WorldWideScience

Sample records for labeling group ii

  1. Obtention of a prosthetic group for labelling of radioiodinated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Josefina da S.; Colturato, Maria Tereza; Araujo, Elaine B. de

    2000-01-01

    Antibodies and peptides labeled with radionuclides has been extensively used in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunodetection. The principal problem with the use of radioiodinated proteins is the in vivo dehalogenation. The use of prosthetic groups for indirect labeling of proteins with radioiodine has showed to be useful on labeling proteins with greater in vivo stability. A procedure is described for the preparation of an radioiodinated prosthetic group (N-succinimidyl 4-radioiodine-benzoate-SIB), using procedure described by Stocklin et al, with the iodination of p-bromo-benzoic acid and subsequent reaction with TSTU. Preliminary labeling results showed that the prosthetic group can be obtained in a good yield. The coupling of the SIB to the protein will be studied using human IgG as protein model. (author)

  2. Focus group report - part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The Waste Policy Institute, through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST) conducted a focus group with members of the Hanford Advisory Board (HAB), interviews with tribal government representatives, and a survey of Oak Ridge Local Oversight Committee (LOC) and Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) members. The purpose was to understand what members of the interested and involved public want to know about technology development and ways to get that information to them. These data collection activities were used as a follow-up to two previously held focus groups with the general public near Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Most participants from the first two focus groups said they did not have time and/or were not interested in participating in technology decision-making. They said they would prefer to defer to members of their communities who are interested and want to be involved in technology decision-making

  3. Production of radioiodinated prosthetic group for indirect protein labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Josefina da Silva

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments and, more recently, radiolabeled peptides have been extensively studied in order to develop radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The radioiodination of proteins can be done by a direct method, with radioiodine being incorporated in to a tyrosine residue of the protein by electrophilic substitution. The main problem in the use of radioiodinated proteins, is that they are often dehalogenated in vivo by the action of specific enzymes, probably because of the structural similarity between iodophenyl groups and thyroid hormones. Several protein radioiodination methods have been developed in order to minimize this in vivo dehalogenation using prosthetic groups for indirect labeling. In this case, the radioiodine is first incorporated in to the prosthetic group that is subsequently attached to a terminal amino group or to a ε-amino group of lysine residue. The aim of this work is to obtain a radioiodinated prosthetic group for indirect labeling of proteins. The prosthetic group selected was the N-succinimidyl-4-radioiodine benzoate (SIB), obtained by the iodination of the p-bromobenzoic acid followed by the reaction with TSTU (0-(N-succinimidyl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl uronium tetrafluoroborate) The results of these studies showed that the p-radio iodobenzoic acid was obtained with a radiochemical purity greater than 92% and a labeling yield of about 65%. Some reaction parameters were studied like temperature, time and Cu Cl mass (cataliser). The SIB was quantitatively obtained from p-radio iodobenzoic acid, using basic medium and after removing the water from the reaction using an nitrogen stream. The kinetic of this reaction is very fast with complete consumption of the p-radioiodebenzoic acid after 5 minutes. The coupling of the SIB prosthetic group to the protein was studied using Human Immunoglobulin (IgG) as a protein model. In a comparative way, the same protein was used on direct labeling

  4. Synthesis of isotopically labelled angiotensin II receptor antagonist GR138950X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.M.; Cable, K.M.; Newman, J.J.; Sutherland, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Syntheses of [ 13 C] and [ 14 C]-labelled versions of angiotensin II receptor antagonist GR138950X, labelled in the imidazole carboxamide residue, are described. These involved preparation of an iodoimidazole substrate by a novel iododecarboxylation procedure, followed by cyanation with a mixture of carbon-labelled potassium cyanide and copper (l) iodide in DMF at high temperature. The preparation of a mass-labelled (M+5) version of GR138950X is also described. This involved the synthesis of an [ 13 C 3 , 15 N 2 ]-labelled imidazole from a 1,2,3-tricarbonyl compound, [ 13 C 3 ]propionaldehyde and [ 15 N]ammonia. The labelled imidazole was further elaborated into multiply-labelled GR138950X. (Author)

  5. New labeling methods via organometallic species: new synthesis of a chiral methyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucher, Nicolas

    2000-01-01

    Chapter 1: New labeling methods via organometallic species. In the first part of this work, we have developed a new labeling strategy based on the hydrogenolysis of organolithium compounds with tritium gas or deuterium gas. This reaction is catalyzed with palladium on charcoal and leads to the labelled compounds with direct replacement of the proton by its isotopes ("2H or "3H) without further chemical modification of the target molecule. Using this strategy, tritium or deuterium atoms can be introduced in a region but also in a stereoselective fashion with more than 90% ee. The former result was obtained using (-)-sparteine during the lithiation step. Chapter II: New synthesis of a chiral methyl group. In the second part of this work, we have developed a new synthetic method to prepare chiral ditosyl-methylamine using 4,5-disubstituted oxazolidines. Dia-stereoselective substitution of the methoxy group of a 2-alkoxy-oxazolidine by a deuteride in the presence of a Lewis acid leads to the 2-deutero-oxazolidine in a highly stereoselective fashion (de = 100%). Still using a lewis acid, a tritiated hydride open the former 2-deutero-oxazolidine to afford chiral methyl group borne by the nitrogen. Further de-protection and re-protection steps lead to the ditosyl-methylamine with an ee of 65% (RIS= 83/17). Nowadays, this is the best known synthetic method, not only in terms of enantioselectivity but also in terms of chemical yield and number of radioactive steps. As NTs_2 is a fairly good leaving group, the ditosyl-methylamine offers the possibility of introducing chiral methyl group in many substrates using a S_N2 reaction with various nucleophiles. This last point leads to many potential applications in the field of biochemistry or for mechanical studies. (author) [fr

  6. Studies of the labelling of human serum albumin with 99mTc using Sn(II) tartrate and Sn(II)Cl2 as reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kolaly, M.T.; El-Asrag, H.A.; El-Wetery, A.S.; El-Mohty, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study has been carried out on the effect of Sn(II) tartrate and Sn(II)Cl 2 on the labelling efficiency and tissue distribution of 99m Tc-human serum albumin. The effect of reductant content, reaction time (incubation time), albumin content, pH, and ascorbic acid on the efficiency of labelling and the tissue distribution of the labelled albumin has been investigated. The percentage of labelling was determined by paper and thin layer radiochromatography. Ascorbic acid shows no effect on either labelling efficiency or tissue distribution of 99m Tc-HSA prepared by Sn(II) tartrate or Sn(II)Cl 2 . (author)

  7. Finite p′-nilpotent groups. II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Srinivasan

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we continue the study of finite p′-nilpotent groups that was started in the first part of this paper. Here we give a complete characterization of all finite groups that are not p′-nilpotent but all of whose proper subgroups are p′-nilpotent.

  8. Lifts of projective congruence groups, II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiming, Ian

    2014-01-01

    We continue and complete our previous paper ``Lifts of projective congruence groups'' concerning the question of whether there exist noncongruence subgroups of  that are projectively equivalent to one of the groups  or . A complete answer to this question is obtained: In case of  such noncongruence...

  9. On derived groups of division rings II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi Hezavehi, M.; Akbari Feyzaabaadi, S.; Mehraabaadi, M.; Hajie Abolhassan, H.

    1995-05-01

    Let D be a division ring with centre F and denote by D' the derived group (commutator subgroup) of D * = D - {0}. It is shown that if each element of D' is algebraic over F, then D is algebraic over F. It is also proved that each finite separable extension of F in D is of the form F(c) for some element c in the derived group D'. Using these results, it is shown that if each element of the derived group D' is of bounded degree over F, then D is finite dimensional over F. (author). 5 refs

  10. The character of free topological groups II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nickolas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A systematic analysis is made of the character of the free and free abelian topological groups on metrizable spaces and compact spaces, and on certain other closely related spaces. In the first case, it is shown that the characters of the free and the free abelian topological groups on X are both equal to the “small cardinal” d if X is compact and metrizable, but also, more generally, if X is a non-discrete k!-space all of whose compact subsets are metrizable, or if X is a non-discrete Polish space. An example is given of a zero-dimensional separable metric space for which both characters are equal to the cardinal of the continuum. In the case of a compact space X, an explicit formula is derived for the character of the free topological group on X involving no cardinal invariant of X other than its weight; in particular the character is fully determined by the weight in the compact case. This paper is a sequel to a paper by the same authors in which the characters of the free groups were analysed under less restrictive topological assumptions.

  11. 77 FR 74827 - Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... on Prescription Drug Container Labels AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... information on prescription drug container labels accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired. The... stakeholder working group to develop best practices for making information on prescription drug container...

  12. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... solution Potassium oleate Potassium salt of polyolefin acid Propyl acetate Propylene carbonate Propylene... lignosulfonate solution Sodium polyacrylate solution 2 Sodium salt of Ferric hydroxyethylethylenediamine... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grouping of Cargoes II Table II to Part 150 Shipping...

  13. Complexo-potentiometric determination of mercury (II) in chlormerodrin and mercuric chloride labelled with radioactive mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duek, E.E.

    1976-09-01

    A method is described for determining the amount of mercury (II) in radioactively labelled chlormerodrin and mercuric chloride. By measuring the absolute activity in an ionization chamber, the specific activity is therefore immediately obtained. The determination of Hg (II) is based on a complexometric titration. Because of method characteristics and speed convenience, the end point is observed by means of a pH-meter. A comparison is made with a determination performed by detecting the end point with color-change indicators. The error is estimated, and the results are statistically interpreted. (author) [es

  14. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  15. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  16. On the labeling and symmetry adaptation of the solvable finite groups representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caride, A.O.; Zanette, S.I.; Nogueira, S.R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously perform a symmetry adaptation and a labeling of the bases of the irreducible representations of the solvable finite groups. It is performed by difining a self-adjoint operator with ligenvalues which evidence the descent in symmetry of the group-subgroups sequences. We also prove two theorems on the canonicity of the cpomposition series of the solvable groups. (author) [pt

  17. The impact of menu energy labelling across socioeconomic groups: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarink, Danja; Peeters, Anna; Freak-Poli, Rosanne; Beauchamp, Alison; Woods, Julie; Ball, Kylie; Backholer, Kathryn

    2016-04-01

    Menu energy labelling at point of purchase is gaining traction worldwide, yet the potential impact for different socioeconomic groups is unclear. We aimed to summarise evidence on the effectiveness of menu energy labelling by socioeconomic position (SEP). A systematic search for papers published to September 2015 was conducted using terms for labelling, food outlets, and SEP. Quality of studies was assessed. Results were summarised across stages of an intervention logic pathway. Eighteen papers were identified. Of twelve studies reporting the effect of menu energy labelling in low SEP populations, six reported on purchase outcomes. All but one of these reported no positive effect of the policy for this population. Two of the five studies that compared purchase outcomes of menu labelling across SEP groups reported that the policy was effective overall. These two studies reported either a significant decline in fast food calories purchased from consumers in high (but not low) SEP neighbourhoods or a significantly greater decline in calories purchased among consumers visiting stores in higher SEP neighbourhoods post policy implementation. None of the included papers reached the highest quality score. The current evidence describing the impact of menu energy labelling within or across SEP is limited in quantity and quality. Of the two studies that reported a positive benefit of menu energy labelling overall, both identified a greater effect on fast food purchases among consumers visiting stores in high compared to low SEP neighbourhoods. It is difficult to know whether the absence of effectiveness reported in low SEP populations represents a true lack of effectiveness or is a result of a more general lack of policy effectiveness or the limited quality of the reviewed studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An accelerated dose escalation with a grass pollen allergoid is safe and well-tolerated: a randomized open label phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, A M; Al-Kadah, B; Luther, U; Neumann, U; Wagenmann, M

    2015-01-01

    The number of injections in the dose escalation of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is small for some currently used hypoallergenic allergoids, but can still be inconvenient to patients and can impair compliance. The aim of this trial was to compare safety and tolerability of an accelerated to the conventional dose escalation scheme of a grass pollen allergoid. In an open label phase II trial, 122 patients were 1:1 randomized for SCIT using a grass pollen allergoid with an accelerated dose escalation comprising only 4 weekly injections (Group I) or a conventional dose escalation including 7 weekly injections (Group II). Safety determination included the occurrence of local and systemic adverse events. Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Treatment-related adverse events were observed in 22 (36.1 %) patients in Group I and 15 (24.6 %) in Group II. Local reactions were reported by 18 patients in Group I and 11 in Group II. Five Grade 1 systemic reactions (WAO classification) were observed in Group I and 2 in Group II. Grade 2 reactions occurred 3 times in Group I and 2 times in Group II. Tolerability was rated as "good" or "very good" by 53 (86.9 %) patients in Group I and 59 (100 %) in Group II by investigators. Forty-eight patients in Group I (80.0 %) and 54 in Group II (91.5 %) rated tolerability as "good" or "very good". The dose escalation of a grass pollen allergoid can be accelerated with safety and tolerability profiles comparable to the conventional dose escalation.

  19. Labeling and Grouping Effects in the Recall of Pictures by Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Hans G.; Milgram, Norman A.

    1973-01-01

    Free recall of an array of pictures followed by sequential location recall was observed in children ages 4 to 12. Presentation conditions included arrays of pictures differing in salience of categories versus noncategorical array, and two task conditions, overt labeling versus pointing. Grouping effects on memory were systematically related to…

  20. Improved labeling strategy for 13C relaxation measurements of methyl groups in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Andrew L.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Wand, A. Joshua

    1997-01-01

    Selective incorporation of 13 C into the methyl groups of protein side chains is described as a means for simplifying the measurement and interpretation of 13 C relaxation parameters.High incorporation (>90%) is accomplished by using pyruvate(3- 13 C, 99%) as the sole carbon source in the growth media for protein overexpression in E. coli. This improved labeling scheme increases the sensitivity of the relaxation experiments by approximately fivefold when compared to randomly fractionally 13 C-labeled protein, allowing high-quality measurements on relatively dilute (<1 mM)protein samples at a relatively low cost

  1. Blood-group-Ii-active gangliosides of human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizi, T.; Childs, R.A.; Hakomori, S.-I.; Powell, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    More than ten new types of gangliosides, in addition to haematoside and sialosylparagloboside, were isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. These were separated by successive chromatographies on DAEA-Sephadex, on porous silica-gel columns and on thin-layer silica gel as acetylated compounds. Highly potent blood-group-Ii and moderate blood-group-H activities were demonstrated in some of the ganglioside fractions. The gangliosides incorporated into chlolesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes stoicheiometrically inhibited binding of anti-(blood-group-I and i) antibodies to a radioiodinated blood-group-Ii-active glycoprotein. The fraction with the highest blood-group-I activity, I(g) fraction, behaved like sialosyl-deca- to dodeca-glycosylceramides on t.l.c. Certain blood-group-I and most of the i-determinants were in partially or completely cryptic form and could be unmasked by sialidase treatment. Thus the I and i antigens, which are known to occur on internal structures of blood-group-ABH-active glycoproteins in secretions, also occur in the interior of the carbohydrate chains of erythrocyte gangliosides. (author)

  2. New Algebraic Groups Produced By Graphical Passwords Based On Colorings And Labellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety of plain text passwords has been questioned in current researching information passwords. Graphical passwords are another way for alternative text-based passwords and to improve the user account security. As we are constructing Topsnut-graphical passwords that can be traced to an idea of “Graph structure plus the number theory” proposed first by Hongyu Wang with her colleagues, we find that some of Topsnut-graphical passwords can be composed of algebraic groups under the principle of Abelian additive finite group. We apply the odd-elegant labelling of graph theory to produce Topsnut-graphical passwords, and verify our Topsnut-graphical passwords can form algebraic groups, called labelling graphical groups. Our results can provide those users who have business in two or more banks, and our methods are easily transformed into algorithms with polynomial times.

