by cleavage of the beta lactam ring; they covalently bind to proteins to give conjugates which have lost all antibiotic properties but are considered as the major allergenic determinants in penicillin allergy. A solid-phase Enzyme Immuno Assay (EIA) of BPO groups in different biological fluids is described. It is a competitive immunoassay using acetylcholinesterase as label. In all biological fluids, very low non-specific binding values are observed. The sensitivity and the precision of the assay are good since ca. 0.5 ng/ml can be measured with a coefficient of variation less than 10%. Cross reactions between BPO and penicillin or penicillin derivatives are nil or very low. This assay is more sensitive, much more rapid and easier to handle than the other methods available and is thus suitable for routine determinations. In association with reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography this EIA has allowed an initial investigation of the location of BPO-binding sites on micro quantities of serum albumin (ca. 1 mg) from penicillin treated patients.

  19. The anatomy of the NGC 5044 group -- II. Stellar populations and star-formation histories

    CERN Document Server

    Mendel, J Trevor; Rasmussen, Jesper; Brough, Sarah; Forbes, Duncan A

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of galaxy properties in groups and clusters holds important information on galaxy evolution and growth of structure in the Universe. While clusters have received appreciable attention in this regard, the role of groups as fundamental to formation of the present day galaxy population has remained relatively unaddressed. Here we present stellar ages, metallicities and alpha-element abundances derived using Lick indices for 67 spectroscopically confirmed members of the NGC 5044 galaxy group with the aim of shedding light on galaxy evolution in the context of the group environment. We find that galaxies in the NGC 5044 group show evidence for a strong relationship between stellar mass and metallicity, consistent with their counterparts in both higher and lower mass groups and clusters. Galaxies show no clear trend of age or alpha-element abundance with mass, but these data form a tight sequence when fit simultaneously in age, metallicity and stellar mass. In the context of the group environment, ...

  20. Scrambling free combinatorial labeling of alanine-β, isoleucine-δ1, leucine-proS and valine-proS methyl groups for the detection of long range NOEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerfah, Rime [NMR-Bio, IBS/CEA (France); Plevin, Michael J. [University of York, Department of Biology (United Kingdom); Pessey, Ombeline [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2015-01-15

    Specific isotopic labeling of methyl groups in proteins has greatly extended the applicability of solution NMR spectroscopy. Simultaneous labeling of the methyl groups of several different amino acid types can offer a larger number of useful probes that can be used for structural characterisations of challenging proteins. Herein, we propose an improved AILV methyl-labeling protocol in which L and V are stereo-specifically labeled. We show that 2-ketobutyrate cannot be combined with Ala and 2-acetolactate (for the stereo-specific labeling of L and V) as this results in co-incorporation incompatibility and isotopic scrambling. Thus, we developed a robust and cost-effective enzymatic synthesis of the isoleucine precursor, 2-hydroxy-2-(1′-[{sup 2}H{sub 2}], 2′-[{sup 13}C])ethyl-3-keto-4-[{sup 2}H{sub 3}]butanoic acid, as well as an incorporation protocol that eliminates metabolic leakage. We show that application of this labeling scheme to a large 82 kDa protein permits the detection of long-range {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H NOE cross-peaks between methyl probes separated by up to 10 Å.

  1. Systemic exposure to armodafinil and its tolerability in healthy elderly versus young men: an open-label, multiple-dose, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Kirby, Mary; Hellriegel, Edward T; Yang, Ronghua; Robertson, Philmore

    2011-02-01

    Armodafinil (Nuvigil(®), Cephalon, Inc., Frazer, PA, USA), the longer-lasting isomer of racemic modafinil, is a nonamphetamine, wakefulness-promoting medication. In patients with excessive sleepiness associated with shift work disorder, treated obstructive sleep apnoea, or narcolepsy, armodafinil has been found to improve wakefulness throughout the shift or day. In addition, while not approved for this indication, armodafinil has been found to improve excessive sleepiness associated with jet-lag disorder. This study evaluated systemic exposure to armodafinil and its two major circulating metabolites, R-modafinil acid and modafinil sulfone, and assessed the tolerability profile of armodafinil in elderly and young subjects. The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of armodafinil were assessed in an open-label, multiple-dose, parallel-group study in two groups (n = 25 in each group) of healthy men (elderly group aged ≥65 years and young group aged 18-45 years) who received armodafinil 50 mg on day 1, 100 mg on day 2 and 150 mg once daily on days 3 through 7. Plasma concentrations of armodafinil and its metabolites were quantified over 72 hours following the last dose on day 7. Pharmacokinetic parameters, including area under the plasma drug concentration-versus-time curve during a dosing interval (AUC(τ)) and maximum observed plasma drug concentration (C(max)), and tolerability were assessed. All 50 subjects enrolled in the study were evaluable for tolerability and 49 were included in the pharmacokinetic analysis. One elderly subject was excluded from the pharmacokinetic analyses because of apparent noncompliance with armodafinil dosing. Systemic exposure following administration of armodafinil, as measured by steady-state AUC(τ) and C(max) values, was approximately 15% greater in elderly subjects compared with young subjects. Geometric mean ratios for AUC(τ) and C(max) in the two groups were 1.14 (95% CI 1.03, 1.25; p = 0.0086) and 1.15 (95% CI 1

  2. Southern GEMS groups II: HI distribution, mass functions and HI deficient galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kilborn, Virginia A; Barnes, David G; Koribalski, Baerbel S; Brough, Sarah; Kern, Katie

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the neutral hydrogen (HI) content of sixteen groups for which we have multi-wavelength data including X-ray observations. Wide-field imaging of the groups was obtained with the 20-cm multibeam system on the 64-m Parkes telescope. We have detected ten previously uncatalogued HI sources, one of which has no visible optical counterpart. We examine the HI properties of the groups, compared to their X-ray characteristics, finding that those groups with a higher X-ray temperature and luminosity contain less HI per galaxy. The HI content of a group depends on its morphological make-up, with those groups dominated by early-type galaxies containing the least total HI. We determined the expected HI for the spiral galaxies in the groups, and found that a number of the galaxies were HI deficient. The HI deficient spirals were found both in groups with and without a hot intra-group medium. The HI deficient galaxies were not necessarily found at the centre of the groups, however, we did find that two thirds ...

  3. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled cis-malonato [(4R,5R)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane] platinum(II) (SKI 2053R)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae-Kee; Kim, Youngseok; Rim, Jonggill; Kim, Ganghyeok; Gam, Jongsik; Song, Sungkun; Yoo, Kwanghee; Kim, Key H. (Sunkyong Industries, Kyungki-Do (Korea, Republic of). Life Science Research Center)

    1994-02-01

    The synthesis of [sup 14]C-labelled cis-malonato[(4R,5R)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolan e]platinum(II) from [1,4-[sup 14]C] D-tartaric acid is described. The overall radiochemical yield of the product in a eight-step sequence was 23.8% and radiochemical purity was 98.5%. (author).

  4. Canakinumab treatment for patients with active recurrent or chronic TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): an open-label, phase II study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattorno, Marco; Obici, Laura; Cattalini, Marco; Tormey, Vincent; Abrams, Ken; Davis, Nicole; Speziale, Antonio; Bhansali, Suraj G; Martini, Alberto; Lachmann, Helen J

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of canakinumab, a high-affinity human monoclonal anti-interleukin-1β antibody, in inducing complete or almost complete responses in patients with active tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Methods Twenty patients (aged 7–78 years) with active recurrent or chronic TRAPS were treated with canakinumab 150 mg every 4 weeks for 4 months (2 mg/kg for those ≤40 kg) in this open-label, proof-of-concept, phase II study. Canakinumab was then withdrawn for up to 5 months, with reintroduction on relapse, and 4 weekly administration (subsequently increased to every 8 weeks) for 24 months. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of patients achieving complete or almost complete response at day 15, defined as clinical remission (Physician's Global Assessment score ≤1) and full or partial serological remission. Results Nineteen patients (19/20, 95%; 95% CI 75.1% to 99.9%) achieved the primary efficacy variable. Responses to canakinumab occurred rapidly; median time to clinical remission 4 days (95% CI 3 to 8 days). All patients relapsed after canakinumab was withdrawn; median time to relapse 91.5 days (95% CI 65 to 117 days). On reintroduction of canakinumab, clinical and serological responses were similar to those seen during the first phase, and were sustained throughout treatment. Canakinumab was well tolerated and clinical responses were accompanied by rapid and sustained improvement in health-related quality of life. Weight normalised pharmacokinetics of canakinumab, although limited, appeared to be consistent with historical canakinumab data. Conclusions Canakinumab induces rapid disease control in patients with active TRAPS, and clinical benefits are sustained during long-term treatment. Trial registration number NCT01242813; Results. PMID:27269295

  5. Primary analysis of a phase II open-label trial of INCB039110, a selective JAK1 inhibitor, in patients with myelofibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, John O.; Talpaz, Moshe; Gupta, Vikas; Foltz, Lynda M.; Savona, Michael R.; Paquette, Ronald; Turner, A. Robert; Coughlin, Paul; Winton, Elliott; Burn, Timothy C.; O’Neill, Peter; Clark, Jason; Hunter, Deborah; Assad, Albert; Hoffman, Ronald; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2017-01-01

    Combined Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 inhibition therapy effectively reduces splenomegaly and symptom burden related to myelofibrosis but is associated with dose-dependent anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this open-label phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of three dose levels of INCB039110, a potent and selective oral JAK1 inhibitor, in patients with intermediate- or high-risk myelofibrosis and a platelet count ≥50×109/L. Of 10, 45, and 32 patients enrolled in the 100 mg twice-daily, 200 mg twice-daily, and 600 mg once-daily cohorts, respectively, 50.0%, 64.4%, and 68.8% completed week 24. A ≥50% reduction in total symptom score was achieved by 35.7% and 28.6% of patients in the 200 mg twice-daily cohort and 32.3% and 35.5% in the 600 mg once-daily cohort at week 12 (primary end point) and 24, respectively. By contrast, two patients (20%) in the 100 mg twice-daily cohort had ≥50% total symptom score reduction at weeks 12 and 24. For the 200 mg twice-daily and 600 mg once-daily cohorts, the median spleen volume reductions at week 12 were 14.2% and 17.4%, respectively. Furthermore, 21/39 (53.8%) patients who required red blood cell transfusions during the 12 weeks preceding treatment initiation achieved a ≥50% reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused during study weeks 1–24. Only one patient discontinued for grade 3 thrombocytopenia. Non-hematologic adverse events were largely grade 1 or 2; the most common was fatigue. Treatment with INCB039110 resulted in clinically meaningful symptom relief, modest spleen volume reduction, and limited myelosuppression. PMID:27789678

  6. A phase II open label trial evaluating safety and efficacy of a telomerase peptide vaccination in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuso Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sole effective option for patients with advanced HCC is sorafenib and there is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy is a promising option that deserves major investigation. In this open label, single arm clinical trial, we analyzed the effect of a low dose cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with a telomerase peptide (GV1001 vaccination in patients with advanced HCC. Methods 40 patients with advanced HCC were treated with 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide on day -3 followed by GM-CSF + GV1001 vaccinations on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, 22, 36 followed by 4-weekly injections. Primary endpoint of this phase II trial was tumor response; secondary endpoints evaluated were TTP, TTSP, PFS, OS, safety and immune responses. Results None of the patients had a complete or partial response to treatment, 17 patients (45.9% demonstrated a stable disease six months after initiation of treatment. The median TTP was 57.0 days; the median TTSP was estimated to be 358.0 days. Cyclophosphamide, GV1001 and GM-CSF treatment were well tolerated and most adverse events, which were of grade 1 or 2, were generally related to the injection procedure and injection site reactions. GV1001 treatment resulted in a decrease in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells; however, no GV1001 specific immune responses were detected after vaccination. Conclusions Low dose cyclophosphamide treatment followed by GV1001 vaccinations did not show antitumor efficacy as per tumor response and time to progression. Further studies are needed to analyze the effect of a combined chemo-immunotherapy to treat patients with HCC. Trial registration NCT00444782

  7. An open-label, two-stage, phase II study of bevacizumab and lapatinib in children with recurrent or refractory ependymoma: a collaborative ependymoma research network study (CERN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWire, Mariko; Fouladi, Maryam; Turner, David C; Wetmore, Cynthia; Hawkins, Cynthia; Jacobs, Carmen; Yuan, Ying; Liu, Diane; Goldman, Stewart; Fisher, Paul; Rytting, Michael; Bouffet, Eric; Khakoo, Yasmin; Hwang, Eugene I; Foreman, Nicholas; Stewart, Clinton F; Gilbert, Mark R; Gilbertson, Richard; Gajjar, Amar

    2015-05-01

    Co-expression of ERBB2 and ERBB4, reported in 75% of pediatric ependymomas, correlates with worse overall survival. Lapatinib, a selective ERBB1 and ERBB2 inhibitor has produced prolonged disease stabilization in patients with ependymoma in a phase I study. Bevacizumab exposure in ependymoma xenografts leads to ablation of tumor self-renewing cells, arresting growth. Thus, we conducted an open-label, phase II study of bevacizumab and lapatinib in children with recurrent ependymomas. Patients ≤ 21 years of age with recurrent ependymoma received lapatinib orally twice daily (900 mg/m(2)/dose to the first 10 patients, and then 700 mg/m(2)/dose) and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day course. Lapatinib serum trough levels were analyzed prior to each course. Total and phosphorylated VEGFR2 expression was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) before doses 1 and 2 of bevacizumab and 24-48 h following dose 2 of bevacizumab. Twenty-four patients with a median age of 10 years (range 2-21 years) were enrolled; 22 were eligible and 20 evaluable for response. Thirteen had anaplastic ependymoma. There were no objective responses; 4 patients had stable disease for ≥ 4 courses (range 4-14). Grade 3 toxicities included rash, elevated ALT, and diarrhea. Grade 4 toxicities included peri-tracheostomy hemorrhage (n = 1) and elevated creatinine phosphokinase (n = 1). The median lapatinib pre-dose trough concentration was 3.72 µM. Although the combination of bevacizumab and lapatinib was well tolerated in children with recurrent ependymoma, it proved ineffective.

  8. Phase II open-label study to assess efficacy and safety of lenalidomide in combination with cetuximab in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Siena

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of combination treatment with lenalidomide and cetuximab in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients. This was a phase II multicenter, open-label trial comprising a safety lead-in phase (phase IIa to determine the maximum tolerated dose, and a randomized proof of concept phase (phase IIb to determine the response rate of lenalidomide plus cetuximab combination therapy. Phase IIa treatment comprised oral lenalidomide (starting dose 25 mg/day and intravenous cetuximab (400 mg/m(2 followed by weekly 250 mg/m(2 in 28-day cycles. In phase IIb patients were randomized to either the phase IIa treatment schedule of lenalidomide plus cetuximab combination therapy or lenalidomide 25 mg/day monotherapy. Eight patients were enrolled into phase IIa. One patient developed a dose-limiting toxicity and the maximum tolerated dose of lenalidomide was determined at 25 mg/day. Forty-three patients were enrolled into phase IIb proof of concept. Best response was stable disease in 9 patients and study enrollment was terminated prematurely due to lack of efficacy in both treatment arms and failure to achieve the planned response objective. The majority of adverse events were grade 1 and 2. In both phases, the adverse events most commonly attributed to any study drugs were fatigue, rash and other skin disorders, diarrhea, nausea, and stomatitis. Thirty-nine deaths occurred; none was related to study drug. The combination of lenalidomide and cetuximab appeared to be well tolerated but did not have clinically meaningful activity in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01032291.

  9. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Richard, Marta; Massutí, Bartomeu; Pineda, Eva; Alonso, Vicente; Marmol, Maribel; Castellano, Daniel; Fonseca, Emilio; Galán, Antonio; Llanos, Marta; Sala, Maria Angeles; Pericay, Carlos; Rivera, Fernando; Sastre, Javier; Segura, Angel; Quindós, Maria; Maisonobe, Pascal

    2013-09-20

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18.

  10. A unique restriction site in the flaA gene allows rapid differentiation of group I and group II Clostridium botulinum strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J; Tran, Shulin; Tam, Kevin J; Austin, John W

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of botulism. Based on distinctive physiological traits, strains of C. botulinum can be divided into four groups: however, only groups I and II are associated with human illness. Alignment of the flaA gene sequences from 40 group I and 40 group II strains identified a single BsrG1 restriction cut site that was present at base pair 283 in all group II flaA sequences and was not found in any group I sequence. The flaA gene was amplified by rapid colony PCR from 22 group I strains and 18 group II strains and digested with BsrGI restriction enzyme. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining showed two fragments, following restriction digestion of group II flaA gene amplicons with BsrGI, but only a single band of uncut flaA from group I strains. Combining rapid colony PCR with BsrGI restriction digest of the flaA gene at 60 degrees C is a significant improvement over current methods, such as meat digestion or amplified fragment length polymorphism, as a strain can be identified as either group I or group II in under 5 h when starting with a visible plated C. botulinum colony.

  11. The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the intrathecal noradrenaline-induced facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakitama, K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers (group II flexor reflex) in anesthetized intact rats and on the intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex in anesthetized spinal rats were investigated. In anesthetized intact rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen inhibited the group II flexor reflex dose-dependently, whereas the inhibitory effect of tizanidine-HCl was bell-shaped. The effect of diazepam tended to be saturated. In anesthetized spinal rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl, diazepam and baclofen also depressed the group II flexor reflex, but tizanidine-HCl slightly increased it. The intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex was not affected by mephenesin or diazepam, but was inhibited by tizanidine-HCl, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen. These results suggest that compounds with centrally acting muscle relaxant activity depress the group II flexor reflex in different manners, and the inhibition of descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord participates in the depressant action of the group II flexor reflex produced by tolperisone-HCl, tizanidine-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen.

  12. The anatomy of the NGC5044 group - II. Stellar populations and star formation histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, J. Trevor; Proctor, Robert N.; Rasmussen, Jesper; Brough, Sarah; Forbes, Duncan A.

    2009-07-01

    The distribution of galaxy properties in groups and clusters holds important information on galaxy evolution and growth of structure in the Universe. While clusters have received appreciable attention in this regard, the role of groups as fundamental to formation of the present-day galaxy population has remained relatively unaddressed. Here, we present stellar ages, metallicities and α-element abundances derived using Lick indices for 67 spectroscopically confirmed members of the NGC5044 galaxy group with the aim of shedding light on galaxy evolution in the context of the group environment. We find that galaxies in the NGC5044 group show evidence for a strong relationship between stellar mass and metallicity, consistent with their counterparts in both higher and lower mass groups and clusters. Galaxies show no clear trend of age or α-element abundance with mass, but these data form a tight sequence when fitted simultaneously in age, metallicity and stellar mass. In the context of the group environment, our data support the tidal disruption of low-mass galaxies at small group-centric radii, as evident from an apparent lack of galaxies below ~109Msolar within ~100kpc of the brightest group galaxy. Using a joint analysis of absorption- and emission-line metallicities, we are able to show that the star-forming galaxy population in the NGC5044 group appears to require gas removal to explain the ~1.5dex offset between absorption- and emission-line metallicities observed in some cases. A comparison with other stellar population properties suggests that this gas removal is dominated by galaxy interactions with the hot intragroup medium.

  13. Tips for leaders, Part II: Leading a private practice physician group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2011-09-01

    Leaders of private practice groups face many challenges. Establishing proper governance, having a good mission statement and business plan, having good participation by the members in administrative practice activities, and establishing proper channels of communication are some important steps. Once that is done, efficient decision making can be done regarding issues of finance, operations, keeping existing business, and finding new opportunities. Who is chosen to be the leader of such a group is less dependent on their field of specialization, but more dependent on their leadership skills. Nuclear medicine physicians interested in the future of their group and field should seek opportunities to learn leadership skills by experience and education.

  14. A simple generalization of the El-Gamal cryptosystem to non-abelian groups II

    CERN Document Server

    Mahalanobis, Ayan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the MOR crystosystem using the special linear groups over finite fields. At this present state of knowledge, we show that the MOR cryptosystem is more secure than the El-Gamal cryptosystem over finite fields.

  15. Matrix Elements of One- and Two-Body Operators in the Unitary Group Approach (II) - Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Lian-Rong; PAN Feng

    2001-01-01

    Simple analytical expressions for one- and two-body matrix elements in the unitary group approach to the configuration interaction problems of many-electron systems are obtained based on the previous results for general Un irreps.

  16. A Complex Multiherbal Regimen Based on Ayurveda Medicine for the Management of Hepatic Cirrhosis Complicated by Ascites: Nonrandomized, Uncontrolled, Single Group, Open-Label Observational Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish V; Patel, Kalapi B; Gupta, Shivenarain; Michalsen, Andreas; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Kessler, Christian S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, especially if complicated by ascites. This chronic condition can be related to the classical disease entity jalodara in Traditional Indian Medicine (Ayurveda). The present paper aims to evaluate the general potential of Ayurvedic therapy for overall clinical outcomes in hepatic cirrhosis complicated by ascites (HCcA). In form of a nonrandomized, uncontrolled, single group, open-label observational clinical study, 56 patients fulfilling standardized diagnostic criteria for HCcA were observed during their treatment at the P. D. Patel Ayurveda Hospital, Nadiad, India. Based on Ayurvedic tradition, a standardized treatment protocol was developed and implemented, consisting of oral administration of single and compound herbal preparations combined with purificatory measures as well as dietary and lifestyle regimens. The outcomes were assessed by measuring liver functions through specific clinical features and laboratory parameters and by evaluating the Child-Pugh prognostic grade score. After 6 weeks of treatment and a follow-up period of 18 weeks, the outcomes showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements. Further larger and randomized trials on effectiveness, safety, and quality of the Ayurvedic approach in the treatment of HCcA are warranted to support these preliminary findings.

  17. A Complex Multiherbal Regimen Based on Ayurveda Medicine for the Management of Hepatic Cirrhosis Complicated by Ascites: Nonrandomized, Uncontrolled, Single Group, Open-Label Observational Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish V. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, especially if complicated by ascites. This chronic condition can be related to the classical disease entity jalodara in Traditional Indian Medicine (Ayurveda. The present paper aims to evaluate the general potential of Ayurvedic therapy for overall clinical outcomes in hepatic cirrhosis complicated by ascites (HCcA. In form of a nonrandomized, uncontrolled, single group, open-label observational clinical study, 56 patients fulfilling standardized diagnostic criteria for HCcA were observed during their treatment at the P. D. Patel Ayurveda Hospital, Nadiad, India. Based on Ayurvedic tradition, a standardized treatment protocol was developed and implemented, consisting of oral administration of single and compound herbal preparations combined with purificatory measures as well as dietary and lifestyle regimens. The outcomes were assessed by measuring liver functions through specific clinical features and laboratory parameters and by evaluating the Child-Pugh prognostic grade score. After 6 weeks of treatment and a follow-up period of 18 weeks, the outcomes showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements. Further larger and randomized trials on effectiveness, safety, and quality of the Ayurvedic approach in the treatment of HCcA are warranted to support these preliminary findings.

  18. Group Analysis of Nonlinear Internal Waves in Oceans. II: The symmetries and rotationally invariant solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, Nail H; Kovalev, Vladimir F

    2011-01-01

    74J30The maximal group of Lie point symmetries of a system of nonlinear equations used in geophysical fluid dynamics is presented. The Lie algebra of this group is infinite-dimensional and involves three arbitrary functions of time. The invariant solution under the rotation and dilation is constructed. Qualitative analysis of the invariant solution is provided and the energy of this solution is presented.

  19. RR Lyrae Luminosity Differences between Oosterhoff Group I and II Cluster Systems and the Origin of the Oosterhoff Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Woo; Carney, Bruce W.

    1999-09-01

    We present a comparative study of the Oosterhoff II cluster M2 and the Oosterhoff I cluster M3. Both have similar metallicities, [Fe/H]=-1.62 for M2 and -1.66 for M3, but very different horizontal-branch (HB) morphologies (B-R)/(B+V+R)=0.92 for M2 and 0.08 for M3. A period shift analysis and main-sequence fitting show that RRab variables in M2 are about 0.2 mag brighter than those in M3. Comparisons of the M2 period shift with Oosterhoff I clusters NGC 3201 and NGC 7006 also yield similar results, while a comparison between M2 and the Oosterhoff II cluster NGC 5986 reveals that the RR Lyrae luminosities are very similar. The luminosity difference is thought to be due to the evolutionary effect described in 1990 by Lee, Demarque, & Zinn: the M2 RRab variables have evolved away from the zero-age horizontal branch (ZAHB), while most M3 RRab variables lie near the ZAHB. A comparison of the mean period change rates of two clusters supports this hypothesis. Our relative age estimation using the difference in color between the base of giant branch and turn-off point shows that M2 is about 2 Gyr older than M3. Our result strongly suggests that the Oosterhoff dichotomy is due to age differences between Oosterhoff group I and II. This is consistent with the idea that the global second parameter is age. We discuss the kinematic differences between Oosterhoff group I and II clusters. Our result shows that the Oosterhoff group I clusters have zero or retrograde rotation with =-68+/-56 km s^-1 and sigma_los=131+/-28 km s^-1, while the Oosterhoff group II clusters have prograde rotation with =+94+/-47 km s^-1 and sigma_los=115+/-29 km s^-1, confirming a similar conclusion of van den Bergh. The difference in kinematics and ages between Oosterhoff group I and II clusters suggests that they may have different origins: The Oosterhoff II clusters were formed very early in the proto-Galaxy while the Oosterhoff I clusters were formed at different locations and at a later time, and were

  20. Rescue at nonpermissive temperature of complementation group II temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus by uv-irradiated VSV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, V.; Brun, G.

    1978-06-01

    Rescue is group-characteristic. The helper virus can be either the wt strain or a mutant belonging to any group of ts mutants except group II. With regard to genotype, the rescue progeny virus is temperature-sensitive and belongs to group II, and its ts II parent (ts O52(II)) can be characterized. As for phenotype, the in vitro thermal stability of rescue virions is intermediate between that of parental ts O52(II) and uv-irradiated wt virus, suggesting incorporation of some wt protein II molecules in the rescue virions. Different slopes (zero or different from zero) were seen in dose-effect curves representing rescue obtained by structural protein molecules, suggesting that protein II structural role could be distinguished from its functional role(s) by uv sensitivity. Differences in efficiency of the rescue of ts O52(II) by ts I mutants irradiated with low uv fluence may reflect their different transcribing capabilities at 39.6/sup 0/. The results are discussed taking into account the fact that the phenotype of group II mutants is characterized by an unstable nucleocapsid.

  1. HEAD - TO - HEAD COMPARISON OF TOLERABILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF SINGLE DOSE OF FOUR TOPICAL NSAIDS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CATARACT SURGERY : A RANDOMIZED OPEN LABEL PARALLEL GROUP STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Ophthalmic NSAIDs are used to control pain , discomfort and inflammation associated with ocular conditions and also , following ophthalmic cataract surgeries. These drugs can cause ocular discomfort following administration which lasts for a short duration. However , there exist differences in the intensity and duration of burning sensation among the c ommonly used ophthalmic NSAIDs. Hence , we evaluated the tolerability and acceptability of four topical NSAIDS i.e. , 0.3% nepafenac (N , 0.5% ketorolac (K , 0.4% ketorolac (K LS and 0.09% bromfenac (B after instilling a single drop. METHODS: This randomized , open label , parallel group study was conducted in the department of Ophthalmology in Narayana Medical College , Nellore. A total number of 80 patients participated in the study. Randomization list was computer generated in a ratio of 1:1:1:1 of N , K , K L Sand B. Each patient received one drop of the study drug either in right or left eye which was also decidedat random.Patients of either gender above21 years of age , having no ocular surface pathology and eligible for cataract surgery were include d in the study. Outcome variables included ocular burning intensity on VAS (0 - 100 mm at 0 min (immediately , 2 min and 6 min after administration of medications , time to complete pain relief and global medication performance rated by patient as 0 (bad , 1 (fair , 2(good or 3 (severe . RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 52.85±17.46 years. All groups were age matched , however there were more females than males (pN>K LS >K on global medication performance. CONCLUSION: Bromfenac had better tolerability and acceptability as compared to other tested topical NSAIDs , which was in the order of B>N> K LS >K.

  2. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  3. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  4. Group Lifting Structures For Multirate Filter Banks, II: Linear Phase Filter Banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brislawn, Christopher M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The theory of group lifting structures is applied to linear phase lifting factorizations for the two nontrivial classes of two-channel linear phase perfect reconstruction filter banks, the whole-and half-sample symmetric classes. Group lifting structures defined for the reversible and irreversible classes of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are shown to satisfy the hypotheses of the uniqueness theorem for group lifting structures. It follows that linear phase lifting factorizations of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are therefore independent of the factorization methods used to compute them. These results cover the specification of user-defined whole-sample symmetric filter banks in Part 2 of the ISO JPEG 2000 standard.

  5. Synthesis, Cu(II) complexation, 64Cu-labeling and biological evaluation of cross-bridged cyclam chelators with phosphonate pendant arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdani, Riccardo; Stigers, Dannon J; Fiamengo, Ashley L; Wei, Lihui; Li, Barbara T Y; Golen, James A; Rheingold, Arnold L; Weisman, Gary R; Wong, Edward H; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2012-02-21

    A new class of cross-bridged cyclam-based macrocycles featuring phosphonate pendant groups has been developed. 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,8-di(methanephosphonic acid) (CB-TE2P, 1) and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1-(methanephosphonic acid)-8-(methanecarboxylic acid) (CB-TE1A1P, 2) have been synthesized and have been shown to readily form neutral copper(II) complexes at room temperature as the corresponding dianions. Both complexes showed high kinetic inertness to demetallation and crystal structures confirmed complete encapsulation of copper(II) ion within each macrocycle's cleft-like structure. Unprecedented for cross-bridged cyclam derivatives, both CB-TE2P (1) and CB-TE1A1P (2) can be radiolabeled with (64)Cu at room temperature in less than 1 h with specific activities >1 mCi μg(-1). The in vivo behavior of both (64)Cu-CB-TE2P and (64)Cu-CB-TE1A1P were investigated through biodistribution studies using healthy male Lewis rats. Both new compounds showed rapid clearance with similar or lower accumulation in non-target organs/tissues when compared to other copper chelators including CB-TE2A, NOTA and Diamsar.

  6. Insights into functional-group-tolerant polymerization catalysis with phosphine-sulfonamide palladium (II) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Jian, Zhongbao

    2014-12-08

    Two series of cationic palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NHC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe}2[A]2 (X1+-A: R1=R2=H: H1+-A; R1=R2=CH(CH3)2: DIPP1+-A; R1=H, R2=CF3: CF31+-A; A=BF4 or SbF6) and neutral palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe(L)} (X1-acetone: L=acetone; X1-dmso: L=dimethyl sulfoxide; X1-pyr: L=pyridine) chelated by a phosphine-sulfonamide were synthesized and fully characterized. Stoichiometric insertion of methyl acrylate (MA) into all complexes revealed that a 2,1 regiochemistry dominates in the first insertion of MA. Subsequently, for the cationic complexes X1+-A, β-H elimination from the 2,1-insertion product X2+-AMA-2,1 is overwhelmingly favored over a second MA insertion to yield two major products X4+-AMA-1,2 and X5+-AMA. By contrast, for the weakly coordinated neutral complexes X1-acetone and X1-dmso, a second MA insertion of the 2,1-insertion product X2MA-2,1 is faster than β-H elimination and gives X3MA as major products. For the strongly coordinated neutral complexes X1-pyr, no second MA insertion and no β-H elimination (except for DIPP2-pyrMA-2,1) were observed for the 2,1-insertion product X2-pyrMA-2,1. The cationic complexes X1+-A exhibited high catalytic activities for ethylene dimerization, affording butenes (C4) with a high selectivity of up to 97.7% (1-butene: 99.3%). Differences in activities and selectivities suggest that the phosphine-sulfonamide ligands remain coordinated to the metal center in a bidentate fashion in the catalytically active species. By comparison, the neutral complexes X1-acetone, X1-dmso, and X1-pyr showed very low activity towards ethylene to give traces of oligomers. DFT analyses taking into account the two possible coordination modes (O or N) of the sulfonamide ligand for the cationic system CF31+ suggested that the experimentally observed high activity in ethylene dimerization is the result of a facile first ethylene insertion into the O-coordinated PdMe isomer and

  7. Coherent states, quantum gravity, and the Born- Oppenheimer approximation. II. Compact Lie groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottmeister, Alexander; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    In this article, the second of three, we discuss and develop the basis of a Weyl quantisation for compact Lie groups aiming at loop quantum gravity-type models. This Weyl quantisation may serve as the main mathematical tool to implement the program of space adiabatic perturbation theory in such models. As we already argued in our first article, space adiabatic perturbation theory offers an ideal framework to overcome the obstacles that hinder the direct implementation of the conventional Born-Oppenheimer approach in the canonical formulation of loop quantum gravity. Additionally, we conjecture the existence of a new form of the Segal-Bargmann-Hall "coherent state" transform for compact Lie groups G, which we prove for G = U(1)n and support by numerical evidence for G = SU(2). The reason for conjoining this conjecture with the main topic of this article originates in the observation that the coherent state transform can be used as a basic building block of a coherent state quantisation (Berezin quantisation) for compact Lie groups G. But, as Weyl and Berezin quantisation for ℝ2d are intimately related by heat kernel evolution, it is natural to ask whether a similar connection exists for compact Lie groups as well. Moreover, since the formulation of space adiabatic perturbation theory requires a (deformation) quantisation as minimal input, we analyse the question to what extent the coherent state quantisation, defined by the Segal-Bargmann-Hall transform, can serve as basis of the former.

  8. Moving Toward Cultural Pluralism, Part II: "Enculturation within Group Culture-Clusters."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes, Jose R.

    A survey of assimilation processes of Vietnamese immigrants suggests that biculturalism enables a person to gain the benefits of economic and political enfranchisement while still receiving social and psychological nourishment from his/her native culture-cluster. The sample consisted of three groups of Vietnamese immigrants who arrived in San…

  9. Intragroup diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies II. HCG 15, 35 and 51

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rocha, C; de Oliveira, C Mendes

    2008-01-01

    This continuing study of intragroup light in compact groups of galaxies aims to establish new constraints to models of formation and evolution of galaxy groups, specially of compact groups, which are a key part in the evolution of larger structures, such as clusters. In this paper we present three additional groups (HCG 15, 35 and 51) using deep wide field $B$ and $R$ band images observed with the LAICA camera at the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA). This instrument provides us with very stable flatfielding, a mandatory condition for reliably measuring intragroup diffuse light. The images were analyzed with the OV\\_WAV package, a wavelet technique that allows us to uncover the intragroup component in an unprecedented way. We have detected that 19, 15 and 26% of the total light of HCG 15, 35 and 51, respectively, is in the diffuse component, with colours that are compatible with old stellar populations and with mean surface brightness that can be as low as $28.4 {\\rm B mag arcsec^{-2}}$. Dyn...

  10. Quantum groups as generalized gauge symmetries in WZNW models. Part II. The quantized model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiivanov, L.; Furlan, P.

    2017-07-01

    This is the second part of a paper dealing with the "internal" (gauge) symmetry of the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) model on a compact Lie group G. It contains a systematic exposition, for G = SU( n), of the canonical quantization based on the study of the classical model (performed in the first part) following the quantum group symmetric approach first advocated by L.D. Faddeev and collaborators. The internal symmetry of the quantized model is carried by the chiral WZNW zero modes satisfying quadratic exchange relations and an n-linear determinant condition. For generic values of the deformation parameter the Fock representation of the zero modes' algebra gives rise to a model space of U q ( sl( n)). The relevant root of unity case is studied in detail for n = 2 when a "restricted" (finite dimensional) quotient quantum group is shown to appear in a natural way. The module structure of the zero modes' Fock space provides a specific duality with the solutions of the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equation for the four point functions of primary fields suggesting the existence of an extended state space of logarithmic CFT type. Combining left and right zero modes (i.e., returning to the 2 D model), the rational CFT structure shows up in a setting reminiscent to covariant quantization of gauge theories in which the restricted quantum group plays the role of a generalized gauge symmetry.

  11. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA - II. Non-thermal diffuse emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regis, Marco; Richter, Laura; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; de Blok, W. J. G.; Massardi, Marcella

    Our closest neighbours, the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, are extremely quiescent and dim objects, where thermal and non-thermal diffuse emissions lack, so far, of detection. In order to possibly study the dSph interstellar medium, deep observations are required. They could reveal

  12. Mitochondrion-to-Chloroplast DNA Transfers and Intragenomic Proliferation of Chloroplast Group II Introns in Gloeotilopsis Green Algae (Ulotrichales, Ulvophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmel, Monique; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2016-09-19

    To probe organelle genome evolution in the Ulvales/Ulotrichales clade, the newly sequenced chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of Gloeotilopsis planctonica and Gloeotilopsis sarcinoidea (Ulotrichales) were compared with those of Pseudendoclonium akinetum (Ulotrichales) and of the few other green algae previously sampled in the Ulvophyceae. At 105,236 bp, the G planctonica mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the largest mitochondrial genome reported so far among chlorophytes, whereas the 221,431-bp G planctonica and 262,888-bp G sarcinoidea chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) are the largest chloroplast genomes analyzed among the Ulvophyceae. Gains of non-coding sequences largely account for the expansion of these genomes. Both Gloeotilopsis cpDNAs lack the inverted repeat (IR) typically found in green plants, indicating that two independent IR losses occurred in the Ulvales/Ulotrichales. Our comparison of the Pseudendoclonium and Gloeotilopsis cpDNAs offered clues regarding the mechanism of IR loss in the Ulotrichales, suggesting that internal sequences from the rDNA operon were differentially lost from the two original IR copies during this process. Our analyses also unveiled a number of genetic novelties. Short mtDNA fragments were discovered in two distinct regions of the G sarcinoidea cpDNA, providing the first evidence for intracellular inter-organelle gene migration in green algae. We identified for the first time in green algal organelles, group II introns with LAGLIDADG ORFs as well as group II introns inserted into untranslated gene regions. We discovered many group II introns occupying sites not previously documented for the chloroplast genome and demonstrated that a number of them arose by intragenomic proliferation, most likely through retrohoming.

  13. Evolutionary trails of plant group II Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase (HDC genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species.

  14. Three classes of plasmid (47-63 kb) carry the type B neurotoxin gene cluster of group II Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Austin, John W; Weedmark, Kelly A; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47-63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin-antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4.