  3. Adjunctive agomelatine therapy in the treatment of acute bipolar II depression: a preliminary open label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornaro M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Michele Fornaro,1 Michael J McCarthy,2,3 Domenico De Berardis,4 Concetta De Pasquale,1 Massimo Tabaton,5 Matteo Martino,6 Salvatore Colicchio,7 Carlo Ignazio Cattaneo,8 Emanuela D'Angelo,9 Pantaleo Fornaro61Department of Formative Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; 2Department of Psychiatry, Veteran's Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, 3University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; 4Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, "ASL 4", Teramo, Italy; 5Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy; 6Department of Neurosciences, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy; 7Unit of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy; 8National Health System, "ASL 13", Novara, Italy; 9National Health System, "ASL 3", Genoa, ItalyPurpose: The circadian rhythm hypothesis of bipolar disorder (BD suggests a role for melatonin in regulating mood, thus extending the interest toward the melatonergic antidepressant agomelatine as well as type I (acute or II cases of bipolar depression.Patients and methods: Twenty-eight depressed BD-II patients received open label agomelatine (25 mg/bedtime for 6 consecutive weeks as an adjunct to treatment with lithium or valproate, followed by an optional treatment extension of 30 weeks. Measures included the Hamilton depression scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Clinical Global Impression Scale–Bipolar Version, Young Mania Rating Scale, and body mass index.Results: Intent to treat analysis results demonstrated that 18 of the 28 subjects (64% showed medication response after 6 weeks (primary study endpoint, while 24 of the 28 subjects (86% responded by 36 weeks. When examining primary mood stabilizer treatment, 12 of the 17 (70.6% valproate and six of the 11 (54.5% lithium patients responded by the first endpoint. At 36 weeks, 14 valproate treated (82.4% and 10 lithium

  4. Reducing Prejudice With Labels: Shared Group Memberships Attenuate Implicit Bias and Expand Implicit Group Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, W Anthony; Mackie, Diane M; Allen, Thomas J; Sherman, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-01

    In three experiments, we used a novel Implicit Association Test procedure to investigate the impact of group memberships on implicit bias and implicit group boundaries. Results from Experiment 1 indicated that categorizing targets using a shared category reduced implicit bias by increasing the extent to which positivity was associated with Blacks. Results from Experiment 2 revealed that shared group membership, but not mere positivity of a group membership, was necessary to reduce implicit bias. Quadruple process model analyses indicated that changes in implicit bias caused by shared group membership are due to changes in the way that targets are evaluated, not to changes in the regulation of evaluative bias. Results from Experiment 3 showed that categorizing Black targets into shared group memberships expanded implicit group boundaries. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  5. A primer of drug safety surveillance: an industry perspective. Part II: Product labeling and product knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, M C

    1992-01-01

    To place the fundamentals of clinical drug safety surveillance in a conceptual framework that will facilitate understanding and application of adverse drug event data to protect the health of the public and support a market for pharmaceutical manufacturers' products. Part II of this series discusses specific issues regarding product labeling, such as developing the labeling, changing the labeling, and the legal as well as commercial ramifications of the contents of the labeling. An adverse event report scenario is further analyzed and suggestions are offered for maintaining the product labeling as an accurate reflection of the drug safety surveillance data. This article also emphasizes the necessity of product knowledge in adverse event database management. Both scientific and proprietary knowledge are required. Acquiring product knowledge is a part of the day-to-day activities of drug safety surveillance. A knowledge of the history of the product may forestall adverse publicity, as shown in the illustration. This review uses primary sources from the federal laws (regulations), commentaries, and summaries. Very complex topics are briefly summarized in the text. Secondary sources, ranging from newspaper articles to judicial summaries, illustrate the interpretation of adverse drug events and opportunities for drug safety surveillance intervention. The reference materials used were articles theoretically or practically applicable in the day-to-day practice of drug safety surveillance. The role of clinical drug safety surveillance in product monitoring and drug development is described. The process of drug safety surveillance is defined by the Food and Drug Administration regulations, product labeling, product knowledge, and database management. Database management is subdivided into the functions of receipt, retention, retrieval, and review of adverse event reports. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic interaction of the components of the process. Suggestions are offered

  6. Cholera toxin B subunit labeling in lamina II of spinal cord dorsal horn following chronic inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing Ping; Tian, Li

    2002-07-26

    We have investigated the effect of inflammation on the labeling pattern of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-conjugated horseradish peroxidase, an A-fiber marker, by an intra-sciatic nerve injection of the tracer. Following chronic inflammation in one hind paw in rats, there was substantial CTB labeling in lamina II of the spinal dorsal horn, which is normally absent. However, there was no change in the labeling pattern of wheat germ agglutinin or fluoride resistant acid phosphatase/thiamine monophosphatase, two C-fiber markers. The CTB labeling in lamina II after peripheral nerve injury has been interpreted as central sprouting of A-fibers or uptake of the tracer by injured C-fibers. Our results suggest that chronic inflammation and nerve injury may share some common mechanisms in generating allodynia and hyperalgesia.

  7. Preparation of C-II labeled pyruvic acid for use in assessment of hypoxia in tumors. Project 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Of the three methods of synthesis of C-II-labeled pyruvic acid that we had proposed to investigate in order to determine the best and most appropriate synthesis of C-II-labeled pyruvate, the cold chemistry of Method A, via an isocyanide intermediate, has been verified. Similarly, the cold chemistry of Method B, via the 1,3-dithiane derivative, has been verified up to the deprotection and last step of the synthesis. The difficulties which have been encountered with the biochemistry of Method C from ribulose 1,5-diphosphate, have yet to be resolved. 12 refs., 6 figs

  8. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-09-28

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D{sub 2}O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d{sub 10}. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  9. TIBER II/ETR: Nuclear Performance Analysis Group Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    A Nuclear Performance Analysis Group was formed to develop the nuclear technology mission of TIBER-II under the leadership of Argonne National Laboratory reporting to LLNL with major participation by the University of California - Los Angeles (test requirements, R and D needs, water-cooled test modules, neutronic tests). Additional key support was provided by GA Technologies (helium-cooled test modules), Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (material-irradiation tests), Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque (high-heat-flux component tests), and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (safety tests). Support also was provided by Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, and the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. This report discusses these areas and provides a schedule for their completion

  10. HYNIC a bifunctional prosthetic group for the labelling of peptides with 99mTc and 18FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepideh Khoshbakht; Omid Sabzevari; Mohsen Amini; Faramarz Mehrnejad; Kimia Tabib; Soraya Shahhosseini; Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran

    2016-01-01

    With regard to high reactivity and chemoselectivity of HYNIC towards carbonyl of acyclic form of 18 FDG and its stable complexes with 99m Tc, in this study, LIKKPF as the model peptide was conjugated with HYNIC and labelled with 99m Tc (RCP[90 %) and 18 FDG for the first time. The RCP of [70 % was achieved for labelling with 18 FDG, in the presence of glucose (50-250 lg/mL). Our results showed the high potential of HYNIC conjugated peptides for labelling with 99m Tc and 18 FDG as 18 F-fluorinated prosthetic group, to be clinically accepted for the radiolabelling of peptides. (author)

  11. Phase II open label study of valproic acid in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J Swoboda

    Full Text Available Preliminary in vitro and in vivo studies with valproic acid (VPA in cell lines and patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA demonstrate increased expression of SMN, supporting the possibility of therapeutic benefit. We performed an open label trial of VPA in 42 subjects with SMA to assess safety and explore potential outcome measures to help guide design of future controlled clinical trials. Subjects included 2 SMA type I ages 2-3 years, 29 SMA type II ages 2-14 years and 11 type III ages 2-31 years, recruited from a natural history study. VPA was well-tolerated and without evident hepatotoxicity. Carnitine depletion was frequent and temporally associated with increased weakness in two subjects. Exploratory outcome measures included assessment of gross motor function via the modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS, electrophysiologic measures of innervation including maximum ulnar compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitudes and motor unit number estimation (MUNE, body composition and bone density via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, and quantitative blood SMN mRNA levels. Clear decline in motor function occurred in several subjects in association with weight gain; mean fat mass increased without a corresponding increase in lean mass. We observed an increased mean score on the MHFMS scale in 27 subjects with SMA type II (p

  12. D-[3H]aspartate retrograde labelling of callosal and association neurons of somatosensory areas I and II of cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaresi, P.; Fabri, M.; Conti, F.; Manzoni, T.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on cats to ascertain whether corticocortical neurons of somatosensory areas I (SI) and II (SII) could be labelled by retrograde axonal transport of D-[ 3 H]aspartate (D-[ 3 H]Asp). This tritiated enantiomer of the amino acid aspartate is (1) taken up selectively by axon terminals of neurons releasing aspartate and/or glutamate as excitatory neurotransmitter, (2) retrogradely transported and accumulated in perikarya, (3) not metabolized, and (4) visualized by autoradiography. A solution of D-[ 3 H]Asp was injected in eight cats in the trunk and forelimb zones of SI (two cats) or in the forelimb zone of SII (six cats). In order to compare the labelling patterns obtained with D-[ 3 H]Asp with those resulting after injection of a nonselective neuronal tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was delivered mixed with the radioactive tracer in seven of the eight cats. Furthermore, six additional animals received HRP injections in SI (three cats; trunk and forelimb zones) or SII (three cats; forelimb zone). D-[ 3 H]Asp retrograde labelling of perikarya was absent from the ipsilateral thalamus of all cats injected with the radioactive tracer but a dense terminal plexus of anterogradely labelled corticothalamic fibers from SI and SII was observed, overlapping the distribution area of thalamocortical neurons retrogradely labelled with HRP from the same areas. D-[ 3 H]Asp-labelled neurones were present in ipsilateral SII (SII-SI association neurones) in cats injected in SI. In these animals a bundle of radioactive fibres was observed in the rostral portion of the corpus callosum entering the contralateral hemisphere. There, neurones retrogradely labelled with silver grains were present in SI (SI-SI callosal neurons)

  13. A label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) based on platinum (II)-oligonucleotide coordination induced gold nanoparticles aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhai, Qingfeng; Zhou, Weijun; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) was constructed for the first time. Four bases (G-G mismatch) mismatched streptavidin aptamer (MSAA) was used to protect AuNPs from salt-induced aggregation and recognize Pt (II) specifically. Only in the presence of Pt (II), coordination occurs between G-G bases and Pt (II), leading to the activation of streptavidin aptamer. Streptavidin coated magnetic beads (MBs) were used as separation agent to separate Pt (II)-coordinated MSAA. The residual less amount of MSAA could not efficiently protect AuNPs anymore and aggregation of AuNPs will produce a colorimetric product. With the addition of Pt (II), a pale purple-to-blue color variation could be observed by the naked eye. A detection limit of 150nM and a linear range from 0.6μM to 12.5μM for Pt (II) could be achieved without any amplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfide precipitation method of separating uranium from Group II and Group III metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium is separated from analytical Group II and Group III metal ions in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is extracted with a non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent containing a reagent which will react with the uranyl ions to form a complex soluble in the solvent. If the liquor is acidic, the solvent is washed with water. Then to the solvent is added an aqueous solution containing about 0.5 to 1.0 mole per liter of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions and sufficient sulfide ions to precipitate the metal ions as sulfides. The solvent and the aqueous solution are separated and the sulfides filtered from the aqueous solution. The ammonium-uranyl-tricarbonate in the aqueous solution can then be precipitated by increasing the concentration of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions to about 1.5 to 2.5 moles per liter. The precipitate is filtered and calcined to obtain U 3 O 8 or UO 2 . 21 claims, 1 figure

  15. II ZWICKY 23 AND FAMILY: A GROUP IN INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Gallagher III, John S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison and 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cigan, Phillip J. [Cardiff University School of Physics and Astronomy Queen’s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, Cf24 3AA (United Kingdom); Rudie, Gwen C., E-mail: elizabeth@thewehners.net, E-mail: jsg@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: CiganP@cardiff.ac.uk, E-mail: gwen@obs.carnegiescience.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science and 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    II Zw 23 (UGC 3179) is a luminous (M{sub B}  ∼ −21) nearby compact narrow emission line starburst galaxy with blue optical colors and strong emission lines. We present a photometric and morphological study of II Zw 23 and its interacting companion, KPG103a, using data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in combination with a WFPC2 image from the Hubble Space Telescope archives. II Zw 23 has a highly disturbed outer structure with long trails of debris that may be contributing material toward the production of tidal dwarfs. Its central regions appear disky, a structure that is consistent with the overall rotation pattern observed in the H α velocity field measured from Densepak observations obtained with WIYN. We find additional evidence for interaction in this system, including the discovery of a new tidal loop extending from an associated dwarf galaxy, which appears to be in the process of disrupting along its orbit. We also present H α equivalent widths and discuss the relative star formation rates across this interacting system.

  16. Definably compact groups definable in real closed fields.II

    OpenAIRE

    Barriga, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    We continue the analysis of definably compact groups definable in a real closed field $\\mathcal{R}$. In [3], we proved that for every definably compact definably connected semialgebraic group $G$ over $\\mathcal{R}$ there are a connected $R$-algebraic group $H$, a definable injective map $\\phi$ from a generic definable neighborhood of the identity of $G$ into the group $H\\left(R\\right)$ of $R$-points of $H$ such that $\\phi$ acts as a group homomorphism inside its domain. The above result and o...

  17. Comparative analysis of the labelling of nanotechnologies across four stakeholder groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capon, Adam; Gillespie, James; Rolfe, Margaret; Smith, Wayne

    2015-08-01

    Societies are constantly challenged to develop policies around the introduction of new technologies, which by their very nature contain great uncertainty. This uncertainty gives prominence to varying viewpoints which are value laden and have the ability to drastically shift policy. The issue of nanotechnologies is a prime example. The labelling of products that contain new technologies has been one policy tool governments have used to address concerns around uncertainty. Our study develops evidence regarding opinions on the labelling of products made by nanotechnologies. We undertook a computer-assisted telephone (CATI) survey of the Australian public and those involved in nanotechnologies from the academic, business and government sectors using a standardised questionnaire. Analysis was undertaken using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. We explored reluctance to purchase as a result of labelling products which contained manufactured nanomaterials both generally and across five broad products (food, cosmetics/sunscreens, medicines, pesticides, tennis racquets/computers) which represent the broad categories of products regulated by differing government agencies in Australia. We examined the relationship between reluctance to purchase and risk perception, trust, and familiarity. We found irrespective of stakeholder, most supported the labelling of products which contained manufactured nanomaterials. Perception of risk was the main driver of reluctance to purchase, while trust and familiarity were likely to have an indirect effect through risk perception. Food is likely to be the greatest product impacted by labelling. Risk perception surrounding nanotechnologies and label `framing' on the product are key issues to be addressed in the implementation of a labelling scheme.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of two radioiodinated maleimide derivatives targeting peripheral and membrane sulfhydryl groups for in vitro cell labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amartey, John K., E-mail: amarjk48@hotmail.co [Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Parhar, Ranjit S. [Biological and Medical Research Department, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Shi, Yufei [Genetics Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Mohanna, Futwan [Biological and Medical Research Department, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-15

    A factor impeding the advancement of cell mediated therapy is the inability to track these cells in vivo by noninvasive techniques. It has been shown that cells express high levels of sulfhydryl groups. We sought to explore these groups to covalently label cells with radiolabeled maleimide derivatives. Two maleimide derivatives; N-[2-(2,5-dioxoazolinyl)ethyl](5-iodo(3-pyridyl))carboxamide and N-[2-(2,5-dioxoazolinyl)ethyl](3-iodophenyl)carboxamide ([{sup 125}I]-4 and [{sup 125}I]-8) were synthesized and radioiodinated. These compounds were evaluated for in vitro binding to neutrophils, endothelial and mesenchymal stem cells, and biodistribution of the radiolabeled stem cells in nude mice. These radiotracers were obtained in moderate to high radiochemical yields. Binding to cells were moderate (20-60%/10{sup 6} cells) and the label was retained, although washout (an average of 18-55%) was observed depending on the cell type and the tracer used. The labeled cells initially localized in well perfused organs and at a later time showed a general distribution as expected. The novel tracers labeled several cell types and shown that the stability of the label and viability of the cells were maintained in vitro and in vivo for a reasonable period and warrant further in vivo investigation.

  19. Finite Groups with Given Quantitative Non-Nilpotent Subgroups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2014-01-01

    As an extension of Shi and Zhang's 2011 article [4], we prove that any finite group having at most 23 non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is solvable except for G ≅ A 5 or SL(2, 5), and any finite group having at most three conjugacy classes of non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is s...