  15. Albino Leaf 2 is involved in the splicing of chloroplast group I and II introns in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhong; Zhu, Haitao; Xing, Yi; Tan, Jianjie; Chen, Xionghui; Zhang, Jianjun; Peng, Haifeng; Xie, Qingjun; Zhang, Zemin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an essential role in plant growth and development through manipulating photosynthesis and the production of hormones and metabolites. Although many genes or regulators involved in chloroplast biogenesis and development have been isolated and characterized, identification of novel components is still lacking. We isolated a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, termed albino leaf 2 (al2), using genetic screening. Phenotypic analysis revealed that the al2 mutation caused obvious albino leaves at the early developmental stage, eventually leading to al2 seedling death. Electron microscopy investigations indicated that the chloroplast structure was disrupted in the al2 mutants at an early developmental stage and subsequently resulted in the breakdown of the entire chloroplast. Molecular cloning illustrated that AL2 encodes a chloroplast group IIA intron splicing facilitator (CRS1) in rice, which was confirmed by a genetic complementation experiment. Moreover, our results demonstrated that AL2 was constitutively expressed in various tissues, including green and non-green tissues. Interestingly, we found that the expression levels of a subset of chloroplast genes that contain group IIA and IIB introns were significantly reduced in the al2 mutant compared to that in the wild type, suggesting that AL2 is a functional CRS1 in rice. Differing from the orthologous CRS1 in maize and Arabidopsis that only regulates splicing of the chloroplast group II intron, our results demonstrated that the AL2 gene is also likely to be involved in the splicing of the chloroplast group I intron. They also showed that disruption of AL2 results in the altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes, including chlorophyll biosynthetic genes, plastid-encoded polymerases and nuclear-encoded chloroplast genes. Taken together, these findings shed new light on the function of nuclear-encoded chloroplast group I and II intron splicing factors in rice. PMID:27543605

  16. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxyurea significantly reduced the conversion from conditional TCD velocities to abnormal velocities; whether hydroxyurea can be used for children with newly diagnosed severe cerebrovascular disease in place of starting transfusion therapy remains unknown. Objective The primary objective of the EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND) trial is to investigate the effect of open label hydroxyurea on the maximum time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) after 18 months of treatment compared to the pre-treatment value. Secondary objectives include the effects of hydroxyurea on serial TCD velocities, the incidence of neurological and non-neurological events, quality of life (QOL), body composition and metabolism, toxicity and treatment response, changes to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), genetic and serologic markers of disease severity, and cognitive and pulmonary function. Methods This prospective Phase II trial will enroll children with SCA in Jamaica, between the ages of 2 and 17 years, with either conditional (170-199 cm/sec) or abnormal (≥ 200 cm/sec) TCD velocities. Oral hydroxyurea will be administered daily and escalated to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Participants will be seen in the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU) in Kingston, Jamaica monthly until achieving MTD, and then every 3 months. TCD will be performed every 6 months. Results Currently, 43 participants have been enrolled out of a projected 50. There was one

  17. Renormalization Group and Decoupling in Curved Space II. The Standard Model and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbar, E V; Gorbar, Eduard V.; Shapiro, Ilya L.

    2003-01-01

    We continue the study of the renormalization group and decoupling of massive fields in curved space, started in the previous article and analyse the higher derivative sector of the vacuum metric-dependent action of the Standard Model. The QCD sector at low-energies is described in terms of the composite effective fields. For fermions and scalars the massless limit shows perfect correspondence with the conformal anomaly, but similar limit in a massive vector case requires an extra compensating scalar. In all three cases the decoupling goes smoothly and monotonic. A particularly interesting case is the renormalization group flow in the theory with broken supersymmetry, where the sign of one of the beta-functions changes on the way from the UV to IR.

  18. Solvable Groups, Free Divisors and Nonisolated Matrix Singularities II: Vanishing Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Damon, James

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we use the results from the first part to compute the vanishing topology for matrix singularities based on certain spaces of matrices. We place the variety of singular matrices in a geometric configuration of free divisors which are the "exceptional orbit varieties" for repesentations of solvable groups. Because there are towers of representations for towers of solvable groups, the free divisors actually form a tower of free divisors $E_n$, and we give an inductive procedure for computing the vanishing topology of the matrix singularities. The inductive procedure we use is an extension of that introduced by L\\^{e}-Greuel for computing the Milnor number of an ICIS. Instead of linear subspaces, we use free divisors arising from the geometric configuration and which correspond to subgroups of the solvable groups. Here the vanishing topology involves a singular version of the Milnor fiber; however, it still has the good connectivity properties and is homotopy equivalent to a bouquet of spheres, whos...

  19. A conjugation-free geometric presentation of fundamental groups of arrangements II: Expansion and some properties

    CERN Document Server

    Eliyahu, Meital; Teicher, Mina

    2010-01-01

    A conjugation-free geometric presentation of a fundamental group is a presentation with the natural topological generators $x_1, \\dots, x_n$ and the cyclic relations: $x_{i_k}x_{i_{k-1}} \\cdots x_{i_1} = x_{i_{k-1}} \\cdots x_{i_1} x_{i_k} = \\cdots = x_{i_1} x_{i_k} \\cdots x_{i_2}$ with no conjugations on the generators. We have already proved that if the graph of the arrangement is a disjoint union of cycles, then its fundamental group has a conjugation-free geometric presentation. In this paper, we extend this property to arrangements whose graphs are a disjoint union of cycle-tree graphs. Moreover, we study some properties of this type of presentations for a fundamental group of a line arrangement's complement. We show that these presentations satisfy a completeness property in the sense of Dehornoy, if the corresponding graph of the arrangement is triangle-free. The completeness property is a powerful property which leads to many nice properties concerning the presentation (as the left-cancellativity of th...

  20. Amyloid-beta neurotoxicity and clearance are both regulated by glial group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Daniela; Carniglia, Lila; Turati, Juan; Ramírez, Delia; Saba, Julieta; Caruso, Carla; Lasaga, Mercedes

    2017-09-01

    Astrocytes are now fully endorsed as key players in CNS functionality and plasticity. We recently showed that metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3R) activation by LY379268 promotes non-amyloidogenic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in cultured astrocytes, leading to increased release of neuroprotective sAPPα. Furthermore, mGlu3R expression is reduced in hippocampal astrocytes from PDAPP-J20 mice, suggesting a role for these receptors in Alzheimer's disease. The present study enquires into the role of astroglial-derived neurotrophins induced by mGlu3R activation in neurotoxicity triggered by amyloid β (Aβ). Conditioned medium from LY379268-treated astrocytes protected hippocampal neurons from Aβ-induced cell death. Immunodepletion of sAPPα from the conditioned medium prevented its protective effect. LY379268 induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in astrocytes, and neutralizing BDNF from conditioned medium also prevented its neuroprotective effect on Aβ neurotoxicity. LY379268 was also able to decrease Aβ-induced neuron death by acting directly on neuronal mGlu3R. On the other hand, LY379268 increased Aβ uptake in astrocytes and microglia. Indeed, and more importantly, a reduction in Aβ-induced neuron death was observed when co-cultured with LY379268-pretreated astrocytes, suggesting a link between neuroprotection and increased glial phagocytic activity. Altogether, these results indicate a double function for glial mGlu3R activation against Aβ neurotoxicity: (i) it increases the release of protective neurotrophins such as sAPPα and BDNF, and (ii) it induces amyloid removal from extracellular space by glia-mediated phagocytosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identifying the Young Low-mass Stars within 25 pc. II. Distances, Kinematics, and Group Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-01

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of lsim300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of lsim25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young (lsim3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and β Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages lsim150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, the du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Subaru Telescope. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial

  2. Sustainability Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability labeling originated from a need to protect the identity of alternative systems of food production and to increase market transparency. From the 1980s onwards sustainability labeling has changed into a policy instrument replacing direct government regulation of the food market, and a

  3. Constructive Tensorial Group Field Theory II: The $U(1)-T^4_4$ Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lahoche, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we continue our program of non-pertubative constructions of tensorial group field theories (TGFT). We prove analyticity and Borel summability in a suitable domain of the coupling constant of the simplest super-renormalizable TGFT which contains some ultraviolet divergencies, namely the color-symmetric quartic melonic rank-four model with Abelian $U(1)$ gauge invariance, nicknamed $U(1)-T^4_4$. We use a multiscale loop vertex expansion. It is an extension of the loop vertex expansion (the basic constructive technique for non-local theories) which is required for theories that involve non-trivial renormalization.

  4. Optimal Variational Approximations to Renormalization Groups. II. Determination of Optimal Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Michael N.

    1980-03-01

    An algorithm for determining the sequence of variational parameters in a variational approximation to a real-space renormalization group is developed. Using this procedure, the Kadanoff one-hypercube approximation for the two-dimensional Ising model is investigated in some detail. We conclude that the apparent success of this method is somewhat fortuitous; a consistent and completely optimized treatment yielding considerably poorer estimates of the specific heat exponents. In addition, the variational parameter is found to be non-analytic at the fixed point. The nature of singularity agrees with the predictions of van Saarloos, van Leeuwen, and Pruisken.

  5. Mutations in the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron that retain mobility in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Lisa M

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that form conserved secondary and tertiary structures. In order to determine which of the conserved structural elements are required for mobility, a series of domain and sub-domain deletions were made in the Lactococcus lactis group II intron (Ll.LtrB and tested for mobility in a genetic assay. Point mutations in domains V and VI were also tested. Results The largest deletion that could be made without severely compromising mobility was 158 nucleotides in DIVb(1–2. This mutant had a mobility frequency comparable to the wild-type Ll.LtrB intron (ΔORF construct. Hence, all subsequent mutations were done in this mutant background. Deletion of DIIb reduced mobility to approximately 18% of wild-type, while another deletion in domain II (nts 404–459 was mobile to a minor extent. Only two deletions in DI and none in DIII were tolerated. Some mobility was also observed for a DIVa deletion mutant. Of the three point mutants at position G3 in DV, only G3A retained mobility. In DVI, deletion of the branch-point nucleotide abolished mobility, but the presence of any nucleotide at the branch-point position restored mobility to some extent. Conclusions The smallest intron capable of efficient retrohoming was 725 nucleotides, comprising the DIVb(1–2 and DII(iia,b deletions. The tertiary elements found to be nonessential for mobility were alpha, kappa and eta. In DV, only the G3A mutant was mobile. A branch-point residue is required for intron mobility.

  6. Clustering of local group distances: Publication bias or correlated measurements? II. M31 and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Bono, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, via Della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133, Roma (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The accuracy of extragalactic distance measurements ultimately depends on robust, high-precision determinations of the distances to the galaxies in the local volume. Following our detailed study addressing possible publication bias in the published distance determinations to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), here we extend our distance range of interest to include published distance moduli to M31 and M33, as well as to a number of their well-known dwarf galaxy companions. We aim at reaching consensus on the best, most homogeneous, and internally most consistent set of Local Group distance moduli to adopt for future, more general use based on the largest set of distance determinations to individual Local Group galaxies available to date. Based on a careful, statistically weighted combination of the main stellar population tracers (Cepheids, RR Lyrae variables, and the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch), we derive a recommended distance modulus to M31 of (m−M){sub 0}{sup M31}=24.46±0.10 mag—adopting as our calibration an LMC distance modulus of (m−M){sub 0}{sup LMC}=18.50 mag—and a fully internally consistent set of benchmark distances to key galaxies in the local volume, enabling us to establish a robust and unbiased, near-field extragalactic distance ladder.

  7. Clustering of Local Group distances: publication bias or correlated measurements? II. M31 and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    de Grijs, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of extragalactic distance measurements ultimately depends on robust, high-precision determinations of the distances to the galaxies in the local volume. Following our detailed study addressing possible publication bias in the published distance determinations to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), here we extend our distance range of interest to include published distance moduli to M31 and M33, as well as to a number of their well-known dwarf galaxy companions. We aim at reaching consensus on the best, most homogeneous, and internally most consistent set of Local Group distance moduli to adopt for future, more general use based on the largest set of distance determinations to individual Local Group galaxies available to date. Based on a careful, statistically weighted combination of the main stellar population tracers (Cepheids, RR Lyrae variables, and the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch), we derive a recommended distance modulus to M31 of $(m-M)_0^{\\rm M31} = 24.46 \\pm 0.10$ mag---ado...

  8. Galaxy Interactions in Compact Groups II: abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, F P A; Borthakur, S; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Heckman, T M; Yun, M S; Chambers, K C

    2015-01-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of HII regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three HII regions harbor an oxygen abundance ~0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km/s with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. HI observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broadband optical images from Pan-STARRS suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain...

  9. New strings for old Veneziano amplitudes. II. Group-theoretic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, A. L.

    2006-09-01

    In this part of our four parts work we use theory of polynomial invariants of finite pseudo-reflection groups in order to reconstruct both the Veneziano and Veneziano-like (tachyon-free) amplitudes and the generating function reproducing these amplitudes. We demonstrate that such generating function and amplitudes associated with it can be recovered with help of finite dimensional exactly solvableN=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model known earlier from works of Witten, Stone and others. Using the Lefschetz isomorphism theorem we replace traditional supersymmetric calculations by the group-theoretic thus solving the Veneziano model exactly using standard methods of representation theory. Mathematical correctness of our arguments relies on important theorems by Shepard and Todd, Serre and Solomon proven respectively in the early 50s and 60s and documented in the monograph by Bourbaki. Based on these theorems, we explain why the developed formalism leaves all known results of conformal field theories unchanged. We also explain why these theorems impose stringent requirements connecting analytical properties of scattering amplitudes with symmetries of space-time in which such amplitudes act.

  10. Galaxy Groups in the SDSS DR4: II. halo occupation statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaohu; Bosch, Frank C van den

    2007-01-01

    We investigate various halo occupation statistics using a large galaxy group catalogue constructed from the SDSS DR4 with an adaptive halo-based group finder. The conditional luminosity function (CLF) is measured separately for all, red and blue galaxies, as well as in terms of central and satellite galaxies. The CLFs for central and satellite galaxies can be well modelled with a log-normal distribution and a modified Schechter form, respectively. About 85% of the central galaxies and about 80% of the satellite galaxies in halos with masses $M_h\\ga 10^{14}\\msunh$ are red galaxies. These numbers decrease to 50% and 40%, respectively, in halos with $M_h \\sim 10^{12}\\msunh$. For halos of a given mass, the distribution of the luminosities of central galaxies, $L_c$, has a dispersion of about 0.15 dex. The mean luminosity (stellar mass) of the central galaxies scales with halo mass as $L_c\\propto M_h^{0.17}$ ($M_{*,c}\\propto M_h^{0.22}$) for halos with masses $M\\gg 10^{12.5}\\msunh$, and both relations are signific...

  11. HLA antigens in South India: II. Selected caste groups of Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, R; Kakkanaiah, V N; Pitchappan, R M

    1987-09-01

    HLA-A, B antigen and haplotype frequencies were studied in four different caste groups of Tamil Nadu living in Madurai. A total number of 101 Nadars, 36 Kallars, 54 Iyers and 57 Telugu-speaking Naidus were studied. HLA A3 and B15 were significantly higher in Nadars; A10 & B8 in Kallars and Aw19, B12 & B35 in Iyers. HLA A-B haplotypes A10-B7, A28-B17 & A24-B- were characteristic of Nadars; A10-B8 & A1-B-, Kallars; Aw19-B12 & A1-B15, Iyers and A2-B-, Naidus. Negative linkage disequilibria for Aw19-B7, A28-B15 & A9-B51 were significant in Nadars; A1-B5, A1-B12 & Aw19-B- in Iyers and A2-B17 in Naidus. Heterogeneity chi-square based on antigen frequency and genetic distance also suggest the heterogeneous nature of the population of South India. Will these caste groups with such diverse haplotypic combinations differ from one another in their immune response and susceptibility to a given epidemic or infection?

  12. Group, field and isolated early-type galaxies II. Global trends from nuclear data

    CERN Document Server

    Denicolo, G; Terlevich, E; Forbes, D A; Terlevich, A I; Denicolo, Glenda; Terlevich, Roberto; Terlevich, Elena; Forbes, Duncan A.; Terlevich, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    We have derived ages, metallicities and enhanced-element ratios [alpha/Fe] for a sample of 83 early-type galaxies essentially in groups, the field or isolated objects. The stellar population properties derived for each galaxy corresponds to the nuclear r_e/8 aperture extraction. The median age found for Es is 5.8 +- 0.6 Gyr and the average metallicity is +0.37 +- 0.03 dex. For S0s, the median age is 3.0 +- 0.6 Gyr and [Z/H] = 0.53 +- 0.04 dex. We compare the distribution of our galaxies in the Hbeta-[MgFe] diagram with Fornax galaxies. Our elliptical galaxies are 3-4 Gyr younger than Es in the Fornax cluster. We find that the galaxies lie in a plane defined by [Z/H] = 0.99 log sigma_0 - 0.46 log Age - 1.60. More massive (larger sigma_0) and older galaxies present, on average, large [alpha/Fe] values, and therefore, must have undergone shorter star-formation timescales. Comparing group against field/isolated galaxies, it is not clear that environment plays an important role in determining their stellar populat...

  13. Conformation of a group 2 late embryogenesis abundant protein from soybean. Evidence of poly (L-proline)-type II structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulages, Jose L; Kim, Kangmin; Arrese, Estela L; Walters, Christina; Cushman, John C

    2003-03-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are members of a large group of hydrophilic, glycine-rich proteins found in plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria known collectively as hydrophilins that are preferentially expressed in response to dehydration or hyperosmotic stress. Group 2 LEA (dehydrins or responsive to abscisic acid) proteins are postulated to stabilize macromolecules against damage by freezing, dehydration, ionic, or osmotic stress. However, the structural and physicochemical properties of group 2 LEA proteins that account for such functions remain unknown. We have analyzed the structural properties of a recombinant form of a soybean (Glycine max) group 2 LEA (rGmDHN1). Differential scanning calorimetry of purified rGmDHN1 demonstrated that the protein does not display a cooperative unfolding transition upon heating. Ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein is in a largely hydrated and unstructured conformation in solution. However, ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism measurements collected at different temperatures showed that the protein exists in equilibrium between two extended conformational states: unordered and left-handed extended helical or poly (L-proline)-type II structures. It is estimated that 27% of the residues of rGmDHN1 adopt or poly (L-proline)-type II-like helical conformation at 12 degrees C. The content of extended helix gradually decreases to 15% as the temperature is increased to 80 degrees C. Studies of the conformation of the protein in solution in the presence of liposomes, trifluoroethanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that rGmDHN1 has a very low intrinsic ability to adopt alpha-helical structure and to interact with phospholipid bilayers through amphipathic alpha-helices. The ability of the protein to remain in a highly extended conformation at low temperatures could constitute the basis of the functional role of GmDHN1 in the prevention of freezing, desiccation

  14. New strings for old Veneziano amplitudes II Group-theoretic treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Kholodenko, A L

    2004-01-01

    In this part of our four parts work (e.g see Part I, hep-th/04102242) we use the theory of polynomial invariants of finite pseudo-reflection groups in order to reconstruct both the Veneziano and Veneziano-like (tachyon-free) amplitudes and the generating function producing these amplitudes. We demonstrate that such generating function can be produced with help of the finite dimensional quantum mechanical supersymmetric model (to be further discussed in Part III). Mathematical correctness of our arguments relies on important theorems by Shepard and Todd, Serre and Solomon documented in one of the monographs by Bourbaki. Based on these theorems, we explain why the developed new formalism leaves all earlier known results of conformal field theories unchanged. We also explain why these theorems impose very stringent requirements connecting the analytical form of the scattering amplitudes with the local symmetries of space-time in which such amplitudes act.

  15. Mergers in Galaxy Groups. II. The Fundamental Plane of Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Taranu, Dan S; Yee, H K C

    2014-01-01

    Observations consistently show that elliptical galaxies follow a tight "fundamental plane" scaling relation between size, mean surface brightness and velocity dispersion, with the form R $\\propto {\\sigma}^a {\\mu}^b$. This relation not only has very small (<0.05 dex) intrinsic scatter, but also has significantly different coefficients from the expect virial scaling (a "tilt"). We analyze hundreds of simulations of elliptical galaxies formed from mergers of spiral galaxies in groups to determine if the fundamental plane can emerge from multiple, mostly minor and hierarchical collisionless mergers. We find that these simulated ellipticals lie on a similar fundamental plane with a~1.7 and b~0.3. The scatter about this plane is even smaller than observed, while the tilt is in the correct sense, although a is larger than for typical observations. This demonstrates that collisionless mergers can contribute significantly to the tilt of the fundamental plane, contrary to previous claims that only gas dissipation co...

  16. Hydrogen storage materials with focus on main group I-II elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2005-07-01

    variations in the observed apparent activation energies of hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation of magnesium based systems, as generally found in the literature. Further, concurrent changes apparent prefactors i.e. a compensation effect (CE) is found. A detailed analysis leads to the general conclusion that any observed CE based on an Arrhenius analysis is false and a direct consequence of the data analysis. The effect of both particle/crystallite size reductions along with the effect of Ti-doping on the two-step dehydrogenation kinetics of lithium aluminum hydride is investigated. It is found that only the kinetics the first reaction step is sensitive to a reduction in the crystallite size. In order to achieve improved kinetics of the second reaction step as well, Ti-doping is found to be very effective. The main results of these investigations are; i) the first dehydrogenation step is subject to transport limitations probably diffusional limitations ii) the apparent activation energy of both dehydrogenation steps is insensitive to Ti-doping, suggesting that a prefactor effect is responsible for the kinetic improvements i.e. the number of reaction sites is probably increased e.g. by creation of lattice defects such as atomic vacancies. Finally, the hydrogen mobility in sodium aluminum hydride, potentially limiting the overall kinetics of hydrogenation/dehydrogenation, is studies with neutron scattering experiments. Both the hydrogen jump frequency and the mean square atomic displacement of hydrogen atoms are estimated. (au)

  17. CT coronary angiography in patients with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease (SCOT-HEART): an open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-13

    The benefit of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients presenting with stable chest pain has not been systematically studied. We aimed to assess the effect of CTCA on the diagnosis, management, and outcome of patients referred to the cardiology clinic with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. In this prospective open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial, we recruited patients aged 18-75 years referred for the assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease from 12 cardiology chest pain clinics across Scotland. We randomly assigned (1:1) participants to standard care plus CTCA or standard care alone. Randomisation was done with a web-based service to ensure allocation concealment. The primary endpoint was certainty of the diagnosis of angina secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. All analyses were intention to treat, and patients were analysed in the group they were allocated to, irrespective of compliance with scanning. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01149590. Between Nov 18, 2010, and Sept 24, 2014, we randomly assigned 4146 (42%) of 9849 patients who had been referred for assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. 47% of participants had a baseline clinic diagnosis of coronary heart disease and 36% had angina due to coronary heart disease. At 6 weeks, CTCA reclassified the diagnosis of coronary heart disease in 558 (27%) patients and the diagnosis of angina due to coronary heart disease in 481 (23%) patients (standard care 22 [1%] and 23 [1%]; pcoronary heart disease increased (1·09, 1·02-1·17; p=0·0172), the certainty increased (1·79, 1·62-1·96; pcoronary heart disease. This changed planned investigations (15% vs 1%; pcoronary heart disease, CTCA clarifies the diagnosis, enables targeting of interventions, and might reduce the future risk of myocardial infarction. The Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates funded the trial

  18. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies II. Searching For Signatures of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Skillman, Evan D; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Williams, Benjamin F

    2014-01-01

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10$^4$ $<$ M$_{\\star}$ $<$ 10$^9$ M$_{\\odot}$). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted `true fossils' identified by Bovill & Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environment...

  19. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  20. Fine specificities of two lectins from Cymbosema roseum seeds: a lectin specific for high-mannose oligosaccharides and a lectin specific for blood group H type II trisaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Tarun K; Cavada, Benildo S; Nagano, Celso S; Rocha, Bruno Am; Benevides, Raquel G; Nascimento, Kyria S; de Sousa, Luiz Ag; Oscarson, Stefan; Brewer, C Fred

    2011-07-01

    The legume species of Cymbosema roseum of Diocleinae subtribe produce at least two different seed lectins. The present study demonstrates that C. roseum lectin I (CRL I) binds with high affinity to the "core" trimannoside of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cymbosema roseum lectin II (CRL II), on the other hand, binds with high affinity to the blood group H trisaccharide (Fucα1,2Galα1-4GlcNAc-). Thermodynamic and hemagglutination inhibition studies reveal the fine binding specificities of the two lectins. Data obtained with a complete set of monodeoxy analogs of the core trimannoside indicate that CRL I recognizes the 3-, 4- and 6-hydroxyl groups of the α(1,6) Man residue, the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the α(1,3) Man residue and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside. CRL I possesses enhanced affinities for the Man5 oligomannose glycan and a biantennary complex glycan as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans. On the other hand, CRL II distinguishes the blood group H type II epitope from the Lewis(x), Lewis(y), Lewis(a) and Lewis(b) epitopes. CRL II also distinguishes between blood group H type II and type I trisaccharides. CRL I and CRL II, respectively, possess differences in fine specificities when compared with other reported mannose and fucose recognizing lectins. This is the first report of a mannose-specific lectin (CRL I) and a blood group H type II-specific lectin (CRL II) from seeds of a member of the Diocleinae subtribe.

  1. A qualitative focus group study to identify the needs of survivors of stage II and III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Maria Y; McBride, Mary L; Gotay, Carolyn; Grunfeld, Eva; Earle, Craig C; Relova, Sharon; Tsonis, Miranda; Ruan, Jenny Y; Chang, Jennifer T; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-12-01

    Prior survivorship research has largely focused on issues faced by survivors of childhood tumors, breast cancers, or hematologic malignancies. Relatively little is known about the needs of other prevalent survivor groups. Our aim was to identify the specific concerns of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors in the key domains of physical functioning, psychological wellbeing, and social relationships. We conducted focus groups with stage II and III CRC survivors who had completed their primary active anti-cancer treatments. Patients were asked to describe how their diagnosis and treatment impacted their lives, to outline deficiencies in the care that they received, and to suggest ways of addressing any unmet needs. A content analysis was subsequently conducted to identify major themes. Thirty CRC survivors participated in six focus groups. Individuals reported some degree of dissatisfaction with the amount and type of diagnostic and treatment information they received at their initial clinic visit. Distress from toxicities, such as peripheral neuropathy, was also common among the survivors. Similarly, the majority faced challenges adjusting to their lives and daily activities, especially in caring for their colostomy. Having survived CRC, many survivors expressed an interest in advocacy and health promotion of CRC. CRC survivors face many barriers after their cancer treatment. Issues with colostomy are unique to this survivor group. Interventions to improve CRC survivorship care should also incorporate opportunities for patient advocacy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Exon sequence requirements for excision in vivo of the bacterial group II intron RmInt1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Nicolás

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II intron splicing proceeds through two sequential transesterification reactions in which the 5' and 3'-exons are joined together and the lariat intron is released. The intron-encoded protein (IEP assists the splicing of the intron in vivo and remains bound to the excised intron lariat RNA in a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP that promotes intron mobility. Exon recognition occurs through base-pairing interactions between two guide sequences on the ribozyme domain dI known as EBS1 and EBS2 and two stretches of sequence known as IBS1 and IBS2 on the 5' exon, whereas the 3' exon is recognized through interaction with the sequence immediately upstream from EBS1 [(δ-δ' interaction (subgroup IIA] or with a nucleotide [(EBS3-IBS3 interaction (subgroup IIB and IIC] located in the coordination-loop of dI. The δ nucleotide is involved in base pairing with another intron residue (δ' in subgroup IIB introns and this interaction facilitates base pairing between the 5' exon and the intron. Results In this study, we investigated nucleotide requirements in the distal 5'- and 3' exon regions, EBS-IBS interactions and δ-δ' pairing for excision of the group IIB intron RmInt1 in vivo. We found that the EBS1-IBS1 interaction was required and sufficient for RmInt1 excision. In addition, we provide evidence for the occurrence of canonical δ-δ' pairing and its importance for the intron excision in vivo. Conclusions The excision in vivo of the RmInt1 intron is a favored process, with very few constraints for sequence recognition in both the 5' and 3'-exons. Our results contribute to understand how group II introns spread in nature, and might facilitate the use of RmInt1 in gene targeting.

  3. Holography as a highly efficient renormalization group flow. II. An explicit construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Nicolas; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2016-07-01

    We complete the reformulation of the holographic correspondence as a highly efficient renormalization group (RG) flow that can also determine the UV data in the field theory in the strong-coupling and large-N limit. We introduce a special way to define operators at any given scale in terms of appropriate coarse-grained collective variables, without requiring the use of the elementary fields. The Wilsonian construction is generalized by promoting the cutoff to a functional of these collective variables. We impose three criteria to determine the coarse-graining. The first criterion is that the effective Ward identities for local conservation of energy, momentum, etc. should preserve their standard forms, but in new scale-dependent background metric and sources which are functionals of the effective single-trace operators. The second criterion is that the scale-evolution equations of the operators in the actual background metric should be state-independent, implying that the collective variables should not explicitly appear in them. The final required criterion is that the end point of the scale-evolution of the RG flow can be transformed to a fixed point corresponding to familiar nonrelativistic equations with a finite number of parameters, such as incompressible nonrelativistic Navier-Stokes, under a certain universal rescaling of the scale and of the time coordinate. Using previous work, we explicitly show that in the hydrodynamic limit each such highly efficient RG flow reproduces a unique classical gravity theory with precise UV data that satisfy our IR criterion and also lead to regular horizons in the dual geometries. We obtain the explicit coarse-graining which reproduces Einstein's equations. In a simple example, we are also able to construct a low-energy effective action and compute the beta function. Finally, we show how our construction can be interpolated with the traditional Wilsonian RG flow at a suitable scale and can be used to develop new

  4. GLOBAL MOLECULAR ANALYSES OF METHANE METABOLISM IN METHANOTROPHIC ALPHAPROTEOBACTERIUM, METHYLOSINUS TRICHOSPORIUM OB3B.PART II. METABOLOMICS AND 13C-LABELING STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Kalyuzhanaya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we use metabolomics and 13C-labeling data to refine central metabolic pathways for methane utilization in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a model alphaproteobacterial methanotrophic bacterium. We demonstrate here that similar to non-methane utilizing methylotrophic alphaproteobacteria the core metabolism of the microbe is represented by several tightly connected metabolic cycles, such as the serine pathway, the ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC pathway, and the citric acid (TCA cycle. Both in silico estimations and stable isotope labeling experiments combined with single cell (NanoSIMS and bulk biomass analyses indicate that a significantly larger portion of the cell carbon (over 60% is derived from CO2 in this methanotroph. Our 13C-labeling studies revealed an unusual topology of the assimilatory network in which phosph(enolpyruvate/pyruvate interconversions are key metabolic switches. A set of additional pathways for carbon fixation are identified and discussed.

  5. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  6. Tritiated-nicotine- and /sup 125/I-alpha-bungarotoxin-labeled nicotinic receptors in the interpeduncular nucleus of rats. II. Effects of habenular destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, P.B.; Hamill, G.S.; Nadi, N.S.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Pert, A.

    1986-09-15

    The cholinergic innervation of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) is wholly extrinsic and is greatly attenuated by bilateral habenular destruction. We describe changes in the labeling of putative nicotinic receptors within this nucleus at 3, 5, or 11 days after bilateral habenular lesions. Adjacent tissue sections of the rat IPN were utilized for /sup 3/H-nicotine and /sup 125/I-alpha-bungarotoxin (/sup 125/I-BTX) receptor autoradiography. Compared to sham-operated controls, habenular destruction significantly reduced autoradiographic /sup 3/H-nicotine labeling in rostral (-25%), intermediate (-13%), and lateral subnuclei (-36%). Labeling in the central subnucleus was unchanged. Loss of labeling was maximal at the shortest survival time (3 days) and did not change thereafter. In order to establish whether this loss was due to a reduction in the number or the affinity of /sup 3/H-nicotine-binding sites, a membrane assay was performed on microdissected IPN tissue from rats that had received surgery 3 days previously. Bilateral habenular lesions produced a 35% reduction of high-affinity /sup 3/H-nicotine-binding sites, with no change in binding affinity. Bilateral habenular lesions reduced /sup 125/I-BTX labeling in the intermediate subnuclei, and a slight increase occurred in the rostral subnucleus. In the lateral subnuclei, /sup 125/I-BTX labeling was significantly reduced (27%) at 3 days but not at later survival times. In view of the known synaptic morphology of the habenulointerpeduncular tract, it is concluded that a subpopulation of /sup 3/H-nicotine binding sites within the IPN is located on afferent axons and/or terminals. This subpopulation, located within rostral, intermediate, and lateral subnuclei, may correspond to presynaptic nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Sites that bind /sup 125/I-BTX may include a presynaptic subpopulation located in the lateral and possibly the intermediate subnuclei.

  7. Permian plants from the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, Northern Altiplano of Bolivia: II. The morphogenus Glossopteris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Iannuzzi

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Fossil plants belonging to the morphogenera Glossopteris, Pecopteris and Asterotheca were collected from the upper part of the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, near the town of San Pablo de Tiquina, on the southeastern shore of Lake Titicaca (northern Altiplano, Bolivia. This paper presents the first description of specimens of the morphogenus Glossopteris from Bolivia. The Bolivian specimens of Glossopteris consist of poorly-preserved impressions, although they present the diagnostic features of this morphogenus. They are fragments of leaves with secondary veins of taeniopterid-type, typical of glossopterids from Late Permian deposits of Gondwana. The only species of Pecopteris confirmed in the first part of this study, i.e. P. dolianitii Rösler and Rohn (see Vieira et al. 2004, was previously reported from the Late Permian beds of the Rio do Rasto and Estrada Nova formations in the Paraná Basin (southern Brazil. Therefore, a Late Permian age is proposed for the fossil plant-bearing beds of the Chutani Formation based on the analyzed assemblage. The phytogeographic implications of this new find are briefly analyzed.Plantas fósseis, pertencentes aos morfo-gêneros Glossopteris, Pecopteris e Asterotheca, foram coletadas na porção superior da seção aflorante da Formação Chutani, próxima ao povoado de San Pablo de Tiquina, sudeste do lago Titicaca (Altiplano norte, Bolívia. Este trabalho apresenta a primeira descrição de espécimes do morfo-gênero Glossopteris provenientes da Bolívia. Os espécimes estudados de Glossopteris consistem em impressões foliares pobremente preservadas nas quais feições diagnósticas estão presentes. Os fragmentos foliares apresentam venação secundária do tipo teniopteróide, uma característica típica de glossopterídeas encontradas em depósitos do Permiano Superior do Gondwana. Por sua vez, a única espécie de Pecopteris confirmada para estes níveis da Formação Chutani, i.e. P. dolianitii

  8. Open-label phase II clinical trial in 75 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma receiving daily dose of tableted liver cancer vaccine, hepcortespenlisimut-L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarakanovskaya MG

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Marina G Tarakanovskaya,1 Jigjidsuren Chinburen,2 Purev Batchuluun,2 Chogsom Munkhzaya,2 Genden Purevsuren,2 Dorjiin Dandii,3 Tsogkhuu Hulan,3 Dandii Oyungerel,4 Galyna A Kutsyna,5 Alan A Reid,6 Vika Borisova,6 Allen I Bain,7 Vichai Jirathitikal,7 Aldar S Bourinbaiar6–8 1Ekomed LLC, 2National Cancer Center, 3Monserum LLC, 4National Center for Public Health, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 5Department of Infectious Diseases, Luhansk State Medical University, Luhansk, Ukraine; 6Immunitor China Ltd, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Immunitor Inc, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 8Immunitor LLC, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Background: An increasing number of studies is now devoted to immunotherapy of cancer. We evaluated the clinical benefit of hepcortespenlisimut-L (Hepko-V5 [formerly known as V5]—an oral therapeutic vaccine designated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA as an orphan drug for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. V5 was initially developed by us in 2002 to treat hepatitis B or C viral infections and liver cirrhosis.Methods: The outcome of open-label Phase II trial of daily dose of V5 pill was analyzed retrospectively. Over a period of 5 years, 75 patients with advanced HCC were enrolled, consisting of 29 (38.7% females and 46 (61.3% males with a median age of 60 years (mean 61.6±8.1 years. Out of these, 23 (30.7% had hepatitis B and 34 (45.3% had hepatitis C infections, including 9 (12% with dual infection, 4 (5.3% negative for both viruses, and 5 (6.7% without established viral diagnosis. Most patients (94.7% had underlying liver cirrhosis of varying severity.Results: After a median of 2 months of treatment, 50 out of 75 patients had experienced a decline in serum levels of the tumor marker, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP (66.7%; P=0.006 by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Baseline median AFP levels were 245.2 IU/mL (mean 4,233; range 7.2–92,407; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1,186–7,280 and post-treatment values were 102.3 IU

  9. Clonal Evolutionary Analysis during HER2 Blockade in HER2-Positive Inflammatory Breast Cancer: A Phase II Open-Label Clinical Trial of Afatinib +/- Vinorelbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ramona; Arpornwirat, Wichit; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Ganju, Vinod; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Sung-Bae; Dechaphunkul, Arunee; Maneechavakajorn, Jedzada; Spector, Neil; Yau, Thomas; Afrit, Mehdi; Ahmed, Slim Ben; Johnston, Stephen R.; Gibson, Neil; Herrero, Javier; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, aggressive form of breast cancer associated with HER2 amplification, with high risk of metastasis and an estimated median survival of 2.9 y. We performed an open-label, single-arm phase II clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01325428) to investigate the efficacy and safety of afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family inhibitor, alone and in combination with vinorelbine in patients with HER2-positive IBC. This trial included prospectively planned exome analysis before and after afatinib monotherapy. Methods and Findings HER2-positive IBC patients received afatinib 40 mg daily until progression, and thereafter afatinib 40 mg daily and intravenous vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 weekly. The primary endpoint was clinical benefit; secondary endpoints were objective response (OR), duration of OR, and progression-free survival (PFS). Of 26 patients treated with afatinib monotherapy, clinical benefit was achieved in 9 patients (35%), 0 of 7 trastuzumab-treated patients and 9 of 19 trastuzumab-naïve patients. Following disease progression, 10 patients received afatinib plus vinorelbine, and clinical benefit was achieved in 2 of 4 trastuzumab-treated and 0 of 6 trastuzumab-naïve patients. All patients had treatment-related adverse events (AEs). Whole-exome sequencing of tumour biopsies taken before treatment and following disease progression on afatinib monotherapy was performed to assess the mutational landscape of IBC and evolutionary trajectories during therapy. Compared to a cohort of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) patients with HER2-positive non-IBC, HER2-positive IBC patients had significantly higher mutational and neoantigenic burden, more frequent gain-of-function TP53 mutations and a recurrent 11q13.5 amplification overlapping PAK1. Planned exploratory analysis revealed that trastuzumab-naïve patients with tumours harbouring somatic activation of PI3K/Akt signalling had significantly shorter PFS compared to those without

  10. Galaxy evolution in nearby groups. II. Galaxy evolution in nearby loose groups. II. Photometric and kinematic characterization of USGC U268 and USGC U376 group members in the Leo cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, A; Rampazzo, R; Bianchi, L; Rosado, M; Bettoni, D; Galletta, G; Mazzei, P; Buson, L; Ambrocio-Cruz, P; Gabbasov, R F

    2012-01-01

    We present the photometric and kinematic characterization of two groups, USGC U268 and USGC U376 located in different regions of the Leo cloud. U268, composed of 10 catalogued members and 11 new added members, has a small fraction (~24%) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). U376 has 16 plus 8 new added members, with ~38% of ETGs. We find the presence of significant substructures in both groups suggesting that they are likely accreting galaxies. U268 is located in a more loose environment than U376. For each member galaxy, broad band integrated and surface photometry have been obtained in far-UV and near-UV with GALEX, and in u,g, r, i, z (SDSS) bands. H_alpha imaging and 2D high resolution kinematical data have been obtained using PUMA Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 2.12 m telescope in San Pedro M\\'artir, (Baja California, M\\'exico). We improved the galaxy classification and we detected morphological and kinematical distortions that may be connected to either on-going and/or past interaction/accretion e...

  11. On the viability of cyclometalated Ru(II) complexes as dyes in DSSC regulated by COOH group, a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Bai, Fu-Quan; Xia, Bao-Hui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Pan, Qing-Jiang

    2011-02-14

    The Ru(II) complexes [Ru(bpp)(dcbpy)Cl](+) (1), [Ru(tcbpp)(bpy)Cl](+) (2), and [Ru(tc'bpp)(bpy)Cl](+) (3) (bpp = 2,6-bis(N-pyrazolyl)pyridine, dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxyl-bipyridine, bpy = bipyridine, tcbpp = 4-carboxyl-2,6-bis(2-carboxyl-N-pyrazolyl)pyridine, tc'bpp = 4-carboxyl-2,6-bis(4-carboxyl-N-pyrazolyl)pyridine) are studied theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) techniques to explore their properties as dye in a solar cell. The calculated geometry structure and absorption spectrum of 1 are consistent with its experimental results. The calculation results indicate which sites the COOH groups attach to can significantly influence the electronic structure of the complex. By migrating the COOH groups from the bpy ligand in 1 to bpp ligand in 2 and 3, the nature of LUMO changes from bpy-localized to bpp dominated. The calculated low-lying absorptions at λ > 370 nm of the three complexes are categorized as metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) transitions and the transition terminates at the orbital populated by the COOH appended ligand. The atomic spin density analysis also indicates that the ligand which is modified by the COOH groups is the ideal spot for the captured electron to situate. It can be predicted that the performance of 2 and 3 in the dye-sensitized solar cell can be enhanced as compared with 1.

  12. A phase II trial of CPT-11 in recurrent squamous carcinoma of the cervix: a gynecologic oncology group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, K Y; Blessing, J A; Levenback, C; Kohler, M; Chafe, W; Roman, L D

    1998-09-01

    To determine the response rate and associated toxicity of weekly CPT-11 in squamous carcinoma of the cervix. From October 1994 to May 1996, the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) conducted a Phase II trial in patients with recurrent squamous cervix carcinoma. The schedule employed weekly x4 intravenous CPT-11 at 125 mg/m2 followed with a 2-week rest, to be repeated until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Eligibility criteria were a GOG performance status of 0-2, adequate bone marrow reserve, adequate liver function, and serum creatinine OFFis schedule of CPT-11 exhibits modest activity with moderate toxicity in patients with recurrent squamous carcinoma of the cervix. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  13. Group II muscle afferents probably contribute to the medium latency soleus stretch reflex during walking in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Ladouceur, Michel; Andersen, Jacob B.

    2001-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to determine which afferents contribute to the medium latency response of the soleus stretch reflex resulting from an unexpected perturbation during human walking. 2. Fourteen healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at approximately 3.5 km h(-1) with the left ankle...... component (P = 0.004), whereas the medium latency component was unchanged (P = 0.437). 6. Two hours after the ingestion of tizanidine, an alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist known to selectively depress the transmission in the group II afferent pathway, the medium latency reflex was strongly depressed (P...... = 0.007), whereas the short latency component was unchanged (P = 0.653). 7. An ankle block with lidocaine hydrochloride was performed to suppress the cutaneous afferents of the foot and ankle. Neither the short (P = 0.453) nor medium (P = 0.310) latency reflexes were changed. 8. Our results support...

  14. Sub-volcanic development of kimberlite pipes: Evidence from the Lace and Voorspoed (Group II) kimberlites, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Skinner, E. Michael W.

    2013-12-01

    The Lace and Voorspoed kimberlites occur on the Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa), and form part of the Kroonstad Group II kimberlite (orangeite) cluster. The Lace kimberlite is composed of a main pipe and a satellite blind pipe, the latter of which does not reach the current land surface (~ 30 m below the current land surface), and is not observed connecting with the main pipe at depth. The main pipe increases in size from ~ 100 m to ~ 250 m in diameter at depth. The Voorspoed kimberlite pipe is the largest of the cluster and is dominantly infilled with massive layers (up to 200 m thick) of resedimented volcaniclastic kimberlite (RVK). Coherent kimberlite (CK), identified at all three pipes, is described here in order to constrain their formation.

  15. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Chary, K.V.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-03-15

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH{sub 3}) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally {sup 13}C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally {sup 13}C-labeling the rest. A 2D [{sup 13}C-{sup 1}H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH{sub 3} groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  16. Lineage-specific group II intron gains and losses of the mitochondrial rps3 gene in gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Teresa M R; Quagliariello, Carla

    2010-08-01

    According to PCR assays and sequencing, we now report the shared presence of two rps3 introns, namely the rps3i74 and the rps3i249, in the mitochondria of all the classes representing the surviving lineages of gymnosperms, and unveil several lineages experiencing intron loss. Interestingly, the rps3 intron gains and losses within the four groups of gymnosperms let us sort out the Pinaceae and the non-Pinaceae into intron (+)- and intron (-)-lineages, respectively. Worthy of mention is also the finding that only Gnetum within the Gnetales harbours both the rps3 introns. This intron distribution pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the two rps3 introns were likely present in the common ancestor of the seed plants and, then, independently lost in the non-Pinaceae during gymnosperm evolution. The derived secondary structural model of the novel group IIA intron improves our understanding of the significance and origin of the extraordinary length polymorphisms observed among rps3i249 orthologs. Despite the remarkable structural plasticity to adopt and reject introns, the rps3 mRNAs undergo accurate processing by splicing and extensive editing in gymnosperm mitochondria. This study provides additional insights into the evolutionarily high dynamics of mitochondrial introns which may come and go in closely related plant species. The turnover of the mitochondrial rps3 group II introns seen among lineages of seed plants further suggests that these introns might be an additional signature to discriminate between particularly cryptical taxonomic groups for which there is a need of a further evaluation of their evolutionary affiliation.

  17. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors inhibits glutamatergic transmission in the rat entorhinal cortex via reduction of glutamate release probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouping; Chen, Xiaotong; Kurada, Lalitha; Huang, Zitong; Lei, Saobo

    2012-03-01

    Glutamate interacts with ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Whereas the entorhinal cortex (EC) is a principal structure involved in learning and memory, the roles of mGluRs in synaptic transmission in the EC have not been completely determined. Here, we show that activation of group II mGluRs (mGluR II) induced robust depression of glutamatergic transmission in the EC. The mGluR II-induced depression was due to a selective reduction of presynaptic release probability without alterations of the quantal size and the number of release sites. The mechanisms underlying mGluR II-mediated suppression of glutamate release included the inhibition of presynaptic release machinery and the depression of presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels. Whereas mGluR II-induced depression required the function of Gα(i/o) proteins, protein kinase A (PKA) pathway was only involved in mGluR II-mediated inhibition of release machinery and thereby partially required for mGluR II-induced inhibition of glutamate release. Presynaptic stimulation at 5 Hz for 10 min also induced depression of glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic mGluR II suggesting an endogenous role for mGluR II in modulating glutamatergic transmission.

  18. Metformin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Active Controlled, Parallel-Group, Randomized, Open Label Study in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To assess the effect of metformin and to compare it with insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy in terms of perinatal outcome, maternal complications, additional insulin requirement, and treatment acceptability. Methods. In this randomized, open label study, 206 patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy who met the eligibility criteria were selected from the antenatal clinics. Insulin was added to metformin treatment when required, to maintain the target glycem...

  19. Genetic diversity, haplotypes and allele groups of Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun-Yik; Lau, Yee-Ling; Chang, Phooi-Yee; Anthony, Claudia Nisha

    2014-04-03

    The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is now recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium that can cause human malaria. Like the region II of the Duffy binding protein of P. vivax (PvDBPII), the region II of the P. knowlesi Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) plays an essential role in the parasite's invasion into the host's erythrocyte. Numerous polymorphism studies have been carried out on PvDBPII, but none has been reported on PkDBPαII. In this study, the genetic diversity, haplotyes and allele groups of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia were investigated. Blood samples from 20 knowlesi malaria patients and 2 wild monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were used. These samples were collected between 2010 and 2012. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and haplotypes of PkDBPαII were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Fifty-three PkDBPαII sequences from human infections and 6 from monkeys were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence showed 52 synonymous and 76 nonsynonymous mutations. Analysis on the rate of these mutations indicated that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 36 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 20 human and 1 monkey blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. These haplotypes were clustered into 2 distinct allele groups. The majority of the haplotypes clustered into the large dominant group. Our present study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII. Hence, the haplotypes described in this report can be considered as novel. Although a high level of genetic diversity was observed, the PkDBPαII appeared to be under purifying selection. The distribution of the haplotypes was skewed, with one dominant major and one minor

  20. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-03-10

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  1. High affinity binding of /sup 125/I-labeled mouse interferon to a specific cell surface receptor. II. Analysis of binding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguet, M.; Blanchard, B.

    1981-12-01

    Direct ligand-binding studies with highly purified /sup 125/I-labeled virus-induced mouse interferon on mouse lymphoma L 1210 cells revealed a direct correlation of specific high-affinity binding with the biologic response to interferon. Neutralization of the antiviral effect by anti-interferon gamma globulin occurred at the same antibody concentration as the inhibition of specific binding. These results suggest that specific high-affinity binding of /sup 125/I-interferon occurred at a biologically functional interferon receptor. Competitive inhibition experiments using /sup 125/I- and /sup 127/I-labeled interferon provided strong evidence that the fraction of /sup 125/I-interferon inactivated upon labeling did not bind specifically. Scatchard analysis of the binding data yielded linear plots and thus suggested that interferon binds to homogeneous noncooperative receptor sites. In contrast to a characteristic property of several peptide hormone systems, binding of /sup 125/I-interferon to its specific receptor did not induce subsequent ligand degradation. At 37/sup o/ bound interferon was rapidly released in a biologically active form without evidence for molecular degradation. The expression of interferon receptors was not modified by treatment with interferon. Trypsin treatment of target cells and inhibition of protein synthesis abolished the specific binding of /sup 125/I-interferon. Three major molecular weight species of Newcastle disease virus-induced mouse C 243 cell interferon were isolated, separated, and identified as mouse ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. interferons. These interferons were shown to inhibit competitively the specific binding of the highly purified labeled starting material thus providing evidence for a common receptor site for mouse interferon.

  2. 27 CFR 4.23 - Varietal (grape type) labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Standards of Identity for Wine § 4.23... percent (name of variety)” is shown on the brand label, back label, or a separate strip label, (except... variety; (ii) The statement “contains not less than 51 percent (name of variety)” is shown on the brand...

  3. Fully integrated graphene electronic biosensor for label-free detection of lead (II) ion based on G-quadruplex structure-switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijun; Wang, Cheng; Zhu, Yibo; Zhou, Xiaohong; Xiang, Yu; He, Miao; Zeng, Siyu

    2017-03-15

    This work presents a fully integrated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) biosensor for the label-free detection of lead ions (Pb(2+)) in aqueous-media, which first implements the G-quadruplex structure-switching biosensing principle in graphene nanoelectronics. We experimentally illustrate the biomolecular interplay that G-rich DNA single-strands with one-end confined on graphene surface can specifically interact with Pb(2+) ions and switch into G-quadruplex structures. Since the structure-switching of electrically charged DNA strands can disrupt the charge distribution in the vicinity of graphene surface, the carrier equilibrium in graphene sheet might be altered, and manifested by the conductivity variation of GFET. The experimental data and theoretical analysis show that our devices are capable of the label-free and specific quantification of Pb(2+) with a detection limit down to 163.7ng/L. These results first verify the signaling principle competency of G-quadruplex structure-switching in graphene electronic biosensors. Combining with the advantages of the compact device structure and convenient electrical signal, a label-free GFET biosensor for Pb(2+) monitoring is enabled with promising application potential.

  4. Labelling of benzocaine with tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Sohail (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    A convenient method is described to label a local anesthetic, benzocaine, with tritium. The bromoester of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) was prepared from para-nitrotoluene and was reduced with tritium. The generation of isotopic hydrogen and labelling of benzocaine was achieved in one-step. A mixture of sodium borohydride (NaB[sup 3]H[sub 4]) with cobalt (II) chloride was used to generate tritium gas. 5% Pd/C was used as a catalyst. This constitutes the first report of tritium labelled benzocaine. (author).

  5. Insights into the history of a bacterial group II intron remnant from the genomes of the nitrogen-fixing symbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Sinorhizobium medicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, N; Martínez-Rodríguez, L; Martínez-Abarca, F

    2014-10-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs that act as mobile retroelements. In bacteria, they are thought to be tolerated to some extent because they self-splice and home preferentially to sites outside of functional genes, generally within intergenic regions or in other mobile genetic elements, by mechanisms including the divergence of DNA target specificity to prevent target site saturation. RmInt1 is a mobile group II intron that is widespread in natural populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti and was first described in the GR4 strain. Like other bacterial group II introns, RmInt1 tends to evolve toward an inactive form by fragmentation, with loss of the 3' terminus. We identified genomic evidence of a fragmented intron closely related to RmInt1 buried in the genome of the extant S. meliloti/S. medicae species. By studying this intron, we obtained evidence for the occurrence of intron insertion before the divergence of ancient rhizobial species. This fragmented group II intron has thus existed for a long time and has provided sequence variation, on which selection can act, contributing to diverse genetic rearrangements, and to generate pan-genome divergence after strain differentiation. The data presented here suggest that fragmented group II introns within intergenic regions closed to functionally important neighboring genes may have been microevolutionary forces driving adaptive evolution of these rhizobial species.

  6. Factors associated with nonresponse to ovulation induction using letrozole among women with World Health Organization group II anovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilina Sanjeewa Palihawadana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Letrozole, a third generation aromatase inhibitor is gaining importance in ovulation induction. Some prefer to use it as a second line agent in women who fail to respond to clomifene citrate. However, our knowledge about the predictors of response to letrozole is limited. Aims: The study was aimed at identifying the factors associated with letrozole resistance among women with World Health Organization (WHO group II anovulation. Subjects and Methods: Study was conducted at the infertility clinic at a tertiary care hospital in Sri Lanka. A case-control study design was used and included 50 subjects with WHO group II anovulation (25 clomifene responsive and 25 clomifene resistant. After a treatment cycle of letrozole, the factors were compared between the subjects who responded and those who failed to respond to treatment. Results: Ovulation was achieved in 76% (n = 19 of subjects who had responded to clomifene previously and in 24% (n = 6 with clomifene resistance. The factors associated with letrozole resistance included the presence of hirsutism (odds ratio [OR]: 3.89; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-12.3 and clomifene resistance (OR: 10.03; 95% CI: 2.81-35.7. The early follicular phase mean (standard deviation luteinizing hormone level was significantly higher among the nonresponders (9.75 [4.78] - 7.28 [2.3]; P = 0.02. Nonresponders showed significantly lower levels of oestradiol on the 5 th and 9 th days (28.50 [3.39] pg/mL vs. 7.49 [3.62] pg/mL; P = 0.0007 and 142.04 [76.22] pg/mL vs. 28.10 [12.8] pg/mL; P = 0.0001 of the menstrual cycle, respectively. Conclusions: The features associated with resistance to Letrozole at a dose of 2.5 mg show some overlap with those associated with clomifene resistance. However, some features do not show similar association. The effectiveness of letrozole at a dose of 2.5 mg in induction of ovulation among women with clomifene resistance is low and it does not seem to be a suitable treatment at a

  7. A spin label study of egg white avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chignell, C F; Starkweather, D K; Sinha, B K

    1975-07-25

    Avidin is a tetrametric protein (mass 68,000 daltons) that binds 4 molecules of vitamin biotin (1). The biotin binding sites, 1 per subunit, are grouped in two pairs at opposite ends of the avidin molecule (GREEN, N.M., KONIECZNY, L., TOMS, E.J., and VALENTINE, R.C. (1971) Biochem. J. 125, 781). We have studied the topography of the avidin binding sites with the aid of four spin-labeled analogs of biotin: 4-biotinamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (II), 3-biotinamido-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (III), 3-biotinamidomethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (IV), 4-(biotinylglycyl)-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (V). Fluorescence and optical absorption spectroscopy indicated that II to V occupied the same binding sites on avidin as did biotin. The electron spin resonance spectrum of the 4:1 complex between II and avidin contained broad line components characteristic of a highly immobilized spin label. Dipole-dipole interactions between spin labels bound to adjacent sites split each of the three major hyperfine lines into doublets with a separation of 13.8 G. The distance between adjacent bound nitroxide groups was calculated from this splitting to be 16 A. The dissociation of the 4:1 complex between II and avidin was biphasic with approximately half of the labels dissociating at a rate (kdiss equal to 2.51 times 10- minus 4 s- minus 1) that was much faster than the remainder (kdiss equal to 1.22 times 10- minus 5 s- minus 1). The electron spin resonance spectrum of the 2:1 complex between II and avidin clearly showed that, immediately after mixing, the spin labels were distributed in a random fashion among the available binding sites but that they slowly redistributed themselves so that each label bound to a site which was adjacent to an unoccupied site. The final time-independent electron spin resonance spectrum exhibited a splitting 69 G between the low and high field hyperfine lines which is characteristic of a highly immobilized

  8. Oxidative addition of disulfide/diselenide to group 10 metal(0) and in situ functionalization to form neutral thiasalen/selenasalen group 10 metal(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Pradip Kr; Asatkar, Ashish K; Zade, Sanjio S; Panda, Snigdha

    2014-01-28

    Three components, one pot synthesis of thiasalen/selenasalen Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes, 14-19, by the oxidative addition of S-S/Se-Se bond of bis(o-formylphenyl)disulfide/-diselenide to Ni(0), Pd(0) and Pt(0) followed by in situ Schiff base formation with ethylenediamine is reported. S-S or Se-Se bonds were cleaved and coordinated to the metal center as thiolate (ArS(-)) or selenolate (ArSe(-)) while the formal oxidation state of metal centers was changed from '0' to '+2'. The disulfide/diselenide reacted with zero-valent metals at room temperature to give only the monometallic complexes. All complexes (except Pd-thiolate complex 15) were studied by single crystal X-ray crystallography and revealed the square planar geometry around metal centers.

  9. A factor related to pseudouridine synthases is required for chloroplast group II intron trans-splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, K; Goldschmidt-Clermont, M; Rochaix, J D

    1999-11-15

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the psaA mRNA is assembled by a process involving two steps of trans-splicing that remove two group II introns and give rise to the mature mRNA. The products of at least 14 nuclear genes and one chloroplast gene (tscA) are necessary for this process. We have cloned Maa2, one of the nuclear genes involved in trans-splicing of the second intron. Maa2 encodes a protein with similarity to conserved domains of pseudouridine synthases, but mutagenesis of putative catalytic residues showed that this activity may not be required for trans-splicing of psaA RNA. Although it is not clear whether the pseudouridine synthase activity has been maintained in Maa2, it is possible that this enzyme was recruited during evolution as an RNA chaperone for folding or stabilizing the psaA intron. The Maa2 protein appears to be associated through ionic interactions with a low density membrane system in the chloroplast that also contains RNA-binding proteins involved in translation.

  10. Label-Free LSPR Detection of Trace Lead(II) Ions in Drinking Water by Synthetic Poly(mPD-co-ASA) Nanoparticles on Gold Nanoislands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guangyu; Ng, Siu Pang; Liang, Xiongyi; Ding, Ning; Chen, Xiangfeng; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2017-02-07

    Using self-assembly gold nanoislands (SAM-AuNIs) functionalized by poly(m-phenylenediamine-co-aniline-2-sulfonic acid) (poly(mPD-co-ASA)) copolymer nanoparticles as specific receptors, a highly sensitive localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) optochemical sensor is demonstrated for detection of trace lead cation (Pb(II)) in drinking water. The copolymer receptor is optimized in three aspects: (1) mole ratio of mPD:ASA monomers, (2) size of copolymer nanoparticles, and (3) surface density of the copolymer. It is shown that the 95:5 (mPD:ASA mole ratio) copolymer with size less than 100 nm exhibits the best Pb(II)-sensing performance, and the 200 times diluted standard copolymer solution contributes to the most effective functionalization protocol. The resulting poly(mPD-co-ASA)-functionalized LSPR sensor attains the detection limit to 0.011 ppb toward Pb(II) in drinking water, and the linear dynamic range covers 0.011 to 5000 ppb (i.e., 6 orders of magnitude). In addition, the sensing system exhibits robust selectivity to Pb(II) in the presence of other metallic cations as well as common anions. The proposed functional copolymer functionalized on AuNIs is found to provide excellent Pb(II)-sensing performance using simple LSPR instrumentation for rapid drinking-water inspection.

  11. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts.

  12. A new and convenient method for purification of {sup 86}Y using a Sr(II) selective resin and comparison of biodistribution of {sup 86}Y and {sup 111}In labeled Herceptin{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmestani, Kayhan; Milenic, Diane E.; Plascjak, Paul S.; Brechbiel, Martin W. E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov

    2002-07-01

    A simple and rapid procedure was developed for purification of cyclotron produced {sup 86}Y via the {sup 86}Sr(p,n) {sup 86}Y reaction. A commercially available Sr(II) selective resin was used to separate {sup 86}Y from the cyclotron irradiated Sr(II) target with a recovery of the enriched Sr(II) target while yielding a 75-80% recovery of {sup 86}Y suitable for radiolabeling either proteins or peptides. To demonstrate the utility of this methodology, the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody Herceptin{sup TM} was radiolabeled with the purified {sup 86}Y and compared to {sup 111}In labeled Herceptin{sup TM}. The biodistribution study demonstrated that {sup 111}In-Herceptin{sup TM}, while a suitable surrogate for {sup 90}Y in the major organs, did not parallel the uptake of {sup 86}Y-Herceptin{sup TM} in the bone, and thus may not accurately predict the level of {sup 90}Y accumulation in the bone for clinical RIT applications. This result exemplifies the requirement of employing appropriate matched pair isotopes for imaging and therapy to insure that dosimetry considerations may be addressed accurately.

  13. Food labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsøe Sørensen, Henrik; Clement, Jesper; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    The food industry develops tasty and healthy food but fails to deliver the message to all consumers. The consumers’ background knowledge is essential for how they find and decode relevant elements in the cocktail of signs which fight for attention on food labels. In this exploratory study, we find...... evidence for dividing consumers into two profiles: one relying on general food knowledge and another using knowledge related to signpost labels. In a combined eyetracking and questionnaire survey we analyse the influence of background knowledge and identify different patterns of visual attention...... for the two consumer profiles. This underlines the complexity in choosing and designing the ‘right’ elements for a food package that consumers actually look at and are able to make rational use of. In spite of any regulation of food information provided by authorities, consumers will still be confronted...

  14. Group I, II, and III mGluR compounds affect rhythm generation in the gastric circuit of the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenz, W D; Nguyen, D; Pérez-Acevedo, N L; Selverston, A I

    2000-03-01

    We have studied the effects of group I, II, and III metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists on rhythm generation by the gastric circuit of the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus. All mGluR agonists and some antagonists we tested in this study had clear and distinct effects on gastric rhythm generation when superfused over combined oscillating or blocked silent STG preparations. A consistent difference between group I agonists and group II and III agonists was that group I agonists acted excitatory. The group I-specific agonists L-quisqualic acid and (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, as well as the nonspecific agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylic acid accelerated ongoing rhythms and could induce gastric rhythms in silent preparations. The group II agonist (2S,1'S, 2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) and the group III agonist L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) slowed down or completely blocked ongoing gastric rhythms and were without detectable effect on silent preparations. The action of L-CCG-I was blocked partially by the group-II-specific antagonist, (RS)-1-amino-5-phosphonoindan-1-carboxylic acid [(RS)APICA], and the group-III-specific antagonist (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine completely blocked the action of L-AP4. Besides its antagonistic action, the group-II-specific antagonist (RS)APICA had a remarkably strong apparent inverse agonist action when applied alone on oscillating preparations. The action of all drugs was dose dependent and reversible, although recovery was not always complete. In our experiments, the effects of none of the mGluR-specific agonists were antagonized or amplified by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor-specific antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, excluding the contamination of responses to mGluR agonists by nonspecific cross-reactivity with NMDA receptors. Picrotoxin did not prevent the inhibitory action of L-CCG-I and

  15. Evidence for transitional stages in the evolution of euglenid group II introns and twintrons in the Monomorphina aenigmatica plastid genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Pombert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photosynthetic euglenids acquired their plastid by secondary endosymbiosis of a prasinophyte-like green alga. But unlike its prasinophyte counterparts, the plastid genome of the euglenid Euglena gracilis is riddled with introns that interrupt almost every protein-encoding gene. The atypical group II introns and twintrons (introns-within-introns found in the E. gracilis plastid have been hypothesized to have been acquired late in the evolution of euglenids, implying that massive numbers of introns may be lacking in other taxa. This late emergence was recently corroborated by the plastid genome sequences of the two basal euglenids, Eutreptiella gymnastica and Eutreptia viridis, which were found to contain fewer introns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain further insights into the proliferation of introns in euglenid plastids, we have characterized the complete plastid genome sequence of Monomorphina aenigmatica, a freshwater species occupying an intermediate phylogenetic position between early and late branching euglenids. The M. aenigmatica UTEX 1284 plastid genome (74,746 bp, 70.6% A+T, 87 genes contains 53 intron insertion sites, of which 41 were found to be shared with other euglenids including 12 of the 15 twintron insertion sites reported in E. gracilis. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of insertion sites suggests an ongoing but uneven process of intron gain in the lineage, with perhaps a minimum of two bursts of rapid intron proliferation. We also identified several sites that represent intermediates in the process of twintron evolution, where the external intron is in place, but not the internal one, offering a glimpse into how these convoluted molecular contraptions originate.

  16. Site-specific, insertional inactivation of incA in Chlamydia trachomatis using a group II intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cayla M; Fisher, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate, intracellular bacterial pathogen that has until more recently remained recalcitrant to genetic manipulation. However, the field still remains hindered by the absence of tools to create selectable, targeted chromosomal mutations. Previous work with mobile group II introns demonstrated that they can be retargeted by altering DNA sequences within the intron's substrate recognition region to create site-specific gene insertions. This platform (marketed as TargeTron™, Sigma) has been successfully employed in a variety of bacteria. We subsequently modified TargeTron™ for use in C. trachomatis and as proof of principle used our system to insertionally inactivate incA, a chromosomal gene encoding a protein required for homotypic fusion of chlamydial inclusions. C. trachomatis incA::GII(bla) mutants were selected with ampicillin and plaque purified clones were then isolated for genotypic and phenotypic analysis. PCR, Southern blotting, and DNA sequencing verified proper GII(bla) insertion, while continuous passaging in the absence of selection demonstrated that the insertion was stable. As seen with naturally occurring IncA(-) mutants, light and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of non-fusogenic inclusions in cells infected with the incA::GII(bla) mutants at a multiplicity of infection greater than one. Lack of IncA production by mutant clones was further confirmed by Western blotting. Ultimately, the ease of retargeting the intron, ability to select for mutants, and intron stability in the absence of selection makes this method a powerful addition to the growing chlamydial molecular toolbox.

  17. Nonlinear-optical properties of α-diiminedithiolatonickel(II) complexes enhanced by electron-withdrawing carboxyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, Luca; Pizzotti, Maddalena; Tessore, Francesca; Robertson, Neil

    2014-05-05

    We report the synthesis, characterization, nonlinear-optical (NLO) properties, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for three nickel diiminedithiolate complexes [Ni(4,4'-R2carboxy-bpy)(L)] [R = methyl, L = 1,2-benzenedithiolate (bdt), 1; R = ethyl, L = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithine-2,3-dithiolate (dddt), 2; R = ethyl, L = 1-(N-methylindol-5-yl)ethene-1,2-dithiolate (mi-5edt), 3]. The crystal structure of 1 shows a square-planar coordination for the nickel ion and bond distances consistent with a diiminedithiolate description for the complex. For all complexes, the cyclic voltammetry measurements show two reversible reduction processes (-1.353/-1.380 V and -0798/-0.830 V, respectively) and an anodic wave (+0.372/+0.601 V). The UV-vis spectra present a band around 600-700 nm (ε = 4880-6000 dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1)) mainly attributed to a charge-transfer highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) transition, which shows a large negative solvatochromic shift, characteristic of push-pull complexes, and is responsible for the NLO properties of these molecules. The charge-transfer character of this electronic transition is confirmed by DFT calculations, with the HOMO mainly centered on the dithiolate moiety and the LUMO on the bpy ligand, with important contribution given by the carboxyl groups (≈13%). Small contributions from the nickel(II) ion are present in both of the frontier orbitals. The carboxyl groups enhance the optical properties of this class of complexes, confirmed by comparison with the corresponding unsubstituted compounds. The second-order NLO properties have been measured by an electric-field-induced second-harmonic-generation technique using a 10(-3) M solution in N,N-dimethylformamide and working with a 1.907 μm incident wavelength, giving for μβ1.907 (μβ0) values of -1095 (-581), -2760 (-954), and -1650 (-618) × 10(-48) esu for 1-3, respectively. These values are among the highest in the class of

  18. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  19. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Products Food Home Food Ingredients, Packaging & Labeling Labeling & Nutrition The Food Label and You — Video Share Tweet ... FDA has issued final changes to update the Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods. For more information, ...

  20. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1961-91 a total of 567,635 strains of Staphylococcus aureus from hospitalized patients in Denmark have been characterized according to their antibiotic resistance, site of isolation and phage type. Strains of phage group II (typed by the phages 3A, 3C, 55 and 71) have been analy...

  1. Labelling schemes: From a consumer perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2000-01-01

    . A recent MAPP study has investigated the value consumers attach the Government-controlled labels 'Ø-mærket' and 'Den Blå Lup' and the private supermarket label 'Mesterhakket' when they purchase minced meat. The results reveal four consumer segments that use labelling schemes for food products very....... The remaining consumers, about 55%, trust the institutions guaranteeing the labels and they use the labels as a signal without actually knowing the content of each label. Segment composition will probably change depending on the food group studied. It is therefore recommended that the different consumer types...

  2. The retrohoming of linear group II intron RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster occurs by both DNA ligase 4-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B White

    Full Text Available Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons that are thought to have invaded early eukaryotes and evolved into introns and retroelements in higher organisms. In bacteria, group II introns typically retrohome via full reverse splicing of an excised intron lariat RNA into a DNA site, where it is reverse transcribed by the intron-encoded protein. Recently, we showed that linear group II intron RNAs, which can result from hydrolytic splicing or debranching of lariat RNAs, can retrohome in eukaryotes by performing only the first step of reverse splicing, ligating their 3' end to the downstream DNA exon. Reverse transcription then yields an intron cDNA, whose free end is linked to the upstream DNA exon by an error-prone process that yields junctions similar to those formed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. Here, by using Drosophila melanogaster NHEJ mutants, we show that linear intron RNA retrohoming occurs by major Lig4-dependent and minor Lig4-independent mechanisms, which appear to be related to classical and alternate NHEJ, respectively. The DNA repair polymerase θ plays a crucial role in both pathways. Surprisingly, however, mutations in Ku70, which functions in capping chromosome ends during NHEJ, have only moderate, possibly indirect effects, suggesting that both Lig4 and the alternate end-joining ligase act in some retrohoming events independently of Ku. Another potential Lig4-independent mechanism, reverse transcriptase template switching from the intron RNA to the upstream exon DNA, occurs in vitro, but gives junctions differing from the majority in vivo. Our results show that group II introns can utilize cellular NHEJ enzymes for retromobility in higher organisms, possibly exploiting mechanisms that contribute to retrotransposition and mitigate DNA damage by resident retrotransposons. Additionally, our results reveal novel activities of group II intron reverse transcriptases, with implications for retrohoming mechanisms and

  3. On Online Labeling with Polynomially Many Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babka, Martin; Bulánek, Jan; Cunat, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    In the online labeling problem with parameters n and m we are presented with a sequence of nkeys from a totally ordered universe U and must assign each arriving key a label from the label set {1,2,…,m} so that the order of labels (strictly) respects the ordering on U. As new keys arrive it may be...

  4. Results of a phase II, open-label, non-comparative study of intralesional PV-10 followed by radiotherapy for the treatment of in-transit or metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Matthew; Read, Tavis; Thomas, Janine; Wagels, Michael; Burmeister, Bryan; Smithers, B Mark

    2017-06-01

    In-transit and recurrent dermal or subcutaneous melanoma metastases represent a significant burden of advanced disease. Intralesional Rose Bengal can elicit tumor selective ablation and a T-cell mediated abscopal effect in untreated lesions. A subset of patients in a phase II trial setting received external beam radiotherapy to their recurrent lesions with complete or partial response and no significant acute radiation reaction. An open-label, single-arm phase II study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of PV-10 followed by hypofractionated radiotherapy. Patients had in-transit melanoma metastases suitable for IL therapy and radiotherapy. Fifteen patients were enrolled and thirteen completed both treatment components. The overall response rate was 86.6% and the clinical benefit was 93.3% on an intention to treat analysis (CR 33.3%, PR 53.3%, SD 6.7%). The median follow up duration was 19.25 months. Size of metastases (Treatment was well tolerated with no associated grade 4 or 5 adverse events. The combination of PV-10 and radiotherapy resulted in lesion-specific, normal tissue-sparing, ablation of disease with minimal local or systemic adverse effects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy as a debulking agent for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: an open-label prospective phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Maria Rørbæk; Lindahl, L M; Gniadecki, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a powerful treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Based on the occurrence of relapses with low radiation doses, doses of 30-36 Gy are commonly used but most patients still eventually relapse and repeat treatment courses are limited...... due to the cumulative toxicity. Complete response rates are about 60-90% for T2-4 stages with a 5-year relapse-free survival of 10-25% for stages IB-III. Objectives: To evaluate prospectively the efficacy of low-dose TSEBT (10 Gy) in terms of complete cutaneous response rate, overall response rate...... and response duration in CTCL. Methods: Ten patients with stage IB-IV mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated in an open-label manner with 4 fractions of 1 Gy/week TSEB to a total skin dose of 10 Gy. Treatment responses were assessed at 1 and 3 months after treatment and subsequently at least every 6 months...

  6. A new antigenic marker specifically labels a subpopulation of the class II Kenyon cells in the brain of the European honeybee Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kubo, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The mushroom bodies are the higher-order integration center in the insect brain and are involved in higher brain functions such as learning and memory. In the social hymenopteran insects such as honeybees, the mushroom bodies are the prominent brain structures. The mushroom bodies are composed of lobed neuropils formed by thousands of parallel-projecting axons of intrinsic neurons, and the lobes are divided into parallel subdivisions. In the present paper, we report a new antigenic marker to label a single layer in the vertical lobes of the European honeybee Apis mellifera. In the brain of A. mellifera, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 15C3, which was originally developed against an insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) protein, immunolabels a single layer of the vertical lobes that correspond to the most dorsal layer of the γ-lobe. The 15C3 mAb recognizes a single ~200 kDa protein expressed in the adult honeybee brain. In addition, the 15C3 mAb immunoreactivity was also observed in the lobes of the developing pupal mushroom bodies. Since γ-lobe is well known to their extensive reorganization that occurs during metamorphosis in Drosophila, the novel antigenic marker for the honeybee γ-lobe allows us to investigate morphological changes of the mushroom bodies during metamorphosis.

  7. Recommended implementation of arterial spin‐labeled perfusion MRI for clinical applications: A consensus of the ISMRM perfusion study group and the European consortium for ASL in dementia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alsop, David C; Detre, John A; Golay, Xavier; Günther, Matthias; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Hernandez‐Garcia, Luis; Lu, Hanzhang; MacIntosh, Bradley J; Parkes, Laura M; Smits, Marion; Osch, Matthias J. P; Wang, Danny J. J; Wong, Eric C; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    ...) for clinical applications. It is a consensus of the ISMRM Perfusion Study Group and the European ASL in Dementia consortium, both of whom met to reach this consensus in October 2012 in Amsterdam...