  20. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of group I and group II metal complexes with Boc-hydroxylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dain, R.P.; Gresham, G.; Groenewold, G.S.; Steill, J.D.; Oomens, J.; van Stipdonk, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Hydroxamates are essential growth factors for some microbes, acting primarily as siderophores that solubilize iron for transport into a cell. Here we determined the intrinsic structure of 1:1 complexes between Boc-protected hydroxylamine and group I ([M(L)](+)) and group II ([M(L-H)](+))

  1. Comparative analysis of the labelling of nanotechnologies across four stakeholder groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capon, Adam; Gillespie, James; Rolfe, Margaret; Smith, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Societies are constantly challenged to develop policies around the introduction of new technologies, which by their very nature contain great uncertainty. This uncertainty gives prominence to varying viewpoints which are value laden and have the ability to drastically shift policy. The issue of nanotechnologies is a prime example. The labelling of products that contain new technologies has been one policy tool governments have used to address concerns around uncertainty. Our study develops evidence regarding opinions on the labelling of products made by nanotechnologies. We undertook a computer-assisted telephone (CATI) survey of the Australian public and those involved in nanotechnologies from the academic, business and government sectors using a standardised questionnaire. Analysis was undertaken using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. We explored reluctance to purchase as a result of labelling products which contained manufactured nanomaterials both generally and across five broad products (food, cosmetics/sunscreens, medicines, pesticides, tennis racquets/computers) which represent the broad categories of products regulated by differing government agencies in Australia. We examined the relationship between reluctance to purchase and risk perception, trust, and familiarity. We found irrespective of stakeholder, most supported the labelling of products which contained manufactured nanomaterials. Perception of risk was the main driver of reluctance to purchase, while trust and familiarity were likely to have an indirect effect through risk perception. Food is likely to be the greatest product impacted by labelling. Risk perception surrounding nanotechnologies and label ‘framing’ on the product are key issues to be addressed in the implementation of a labelling scheme

  2. Comparative analysis of the labelling of nanotechnologies across four stakeholder groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capon, Adam, E-mail: acap1921@uni.sydney.edu.au; Gillespie, James, E-mail: james.gillespie@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney, Menzies Centre for Health Policy, School of Public Health (Australia); Rolfe, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.rolfe@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney, University Centre for Rural Health, School of Public Health (Australia); Smith, Wayne, E-mail: wayne.smith@doh.health.nsw.gov.au [Health Protection NSW, Environmental Health Branch (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Societies are constantly challenged to develop policies around the introduction of new technologies, which by their very nature contain great uncertainty. This uncertainty gives prominence to varying viewpoints which are value laden and have the ability to drastically shift policy. The issue of nanotechnologies is a prime example. The labelling of products that contain new technologies has been one policy tool governments have used to address concerns around uncertainty. Our study develops evidence regarding opinions on the labelling of products made by nanotechnologies. We undertook a computer-assisted telephone (CATI) survey of the Australian public and those involved in nanotechnologies from the academic, business and government sectors using a standardised questionnaire. Analysis was undertaken using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. We explored reluctance to purchase as a result of labelling products which contained manufactured nanomaterials both generally and across five broad products (food, cosmetics/sunscreens, medicines, pesticides, tennis racquets/computers) which represent the broad categories of products regulated by differing government agencies in Australia. We examined the relationship between reluctance to purchase and risk perception, trust, and familiarity. We found irrespective of stakeholder, most supported the labelling of products which contained manufactured nanomaterials. Perception of risk was the main driver of reluctance to purchase, while trust and familiarity were likely to have an indirect effect through risk perception. Food is likely to be the greatest product impacted by labelling. Risk perception surrounding nanotechnologies and label ‘framing’ on the product are key issues to be addressed in the implementation of a labelling scheme.

  3. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  4. Structural analysis of group II chitinase (ChtII) catalysis completes the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qu, Mingbo; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Qing

    2018-02-23

    Chitin is a linear homopolymer of N -acetyl-β-d-glucosamines and a major structural component of insect cuticles. Chitin hydrolysis involves glycoside hydrolase family 18 (GH18) chitinases. In insects, chitin hydrolysis is essential for periodic shedding of the old cuticle ecdysis and proceeds via a pathway different from that in the well studied bacterial chitinolytic system. Group II chitinase (ChtII) is a widespread chitinolytic enzyme in insects and contains the greatest number of catalytic domains and chitin-binding domains among chitinases. In Lepidopterans, ChtII and two other chitinases, ChtI and Chi-h, are essential for chitin hydrolysis. Although ChtI and Chi-h have been well studied, the role of ChtII remains elusive. Here, we investigated the structure and enzymology of Of ChtII, a ChtII derived from the insect pest Ostrinia furnacalis We present the crystal structures of two catalytically active domains of Of ChtII, Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2, both in unliganded form and complexed with chitooligosaccharide substrates. We found that Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2 both possess long, deep substrate-binding clefts with endochitinase activities. Of ChtII exhibited structural characteristics within the substrate-binding cleft similar to those in Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. However, Of ChtII lacked structural elements favoring substrate binding beyond the active sites, including an extra wall structure present in Of Chi-h. Nevertheless, the numerous domains in Of ChtII may compensate for this difference; a truncation containing one catalytic domain and three chitin-binding modules ( Of ChtII-B4C1) displayed activity toward insoluble polymeric substrates that was higher than those of Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. Our observations provide the last piece of the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Braid group, knot theory and statistical mechanics II

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Chen Ning

    1994-01-01

    The present volume is an updated version of the book edited by C N Yang and M L Ge on the topics of braid groups and knot theory, which are related to statistical mechanics. This book is based on the 1989 volume but has new material included and new contributors.

  6. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of group I and group II metal complexes with Boc-hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Ryan P; Gresham, Gary; Groenewold, Gary S; Steill, Jeffrey D; Oomens, Jos; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2013-08-30

    Hydroxamates are essential growth factors for some microbes, acting primarily as siderophores that solubilize iron for transport into a cell. Here we determined the intrinsic structure of 1:1 complexes between Boc-protected hydroxylamine and group I ([M(L)](+)) and group II ([M(L-H)](+)) cations, where M and L are the cation and ligand, respectively, which are convenient models for the functional unit of hydroxamate siderphores. The relevant complex ions were generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) and isolated and stored in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Infrared spectra of the isolated complexes were collected by monitoring (infrared) photodissociation yield as a function of photon energy. Experimental spectra were then compared to those predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra collected are in good agreement with those predicted to be lowest-energy by DFT. The spectra for the group I complexes contain six resolved absorptions that can be attributed to amide I and II type and hydroxylamine N-OH vibrations. Similar absorptions are observed for the group II cation complexes, with shifts of the amide I and amide II vibrations due to the change in structure with deprotonation of the hydroxylamine group. IRMPD spectroscopy unequivocally shows that the intrinsic binding mode for the group I cations involves the O atoms of the amide carbonyl and hydroxylamine groups of Boc-hydroxylamine. A similar binding mode is preferred for the group II cations, except that in this case the metal ion is coordinated by the O atom of the deprotonated hydroxylamine group. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. On discretization of tori of compact simple Lie groups: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrivnák, Jiří; Motlochová, Lenka; Patera, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    The discrete orthogonality of special function families, called C- and S-functions, which are derived from the characters of compact simple Lie groups, is described in Hrivnák and Patera (2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 385208). Here, the results of Hrivnák and Patera are extended to two additional recently discovered families of special functions, called S s - and S l -functions. The main result is an explicit description of their pairwise discrete orthogonality within each family, when the functions are sampled on finite fragments F s M and F l M of a lattice in any dimension n ⩾ 2 and of any density controlled by M, and of the symmetry of the weight lattice of any compact simple Lie group with two different lengths of roots. (paper)

  8. Crossed products by endomorphisms, vector bundles and group duality, II

    OpenAIRE

    Vasselli, Ezio

    2004-01-01

    We study C*-algebra endomorphims which are special in a weaker sense w.r.t. the notion introduced by Doplicher and Roberts. We assign to such endomorphisms a geometrical invariant, representing a cohomological obstruction for them to be special in the usual sense. Moreover, we construct the crossed product of a C*-algebra by the action of the dual of a (nonabelian, noncompact) group of vector bundle automorphisms. These crossed products supply a class of examples for such generalized special ...

  9. Identification of an electron transfer locus in plastocyanin by chromium(II) affinity labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1981-01-01

    Cu(II)--plastocyanin from French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) is reduced quantitatively by Cr(II)aq ions to give a substitution-inert Cr(III) adduct of Cu(I)--plastocyanin. Enzymatic proteolysis of this derivative by thermolysin led to the identification of the Cr(III) binding peptide. This contains...

  10. Interpretation of drug label instructions: A study among four immigrants groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; Blom, Lyda; Winters, Nina A.; Van Hulten, Rolf P.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Poor understanding of medical instructions or misinterpretations can be a cause for not using medication as prescribed. Previous studies reported misunderstanding of instructions and warnings on drug labels by up to 50 % of the adult population. Objective: The aim of this study was to

  11. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  12. The group environment of Seyfert galaxies. II. Spectrophotometry of galaxies in groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, K.J.; Kollatschny, W.

    1989-01-01

    Medium-resolution spectrophotometric data of 104 galaxies have been obtained. These galaxies are members of 22 loose groups of < 1 Mpc size. Thirteen of these groups contain Seyfert galaxies. In this paper we present calibrated emission-line data and absolute optical spectra of the individual galaxies as well as plates of each group

  13. Label free luminescence strategy for sensitive detection of ATP using aptamer-Ru(II) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, Eththilu [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Industrial Chemistry, Alagappa Univesity, Karaikudi 630003, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramdass, Arumugam [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Research Department of Chemistry, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur 628216, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramesh, Pandian [UCIBIO-REQUIMTE, Departmento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Rajagopal, Seenivasan, E-mail: rajagopalseenivasan@yahoo.com [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-07-15

    A simple and sensitive aptamer-based luminescence strategy for ATP detection is developed using Ru(II) complexes as probe molecule. It is based on the fact that Ru(II)-dppz complexes show the light switching behavior with DNA aptamers and found to show significant luminescence spectral change on the addition of ATP molecules. The binding efficiencies of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP are calculated and compared. The structural change of aptamer is also studied using circular dichroism (CD) spectral techniques. Moreover, the binding nature of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP is demonstrated by computational techniques. The proposed strategy was successfully applied to the detection of ATP.

  14. Label free luminescence strategy for sensitive detection of ATP using aptamer-Ru(II) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Eththilu; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Ramdass, Arumugam; Ramesh, Pandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive aptamer-based luminescence strategy for ATP detection is developed using Ru(II) complexes as probe molecule. It is based on the fact that Ru(II)-dppz complexes show the light switching behavior with DNA aptamers and found to show significant luminescence spectral change on the addition of ATP molecules. The binding efficiencies of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP are calculated and compared. The structural change of aptamer is also studied using circular dichroism (CD) spectral techniques. Moreover, the binding nature of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP is demonstrated by computational techniques. The proposed strategy was successfully applied to the detection of ATP.

  15. Characterization of IGF-II isoforms in binge eating disorder and its group psychological treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Tasca

    Full Text Available Binge eating disorder (BED affects 3.5% of the population and is characterized by binge eating for at least 2 days a week for 6 months. Treatment options include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and pharmacotherapy which are associated with varied success. Little is known about the biology of BED. Since there is evidence that the insulin like growth factor system is implicated in regulation of body weight, insulin sensitivity and feeding behavior, we speculated it may be involved in BED.A cross-sectional comparison was made between three groups of women: overweight with BED, overweight without BED and normal weight without BED. Women were assigned to Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Blood was collected before therapy, at completion and at 6 months follow up for evaluation of IGF-II using Western blot.97 overweight women with BED contributed to the cross-sectional comparison. The two control groups comprised 53 overweight women without BED, and 50 age matched normal weight women without BED. Obese women had significantly lower Big IGF-II than normal weight women, p = .028; Overweight women with BED had higher Mature IGF-II than normal weight women, p<.05. Big IGF-II showed a significant decreasing slope from pre- to post- to six months post-group psychological treatment, unrelated to changes in BMI (p = .008.Levels of IGF-II isoforms differed significantly between overweight and normal weight women. Overweight women with BED display abnormal levels of circulating IGF-II isoforms. BED is characterized by elevated mature IGF-II, an isoform shown to carry significant bioactivity. This finding is not related to BMI or to changes in body weight. The results also provide preliminary evidence that BIG IGF-II is sensitive to change due to group psychological treatment. We suggest that abnormalities in IGF-II processing may be involved in the neurobiology of BED.

  16. Study of biodistribution of lipidic nanospheres charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, V.; Juarez O, C.; Medina L, A.; Perez C, E.; Garcia L, P.

    2007-01-01

    The general objective of the study was to evaluate the lipidic nanospheres biodistribution charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-DDP) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111 (Lip-Cis-in-111) in Wistar rats and in a tumoral model of CaCu. The conclusions were: 1. The system Lip-Cis-in-111 it presents a very fast elimination probably, to a fast recognition response of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). 2. It is planned to make modifications to the formulation to increase the quantity of the hydrophilic polymer (PEG), so that its time of residence in the blood is bigger and allow a bigger accumulation in the tumor. (Author)

  17. The group theory of oxidation II: cosets of non-split groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keurentjes, Arjan

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation program given in the first article of this series (see preceding article in this issue) is extended to cover oxidation of 3d sigma model theories on a coset G/H, with G non-compact (but not necessarily split), and H the maximal compact subgroup. We recover the matter content, the equations of motion and Bianchi identities from group lattice and Cartan involution. Satake diagrams provide an elegant tool for the computations, the maximal oxidation dimension, and group disintegration chains can be directly read off. We give a complete list of theories that can be recovered from oxidation of a 3-dimensional coset sigma model on G/H, where G is a simple non-compact group

  18. The generation, validation and testing of a coupled 219-group neutron 36-group gamma ray AMPX-II library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, G.C.; Siciliano, F.; Lioi, A.

    1987-01-01

    The main characteristics of a P 3 coupled 219-group neutron 36-group gamma-ray library in the AMPX-II Master Interface Format obtained processing ENDF/B-IV data by means of various AMPX-II System modules are presented in this note both for the more reprocessing aspects and features of the generated component files-neutrons, photon and secondary gamma-ray production cross sections. As far as the neutron data are concerned there is the avaibility of 186 data sets regarding most significant fission products. Results of the additional validation of the neutron data pertaining to eighteen benchmark experiments are also given. Some calculational tests on both neutron and coupled data emphasize the important role of the secondary gamma-ray data in nuclear criticality safety calculations

  19. Evolution of protoplanetary disks from their taxonomy in scattered light: Group I vs. Group II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garufi, A.; Meeus, G.; Benisty, M.; Quanz, S.P.; Banzatti, A.; Kama, M.; Canovas, H.; Eiroa, C.; Schmid, H.M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; Rigliaco, E.; Ménard, F.; Meyer, M.R.; van Boekel, R.; Dominik, C.

    Context. High-resolution imaging reveals a large morphological variety of protoplanetary disks. To date, no constraints on their global evolution have been found from this census. An evolutionary classification of disks was proposed based on their IR spectral energy distribution, with the Group I

  20. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings...

  1. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.8 Section 76.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1...

  2. Adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on activated carbon by complexation with surface functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella; Alberti, Giancarla; Conti, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on an activated carbon (Filtrasorb 300, Chemviron) was characterized assuming that it takes place by formation of complexes with functional groups, present in the activated carbon. Their concentration and conditional adsorption coefficients were determined for each metal by titration of the carbon in suspension in aqueous phase, at constant acidity, with the metal itself. For each titration point, the concentration of the metal in the solution phase after equilibration was determined, and the data were processed by the Ruzic linearization method, to obtain the concentration of the active sites involved in the sorption, and the conditional constant. The effect of the pH was also examined, in the range 4-6, obtaining that the adsorption increases at increasing pH. The protonation and adsorption constants were determined from the conditional adsorption coefficients obtained at the different acidities. The concentration of the active sites is 0.023 and 0.042 mmol g -1 , and the protonation constants are 1.0x10 6 and 4.6x10 4 M -1 for Pb(II) and Cu(II). The corresponding adsorption constants are respectively 1.4x10 5 and 6.3x10 3 M -1 . All the parameters are affected by a large uncertainty, probably due to the heterogeneity of the active groups in the activated carbon. Even if so, these parameters make it possible a good prediction of the adsorption in a wide range of conditions. Other sorption mechanism can be set up at different conditions, in particular at different pH, as it has been demonstrated in the case of copper(II)

  3. Adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on activated carbon by complexation with surface functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella; Alberti, Giancarla; Conti, Fabio

    2003-03-17

    The adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on an activated carbon (Filtrasorb 300, Chemviron) was characterized assuming that it takes place by formation of complexes with functional groups, present in the activated carbon. Their concentration and conditional adsorption coefficients were determined for each metal by titration of the carbon in suspension in aqueous phase, at constant acidity, with the metal itself. For each titration point, the concentration of the metal in the solution phase after equilibration was determined, and the data were processed by the Ruzic linearization method, to obtain the concentration of the active sites involved in the sorption, and the conditional constant. The effect of the pH was also examined, in the range 4-6, obtaining that the adsorption increases at increasing pH. The protonation and adsorption constants were determined from the conditional adsorption coefficients obtained at the different acidities. The concentration of the active sites is 0.023 and 0.042 mmol g{sup -1}, and the protonation constants are 1.0x10{sup 6} and 4.6x10{sup 4} M{sup -1} for Pb(II) and Cu(II). The corresponding adsorption constants are respectively 1.4x10{sup 5} and 6.3x10{sup 3} M{sup -1}. All the parameters are affected by a large uncertainty, probably due to the heterogeneity of the active groups in the activated carbon. Even if so, these parameters make it possible a good prediction of the adsorption in a wide range of conditions. Other sorption mechanism can be set up at different conditions, in particular at different pH, as it has been demonstrated in the case of copper(II)

  4. The group II intron maturase: a reverse transcriptase and splicing factor go hand in hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2017-12-01

    The splicing of group II introns in vivo requires the assistance of a multifunctional intron encoded protein (IEP, or maturase). Each IEP is also a reverse-transcriptase enzyme that enables group II introns to behave as mobile genetic elements. During splicing or retro-transposition, each group II intron forms a tight, specific complex with its own encoded IEP, resulting in a highly reactive holoenzyme. This review focuses on the structural basis for IEP function, as revealed by recent crystal structures of an IEP reverse transcriptase domain and cryo-EM structures of an IEP-intron complex. These structures explain how the same IEP scaffold is utilized for intron recognition, splicing and reverse transcription, while providing a physical basis for understanding the evolutionary transformation of the IEP into the eukaryotic splicing factor Prp8. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating the perceived effectiveness of pregnancy-related cigarette package health warning labels among different gender/age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollath-Cattano, Christy; Osman, Amira; Thrasher, James F

    2017-03-01

    The impact of pregnancy-related health warning labels (HWLs) appearing on cigarette packages on women of reproductive age and other socio-demographic groups is not well understood. The current study analyzes how different age/gender groups respond to pregnancy-related HWLs as compared to non-pregnancy HWLs. Data were analyzed from four waves of an online longitudinal study with adult smokers aged 18-64 in Australia, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Participants were classified into four age\\gender groups: women 40 and under; men 40 and under; women over 40; men over 40. Participants rated one pregnancy-related and several non-pregnancy related labels on worry, believability, and motivation to quit. Country-specific adjusted linear GEE were estimated regressing ratings for each of the three key outcomes for 1) pregnancy-related HWLs and 2) a rating difference score that subtracted the average ratings of the non-pregnancy warning from the rating of the pregnancy warning. All models adjusted for socio-demographics and smoking related variables. In Mexico and Australia, where graphic pregnancy-related HWL imagery is used (i.e., premature infant), women of reproductive age reported stronger believability, worry, and quit motivation than all other groups. Results were similar in the US, where text only HWLs are used. In contrast in Canada, where the pregnancy-related HWL imagery features a pregnant woman, ratings were unassociated with gender/age groups. Stronger effects among women of reproductive age were limited to pregnancy HWLs in each country, except Canada. HWLs that depict graphic effects to illustrate smoking-related pregnancy risks appear to be perceived as particularly effective among women of reproductive age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid synthesis of maleimide functionalized fluorine-18 labeled prosthetic group using "radio-fluorination on the Sep-Pak" method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuli, Falguni; Zhang, Xiang; Jagoda, Elaine M; Choyke, Peter L; Swenson, Rolf E

    2018-03-25

    Following our recently published fluorine-18 labeling method, "Radio-fluorination on the Sep-Pak", we have successfully synthesized 6-[ 18 F]fluoronicotinaldehyde by passing a solution (1:4 acetonitrile: t-butanol) of its quaternary ammonium salt precursor, 6-(N,N,N-trimethylamino)nicotinaldehyde trifluoromethanesulfonate (2), through a fluorine-18 containing anion exchange cartridge (PS-HCO 3 ). Over 80% radiochemical conversion was observed using 10 mg of precursor within 1 minute. The [ 18 F]fluoronicotinaldehyde ([ 18 F]5) was then conjugated with 1-(6-(aminooxy)hexyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione to prepare the fluorine-18 labeled maleimide functionalized prosthetic group, 6-[ 18 F]fluoronicotinaldehyde O-(6-(2,5-dioxo-2,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)hexyl) oxime, 6-[ 18 F]FPyMHO ([ 18 F]6). The current Sep-Pak method not only improves the overall radiochemical yield (50 ± 9%, decay-corrected, n = 9) but also significantly reduces the synthesis time (from 60-90 minutes to 30 minutes) when compared with literature methods for the synthesis of similar prosthetic groups. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Applications of automata and graphs: Labeling operators in Hilbert space. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ilwoo; Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2009-01-01

    We introduced a family of infinite graphs directly associated with a class of von Neumann automaton model A G . These are finite state models used in symbolic dynamics: stimuli models and in control theory. In the context of groupoid von Neumann algebras, and an associated fractal group, we prove a classification theorem for representations of automata.

  8. Confidence- and security-building in South-East Asia. Working group II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagappa, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion in the Working Group II focused on the following subjects: the establishment of a zone of peace, freedom and neutrality in South-East Asia; the establishment of a nuclear weapon-free zone in South-East Asia; the Cambodian conflict; regional co-operation; military security confidence-building measures

  9. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......, but according to AMH levels, the ovaries remain multifollicular. PERSPECTIVES: A better distinction between hypothalamic amenorrhoea and PCOS could improve treatment strategies for anovulatory infertility....

  11. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Leclercq

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model. Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  12. Physicochemical properties of aluminium alloys with elements of II and III groups of periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshov, B.B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to establish the mechanism and regularities of changes of physicochemical properties of binary and multicomponent aluminium alloys with elements of II and III groups of periodic table as well as optimization and elaboration of new alloys.

  13. Homophilic and Heterophilic Interactions of Type II Cadherins Identify Specificity Groups Underlying Cell-Adhesive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Brasch

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Type II cadherins are cell-cell adhesion proteins critical for tissue patterning and neuronal targeting but whose molecular binding code remains poorly understood. Here, we delineate binding preferences for type II cadherin cell-adhesive regions, revealing extensive heterophilic interactions between specific pairs, in addition to homophilic interactions. Three distinct specificity groups emerge from our analysis with members that share highly similar heterophilic binding patterns and favor binding to one another. Structures of adhesive fragments from each specificity group confirm near-identical dimer topology conserved throughout the family, allowing interface residues whose conservation corresponds to specificity preferences to be identified. We show that targeted mutation of these residues converts binding preferences between specificity groups in biophysical and co-culture assays. Our results provide a detailed understanding of the type II cadherin interaction map and a basis for defining their role in tissue patterning and for the emerging importance of their heterophilic interactions in neural connectivity. : Type II cadherins are a family of vertebrate cell adhesion proteins expressed primarily in the CNS. Brasch et al. measure binding between adhesive fragments, revealing homophilic and extensive selective heterophilic binding with specificities that define groups of similar cadherins. Structures reveal common adhesive dimers, with residues governing cell-adhesive specificity. Keywords: cell adhesion, crystal structure, hemophilic specificity, heterophilic specificity, neural patterning, synaptic targeting, cadherin

  14. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  15. Treatment strategies for women with WHO group II anovulation: systematic review and network meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Rui; Kim, Bobae V.; van Wely, Madelon; Johnson, Neil P.; Costello, Michael F.; Zhang, Hanwang; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu; Legro, Richard S.; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Norman, Robert J.; Mol, Ben Willem J.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of alternative first line treatment options for women with WHO group II anovulation wishing to conceive. Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and Embase, up to 11 April 2016. Randomised controlled trials

  16. Radioimmunoassay of serum group I and group II pepsinogens in normal controls and patients with various disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, M.; Miki, K.; Hayashi, R.; Niwa, H.; Oka, H.; Furihata, C.; Matsushima, T.; Kageyama, T.; Takahashi, K.

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human group I pepsinogens (PgI) in serum was developed, using PgI purified from gastric mucosa. The sensitivity (0.7 μg/l) and reproducibility of the assay were satisfactory for clinical use. In normal controls total serum pepsinogen (T-Pg) level was 58.9 +- 31.7 μg/l (mean +- SD) (PgI, 43.6 +- 25.0 μg/l; PgII, 15.3 +- 11.1 μg/l). Peptic ulcer cases had elevated T-Pg levels (gastric ulcer, gastroduodenal ulcer and duodenal ulcer, in increasing order of magnitude). T-Pg levels were not useful for diagnosis of peptic ulcer because of a large overlap with normal controls. T-Pg levels were low in patients with gastric polyp and in aged subjects. In these groups, the decrease of PgI was more marked than that of PgII. (Auth.)

  17. Radioimmunoassay of serum group I and group II pepsinogens in normal controls and patients with various disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichinose, M.; Miki, K.; Hayashi, R.; Niwa, H.; Oka, H. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Furihata, C.; Matsushima, T. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Medical Science); Kageyama, T.; Takahashi, K. (Kyoto Univ., Inuyama (Japan). Primate Research Inst.)

    1982-12-09

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human group I pepsinogens (PgI) in serum was developed, using PgI purified from gastric mucosa. The sensitivity (0.7 ..mu..g/l) and reproducibility of the assay were satisfactory for clinical use. In normal controls total serum pepsinogen (T-Pg) level was 58.9 +- 31.7 ..mu..g/l (mean +- SD) (PgI, 43.6 +- 25.0 ..mu..g/l; PgII, 15.3 +- 11.1 ..mu..g/l). Peptic ulcer cases had elevated T-Pg levels (gastric ulcer, gastroduodenal ulcer and duodenal ulcer, in increasing order of magnitude). T-Pg levels were not useful for diagnosis of peptic ulcer because of a large overlap with normal controls. T-Pg levels were low in patients with gastric polyp and in aged subjects. In these groups, the decrease of PgI was more marked than that of PgII.

  18. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Brunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favourable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified (encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB and gerC genes (gerX. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC gerX1, ABABCB gerX2 and ACxBBB gerX4, and a single CA-B gerX3 gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptors types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2 and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in DPA release. The cortex lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important.

  19. Synthesis of the arginine labelled by {sup 15}N on the amidine group; Synthese de l'arginine marquee par {sup 15}N dans le groupe amidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, L; Clement, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    For some biologic studies, it was necessarily to have (+) arginine marked by nitrogen 15 in the amidine group. This report describes the synthesis of the labelled arginine. The first step is the synthesis of the methyl-isourated hydro-chlorate, the intermediate reactive, from the ClNH{sub 4} isotope. The arginine is obtained from the ornithine which we previously blocked the amino group as cupric complex. The mean yield in arginine reaches 30%, based on the ammonium chloride uses. (M.B.) [French] Pour certaines etudes biologiques, il etait indispensable de disposer de (+) arginine marquee par l'azote 15 dans le groupement amidine. Ce rapport decrit la synthese de l'ariginine marquee. La premiere etape est la synthese du chlorhydrate de methylisouree, intermediaire reactif, a partir du ClNH{sub 4} isotopique. L'obtention de l'arginine est obtenue a partir de l'ornithine dont on a prealablement bloque le groupe amino sous forme de complexe cuivrique. Le rendement global moyen en arginine atteint 30 %, base sur le chlorure d'ammonium utilise. (M.B.)

  20. Blood cell labeling with technetium-99m. II. Measurement of circulating blood volume by sup(99m)Tc-labeled red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, T; Yoshida, H; Matsuda, S; Kimura, H; Miura, N [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1978-02-01

    Using a labeling method with sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate to red blood cells (RBC), circulating blood volume was measured in comparison with that from /sup 51/Cr-labeled RBC method. The technique is easier than already published methods, because CIS kit for sup(99m)Tc-RBC labeling (TCK-11) became to be available recently. Two mls of ACD-anticoagulated blood were withdrawn and 0.5 ml of reducing reagent prepared just before use was added to blood, waiting 5 minutes and discarding the serum after centrifugation, then adding 100 ..mu..Ci of sup(99m)Tc. After washing the labeled cells by isotonic saline, cells were re-suspended in 10 ml of saline and injected to the subject. Blood specimen was obtained 10, 30, 60 and 120 minutes after infusion and blood volume was calculated by the usual way. Circulating blood volume by sup(99m)Tc was well correlated with that by /sup 51/Cr (=0.98, p 0.01), however, the value calculated from sup(99m)Tc were 4.8 percent higher than those by /sup 51/Cr, which suggested the elution of sup(99m)Tc from labeled RBC. sup(99m)Tc method has the advantages that higher radioactivity can be obtained in small amount of blood, which is useful in the determination of blood volume in children or in small animals in the laboratory. The measurement of blood volume of the mouse was done by using sup(99m)Tc method. The results were 1.70 +- 0.06 ml (6.35 +- 0.18%/gm), which coincided with the values reported previously. Because of it's short half life and low radiation dosage to the patients, sup(99m)Tc method will be recommended in the field of pediatrics or in patients with polycythemia or congestive heart failure, who are requested the repeated measurement of blood volume.

  1. [3H]-labelling of hydroxyethyl groups - synthesis of S-(2-hydroxy [2-3H] ethyl) glutathione and of [3H]-melphalan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verny, M.; Nicolas, C.

    1988-01-01

    The easy preparation of 2-bromo [1- 3 H] ethanol allows the tritium labelling of molecules bearing S- or N-hydroxyethyl groups. Thus S-(2-hydroxy [2- 3 H] ethyl) glutathione and [ 3 H]-Melphalan were synthesised with specific radioactivities of around 10 mCi/mmol (370 MBq/mmol). These values could be theoretically raised to 10 Ci/mmol (370 GBq/mmol), according to the specific activity of the labelling precursor, sodium [ 3 H] borohydride. (author)

  2. The MANDELA study: A multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel group trial to refine the use of everolimus after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuse, Tobias; Bara, Christoph; Barten, Markus J; Hirt, Stephan W; Doesch, Andreas O; Knosalla, Christoph; Grinninger, Carola; Stypmann, Jörg; Garbade, Jens; Wimmer, Peter; May, Christoph; Porstner, Martina; Schulz, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    In recent years a series of trials has sought to define the optimal protocol for everolimus-based immunosuppression in heart transplantation, with the goal of minimizing exposure to calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and harnessing the non-immunosuppressive benefits of everolimus. Randomized studies have demonstrated that immunosuppressive potency can be maintained in heart transplant patients receiving everolimus despite marked CNI reduction, although very early CNI withdrawal may be inadvisable. A potential renal advantage has been shown for everolimus, but the optimal time for conversion and the adequate reduction in CNI exposure remain to be defined. Other reasons for use of everolimus include a substantial reduction in the risk of cytomegalovirus infection, and evidence for inhibition of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, a major cause of graft loss. The ongoing MANDELA study is a 12-month multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study in which efficacy, renal function and safety are compared in approximately 200 heart transplant patients. Patients receive CNI therapy, steroids and everolimus or mycophenolic acid during months 3 to 6 post-transplant, and are then randomized at month 6 post-transplant (i) to convert to CNI-free immunosuppression with everolimus and mycophenolic acid or (ii) to continue reduced-exposure CNI, with concomitant everolimus. Patients are then followed to month 18 post-transplant The rationale and expectations for the trial and its methodology are described herein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. On E-discretization of tori of compact simple Lie groups. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrivnák, Jiří; Juránek, Michal

    2017-10-01

    Ten types of discrete Fourier transforms of Weyl orbit functions are developed. Generalizing one-dimensional cosine, sine, and exponential, each type of the Weyl orbit function represents an exponential symmetrized with respect to a subgroup of the Weyl group. Fundamental domains of even affine and dual even affine Weyl groups, governing the argument and label symmetries of the even orbit functions, are determined. The discrete orthogonality relations are formulated on finite sets of points from the refinements of the dual weight lattices. Explicit counting formulas for the number of points of the discrete transforms are deduced. Real-valued Hartley orbit functions are introduced, and all ten types of the corresponding discrete Hartley transforms are detailed.