  8. Evaluation of wet-cupping therapy for persistent non-specific low back pain: a randomised, waiting-list controlled, open-label, parallel-group pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent non-specific low back pain (PNSLBP is one of the most frequently experienced types of back pain around the world. Wet-cupping is a common intervention for various pain conditions, especially in Korea. In this context, we conducted a pilot study to determine the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatment for PNSLBP. Methods We recruited 32 participants (21 in the wet-cupping group and 11 in the waiting-list group who had been having PNSLBP for at least 3 months. The participants were recruited at the clinical research centre of the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Korea. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to wet-cupping and waiting-list groups. Following the practice of traditional Korean medicine, the treatment group was provided with wet-cupping treatment at two acupuncture points among the BL23, BL24 and BL25 6 times within 2 weeks. Usual care, including providing brochures for exercise, general advice for PNSLBP and acetaminophen, was allowed in both groups. Separate assessors participated in the outcome assessment. We used the 0 to100 numerical rating scale (NRS for pain, the McGill Pain Questionnaire for pain intensity (PPI and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ, and we assessed acetaminophen use and safety issues. Results The results showed that the NRS score for pain decreased (-16.0 [95% CI: -24.4 to -7.7] in the wet-cupping group and -9.1 [-18.1 to -0.1] in the waiting-list group, but there was no statistical difference between the groups (p = 0.52. However, the PPI scores showed significant differences between the two groups (-1.2 [-1.6 to -0.8] for the wet-cupping group and -0.2 [-0.8 to 0.4] for the waiting-list group, p Conclusion This pilot study may provide preliminary data on the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatments for PNSLBP. Future full-scale randomised controlled trials will be needed to provide firm evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention

  9. Tetrabenazine as anti-chorea therapy in Huntington Disease: an open-label continuation study. Huntington Study Group/TETRA-HD Investigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Samuel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetrabenazine (TBZ selectively depletes central monoamines by reversibly binding to the type-2 vesicular monoamine transporter. A previous double blind study in Huntington disease (HD demonstrated that TBZ effectively suppressed chorea, with a favorable short-term safety profile (Neurology 2006;66:366-372. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term safety and effectiveness of TBZ for chorea in HD. Methods Subjects who completed the 13-week, double blind protocol were invited to participate in this open label extension study for up to 80 weeks. Subjects were titrated to the best individual dose or a maximum of 200 mg/day. Chorea was assessed using the Total Maximal Chorea (TMC score from the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale. Results Of the 75 participants, 45 subjects completed 80 weeks. Three participants terminated due to adverse events (AEs including depression, delusions with associated previous suicidal behavior, and vocal tics. One subject died due to breast cancer. The other 26 subjects chose not to continue on with each ensuing extension for various reasons. When mild and unrelated AEs were excluded, the most commonly reported AEs (number of subjects were sedation/somnolence (18, depressed mood (17, anxiety (13, insomnia (10, and akathisia (9. Parkinsonism and dysphagia scores were significantly increased at week 80 compared to baseline. At week 80, chorea had significantly improved from baseline with a mean reduction in the TMC score of 4.6 (SD 5.5 units. The mean dosage at week 80 was 63.4 mg (range 12.5-175 mg. Conclusions TBZ effectively suppresses HD-related chorea for up to 80 weeks. Patients treated chronically with TBZ should be monitored for parkinsonism, dysphagia and other side effects including sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and akathisia. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov registration number (initial study: NCT00219804

  10. Determination of the degree of acetylation and the distribution of acetyl groups in chitosan by HPLC analysis of nitrous acid degraded and PMP labeled products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhangrun; Zeng, Yangyang; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Lijuan

    2015-09-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant polysaccharides on earth. It consists of repeating β-1,4 linked N-acetylated glucosamine (A) units. Chitosan is an N-deacetylated product of chitin. Chitosan and its derivatives have broad medical applications as drugs, nutraceuticals, or drug delivery agents. However, a reliable analytical method for quality control of medically used chitosans is still lacking. In current study, nitrous acid was used to cleave all glucosamine residues in chitosan into 2,5-anhydromannose (M) or M at the reducing end of di-, tri-, and oligosaccharides. PMP, i.e. 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, was used to label all the Ms. Online UV detection allowed quantification of all M-containing UV peaks whereas online MS analysis directly identified 11 different kinds of mono-, di-, tri-, and oligosaccharides that correlated each oligosaccharide with specific UV peak after HPLC separation. The DA (degree of acetylation) for chitosans was calculated based on the A/(A+M) value derived from the UV data. This newly developed method had several advantages for quality control of chitosan: 1. the experimental procedures were extensively optimized; 2. the reliability of the method was confirmed by online LC-MS analysis; 3. the DA value was obtainable based on the UV data after HPLC analysis, which was comparableto that of (1)H NMR and conductometric titration analyses; 4. finally and most importantly, this method could be used to obtain the DA as well as chemical acetylation/deacetylation mechanisms for chitosan by any laboratory equipped with a HPLC and an online UV detector.

  11. Itolizumab in combination with methotrexate modulates active rheumatoid arthritis: safety and efficacy from a phase 2, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, dose-ranging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Arvind; Chandrashekara, S; Iyer, Rajgopalan; Rajasekhar, Liza; Shetty, Naresh; Veeravalli, Sarathchandra Mouli; Ghosh, Alakendu; Merchant, Mrugank; Oak, Jyotsna; Londhey, Vikram; Barve, Abhijit; Ramakrishnan, M S; Montero, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of itolizumab with methotrexate in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had inadequate response to methotrexate. In this open-label, phase 2 study, 70 patients fulfilling American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and negative for latent tuberculosis were randomized to four arms: 0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/kg itolizumab weekly combined with oral methotrexate, and methotrexate alone (2:2:2:1). Patients were treated for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of methotrexate alone during follow-up. Twelve weeks of itolizumab therapy was well tolerated. Forty-four patients reported adverse events (AEs); except for six severe AEs, all others were mild or moderate. Infusion-related reactions mainly occurred after the first infusion, and none were reported after the 11th infusion. No serum anti-itolizumab antibodies were detected. In the full analysis set, all itolizumab doses showed evidence of efficacy. At 12 weeks, 50 % of the patients achieved ACR20, and 58.3 % moderate or good 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS-28) response; at week 24, these responses were seen in 22 and 31 patients. Significant improvements were seen in Short Form-36 Health Survey and Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index scores. Overall, itolizumab in combination with methotrexate was well tolerated and efficacious in RA for 12 weeks, with efficacy persisting for the entire 24-week evaluation period. (Clinical Trial Registry of India, http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/login.php , CTRI/2008/091/000295).

  12. GEO label: The General Framework for Labeling and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B. L.; McCallum, I.; Maso, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. As part of a strategy to increase the involvement of the science and technology community in GEOSS, both as users and developers of GEOSS itself, GEO decided to develop a GEO label concept related to the scientific relevance, quality, acceptance and societal needs for services and data sets of GEOSS. The development of a GEO label is included in the GEO work plan and several projects address the challenges of developing a GEO label concept. Within the different projects developing the GEO label, various perspectives and approaches are being applied. In order to arrive at a generally accepted GEO label concept, a common understanding and basic knowledge of labeling is necessary. Assessment of quality of internationally standardized Earth observation data products implies possible certification. A general understanding of the framework for international standards and certification will also contribute to a more coherent discussion and more efficient development of a GEO label. We will describe the general labeling and certification framework emphasizing the relation to the three elements of the GEO label: quality, user acceptance and relevance. Based on a survey of international labels done by the EGIDA project, we have analyzed the legal framework and organization of labels and certification. We will discuss the frameworks for certification, user ratings, registration and analysis of user requirements. Quality assessment is a particular focus of the analysis and is based on the work done by the GeoViQua project. A GEO label will function both as a data distribution strategy and as a general management system for data. Through a label users can compare different data sets and get access to more information about the relevant data, including quality. A label will provide traceability of data both in the interest of users as well as data

  13. Physical localization of molecular markers and assignment of the 15th linkage group to chromosome 11 of the karyotype in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by primed in situ labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J F; Yin, H; Gao, H Q; Zhuang, N S; Liu, J P

    2015-07-28

    Physical localization of molecular markers and assignment of the 15th linkage group to chromosome 11 of the karyotype in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) were achieved using primed in situ labeling. Amplified signals for both the EST507-1 and SSRY13-5 markers were consistently observed in different stages of cell division. A comparison of the length, arm ratio, and other morphological characteristics of somatic metaphase chromosomes in karyotype analysis indicated that the EST507-1 and SSRY13-5 markers were localized on the short and long arm of cassava chromosome 11 with the relative map positions of 41.67 and 23.07, respectively. The physical localization of the 2 markers on chromosome 11 of the karyotype corresponds to their positions on the 15th linkage group in cassava.

  14. Intraoperative avidination for radionuclide treatment as a radiotherapy boost in breast cancer: results of a phase II study with {sup 90}Y-labeled biotin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Giovanni; De Cicco, Concetta; Carbone, Giuseppe; Pacifici, Monica [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila E.; Cremonesi, Marta; Di Dia, Amalia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Gianmatteo; Galimberti, Viviana; Luini, Alberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ferrari, Annamaria; Orecchia, Roberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy); De Santis, Rita [Sigma-Tau SpA R and D, Rome (Italy); Zurrida, Stefano [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); Veronesi, Umberto [European Institute of Oncology, Scientific Director, Milan (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after conservative surgery for early breast cancer requires 5-7 weeks. For elderly patients and those distant from an RT center, attending for EBRT may be difficult or impossible. We investigated local toxicity, cosmetic outcomes, and quality of life in a new breast irradiation technique - intraoperative avidination for radionuclide therapy (IART) - in which avidin is administered to the tumor bed and {sup 90}Y-labelled biotin later administered intravenously to bind the avidin and provide irradiation. Reduced duration EBRT (40 Gy) is given subsequently. After surgery, 50 (ten patients), 100 (15 patients) or 150 mg (ten patients) of avidin was injected into the tumor bed. After 12-24 h, 3.7 GBq {sup 90}Y-biotin (beta source for therapeutic effect) plus 185 MBq {sup 111}In-biotin (gamma source for imaging and dosimetry) was infused slowly. Whole-body scintigraphy and SPECT/CT images were taken for up to 30 h. Shortened EBRT started 4 weeks later. Local toxicity was assessed by RTOG scale; quality of life was assessed by EORTC QOL-30. Of 35 patients recruited (mean age 63 years; range 42-74) 32 received IART plus EBRT. 100 mg avidin provided 19.5 {+-} 4.0 Gy to the tumor bed and was considered the optimum dose. No side-effects of avidin or {sup 90}Y-biotin occurred, with no hematological or local toxicity. Local G3 toxicity occurred in 3/32 patients during EBRT. IART plus EBRT was well accepted, with good cosmetic outcomes and maintained quality of life. IART plus reduced EBRT can accelerate irradiation after conservative breast surgery. (orig.)

  15. Enhancing sensitivity and selectivity in a label-free colorimetric sensor for detection of iron(II) ions with luminescent molybdenum disulfide nanosheet-based peroxidase mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Hu, Jie; Zhuang, Qianfen; Ni, Yongnian

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, we demonstrated that the luminescent molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets, which were prepared hydrothermally by using sodium molybdate and thiourea as precursors, possessed peroxidase-like activity, and could catalyze the oxidation of peroxidase substrate o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to produce a yellow color reaction. Further addition of Fe(2+) into the nanosheets led to peroxidase mimetics with greatly enhanced catalytic activity. The observation was exploited to develop a label-free colorimetric nanozyme sensor for detection of Fe(2+). The fabricated MoS2/OPD/H2O2 sensor showed a wide linear range of 0.01-0.8 µM with a detection limit of 7 nM. Moreover, it was found that the MoS2/OPD/H2O2 sensor displayed enhanced sensitivity and selectivity toward Fe(2+) compared with the OPD/H2O2 sensor, suggesting that the MoS2 nanosheets could improve the performance of the Fe(2+) sensor. An advanced chemometrics algorithm, multivariate curve resolution by alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), was further applied to interpret the origin of enhancing sensitivity and selectivity in the Fe(2+) sensor with the MoS2 nanosheets. The time-dependent UV-vis spectral data of the studied systems were collected, and submitted to the MCR-ALS. The results showed that the increased sensitivity and selectivity of the MoS2/OPD/H2O2 sensor for Fe(2+) detection likely arose from its large reaction rate constant. Finally, the proposed MoS2/OPD/H2O2 sensor was successfully applied for detection of Fe(2+) in water samples.

  16. A Phase II Multicentre, Open-Label, Proof-of-Concept Study of Tasquinimod in Hepatocellular, Ovarian, Renal Cell, and Gastric Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudier, Bernard; Faivre, Sandrine; Van Cutsem, Eric; Germann, Nathalie; Pouget, Jean-Christophe; Plummer, Ruth; Vergote, Ignace; Thistlethwaite, Fiona; Bjarnason, Georg A; Jones, Robert; Mackay, Helen; Edeline, Julien; Fartoux, Laetitia; Hirte, Hal; Oza, Amit

    2017-08-10

    Tasquinimod is a small molecule with immunomodulatory, anti-angiogenic, and anti-metastatic properties that targets the tumor microenvironment. This study aimed to obtain a clinical proof of concept that tasquinimod was active and tolerable in patients with advanced solid tumors. This early stopping design, open-label, proof-of-concept clinical trial evaluated the clinical activity of tasquinimod in four independent cohorts of patients with advanced hepatocellular (n = 53), ovarian (n = 55), renal cell (n = 38), and gastric (n = 21) cancers. Tasquinimod was given orally every day (0.5 mg/day for at least 2 weeks, with dose increase to 1 mg/day) until radiological progression according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor (RECIST) 1.1 criteria, intolerable toxicity, or patient withdrawal. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) rate according to RECIST 1.1 by central assessment. Interim futility analyses at 8 weeks (6 weeks for the gastric cancer cohort) found adequate clinical activity of tasquinimod only in the hepatocellular cohort and recruitment to the other three cohorts was stopped. PFS rates were 26.9% at 16 weeks, 7.3% at 24 weeks, 13.2% at 16 weeks, and 9.5% at 12 weeks, respectively, in hepatocellular, ovarian, renal cell, and gastric cancer cohorts. The pre-defined PFS threshold was not reached in the hepatocellular cancer cohort at the second stage of the trial. The most common treatment-related adverse events were fatigue (48.5%), nausea (34.1%), decreased appetite (31.7%), and vomiting (24.6%). This study failed to demonstrate clinical activity of tasquinimod in heavily pre-treated patients with advanced hepatocellular, ovarian, renal cell, and gastric cancer. NCT01743469.

  17. Deep Chandra observations of HCG 16. II. The development of the intra-group medium in a spiral-rich group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, E.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P.; Zezas, A.; Nulsen, P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giacintucci, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Ponman, T. J.; Raychaudhury, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mamon, G. A. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris (UMR 7095 CNRS and UMPC), 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-10-01

    We use a combination of deep Chandra X-ray observations and radio continuum imaging to investigate the origin and current state of the intra-group medium (IGM) in the spiral-rich compact group HCG 16. We confirm the presence of a faint (L {sub X,} {sub bolo} = 1.87{sub −0.66}{sup +1.03}×10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1}), low-temperature (0.30{sub −0.05}{sup +0.07} keV) IGM extending throughout the ACIS-S3 field of view, with a ridge linking the four original group members and extending to the southeast, as suggested by previous ROSAT and XMM-Newton observations. This ridge contains 6.6{sub −3.3}{sup +3.9}× 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} of hot gas and is at least partly coincident with a large-scale H I tidal filament, indicating that the IGM in the inner part of the group is highly multi-phase. We present evidence that the group is not yet virialized, and show that gas has probably been transported from the starburst winds of NGC 838 and NGC 839 into the surrounding IGM. Considering the possible origin of the IGM, we argue that material ejected by galactic winds may have played a significant role, contributing 20%-40% of the observed hot gas in the system.

  18. Deep Chandra Observations of HCG 16. II. The Development of the Intra-group Medium in a Spiral-rich Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, E.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P.; Giacintucci, S.; Zezas, A.; Ponman, T. J.; Mamon, G. A.; Nulsen, P.; Raychaudhury, S.

    2014-10-01

    We use a combination of deep Chandra X-ray observations and radio continuum imaging to investigate the origin and current state of the intra-group medium (IGM) in the spiral-rich compact group HCG 16. We confirm the presence of a faint (L X, bolo = 1.87+1.03-0.66×1041 erg s-1), low-temperature (0.30+0.07-0.05 keV) IGM extending throughout the ACIS-S3 field of view, with a ridge linking the four original group members and extending to the southeast, as suggested by previous ROSAT and XMM-Newton observations. This ridge contains 6.6+3.9-3.3× 109 M ⊙ of hot gas and is at least partly coincident with a large-scale {H} {I} tidal filament, indicating that the IGM in the inner part of the group is highly multi-phase. We present evidence that the group is not yet virialized, and show that gas has probably been transported from the starburst winds of NGC 838 and NGC 839 into the surrounding IGM. Considering the possible origin of the IGM, we argue that material ejected by galactic winds may have played a significant role, contributing 20%-40% of the observed hot gas in the system.

  19. A one-dimensional barium(II) coordination polymer with a coordinated nitro group of 2-nitrobenzoate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bikshandarkoil R Srinivasan; Santosh Y Shetgaonkar; Pallepogu Raghavaiah

    2008-03-01

    The aqueous reaction of barium carbonate with 2-nitrobenzoic acid (2-nbaH) results in the formation of a one-dimensional coordination polymer, catena-poly[[hexa(aqua)dibarium(II)]bis[(2-2-nitrobenzoate-O,O,O-NO2)(2-2-nitrobenzoate-O,O,O')

  20. Structural difference between group I and group II cobra cardiotoxins: X-ray, NMR, and CD analysis of the effect of cis-proline conformation on three-fingered toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Shou; Chung, Fong-Yu; Tjong, Siu-Cin; Goh, King-Siang; Huang, Wei-Ning; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Po-Long; Lin, Hua-Ching; Chen, Chun-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2005-05-24

    Natural homologues of cobra cardiotoxins (CTXs) were classified into two structural subclasses of group I and II based on the amino acid sequence and circular dichroism analysis, but the exact differences in their three-dimensional structures and biological significance remain elusive. We show by circular dichroism, NMR spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic analyses of a newly purified group I CTX A6 from eastern Taiwan cobra (Naja atra) venoms that its loop I conformation adopts a type VIa turn with a cis peptide bond located between two proline residues of PPxY. A similar "banana-twisted" conformation can be observed in other group I CTXs and also in cyclolinopeptide A and its analogues. By binding to the membrane environment, group I CTX undergoes a conformational change to adopt a more extended hydrophobic domain with beta-sheet twisting closer to the one adopted by group II CTX. This result resolves a discrepancy in the CTX structural difference reported previously between solution as well as crystal state and shows that, in addition to the hydrophobicity, the exact loop I conformation also plays an important role in CTX-membrane interaction. Potential protein targets of group I CTXs after cell internalization are also discussed on the basis of the determined loop I conformation.

  1. The Development and Evaluation of Training Methods for Group 4 Personnel. II. Training Group 4 Personnel in the Operation of the Electronic Multimeter AN/PSM-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Joseph C.; And Others

    Part of continuing Navy research on training and utilizing Group 4 (low ability) personnel, this study investigated the feasibility of teaching such personnel a course in the operation of the AN/PSM-4 multimeter (an electronic measuring device), and evaluate the relative effectiveness of two different instructional methods. The course was given to…

  2. An open label, randomized, comparative, parallel group, multicenter, prospective, interventional, clinical study to evaluate efficacy and safety of “AHPL/AYTOP/0113” in comparison with “Framycetin sulphate cream” in acute wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay U Nipanikar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to assess efficacy and safety of AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream, a polyherbal formulation in comparison with Framycetin sulphate cream in acute wounds. Methodology: It was an open label, randomized, comparative, parallel group and multi-center clinical study. Total 47 subjects were randomly assigned to Group-A (AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream and 42 subjects were randomly assigned to Group-B (Framycetin sulphate cream. All the subjects were advised to apply study drug, thrice daily for 21 days or up to complete wound healing (whichever was earlier. All the subjects were called for follow up on days 2, 4, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 or up to the day of complete wound healing. Data describing quantitative measures are expressed as mean ± SD. Comparison of variables representing categorical data was performed using Chi-square test. Results: Group-A subjects took significantly less (P < 0.05 i.e., (mean 7.77 days than (mean 9.87 days of Group-B subjects for wound healing. At the end of the study, statistically significant better (P < 0.05 results were observed in Group-A than Group-B in mean wound surface area, wound healing parameters and pain associated with wound. Excellent overall efficacy and tolerability was observed in subjects of both the groups. No adverse event or adverse drug reaction was noted in any subject of both the groups. Conclusion: AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream proved to be superior to Framycetin sulphate cream in healing of acute wounds.

  3. ML-MG: Multi-label Learning with Missing Labels Using a Mixed Graph

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan

    2015-12-07

    This work focuses on the problem of multi-label learning with missing labels (MLML), which aims to label each test instance with multiple class labels given training instances that have an incomplete/partial set of these labels (i.e. some of their labels are missing). To handle missing labels, we propose a unified model of label dependencies by constructing a mixed graph, which jointly incorporates (i) instance-level similarity and class co-occurrence as undirected edges and (ii) semantic label hierarchy as directed edges. Unlike most MLML methods, We formulate this learning problem transductively as a convex quadratic matrix optimization problem that encourages training label consistency and encodes both types of label dependencies (i.e. undirected and directed edges) using quadratic terms and hard linear constraints. The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) can be used to exactly and efficiently solve this problem. To evaluate our proposed method, we consider two popular applications (image and video annotation), where the label hierarchy can be derived from Wordnet. Experimental results show that our method achieves a significant improvement over state-of-the-art methods in performance and robustness to missing labels.

  4. Effect of verapamil on ischemia and ventricular arrhythmias after an acute myocardial infarction: prognostic implications. The Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaage-Nilsen, M; Rasmussen, Verner; Hansen, J F

    1991-01-01

    This article is a review of presented subsets of the Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II (DAVIT II) regarding the effect of verapamil on postinfarction ischemia, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart rate (HR), and the prognostic implications of these findings. Patients underwent Holter monitoring...... for 24-48 h at 1 week, i.e., before randomization to long-term treatment with placebo or verapamil, and after 1 month and about 1 year of study treatment. Ischemia: 18% of the patients had transient ST-segment deviation before randomization; 24% of the placebo- and 8% of the verapamil-treated patients (p......: In the placebo group the prevalence and incidence of many ventricular ectopic beats (VEBs), i.e., more than 10 VEBs/h, increased significantly during the first years after infarction; this was not the case in the verapamil patients group. The mean HR was significantly reduced by verapamil treatment after 1 month...

  5. Synthesis of S-adenosyl-L-methionine analogs with extended transferable groups for methyltransferase-directed labeling of DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masevičius, Viktoras; Nainytė, Milda; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) is a ubiquitous methyl donor for a variety of biological methylation reactions catalyzed by methyltransferases (MTases). AdoMet analogs with extended propargylic chains replacing the sulfonium-bound methyl group can serve as surrogate cofactors for many DNA and RNA MTases enabling covalent deposition of these linear chains to their cognate targets sites in DNA or RNA. Here we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of two representative examples of AdoMet analogs with a transferable hex-2-ynyl group carrying a terminal azide or amine functionality. Our approach is based on direct chemoselective alkylation of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine at sulfur with corresponding nosylates under acidic conditions. We also describe synthetic routes to 6-substituted hex-2-yn-1-ols and their conversion to the corresponding nosylates. Using these protocols, synthetic AdoMet analogs can be prepared within one to two weeks. PMID:26967468

  6. A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Labeled, Parallel Group Trial of Sildenafil in Alcohol-Associated Erectile Dysfunction: The Impact on Psychosocial Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Grinshpoon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To examine the effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction (ED and psychosocial outcomes in alcohol-dependent (AD men, 108 men with these diagnoses were randomly assigned to either take sildenafil (50 mg as add-on to standard treatment for AD, or the same treatment without sildenafil, for 12 weeks. Only 50 patients in sildenafil group and 51 in control group twice completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF and a battery of self-report questionnaires. IIEF scores and psychosocial functioning, self-esteem and support from friends improved only for sildenafil-treated patients (P < 0.001. The high effect sizes suggest that the observed benefits are unlikely to be a placebo effect, although their unspecific nature could not be ruled out. In men with ED associated with AD, sildenafil improves both ED and psychosocial outcomes. Further placebo-controlled clinical trial is warranted.

  7. Aggressiveness between genetic groups I and II of isolates of Cercospora zeae-maydis Agressividade entre isolados dos grupos genéticos I e II de Cercospora zeae-maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Marisa Mathioni

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years, the gray leaf spot disease (GLS caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, was not considered an important pathogen of maize (Zea mays, L. in Brazil. However, the recent adoption of agronomical practices such as no-tillage and cultivation under central pivot irrigation systems increased the incidence and severity to the extent that GLS is now one of the most important diseases of maize. Isolates of C. zeae-maydis can be distinguished by two genetic groups (I and II based on AFLP markers and on polymorphisms of the ITS and 5.8S rDNA regions. Until now, however, the biological implications of this distinction remain unclear. This study investigated whether isolates from the two genetic groups differ in aggressiveness towards maize. For this, symptoms of a susceptible hybrid were evaluated under greenhouse conditions with 9 and 11 isolates of C. zeae-maydis from groups I and II, respectively. Plants in the V3 growth stage were inoculated by placing sorghum seeds colonized with the pathogen in the leaf whorl and symptoms were evaluated with a visual rating scale 30 days later. On average, isolates of genetic group II were more aggressive than those of group I, with mean disease scores of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively. Differences were also observed between experiments, which suggested that group I and II might also differ in their fitness under different environments. This is the first report on differences in aggressiveness between the two genetic groups of C. zeae-maydis.Durante muitos anos, a cercosporiose, causada pelo fungo Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, não foi considerada importante para a cultura do milho (Zea mays, L. no Brasil. Entretanto, a recente utilização de práticas culturais como o plantio direto e o cultivo sob pivôs centrais favoreceram o aumento de sua severidade e incidência, de forma que a doença é hoje considerada uma das mais importantes da cultura. Isolados de C. zeae

  8. S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Augmentation in Patients with Stage II Treatment-Resistant Major Depressive Disorder: An Open Label, Fixed Dose, Single-Blind Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico De Berardis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the efficacy of S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe augmentation in patients with treatment-resistant depressive disorder (TRD. Thirty-three outpatients with major depressive episode who failed to respond to at least 8 weeks of treatment with two adequate and stable doses of antidepressants were treated openly with fixed dose of SAMe (800 mg for 8 weeks, added to existing medication. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline in total score on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D. The Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I was rated at the endpoint. Patients with a reduction of 50% or more on HAM-D total score and a CGI-I score of 1 or 2 at endpoint were considered responders; remission was defined as a HAM-D score ≤7. Secondary outcome measures included the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS. At 8 weeks, a significant decrease in HAM-D score was observed with response achieved by 60% of the patients and remission by 36%. Also a statistically significant reduction in SHAPS and SDS was observed. Our findings indicate that SAMe augmentation may be effective and well tolerated in stage II TRD. However, limitations of the present study must be considered and further placebo-controlled trials are needed.

  9. Phase I/II Study of Temozolomide Plus Nimustine Chemotherapy for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas: Kyoto Neuro-oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOKI, Tomokazu; ARAKAWA, Yoshiki; UEBA, Tetsuya; ODA, Masashi; NISHIDA, Namiko; AKIYAMA, Yukinori; TSUKAHARA, Tetsuya; IWASAKI, Koichi; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this phase I/II study was to examine the efficacy and toxicity profile of temozolomide (TMZ) plus nimustine (ACNU). Patients who had received a standard radiotherapy with one or two previous chemo-regimens were enrolled. In phase I, the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) by TMZ (150 mg/m2/day) (Day 1–5) plus various doses of ACNU (30, 35, 40, 45 mg/m2/day) (Day 15) per 4 weeks was defined on a standard 3 + 3 design. In phase II, these therapeutic activity and safety of this regimen were evaluated. Forty-nine eligible patients were enrolled. The median age was 50 years-old. Eighty percent had a KPS of 70–100. Histologies were glioblastoma (73%), anaplastic astrocytoma (22%), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (4%). In phase I, 15 patients were treated at four cohorts by TMZ plus ACNU. MTD was TMZ (150 mg/m2) plus ACNU (40 mg/m2). In phase II, 40 patients were treated at the dose of cohort 3 (MTD). Thirty-five percent of patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicities, mainly hematologic. The overall response rate was 11% (4/37). Sixty-eight percent (25/37) had stable disease. Twenty-two percent (8/37) showed progression. Progression-free survival (PFS) rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% (95% CI, 12–35%) and 8% (95% CI, 4–15%). Median PFS was 13 months (95% CI, 9.2–17.2 months). Overall survival (OS) at 6 and 12 were 78% (95% CI, 67–89%) and 49% (95% CI, 33–57%). Median OS was 11.8 months (95% CI, 8.2–14.5 months). This phase I/II study showed a moderate toxicity in hematology and may has a promising efficacy in OS, without inferiority in PFS. PMID:27725524

  10. Unexpected metal ion-assisted transformations leading to unexplored bridging ligands in Ni(II) coordination chemistry: the case of PO3F(2-) group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermitzaki, Despina; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Escuer, Albert; Perlepes, Spyros P; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2014-10-21

    The initial 'accidental', metal ion-assisted hydrolysis of PF6(-) to PO3F(2-) has been evolved in a systematic investigation of the bridging affinity of the latter group in Ni(II)/oximate chemistry; mono-, di- and trinuclear complexes have been prepared and confirmed both the rich reactivity of PO3F(2-) and its potential for further use as bridging ligand in high-nuclearity 3d-metal cluster chemistry.

  11. The type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster locus of group II clostridium botulinum has evolved by successive disruption of two different ancestral precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Stringer, Sandra C; Webb, Martin D; Peck, Michael W

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequences of five different Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type F6 strains were compared at a 50-kb locus containing the neurotoxin gene cluster. A clonal origin for these strains is indicated by the fact that sequences were identical except for strain Eklund 202F, with 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and a 15-bp deletion. The essential topB gene encoding topoisomerase III was found to have been split by the apparent insertion of 34.4 kb of foreign DNA (in a similar manner to that in Group II C. botulinum type E where the rarA gene has been disrupted by a neurotoxin gene cluster). The foreign DNA, which includes the intact 13.6-kb type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster, bears not only a newly introduced topB gene but also two nonfunctional botulinum neurotoxin gene remnants, a type B and a type E. This observation combined with the discovery of bacteriophage integrase genes and IS4 elements suggest that several rounds of recombination/horizontal gene transfer have occurred at this locus. The simplest explanation for the current genotype is that the ancestral bacterium, a Group II C. botulinum type B strain, received DNA firstly from a strain containing a type E neurotoxin gene cluster, then from a strain containing a type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster. Each event disrupted the previously functional neurotoxin gene. This degree of successive recombination at one hot spot is without precedent in C. botulinum, and it is also the first description of a Group II C. botulinum genome containing more than one neurotoxin gene sequence.

  12. Semi-longitudinal Study of the Mcnamara Cephalometric Triangle in Class II and Class III Subjects Grouped by Cervical Vertebrae Maturation Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola-Guillén, Luis E; Fitzcarrald, Fernando D; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to compare the McNamara cephalometric triangle values in untreated normodivergent Class II and Class III malocclusion subjects of Latin American origin grouped by cervical vertebrae maturation stage to an untreated Class I malocclusion normodivergent control group. The study was conducted on a sample of 610 pretreatment lateral cephalograms (250 male, 360 female), examined and grouped according to their anteroposterior skeletal relationship (Class I, II or III), cervical vertebrae maturation stage (Pre Pubertal Peak P1 = CS1 and CS2, Pubertal Peak P2= CS3 and CS4, and Post Pubertal Peak P3 = CS5 and CS6) and sex. Co-A, Co-Gn and ENA-Me were measured in each lateral cephalogram. ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests were performed to determine differences between the groups. The results showed that in males, the greatest maxillary and mandibular dimensional increases occurred during the P3 stage (CS5 to CS6), while in females, they occurred in the P2 stage (CS3 to CS4). The Co-A and Co-Gn showed significant differences between the malocclusion classes (pClass II subjects and the mandibular lengths in Class III subjects were already higher at the beginning of the period evaluated (P1). A worsening trend for the Class II and III malocclusions was identified during the period evaluated. Finally, changes in the McNamara cephalometric triangle values were markedly different in the three normodivergent skeletal malocclusion classes. In these Latin American subjects the pubertal growth spurt occurred at different times with respect to the Caucasian and Asian norms.

  13. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedreza Mazlom; Mahbobeh Firooz; Farzane Hasanzade; Seyedali Kimiaee; Aliakbar Raoufsaeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type I...

  14. Suggested guidelines for the provision and assessment of orthodontic education in Europe. A report from the Professional Development Group of the EURO-QUAL BIOMED II Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, K A; Adamidis, J P; McDonald, J P; Seeholzer, H; Sieminska-Piekarczyk, B

    2000-12-01

    The suggested guidelines for the provision and assessment of Orthodontic education in Europe, which are introduced, set out, and discussed in this paper, resulted from the work of the Professional Development Group (PDG) of the EURO-QUAL BIOMED II project. They were published in the final report of the project, after comments had been received from a range of national and European bodies and societies, including the British and the European Orthodontic Societies, Royal Colleges, and the General Dental Council.

  15. Vaccination response to tetanus toxoid and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccines following administration of a single dose of abatacept: a randomized, open-label, parallel group study in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Lee; Leon, Francisco; Vratsanos, George; Raymond, Ralph; Corbo, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The effect of abatacept, a selective T-cell co-stimulation modulator, on vaccination has not been previously investigated. In this open-label, single-dose, randomized, parallel-group, controlled study, the effect of a single 750 mg infusion of abatacept on the antibody response to the intramuscular tetanus toxoid vaccine (primarily a memory response to a T-cell-dependent peptide antigen) and the intramuscular 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (a less T-cell-dependent response to a polysaccharide antigen) was measured in 80 normal healthy volunteers. Subjects were uniformly randomized to receive one of four treatments: Group A (control group), subjects received vaccines on day 1 only; Group B, subjects received vaccines 2 weeks before abatacept; Group C, subjects received vaccines 2 weeks after abatacept; and Group D, subjects received vaccines 8 weeks after abatacept. Anti-tetanus and anti-pneumococcal (Danish serotypes 2, 6B, 8, 9V, 14, 19F and 23F) antibody titers were measured 14 and 28 days after vaccination. While there were no statistically significant differences between the dosing groups, geometric mean titers following tetanus or pneumococcal vaccination were generally lower in subjects who were vaccinated 2 weeks after receiving abatacept, compared with control subjects. A positive response (defined as a twofold increase in antibody titer from baseline) to tetanus vaccination at 28 days was seen, however, in ≥ 60% of subjects across all treatment groups versus 75% of control subjects. Similarly, over 70% of abatacept-treated subjects versus all control subjects (100%) responded to at least three pneumococcal serotypes, and approximately 25–30% of abatacept-treated subjects versus 45% of control subjects responded to at least six serotypes. PMID:17425783

  16. Phase II, Open-Label, Randomized Trial of the MEK 1/2 Inhibitor Selumetinib as Monotherapy versus Temozolomide in Patients with Advanced Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkwood, John M; Bastholt, Lars; Robert, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    and temozolomide (median time to event 78 and 80 days, respectively; hazard ratio, 1.07; 80% confidence interval, 0.86-1.32). Objective response was observed in six (5.8%) patients receiving selumetinib and nine (9.4%) patients in the temozolomide group. Among patients with BRAF mutations, objective responses were...... similar between selumetinib and temozolomide groups (11.1% and 10.7%, respectively). However, five of the six selumetinib partial responders were BRAF mutated. Frequently reported adverse events with selumetinib were dermatitis acneiform (papular pustular rash; 59.6%), diarrhea (56.6%), nausea (50.......5%) and peripheral edema (40.4%), whereas nausea (64.2%), constipation (47.4%) and vomiting (44.2%) were reported with temozolomide. CONCLUSIONS: No significant difference in progression-free survival was observed between patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma unselected for BRAF/NRAS mutations, who...

  17. Production of Group II and III base oils by hybrid route using brazilian crude; Producao de oleos basicos lubrificantes dos grupos II e III pela rota hibrida ou mista a partir de petroleo brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Wlamir Soares; Fontes, Anita Eleonora Ferreira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a series of pilot plant tests made at PETROBRAS Research Centre, considering hydrotreatment and solvent dewaxing steps, to produce group II and group III lube base oils from Baiano Light crude feeds (Brazilian crude). RLAM Refinery has been using Baiano light crude to produce group I base oils by conventional route and in the pilot plant studies, two types of process scheme were tested. In the first one, an industrial run was performed at RLAM Refinery, including distillation, dewaxing and extraction and the light raffinate was used as a feed for a hydrotreatment pilot plant, followed by a distillation to remove the front ends. In the second scheme, another industrial run was performed, including distillation and dewaxing steps and the medium dewaxed oil was used as a charge for a hydrotreatment followed by distillation and dewaxing pilot plant tests. Products of excellent quality were obtained. Due to their high viscosity indexes (from 96 to 126), low contaminants levels (sulfur < 5 ppm and nitrogen < 5 ppm) and low aromatic content (CA < 2 %), the lube base oils produced are therefore classified as group II and group III. The main advantages of this route are related to the base oils quality improvements with low investment and more flexibility in terms of crude source. (author)

  18. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  19. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Ingredients, Packaging & Labeling Labeling & Nutrition The Food Label and You — Video Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ...

  20. Intrinsic plasticity induced by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors via enhancement of high-threshold KV currents in sound localizing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, W R; Lu, Y

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsic plasticity has emerged as an important mechanism regulating neuronal excitability and output under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we report a novel form of intrinsic plasticity. Using perforated patch clamp recordings, we examined the modulatory effects of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) on voltage-gated potassium (KV) currents and the firing properties of neurons in the chicken nucleus laminaris (NL), the first central auditory station where interaural time cues are analyzed for sound localization. We found that activation of mGluR II by synthetic agonists resulted in a selective increase of the high-threshold KV currents. More importantly, synaptically released glutamate (with reuptake blocked) also enhanced the high-threshold KV currents. The enhancement was frequency-coding region dependent, being more pronounced in low-frequency neurons compared to middle- and high-frequency neurons. The intracellular mechanism involved the Gβγ signaling pathway associated with phospholipase C and protein kinase C. The modulation strengthened membrane outward rectification, sharpened action potentials, and improved the ability of NL neurons to follow high-frequency inputs. These data suggest that mGluR II provides a feedforward modulatory mechanism that may regulate temporal processing under the condition of heightened synaptic inputs.

  1. An open-label, single-dose, parallel-group study of the effects of chronic hepatic impairment on the safety and pharmacokinetics of desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird-Bellaire, Susan; Behrle, Jessica A; Parker, Vernon D; Patat, Alain; Paul, Jeffrey; Nichols, Alice I

    2013-06-01

    Many antidepressants are extensively metabolized in the liver, requiring dose adjustments in individuals with hepatic impairment. Clinical studies indicate that the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine is metabolized primarily via glucuronidation, and ∼45% is eliminated unchanged in urine. The objectives of this study were to assess the pharmacokinetic profile, safety, and tolerability of desvenlafaxine in adults with chronic Child-Pugh class A, B, and C hepatic impairment. Subjects (aged 18-65 years) with mild (Child-Pugh class A, n = 8), moderate (Child-Pugh class B, n = 8), and severe (Child-Pugh class C, n = 8) hepatic impairment and 12 healthy matched subjects received a single 100-mg oral dose of desvenlafaxine. Disposition of (R)-, (S)-, and (R+S)-enantiomers of desvenlafaxine were examined in plasma and urine. Geometric least squares (GLS) mean ratios and 90% CIs for AUC, AUC0-τ, Cmax, and Cl/F were calculated; comparisons were made by using a 1-factor ANOVA. Safety was evaluated according to adverse events, physical examination, vital signs, and laboratory assessments. Healthy participants had a mean age of 51 years (range, 36-62 years) and weight of 79.1 kg (range, 52.5-105.0 kg); hepatically impaired participants had a mean age of 52 years (range, 31-65 years) and weight of 80.9 kg (range, 50.2-119.5 kg). In both groups, 67% of participants were male. No statistically significant differences (≥50%) in the disposition of desvenlafaxine were detected between hepatically impaired patients and healthy subjects based on GLS mean ratios for Cmax, AUC0-τ, AUC, or Cl/F (P > 0.05 for each comparison). Median Tmax was similar for all groups (range, 6-9 hours). A nonsignificant increase was observed for desvenlafaxine exposure in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment (GLS mean ratios [90% CIs] for AUC, 31% [93.2-184], 35% [96.5-190], respectively). The most common adverse events were nausea (n = 2, healthy subjects; n = 3

  2. Diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis by simultaneous detection of Adenovirus group F, Astrovirus, Rotavirus group A, Norovirus genogroups I and II, and Sapovirus in two internally controlled multiplex real-time PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maarseveen, Noortje M; Wessels, Els; de Brouwer, Caroline S; Vossen, Ann C T M; Claas, Eric C J

    2010-11-01

    Norovirus, Rotavirus group A, Astrovirus, Sapovirus and Adenovirus serotypes 40 and 41, are common causes of gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnosis of these causative agents is based on antigen detection and electron microscopy. To improve the diagnostic possibilities for viral gastroenteritis, two internally controlled multiplex real-time PCRs have been developed. Individual real-time PCRs were developed and optimized for the specific detection of Norovirus genogroup I, Norovirus genogroup II, Rotavirus group A, Astrovirus, Adenovirus group F and Sapovirus. Subsequently, the PCRs were combined to two multiplex PCR reactions. The multiplex assays were clinically evaluated using 239 fecal samples submitted to our laboratory over a 1-year period for the routine detection of Rotavirus and/or Adenovirus antigens using the Vikia(®) Rota/Adeno test (bioMérieux, Boxtel, The Netherlands). In general, the multiplex real-time PCR assays showed comparable sensitivity and specificity to the individual assays. A retrospective clinical evaluation showed increased pathogen detection in samples from 14% using conventional methods to 45% using PCR. Subsequently, the assay was implemented as a routine diagnostic tool. From September 2007 up to December 2009, 486 positive results were obtained in 1570 samples (31%) analyzed. Norovirus genogroup II was found the most frequently (61.1%), followed by Adenovirus (9.9%), Rotavirus (9.3%), Astrovirus (6.0%), Norovirus genogroup I (3.3%) and Sapovirus (0.4%). Two internally controlled multiplex real-time PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of Astrovirus, Adenovirus group F, Rotavirus, Norovirus genogroups I and II and Sapovirus have shown significant improvement in the diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cyclometallated ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes with 1-pyrenaldehyde 4-R-3-thiosemicarbazones: Regioselective ruthenation of the 1-pyrenyl group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupesh Narayana Prabhu; Samudranil Pal

    2015-04-01

    A facile method for the synthesis of a series of cyclometallated ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes with 1-pyrenaldehyde 4-R-3-thiosemicarbazones (H2Ln where the two H’s represent the dissociable thioamide and pyrenyl protons; R = H, Me and Ph) has been described. The characterization of the complexes having the general molecular formula trans-[Ru(Ln)(CO)(EPh33)2] (where E = P or As) were accomplished by elemental (CHN) analysis, magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic (ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis, emission and 1H-NMR) measurements. Electronic spectra of the complexes display multiple strong absorptions in the range 440–224 nm due to intraligand transitions. All the complexes exhibit emission bands that are characteristic of ligand centred emissive states. X-ray diffraction studies with representative complexes reveal a pincer-like 5,5-membered fused chelate rings forming CNS coordination mode of the thiosemicarbazonate ligand (Ln)2− via regioselective activation of 1-pyrenyl ortho C–H and formation of a distorted octahedral C2NSE2 coordination sphere around the ruthenium(II) centre.

  4. School-based mindfulness intervention for stress reduction in adolescents: Design and methodology of an open-label, parallel group, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette M. Johnstone

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents are in a high-risk period developmentally, in terms of susceptibility to stress. A mindfulness intervention represents a potentially useful strategy for developing cognitive and emotion regulation skills associated with successful stress coping. Mindfulness strategies have been used successfully for emotional coping in adults, but are not as well studied in youth. This article details a novel proposal for the design of an 8-week randomized study to evaluate a high school-based mindfulness curriculum delivered as part of a two semester health class. A wellness education intervention is proposed as an active control, along with a waitlist control condition. All students enrolled in a sophomore (10th grade health class at a private suburban high school will be invited to participate (n = 300. Pre-test assessments will be obtained by youth report, parent ratings, and on-site behavioral testing. The assessments will evaluate baseline stress, mood, emotional coping, controlled attention, and working memory. Participants, divided into 13 classrooms, will be randomized into one of three conditions, by classroom: A mindfulness intervention, an active control (wellness education, and a passive control (waitlist. Waitlisted participants will receive one of the interventions in the following term. Intervention groups will meet weekly for 8 weeks during regularly scheduled health classes. Immediate post-tests will be conducted, followed by a 60-day post-test. It is hypothesized that the mindfulness intervention will outperform the other conditions with regard to the adolescents' mood, attention and response to stress.

  5. Comparative studies of mononuclear Ni(II) and UO2(II) complexes having bifunctional coordinated groups: synthesis, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, surface morphology studies and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahem, Abeer A

    2012-03-01

    Two Schiff base ligands derived from condensation of phthalaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in 1:2 (L(1)) and 2:1 (L(2)) having bifunctional coordinated groups (NH(2) and CHO groups, respectively) and their metal complexes with Ni(II) and UO(2)(II) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibilities and spectral data (IR, (1)H NMR, mass and solid reflectance) as well as thermal, XRPD and SEM analysis. The formula [Ni(L(1))Cl(2)]·2.5H(2)O, [UO(2)(L(1))(NO(3))(2)]·2H(2)O, [Ni(L(2))Cl(2)]·1.5H(2)O and [UO(2)(L(2))(NO(3))(2)] have been suggested for the complexes. The vibrational spectral data show that the ligands behave as neutral ligands and coordinated to the metal ions in a tetradentate manner. The Ni(II) complexes are six coordinate with octahedral geometry and the ligand field parameters: D(q), B, β and LFSE were calculated while, UO(2)(II) complexes are eight coordinate with dodecahedral geometry and the force constant, F(U-O) and bond length, R(U-O) were calculated. The thermal decomposition of complexes ended with metal chloride/nitrate as a final product and the highest thermal stability is displayed by [UO(2)(L(2))(NO(3))(2)] complex. The X-ray powder diffraction data revealed the formation of nano sized crystalline complexes. The SEM analysis provides the morphology of the synthesized compounds and SEM image of [UO(2)(L(2))(NO(3))(2)] complex exhibits nano rod structure. The growth-inhibiting potential of the ligands and their complexes has been assessed against a variety of bacterial and fungal strains.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of near-IR absorbing metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines modified with aromatic azo groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes Özçeşmeci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanine complexes bearing peripheral (E-4-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yldiazenyl units have been synthesized. Novel phthalonitrile derivative required for the preparation of phthalocyanine complexes was prepared by coupling 4-aminophthalonitrile and 2-naphthol. The structures of these new compounds were characterized by using elemental analyses, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In the UV-Vis spectra a broad absorption band appears for phthalocyanine complexes at around 450–500 nm resulting from azo-group introduced onto the phthalocyanine ring. The photophysical properties of metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines were studied in tetrahydrofuran.

  7. Deep Label Distribution Learning With Label Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin-Bin; Xing, Chao; Xie, Chen-Wei; Wu, Jianxin; Geng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets) have achieved excellent recognition performance in various visual recognition tasks. A large labeled training set is one of the most important factors for its success. However, it is difficult to collect sufficient training images with precise labels in some domains such as apparent age estimation, head pose estimation, multi-label classification and semantic segmentation. Fortunately, there is ambiguous information among labels, which makes these tasks different from traditional classification. Based on this observation, we convert the label of each image into a discrete label distribution, and learn the label distribution by minimizing a Kullback-Leibler divergence between the predicted and ground-truth label distributions using deep ConvNets. The proposed DLDL (Deep Label Distribution Learning) method effectively utilizes the label ambiguity in both feature learning and classifier learning, which help prevent the network from over-fitting even when the training set is small. Experimental results show that the proposed approach produces significantly better results than state-of-the-art methods for age estimation and head pose estimation. At the same time, it also improves recognition performance for multi-label classification and semantic segmentation tasks.

  8. Molecular docking of heparin oligosaccharides with Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin reveals an interplay between the different positions of sulfate groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Mathieu; Denys, Agnès; Allain, Fabrice; Vergoten, Gérard

    2014-02-01

    Fibronectin is a major component of the extracellular matrix and serves as support for cell adhesion and migration. Heparin and heparan sulfates (HS) have been reported to be high-affinity ligands for fibronectin. The strongest heparin/HS-binding site, named Hep-II, is located in the C-terminal repeat units FN12-14 of fibronectin. Mutational studies of recombinant fibronectin fragments and elucidation of the X-ray crystallographic structure of Hep-II in complex with heparin allowed localizing the main heparin/HS-binding site in FN13 to two parallel amino acid clusters: R1697, R1698, R1700 and R1714, R1716, R1745. Heparin, which is more sulfated than HS, is a better ligand for fibronectin, indicating that the sulfate density is important for the interactions. However, other studies demonstrated that the position of sulfate groups is also critical for high-affinity binding of the polysaccharides to fibronectin. In the current work, we used molecular docking of Hep-II domain of fibronectin with a series of differently sulfated dodecasaccharides of heparin to determine the implication of each sulfate position in the interaction. By using this approach, we confirmed the implication of R1697, R1698, R1700 and R1714 and we identified other amino acids possibly involved in the interaction. We also confirmed a hierarchic involvement of sulfate position as follows: 2S > 6S > NS. Interestingly, the formation of stable complexes required a mutual adaptation between Hep-II domain and oligosaccharides, which was different according to the pattern of sulfation. Finally, we demonstrated that 3-O-sulfation of heparin stabilized even more the complex with Hep-II by creating new molecular interactions. Collectively, our models point out the complexity of the molecular interactions between heparin/HS and fibronectin.

  9. Two mixed-NH3/amine platinum (II) anticancer complexes featuring a dichloroacetate moiety in the leaving group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Su, Jia; Jiang, Jing; Li, Xingyao; Ye, Qingsong; Zhou, Hongyu; Chen, Jialin; Li, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Two mixed-NH3/amine platinum (II) complexes of 3-dichoroacetoxylcyclobutane-1, 1-dicarboxylate have been prepared in the present study and characterized by elemental analysis and IR, HPLC-MS and 1H, 13C-NMR. The complexes exist in equilibrium between two position isomeric forms and undergo hydrolysis reaction in aqueous solution, releasing the platinum pharmacophores and dichloroacetate which is a small-molecular cell apoptosis inducer. Both complexes were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic profile in A549, SGC-7901 and SK-OV-3 caner cells as well as in BEAS-2B normal cells. They exhibit markedly cytoxicity toward cancer cells by selectively inducing the apoptosis of cancer cells, whereas leaving normal cells less affected. They have also the ability to overcome the resistance of SK-OV-3 cancer cells to cisplatin. Our findings offer an alternative novel way to develop platinum drugs which can both overcome the drug resistance and selectively target tumor cells.

  10. Synthesis and assembly with mesoporous silica of platinum (II) porphyrin complexes bearing carbazyl groups: Luminescent and oxygen sensing properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Cheng; ZHANG Huidong; GUO Jianhua; ZHANG Hongyu; ZHANG Ping; WANG Yue

    2006-01-01

    A series of platinum meso-tetrakis [3-methoxy-4-(N-carbazyl)n-alkyloxyphenyl]porphyrin (Pt-4Cn-TPP, n = 4, 6 and 8) are synthesized. Pt-4C4-TPP, Pt-4C6-TPP and Pt-4C8-TPP exhibit similar luminescent properties in solution and solid state. Three protonated platinum (II) porphyrins are assembled with mesoporous silica MCM-48, respectively, resulting in assembly materials Pt-4Cn-TPP4+/ MCM-48 (n = 4, 6 and 8). The luminescent intensity of Pt-4Cn-TPP4+/MCM-48 can be extremely quenched by molecular oxygen with high sensitivity (I0/I100>9). The Stern-Volmer plots of these assembly materials display considerable linearity within a wide range of oxygen concentration (0 to 100%). The response time is all ≤ 1 s and recovery time ≤ 22 s for these assembly materials.

  11. Pharmacokinetic comparison of acetaminophen elixir versus suppositories in vaccinated infants (aged 3 to 36 months): a single-dose, open-label, randomized, parallel-group design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walson, Philip D; Halvorsen, Mark; Edge, James; Casavant, Marcel J; Kelley, Michael T

    2013-02-01

    Because of practical problems and ethical concerns, few studies of the pharmacokinetics (PK) of acetaminophen (ACET) in infants have been published. The goal of this study was to compare the PK of an ACET rectal suppository with a commercially available ACET elixir to complete a regulatory obligation to market the suppository. This study was not submitted previously because of numerous obstacles related to both the investigators and the commercial entities associated with the tested product. Thirty infants (age 3-36 months) prescribed ACET for either fever, pain, or postimmunization prophylaxis of fever and discomfort were randomized to receive a single 10- to 15-mg/kg ACET dose either as the rectal suppository or oral elixir. Blood was collected at selected times for up to 8 hours after administration. ACET concentrations were measured by using a validated HPLC method, and PK behavior and bioavailability were compared for the 2 preparations. All 30 infants enrolled were prescribed ACET for postimmunization prophylaxis. PK samples were available in 27 of the 30 enrolled infants. Subject enrollment (completed in January 1995) was rapid (8.3 months) and drawn entirely from a vaccinated infant clinic population. There were no statistically significant differences between the subjects (elixir, n = 12; suppository, n = 15) in either mean (SD) age (10.0 [6.3] vs 12.4 [8.1] months), weight (8.6 [2.3] vs 9.4 [2.4] kg), sex (7 of 12 males vs 7 of 15 males), or racial distribution (5 white, 5 black, and 2 biracial vs 4 white and 11 black) between the 2 dosing groups (oral vs rectal, respectively). The oral and rectal preparations produced similar, rapid peak concentrations (T(max), 1.16 vs 1.17 hours; P = 0.98) and elimination t(½) (1.84 vs 2.10 hours; P = 0.14), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between either C(max) (7.65 vs 5.68 μg/mL) or total drug exposure (AUC(0-∞), 23.36 vs 20.45 μg-h/mL) for the oral versus rectal preparations

  12. Reclassification of the Candida haemulonii complex as Candida haemulonii (C. haemulonii group I), C. duobushaemulonii sp. nov. (C. haemulonii group II), and C. haemulonii var. vulnera var. nov.: three multiresistant human pathogenic yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendejas-Bueno, E; Kolecka, A; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A; Theelen, B; Groenewald, M; Kostrzewa, M; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Gómez-López, A; Boekhout, T

    2012-11-01

    The Candida haemulonii species complex is currently known as C. haemulonii groups I and II. Here we describe C. haemulonii group II as a new species, Candida duobushaemulonii sp. nov., and C. haemulonii var. vulnera as new a variety of C. haemulonii group I using phenotypic and molecular methods. These taxa and other relatives of C. haemulonii (i.e., Candida auris and Candida pseudohaemulonii) cannot be differentiated by the commercial methods now used for yeast identification. Four isolates (C. haemulonii var. vulnera) differed from the other isolates of C. haemulonii in the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear rRNA gene operon. The new species and the new variety have a multiresistant antifungal profile, which includes high MICs of amphotericin B (geometric mean MIC, 1.18 mg/liter for C. haemulonii var. vulnera and 2 mg/liter for C. duobushaemulonii sp. nov) and cross-resistance to azole compounds. Identification of these species should be based on molecular methods, such as sequence analysis of ITS regions and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

  13. Synthesis, Structure, and Anticancer Activity of Arene-Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Acylpyrazolones Bearing Aliphatic Groups in the Acyl Moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmucci, Jessica; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Pettinari, Claudio; Scopelliti, Rosario; Riedel, Tina; Therrien, Bruno; Galindo, Agustin; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-11-21

    A series of neutral ruthenium(II) arene complexes [(arene)Ru(Q(R))Cl] (arene = p-cymene (cym) or hexamethylbenzene (hmb)) containing 4-acyl-5-pyrazolonate Q(R) ligands with different electronic and steric substituents (R = 4-cyclohexyl, 4-stearoyl, or 4-adamantyl) and related ionic complexes [(arene)Ru(Q(R))(PTA)][PF6] (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy (IR, UV-vis, ESI-MS, and (1)H and (13)C NMR), elemental analysis, X-ray crystallography, and density functional theory studies. The cytotoxicity of the proligands and metal complexes was evaluated in vitro against human ovarian carcinoma cells (A2780 and A2780cisR), as well as against nontumorous human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. In general the cationic PTA-containing complexes are more cytotoxic than their neutral precursors with a chloride ligand in place of the PTA. Moreover, the complexes do not show cross-resistance and are essentially equally cytotoxic to both the A2780 and A2780cisR cell lines, although they only show limited selectivity toward the cancer cell lines.

  14. The SLUGGS survey: Exploring the globular cluster systems of the Leo II group and their global relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Kartha, Sreeja S; Alabi, Adebusola B; Brodie, Jean P; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Strader, Jay; Spitler, Lee R; Jennings, Zachary G; Roediger, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We present an investigation of the globular cluster (GC) systems of NGC 3607 and NGC 3608 as part of the ongoing SLUGGS survey. We use wide-field imaging data from the Subaru telescope in the g, r, and i filters to analyse the radial density, colour and azimuthal distributions of both GC systems. With the complementary kinematic data obtained from the Keck II telescope, we measure the radial velocities of a total of 81 GCs. Our results show that the GC systems of NGC 3607 and NGC 3608 have a detectable spatial extent of ~ 15, and 13 galaxy effective radii, respectively. Both GC systems show a clear bimodal colour distribution. We detect a significant radial colour gradient for the GC subpopulations in both galaxies. NGC 3607 exhibits an overabundance of red GCs on the galaxy minor axis and NGC 3608 shows a misalignment in the GC subpopulation position angles with respect to the galaxy stellar component. With the aid of literature data, we discuss several relationships between the properties of GC systems and ...

  15. Protection of mice against Japanese encephalitis virus group II strain infections by combinations of monoclonal antibodies to different antigenic domains on glycoprotein E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of at least three hemagglutination- inhibition-positive (HAI and virus-specific (Hs monoclonal antibodies (MAbs to glycoprotein E (gpE of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV fully protected (100% mice against JEV strain 733913 infections (group 1. However, these representative epitopes are reported to have been lost on JEV group II strains. In the present study, therefore, the protective effect of various combinations of anti-gpE MAbs representing antigenic epitopes other than Hs was studied on mice infections with JEV group II strains: JEV strains 641686 and 691004. MAbs used in the protective experiments were characterized as HAI-negative virus-specific (NHs and HAI-positive flavivirus cross-reactive (Hx. Additionally, one of the Hs MAbs (MAb Hs-3 was included in the experiments. Mice were first administered single MAbs or their combinations intraperitoneally and 24 h later, infected with the virus intracerebrally. Protection rates of 70-75% were obtained with a combination of four MAbs: MAbs NHs-1, Hx-1, Hx-3 and Hs-3. However, protection rates of only 20-40% were obtained with three MAbs but none was observed with single or two MAbs. There was, however, a substantial increase in mice survival. The protective effect of several combinations of anti-gpE MAbs representing different antigenic epitopes might be due to the enhancement of binding within the same group and also between different MAb groups. The present results indicate that NHs and Hx epitopes should be incorporated with three Hs epitopes in a JEV vaccine that would have an added advantage, particularly in the flaviviral endemic areas with JEV strain variations.

  16. COMPARISON OF THE INFLUENCE OF LONG-TERM TREATMENT BASED ON CARVEDILOL OR BISOPROLOL ON METABOLIC PARAMETERS IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS WITH OVERWEIGHT OR OBESITY RESULTS OF THE RANDOMIZED OPEN-LABEL PARALLEL-GROUPS STEPPED TRIAL CABRIOLET (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive and metabolic effects of long-term treatment with carvedilol or bisoprolol in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree and overweight/obesity. Material and methods. A total of 105 patients were enrolled into open-label comparative stepped trial in two parallel groups. The patients were randomized into two groups: the group 1 (n=53 started treatment with carvedilol 25 mg daily and the group 2 (n=52 – with bisoprolol 5 mg daily. If the effect was insufficient a dose of a beta-blocker was doubled, then amlodipine was added in the dose of 5 mg daily with its further increase if necessary or indapamide in dose 1.5 mg daily. The follow-up for each patient was 24 weeks. At the start and then 12 and 24 weeks later the frequency of target blood pressure (BP achievement, body mass index, biochemical indices, ECG and treatment safety were evaluated. Results. Significant distinctions in antihypertensive therapy effect between the groups were absent (ΔBP=-29.5±11.3/17.8±8.4 and -30.4±12.8/18.7±8 mm Hg for groups 1 and 2, respectively , p<0.001 for the both groups as well as the necessity for additional therapy. All the patients completed the study had achieved target BP level. The patients of the both groups decreased body mass index after 6-month treatment (-0.57±1.1, p=0.001 and -0.53±0.8 kg/m2, p<0.001 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Patients of the group 1 demonstrated significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose level (-0.45±1.2 mM/l, p=0.01, uric acid (-0.05±0.01 mM/l, p<0.001 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (-0.28±0.9 mM/l, p<0.05 as well as a trend for HOMA index decrease. Serum creatinine level increased in patients of the group 2 (6.35±22.4 mcM/l, p=0.05 with no significant dynamics in metabolic indices. Glomerular filtration rate did not change significantly in the group 1, while there was significant decrease in the group 2 (Δ-3.8±15.2 ml/min/1,73m2, р=0.01. The

  17. COMPARISON OF THE INFLUENCE OF LONG-TERM TREATMENT BASED ON CARVEDILOL OR BISOPROLOL ON METABOLIC PARAMETERS IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS WITH OVERWEIGHT OR OBESITY RESULTS OF THE RANDOMIZED OPEN-LABEL PARALLEL-GROUPS STEPPED TRIAL CABRIOLET (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive and metabolic effects of long-term treatment with carvedilol or bisoprolol in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree and overweight/obesity. Material and methods. A total of 105 patients were enrolled into open-label comparative stepped trial in two parallel groups. The patients were randomized into two groups: the group 1 (n=53 started treatment with carvedilol 25 mg daily and the group 2 (n=52 – with bisoprolol 5 mg daily. If the effect was insufficient a dose of a beta-blocker was doubled, then amlodipine was added in the dose of 5 mg daily with its further increase if necessary or indapamide in dose 1.5 mg daily. The follow-up for each patient was 24 weeks. At the start and then 12 and 24 weeks later the frequency of target blood pressure (BP achievement, body mass index, biochemical indices, ECG and treatment safety were evaluated. Results. Significant distinctions in antihypertensive therapy effect between the groups were absent (ΔBP=-29.5±11.3/17.8±8.4 and -30.4±12.8/18.7±8 mm Hg for groups 1 and 2, respectively , p<0.001 for the both groups as well as the necessity for additional therapy. All the patients completed the study had achieved target BP level. The patients of the both groups decreased body mass index after 6-month treatment (-0.57±1.1, p=0.001 and -0.53±0.8 kg/m2, p<0.001 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Patients of the group 1 demonstrated significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose level (-0.45±1.2 mM/l, p=0.01, uric acid (-0.05±0.01 mM/l, p<0.001 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (-0.28±0.9 mM/l, p<0.05 as well as a trend for HOMA index decrease. Serum creatinine level increased in patients of the group 2 (6.35±22.4 mcM/l, p=0.05 with no significant dynamics in metabolic indices. Glomerular filtration rate did not change significantly in the group 1, while there was significant decrease in the group 2 (Δ-3.8±15.2 ml/min/1,73m2, р=0.01. The

  18. An open label phase II study evaluating first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors showing high EGFR gene copy number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Anna; Suszko-Kazarnowicz, Malgorzata; Duchnowska, Renata; Szczesna, Aleksandra; Ratajska, Magdalena; Sowa, Aleksander; Limon, Janusz; Biernat, Wojciech; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Jassem, Jacek; Dziadziuszko, Rafal

    2017-01-01

    Background First-line treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in NSCLC is effective in patients with activating EGFR mutations. The activity of erlotinib in patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number has been considered debatable. Patients and Methods A multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase II clinical trial was performed to test the efficacy of erlotinib in the first-line treatment of NSCLC patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number defined as =4 copies in =40% of cells. Findings Between December 2007 and April 2011, tumor samples from 149 subjects were screened for EGFR gene copy number by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), Out of 49 patients with positive EGFR FISH test, 45 were treated with erlotinib. Median PFS in the intent-to-treat population was 3.3 months (95%CI: 1.83.9 months), and median overall survival was 7.9 months (95% CI: 5.112.6 months). Toxicity profile of erlotinib was consistent with its known safety profile. The trial was stopped prematurely at 63% of originally planned sample size due to accumulating evidence that EGFR gene copy number should not be used to select NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKI. Data on erlotinib efficacy according to EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations are additionally presented. Interpretation This trial argues against using high gene copy number for selection of NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKIs. The study adds to the discussion on efficacy of other targeted agents in patients with target gene amplified tumors. PMID:27924059

  19. Synthesis of Se-75 labeled catecholamine derivatives: adrenal medulla tumor specific radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Sadek, S.; Ice, R.D. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City (USA). Health Sciences Center)

    Three classes of /sup 75/Se-labelled catecholamines have been synthesised. In class I the /sup 75/Se replaces the amine function of dopamine, using Na/sup 75/SeH. In class II the selenomethyl group replaces the -OH function in epinephrine. In class III /sup 75/Se replaces the ..beta..-carbon in catecholamine. NMR and mass spectroscopy were used to characterise the compounds.

  20. Relationship between cellular uptake rate and chemical behavior of diammine/diaminocyclohexane platinum (II) complexes with oxygen-ligating anionic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J; Yang, X D; An, F; Wang, K

    1998-07-01

    The uptake kinetics of the platinum (II) complexes of the formula Pt(NH3)2X, Pt(dach)X by human erythrocyte in the plasma isotonic buffer was studied. The results showed that across-membrane transport of all the platinum complexes studied follows a first-order kinetic process. The uptake rate constants decrease with the change of oxygen-ligating anionic group in the sequence: sulfato > selenato > anion of squaric acid > oxalato > anion of demethylcantharic acid > malonato and increase with increasing lipophilicity of carrier group. The relationship between uptake rate and reactivity of these complexes was established. The stereochemistry of dach isomers was shown without effect on the reactivity and the sequence.

  1. A phase II study of amifostine in children with myelodysplastic syndrome: a report from the Children's Oncology Group study (AAML0121).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Prasad; Gerbing, Robert; Alonzo, Todd A; Wallas, Tanya; Gong, Jerald Z; Jasty, Rama; Jorstad, Dean T; Raimondi, Susana C; Chavez, Cathy M; Eisenberg, Nancy L; Hirsch, Betsy; Gamis, Alan; Smith, Franklin O; Arceci, Robert J

    2011-12-15

    Based on its potential role in adult myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), the Children's Oncology Group (COG) embarked on a phase II study using amifostine in pediatric MDS (WHO 2001 criteria) patients. Responses were evaluated after two cycles. Ten patients were enrolled; five were deemed ineligible, and four withdrew after the first course. Only one patient completed two courses, and was found to be in complete remission. The study was closed after being open for 2 years due to slow accrual. Studying a rare disease like MDS may pose insurmountable obstacles even in a large clinical trials group such as COG, in part because of the changing definitions of MDS and the rarity of adult type MDS in children. The role of amifostine in pediatric MDS was not known at the time of study.

  2. Theoretical study on magneto-structural correlation of trinuclear copper (II) complex with the hydroxo bridge and bidentate syn-syn carboxylate group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Zhongnan; WU Jian; LIU Chengbu; WANG Ruoxi; SUN Youmin

    2006-01-01

    The theoretical study on magneto- structural correlation in linear trinuclear Cu (II) complex bridged by hydroxo group and bidentate formato group has been performed using the broken symmetry approach with the framework of density functional theory (DFT-BS). The magnetic coupling constant for the model complex is 70.97 cm-1, comparable with the experimentally measured J value (77 cm-1). The calculated results show that the magnetic coupling interaction firstly slightly increases with the changes of the coordination environment around the terminal Cu atoms from a distorted square pyramid to a trigonal bi-pyramid, and decreases subsequently. In the course of changes, the sign of J value shifts from positive to negative. The magnetic coupling interaction is sensitive to coordination environment of the terminal Cu. The calculated results also reveal that the ferromagnetic coupling arises from the countercomplementarity of the hydroxo and formato bridges. Molecular orbital analysis validates the conclusion.

  3. The 2-Methoxy Group Orientation Regulates the Redox Potential Difference between the Primary (QA) and Secondary (QB) Quinones of Type II Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from purple bacteria such as Rb. sphaeroides. 13C HYSCORE measurements of the 2-methoxy group in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with DFT calculations of the 13C hyperfine couplings as a function of the 2-methoxy dihedral angle. X-ray structure comparisons support 2-methoxy dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of 175–193 mV. A model having a methyl group substituted for the 2-methoxy group exhibits no electron affinity difference. This is consistent with the failure of a 2-methyl ubiquinone analogue to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ∼160–195 mV. The conclusion reached is that the 2-methoxy group is the principal determinant of electron transfer from QA to QB in type II photosynthetic reaction centers with ubiquinone serving as both acceptor quinones. PMID:25126386

  4. The 2-Methoxy Group Orientation Regulates the Redox Potential Difference between the Primary (QA) and Secondary (QB) Quinones of Type II Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Wagner B; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; O'Malley, Patrick J

    2014-08-07

    Recent studies have shown that only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from purple bacteria such as Rb. sphaeroides. (13)C HYSCORE measurements of the 2-methoxy group in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with DFT calculations of the (13)C hyperfine couplings as a function of the 2-methoxy dihedral angle. X-ray structure comparisons support 2-methoxy dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of 175-193 mV. A model having a methyl group substituted for the 2-methoxy group exhibits no electron affinity difference. This is consistent with the failure of a 2-methyl ubiquinone analogue to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ∼160-195 mV. The conclusion reached is that the 2-methoxy group is the principal determinant of electron transfer from QA to QB in type II photosynthetic reaction centers with ubiquinone serving as both acceptor quinones.

  5. All-sky Co-moving Recovery Of Nearby Young Members (ACRONYM). II. The β Pictoris Moving Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Kraus, Adam L.; Liu, Michael C.; Flagg, Laura

    2017-08-01

    We confirm 66 low-mass stellar and brown dwarf systems (K7-M9) plus 19 visual or spectroscopic companions of the β Pictoris moving group (BPMG). Of these, 41 are new discoveries, increasing the known low-mass members by 45%. We also add four objects to the 14 known with masses predicted to be less than 0.07 {M}⊙ . Our efficient photometric + kinematic selection process identified 104 low-mass candidates, which we observed with ground-based spectroscopy. We collected infrared observations of the latest spectral types (>M5) to search for low-gravity objects. These and all tested the efficiency and false-membership assignments using our selection and confirmation criteria. Using the new census, we assess a group age of 22 ± 6 Myr, consistent with past estimates. With the now-densely sampled lithium depletion boundary, we resolve the broadening of the boundary by either an age spread or astrophysical influences on lithium-burning rates. We find that 69% of the now-known members with AFGKM primaries are M stars, nearing the expected value of 75%. However, the new initial mass function for the BPMG shows a deficit of 0.2-0.3 {M}⊙ stars by a factor of ˜2. We expect that the AFGK census of the BPMG is also incomplete, probably due to biases of searches toward the nearest stars. Based on observations made with the IRTF, Keck, and Magellan/Clay telescopes.

  6. An intronic open reading frame was released from one of group II introns in the mitochondrial genome of the haptophyte Chrysochromulina sp. NIES-1333.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yuki; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences, which often bear introns, have been sampled from phylogenetically diverse eukaryotes. Thus, we can anticipate novel insights into intron evolution from previously unstudied mt genomes. We here investigated the origins and evolution of three introns in the mt genome of the haptophyte Chrysochromulina sp. NIES-1333, which was sequenced completely in this study. All the three introns were characterized as group II, on the basis of predicted secondary structure, and the conserved sequence motifs at the 5' and 3' termini. Our comparative studies on diverse mt genomes prompt us to propose that the Chrysochromulina mt genome laterally acquired the introns from mt genomes in distantly related eukaryotes. Many group II introns harbor intronic open reading frames for the proteins (intron-encoded proteins or IEPs), which likely facilitate the splicing of their host introns. However, we propose that a "free-standing," IEP-like protein, which is not encoded within any introns in the Chrysochromulina mt genome, is involved in the splicing of the first cox1 intron that lacks any open reading frames.

  7. Effect of Labels on Memory in the Absence of Rehearsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William C.; Legant, Patricia

    This study tests the hypothesis that labeling facilitates recall in nursery school children if and only if it leads to rehearsal. Subjects were 34 children ranging in age from 47 to 53 months. During pretraining, those children in the Label group named pictures of animals and fruits as they were presented, while those in the No Label group matched…

  8. A study of genetic polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I and II of the five major ethnic groups and Vedda population in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Ruwandi; Tennekoon, Kamani H; Karunanayake, Eric H; Lembring, Maria; Allen, Marie

    2015-11-01

    Diversity of the hypervariable regions (HV) I and II of the mitochondrial genome was studied in maternally unrelated Sri Lankans (N=202) from six ethnic groups (i.e.: Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamil, Muslim, Malay, Indian Tamil and Vedda). DNA was extracted from blood and buccal swabs and HVI and HVII regions were PCR amplified and sequenced. Resulting sequences were aligned and edited between 16024-16365 and 73-340 regions and compared with revised Cambridge reference sequences (rCRS). One hundred and thirty-five unique haplotypes and 22 shared haplotypes were observed. A total of 145 polymorphic sites and 158 polymorphisms were observed. Hypervariable region I showed a higher polymorphic variation than hypervariable region II. Nucleotide diversities were quite low and similar for all ethnicities apart from a slightly higher value for Indian Tamils and a much lower value for the Vedda population compared to the other groups. When the total population was considered South Asian (Indian) haplogroups were predominant, but there were differences in the distribution of phylo-geographical haplogroups between ethnic groups. Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamil and Vedda populations had a considerable presence of West Eurasian haplogroups. About 2/3rd of the Vedda population comprised of macro-haplogroup N or its subclades R and U, whereas macro-haplogroup M was predominant in all other populations. The Vedda population clustered separately from other groups and Sri Lankan Tamils showed a closer genetic affiliation to Sinhalese than to Indian Tamils. Thus this study provides useful information for forensic analysis and anthropological studies of Sri Lankans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A High Speed Acquisition System Based on Nios II for the Electronic Cabin Signal Group%基于 Nios II 的导引头电子舱信号群高速采集系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦文姬; 李力

    2016-01-01

    导引头电子舱是导弹探测、跟踪目标的部件,是导弹系统的关键部分,因此电子舱产品使用前的调试和检测至关重要。介绍了一种基于 Nios II 的导引头电子舱信号群高速采集系统。该系统采用 Cyclone II 系列 EP2C35芯片,以 Nios II 软核为核心处理器,完成了对 A /D 转换后的30路信号群的高速采集处理。与之前采用 PCI 总线方案相比,此方案简化了硬件电路、减小了设备体积、降低了成本,可以满足不同产品的各种逻辑电平、编码装定、参数预置及功能拓展升级的需求,提高了系统的可靠性和智能化分析处理实验数据的水平。%As a key part of the missile system ,the electronic cabin can detect and track the target missile,and it is required to be debugged and tested before using.A high speed data acquisition system based on Nios II is designed and realized for the electronic cabin signal group in this paper.Using cyclone series EP2C35 chip and Nios II as core processor,the system can process the signals converted by A /D and complete the high speed data acquisition.Compared with the previous PCI bus program,this system has some advantages,such as simplifying the hardware circuit,reducing equipment size and costs, adapting to a variety of different products'logic level,coding stapling and satisfying needs of presetting parameters and functional expansion upgrade.And it improves the level of reliability and intelligent analysis of experimental data processing system.

  10. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  11. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    CERN Document Server

    Habib, Salman; LeCompte, Tom; Marshall, Zach; Borgland, Anders; Viren, Brett; Nugent, Peter; Asai, Makoto; Bauerdick, Lothar; Finkel, Hal; Gottlieb, Steve; Hoeche, Stefan; Sheldon, Paul; Vay, Jean-Luc; Elmer, Peter; Kirby, Michael; Patton, Simon; Potekhin, Maxim; Yanny, Brian; Calafiura, Paolo; Dart, Eli; Gutsche, Oliver; Izubuchi, Taku; Lyon, Adam; Petravick, Don

    2015-01-01

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  12. A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars: \\\\II. UBVRI Photometry of Stars in Seven Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, P; Hodge, P W; Jacoby, G H; McNeill, R T; Smith, R C; Strong, S B; Massey, Philip; Hodge, Paul W.; Jacoby, George H.; Neill, Reagin T. Mc; Strong, Shay B.

    2007-01-01

    We have obtained UBVRI images with the Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes and Mosaic cameras of seven dwarfs in (or near) the Local Group, all of which have known evidence of recent star formation: IC10, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextans B, Sextans A, Pegasus,and Phoenix. We construct color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of these systems, as well as neighboring regions that can be used to evaluate the degree of foreground contamination by stars in the Milky Way. Inter-comparison of these CMDs with those of M31, M33, the LMC, and the SMC permits us to determine improved reddening values for a typical OB star found within these galaxies. All of the CMDs reveal a strong or modest number of blue supergiants. All but Pegasus and Phoenix also show the clear presence of red supergiants in the CMD, although IC10 appears to be deficient in these objects given its large WR population. The bright stars of intermediate color in the CMD are badly contaminated by foreground stars (30-100%), and considerable spectroscopy is needed b...