  4. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  5. Nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu KG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available K Govind Babu,1 Kumar Prabhash,2 Ashok K Vaid,3 Bhawna Sirohi,3 Ravi B Diwakar,4 Raghunadha Rao,5 Madhuchanda Kar,6 Hemant Malhotra,7 Shona Nag,8 Chanchal Goswami,9 Vinod Raina,10 Ravi Mohan111Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 2Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, 3Artemis Health Institute, Delhi, 4Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 5Nizam Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, 6B R Singh Hospital, Kolkata, 7Birla Cancer Centre, Jaipur, 8Jehangir Hospital, Pune, 9B P Poddar Hospital and Medical Research Ltd, Kolkata, 10Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi, 11King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, IndiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy (docetaxel and carboplatin versus chemotherapy alone in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer.Methods: This multicenter, open-label, Phase II study randomized 110 patients to receive nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy (nimotuzumab group or chemotherapy alone (control group, and comprised concomitant, maintenance, and follow-up phases. Nimotuzumab 200 mg was administered once weekly for 13 weeks during the first two phases with four cycles of chemotherapy and docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and carboplatin (area under the curve 5 mg/mL*min every 3 weeks for a maximum of four cycles during the concomitant phase. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (sum of complete response and partial response. Secondary endpoints, ie, overall survival and progression-free survival, were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Efficacy was evaluated on the intent-to-treat and efficacy-evaluable sets. Safety was assessed from adverse event and serious adverse event data.Results: The objective response rate was significantly higher in the nimotuzumab group than in the control group in the intent-to-treat population (54% versus 34.5%; P=0.04. A complete response and partial response were achieved in 3

  6. Characterization and evolutionary implications of the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu in group II phosphopantetheinyl transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Yu-Dong; Liu, Jian-Bo; Ran, Xin-Xin; Guo, Yuan-Yang; Ren, Ni-Ni; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases), which play an essential role in both primary and secondary metabolism, are magnesium binding enzymes. In this study, we characterized the magnesium binding residues of all known group II PPTases by biochemical and evolutionary analysis. Our results suggested that group II PPTases could be classified into two subgroups, two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu and three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Glu-Glu. Mutations of two three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases and one two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTase indicate that the first and the third residues in the triads are essential to activities; the second residues in the triads are non-essential. Although variations of the second residues in the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu exist throughout the whole phylogenetic tree, the second residues are conserved in animals, plants, algae, and most prokaryotes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that: the animal group II PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may derive from horizontal gene transfer from prokaryotes.

  7. Group II intron inhibits conjugative relaxase expression in bacteria by mRNA targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Carol Lyn; Smith, Dorie

    2018-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile ribozymes that are rare in bacterial genomes, often cohabiting with various mobile elements, and seldom interrupting housekeeping genes. What accounts for this distribution has not been well understood. Here, we demonstrate that Ll.LtrB, the group II intron residing in a relaxase gene on a conjugative plasmid from Lactococcus lactis, inhibits its host gene expression and restrains the naturally cohabiting mobile element from conjugative horizontal transfer. We show that reduction in gene expression is mainly at the mRNA level, and results from the interaction between exon-binding sequences (EBSs) in the intron and intron-binding sequences (IBSs) in the mRNA. The spliced intron targets the relaxase mRNA and reopens ligated exons, causing major mRNA loss. Taken together, this study provides an explanation for the distribution and paucity of group II introns in bacteria, and suggests a potential force for those introns to evolve into spliceosomal introns. PMID:29905149

  8. Surgical outcomes in two different age groups with Focal Cortical Dysplasia type II: Any real difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Molina, Jorge Luis; Di Giacomo, Roberta; Mariani, Valeria; Deleo, Francesco; Cardinale, Francesco; Uscátegui-Daccarett, Angélica María; Lorenzana, Pablo; Tassi, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Focal Cortical Dysplasias (FCDs) represent a common architectural cortical disorder underlying drug-resistant focal epilepsy. So far, studies aimed at evaluating whether age at surgery is a factor influencing surgical outcome are lacking, so that data on the comparison between patients harboring Type II FCD operated at younger age and those operated at adult age are still scarce. We compared presurgical clinical features and surgical outcomes of patients with histopathologically diagnosed Type II FCD undergoing surgery at an earlier age with those operated after 20 years of age. We retrospectively analyzed 1660 consecutive patients operated at the "Claudio Munari" Epilepsy Surgery Centre. There were 289 patients (17.4%) with a neuropathological diagnosis of Type II FCD. We included two different groups of patients, the first one including patients operated on at less than 6years, the second sharing the same seizure onset age but with delayed surgery, carried out after the age of 20. Seizure characteristics and, neuropsychological and postoperative seizure outcomes were evaluated by study group. Forty patients underwent surgery before the age of 6 and 66 patients after the age of 20. Surgical outcome was favorable in the whole population (72.6% were classified in Engel's Class Ia+Ic), independently from age at surgery. In the children group, 32 patients were classified in Class I, including 30 (75%) children in classes Ia and Ic. In the adult group, 53 belonged to Class I of whom 47 (71%) were in classes Ia and Ic. The percentage of permanent complications, the surgical outcomes, and AED withdrawal did not significantly differ by study group. Our results indicate that there is no difference between the groups, suggesting that outcome depends mainly on the histological findings and not on timing of surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of serelaxin in patients with hepatic impairment: a single-dose, open-label, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobalava, Zhanna; Villevalde, Svetlana; Kotovskaya, Yulia; Hinrichsen, Holger; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Zaehringer, Andreas; Pang, Yinuo; Rajman, Iris; Canadi, Jasna; Dahlke, Marion; Lloyd, Peter; Halabi, Atef

    2015-06-01

    Serelaxin is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2 in development for treatment of acute heart failure. This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of serelaxin in patients with hepatic impairment. Secondary objectives included evaluation of immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of serelaxin. This was an open-label, parallel group study (NCT01433458) comparing the PK of serelaxin following a single 24 h intravenous (i.v.) infusion (30 μg kg(-1)  day(-1) ) between patients with mild, moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class A, B, C) and healthy matched controls. Blood sampling and standard safety assessments were conducted. Primary non-compartmental PK parameters [including area under the serum concentration-time curve AUC(0-48 h) and AUC(0-∞) and serum concentration at 24 h post-dose (C24h )] were compared between each hepatic impairment group and healthy controls. A total of 49 subjects (including 25 patients with hepatic impairment) were enrolled, of which 48 subjects completed the study. In all groups, the serum concentration of serelaxin increased over the first few hours of infusion, reached steady-state at 12-24 h and then declined following completion of infusion, with a mean terminal half-life of 7-8 h. All PK parameter estimates were comparable between each group of patients with hepatic impairment and healthy controls. No serious adverse events, discontinuations due to adverse events or deaths were reported. No serelaxin treatment-related antibodies developed during this study. The PK and safety profile of serelaxin were not affected by hepatic impairment. No dose adjustment is needed for serelaxin treatment of 48 h i.v. infusion in patients with hepatic impairment. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Efficacy of Rituximab in Refractory Inflammatory Myopathies Associated with Anti- Synthetase Auto-Antibodies: An Open-Label, Phase II Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Allenbach

    Full Text Available Anti-synthetase syndrome (anti-SS is frequently associated with myositis and interstitial lung disease (ILD. We evaluated prospectively, in a multicenter, open-label, phase II study, the efficacy of rituximab on muscle and lung outcomes.Patients were enrolled if they were refractory to conventional treatments (prednisone and at least 2 immunosuppressants. They received 1 g of rituximab at D0, D15, and M6. The primary endpoint was muscular improvement based on manual muscular testing (MMT10, Kendall score in 10 muscles at M12. Secondary endpoints were normalization of creatine kinase (CK level, ILD improvement based on forced vital capacity and/or diffuse capacity for carbon monoxide, and number and/or doses of associated immunosuppressants.Twelve patients were enrolled, and 10 completed the study. Only 2 patients presented an improvement of at least 4 points on at least two muscle groups (primary end-point. Overall, seven patients had an increase of at least 4 points on MMT10. CK level decreased from 399 IU/L (range, 48-11,718 to 74.5 IU/L (range, 40-47,857. Corticosteroid doses decreased from 52.5 mg/d (range, 10-70 to 9 mg/d (range, 7-65 and six patients had a decrease in the burden of their associated immunosuppressants. At baseline, all 10 patients presented with ILD. At M12, improvement of ILD was observed in 5 out of the 10 patients, stabilization in 4, and worsening in 1.This pilot study of rituximab treatment in patients with refractory anti-SS provided data on evolution of muscular and pulmonary parameters. Rituximab should now be evaluated in a larger, controlled study for this homogenous group of patients.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00774462.

  11. Pd(II)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalizations Directed by Distal Weakly Coordinating Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wan, Li; Zhang, Guofu; Leow, Dasheng; Spangler, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Ortho-C(sp2)–H olefination and acetoxylation of broadly useful synthetic building blocks phenylacetyl Weinreb amides, esters, and ketones are developed without installing an additional directing group. The interplay between the distal weak coordination and the ligand-acceleration is crucial for these reactions to proceed under mild conditions. The tolerance of longer distance between the target C–H bonds and the directing functional groups also allows for the functionalizations of more distal C–H bonds in hydrocinnamoyl ketones, Weinreb amides and biphenyl Weinreb amides. Mechanistically, the coordination of these carbonyl groups and the bisdentate amino acid ligand with Pd(II) centers provides further evidence for our early hypothesis that the carbonyl groups of the potassium carboxylate is responsible for the directed C–H activation of carboxylic acids. PMID:25768039

  12. The Effect of Group Reminiscence Therapy on Depression in Women With Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of psychological disorders and symptoms. Objectives This research investigated the effect of group reminiscence therapy on depression among women with type II diabetes. Patients and Methods The present study was a clinical trial study. Twenty-four patients referring to the diabetic clinic of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, Iran were selected through simple random sampling and were divided in two groups. Data were collected through a demographic questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. Group reminiscence therapy was held over eight biweekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. Finally, data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Chi-Square tests, using SPSS version 20. Results A significant difference was observed between the two groups after the intervention (P = 0.001. The rating for depression decreased significantly in the experimental group. Before the group reminiscence therapy, the highest rating for depression obtained by the experimental group was “need for consultation” (50%, whereas after the intervention, the highest rating was “no depression” (50%. One month after the intervention, the highest rating obtained for depression was “low” (50%. Conclusions Reminiscence therapy decreased depression among diabetic female patients after the intervention and one month after the intervention. It can be said that, through the reminiscence therapy, patients’ past memories were reviewed and emphasis on the positive aspects thereof in the group setting was followed by an increased sense of self-worth and a decrease in depression.

  13. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  14. Synthesis and labelling of organo-metallic prosthetic groups used for indirect radioiodination of peptides and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi, Oscar R.; Castiglia, Silvia G.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of an IAEA co-ordinated research programme the prosthetic compound ATE [N-succidinimil 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate] has been synthesized and it has been labelled with 131 I and 125 I. Its structure has been confirmed by NMR and mass spectrometry. The labelled ATE has been conjugated with human immunoglobulin G with a yield of 41%-57%. Indirect radioiodination of peptides is currently prepared. (author)

  15. Characterization of the molecular basis of group II intron RNA recognition by CRS1-CRM domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ido; Klipcan, Liron; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Kolton, Max; Shaya, Felix; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2008-08-22

    CRM (chloroplast RNA splicing and ribosome maturation) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain of ancient origin that has been retained in eukaryotic genomes only within the plant lineage. Whereas in bacteria CRM domains exist as single domain proteins involved in ribosome maturation, in plants they are found in a family of proteins that contain between one and four repeats. Several members of this family with multiple CRM domains have been shown to be required for the splicing of specific plastidic group II introns. Detailed biochemical analysis of one of these factors in maize, CRS1, demonstrated its high affinity and specific binding to the single group II intron whose splicing it facilitates, the plastid-encoded atpF intron RNA. Through its association with two intronic regions, CRS1 guides the folding of atpF intron RNA into its predicted "catalytically active" form. To understand how multiple CRM domains cooperate to achieve high affinity sequence-specific binding to RNA, we analyzed the RNA binding affinity and specificity associated with each individual CRM domain in CRS1; whereas CRM3 bound tightly to the RNA, CRM1 associated specifically with a unique region found within atpF intron domain I. CRM2, which demonstrated only low binding affinity, also seems to form specific interactions with regions localized to domains I, III, and IV. We further show that CRM domains share structural similarities and RNA binding characteristics with the well known RNA recognition motif domain.

  16. Off-label use of medical products in radiation therapy: Summary of the Report of AAPM Task Group No. 121

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Thompson, Heaton H. II; Jani, Shirish K.

    2010-01-01

    Medical products (devices, drugs, or biologics) contain information in their labeling regarding the manner in which the manufacturer has determined that the products can be used in a safe and effective manner. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves medical products for use for these specific indications which are part of the medical product's labeling. When medical products are used in a manner not specified in the labeling, it is commonly referred to as off-label use. The practice of medicine allows for this off-label use to treat individual patients, but the ethical and legal implications for such unapproved use can be confusing. Although the responsibility and, ultimately, the liability for off-label use often rests with the prescribing physician, medical physicists and others are also responsible for the safe and proper use of the medical products. When these products are used for purposes other than which they were approved, it is important for medical physicists to understand their responsibilities. In the United States, medical products can only be marketed if officially cleared, approved, or licensed by the FDA; they can be used if they are not subject to or specifically exempt from FDA regulations, or if they are being used in research with the appropriate regulatory safeguards. Medical devices are either cleared or approved by FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Drugs are approved by FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and biological products such as vaccines or blood are licensed under a biologics license agreement by FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. For the purpose of this report, the process by which the FDA eventually clears, approves, or licenses such products for marketing in the United States will be referred to as approval. This report summarizes the various ways medical products, primarily medical devices, can legally be brought to market in the United States, and includes a discussion of the

  17. Off-label use of medical products in radiation therapy: Summary of the Report of AAPM Task Group No. 121

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Thompson, Heaton H. II; Jani, Shirish K. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 (United States); and others

    2010-05-15

    Medical products (devices, drugs, or biologics) contain information in their labeling regarding the manner in which the manufacturer has determined that the products can be used in a safe and effective manner. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves medical products for use for these specific indications which are part of the medical product's labeling. When medical products are used in a manner not specified in the labeling, it is commonly referred to as off-label use. The practice of medicine allows for this off-label use to treat individual patients, but the ethical and legal implications for such unapproved use can be confusing. Although the responsibility and, ultimately, the liability for off-label use often rests with the prescribing physician, medical physicists and others are also responsible for the safe and proper use of the medical products. When these products are used for purposes other than which they were approved, it is important for medical physicists to understand their responsibilities. In the United States, medical products can only be marketed if officially cleared, approved, or licensed by the FDA; they can be used if they are not subject to or specifically exempt from FDA regulations, or if they are being used in research with the appropriate regulatory safeguards. Medical devices are either cleared or approved by FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Drugs are approved by FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and biological products such as vaccines or blood are licensed under a biologics license agreement by FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. For the purpose of this report, the process by which the FDA eventually clears, approves, or licenses such products for marketing in the United States will be referred to as approval. This report summarizes the various ways medical products, primarily medical devices, can legally be brought to market in the United States, and includes a

  18. The synthesis and properties of some organometallic compounds containing group IV (Ge, Sn)-group II (Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Des Tombe, F.J.A.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der; Creemers, H.M.J.C.; Carey, N.A.D.; Noltes, J.G.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions of triphenylgermane and triphenyltin hydride with coordinatively saturated organozinc or organocadmium compounds give organometallic complexes containing Group IV (Ge, Sn)-Group II(Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds. The 2,2′-bipyridine complexes show solvent-dependent charge-transfer

  19. The inhalation of insoluble iron oxide particles in the sub-micron ranges. Part II - Plutonium-237 labelled aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.A.; Ramsden, D.

    1971-10-01

    The results of a series of inhalation studies using iron oxide particles in the size range 0.1 to 0.3 um (count median diameter) are described. In this series the aerosols were labelled with plutonium 237. In vivo detection, excretion analysis and crude location studies were obtainable and the results compared to the earlier studies using chromium 51 labelled aerosols. Plutonium 237 can be considered as a simulator for plutonium 239 and attempts are made to extrapolate the results to the problem of the estimation of plutonium 239 in the human lung. (author)

  20. A combined phase I and II open label study on the effects of a seaweed extract nutrient complex on osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Myers

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Stephen P Myers1,2, Joan O’Connor1,2, J Helen Fitton3, Lyndon Brooks4, Margaret Rolfe4, Paul Connellan5, Hans Wohlmuth2,5,6, Phil A Cheras1,2, Carol Morris51NatMed-Research, 2Centre for Health and Wellbeing, 4Graduate Research College, 5Centre for Phytochemistry and Pharmacology, 6Medicinal Plant Herbarium, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 3Marinova Pty Ltd, Hobart, Tasmania, AustraliaBackground: Isolated fucoidans from brown marine algae have been shown to have a range of anti-inflammatory effects.Purpose: This present study tested a Maritech® extract formulation, containing a blend of extracts from three different species of brown algae, plus nutrients in an open label combined phase I and II pilot scale study to determine both acute safety and efficacy in osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients and methods: Participants (n = 12, five females [mean age, 62 ± 11.06 years] and seven males [mean age, 57.14 ± 9.20 years] with a confirmed diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee were randomized to either 100 mg (n = 5 or 1000 mg (n = 7 of a Maritech® extract formulation per day. The formulation contained Maritech® seaweed extract containing Fucus vesiculosis (85% w/w, Macrocystis pyrifera (10% w/w and Laminaria japonica (5% w/w plus vitamin B6, zinc and manganese. Primary outcome was the average comprehensive arthritis test (COAT score which is comprised of four sub-scales: pain, stiffness, difficulty with physical activity and overall symptom severity measured weekly. Safety measures included full blood count, serum lipids, liver function tests, urea, creatinine and electrolytes determined at baseline and week 12. All adverse events were recorded.Results: Eleven participants completed 12 weeks and one completed 10 weeks of the study. Using a multilevel linear model, the average COAT score was reduced by 18% for the 100 mg treatment and 52% for the 1000 mg dose at the end of the study. There was a clear dose response effect

  1. Impact of tobacco-related health warning labels across socioeconomic, race and ethnic groups: results from a randomized web-based experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cantrell

    control policies that have the potential to reduce communication inequalities across groups. Policies that establish strong pictorial warning labels on tobacco packaging may be instrumental in reducing the toll of the tobacco epidemic, particularly within vulnerable communities.