  13. Achieving lipid goals with rosuvastatin compared with simvastatin in high risk patients in real clinical practice: a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center study: the DISCOVERY-Beta study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toivo Laks

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Toivo Laks1, Ester Keba2, Mariann Leiner3, Eero Merilind4, Mall Petersen5, Sirje Reinmets6, Sille Väli7, Terje Sööt8, Karin Otter81Clinic of Internal Medicine, North-Estonia Regional Hospital, Tallinn, Estonia; 2Clinic of Internal Medicine, Viljandi County Hospital, Viljandi, Estonia; 3Mustamäe Family Doctors Centre, Tallinn, Estonia; 4Nõmme Family Doctors Centre, Tallinn, Estonia; 5Saku Health Centre, Saku, Estonia; 6Kristiine Family Doctors, Tallinn, Estonia; 7Family Doctor Sille Väli, Kuressaare, Estonia; 8AstraZeneca, Tallinn, EstoniaAbstract: The aim of this multi-center, open-label, randomized, parallel-group trial was to compare the efficacy of rosuvastatin with that of simvastatin in achieving the 1998 European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS lipid treatment goals. 504 patients (≥18 years with primary hypercholesterolemia and a 10-year cardiovascular (CV risk >20% or history of coronary heart disease (CHD or other established atherosclerotic disease were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive rosuvastatin 10 mg or simvastatin 20 mg once daily for 12 weeks. A significantly higher proportion of patients achieved 1998 EAS low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C goal after 12 weeks of treatment with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared to simvastatin 20 mg (64 vs 51.5%, p < 0.01. Similarly, significantly more patients achieved the 1998 EAS total cholesterol (TC goal and the 2003 EAS LDL-C and TC goals (p < 0.001 with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared with simvastatin 20 mg. The incidence of adverse events and the proportion of patients who discontinued study treatment were similar between treatment groups. In conclusion, in the DISCOVERY-Beta Study in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia greater proportion of patients in the rosuvastatin 10 mg group achieved the EAS LDL-C treatment goal compared with the simvastatin 20 mg group. Drug tolerability was similar across both treatment groups.Keywords: hypercholesterolemia, low-density lipoprotein

  14. China Cotton label to be generalized

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    "China Cotton"authorization press conference was held in Beijing on October 11. China Cotton Association granted authorization to the first four enterprises, allowing them to use the label of China Cotton on their qualified products. Shandong Lanyan Group, Beijing Miantian Textile Co., Ltd are among the fi rst companies authorized to use China Cotton label.

  15. Human mtDNA hypervariable regions, HVR I and II, hint at deep common maternal founder and subsequent maternal gene flow in Indian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swarkar; Saha, Anjana; Rai, Ekta; Bhat, Audesh; Bamezai, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    We have analysed the hypervariable regions (HVR I and II) of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in individuals from Uttar Pradesh (UP), Bihar (BI) and Punjab (PUNJ), belonging to the Indo-European linguistic group, and from South India (SI), that have their linguistic roots in Dravidian language. Our analysis revealed the presence of known and novel mutations in both hypervariable regions in the studied population groups. Median joining network analyses based on mtDNA showed extensive overlap in mtDNA lineages despite the extensive cultural and linguistic diversity. MDS plot analysis based on Fst distances suggested increased maternal genetic proximity for the studied population groups compared with other world populations. Mismatch distribution curves, respective neighbour joining trees and other statistical analyses showed that there were significant expansions. The study revealed an ancient common ancestry for the studied population groups, most probably through common founder female lineage(s), and also indicated that human migrations occurred (maybe across and within the Indian subcontinent) even after the initial phase of female migration to India.

  16. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  17. Electrochemical, linear optical, and nonlinear optical properties and interpretation by density functional theory calculations of (4-N,N-dimethylaminostyryl)-pyridinium pendant group associated with polypyridinic ligands and respective multifunctional metal complexes (Ru(II) or Zn(II)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumur, Frédéric; Mayer, Cédric R; Hoang-Thi, Khuyen; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Miomandre, Fabien; Clavier, Gilles; Dumas, Eddy; Méallet-Renault, Rachel; Frigoli, Michel; Zyss, Joseph; Sécheresse, Francis

    2009-09-07

    The synthesis, linear optical and nonlinear optical properties, as well as the electrochemical behavior of a series of pro-ligands containing the 4-(4-N,N-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methyl pyridinium (DASP(+)) group as a push-pull moiety covalently linked to terpyridine or bipyridine as chelating ligands are reported in this full paper. The corresponding multifunctional Ru(II) and Zn(II) complexes were prepared and investigated. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of the pro-ligands and the ruthenium complexes were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. A fairly good agreement was observed between the experimental and the calculated electronic spectra of the pro-ligands and their corresponding ruthenium complexes. A quenching of luminescence was evidenced in all ruthenium complexes compared with the free pro-ligands but even the terpyridine-functionalized metal complexes exhibited detectable luminescence at room temperature. Second order nonlinear optical (NLO) measurements were performed by Harmonic Light Scattering and the contribution of the DASP(+) moieties (and their relative ordering) and the metal-polypyridyl core need to be considered to explain the nonlinear optical properties of the metal complexes.

  18. Reduction of the morning blood pressure surge treated with olmesartan in Chinese patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension--a multicenter, open-label, single treatment group clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuan; Ke, Yuannan; Sun, Ningling; Wang, Jiguang; Deng, Wude; Zhu, Junren

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) in Chinese patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension treated with long-term administration of olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist according to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). In a multi-center, prospective study, we investigated the long-term efficacy of olmesartan by ABPM in 18-75 years-old Chinese patients with mild to moderate hypertension (clinic diastolic blood pressure [DBP] 90-109 mm Hg and systolic blood pressure [SBP] olmesartan 20 mg once daily in the morning for 24 weeks. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted at baseline and at the end of 24 weeks. At baseline, patients with an MBPS > or = 23 mmHg were classified as the MBPS group (n = 41), and all other patients were classified as the non-MBPS group (n = 46). The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP/DBP) over 24 hours were reduced from 141.78 +/- 12.8/91.17 +/- 7.34 to 128.35 +/- 15.86/83.58 +/- 9.53 mmHg (p olmesartan were significantly different between the two groups (p Olmesartan effectively reduces blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension, and olmesartan especially reduces the MBPS in MBPS-prone patients.

  19. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  20. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has issued final changes to update the Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods. For more information, see Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label . FDA presents an entertaining and educational tool ...

  1. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  2. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  3. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  4. Bronchodilator efficacy of 18 µg once-daily tiotropium inhalation via Discair® versus HandiHaler® in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: randomized, active-controlled, parallel-group, open-label, Phase IV trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildiz P

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pinar Yildiz, Mesut Bayraktaroglu, Didem Gorgun, Funda Secik Clinics of Chest Diseases, Yedikule Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Purpose: To compare the bronchodilator efficacy of 18 µg once-daily tiotropium inhalation administered via Discair® versus HandiHaler® in adults with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Patients and methods: Fifty-eight patients with moderate-to-severe COPD were enrolled in this randomized, active-controlled, parallel-group, open-label, Phase IV non-inferiority trial. Patients were randomly assigned to a test group (n=29, inhalation with Discair or a reference group (n=29, inhalation with HandiHaler. The primary efficacy parameter was the average maximum change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, in L. Change in forced vital capacity (FVC, in L, %FEV1 and %FVC, the standardized area under the response–time curve (AUC for the absolute change in FEV1 and FVC, time to onset and peak of response, and safety data were also evaluated.Results: The test inhaler was non-inferior to the reference inhaler in terms of maximum change in FEV1 at 24 h (unadjusted change: 0.0017 L [95% confidence interval [CI]: –0.0777, 0.0812]; change adjusted for time to reach maximum change in FEV1 and smoking in pack-years: 0.0116 L [95% CI: –0.0699, 0.0931], based on a non-inferiority margin of 0.100 L. There were also no significant differences between the two groups in maximum change in FVC value from baseline (0.3417 L vs 0.4438 L, P=0.113, percent change from baseline (22.235 vs 20.783 for FEV1, P=0.662; 16.719 vs 20.337 for FVC, P=0.257, and AUC0–24 h (2.949 vs 2.833 L for FEV1, P=0.891; 2.897 vs 4.729 L for FVC, P=0.178. There were no adverse events, serious adverse events, or deaths.Conclusion: Our findings show that the Discair was non-inferior to the HandiHaler. More specifically, these devices had similar clinical efficacy in terms of

  5. A Label to Regulate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoire, Aurélie; Boxenbaum, Eva; Laurent, Brice

    This paper examines the role labelling plays in the government of the contemporary economy.1Drawing on a detailed study of BBC-Effinergy, a French label for sustainable construction, we showhow the adoption and evolution of voluntary labels can be seen as emblematic of a governmentthrough experim...... experiment engaging 4 operations: stimulating market anticipations, focussing politicalconsultations, producing collective expertise and containing the regulatory transcription of the label....

  6. Synthesis and spectral studies on Pb(II) dithiocarbamate complexes containing benzyl and furfuryl groups and their use as precursors for PbS nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyaraj, Ethiraj; Thirumaran, Subbiah

    2012-11-01

    Nine lead bis(dithiocarbamate) complexes based on benzyl and furfuryl groups have been prepared. The complexes were characterized using IR and NMR spectroscopy. All the complexes showed the expected signals in 1H and 13C NMR spectra associated with the dithiocarbamate ligands. IR and 13C NMR spectral studies indicate that the S2Cpdbdtd N double bond character increases with increase in length of alkyl chain bonded to nitrogen atom. Bis(N-benzyl-N-(2-phenylethyl)dithiocarbamato-S,S')lead(II) (3) and bis(N-furfuryl-N-(2-phenylethyl)dithiocarbamato-S,S')lead(II) (4) have been used as single source precursors for the synthesis of ethylenediamine capped PbS nanoparticles. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FTIR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used to characterize the as-prepared lead sulfide nanoparticles. The PXRD measurements suggest that PbS nanoparticles are single phase with face-centered-cubic structure.

  7. A Multicenter, Open-Label, Controlled Phase II Study to Evaluate Safety and Immunogenicity of MVA Smallpox Vaccine (IMVAMUNE in 18-40 Year Old Subjects with Diagnosed Atopic Dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Greenberg

    Full Text Available Replicating smallpox vaccines can cause severe complications in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD. Prior studies evaluating Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA, a non-replicating vaccine in humans, showed a favorable safety and immunogenicity profile in healthy volunteers.This Phase II study compared the safety and immunogenicity of MVA enrolling groups of 350 subjects with AD (SCORAD ≤ 30 and 282 healthy subjects.Subjects were vaccinated twice with MVA, each dose given subcutaneously 4 weeks apart. Adverse events, cardiac parameters, and the development of vaccinia virus humoral immune responses were monitored.The overall safety of the vaccine was similar in both groups. Adverse events affecting skin were experienced significantly more often in subjects with AD, but the majority of these events were mild to moderate in intensity. Seroconversion rates and geometric mean titers for total and neutralizing vaccinia-specific antibodies in the AD group were non-inferior compared to the healthy subjects.The size of the study population limited the detection of serious adverse events occurring at a frequency less than 1%.MVA has a favorable safety profile and the ability to elicit vaccinia-specific immune responses in subjects with AD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00316602.

  8. A Multicenter, Open-Label, Controlled Phase II Study to Evaluate Safety and Immunogenicity of MVA Smallpox Vaccine (IMVAMUNE) in 18–40 Year Old Subjects with Diagnosed Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Richard N; Hurley, Yadira; Dinh, Dinh V.; Mraz, Serena; Vera, Javier Gomez; von Bredow, Dorothea; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Roesch, Siegfried; Virgin, Garth; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Meyer, Thomas Peter; Schmidt, Darja; Nichols, Richard; Young, Philip; Chaplin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Replicating smallpox vaccines can cause severe complications in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD). Prior studies evaluating Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA), a non-replicating vaccine in humans, showed a favorable safety and immunogenicity profile in healthy volunteers. Objective This Phase II study compared the safety and immunogenicity of MVA enrolling groups of 350 subjects with AD (SCORAD ≤ 30) and 282 healthy subjects. Methods Subjects were vaccinated twice with MVA, each dose given subcutaneously 4 weeks apart. Adverse events, cardiac parameters, and the development of vaccinia virus humoral immune responses were monitored. Results The overall safety of the vaccine was similar in both groups. Adverse events affecting skin were experienced significantly more often in subjects with AD, but the majority of these events were mild to moderate in intensity. Seroconversion rates and geometric mean titers for total and neutralizing vaccinia-specific antibodies in the AD group were non-inferior compared to the healthy subjects. Limitations The size of the study population limited the detection of serious adverse events occurring at a frequency less than 1%. Conclusion MVA has a favorable safety profile and the ability to elicit vaccinia-specific immune responses in subjects with AD. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00316602 PMID:26439129

  9. Comparison of three development approaches for Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography based screening methods Part II: A group of structural analogues (PDE-5 inhibitors in food supplements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, E; Ghijs, L; Kamugisha, A; Courselle, P

    2016-02-01

    Three approaches for the development of a screening method to detect adulterated dietary supplements, based on Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography were compared for their easiness/speed of development and the performance of the optimal method obtained. This comparison was performed for a heterogeneous group of molecules, i.e. slimming agents (Part I) and a group of structural analogues, i.e. PDE-5 inhibitors (Part II). The first approach makes use of primary runs at one isocratic level, the second of primary runs in gradient mode and the third of primary runs at three isocratic levels to calculate the optimal combination of segments of stationary phases. In each approach the selection of the stationary phase was followed by a gradient optimisation. For the PDE-5 inhibitors, the group of structural analogues, only the method obtained with the third approach was able to differentiate between all the molecules in the development set. Although not all molecules are baseline separated, the method allows the identification of the selected adulterants in dietary supplements using only diode array detection. Though, due to the mobile phases used, the method could also be coupled to mass spectrometry. The method was validated for its selectivity following the guidelines as described for the screening of pesticide residues and residues of veterinary medicines in food.

  10. Oxocentered Cu(II) lead selenite honeycomb lattices hosting Cu(I)Cl2 groups obtained by chemical vapor transport reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovrugin, Vadim M; Colmont, Marie; Siidra, Oleg I; Mentré, Olivier; Al-Shuray, Alexander; Gurzhiy, Vladislav V; Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2015-06-11

    Chemical vapor transport (CVT) reactions were used to prepare three modular mixed-valent Cu(I)-Cu(II) compounds, (Pb2Cu(2+)9O4)(SeO3)4(Cu(+)Cl(2))Cl5 (1), (PbCu(2+)5O2)(SeO3)2(Cu(+)Cl2)Cl3 (2), and (Pb(x)Cu(2+)(6-x)O2)(SeO3)2(Cu(+)Cl2)K(1-x)Cl(4-x) (x = 0.20) (3). In their crystal structures chains of anion-centered (OCu(2+)4) and (OCu(2+)3Pb) tetrahedra form honeycomb-like double layers with cavities occupied by linear [Cu(+)Cl2](-) groups.

  11. Synthesis, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of terpyridine Zn(II) complexes based on carbazole derivative with polyether group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming; Liu, Yanqiu; Wang, Hui; Luo, Junshan; Li, Dandan; Zhang, Shengyi; Li, Shengli; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    Four novel Zn(II) terpyridine complexes (ZnLCl2, ZnLBr2, ZnLI2, ZnL(SCN)2) based on carbazole derivative group were designed, synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including absorption and one-photon excited fluorescence, two-photon absorption (TPA) and optical power limiting (OPL) were further investigated systematically and interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations (TD-DFT). The influences of different solvents on the absorption and One-Photon Excited Fluorescence (OPEF) spectral behavior, quantum yields and the lifetime of the chromophores have been investigated in detail. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by open/closed aperture Z-scan measurements using femtosecond pulse laser in the range from 680 to 1080 nm. These results revealed that ZnLCl2 and ZnLBr2 exhibited strong two-photon absorption and ZnLCl2 showed superior optical power limiting property.

  12. Novel platinum(II) complexes of long chain aliphatic diamine ligands with oxalato as the leaving group: Comparative cytotoxic activity relative to chloride precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Heveline; Barra, Carolina V.; Rocha, Fillipe V.; Fontes, Ana Paula S. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lopes, Miriam T.P. [Universidade Federal deMinas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacologia; Frezard, Frederic, E-mail: frezard@icb.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia e Biofisica

    2010-07-01

    Platinum complexes play an important role in the development of anticancer drugs. Their cytotoxicity can be influenced by the nature of the leaving ligands, due to the hydrolysis reaction that occurs prior to the binding of the platinum complex to DNA. Also, non-leaving groups such as lipophilic diamines may affect cellular uptake. In this work, we describe the synthesis of platinum(II) complexes having oxalato and long chain aliphatic N-alkyl ethylenediamines as ligands. The products were characterized by elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy. Biological activity was assessed against tumor cell lines (A{sub 549}, B16-F1, B16-F10, MDA-MB-231) and non-tumor cell lines (BHK-21 and CHO). The length of the carbon chain affects the cytotoxicity and the oxalato complexes were less cytotoxic than the respective chloride-containing analogues. (author)

  13. Roget's II the new thesaurus

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Roget’s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition, allows the user to find the right synonym with a minimum of effort. Unlike many thesauruses, this easy-to-use reference lists main entry words alphabetically, as in a dictionary, for quick lookup. Each entry is divided into senses, with brief definitions and a full list of synonyms for each sense, to ensure that the selected usage is the most appropriate one. All special usages, such as slang terms, are labeled and grouped together at the end of each synonym list. Following each list is a cross-reference to a related entry in the thesaurus’s unique Category Index. This index leads the reader from the starting word to dozens of others that have related or opposite meanings. All these features make Roget’s II the best resource for finding the right word every time.

  14. The mitochondrial LSU rRNA group II intron of Ustilago maydis encodes an active homing endonuclease likely involved in intron mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Pfeifer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The a2 mating type locus gene lga2 is critical for uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance during sexual development of Ustilago maydis. Specifically, the absence of lga2 results in biparental inheritance, along with efficient transfer of intronic regions in the large subunit rRNA gene between parental molecules. However, the underlying role of the predicted LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene I-UmaI located within the group II intron LRII1 has remained unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the enzymatic activity of I-UmaI in vitro based on expression of a tagged full-length and a naturally occurring mutant derivative, which harbors only the N-terminal LAGLIDADG domain. This confirmed Mg²⁺-dependent endonuclease activity and cleavage at the LRII1 insertion site to generate four base pair extensions with 3' overhangs. Specifically, I-UmaI recognizes an asymmetric DNA sequence with a minimum length of 14 base pairs (5'-GACGGGAAGACCCT-3' and tolerates subtle base pair substitutions within the homing site. Enzymatic analysis of the mutant variant indicated a correlation between the activity in vitro and intron homing. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that putatively functional or former functional I-UmaI homologs are confined to a few members within the Ustilaginales and Agaricales, including the phylogenetically distant species Lentinula edodes, and are linked to group II introns inserted into homologous positions in the LSU rDNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data provide strong evidence that intron homing efficiently operates under conditions of biparental inheritance in U. maydis. Conversely, uniparental inheritance may be critical to restrict the transmission of mobile introns. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that I-UmaI-associated introns have been acquired independently in distant taxa and are more widespread than anticipated from available genomic data.

  15. Powerful H2 Line Cooling in Stephan’s Quintet. II. Group-wide Gas and Shock Modeling of the Warm H2 and a Comparison with [C II] 157.7 μm Emission and Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, P. N.; Guillard, P.; Togi, A.; Alatalo, K.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.; Xu, C. K.

    2017-02-01

    We map for the first time the two-dimensional H2 excitation of warm intergalactic gas in Stephan's Quintet on group-wide (50 × 35 kpc2) scales to quantify the temperature, mass, and warm H2 mass fraction as a function of position using Spitzer. Molecular gas temperatures are seen to rise (to T > 700 K) and the slope of the power-law density–temperature relation flattens along the main ridge of the filament, defining the region of maximum heating. We also performed MHD modeling of the excitation properties of the warm gas, to map the velocity structure and energy deposition rate of slow and fast molecular shocks. Slow magnetic shocks were required to explain the power radiated from the lowest-lying rotational states of H2, and strongly support the idea that energy cascades down to small scales and low velocities from the fast collision of NGC 7318b with group-wide gas. The highest levels of heating of the warm H2 are strongly correlated with the large-scale stirring of the medium as measured by [C ii] spectroscopy with Herschel. H2 is also seen associated with a separate bridge that extends toward the Seyfert nucleus in NGC 7319, from both Spitzer and CARMA CO observations. This opens up the possibility that both galaxy collisions and outflows from active galactic nuclei can turbulently heat gas on large scales in compact groups. The observations provide a laboratory for studying the effects of turbulent energy dissipation on group-wide scales, which may provide clues about the heating and cooling of gas at high z in early galaxy and protogalaxy formation.

  16. Labeling Schemes with Queries

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    We study the question of ``how robust are the known lower bounds of labeling schemes when one increases the number of consulted labels''. Let $f$ be a function on pairs of vertices. An $f$-labeling scheme for a family of graphs $\\cF$ labels the vertices of all graphs in $\\cF$ such that for every graph $G\\in\\cF$ and every two vertices $u,v\\in G$, the value $f(u,v)$ can be inferred by merely inspecting the labels of $u$ and $v$. This paper introduces a natural generalization: the notion of $f$-...

  17. Enzymic synthesis of labelled chiral substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, A R

    1985-01-01

    The enzymic synthesis of chiral substances in which one hydrogen atom of a methylene group has been replaced by deuterium or tritium is illustrated. Such labelled products can be used to determine the stereochemistry of other enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  18. PF-03446962, a fully-human monoclonal antibody against transforming growth-factor β (TGFβ) receptor ALK1, in pre-treated patients with urothelial cancer: an open label, single-group, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necchi, A; Giannatempo, P; Mariani, L; Farè, E; Raggi, D; Pennati, M; Zaffaroni, N; Crippa, F; Marchianò, A; Nicolai, N; Maffezzini, M; Togliardi, E; Daidone, M G; Gianni, A M; Salvioni, R; De Braud, F

    2014-06-01

    Despite a compelling preclinical rationale for the use of anti-angiogenic drugs in urothelial cancer (UC), short-living responses have been observed in clinical trials. PF-03446962 is a novel monoclonal antibody against Activin Receptor-Like Kinase-1 (ALK1), a type I subclass of the TGFβ receptor, with dose-dependent anti-angiogenic activity. An open label, single-group, phase 2 trial of PF-03446962 was conducted in salvage setting. Patients failing at least one chemotherapy regimen were eligible. Design provided PF-03446962 10 mg/Kg intravenously fortnightly until disease progression (PD) or unacceptable toxicity. Two-month progression-free survival (PFS) was the primary endpoint. The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01620970. Fourteen patients were enrolled from October 2012 to July 2013. Median age was 64 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 58.2-69.5), 9 patients had a Bellmunt score of 1-2, median number of prior drugs was 3. One stable disease and 13 PD were recorded and the study met the futility stopping rule of interim analysis. Median PFS was 1.8 months (95 %CI, 1.4-2.0). After a median follow up of 7.4 months (IQR 4.5-10.9), 8 patients are alive. Median overall survival (OS) was 8 months (95 %CI, 2.9-not estimable). Most common toxicities were thrombocytopenia (G1-2 in 5 cases, persistent G3 in one, with 3 dose delays and 1 dose interruption), fatigue and abdominal pain (G1-2 in 4 cases each). Impairment of quality of life (ESAS score) was observed as well as an increase from baseline to +2 month median levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-8. PF-03446962 had no activity as single drug in refractory UC and we do not recommend further investigation outside of the combination with agents targeting the VEGF receptor axis.

  19. Pharmacological antagonism of the actions of group II and III mGluR agonists in the lateral perforant path of rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushell, T J; Jane, D E; Tse, H W; Watkins, J C; Garthwaite, J; Collingridge, G L

    1996-04-01

    1. An understanding of the physiological and pathological roles of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) is currently hampered by the lack of selective antagonists. Standard extracellular recording techniques were used to investigate the activity of recently reported mGluR antagonists on agonist-induced depressions of synaptic transmission in the lateral perforant path of hippocampal slices obtained from 12-16 day-old rats. 2. The group III specific mGluR agonist, (S)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4) depressed basal synaptic transmission in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. The mean (+/-s.e. mean) depression obtained with 100 microM L-AP4 (the maximum concentration tested) was 74 +/- 3% and the IC50 value was 3 +/- 1 microM (n = 5). 3. The selective group II mGluR agonists, (1S,3S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylate ((1S,3s)-ACPD) and (2S, 1'R, 2'R, 3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) also depressed basal synaptic transmission in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. The mean depression obtained with 200 microM (1S,3S)-ACPD was 83 +/- 8% and the IC50 value was 12 +/- 3 microM (n = 5). The mean depression obtained with 1 microM DCG-IV was 73 +/- 7% and the IC50 value was 88 +/- 15 nM (n = 4). 4. Synaptic depressions induced by the actions of 20 microM (1S,3S)-ACPD and 10 microM L-AP4 were antagonized by the mGluR antagonists (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine ((+)-MCPG), (S)-2-methyl-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (MAP4), (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-methyl-2(2'-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (MCCG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) (all tested at 500 microM). 5. (+)-MCPG was a weak antagonist of both L-AP4 and (1S,3S)-ACPD-induced depressions. MCCG was selective towards (1S,3S)-ACPD, but analysis of its effects were complicated by apparent partial agonist activity. MAP4 showed good selectivity for L-AP4-induced effects. 6

  20. Giardia intestinalis: conservation of the variant-specific surface protein VSP417-1 (TSA417) and identification of a divergent homologue encoded at a duplicated locus in genetic group II isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ey, P L; Darby, J M

    1998-11-01

    The stability of the gene encoding TSA417, a 72-kDa variant-specific surface protein (VSP) produced by trophozoites of Giardia intestinalis isolate WB-C6, was investigated in isolates of similar (Assemblage A / Group I) or distinct (Assemblage A / Group II) genotype. Using primers specific for the WB-C6 tsa417 gene, DNA amplified in polymerase chain reactions from genomic DNA indicated the presence, in every isolate, of an intact coding sequence possessing conserved restriction sites diagnostic for this locus (herein designated vsp417-1). Sequence analysis of the DNA amplified from the genomes of genetic Group I ("A-I") isolates revealed complete identity with the published WB-C6 tsa417 (vsp417-1(A-I)) sequence. Equivalent products, amplified from the genomes of genetic Group II ("A-II") isolates, similarly yielded an invariant and apparently allelic 2142-bp coding sequence (designated vsp417-1(A-II)) possessing 79% nucleotide identity with vsp417-1(A-I) and polymorphisms unique to Group II organisms. The encoded polypeptides (VSP417-1(A-I) and VSP417-1(A-II)) are identical at 75% of amino acid positions. Substitutions are concentrated within the N-terminal portions of the proteins, but the overall structure of VSP417-1 has changed little during the evolution of the Group I and Group II genotypes from their common clonal ancestor. An additional 0.7-kb DNA, representing a separate locus (vsp417-5) encoding a 22.3-kDa VSP, was amplified from genetic Group II genomes exclusively but only using particular primer combinations. The vsp417-5(A-II) gene exhibits >85% sequence identity with the 5' and 3' segments of vsp417-1(A-I) and vsp417-1(A-II) but it lacks a 1482-bp segment that comprises the central portion of the vsp417-1 locus. Excision of this segment seems to have occurred by intragenic recombination, possibly initiated by a stem loop formed between palindromic sequences which border the 1482-bp segment within vsp417-1 but which are contiguous in vsp417-5(A-II

  1. Epigenetic Therapy Using Belinostat for Patients With Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Multicenter Phase I/II Study With Biomarker and Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Tumors From Patients in the Mayo Phase II Consortium and the Cancer Therapeutics Research Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Winnie; Chung, Hyun C.; Chan, Stephen L.; Wang, Ling Z.; Lim, Robert; Picus, Joel; Boyer, Michael; Mo, Frankie K.F.; Koh, Jane; Rha, Sun Y.; Hui, Edwin P.; Jeung, Hei C.; Roh, Jae K.; Yu, Simon C.H.; To, Ka F.; Tao, Qian; Ma, Brigette B.; Chan, Anthony W.H.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Erlichman, Charles; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Goh, Boon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Epigenetic aberrations have been reported in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study of patients with unresectable HCC and chronic liver disease, epigenetic therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat was assessed. The objectives were to determine dose-limiting toxicity and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), to assess pharmacokinetics in phase I, and to assess activity of and explore potential biomarkers for response in phase II. Patients and Methods Major eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed unresectable HCC, European Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≤ 2, and adequate organ function. Phase I consisted of 18 patients; belinostat was given intravenously once per day on days 1 to 5 every 3 weeks; dose levels were 600 mg/m2 per day (level 1), 900 mg/m2 per day (level 2), 1,200 mg/m2 per day (level 3), and 1,400 mg/m2 per day (level 4). Phase II consisted of 42 patients. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), and the main secondary end points were response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory analysis was conducted on pretreatment tumor tissues to determine whether HR23B expression is a potential biomarker for response. Results Belinostat pharmacokinetics were linear from 600 to 1,400 mg/m2 without significant accumulation. The MTD was not reached at the maximum dose administered. Dose level 4 was used in phase II. The median number of cycles was two (range, one to 12). The partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 2.4% and 45.2%, respectively. The median PFS and OS were 2.64 and 6.60 months, respectively. Exploratory analysis revealed that disease stabilization rate (complete response plus PR plus SD) in tumors having high and low HR23B histoscores were 58% and 14%, respectively (P = .036). Conclusion Epigenetic therapy with belinostat demonstrates tumor stabilization and is generally well-tolerated. HR23B

  2. Effectiveness of a psychoeducational intervention group program in the reduction of the burden experienced by caregivers of patients with dementia: the EDUCA-II randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Carrasco, Manuel; Domínguez-Panchón, Ana Isabel; González-Fraile, Eduardo; Muñoz-Hermoso, Paula; Ballesteros, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multicenter, prospective, evaluator-blinded, 2-arm parallel randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a group psychoeducational intervention (PIP) with that of standard care in dementia caregivers. The primary outcome was the burden experience evaluated by the Zarit Burden Interview. Secondary outcomes were psychological distress evaluated with the scaled General Health Questionnaire-28 items, and quality of life evaluated with the Short-Form Health Survey 12. Effectiveness endpoint was at 4 months since inception. Statistical analyses used complete case and intention-to-treat analysis (ITT). The trial recruited 238 caregivers from 22 research sites (115 randomized to PIP, 123 randomized to standard care). No differences were found in the Zarit Burden Interview scores (complete case analysis: mean difference=-1.02, 95% confidence interval=-4.41 to 2.37; ITT analysis: MD=-0.55, 95% confidence interval=-3.64 to 2.55), the Short-Form Health Survey 12 domain scores (all P>0.05), and total General Health Questionnaire-28 items scores and some of its subscales (all P>0.05) except the anxiety and insomnia subscale for the ITT analysis (P=0.03). In summary, PIP in modality of group intervention was not better than standard care to reduce caregiver burden and overall psychological distress or to improve quality-of-life domains. EDUCA-II trial registry: ISRCTN14411440.

  3. An Ionic 1,4-Bis(styrylbenzene-Based Fluorescent Probe for Mercury(II Detection in Water via Deprotection of the Thioacetal Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sang Le

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Highly sensitive and selective mercury detection in aqueous media is urgently needed because mercury poisoning usually results from exposure to water-soluble forms of mercury by inhalation and/or ingesting. An ionic conjugated oligoelectrolye (M1Q based on 1,4-bis(styrylbenzene was synthesized as a fluorescent mercury(II probe. The thioacetal moiety and quaternized ammonium group were incorporated for Hg2+ recognition and water solubility. A neutral Hg2+ probe (M1 was also prepared based on the same molecular backbone, and their sensor characteristics were investigated in a mixture of acetonitrile/water and in water. In the presence of Hg2+, the thioacetal group was converted to aldehyde functionality, and the resulting photoluminescence intensity decreased. In water, M1Q successfully demonstrated highly sensitive detection, showing a binding toward Hg2+ that was ~15 times stronger and a signal on/off ratio twice as high, compared to M1 in acetonitrile/water. The thioacetal deprotection by Hg2+ ions was substantially facilitated in water without an organic cosolvent. The limit of detection was measured to be 7 nM with a detection range of 10–180 nM in 100% aqueous medium.

  4. An Ionic 1,4-Bis(styryl)benzene-Based Fluorescent Probe for Mercury(II) Detection in Water via Deprotection of the Thioacetal Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Van Sang; Jeong, Ji-Eun; Huynh, Huy Tuan; Lee, Jiae; Woo, Han Young

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive and selective mercury detection in aqueous media is urgently needed because mercury poisoning usually results from exposure to water-soluble forms of mercury by inhalation and/or ingesting. An ionic conjugated oligoelectrolye (M1Q) based on 1,4-bis(styryl)benzene was synthesized as a fluorescent mercury(II) probe. The thioacetal moiety and quaternized ammonium group were incorporated for Hg2+ recognition and water solubility. A neutral Hg2+ probe (M1) was also prepared based on the same molecular backbone, and their sensor characteristics were investigated in a mixture of acetonitrile/water and in water. In the presence of Hg2+, the thioacetal group was converted to aldehyde functionality, and the resulting photoluminescence intensity decreased. In water, M1Q successfully demonstrated highly sensitive detection, showing a binding toward Hg2+ that was ~15 times stronger and a signal on/off ratio twice as high, compared to M1 in acetonitrile/water. The thioacetal deprotection by Hg2+ ions was substantially facilitated in water without an organic cosolvent. The limit of detection was measured to be 7 nM with a detection range of 10–180 nM in 100% aqueous medium. PMID:27941624

  5. A multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II controlled study of rh-endostatin (Endostar) in combination with chemotherapy in previously untreated extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Li, Lu; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Li; Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhiwei; Huang, Cheng; Guo, Shuliang; Zhang, Yiping; Song, Xiangqun; Yu, Yongfeng; Zhou, Caicun; Li, Wei; Liao, Meilin; Li, Baolan; Xu, Liyan; Chen, Ping; Hu, Chunhong; Hu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    Based on promising efficacy in a single-arm study, a randomized phase II trial was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of adding rh-endostatin (Endostar) to first-line standard etoposide and carboplatin (EC) chemotherapy for treatment of extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. One hundred forty Chinese patients with pathologically confirmed, extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer were randomly assigned to EC alone or rh-endostatin + EC for 4-6 cycles, followed by single-agent rh-endostatin until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints included overall survival, Objective response rate (ORR), and quality of life. Median PFS was 6.4 months with rh-endostatin + EC (n = 69) and 5.9 months with EC (n = 69) (hazard ratio 0.8 [95% confidence interval 0.6-1.1]). PFS was significantly higher with rh-endostatin + EC than with EC (hazard ratio 0.4 [0.2-0.9; p = 0.020]) in female. Median overall survival was similar in both groups (12.1 versus 12.4 months, respectively [p = 0.82]). ORR was higher in the rh-endostatin + EC group (75.4%) than in the EC group (66.7%) (p = 0.348). The efficacy of rh-endostatin + EC relative to that of EC was reflected by greater improvements in patient-assessed quality of life scores after 4 and 6 weeks of treatment. There was no difference between each regimen in the incidence of nonhematological or Grade III-IV hematological toxicities. Addition of rh-endostatin to EC for the treatment of extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer had an acceptable toxicity profile, but did not improve overall survival, PFS, and ORR.

  6. Roles of phenol groups and auxiliary ligand of copper(ii) complexes with tetradentate ligands in the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Guangli; Zhong, Wei; Wei, Zhenhong; Liu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xiaoming

    2017-06-27

    Herein, six copper(ii) complexes with multidentate ligands, [Cu(HL1)(OAc)(HOAc)] (1), [Cu(HL2)(OAc)] (2), [Cu(HL3)(OAc)] (3), [CuL4(OAc)] (4), [Cu(HL2)Cl] (5), and [Cu(HL3)Cl] (6) {H2L1 = [bis(3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)](2-pyridylmethyl)amine, H2L2 = [(3-tert-butyl-2-hydoxybenzyl)(3-trifluoromethyl-2-hydroxybenzyl) (2-pyridylmethyl)]amine, H2L3 = [bis(3-trifluoromethyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)] (2-pyridylmethyl)amine, and HL4 = [bis(2-pyridylmethyl)] (3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)amine}, are reported. The complexes were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry, X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis and electrochemistry. These copper(ii) complexes have been investigated as catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde mediated by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl) radical in water at ambient temperature. Mechanistic investigations have revealed that the phenolate/phenol is involved in the intramolecular proton transfer with a bound substrate in catalysis. Hence, the presence of the trifluoromethyl group on the phenol ring significantly affects the catalysis process since the substituent affects the acidity of phenol, and subsequently, the intramolecular proton transfer from the bound substrate. During catalysis, the dissociation of the auxiliary ligand (Cl(-) or OAc(-)) occurred in the SN1 pathway, and it is necessary for the substrate to bind. To complete the catalytic cycle, the cleaved auxiliary ligand rebinds to the metal center to regenerate the catalyst.

  7. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not. In the ......It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not....... In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  8. Some technetium complexes for labelling red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to produce technetium labelled red blood cells, used routinely in diagnostic nuclear medicine, is reported. The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA), present in erythrocytes, is strongly inhibited by primary aromatic sulphonamides, which bind at the enzyme active site. Three types of ligand able to coordinate to technetium and suitable for modification to include a primary aromatic sulphonamide group were studied; bis(thiosemicarbazones), Schiff bases and some propylene amine oximes. The experimental conditions needed to label the ligands were determined. Both the thiosemicarbazone and propyleneamine oxime derivatives were labelled, but under no conditions attempted were the Schiff bases complexed by Technetium. The two major isozymes of Human Carbonic Anhydrase, HCA I and HCA II, were isolated from blood. The strength of binding of the free ligands SET, PN130 and PN135 with each of the isozymes was measured and expressed as the Dissociation Constant K{sub d}. The rate of uptake of the technetium complexes into washed RBCs and whole blood was measured and found to be much slower in whole blood. The biodistribution of both TcPN130 and TcPN135 in rats was determined and scintigraphic images for the TcPN130 complex were recorded. Attempts to synthesise the Tc-99 analogues on the milligram scale to allow chemical characterisation of these complexes were unsuccessful. (author).

  9. Telmisartan and Insulin Resistance in HIV (TAILoR): protocol for a dose-ranging phase II randomised open-labelled trial of telmisartan as a strategy for the reduction of insulin resistance in HIV-positive individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpakom, Sudeep P; Taylor, Claire; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Spowart, Catherine; Vora, Jiten; García-Fiñana, Marta; Kemp, Graham J; Whitehead, John; Jaki, Thomas; Khoo, Saye; Williamson, Paula; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2015-10-15

    Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, has beneficial effects on insulin resistance and cardiovascular health in non-HIV populations. This trial will evaluate whether telmisartan can reduce insulin resistance in HIV-positive individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy. This is a phase II, multicentre, randomised, open-labelled, dose-ranging trial of telmisartan in 336 HIV-positive individuals over a period of 48 weeks. The trial will use an adaptive design to inform the optimal dose of telmisartan. Patients will be randomised initially 1:1:1:1 to receive one of the three doses of telmisartan (20, 40 and 80 mg) or no intervention (control). An interim analysis will be performed when half of the planned maximum of 336 patients have been followed up for at least 24 weeks. The second stage of the study will depend on the results of interim analysis. The primary outcome measure is a reduction in insulin resistance (as measured by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR)) in telmisartan treated arm(s) after 24 weeks of treatment in comparison with the non-intervention arm. The secondary outcome measures include changes in lipid profile; body fat redistribution (as measured by MRI); plasma and urinary levels of various biomarkers of cardiometabolic and renal health at 12, 24 and 48 weeks. Serious adverse events will be compared between different telmisartan treated dose arm(s) and the control arm. The study, this protocol and related documents have been approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee North West-Liverpool Central (Ref: 12/NW/0214). On successful completion, study data will be shared with academic collaborators. The findings from TAILoR will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, at scientific conferences, the media and through patient and public involvement. 04196/0024/001-0001; 2012-000935-18; 51069819. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  10. ERP II: Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2004-01-01

    ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: eERP). The re......ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: e...

  11. Analysis of genetic variants of class II cytokine and their receptor genes in psoriasis patients of two ethnic groups from the Volga-Ural region of Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimova, Elvira; Akhmetova, Vita; Latipov, Boris; Kingo, Külli; Rätsep, Ranno; Traks, Tanel; Kõks, Sulev; Khusnutdinova, Elza

    2012-10-01

    The molecular basis of pathogenesis of psoriasis remains unclear, but one unifying hypothesis of disease aetiology is the cytokine network model. The class II cytokines (CF2) and their receptors (CRF2) are all involved in the inflammatory processes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in respective genes have been associated with psoriasis in a previous study of the Estonian population. We performed a replication study of 47 SNPs in CF2 and CRF2 genes in independent cohorts of psoriasis patients of two ethnic groups (Russians and Bashkirs) from the Volga-Ural region of Russia. DNA was obtained from 395 psoriasis patients of two ethnic groups from the Volga-Ural region of Russia and 476 ethnically matched controls. 47 SNPs in the loci of the genes encoding Class II cytokines and their receptors were selected by SNPbrowser version 3.5. Genotyping was performed using the SNPlex™ (Applied Biosystems) platform. The genetic variant rs30461 previously associated in original case-control study in Estonians, was also associated in Russians (corrected P-value (Pc=0.008, OR=0.44), but did not reach statistical significance in the Bashkir population. Additionally, the haplotype analysis provided that CC haplotype formed by the SNPs rs30461 and rs955155 had a protective effect in Russians (Pc=0.0024, OR=0.44), supporting the involvement of this locus in the protection against psoriasis. Combined meta-analysis of three populations, including 943 psoriasis patients and 812 healthy controls, showed that the IL29 rs30461 C-allele was not associated with decreased risk of psoriasis (P=0.165, OR=0.68). Moreover, stratification of studies by ethnicity revealed a significant association in the European cohort (P=9.506E-006, OR=0.53). Therefore, there is no overall evidence of association between psoriasis and SNP rs30461 of the IL29 gene, but there is some evidence to suggest that an association exists in Europeans. However, this current concept should be considered as

  12. Modeling of the structure-specific kinetics of abiotic, dark reduction of Hg(II) complexed by O/N and S functional groups in humic acids while accounting for time-dependent structural rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Skyllberg, Ulf; Wei, Shiqiang; Wang, Dingyong; Lu, Song; Jiang, Zhenmao; Flanagan, Dennis C.

    2015-04-01

    Dark reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) in deep waters, soils and sediments accounts for a large part of legacy Hg recycling back to the atmosphere. Natural organic matter (NOM) plays a dual role in the process, acting as an electron donor and complexation agent of Hg(II). Experimental determination of rates of dark Hg(II) reduction is complicated by the simultaneously ongoing kinetics of Hg(II) rearrangement from the abundant, relatively weakly bonding RO/N (carboxyl, amino) groups in NOM to the much stronger bonding RSH (thiol) group. In this study, kinetics of the rearrangement are accounted for and we report rates of dark Hg(II) reduction for two molecular structures in presence of humic acids (HA) extracted from three different sources. Values on the pseudo first-order rate constant for the proposed structure Hg(OR)2 (kredHg(OR)2) were 0.18, 0.22 and 0.35 h-1 for Peat, Coal and Soil HA, respectively, and values on the constant for the proposed structure RSHgOR (kred RSHgOR) were 0.003 and 0.006 h-1 for Peat and Soil HA, respectively. The Hg(SR)2 structure is the thermodynamically most stable, but the limited time of the experiment (53 h) did not allow for a determination of the rate of the very slow reduction of Hg(II) in this structure. For two out of three HA samples the concentration of RSH groups optimized by the kinetic model (0.6 × 10-3 RSH groups per C atoms) was in good agreement with independent estimates provided by sulfur X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (S XANES). Experiments conducted at varying concentrations of Hg(II) and HA demonstrated a positive relationship between Hg(II) reduction and concentrations of specific Hg(II) structures and electron donor groups, suggesting first order in each of these two components. The limitation of the Hg(II) reduction by electron donating groups of HA, as represented by the native reducing capacity (NRC), was demonstrated for the Coal HA sample. Normalization to NRC resulted in pseudo second-order rate

  13. Connected Component Labeling Using Components Neighbors-Scan Labeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Rakhmadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Many approaches have been proposed in previous such as the classic sequential connected components labeling algorithm which is relies on two subsequent raster-scans of a binary image. This method produced good performance in terms of accuracy, but because of the implementation of the image processing systems now requires faster process of the computer, the speed of this technique’s process has become an important issue. Approach: A computational approach, called components neighbors-scan labeling algorithm for connected component labeling was presented in this study. This algorithm required scanning through an image only once to label connected components. The algorithm started by scanning from the head of the component’s group, before tracing all the components neighbors by using the main component’s information. This algorithm had desirable characteristics, it is simple while promoted accuracy and low time consuming. By using a table of components, this approach also gave other advantages as the information for the next higher process. Results: The approach had been tested with a collection of binary images. In practically all cases, the technique had successfully given the desired result. Averagely, from the results the algorithm increased the speed around 67.4% from the two times scanning method. Conclusion: Conclusion from the comparison with the previous method, the approach of components neighbors-scan for connected component labeling promoted speed, accuracy and simplicity. The results showed that the approach has a good performance in terms of accuracy, the time consumed and the simplicity of the algorithm.

  14. Phase II study of temozolomide (TMZ) and everolimus (RAD001) therapy for metastatic melanoma: a North Central Cancer Treatment Group study, N0675.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronca, Roxana S; Allred, Jacob B; Perez, Domingo G; Nevala, Wendy K; Lieser, Elizabeth A T; Thompson, Michael; Maples, William J; Creagan, Edward T; Pockaj, Barbara A; Kaur, Judith S; Moore, Timothy D; Marchello, Benjamin T; Markovic, Svetomir N

    2014-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is activated in malignant melanoma and in situ lesions as opposed to benign nevi. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling is implicated in sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agents (temozolomide [TMZ]) and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. We conducted a single-arm phase II multi-institution cooperative group study to assess the antitumor activity and safety profile of the combination of TMZ and the rapamycin derivative everolimus in patients with metastatic unresectable malignant melanoma. Patients received 10 mg/d of RAD001 for 5 of 7 days (ie, 50 mg/wk) and 200 mg/m/d of TMZ for 5 days each cycle. Of the first 39 eligible patients, 17 were PFS-9 successes, for a predetermined threshold of 18/39 patients for a positive trial. Overall, 21 of 48 patients were progression free at 9 weeks, for an event-free survival rate of 44% (95% confidence interval, 29%-59%). The median progression-free survival was 2.4 months and the median overall survival was 8.6 months. Four patients achieved a partial response; the median duration of response was 15.1 months. No complete remissions were observed. Treatment was in general well tolerated with only 1 patient discontinuing therapy due to toxicity (hyperlipidemia). The combination of TMZ and RAD001 was well tolerated but failed to meet/exceed our study threshold for promising clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma.

  15. FDA Consumer Nutrition Knowledge Survey. Report II, 1975. A Nationwide Study of Food Shopper's Knowledge, Beliefs, Attitudes and Reported Behavior Regarding Food and Nutrition. Factors Related to Nutrition Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Herbert; And Others

    During 1973, a nationwide study for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was conducted which provided information on nutrition knowledge, beliefs about nutrition, and first reactions to nutrition labeling among food shoppers. This initial research provided a baseline measurement of nutrition knowledge and attitudes among consumers, and in 1975…

  16. Moessbauer study of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes of some nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulphur donor ligands, reduction of iron(III) by the mercaptide group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawhney, G.L.; Baijal, J.S. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics); Chandra, S. (Zakir Hussain College, Ajmeri Gate, Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry); Pandeya, K.B. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-01-01

    Complex formation reactions of iron(II) and iron(III) with semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones of pyruvic acid and phenyl pyruvic acid have been studied by magnetic measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With iron(II), all the ligands form hexa-coordinated octahedral complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H/sub 2/). With iron(III) semicarbazones, complexes of the composition (Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/)(OH) are formed. Thiosemicarbazones first reduce iron(III) to iron(II) and then form iron(II) complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of oral cyanocobalamin formulated with sodium N-[8-(2-hydroxybenzoyl)amino]caprylate (SNAC): an open-label, randomized, single-dose, parallel-group study in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, M Cristina; Wong, Diane F; Friedman, Kristen; Riley, M Gary I

    2011-07-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency may be caused by inadequate dietary intake of B12 or by conditions that result in malabsorption of the vitamin. Crystalline vitamin B12, usually in the form of cyanocobalamin, is administered parenterally (ie, intramuscularly) or orally for treating deficiency states. Intramuscular administration is widely accepted as a treatment method. Oral B12 supplementation is also used, but it is considered to be less reliable. This study was conducted to compare the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of 2 oral formulations of cyanocobalamin-a marketed cyanocobalamin tablet (immediate-release B12 5 mg) and cyanocobalamin formulated with a proprietary carrier, sodium N-[8-(2-hydroxybenzoyl)amino]caprylate (SNAC)-to establish the feasibility of using an absorption enhancer with B12 to improve uptake of the vitamin. This was the first clinical study conducted with the cyanocobalamin/SNAC coformulation. An open-label, randomized, single-dose, parallel-group study was conducted in healthy male subjects. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups: Treatment A subjects (n = 4) received 2 tablets of 5-mg cyanocobalamin formulated with 100-mg SNAC as part of a dose range-finding arm included to determine a dose to provide a measurable concentration of vitamin B12 at all time points when tested with the available vitamin B12 assay; treatment B subjects (n = 6) received 1 tablet of 5-mg cyanocobalamin formulated with 100-mg SNAC; treatment C subjects (n = 6) received 1 commercially available 5-mg cyanocobalamin tablet; and treatment D subjects (n = 4) received commercially available 1-mg cyanocobalamin IV. Treatment A was completed 3 weeks before treatments B, C, and D were studied. Human serum B12 was analyzed by chemiluminescence assay method. Validation procedures established that samples could be diluted up to 100 times without any effects on accuracy and precision. The pharmacokinetic properties of vitamin B12 were characterized by

  18. Pharmacokinetics of venlafaxine extended release 75  mg and desvenlafaxine 50  mg in healthy CYP2D6 extensive and poor metabolizers: a randomized, open-label, two-period, parallel-group, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Alice I; Focht, Kristen; Jiang, Qin; Preskorn, Sheldon H; Kane, Cecelia P

    2011-01-01

    Genetically driven variations in the level of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 metabolic activity have been shown to significantly affect the pharmacokinetic behaviour of medications that are substrates of this enzyme. To evaluate the impact of CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer (EM) and poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes on the pharmacokinetics of single doses of venlafaxine extended release (ER) and desvenlafaxine (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate). This study used a randomized, open-label, two-period, parallel-group, crossover design. The enrolled healthy subjects participated in the study for approximately 8 weeks, which included ≤ 6 weeks of screening procedures and two separate 1-week partial inpatient confinement periods (separated by a 4-day washout period), during which venlafaxine ER or desvenlafaxine was administered and blood samples were collected. Subjects were admitted to partial inpatient confinement in a laboratory setting for the two separate study periods where each study drug was individually administered. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analyses were collected during the 120 hours following administration of each study drug. Plasma concentrations of the study drugs were measured by a third-party analyst using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Healthy subjects were recruited through newspaper advertisements and genotyped to determine their CYP2D6 metabolic phenotype (i.e. EM or PM) using internally developed and commercially available assays. Subjects were reimbursed for their participation in this study. Single, sequentially administered oral doses of the dual-acting, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibiting antidepressants venlafaxine ER (75  mg) and desvenlafaxine (50  mg) were administered. The main outcome measures were differences in the geometric means for area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(∞)) and peak plasma concentration (C(max)) between EMs and PMs. Comparisons were

  19. Two new Ni(II) Schiff base complexes : X-ray absolute structure determination, synthesis of a N-15-labelled complex and full assignment of its H-1 NMR and C-13 NMR spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langer, Vratislav; Popkov, Alexander; Nadvornik, Milan; Lycka, Antonin

    2007-01-01

    The Ni(II) complex of the Schiff base of (S)-N-(2-benzoyl-4-chlorophenyl)-1-benzylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide and glycine (1) [GKCI] and the hemihydrate of the Ni(II) complex of the Schiff base of (S)-N-(2-benzoylphenyl)-1-benzylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide and 2-aminoisobutiric acid (2) Me(2)GK] were pr

  20. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Ingredients, Packaging & Labeling Labeling & Nutrition The Food ...

  1. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – ... temperature and coordinated water were determined ... indicating fairly stable complex compounds (Table 1). The complex compounds are insoluble [Table 2] in water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in ...

  2. Fluorescent labeling of nisin Z and assessment of anti-listerial action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; de Bruin, Marlies; Paris, Cedric; Breukink, Eefjan; Desobry, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Biomolecule labeling by fluorescent markers has emerged as an innovative methodology for bio-analytical purposes in food microbiology, medicine and pharmaceutics due to the great advantages of this method such as precision, wide detection limits, and in vivo recognition. Fluorescent nisin Z was synthesized by linking the carboxyl group and amino group of nisin Z and 5-aminoacetamido fluorescein (AAA-flu). This new structure was fully characterized by mass spectrometry with a molecular weight of 3717.3 Da. Intracellular K(+) leakage and transmembrane electrical potential (Δψ) were used to evaluate the antibacterial action of the labeled molecule against three listerial strains and demonstrated that nisin Z endured the labeling process without any activity loss. In vivo activity of labeled nisin was observed by confocal laser microscope which revealed its localization at the septum of listerial cell division site where the membrane-bound cell wall precursor lipid II is maximal. Fluorescent nisin Z showed its great potential as a tool to study antibacterial mechanism of action of nisin in biological systems.

  3. [Role of rapid movement of spin labels in interpreting EPR spectra for spin-labelled macromolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol'skiĭ, D O; Timofeev, V P

    2003-01-01

    The method of spin labeling was used to monitor quick movements of side residues in protein monocrystals. The EPR spectra of monocrystals of spin-labeled lysozyme at different orientations of the tetrahonal crystal relative to the direction of the magnetic field were interpreted using the molecular dynamics method. A simple model was proposed, which enables one to calculate the trajectory of movements of the spin label by the molecular dynamic method over a relatively short period of time. The entire "frozen" protein molecule and a "defrozen" spin-labeled amino acid residue were considered in the framework of the model. To calculate the trajectories in vacuum, a model of spin-labeled lysozyme was constructed, and the parameters of force potentials for the atoms of the protein molecule and the spin label were specified. It follows from the calculations that the protein environment sterically hinders the range of eventual angular reorientations of the reporter NO-group of nitroxyl incorporated into the spin label, thereby affecting the shape of the EPR spectrum. However, the scatter in the positions of the reporter group in the angular space turned out to correspond to the Gauss distribution. Using the atomic coordinates of the spin label, obtained in a chosen time interval by the method of molecular dynamics, and taking into account the distribution of the states of the spin label in the ensemble of spin-labeled macromolecules in the crystal, we simulated the EPR spectra of monocrystals of spin-labeled lysozyme. The theoretical EPR spectra coincide well with the experimental.

  4. Combination of ofatumumab and reduced-dose CHOP for diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in patients aged 80 years or older: an open-label, multicentre, single-arm, phase 2 trial from the LYSA group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrade, Frédéric; Bologna, Serge; Delwail, Vincent; Emile, Jean François; Pascal, Laurent; Fermé, Christophe; Schiano, Jean-Marc; Coiffier, Bertrand; Corront, Bernadette; Farhat, Hassan; Fruchart, Christophe; Ghesquieres, Herve; Macro, Margaret; Tilly, Hervé; Choufi, Bachra; Delarue, Richard; Fitoussi, Olivier; Gabarre, Jean; Haioun, Corinne; Jardin, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    In 2011 we reported a rituximab plus miniCHOP (reduced-dose cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) combination for patients older than 80 years with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The 2-year overall survival was 59% (95% CI 49-67) with an excess of early toxicity. To improve those results we tested the same chemotherapy protocol in combination with ofatumumab and a pre-phase treatment. For this open-label, multicentre, single-group, phase 2 trial, we recruited patients older than 80 years with untreated histologically-proven CD20-positive DLBCL, Ann Arbor stage I to IV, from 41 academic and hospital centres in France and Belgium. Patients received a pre-phase with oral vincristine (1 mg total dose 1 week before cycle 1 [day -7]) and oral prednisone (60 mg total dose starting 1 week before cycle 1, for 4 days [day -7 to day -4]) before the first cycle of the ofatumumab plus miniCHOP regimen. The regimen consisted of 1000 mg total dose of intravenous ofatumumab, 25 mg/m(2) of intravenous doxorubicin, 400 mg/m(2) of intravenous cyclophosphamide, and 1 mg of intravenous vincristine, on day 1 of each cycle; and 40 mg/m(2) of oral prednisone on days 1-5. Ofatumumab was administered with 1000 mg of paracetamol and 50 mg of diphenhydramine. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population. The statistical analysis has been done on an intention-to-treat principle. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01195714. Between June 2, 2010, and Nov 4, 2011, we enrolled 120 patients. Age-adjusted International Prognostic Index was 2-3 in 68 (57%) of them. The median follow-up time was 26·8 months (IQR 24·5-30·1). The 2-year overall survival was 64·7% (95% CI 55·3-72·7) and median overall survival was not reached (95% CI 30·2-not reached). 45 patients died during the treatment, of whom 28 (62%) died due to lymphoma. The most common side-effect was haematological toxicity. Among the 120 patients

  5. Interisland mutation of a novel phospholipase A2 from Trimeresurus flavoviridis venom and evolution of Crotalinae group II phospholipases A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chijiwa, Takahito; Hamai, Sachiko; Tsubouchi, Shoji; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Hattori, Shosaku; Kihara, Hiroshi; Tsunasawa, Susumu; Ohno, Motonori

    2003-11-01

    Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Crotalinae) snakes inhabit the southwestern islands of Japan: Amami-Oshima, Tokunoshima, and Okinawa. Affinity and conventional chromatographies of Amami-Oshima T. flavoviridis venom led to isolation of a novel phospholipase A2 (PLA2). This protein was highly homologous (91%) in sequence to trimucrotoxin, a neurotoxic PLA2, which had been isolated from T. mucrosquamatus (Taiwan) venom, and exhibited weak neurotoxicity. This protein was named PLA-N. Its LD50 for mice was 1.34 microg/g, which is comparable to that of trimucrotoxin. The cDNA encoding PLA-N was isolated from both the Amami-Oshima and the Tokunoshima T. flavoviridis venom-gland cDNA libraries. Screening of the Okinawa T. flavoviridis venom-gland cDNA library with PLA-N cDNA led to isolation of the cDNA encoding one amino acid-substituted PLA-N homologue, named PLA-N(O), suggesting that interisland mutation occurred and that Okinawa island was separated from a former island prior to dissociation of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima islands. Construction of a phylogenetic tree of Crotalinae venom group II PLA2's based on the amino acid sequences revealed that neurotoxic PLA2's including PLA-N and PLA-N(O) form an independent cluster which is distant from other PLA2 groups such as PLA2 type, basic [Asp49]PLA2 type, and [Lys49]PLA2 type. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of PLA-N cDNA with those of the cDNAs encoding other T. flavoviridis venom PLA2's showed that they have evolved in an accelerated manner. However, when comparison was made within the cDNAs encoding Crotalinae venom neurotoxic PLA2's, their evolutionary rates appear to be reduced to a level between accelerated evolution and neutral evolution. It is likely that ancestral genes of neurotoxic PLA2's evolved in an accelerated manner until they had acquired neurotoxic function and since then they have evolved with less frequent mutation, possibly for functional conservation.

  6. Two phospholipase A2 inhibitors from the plasma of Cerrophidion (Bothrops) godmani which selectively inhibit two different group-II phospholipase A2 myotoxins from its own venom: isolation, molecular cloning and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizano, S; Angulo, Y; Lomonte, B; Fox, J W; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Gutiérrez, J M

    2000-01-01

    Myotoxic phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s; group II) account for most of the muscle-tissue damage that results from envenomation by viperid snakes. In the venom of the Godman's viper (Cerrophidion godmani, formerly Bothrops godmani), an enzymically active PLA(2) (myotoxin I) and an inactive, Lys-49 variant (myotoxin II) induce extensive muscle damage and oedema. In this study, two distinct myotoxin inhibitor proteins of C. godmani, CgMIP-I and CgMIP-II, were purified directly from blood plasma by selective binding to affinity columns containing either myotoxin I or myotoxin II, respectively. Both proteins are glycosylated, acidic (pI=4) and composed of 20-25-kDa subunits that form oligomers of 110 kDa (CgMIP-I) or 180 kDa (CgMIP-II). In inhibition studies, CgMIP-I specifically neutralized the PLA(2) and the myotoxic, oedema-forming and cytolytic activities of myotoxins I, whereas CgMIP-II selectively inhibited the toxic properties of myotoxin II. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis and sequencing of cDNAs encoding the two inhibitors revealed that CgMIP-I is similar to gamma-type inhibitors, which share a pattern of cysteine residues present in the Ly-6 superfamily of proteins, whereas CgMIP-II shares sequence identity with alpha-type inhibitors that contain carbohydrate-recognition-like domains, also found in C-type lectins and mammalian PLA(2) receptors. N-terminal sequencing of myotoxin I revealed a different primary structure from myotoxin II [De Sousa, Morhy, Arni, Ward, Díaz and Gutiérrez (1998) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1384, 204-208], which provides insight into the nature of such pharmacological specificity. PMID:10698689

  7. From Label to Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrkjeflot, Haldor; Strandgaard, Jesper; Svejenova, Silviya

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the process of creation of new Nordic cuisine (NNC) as a culinary innovation, focusing on the main stages, actors, and mechanisms that shaped the new label and its practices and facilitated its diffusion in the region and internationally. Fast-paced diffusion was possible...... because NNC was conceived as an identity movement, triggered by active involvement of entrepreneurial leaders from the culinary profession, high-profile political supporters, legitimating scientists, disseminating media, and interpreting audiences. It was facilitated by three mechanisms: First, the use...... actors and institutions to develop practices associated with the NNC label. Third, organized dissemination allowed the excitement and engagement with the new label to spread quickly....

  8. Capacitive label reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  9. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris have characteristics in common with LMW RNA group II Sinorhizobium meliloti of Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella from soils of mainland Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several isolates from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canaries, had electrophoretic LMW RNA patterns identical with a less common pattern within S. meliloti (assigned as group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northe...

  10. Real-time RT-PCR high-resolution melting curve analysis and multiplex RT-PCR to detect and differentiate grapevine leafroll-associated associated virus 3 variant groups I, II, III and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Rachelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3 is the main contributing agent of leafroll disease worldwide. Four of the six GLRaV-3 variant groups known have been found in South Africa, but their individual contribution to leafroll disease is unknown. In order to study the pathogenesis of leafroll disease, a sensitive and accurate diagnostic assay is required that can detect different variant groups of GLRaV-3. Methods In this study, a one-step real-time RT-PCR, followed by high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and identification of GLRaV-3 variants of groups I, II, III and VI, was developed. A melting point confidence interval for each variant group was calculated to include at least 90% of all melting points observed. A multiplex RT-PCR protocol was developed to these four variant groups in order to assess the efficacy of the real-time RT-PCR HRM assay. Results A universal primer set for GLRaV-3 targeting the heat shock protein 70 homologue (Hsp70h gene of GLRaV-3 was designed that is able to detect GLRaV-3 variant groups I, II, III and VI and differentiate between them with high-resolution melting curve analysis. The real-time RT-PCR HRM and the multiplex RT-PCR were optimized using 121 GLRaV-3 positive samples. Due to a considerable variation in melting profile observed within each GLRaV-3 group, a confidence interval of above 90% was calculated for each variant group, based on the range and distribution of melting points. The intervals of groups I and II could not be distinguished and a 95% joint confidence interval was calculated for simultaneous detection of group I and II variants. An additional primer pair targeting GLRaV-3 ORF1a was developed that can be used in a subsequent real-time RT-PCR HRM to differentiate between variants of groups I and II. Additionally, the multiplex RT-PCR successfully validated 94.64% of the infections detected with the real-time RT-PCR HRM

  11. Robust multi-atlas label propagation by deep sparse representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Chen; Wang, Zhengxia; Zhang, Daoqiang; Liang, Peipeng; Shi, Yonghong; Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong

    2017-03-01

    Recently, multi-atlas patch-based label fusion has achieved many successes in medical imaging area. The basic assumption in the current state-of-the-art approaches is that the image patch at the target image point can be represented by a patch dictionary consisting of atlas patches from registered atlas images. Therefore, the label at the target image point can be determined by fusing labels of atlas image patches with similar anatomical structures. However, such assumption on image patch representation does not always hold in label fusion since (1) the image content within the patch may be corrupted due to noise and artifact; and (2) the distribution of morphometric patterns among atlas patches might be unbalanced such that the majority patterns can dominate label fusion result over other minority patterns. The violation of the above basic assumptions could significantly undermine the label fusion accuracy. To overcome these issues, we first consider forming label-specific group for the atlas patches with the same label. Then, we alter the conventional flat and shallow dictionary to a deep multi-layer structure, where the top layer (label-specific dictionaries) consists of groups of representative atlas patches and the subsequent layers (residual dictionaries) hierarchically encode the patchwise residual information in different scales. Thus, the label fusion follows the representation consensus across representative dictionaries. However, the representation of target patch in each group is iteratively optimized by using the representative atlas patches in each label-specific dictionary exclusively to match the principal patterns and also using all residual patterns across groups collaboratively to overcome the issue that some groups might be absent of certain variation patterns presented in the target image patch. Promising segmentation results have been achieved in labeling hippocampus on ADNI dataset, as well as basal ganglia and brainstem structures, compared

  12. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sports show highlighting the importance of using the nutrition facts label to control portions, fat, calories and percent daily value. Two studio "sports announcers" describe the "game day" food action of ...

  13. FDA Online Label Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The drug labels and other drug-specific information on this Web site represent the most recent drug listing information companies have submitted to the Food and Drug...

  14. Figuring Out Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually appears on the back or side of packaging under the title "Nutrition Facts." It's also displayed in grocery stores near fresh foods, like fruits, vegetables, and fish. The nutrition facts label includes: a column of ...

  15. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use the Nutrition Facts Label to make informed food choices. You can view the new video in its ... two sites, comparing serving sizes, ingredients and overall food choices in this "Battle of the Dueling Dinner Parties". ...

  16. Behind the Label "Alcoholic."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Deborah M.

    1989-01-01

    Relates individual's personal story of her childhood influenced by her parent's alcoholism, her own alcoholism as a young adult, and her experiences with counseling. Asks others not to reject her because of the label "alcoholic." (ABL)

  17. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main page content Skip to search Skip to topics menu Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department ... a contestant in food label knowledge. Questions cover topics such as Calories, Serving Size, Servings per Container, ...

  18. Chemical kin label in seabirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Célérier, Aurélie; Bon, Cécile; Malapert, Aurore; Palmas, Pauline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Chemical signals yield critical socio-ecological information in many animals, such as species, identity, social status or sex, but have been poorly investigated in birds. Recent results showed that chemical signals are used to recognize their nest and partner by some petrel seabirds whose olfactory anatomy is well developed and which possess a life-history propitious to olfactory-mediated behaviours. Here, we investigate whether blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) produce some chemical labels potentially involved in kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance. To overcome methodological constraints of chemical analysis and field behavioural experiments, we used an indirect behavioural approach, based on mice olfactory abilities in discriminating odours. We showed that mice (i) can detect odour differences between individual petrels, (ii) perceive a high odour similarity between a chick and its parents, and (iii) perceive this similarity only before fledging but not during the nestling developmental stage. Our results confirm the existence of an individual olfactory signature in blue petrels and show for the first time, to our knowledge, that birds may exhibit an olfactory kin label, which may have strong implications for inbreeding avoidance. PMID:21525047

  19. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Cu(II) complexes of 2-substituted tropones bearing a ferrocenyl group at 5-position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinaga, Tohru; Aono, Tomoshi; Isomura, Eigo; Watanabe, Sayaka; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Akira; Enoki, Toshiaki; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Otani, Hiroyuki; Iyoda, Masahiko

    2010-03-07

    Heterotrinuclear Fe(II)-Cu(II)-Fe(II) complexes [Cu(FcTropOMe)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](OTf)(2) (FcTropOMe = 5-ferrocenyl-2-methoxytropone) (1), [Cu(FcTropNEt(2))(2)](OTf)(2) (FcTropNEt(2) = 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-5-ferrocenyltropone) (2) and [Cu(FcTropNEt)(2)] (FcTropNEt = 2-(N-ethylamino)-5-ferrocenyltroponate) (3) were synthesized. In addition, a hexafluorophosphate salt of heterotrinuclear Fe(III)-Cu(II)-Fe(III) complex [Cu(FcTropNEt)(2)](2+) (3(2+)) was successfully obtained as single crystals by electrochemical oxidation of 3. By comparing the X-ray structures and absorption spectra of dicationic complexes 1 and 2, the 2-(diethylamino)tropone ligand was found to induce a greater intramolecular charge transfer (CT) from ferrocenyl to tropone-Cu(II) moieties than the 2-methoxytropone ligand. On the other hand, 3(2+) showed a broad CT band in the near-infrared (NIR) region similar to 2, which can be assigned to a transition from troponato-Cu(II) to ferrocenium moieties. As for the magnetic properties of 3(2+)(PF(6)(-))(2), measurements of temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility and ESR on the solid state and in solution revealed the presence of a strong ferromagnetic interaction (J(Fe-Cu) = +12.0 cm(-1)) between the low spin Fe(III) ion with S = 1/2 and Cu(II) ion with S = 1/2 despite a long distance pathway via the aminotroponato and cyclopentadienyl moieties. DFT calculations supported this intramolecular ferromagnetism, which is induced by a spin polarization mechanism through the pi-spacers.

  20. Phase II trial of the combination of bryostatin-1 and cisplatin in advanced or recurrent carcinoma of the cervix: a New York Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhat, Farr; Wadler, Scott; Muggia, Franco; Mandeli, John; Goldberg, Gary; Rahaman, Jamal; Runowicz, Carolyn; Murgo, Anthony J; Gardner, Ginger J

    2004-04-01

    Bryostatin-1 is a macrocyclic lactone that has been shown to regulate protein kinase C (PKC) activity and thereby potentially inhibit tumor invasion, angiogenesis, cell adhesion, and multidrug resistance. In preclinical experiments, bryostatin-1 induces tumor growth inhibition and enhances cytotoxicity when combined with other agents including cisplatin in cervical cancer cells. It was therefore anticipated that combination bryostatin-1-cisplatin therapy would be effective in patients with cervical cancer. The current study was conducted to evaluate this therapeutic approach in patients with recurrent or advanced-stage cervical carcinoma. An IRB-approved New York Gynecologic Oncology Group (NYGOG) trial was activated for patients with a histological diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer or in patients with recurrent disease not eligible for surgery or radiation. Enrolled patients received bryostatin-1 (50-65 microg/m(2)) as a 1-h infusion followed by cisplatin (50 mg/m(2)). The combined treatment was administered every 21 days. Fourteen patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had squamous cell carcinoma. Ten out of fourteen patients had recurrent disease. Fifty percent of the patients received bryostatin at 50 microg/m(2) and 50% received bryostatin at 65 microg/m(2). Seventy-one percent completed two cycles of treatment. The most common grade II-III toxicities were myalgia, anemia, and nausea or vomiting. One patient developed a hypersensitivity reaction and one developed grade III nephrotoxicity. Seventy-one percent (10/14) of patients were evaluated for tumor response. Eight out of ten (80%) of patients had progressive disease and 2/10 (20%) had stable disease. There were no treatment responses. Despite promising preclinical data, this clinical trial indicates that the combination of cisplatin and bryostatin-1 at the doses and schedule used is not effective in patients with advanced-stage or recurrent cervical cancer. There is even the possibility of

  1. Toward comprehensive management tailored to prognostic factors of patients with clinical stages I and II in Hodgkin's disease. The EORTC Lymphoma Group controlled clinical trials: 1964-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, M; Henry-Amar, M; Carde, P; Burgers, J M; Hayat, M; Van der Schueren, E; Noordijk, E M; Tanguy, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Thomas, J

    1989-01-01

    From 1964 to 1987, the EORTC Lymphoma Group conducted four consecutive controlled clinical trials on clinical stages I and II Hodgkin's disease in which 1,579 patients were entered. From the onset the main aim of these trials was to identify the subsets of patients who could be treated safely by regional radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, several prognostic indicators were prospectively registered and progressively used in the trial protocols for the delineation of the favorable and unfavorable subgroups as soon as they were recognized of high predictive value. In the H2 trial (1972 to 1976), the histologic subtype was the only variable taken into account for the therapeutic strategy and the staging laparotomy findings were found to be of prognostic value only in patients with favorable prognostic indicators. In the H5 trial (1977 to 1982), patients were subdivided into two subgroups according to six prognostic indicators. Patients with favorable features were submitted to a staging laparotomy (lap); lap negative patients were randomized between mantle field RT and mantle field plus paraaortic RT. Disease free survival (DFS) and total survival (S) were similar in the two arms. Among patients with unfavorable features, DFS and S were significantly higher in the arm treated by combination of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone (MOPP) chemotherapy (CT) and RT than in the arm treated by total nodal irradiation. Nevertheless, in patients below the age of 40, the overall survival rates were equivalent in the two arms. In the H6 trial, the delineation of the favorable subgroup was based on (a) absence of systemic symptoms and elevated ESR, (b) no more than one or two lymph node areas involved. The aim of the study was to assess the impact on survival of a therapeutic strategy including staging laparotomy. At a 4-year follow-up, no difference in survival was evidenced. In patients with unfavorable prognostic indicators, 3 MOPP-RT-3 MOPP were compared with 3

  2. Induction of apoptosis in leukemia cell lines by new copper(II) complexes containing naphthyl groups via interaction with death receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Lopes, Bruna F; Bull, Erika S; Azeredo, Nathália F B; Kanashiro, Milton M; Borges, Franz V; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Pires, Anderson B; Franco, Roberto W A; Almeida, João Carlos de A; Maciel, Leide L F; Resende, Jackson A L C; Schenk, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and cytotoxicity of four new ligands and their respective copper(II) complexes toward two human leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and U937) are reported (i.e. [(HL1)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL1)]Cl2·H2O (1), [(H2L2)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L2)]Cl2·5H2O (2), [(HL3)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL3)]Cl2·4H2O (3), [(H2L4)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L4)]Cl2·6H2O (4)). Ligands HL1 and HL3 contain two pyridines, amine and alcohol moieties with a naphthyl pendant unit yielding a N3O coordination metal environment. Ligands H2L2 and H2L4 have pyridine, phenol, amine and alcohol groups with a naphthyl pendant unit providing a N2O2 coordination metal environment. These compounds are likely to be dinuclear in the solid state but form mononuclear species in solution. The complexes have an antiproliferative effect against both leukemia cell lines; complex (2) exhibits higher activity than cisplatin against U937 (8.20 vs 16.25μmoldm(-3)) and a comparable one against THP-1. These human neoplastic cells are also more susceptible than peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) toward the tested compounds. Using C57BL/6 mice an LD50 of 55mgkg(-1) was determined for complex (2), suggesting that this compound is almost four times less toxic than cisplatin (LD50=14.5mgkg(-1)). The mechanism of cell death promoted by ligand H2L2 and by complexes (2) and (4) was investigated by a range of techniques demonstrating that the apoptosis signal triggered at least by complex (2) starts from an extrinsic pathway involving the activation of caspases 4 and 8. This signal is amplified by mitochondria with the concomitant release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase 9.

  3. On label graphoidal covering number-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugaperumal Anitha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Let G = (V,E be a graph with p vertices and q edges. An acyclicgraphoidal cover of G is a collection of paths in G which are internallydisjointand covering each edge of the graph exactly once. Let f : V !{1, 2, . . . , p} be a bijective labeling of the vertices of G. Let " Gf bethe directed graph obtained by orienting the edges uv of G from u tov provided f(u < f(v. If the set f of all maximal directed paths in"Gf , with directions ignored, is an acyclic graphoidal cover of G, then fis called a graphoidal labeling of G and G is called a label graphoidal graphand l = min{| f | : f is a graphoidal labeling of G} is called the labelgraphoidal covering number of G. In this paper we characterize graphsfor which (i l = q − m, where m is the number of vertices of degree 2and (ii l = q. Also, we determine the value of label graphoidal coveringnumber for unicyclic graphs.

  4. Quantum dot labeling of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cascio Wayne E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle cells and are being investigated for their utility in cell-based transplantation therapy. Yet, adequate methods to track transplanted MSCs in vivo are limited, precluding functional studies. Quantum Dots (QDs offer an alternative to organic dyes and fluorescent proteins to label and track cells in vitro and in vivo. These nanoparticles are resistant to chemical and metabolic degradation, demonstrating long term photostability. Here, we investigate the cytotoxic effects of in vitro QD labeling on MSC proliferation and differentiation and use as a cell label in a cardiomyocyte co-culture. Results A dose-response to QDs in rat bone marrow MSCs was assessed in Control (no-QDs, Low concentration (LC, 5 nmol/L and High concentration (HC, 20 nmol/L groups. QD yield and retention, MSC survival, proinflammatory cytokines, proliferation and DNA damage were evaluated in MSCs, 24 -120 hrs post QD labeling. In addition, functional integration of QD labeled MSCs in an in vitro cardiomyocyte co-culture was assessed. A dose-dependent effect was measured with increased yield in HC vs. LC labeled MSCs (93 ± 3% vs. 50% ± 15%, p 90% of QD labeled cells were viable in all groups, however, at 120 hrs increased apoptosis was measured in HC vs. Control MSCs (7.2% ± 2.7% vs. 0.5% ± 0.4%, p Conclusion Fluorescent QDs label MSC effectively in an in vitro co-culture model. QDs are easy to use, show a high yield and survival rate with minimal cytotoxic effects. Dose-dependent effects suggest limiting MSC QD exposure.