  2. Chromite and olivine in type II chondrules in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites - Implications for thermal histories and group differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Prinz, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Unequilibrated chromite and olivine margin compositions in type II chondrules are noted to differ systematically among three of the chondrite groups, suggesting that type II liquids differed in composition among the groups. These differences may be interpreted as indicators of different chemical compositions of the precursor solids which underwent melting, or, perhaps, as differences in the extent to which immiscible metal sulfide droplets were lost during chondrule formation. Because zinc is detectable only in type II chromites which have undergone reequilibration, the high zinc contents reported for chondritic chromites in other studies probably reflect redistribution during thermal metamorphism.

  3. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcia, Marco; Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts

  4. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  5. Marine Group II Dominates Planktonic Archaea in Water Column of the Northeastern South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haodong Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, nutrients, and salinity are among the important factors constraining the distribution and abundance of microorganisms in the ocean. Marine Group II (MGII belonging to Euryarchaeota commonly dominates the planktonic archaeal community in shallow water and Marine Group I (MGI, now is called Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in global oceans. Results of quantitative PCR (qPCR and 454 sequencing in our study, however, showed the dominance of MGII in planktonic archaea throughout the water column of the northeastern South China Sea (SCS that is characterized by strong water mixing. The abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA representing the main group of Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in the northeastern SCS was significantly lower than in other oceanic regions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the top operational taxonomic units (OTUs of the MGII occurring predominantly below 200 m depth may be unique in the northeastern SCS based on the observation that they are distantly related to known sequences (identity ranging from 90–94%. The abundance of MGII was also significantly correlated with total bacteria in the whole column, which may indicate that MGII and bacteria may have similar physiological or biochemical properties or responses to environmental variation. This study provides valuable information about the dominance of MGII over AOA in both shallow and deep water in the northeastern SCS and highlights the need for comprehensive studies integrating physical, chemical, and microbial oceanography.

  6. HEXAGA-II-120, -60, -30 two-dimensional multi-group neutron diffusion programmes for a uniform triangular mesh with arbitrary group scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicki, Z.

    1979-06-01

    This report presents the AGA two-sweep iterative methods belonging to the family of factorization techniques in their practical application in the HEXAGA-II two-dimensional programme to obtain the numerical solution to the multi-group, time-independent, (real and/or adjoint) neutron diffusion equations for a fine uniform triangular mesh. An arbitrary group scattering model is permitted. The report written for the users provides the description of input and output. The use of HEXAGA-II is illustrated by two sample reactor problems. (orig.) [de

  7. Effect of the prosthetic group on the pharmacologic properties of 18F-labeled rhodamine B, a potential myocardial perfusion agent for positron emission tomography (PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomä, Mark D; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Zhang, Shaohui; Baker, Amanda; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S Ted; Packard, Alan B

    2012-12-27

    We recently reported the development of the 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl ester of rhodamine B as a potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for myocardial perfusion imaging. This compound, which was prepared using a [(18)F]fluoroethyl prosthetic group, has significant uptake in the myocardium in rats but also demonstrates relatively high liver uptake and is rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo in mice. We have now prepared (18)F-labeled rhodamine B using three additional prosthetic groups (propyl, diethylene glycol, and triethylene glycol) and found that the prosthetic group has a significant effect on the in vitro and in vivo properties of these compounds. Of the esters prepared to date, the diethylene glycol ester is superior in terms of in vitro stability and pharmacokinetics. These observations suggest that the prosthetic group plays a significant role in determining the pharmacological properties of (18)F-labeled compounds. They also support the value of continued investigation of (18)F-labeled rhodamines as PET radiopharmaceuticals for myocardial perfusion imaging.

  8. The Effect of the Prosthetic Group on the Pharmacologic Properties of 18F-labeled Rhodamine B, a Potential Myocardial Perfusion Agent for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomä, Mark D.; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Zhang, Shaohui; Baker, Amanda; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic H.; Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported the development of the 2-[18F]fluoroethyl ester of rhodamine B as a potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for myocardial perfusion imaging. This compound, which was prepared using a [18F]fluoroethyl prosthetic group, has significant uptake in the myocardium in rats, but also demonstrates relatively high liver uptake and is rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo in mice. We have now prepared 18F-labeled rhodamine B using three additional prosthetic groups (propyl, diethylene glycol, and triethylene glycol) and found that the prosthetic group has a significant effect on the in vitro and in vivo properties of these compounds. Of the esters prepared to date, the diethylene glycol ester is superior in terms of in vitro stability and pharmacokinetics. These observations suggest that the prosthetic group plays a significant role in determining the pharmacological properties of 18F-labeled compounds. They also support the value of continued investigation of 18F-labeled rhodamines as PET radiopharmaceuticals for myocardial perfusion imaging. PMID:23210516

  9. Histofluorescent labelling of catecholaminergic structures in rotifers (Aschelminthes). II. Males of Brachionus plicatilis and structures from sectioned females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshmirian, J; Nogrady, T

    1988-01-01

    1. Catecholaminergic structures in the male Brachionus plicatilis were investigated, using aqueous dansylpropranolol as fluorescent label of neurotransmitter receptors. 2. All major organs of the male are innervated by catecholaminergic systems, that may also be involved in the regulation of copulatory behavior. 3. Cryostat-sectioned preparations of the female B. plicatilis were also investigated. They provided additional information to findings on whole animals reported in our previous paper (Keshmirian and Nogrady 1987 a).

  10. The synthesis of isotopic fluorine and iodine-labeled COX-II inhibitor and in vitro validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Gwang Gil; Lee, Tae Sub; Lee, Kyo Chul; Moon, Byung Seok; Choi, Chang Woon; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In these day, NASIDs (non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, diclofenac and ibuprofen are the most common medications used to reduce pain and inflammation. However, they act by inhibiting both COX-I and COX-II which can cause serious gastrointestinal side effects such as ulcers, stomach perforations and bleeds. COX-I produces prostaglandins believed to be responsible for the protection of the stomach lining. However, COX-II produces prostaglandins believed to be responsible for pain and inflammation. Recently, the most widely studied selective COX-II inhibitor such as celecoxib and rofecoxib' one work by inhibiting the effect of COX-II on pain and inflammation without inhibiting COX-I which protects gastrointestinal lining.

  11. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1994-01-01

    of group II have, during the observation period, become more frequently resistant to penicillin and/or tetracycline. Strains typed at 100 x RTD of subgroup 71+ and the 'rest of group II' are more frequently antibiotic resistant than the rest of the group II strains. Strains of the increasing subgroups...

  12. Boys II Men: A Culturally-Responsive School Counseling Group for Urban High School Boys of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gualdrón, Leyla; Yeh, Christine; Russell, LyRyan

    2016-01-01

    Using a participatory and collaborative approach, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a culturally responsive school counseling group, "Boys II Men," for 11 low-income diverse male students of color at an urban public school. The content of the group focused on five areas: social connections and support, exploring gender roles,…

  13. Probing adenine rings and backbone linkages using base specific isotope-edited Raman spectroscopy: application to group II intron ribozyme domain V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Dayie, T Kwaku; Carey, Paul R

    2010-04-27

    Raman difference spectroscopy is used to probe the properties of a 36-nt RNA molecule, "D5", which lies at the heart of the catalytic apparatus in group II introns. For D5 that has all of its adenine residues labeled with (13)C and (15)N and utilizing Raman difference spectroscopy, we identify the conformationally sensitive -C-O-P-O-C- stretching modes of the unlabeled bonds adjacent to adenine bases, as well as the adenine ring modes themselves. The phosphodiester modes can be assigned to individual adenine residues based on earlier NMR data. The effect of Mg(2+) binding was explored by analyzing the Raman difference spectra for [D5 + Mg(2+)] minus [D5 no Mg(2+)], for D5 unlabeled, or D5 labeled with (13)C/(15)N-enriched adenine. In both sets of data we assign differential features to G ring modes perturbed by Mg(2+) binding at the N7 position. In the A-labeled spectra we attribute a Raman differential near 1450 cm(-1) and changes of intensity at 1296 cm(-1) to Mg binding at the N7 position of adenine bases. The A and G bases involved in Mg(2+) binding again can be identified using earlier NMR results. For the unlabeled D5, a change in the C-O-P-O-C stretch profile at 811 cm(-1) upon magnesium binding is due to a "tightening up" (in the sense of a more rigid molecule with less dynamic interchange among competing ribose conformers) of the D5 structure. For adenine-labeled D5, small changes in the adenine backbone bond signatures in the 810-830 cm(-1) region suggest that small conformational changes occur in the tetraloop and bulge regions upon binding of Mg(2+). The PO(2)(-) stretching vibration, near 1100 cm(-1), from the nonbridging phosphate groups, probes the effect of Mg(2+)-hydrate inner-sphere interactions that cause an upshift. In turn, the upshift is modulated by the presence of monovalent cations since in the presence of Na(+) and Li(+) the upshift is 23 +/- 2 cm(-1) while in the presence of K(+) and Cs(+) it is 13 +/- 3 cm(-1), a finding that correlates

  14. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Zerbato

    Full Text Available Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  15. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed “The QUASAR reproducibility study”. Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87±0.95mm and rotations of 1.56±0.66°. Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4±7.5 [ml/100g/min] with a between subject standard variation SDb = 5.5 [ml/100g/min] and a within subject standard deviation SDw = 4.7 [ml/100g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies. PMID:19660557

  16. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies.

  17. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated...... and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing...

  18. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated...... and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing...

  19. Construction of expression vector containing glnA gene and detection of NPT II activity in the transgenic rice calli using 32P-labelled compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Jin; Zhang Xueqin; Yan Qiusheng; Chen Zhangliang; You Chongbiao

    1993-08-01

    The glnA gene encoding glutamine synthetase (GS) was amplified from Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 by PCR technique. the amplified 1.4 kb DNA fragment was cloned at the EcoRV site of Bluescript-SK. Both sequencing and restriction digestion data showed that the 1.4 kb DNA fragment flanked with BamHI site at each end was really the glnA gene of A. brasilense Sp7. The glnA gene was ligated with Bg1 II site of pCo24. As a result, an expression vector pGSC35 with CaMV35S promoter was obtained. Using colony in situ hybridization with α- 32 P-dATP labelled probes to screen the positive clones, another glnA gene expression vector pAGNB92 with rice actin 1 promoter was constructed after three rounds of ligation and transformation. Protoplasts isolated from rice cell suspension line cv. T986 were transformed with glnA expression vectors pGSC35 and pAGNB92 containing neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) gene by using PEG fusion and electroporation. Transformed microcalli were selected on media containing G418 disulfate salt. NPT II activity was detected in 37% of G418 resistant calli by using dot blot hybridization with γ- 32 P-ATP and kanamycin as substrate

  20. High-throughput sequencing of human plasma RNA by using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Wu, Douglas C.; Nottingham, Ryan M.; Mohr, Sabine; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptome profiling, gene expression analysis, and RNA-based diagnostics. Here, we developed a new RNA-seq method that exploits thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs) and used it to profile human plasma RNAs. TGIRTs have higher thermostability, processivity, and fidelity than conventional reverse transcriptases, plus a novel template-switching activity that can efficiently attach RNA-seq adapters to target RNA sequences without RNA ligation. The new TGIRT-seq method enabled construction of RNA-seq libraries from RNA in RNA in 1-mL plasma samples from a healthy individual revealed RNA fragments mapping to a diverse population of protein-coding gene and long ncRNAs, which are enriched in intron and antisense sequences, as well as nearly all known classes of small ncRNAs, some of which have never before been seen in plasma. Surprisingly, many of the small ncRNA species were present as full-length transcripts, suggesting that they are protected from plasma RNases in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and/or exosomes. This TGIRT-seq method is readily adaptable for profiling of whole-cell, exosomal, and miRNAs, and for related procedures, such as HITS-CLIP and ribosome profiling. PMID:26554030

  1. Lattice thermal transport in group II-alloyed PbTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Hodges, James M.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Chan, Maria K. Y.

    2018-04-01

    PbTe, one of the most promising thermoelectric materials, has recently demonstrated a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of above 2.0 when alloyed with group II elements. The improvements are due mainly to significant reduction of lattice thermal conductivity (κl), which was in turn attributed to nanoparticle precipitates. However, a fundamental understanding of various phonon scattering mechanisms within the bulk alloy is still lacking. In this work, we apply the newly-developed density-functional-theory-based compressive sensing lattice dynamics approach to model lattice heat transport in PbTe, MTe, and Pb0.94M0.06Te (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) and compare our results with experimental measurements, with focus on the strain effect and mass disorder scattering. We find that (1) CaTe, SrTe, and BaTe in the rock-salt structure exhibit much higher κl than PbTe, while MgTe in the same structure shows anomalously low κl; (2) lattice heat transport of PbTe is extremely sensitive to static strain induced by alloying atoms in solid solution form; (3) mass disorder scattering plays a major role in reducing κl for Mg/Ca/Sr-alloyed PbTe through strongly suppressing the lifetimes of intermediate- and high-frequency phonons, while for Ba-alloyed PbTe, precipitated nanoparticles are also important.

  2. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2008-04-02

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M{sub 3}P{sub 2} (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be{sub 3}P{sub 2}, Mg{sub 3}P{sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}P{sub 2}, respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail.

  3. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M 3 P 2 (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be 3 P 2 , Mg 3 P 2 and Ca 3 P 2 , respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail

  4. Flagellin Diversity in Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II: a New Strategy for Strain Identification▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Twine, Susan M.; Tam, Kevin J.; Mullen, James A.; Kelly, John F.; Austin, John W.; Logan, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region. PMID:17351097

  5. Flagellin diversity in Clostridium botulinum groups I and II: a new strategy for strain identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J; Twine, Susan M; Tam, Kevin J; Mullen, James A; Kelly, John F; Austin, John W; Logan, Susan M

    2007-05-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region.

  6. Occurrences of flares with type II and IV radio events in interacting sunspot groups in the course of revolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimes, J.; Krivsky, L.