  5. Affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness for public speaking anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Craske, Michelle G; Lieberman, Matthew D; Hur, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Exposure is an effective treatment for anxiety but many patients do not respond fully. Affect labeling (labeling emotional experience) attenuates emotional responding. The current project examined whether affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness in participants with public speaking anxiety. Participants were randomized to exposure with or without affect labeling. Physiological arousal and self-reported fear were assessed before and after exposure and compared between groups. Consistent with hypotheses, participants assigned to Affect Labeling, especially those who used more labels during exposure, showed greater reduction in physiological activation than Control participants. No effect was found for self-report measures. Also, greater emotion regulation deficits at baseline predicted more benefit in physiological arousal from exposure combined with affect labeling than exposure alone. The current research provides evidence that behavioral strategies that target prefrontal-amygdala circuitry can improve treatment effectiveness for anxiety and these effects are particularly pronounced for patients with the greatest deficits in emotion regulation.

  6. Rapid diagnosis of occult abscesses using sup 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coons, T.A.; Rhodes, B.A. (RhoMed, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Thakur, M.L. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Marcus, C.S. (Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (USA)); Ballou, B. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Acute infections, such as appendicitis and occult infections in AIDS patients, can be diagnosed within two hours by gamma scintigraphy after i.v. administration of {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibodies reactive with human granulocytes. The antibody, murine IgM anti-SSEA-1, is partially reduced using Sn(II) to expose and protect reactive sulfide groups. The antibody is then purified, stannous tartrate and stabilizers are added, and the mixture is lyophilized. To label, sodium pertechnetate is added. After a 15 minute incubation the tracer drug is injected. The rate of accumulation and degree of concentration at the site of infection is presumptively determinative of the severity of the infection. Acceptance criteria and tests for the {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibody product have been established and validated. Greater than 93% of the {sup 99m}Tc is firmly bound to the protein as determined by quantitative HPLC. Radiochemical impurities, colloidal {sup 99m}Tc and free pertechnetate are together less than 4% as determined by thin layer chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction, measured by binding to solid phase antigen, and affinity measured be ELISA, are unchanged by the {sup 99m}Tc-direct labeling process. Two hour blood clearance in rats is within 90% of the value of the {sup 125}I labeled analog. The immunoreactive fraction decreases less than 10% when incubated in human plasma for 24 hours. This method has been compared to other direct labeling methods, and found to give higher radiochemical yields. 5 figs.

  7. European consumers and nutrition labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling of food in Europe is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made for the product. The European Commission is proposing mandatory nutrition labelling, even front of pack labelling with nutrition information. Yet, how widespread is nutrition labelling in the EU...

  8. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoill...

  9. European consumers and nutrition labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling of food in Europe is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made for the product. The European Commission is proposing mandatory nutrition labelling, even front of pack labelling with nutrition information. Yet, how widespread is nutrition labelling in the EU...

  10. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoille...... variants such as, for example, small distances in trees [Alstrup et al., SODA, 2003]. We improve the known upper and lower bounds of exact distance labeling by showing that 1/4 log2(n) bits are needed and that 1/2 log2(n) bits are sufficient. We also give (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes using Theta......(log(n)) bits for constant ε> 0. (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes with polylogarithmic label size have previously been established for doubling dimension graphs by Talwar [Talwar, STOC, 2004]. In addition, we present matching upper and lower bounds for distance labeling for caterpillars, showing that labels...

  11. Comparison of the active sites of atropinesterase and some serine proteases by spin-labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Drift, A C; Moes, G W; van der Drift, E; Rousseeuw, B A

    1985-09-24

    The side chain of the serine residue in the active center of atropinesterase (AtrE), alpha-chymotrypsin (Chymo), and subtilisin A (Sub) was labeled with two paramagnetic reporter groups of different size (label I or II, respectively) by sulfonylation with N-[3-(fluorosulfonyl)phenyl]-1-oxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrroline-3 -carboxamide or N-[6-(fluorosulfonyl)-2-naphthyl]-1-oxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrroline+ ++-3 -carboxamide. ESR spectra of labeled enzymes in 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, were measured at temperatures between 133 and 298 K by using a home-built spectrometer operating in the absorption mode at 10-kHz field modulation. The spectra, in particular those at 276-298 K, were analyzed by computer simulation of the overall line shape according to the methods developed by Freed and co-workers, based on eigenfunction expansion. In the case of AtrE for both labels, the best agreement between experimental and simulated solution spectra was obtained with only one mobility component showing anisotropic, axially symmetric reorientation according to the Egelstaff jump-diffusion model. The axis of preferential reorientation was found to lie in the XZ plane at a polar angle of about 30 degrees with the X axis. The corresponding rotational correlation time (tau parallel) did not show appreciable viscosity/temperature (eta/T) dependence but had a constant value of 4.4 and 2.2 ns for labels I and II, respectively. The rotational correlation time associated with rotation around the axes perpendicular to that of preferential reorientation (tau perpendicular) showed the usual eta/T dependence and had a value of 22.0 ns at 276 K for both labels. The above results strongly suggest that in AtrE both nonpolar reporter groups reside in a pocket near the active serine. Contrary to the situation in AtrE, the overall mobility of the -N-O. fragments in Chymo and Sub was found to result from contributions of at least two distinct motional states, strongly and weakly immobilized. In

  12. Synthesis, structural elucidation and carbon dioxide adsorption on Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate (II) Prussian blue analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lugo, F.; Polanco, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the course of the last years hexacyanoferrates have been widely studied; even though, the adsorption properties of Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II) (labelled here Zn-HII) have not been thoroughly considered. In addition, soft porous crystals, i.e., adsorbents that display structural flexibility have been, as well, extensively studied, however this property has not been reported for Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II). In this regard, the key questions addressed here were the synthesis and structural characterization of Zn-HII together with the investigation of their low (up to 1 bar) and high pressure (up to 30 bar) adsorption properties, to found if these materials show structural flexibility. Then, to attain the anticipated goals, structural characterizations were made with: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), simultaneously, with the investigation of the adsorption of carbon dioxide. As a result of the research process we concluded that the Zn-HII displayed Fm barm space group framework. Besides, the carbon dioxide adsorption investigation demonstrated the presence of the framework expansion effect together with an extremely high adsorption heat, properties that could be useful for the use of Zn(II) hexacyanoferrate(II) as an excellent adsorbent.

  13. Understanding the role of the flexible bridging linker through kinetics and mechanistic study of Pt(II) amphiphiles derived from a bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine chelate head group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambanda, Allen; Jaganyi, Deogratius

    2011-01-07

    The substitution of aqua ligands of mononuclear Pt(II) complexes of the general form [Pt(H(2)O)(N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N(CH(2))(n)-CH(3); -NC(CH(3))(3); -NH](CF(3)SO(3))(2), n = 1 (bpea); 2 (bppa); 3 (bpba); 5 (bpha), 9 (bpda) -NC(CH(3))(3) (bpbta) and -NH (bpma) by thiourea nucleophiles was investigated under pseudo first-order conditions as a function of concentration and temperature using the stopped-flow technique and UV-vis spectroscopy. The substitution reactions occur via two separate reaction steps, each fitting to a single exponential curve. In the two reaction steps, the thiourea nucleophiles first substitute the coordinated aqua ligand followed by ring opening via dechelation of one of the pyridyl units. The mode of activation for both steps remains associative in nature and the observed rate constants can be fitted to the equation k(obs(1st/2nd)) = k(2(1st/2nd))[Nu]. Appending a primary alkyl hydrocarbon group on the trans-N donor atom of the chelate head group marginally increases the rate of substitution of the aqua leaving group due to the weaker trans-influence of its alkyl amine donor group. However, when a tert-butyl group is the pendant group, reactivity increases by a factor of about two, reiterating the inductive nature of the flow of electron density from the tailing groups towards the Pt(II) metal centres. A comparison of the reactivities of the studied complexes with their dinuclear analogues bridged by alkyl diamines has demonstrated that the electronic effect of the alkyl diamine bridge on the overall reactivity of the multinuclear Pt(II) complexes is weak and insignificant when compared to steric effects due to the constraining bridge.

  14. Semantic Role Labeling

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Martha; Xue, Nianwen

    2011-01-01

    This book is aimed at providing an overview of several aspects of semantic role labeling. Chapter 1 begins with linguistic background on the definition of semantic roles and the controversies surrounding them. Chapter 2 describes how the theories have led to structured lexicons such as FrameNet, VerbNet and the PropBank Frame Files that in turn provide the basis for large scale semantic annotation of corpora. This data has facilitated the development of automatic semantic role labeling systems based on supervised machine learning techniques. Chapter 3 presents the general principles of applyin

  15. Labeling of Patient Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    noted during the event that the actu.al number of near miss incidmts reported monthly was low due to laboratory personnel performing rounds each...specimens never leaves label and if moved it is labeled), All orders in system and all near misses and errors reported to patient safety Purchase/Install...Meeting 14 Aug 09, 1400 in lab break room thru out Develop TICK sheet to track near misses .JDI Ms. Clark Clinics will provide toPS 1st working day of

  16. The prognostic value of polycomb group protein B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 in stage II colon cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken L. M.; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1) protein expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in a retrospective patient...... cohort consisting of 144 stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 expression at the invasive front of the primary tumors correlated with mismatch repair status of the tumors. Furthermore, BMI1 expression at the luminal surface correlated with T-stage, tumor location, and the histological subtypes....... Likewise, there was no association between 5-year overall survival and BMI1 expression at the invasive front (HR: 1.12; 95% CI 0.80–1.56; p = 0.46) or at the luminal surface of the tumor (HR: 1.16; 95% CI 0.86–1.60; p = 0.33). In conclusion, BMI1 expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer...

  17. Labelled Execution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    This is most starkly evident in the classical example used to demonstrate that, in the case of infinitely branching systems, a transfinite number of... transfinite number of iterations to converge, what can be shown to fail by appropriately embedding the labelled transition systems of [46, prop. 10.5

  18. Waisda?: video labeling game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrand, M.; Brinkerink, M.; Gligorov, R.; Steenbergen, M. van; Huijkman, J.; Oomen, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Waisda? video labeling game is a crowsourcing tool to collect user-generated metadata for video clips. It follows the paradigm of games-with-a-purpose, where two or more users play against each other by entering tags that describe the content of the video. Players score points by entering the sa

  19. Multi-label

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Abdelhamid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Generating multi-label rules in associative classification (AC from single label data sets is considered a challenging task making the number of existing algorithms for this task rare. Current AC algorithms produce only the largest frequency class connected with a rule in the training data set and discard all other classes even though these classes have data representation with the rule’s body. In this paper, we deal with the above problem by proposing an AC algorithm called Enhanced Multi-label Classifiers based Associative Classification (eMCAC. This algorithm discovers rules associated with a set of classes from single label data that other current AC algorithms are unable to induce. Furthermore, eMCAC minimises the number of extracted rules using a classifier building method. The proposed algorithm has been tested on a real world application data set related to website phishing and the results reveal that eMCAC’s accuracy is highly competitive if contrasted with other known AC and classic classification algorithms in data mining. Lastly, the experimental results show that our algorithm is able to derive new rules from the phishing data sets that end-users can exploit in decision making.

  20. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Label and You — Video Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print NOTE: FDA has issued final changes ... choices. You can view the new video in its entirety or select on any of the individual ...

  1. Site-Specific Chemical Labeling of Long RNA Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Kasper; Olsen, Eva Maria; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of RNA molecules is a valuable tool for studying their structure and function. Here, we describe a new site-specific RNA labeling method, which utilizes a DNA-templated chemical reaction to attach a label at a specific internal nucleotide in an RNA molecule. The method...... is nonenzymatic and based on the formation of a four-way junction, where a donor strand is chemically coupled to an acceptor strand at a specific position via an activated chemical group. A disulfide bond in the linker is subsequently cleaved under mild conditions leaving a thiol group attached to the acceptor-RNA...... strand. The site-specific thiol-modified target RNA can then be chemically labeled with an optional group, here demonstrated by coupling of a maleimide-functionalized fluorophore. The method is rapid and allows site specific labeling of both in vitro and in vivo synthesized RNA with a broad range...

  2. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  3. Synthesis of pentamidine labelled with tritium and carbon-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesk, D.; Jones, J.R. (Surrey Univ., Guildford (UK). Dept. of Chemistry); Lockley, W.J.S.; Wilkinson, D.J. (Fisons plc, Loughborough (UK). Pharmaceutical Div.)

    1990-11-01

    Tritium labelled pentamidine has been prepared with a specific activity of 90 mCi mmol{sup -1} using a one-step exchange reaction between the unlabelled drug and tritiated water. The labelling utilised a homogeneous rhodium trichloride catalyst and yielded pentamidine regiospecifically labelled in the positions ortho to the amidine groups. Carbon-14 labelled pentamidine was prepared via a seven-step procedure in which the isotope was introduced via a nucleophilic substitution of 4-bromo-phenol with copper(I) ({sup 14}C)cyanide. (author).

  4. Health Labeling, and Consumption- Understanding Determinants To Health Label Use.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, David; Dossing, Jens; Zhuravleva, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Consumer behavior was explored through the understanding, and use of health labeling. Government and business forces were discovered to influence the ability of consumers to use health labels for improved health and life expectancy, and reduce the negative health care costs of food related diseases. Our survey results were compared to other papers and experiments in the field of consumption and labeling. We discovered high usage of labels, especially nutrition information, and a desire for fr...

  5. Consumer interest in fish information and labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieniak, Zuzanna; Verbeke, Wim; Vermeir, Iris

    2007-01-01

    mandatory information cues on fish labels, they express doubts whether information provided on the labels can be trusted. People who are more experienced and have higher familiarity with fish, seem to be more efficient in searching and using information. Instead of providing one message for the consumers...... of information cues with regard to fish. Qualitative exploratory research was performed in May 2004 through focus group discussions in two European countries: Belgium and Spain. Personal sources are found as the most important information sources with regard to fish. Although a majority of consumers use...

  6. Facial age estimation by learning from label distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xin; Yin, Chao; Zhou, Zhi-Hua

    2013-10-01

    One of the main difficulties in facial age estimation is that the learning algorithms cannot expect sufficient and complete training data. Fortunately, the faces at close ages look quite similar since aging is a slow and smooth process. Inspired by this observation, instead of considering each face image as an instance with one label (age), this paper regards each face image as an instance associated with a label distribution. The label distribution covers a certain number of class labels, representing the degree that each label describes the instance. Through this way, one face image can contribute to not only the learning of its chronological age, but also the learning of its adjacent ages. Two algorithms, named IIS-LLD and CPNN, are proposed to learn from such label distributions. Experimental results on two aging face databases show remarkable advantages of the proposed label distribution learning algorithms over the compared single-label learning algorithms, either specially designed for age estimation or for general purpose.

  7. Measuring disability across cultures — the psychometric properties of the WHODAS II in older people from seven low- and middle-income countries. The 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Renata M; Dewey, Michael E; Acosta, Daisy; Jotheeswaran, AT; Castro-Costa, Erico; Ferri, Cleusa P; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, KS; Pichardo, Juana Guillermina Rodriguez; Ramírez, Nayeli Garcia; Rodriguez, Juan Llibre; Rodriguez, Marina Calvo; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph; Prince, Martin J

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the 12-item interviewer-administered screener version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule – version II (WHODAS II) among older people living in seven low- and middle-income countries. Principal component analysis (PCA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Mokken analyses were carried out to test for unidimensionality, hierarchical structure, and measurement invariance across 10/66 Dementia Research Group sites. PCA generated a one-factor solution in most sites. In CFA, the two-factor solution generated in Dominican Republic fitted better for all sites other than rural China. The two factors were not easily interpretable, and may have been an artefact of differing item difficulties. Strong internal consistency and high factor loadings for the one-factor solution supported unidimensionality. Furthermore, the WHODAS II was found to be a ‘strong’ Mokken scale. Measurement invariance was supported by the similarity of factor loadings across sites, and by the high between-site correlations in item difficulties. The Mokken results strongly support that the WHODAS II 12-item screener is a unidimensional and hierarchical scale confirming to item response theory (IRT) principles, at least at the monotone homogeneity model level. More work is needed to assess the generalizability of our findings to different populations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:20104493

  8. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  9. A revision of the Crane-fly genus Nephrotoma Meigen, 1803, in North America (Diptera, Tipulidae). Part II: the non-dorsalis species-groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbroek, Pjotr

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen nearctic species of Nephrotoma are revised. They are assigned to seven species-groups. Together with the 20 species of the dorsalis-group (Tangelder, 1983), this covers all the nearctic Nephrotoma species. Presented here for every species are: literature, type-material, synonyms,

  10. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  11. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer. A Phase I–II Multicenter Study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Tesselaar, Margot E.; Cats, Annemieke; Havenga, Klaas; Leer, Jan W. H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.; Jansen, Edwin P.; Van Krieken, Han H. J. M.; Wiggers, Theo; Van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2007-01-01

    Background We studied the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of oxaliplatin added to capecitabine and radiotherapy (Capox-RT) as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Methods T3-4 rectal cancer patients received escalating doses of oxaliplatin (day 1 and 29) with a fixed dose of capecitabine of 1000 mg/m2 twice daily (days 1–14, 25–38) added to RT with 50.4 Gy and surgery after 6–8 weeks. The MTD, determined during phase I, was used in the subsequent phase II, in which R0 resection rate (a negative circumferential resection margin) was the primary end point. Results Twenty-one patients were evaluable. In the phase I part, oxaliplatin at 85 mg/m2 was established as MTD. In phase II, the main toxicity was grade III diarrhea (18%). All patients underwent surgery, and 20 patients had a resectable tumor. An R0 was achieved in 17/21 patients, downstaging to T0-2 in 7/21 and a pCR in 2/21. Conclusion Combination of Capox-RT has an acceptable acute toxicity profile and a high R0 resection rate of 81% in locally advanced rectal cancer. However the pCR rate was low. PMID:17653805

  12. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  13. Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved Using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry; Morrow, Melanie; Davis, Thomas; Borger, Sarah; Weiss, Jennifer; DeCoster, Mary; Ricca, Jim; Ernst, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    The Care Group approach, described in detail in a companion paper in this journal, uses volunteers to convey health promotion messages to their neighbors. This article summarizes the available evidence on the effectiveness of the Care Group approach, drawing on articles published in the peer-reviewed literature as well as data from unpublished but publicly available project evaluations and summary analyses of these evaluations. When implemented by strong international NGOs with adequate funding, Care Groups have been remarkably effective in increasing population coverage of key child survival interventions. There is strong evidence that Care Groups can reduce childhood undernutrition and reduce the prevalence of diarrhea. Finally, evidence from multiple sources, comprising independent assessments of mortality impact, vital events collected by Care Group Volunteers themselves, and analyses using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST), that Care Groups are effective in reducing under-5 mortality. For example, the average decline in under-5 mortality, estimated using LiST, among 8 Care Group projects was 32%. In comparison, among 12 non-Care Group child survival projects, the under-5 mortality declined, on average, by an estimated 11%. Care Group projects cost in the range of US$3-$8 per beneficiary per year. The cost per life saved is in the range of $441-$3,773, and the cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted is in the range of $15-$126. The Care Group approach, when implemented as described, appears to be highly cost-effective based on internationally accepted criteria. Care Groups represent an important and promising innovative, low-cost approach to increasing the coverage of key child survival interventions in high-mortality, resource-constrained settings. Next steps include further specifying the adjustments needed in government health systems to successfully incorporate the Care Group approach, testing the feasibility of these adjustments and of the

  14. Icariside II ameliorates diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian W

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wenjie Tian,1,2,* Hongen Lei,1,* Ruili Guan,1 Yongde Xu,1 Huixi Li,1 Lin Wang,1 Bicheng Yang,1 Zhezhu Gao,1 Zhongcheng Xin1 1Andrology Center, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, 2Department of Urology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the therapeutic effects and potential mechanisms of icariside II (ICA II on reversing diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin (STZ-induced type I diabetic rats.Methods: Newborn male Sprague Dawley rats were labeled with thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU for tracking endogenous label retaining progenitor cells (LRCs. At age of 8 weeks, 48 rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control group (n=16, diabetes mellitus group (DM; n=16, and diabetes mellitus plus ICA II therapy group (DM+ICA II, n=16. Eight weeks induced for diabetes with STZ, rats in DM group and DM+ICA II group were treated with vehicle or ICA II (5 mg/kg/day for another 8 weeks, respectively. Then, blood creatinine, 24-hour urine protein, blood urea nitrogen, and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured, as well as the expression of von Willebrand factor, malondialdehyde, transforming growth factor-β/drosophila mothers against decapentaplegic protein/connective tissue growth factor (TGF-β/Smad/CTGF signaling, marker of proliferation Ki-67, and EdU+ LRCs in renal tissues.Results: Increased levels of creatinine, 24-hour urine protein, and blood urea nitrogen and remarkably decreased proportion of normal glomeruli and increased proportions of I, IIa, IIb, and III glomeruli were observed in diabetic rats, while ICA II could reverse these changes. Interestingly, ICA II could significantly downregulate the levels of malondialdehyde and TGF-β/Smad/CTGF signaling and increase the expression of von Willebrand factor, Ki-67, and EdU+ LRCs in the kidney.Conclusion: ICA

  15. The X-Ray Zurich Environmental Study (X-ZENS). II. X-ray Observations of the Diffuse Intragroup Medium in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Miniati, Francesco; Silverman, John D; Carollo, Marcella; Cibinel, Anna; Lilly, Simon J; Schawinski, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a pilot XMM-$Newton$ and $Chandra$ program aimed at studying the diffuse intragroup medium (DIM) of optically-selected nearby groups from the Zurinch ENvironmental Study (ZENS) catalog. The groups are in a narrow mass range about $10^{13}M_\\odot$, a mass scale at which the interplay between the DIM and the group member galaxies is still largely unprobed. X-ray emission from the DIM is detected in the energy band 0.5--2 keV with flux $\\le 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-1}$ s$^{-1}$, which is one order of magnitude fainter than for typical ROSAT groups (RASS). For many groups we set upper limits to the X-ray luminosity, indicating that the detections are likely probing the upper envelope of the X-ray emitting groups. We find evidence for our optically selected groups to be under-luminous with respect to predictions from X-ray scaling relations. X-ray mass determinations are in best agreement with those based on the member galaxies bulge luminosity, followed by their total optical luminosity and v...

  16. Labelling GM-free Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Punt, Maarten; Venus, Thomas; Wesseler, Justus

    2016-01-01

    Food suppliers in the EU must comply with labelling regulations for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). However, excluded from mandatory labelling are food products derived from animals fed with GM feed (mainly GM soybean in the EU). Because of this labelling exemption, consumers are unable to...

  17. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  18. Modeling the effects of labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Fjord, Thomas Ahle; Poulsen, Carsten Stig

    A new approach to evaluate the consequences of labeling is presented and applied to test the potential effect of a label on fresh fish. Labeling effects on quality perceptions and overall quality are studied. The empirical study is based on an experimental design and nearly 500 respondents...

  19. Scaffolding Visitors' Learning through Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joyce; Yoon, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In museum literature, labels have been found to increase visitor learning and contribute to greater cognitive gains. In this study, we seek to understand how various labels support the visitors' learning experience, and specifically in regards to conceptual and cognitive learning. We investigated the increasing use of three types of labels (visual…

  20. Improved blood compatibility of segmented polyurethane by polymeric additives having phospholipid polar group. II. Dispersion state of the polymeric additive and protein adsorption on the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, K; Shibata, N; Tanaka, S; Iwasaki, Y; Kurosaki, T; Nakabayashi, N

    1996-11-01

    To improve the blood compatibility of a segmented polyurethane (SPU), phospholipid polymer, i.e., 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) copolymerized with cyclohexyl methacrylate or 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate, was blended into SPU as a polymeric additive. The blending was achieved by a solvent-evaporation technique from a homogeneous solution containing both the SPU and the MPC polymer. Surface analysis of the SPU membrane blended with the MPC polymer (SPU/MPC polymer membrane) revealed that the MPC polymer was concentrated at the surface of the SPU membrane which contacted the substrate, Teflon, compared with that which contacted air during the membrane-formation period. The dispersion state of the MPC polymer in the SPU membrane was evaluated in detail by staining the MPC unit with osmium tetraoxide. When sonication was applied during preparation of the mixed solution containing SPU and the MPC polymer, the dispersion of the MPC polymer in the SPU membrane was different from that without sonication. That is, the size of the domains of the MPC polymer became smaller but the number of the domains increased. The amount of the MPC polymer mixed with SPU affected the dispersion state. Plasma proteins adsorbed on the SPU/MPC polymer membrane surface after contact with human plasma were detected by gold-colloid-labeled immunoassay. Both albumin and fibrinogen were observed on the SPU membrane; however, the amount of these proteins was reduced on the SPU/MPC polymer membrane. Thus it was concluded that the blood compatibility of the SPU was effectively improved by the blending of the MPC polymer.

  1. Mimicking Peroxidase Activity by a Manganese(II Complex Involving a New Asymmetric Tetradentate Ligand Containing Both Amino and Imino Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Pérez-Otero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric ligand (E-4-bromo-2-(((2-((5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzyl(methylaminoethyliminomethylphenol has been prepared by a novel seven-step route. All organic compounds isolated in each step have been characterised by elemental analysis, infrared and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Interaction of this ligand with manganese has been investigated employing an electrochemical method. This method leads to the formation of a neutral manganese(II complex 7 in high yield and purity. The complex has been thoroughly characterised by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and cyclic voltammetry. Complex 7 behaves as peroxidase mimic in the presence of the water-soluble trap ABTS, probably due to its ease to coordinate the substrate molecule.

  2. RFS2000 (9-nitrocamptothecin) in advanced small cell lung cancer, a phase II study of the EORTC New Drug Development Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, C J A; de Jonge, M J A; Monfardini, S; Daugaard, G; Fiedler, W; Baron, B; Lacombe, D; Fumoleau, P

    2004-06-01

    Camptothecins have shown efficacy in terms of response rate in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). RFS2000 is a new camptothecin derivative, which has shown objective responses in various tumour types. The aim of this phase II study was to determine the objective response rate of RFS2000 in patients with sensitive and refractory SCLC. RFS2000 was given orally at 1.5 mg/m(2) per day for five consecutive days (five days on - two days off) on a continuous basis. Patients were evaluated weekly for toxicity and every six weeks for response. Thirty seven patients were included, 36 patients (14 with sensitive and 22 with refractory SCLC) were evaluable for toxicity, and 35 patients were evaluable for response. No objective responses were observed. Toxicity was acceptable, with myelosuppression, nausea/vomiting, and diarrhoea as the main toxicities. RFS2000 therefore has an acceptable toxicity profile but is not active as a single agent in SCLC.

  3. A phase II clinical trial of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer of undifferentiated type: Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1009/1010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kohei; Takashima, Atsuo; Kimura, Aya; Mizusawa, Junki; Hasuike, Noriaki; Ono, Hiroyuki; Terashima, Masanori; Muto, Manabu; Boku, Narikazu; Sasako, Mitsuru; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    A Phase II clinical trial has been initiated to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for intramucosal (cT1a) gastric cancer of undifferentiated type. Patients with cT1a gastric cancer with undifferentiated-type adenocarcinoma are eligible for the study. The tumor size should be 2 cm or less without ulceration. The study will enroll a total of 325 patients from 51 institutions over a 4-year period. The primary endpoint is proportion of 5-year overall survival (% 5-year overall survival) in patients with undifferentiated dominant type. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, % 5-year overall survival without either recurrence or gastrectomy, % en-bloc resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection, % pathological curative resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection, % 5-year overall survival in patients with differentiated dominant type, % 5-year overall survival in patients with pathologically curative resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection and adverse events.

  4. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  5. Revision of the genus Coeliccia Kirby in Borneo part II: Two new species from the membranipes-group, with a redescription of C. macrostigma Laidlaw (Odonata: Zygoptera: Platycnemididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Rory A

    2016-11-02

    Coeliccia matok sp. nov. (holotype male from Borneo, Sarawak, Samarahan Division, peat swamp forest at old UNIMAS campus, 25 ii 2008, to be deposited in BMNH) and Coeliccia paludensis sp. nov. (holotype male from Borneo, Kalimantan Tengah, peat swamp forest in ex Mega Rice Project Block E, 18 vi 2012, in RMNH) are described from Borneo. The two new species are apparently confined to peat swamp forest (C. paludensis) or largely confined to peat swamp forest and related forest formations (C. matok). Coeliccia macrostigma Laidlaw is redescribed and all available information on it is summarised. Additional terminology for characters of the prothorax in Coeliccia species is introduced. Distribution maps are given for all three species considered.

  6. Depressive symptoms in people with and without alcohol abuse: factor structure and measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II across groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Skule

    Full Text Available This study explored differences in the factor structure of depressive symptoms in patients with and without alcohol abuse, and differences in the severity of depressive symptoms between the two groups. In a sample of 358 patients without alcohol problems and 167 patients with comorbid alcohol problems, confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the same factor structures, Beck et al.'s two-factor Somatic Affective-Cognitive (SA-C model, and Buckley et al.'s three-factor Cognitive-Affective- Somatic (C-A-S model, demonstrated the best fit to the data in both groups. The SA-C model was preferred due to its more parsimonious nature. Evidence for strict measurement invariance across the two groups for the SA-C model was found. MIMIC (multiple-indicator-multiple-cause modeling showed that the level of depressive symptoms was found to be highest on both factors in the group with comorbid alcohol problems. The magnitude of the differences in latent mean scores suggested a moderate difference in the level of depressive symptoms between the two groups. It is argued that patients with comorbid depression and alcohol abuse should be offered parallel and adequate treatment for both conditions.

  7. Impact of nutritional labelling on 10-d energy intake, appetite perceptions and attitudes towards food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Elise; Perron, Julie; Drapeau, Vicky; Lamarche, Benoît; Doucet, Éric; Pomerleau, Sonia; Provencher, Véronique

    2015-12-28

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of nutritional labelling on energy intake, appetite perceptions and attitudes towards food. During a 10-d period, seventy normal-weight (BMIlabelling groups in which the only difference was the label posted on lunch meal entrée: (1) low-fat label, (2) energy label (energy content of the entrée and average daily needs) and (3) no label (control). Average energy intake was calculated by weighing all foods before v. after daily consumption. Hunger and fullness perceptions were rated on visual analogue scales immediately before and after each meal. Satiety efficiency was assessed through the calculation of the satiety quotient (SQ). The appreciation and perceived healthiness of the lunch entrées were rated on eight-point Likert scales. There was no difference in energy intake, SQ and attitudes towards food between the three labelling groups. Fasting hunger perception was higher in the low-fat label group compared with the two others groups (P=0·0037). No interactions between labelling groups and BMI categories were observed. In conclusion, although labelling does not seem to influence energy intake, a low-fat label may increase women's fasting hunger perceptions compared with an energy label or no label.

  8. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation after conditioning with treosulfan, etoposide and cyclophosphamide for patients with ALL: a phase II-study on behalf of the German Cooperative Transplant Study Group and ALL Study Group (GMALL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, N; Bornhäuser, M; Stelljes, M; Pichlmeier, U; Trenschel, R; Schmid, C; Arnold, R; Martin, H; Heinzelmann, M; Wolschke, C; Meyer, R G; Bethge, W; Kobbe, G; Ayuk, F; Gökbuget, N; Hölzer, D; Zander, A; Beelen, D

    2015-12-01

    TBI-based preparative regimens are considered as standard conditioning therapy for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AHSC) in patients with ALL. We investigated toxicity and efficacy of a non-TBI-based regimen consisting of treosulfan, etoposide and cyclophosphamide for ALL within a prospective study. Major inclusion criteria were CR and non-eligibility for TBI. Fifty patients with a median age of 46.5 years (range, 18-64) were included. Donors were HLA-identical sibling (n=8), matched (n=42) or mismatched (n=10) unrelated. The toxicity was moderate, resulting in a cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year of 8% (90% confidence interval: 2-15%). Acute GvHD grade II-IV and grade III/IV was noted in 53% and 14%, respectively. Chronic GvHD at one year was seen in 41%. After a median follow-up of 24 months the cumulative incidence of relapse was 36% (90% confidence interval: 24-48) and 51% (90% confidence interval: 37-65) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. The estimated 2-year disease-free and overall survivals were 36 and 48%, respectively. Treosulfan, etoposide and cyclophosphamide followed by AHSC has a favorable toxicity profile with low NRM and therefore represents a potential alternative regimen for ALL in 1. CR (NCT00682305).

  9. Map labeling and its generalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddi, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Marathe, M.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mirzaian, A. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Computer Science; Moret, B.M.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Zhu, B. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Map labeling is of fundamental importance in cartography and geographical information systems and is one of the areas targeted for research by the ACM Computational Geometry Impact Task Force. Previous work on map labeling has focused on the problem of placing maximal uniform, axis-aligned, disjoint rectangles on the plane so that each point feature to be labeled lies at the corner of one rectangle. Here, we consider a number of variants of the map labeling problem. We obtain three general types of results. First, we devise constant-factor polynomial-time-approximation algorithms for labeling point features by rectangular labels, where the feature may lie anywhere on the boundary of its label region and where labeling rectangles may be placed in any orientation. These results generalize to the case of elliptical labels. Secondly, we consider the problem of labeling a map consisting of disjoint rectilinear fine segments. We obtain constant-factor polynomial-time approximation algorithms for the general problem and an optimal algorithm for the special case where all segments are horizontal. Finally, we formulate a bicriteria version of the map-labeling problem and provide bicriteria polynomial- time approximation schemes for a number of such problems.

  10. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF DERMATOPHAGOIDES PTERONYSSINUS GROUP 1 MAJOR ALLERGEN T CELL FUSION EPITOPE PEPTIDE VACCINE VECTOR BASED ON THE MHC II PATHWAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaopin; Zhao, Beibei; Jiang, Yuxin; Diao, Jidong; Li, Na; Lu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Antecedentes y objetivo: el Dermatophagoides peteronyssinus es uno de los principales ácaros del polvo doméstico responsables del asma alérgica que se pueden administrar provisionalmente para una inmunoterapia específica. El presente estudio busca construir un vector que codifique epítopos de células T del grupo de alérgenos principal, el Grupo 1 de Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus como una vacuna suministrada mediante la vía MHC de clase II. Métodos: se sintetizaron las secuencias de nucleótidos de los 3 genes objetivo, incluyendo TAT, IhC y el fragmento recombinante de Der p 1 encargado de codificar 3 epítopos de célula T. Después de la amplificación de los 3 fragmentos objetivo por PCR y digestión con endonucleasas de restricción correspondientes, el gen recombinante TAT-IhC-Der p 1-3T se ligó usando T4 DNA ligasa y se insertó en el vector de expresión procariota pET28a (+) para construir el plásmido recombinante pET 28a (+)-TAT-IHC-Der p 1-3T, que se confirmó por digestión con endonucleasas de restricción y secuenciación. El vector recombinante se transformó en E. coli cepa BL21 (DE3) y se indujo con IPTG, y la proteína inducida TATIHC- Der p1-3T se detectó mediante SDS-PAGE. Después de la purificación, la proteina recombinante se confirmó por análisis de inmunotransferencia (Western blot) y se probó su alergenicidad usando el ensayo de unión a IgE. Resultados: el plásmido recombinante pET-28a-TATIHCDer p1-3T se construyó con éxito, se confirmó por digestión con endonucleasas de restricción y la secuenciación y la expresión de la proteína recombinante TAT-IHCDer p1-3T fue inducida en E. coli. Purificación con éxito verificada mediante Western blot de la proteína objetivo, que mostró una capacidad de unión a IgE más fuerte que Der p1. Conclusión: hemos construido con éxito el vector de expresión recombinante pET-28a-TAT-IHC-Der p1-3T que expresa una vacuna de epítopo de células T administrada por vía MHC II con

  11. Linerless label device and method

    KAUST Repository

    Binladen, Abdulkari

    2016-01-14

    This apparatus and method for applying a linerless label to an end user product includes a device with a printer for printing on a face surface of a linerless label, and a release coat applicator for applying a release coat to the face surface of the label; another device including an unwinder unit (103) to unwind a roll of printed linerless label; a belt (108); a glue applicator (102) for applying glue to the belt; a nip roller (106) for contacting and applying pressure to the face surface of the linerless label such that the glue on the belt transfers to the back surface of the linerless label; at least one slitting knife 105) positioned downstream the belt and a rewinder unit (104) positioned downstream the slitting knife; and a third device which die cuts and applies the linerless label to an end user object.

  12. Phase II open-label study of erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine in unresectable and/or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: relationship between skin rash and survival (Pantar study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, E; Manzano, J L; Rivera, F; Galán, M; Valladares-Ayerbes, M; Pericay, C; Safont, M J; Mendez, M J; Irigoyen, A; Arrivi, A; Sastre, J; Díaz-Rubio, E

    2012-07-01

    Skin rash is an adverse event which might be associated with longer survival in patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The aim of this nonrandomised phase II clinical trial is to prospectively evaluate the relationship between skin rash and overall survival (OS) in advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with erlotinib plus gemcitabine. Patients were given gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2/week, 3 weeks every 4 weeks) plus erlotinib (100 mg/day orally continuously) until disease progression/unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point was OS. A total of 153 eligible patients were enrolled (grade≥2 rash, 25%; grade<2 rash, 75%). OS was longer in patients with grade≥2 rash versus grade<2 (11 versus 5 months; P<0.001). Progression-free survival was longer in patients with grade≥2 rash versus grade<2 (6 versus 3 months; P<0.001) and shorter in those without rash versus grade 1 (2 versus 4 months; P=0.005) or grade≥2 (2 versus 6 months; P<0.001). Patients with grade≥2 rash showed higher rates of overall response (21% versus 7%; P<0.05) and disease control (84% versus 43%; P<0.05) versus grade<2. This study prospectively confirms the relationship between rash and longer OS in unresectable locally advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with erlotinib plus gemcitabine.

  13. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) < Cd(II) < Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  14. Pitch memory, labelling and disembedding in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Pamela

    2003-05-01

    Autistic musical savants invariably possess absolute pitch ability and are able to disembed individual musical tones from chords. Enhanced pitch discrimination and memory has been found in non-savant individuals with autism who also show superior performance on visual disembedding tasks. These experiments investigate the extent that enhanced disembedding ability will be found within the musical domain in autism. High-functioning children with autism, together with age- and intelligence-matched controls, participated in three experiments testing pitch memory, labelling and chord disembedding. The findings from experiment 1 showed enhanced pitch memory and labelling in the autism group. In experiment 2, when subjects were pre-exposed to labelled individual tones, superior chord segmentation was also found. However, in experiment 3, when disembedding performance was less reliant on pitch memory, no group differences emerged and the