    1984-01-01

    Using data from 11-year solar cycle No. 20, it was found that flares with type II radio bursts are more than twice as frequent and flares with type IV bursts nearly twice as frequent in sunspot groups which developed close to each other or which merged in the course of revolutions than in isolated sunspot groups. With both types the occurrence of these flares is concentrated in the revolution of the so-called sunspot group interaction (their approximation, merging). (author)

  7. Synthesizing labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.; Unkefer, C.J.; Walker, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    A metabolic study is presented of the chemical reactions provided by isotopic labeling and NMR spectroscopy. Synthesis of 13 C-labeled D-glucose, a 6-carbon sugar, involves adding a labeled nitrile group to the 5-carbon sugar D-arabinose by reaction with labeled hydrogen cyanide. The product of this reaction is then reduced and hydrolyzed to a mixture of the labeled sugars. The two sugars are separated by absorption chromotography. The synthesis of 13 C-labeled L-tyrosine, an amino acid, is also presented

  8. Production of radioiodinated prosthetic group for indirect protein labeling; Obtencao de grupamento prostetico radioiodado para marcacao de proteinas por via indireta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Josefina da Silva

    2001-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments and, more recently, radiolabeled peptides have been extensively studied in order to develop radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The radioiodination of proteins can be done by a direct method, with radioiodine being incorporated in to a tyrosine residue of the protein by electrophilic substitution. The main problem in the use of radioiodinated proteins, is that they are often dehalogenated in vivo by the action of specific enzymes, probably because of the structural similarity between iodophenyl groups and thyroid hormones. Several protein radioiodination methods have been developed in order to minimize this in vivo dehalogenation using prosthetic groups for indirect labeling. In this case, the radioiodine is first incorporated in to the prosthetic group that is subsequently attached to a terminal amino group or to a {epsilon}-amino group of lysine residue. The aim of this work is to obtain a radioiodinated prosthetic group for indirect labeling of proteins. The prosthetic group selected was the N-succinimidyl-4-radioiodine benzoate (SIB), obtained by the iodination of the p-bromobenzoic acid followed by the reaction with TSTU (0-(N-succinimidyl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl uronium tetrafluoroborate) The results of these studies showed that the p-radio iodobenzoic acid was obtained with a radiochemical purity greater than 92% and a labeling yield of about 65%. Some reaction parameters were studied like temperature, time and Cu Cl mass (cataliser). The SIB was quantitatively obtained from p-radio iodobenzoic acid, using basic medium and after removing the water from the reaction using an nitrogen stream. The kinetic of this reaction is very fast with complete consumption of the p-radioiodebenzoic acid after 5 minutes. The coupling of the SIB prosthetic group to the protein was studied using Human Immunoglobulin (IgG) as a protein model. In a comparative way, the same protein was used on

  9. Electrochemiluminescence and chemiluminescence of a carboxylic acid derivative of ruthenium(II) tris-(2,2'-bipyridine) chelate synthesized for labeling purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Qinghong; Sun Shiguo; Hakansson, Markus; Langel, Kaarina; Ylinen, Tiina; Suomi, Johanna; Kulmala, Sakari

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis, purification and characterization of [4-ethoxycarbonyl-4'-carboxy-2,2'-bipyridine]bis(2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate is described. This complex is shown to be electrochemiluminescent in aqueous solution during cathodic pulse polarization of thin insulating film-coated electrodes. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) lifetime of the complex was observed to be ca. 40 μs at oxide-coated n-silicon electrodes; thus time-resolved detection is also possible. The ECL emission maximum of this carboxylate derivative is somewhat red-shifted when compared with an unmodified Ru(bpy) 3 2+ . Because the present complex can be easily covalently coupled with antibodies and oligonucleotides it is usable as an electrochemiluminescent label in various bioaffinity assays. The present chelates also produce strong chemiluminescence during dissolution of metallic magnesium in aqueous solution

  10. Proliferation of group II introns in the chloroplast genome of the green alga Oedocladium carolinianum (Chlorophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Simon Brouard

    2016-10-01

    longer and dispersed repeats are more abundant, but a smaller fraction of the Oedocladium genome is occupied by introns. Six additional group II introns are present, five of which lack ORFs and carry highly similar sequences to that of the ORF-less IIA intron shared with Oedogonium. Secondary structure analysis of the group IIA introns disclosed marked differences in the exon-binding sites; however, each intron showed perfect or nearly perfect base pairing interactions with its target site. Discussion Our results suggest that chloroplast genes rearrange more slowly in the Oedogoniales than in the Chaetophorales and raise questions as to what was the nature of the foreign coding sequences in the IR of the common ancestor of the Oedogoniales. They provide the first evidence for intragenomic proliferation of group IIA introns in the Viridiplantae, revealing that intron spread in the Oedocladium lineage likely occurred by retrohoming after sequence divergence of the exon-binding sites.

  11. Separation of Trace Amount Zn (II Using Additional Carbonyl and Carboxyl Groups Functionalized-Nano Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moghimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of Zn(IIions in water samples has been developed.  The first additional carbonyl and carboxyl functionalized-nano graphene (SPFNano graphene. The presence of additional carbonyl and carboxyl groups located at the edge of the sheets makes GO sheets strongly hydrophilic, allowing them to readily swell and disperse in water. Based on these oxygen functionalities, different model structures of GO were used as absorbent for extraction of Zn (II   ions by solid phase extraction method. The complexes were eluted with HNO3 (2M10% V.V-1 methanol in acetone and determined the analyte by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.  The procedure is based on the selective formation of Zn (II at optimum pH by elution with organic eluents and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The method is based on complex formation on the surface of the ENVI-18 DISKTM disks modified carbonyl and carboxyl functionalized-nano graphene oxide molecules covalently bonded together followed by stripping of the retained species by minimum amounts of appropriate organic solvents. The elution is efficient and quantitative. The effect of potential interfering ions, pH, SPFNano graphene, amount, stripping solvent, and sample flow rate were also investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the break-through volume was found to about 1000mL providing a preconcentration factor of 500. The maximum capacity of the disks was found to be 456± 3 µg for Zn2+.The limit of detection of the proposed method is 5ng per 1000mL.The method was applied to the extraction and recovery of Zn in different water samples.

  12. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289.

  13. Regulation of pathogenicity in hop stunt viroid-related group II citrus viroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reanwarakorn, K; Semancik, J S

    1998-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences were determined for two hop stunt viroid-related Group II citrus viroids characterized as either a cachexia disease non-pathogenic variant (CVd-IIa) or a pathogenic variant (CVd-IIb). Sequence identity between the two variants of 95.6% indicated a conserved genome with the principal region of nucleotide difference clustered in the variable (V) domain. Full-length viroid RT-PCR cDNA products were cloned into plasmid SP72. Viroid cDNA clones as well as derived RNA transcripts were transmissible to citron (Citrus medica L.) and Luffa aegyptiaca Mill. To determine the locus of cachexia pathogenicity as well as symptom expression in Luffa, chimeric viroid cDNA clones were constructed from segments of either the left terminal, pathogenic and conserved (T1-P-C) domains or the conserved, variable and right terminal (C-V-T2) domains of CVd-IIa or CVd-IIb in reciprocal exchanges. Symptoms induced by the various chimeric constructs on the two bioassay hosts reflected the differential response observed with CVd-IIa and -IIb. Constructs with the C-V-T2 domains region from clone-IIa induced severe symptoms on Luffa typical of CVd-IIa, but were non-symptomatic on mandarin as a bioassay host for the cachexia disease. Constructs with the same region (C-V-T2) from the clone-IIb genome induced only mild symptoms on Luffa, but produced a severe reaction on mandarin, as observed for CVd-IIb. Specific site-directed mutations were introduced into the V domain of the CVd-IIa clone to construct viroid cDNA clones with either partial or complete conversions to the CVd-IIb sequence. With the introduction of six site-specific changes into the V domain of the clone-IIa genome, cachexia pathogenicity was acquired as well as a moderation of severe symptoms on Luffa.

  14. Functional role of the cytoplasmic tail domain of the major envelope fusion protein of group II baculoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, G.; Pan, M.; Westenberg, M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    F proteins from baculovirus nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) group II members are the major budded virus (BV) viral envelope fusion proteins. They undergo furin-like proteolysis processing in order to be functional. F proteins from different baculovirus species have a long cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD),

  15. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...

  16. Study of biodistribution of lipidic nanospheres charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111; Estudio de biodistribucion de nanoesferas lipidicas cargadas con cis-diaminodicloroplatino (II) y marcadas con nucleos radioactivos de Indio-111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, V.; Juarez O, C.; Medina L, A. [Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCAN-UNAM, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Perez C, E.; Garcia L, P. [Instituto nacional de cancerologia, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The general objective of the study was to evaluate the lipidic nanospheres biodistribution charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-DDP) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111 (Lip-Cis-in-111) in Wistar rats and in a tumoral model of CaCu. The conclusions were: 1. The system Lip-Cis-in-111 it presents a very fast elimination probably, to a fast recognition response of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). 2. It is planned to make modifications to the formulation to increase the quantity of the hydrophilic polymer (PEG), so that its time of residence in the blood is bigger and allow a bigger accumulation in the tumor. (Author)

  17. An Open-Label, Multicenter, Randomized, Phase II Study of Pazopanib in Combination with Pemetrexed in First-Line Treatment of Patients with Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Felip, Enriqueta; Besse, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This randomized open-label phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pazopanib in combination with pemetrexed compared with the standard cisplatin/pemetrexed doublet in patients with previously untreated, advanced, nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer....

  18. Mobile group II intron based gene targeting in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Paul, Eldho; Gomathi, Sivasamy; Abhishek, Albert; Sasikumar, Sundaresan; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2016-10-01

    The usage of recombinant lactic acid bacteria for delivery of therapeutic proteins to the mucosa has been emerging. In the present study, an attempt was made to engineer a thyA mutant of Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) using lactococcal group II intron Ll.LtrB for the development of biologically contained recombinant L. plantarum for prevention of calcium oxalate stone disease. The 3 kb Ll.LtrB intron donor cassettes from the source vector pACD4C was PCR amplified, ligated into pSIP series of lactobacillus vector pLp_3050sAmyA, yielding a novel vector pLpACD4C (8.6 kb). The quantitative real-time PCR experiment shows 94-fold increased expression of Ll.LtrB intron and 14-fold increased expression of ltrA gene in recombinant L. plantarum containing pLpACD4C. In order to target the thyA gene, the potential intron RNA binding sites in the thyA gene of L. plantarum was predicted with help of computer algorithm. The insertion location 188|189s of thyA gene (lowest E-0.134) was chosen and the wild type intron Ll.LtrB was PCR modified, yielding a retargeted intron of pLpACDthyA. The retargeted intron was expressed by using induction peptide (sppIP), subsequently the integration of intron in thyA gene was identified by PCR screening and finally ThyA - mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) was detected. In vitro growth curve result showed that in the absence of thymidine, colony forming units of mutant ThyA18 was decreased, whereas high thymidine concentration (10 μM) supported the growth of the culture until saturation. In conclusion, ThyA - mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) constructed in this study will be used as a biologically contained recombinant probiotic to deliver oxalate decarboxylase into the lumen for treatment of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate stone deposition. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  20. Ammonium absorption mechanism of rice seedling roots and 15N-labelling pattern of their glutamine-amide group, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Yasuhiro; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1975-01-01

    The processes of producing glutamine and asparagine at the initial stage of the absorption and assimilation of ammonia in rice seedling roots were examined in relation to glutamic acid, aspartic acid and ammonia by 15 N-labelling method. When ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 was absorbed into the roots, 15 N concentration appeared very high in glutamine-amide radical and ammonia. It was also higher in amide radical than in amino radical in both glutamine and asparagine, while 15 N concentration in the amino radical of glutamine and asparagine were far lower than that of corresponding glutamine acid and aspartic acid. From these facts, glutamine-amide radical seems to be produced directly from the ammonia in culture media at the contact point of root cells and the culture media, while there is some possibility that asparagine-amide radical is formed from other amino compounds than ammonia. Also the amino radical of aspartic acid seems to be produced not only by the transamination from glutamic acid but also by the reductive amination of oxalautic acid by ammonium. (Kobatake, H.)

  1. Reclassification of the Candida haemulonii Complex as Candida haemulonii (C. haemulonii Group I), C. duobushaemulonii sp. nov. (C. haemulonii Group II), and C. haemulonii var. vulnera var. nov.: Three Multiresistant Human Pathogenic Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cendejas-Bueno, E.; Kolecka, A.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Kostrzewa, M.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Gomez-Lopez, A.; Boekhout, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Candida haemulonii species complex is currently known as C. haemulonii groups I and II. Here we describe C. haemulonii group II as a new species, Candida duobushaemulonii sp. nov., and C. haemulonii var. vulnera as new a variety of C. haemulonii group I using phenotypic and molecular methods.

  2. Insights into functional-group-tolerant polymerization catalysis with phosphine-sulfonamide palladium (II) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Jian, Zhongbao; Falivene, Laura; Wucher, Philipp; Roesle, Philipp; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Gç ttker-Schnetmann, Inigo; Mecking, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Two series of cationic palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NHC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe}2[A]2 (X1+-A: R1=R2=H: H1+-A; R1=R2=CH(CH3)2: DIPP1+-A; R1=H, R2=CF3: CF31+-A; A=BF4 or SbF6) and neutral palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4

  3. Invertase-labeling gold-dendrimer for in situ amplified detection mercury(II) with glucometer readout and thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine coordination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenli; Shu, Jian; Jin, Guixiao; Xu, Mingdi; Wei, Qiaohua; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2016-03-15

    A simple, low-cost transducer with glucometer readout was designed for sensitive detection of mercury(II) (Hg(2+)), coupling with thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry and invertase-functionalized gold-dendrimer nanospheres for the signal amplification. Initially, nanogold-encapsulated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (Au DENs) were synthesized by in-situ reduction of gold(III). Thereafter, the as-prepared Au DENs were utilized for the labeling of invertase and T-rich signal DNA probe. In the presence of target Hg(2+), the functionalized Au DENs were conjugated to capture DNA probe-modified electrode via T-Hg(2+)-T coordination chemistry. Accompanying the Au DENs, the labeled invertase could hydrolyze sucrose into glucose, which could be quantitatively monitored by an external personal glucometer (PGM). The PGM signal increased with the increasing target Hg(2+) in the sample. Under the optimal conditions, our designed sensing platform exhibited good PGM responses toward target Hg(2+), and allowed the detection of Hg(2+) at a concentration as low as 4.2 pM. This sensing system also displayed remarkable specificity relative to target Hg(2+) against other competing ions, and could be applied for reliable monitoring of spiked Hg(2+) into the environmental water samples with satisfactory results. With the advantages of cost-effectiveness, simplicity, portability, and convenience, our strategy provides a tremendous potential to be a promising candidate for point-of-use monitoring of non-glucose targets by the public. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry by group I and group II matrix-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Chan, W.-T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of Na, K, Ca and Ba matrices on the plasma excitation conditions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were studied. Normalized relative intensity was used to indicate the extent of the plasma-related matrix effects. The group I matrices have no effects on the plasma excitation conditions. In contrast, the group II matrices depress the normalized relative intensities of some spectral lines. Specifically, the Group II matrices have no effects on the normalized relative intensity of atomic lines of low upper energy level (soft lines), but reduce the normalized relative intensity of some ionic lines and atomic lines of high energy level (hard lines). The Group II matrices seem to shift the Saha balance of the analytes only; no shift in the Boltzmann balance was observed experimentally. Moreover, for some ionic lines with sum of ionization and excitation potentials close to the ionization potential of argon (15.75 eV), the matrix effect is smaller than other ionic lines of the same element. The reduced matrix effects may be attributed qualitatively to charge transfer excitation mechanism of these ionic lines. Charge transfer reaction renders ionic emission lines from the quasi-resonant levels similar in characteristics of atomic lines. The contribution of charge transfer relative to excitation by other non-specific excitation mechanisms (via Saha balance and Boltzmann balance) determines the degree of atomic behavior of a quasi-resonant level. A significant conclusion of this study is that plasma-related matrix effect depends strongly on the excitation mechanism of a spectral line. Since, in general, more than one excitation mechanism may contribute to the overall excitation of an emission line, the observed matrix effects reflect the sum of the effects due to individual excitation mechanisms. Excitation mechanisms, in addition to the often-used total excitation energy, should be considered in matrix effect studies

  5. Radioactivity in the pelagic fish. II. Group separation of radioactive elements in fish tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K; Tozawa, H; Amano, K; Takase, A

    1955-01-01

    Analytical group separation was performed with various ashed tissues of some fishes exposed to radioactive ash. The radioactivity was particularly large with elements belonging to the 3rd group, both A and B subgroups. The 2nd group showed considerable activity in pyloric ceca and kidney of Skipjacks. The radioactivity of the 1st and 4th groups was detected in some tissues; the 5th group showed slight activity.

  6. Metformin treatment in type 2 diabetes in pregnancy: an active controlled, parallel-group, randomized, open label study in patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainuddin, Jahan Ara; Karim, Nasim; Zaheer, Sidra; Ali, Syed Sanwer; Hasan, Anjum Ara

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of metformin and to compare it with insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy in terms of perinatal outcome, maternal complications, additional insulin requirement, and treatment acceptability. In this randomized, open label study, 206 patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy who met the eligibility criteria were selected from the antenatal clinics. Insulin was added to metformin treatment when required, to maintain the target glycemic control. The patients were followed up till delivery. Maternal, and perinatal outcomes and pharmacotherapeutic characteristics were recorded on a proforma. Maternal characteristics were comparable in metformin and insulin treated group. 84.9% patients in metformin group required add-on insulin therapy at mean gestational age of 26.58 ± 3.85 weeks. Less maternal weight gain (P pregnancy induced hypertension (P = 0.029) were observed in metformin treated group. Small for date babies were more in metformin group (P 24 hours in metformin group (P metformin group. Metformin alone or with add-on insulin is an effective and cheap treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy. This trial is registered with clinical trial registration number: Clinical trials.gov NCT01855763.

  7. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Labels KidsHealth / For Teens / Food Labels What's in ... to have at least 95% organic ingredients. Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  8. Efficacy and Tolerability Outcomes of a Phase II, Randomized, Open-Label, Multicenter Study of a New Water-Dispersible Pediatric Formulation of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in African Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Nicola; Madrid, Lola; Valentini, Giovanni; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Halidou, Tinto; Sirima, Sodiomon; Tshefu, Antoinette; Mtoro, Ali; Gesase, Samwel; Bassat, Quique

    2018-01-01

    Artemisinin combination therapies are considered the mainstay of malaria treatment, but pediatric-friendly formulations for the treatment of infants are scarce. We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new dispersible-tablet formulation of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine phosphate (DHA/PQP) in comparison to the marketed tablet (Eurartesim) in the treatment of infants with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Reported here are the results of a large phase II, randomized, open-label, multicenter trial conducted in African infants (6 to 12 months of age) from Mozambique, Burkina Faso, The Gambia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Tanzania. Primary efficacy endpoint was the PCR-corrected adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) at day 28. Analysis was performed for the intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) populations. A total of 201 patients received the dispersible-tablet formulation, and 99 received the conventional one administered as crushed tablets. At day 28, the PCR-corrected ACPRs were 86.9% (ITT) and 98.3% (PP) in the dispersible-tablet group and 84.9% (ITT) and 100% (PP) in the crushed-tablet group. At day 42, these values were 85.9% (ITT) and 96.5% (PP) in the dispersible-tablet group and 82.8% (ITT) and 96.4% (PP) in the crushed-tablet group. The comparison between survival curves for time to new infections showed no statistically significant differences ( P = 0.409). The safety and tolerability profile for the two groups was similar in terms of type and frequency of adverse events and was consistent with that expected in African infants with malaria. A standard 3-day treatment with the new dispersible DHA/PQP formulation is as efficacious as the currently used tablet in African infants and has a comparable safety profile. (This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01992900.). Copyright © 2017 Gargano et al.

  9. [Sequence polymorphism of mtDNA HVR Iand HVR II of Oroqen ethnic group in Inner Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chun-Xia; Chen, Feng; Dang, Yong-Hui; Li, Tao; Zheng, Hai-Bo; Chen, Teng; Li, Sheng-Bin

    2008-04-01

    Venous blood samples from 50 unrelated Oroqen individuals living in Inner Mongolia were collected and their mtDNA HVR I and HVR II sequences were detected by using ABI PRISM377 sequencers. The number of polymorphic loci, haplotype, haplotype frequence, average nucleotide variability and other polymorphic parameters were calculated. Based on Oroqen mtDNA sequence data obtained in our experiments and published data, genetic distance between Oroqen ethnic group and other populations were computered by Nei's measure. Phylogenetic tree was constructed by Neighbor Joining method. Comparing with Anderson sequence, 52 polymorphic loci in HVR I and 24 loci in HVR II were found in Oroqen mtDNA sequence, 38 and 27 haplotypes were defined herewith. Haplotype diversity and average nucleotide variability were 0.964+/-0.018 and 7.379 in HVR I, 0.929+/-0.019 and 2.408 in HVR II respectively. Fst and dA genetic distance between 12 populations were calculated based on HVR I sequence, and their relative coefficients were 0.993(P HVR I and HVR II in Oroqen ethnic group has some specificities compared with that of other populations. These data provide a useful tool in forensic identification, population genetic study and other research fields.

  10. EffenDys-Fentanyl Buccal Tablet for the Relief of Episodic Breathlessness in Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Randomized, Morphine-Controlled, Crossover, Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steffen T; Kloke, Marianne; Alt-Epping, Bernd; Gärtner, Jan; Hellmich, Martin; Hein, Rebecca; Piel, Maren; Cornely, Oliver A; Nauck, Friedemann; Voltz, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Episodic breathlessness is a frequent and burdensome symptom in cancer patients but pharmacological treatment is limited. To determine time to onset, efficacy, feasibility, and safety of transmucosal fentanyl in comparison to immediate-release morphine for the relief of episodic breathlessness. Phase II, investigator-initiated, multicenter, open-label, randomized, morphine-controlled, crossover trial with open-label titration of fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT) in inpatients with incurable cancer. The primary outcome was time to onset of meaningful breathlessness relief. Secondary outcomes were efficacy (breathlessness intensity difference at 10 and 30 minutes; sum of breathlessness intensity difference at 15 and 60 minutes), feasibility, and safety. Study was approved by local ethics committees. Twenty-five of 1341 patients were eligible, 10 patients agreed to participate (four female, mean age 58 ± 11, mean Karnofsky score 67 ± 11). Two patients died before final visits and two patients dropped-out because of disease progression leaving six patients for analysis with 61 episodes of breathlessness. Mean time to onset was for FBT 12.7 ± 10.0 and for immediate-release morphine 23.6 ± 15.1 minutes with a mean difference of -10.9 minutes (95% CI = -24.5 to 2.7, P = 0.094). Efficacy measures were predominately in favor for FBT. Both interventions were safe. Feasibility failed because of too much study demands for a very ill patient group. The description of a faster and greater relief of episodic breathlessness by transmucosal fentanyl versus morphine justifies further evaluation by a full-powered trial. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Local Heat Application for the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer: Results of a Phase II Open Label Single Center Non Comparative Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of heat treatment. We assessed efficacy based on the endpoints 'absence of clinical BU specific features' or 'wound closure' within 6 months ("primary cure"), and 'absence of clinical recurrence within 24 month' ("definite cure"). Of 53 patients 51 (96%) had ulcerative disease. 62% were classified as World Health Organization category II, 19% each as category I and III. The average lesion size was 45 cm(2). Within 6 months after completion of heat treatment 92.4% (49 of 53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.8% to 98.0%) achieved cure of their primary lesion. At 24 months follow-up 83.7% (41 of 49, 95% CI, 70.3% to 92.7%) of patients with primary cure remained free of recurrence. Heat treatment was well tolerated; adverse effects were occasional mild local skin reactions. Local thermotherapy is a highly effective, simple, cheap and safe treatment for M. ulcerans disease. It has in particular potential as home-based remedy for BU suspicious lesions at community level where laboratory confirmation is not available. ISRCT 72102977. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  12. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Kumar Guha

    Full Text Available In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA small ribosomal subunit (rns gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF encoded within a group I intron (mS1247. This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase. Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2 stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2 to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase.

  13. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB) in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velenik, Vaneja; Omejc, Mirko; Ocvirk, Janja; Music, Maja; Bracko, Matej; Anderluh, Franc; Oblak, Irena; Edhemovic, Ibrahim; Brecelj, Erik; Kropivnik, Mateja

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 twice daily on Days 1-38, and concurrent radiotherapy 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks + three 1.8 Gy/day), starting on Day 1. Total mesorectal excision was scheduled 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Tumour regression grades (TRG) were evaluated on surgical specimens according to Dworak. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR). 61 patients were enrolled (median age 60 years [range 31-80], 64% male). Twelve patients (19.7%) had T3N0 tumours, 1 patient T2N1, 19 patients (31.1%) T3N1, 2 patients (3.3%) T2N2, 22 patients (36.1%) T3N2 and 5 patients (8.2%) T4N2. Median tumour distance from the anal verge was 6 cm (range 0-11). Grade 3 adverse events included dermatitis (n = 6, 9.8%), proteinuria (n = 4, 6.5%) and leucocytopenia (n = 3, 4.9%). Radical resection was achieved in 57 patients (95%), and 42 patients (70%) underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. TRG 4 (pCR) was recorded in 8 patients (13.3%) and TRG 3 in 9 patients (15.0%). T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 45.2%, 73.8%, and 73.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with bevacizumab and capecitabine. The observed adverse events of neoadjuvant treatment are comparable with those previously reported, but the pCR rate was lower

  14. Facilitation of self-transcendence in a breast cancer support group: II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Doris Dickerson

    2003-01-01

    To pilot a second support group intervention study promoting self-transcendence perspectives and activities and to document changes over time in well-being in support group participants compared with nonparticipants. Quasiexperimental, partial randomization, preference trial design. An urban breast cancer resource center established by survivors. 41 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer were recruited, and 39 completed the study. 22 women participated in three intervention support groups; 17 were in a comparison group. The intervention was an eight-week, closed support group based on self-transcendence theory. Data were collected three times during 14 months. Support group intervention, self-transcendence, and emotional and physical well-being. The intervention group had lower scores than the comparison group on self-transcendence and well-being variables at baseline (time [T] 1). Scores were higher for both groups postintervention (T2), with no differences between groups. One year postintervention (T3), intervention group scores again were lower than comparison group scores. Intervention group T3 scores were unchanged from T2. Most potential participants were unwilling to risk being randomized into a nonpreferred group. Activities based on self-transcendence theory were associated with expanded perspectives and activities and an improved sense of well-being in support group participants at the end of the intervention, but not one year later. Findings from the pilot studies informed a study currently in progress. Nurses should maintain awareness of local resources for support and make that information available to women when they are newly diagnosed with breast cancer, during their treatment, and later.

  15. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  16. Enzyme engineering through evolution: thermostable recombinant group II intron reverse transcriptases provide new tools for RNA research and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen; Nilsen, Timothy W

    2013-08-01

    Current investigation of RNA transcriptomes relies heavily on the use of retroviral reverse transcriptases. It is well known that these enzymes have many limitations because of their intrinsic properties. This commentary highlights the recent biochemical characterization of a new family of reverse transcriptases, those encoded by group II intron retrohoming elements. The novel properties of these enzymes endow them with the potential to revolutionize how we approach RNA analyses.

  17. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Richard, Marta; Sala, Maria Angeles; Pericay, Carlos; Rivera, Fernando; Sastre, Javier; Segura, Ángel; Quindós, Maria; Maisonobe, Pascal; Massutí, Bartomeu; Pineda, Eva; Alonso, Vicente; Marmol, Maribel; Castellano, Daniel; Fonseca, Emilio; Galán, Antonio; Llanos, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18

  18. Ex-vivo perfusion of donor hearts for human heart transplantation (PROCEED II): a prospective, open-label, multicentre, randomised non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardehali, Abbas; Esmailian, Fardad; Deng, Mario; Soltesz, Edward; Hsich, Eileen; Naka, Yoshifumi; Mancini, Donna; Camacho, Margarita; Zucker, Mark; Leprince, Pascal; Padera, Robert; Kobashigawa, Jon

    2015-06-27

    The Organ Care System is the only clinical platform for ex-vivo perfusion of human donor hearts. The system preserves the donor heart in a warm beating state during transport from the donor hospital to the recipient hospital. We aimed to assess the clinical outcomes of the Organ Care System compared with standard cold storage of human donor hearts for transplantation. We did this prospective, open-label, multicentre, randomised non-inferiority trial at ten heart-transplant centres in the USA and Europe. Eligible heart-transplant candidates (aged >18 years) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive donor hearts preserved with either the Organ Care System or standard cold storage. Participants, investigators, and medical staff were not masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was 30 day patient and graft survival, with a 10% non-inferiority margin. We did analyses in the intention-to-treat, as-treated, and per-protocol populations. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00855712. Between June 29, 2010, and Sept 16, 2013, we randomly assigned 130 patients to the Organ Care System group (n=67) or the standard cold storage group (n=63). 30 day patient and graft survival rates were 94% (n=63) in the Organ Care System group and 97% (n=61) in the standard cold storage group (difference 2·8%, one-sided 95% upper confidence bound 8·8; p=0·45). Eight (13%) patients in the Organ Care System group and nine (14%) patients in the standard cold storage group had cardiac-related serious adverse events. Heart transplantation using donor hearts adequately preserved with the Organ Care System or with standard cold storage yield similar short-term clinical outcomes. The metabolic assessment capability of the Organ Care System needs further study. TransMedics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pd(II)-catalyzed di-o-olefination of carbazoles directed by the protecting N-(2-pyridyl)sulfonyl group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urones, Beatriz; Gómez Arrayás, Ramón; Carretero, Juan Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Despite the significance of carbazole in pharmacy and material science, examples of the direct C-H functionalization of this privileged unit are quite rare. The N-(2-pyridyl)sulfonyl group enables the Pd(II)-catalyzed ortho-olefination of carbazoles and related systems, acting as both a directing and readily removable protecting group. This method features ample structural versatility, affording typically the double ortho-olefination products (at C1 and C8) in satisfactory yields and complete regiocontrol. The application of this procedure to related heterocyclic systems, such as indoline, is also described.

  20. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Ru(II) and Pt(II) Complexes Bearing Carboxyl Groups as Potential Anticancer Targeted Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ma Ángeles; Carranza, M Pilar; Massaguer, Anna; Santos, Lucia; Organero, Juan A; Aliende, Cristina; de Llorens, Rafael; Ng-Choi, Iteng; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta; Rodríguez, Ana M; Manzano, Blanca R; Espino, Gustavo; Jalón, Félix A

    2017-11-20

    The synthesis and characterization of Pt(II) (1 and 2) and Ru(II) arene (3 and 4) or polypyridine (5 and 6) complexes is described. With the aim of having a functional group to form bioconjugates, one uncoordinated carboxyl group has been introduced in all complexes. Some of the complexes were selected for their potential in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The molecular structures of complexes 2 and 5, as well as that of the sodium salt of the 4'-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine ligand (cptpy), were determined by X-ray diffraction. Different techniques were used to evaluate the binding capacity to model DNA molecules, and MTT cytotoxicity assays were performed against four cell lines. Compounds 3, 4, and 5 showed little tendency to bind to DNA and exhibited poor biological activity. Compound 2 behaves as bonded to DNA probably through a covalent interaction, although its cytotoxicity was very low. Compound 1 and possibly 6, both of which contain a cptpy ligand, were able to intercalate with DNA, but toxicity was not observed for 6. However, compound 1 was active in all cell lines tested. Clonogenic assays and apoptosis induction studies were also performed on the PC-3 line for 1. The photodynamic behavior for complexes 1, 5, and 6 indicated that their nuclease activity was enhanced after irradiation at λ = 447 nm. The cell viability was significantly reduced only in the case of 5. The different behavior in the absence or presence of light makes complex 5 a potential prodrug of interest in PDT. Molecular docking studies followed by molecular dynamics simulations for 1 and the counterpart without the carboxyl group confirmed the experimental data that pointed to an intercalation mechanism. The cytotoxicity of 1 and the potential of 5 in PDT make them good candidates for subsequent conjugation, through the carboxyl group, to "selected peptides" which could facilitate the selective vectorization of the complex toward receptors that are overexpressed in

  1. Metformin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Active Controlled, Parallel-Group, Randomized, Open Label Study in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahan Ara Ainuddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To assess the effect of metformin and to compare it with insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy in terms of perinatal outcome, maternal complications, additional insulin requirement, and treatment acceptability. Methods. In this randomized, open label study, 206 patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy who met the eligibility criteria were selected from the antenatal clinics. Insulin was added to metformin treatment when required, to maintain the target glycemic control. The patients were followed up till delivery. Maternal, and perinatal outcomes and pharmacotherapeutic characteristics were recorded on a proforma. Results. Maternal characteristics were comparable in metformin and insulin treated group. 84.9% patients in metformin group required add-on insulin therapy at mean gestational age of 26.58 ± 3.85 weeks. Less maternal weight gain (P24 hours in metformin group (P<0.01. Significant reduction in cost of treatment was found in metformin group. Conclusion. Metformin alone or with add-on insulin is an effective and cheap treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy. This trial is registered with clinical trial registration number: Clinical trials.gov NCT01855763.

  2. Daily consumption of fermented soymilk helps to improve facial wrinkles in healthy postmenopausal women in a randomized, parallel-group, open-label trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Kano

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soymilk fermented by lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria is attracting attention due to the excellent bioavailability of its isoflavones. We investigated the effects of fermented soymilk containing high amounts of isoflavone aglycones on facial wrinkles and urinary isoflavones in postmenopausal women in a randomized, parallel-group, open-label trial. Healthy Japanese women were randomly divided into active (n = 44, mean age 56.3 ± 0.5 or control (n = 44, mean age 56.1 ± 0.5 groups, who consumed or did not consume a bottle of soymilk fermented by Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult and Lactobacillus mali for 8 weeks. Maximum depth of wrinkles around the crow’s feet area and other wrinkle parameters were evaluated as primary and secondary endpoints respectively at weeks 0, 4, and 8 during the consumption period. Urinary isoflavone levels were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: The active group demonstrated significant improvements in the maximum depth (p=0.015 and average depth (p=0.04 of wrinkles, and significantly elevated urinary isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, and glycitein; each p < 0.001 compared with the control during the consumption period. No serious adverse effects were recorded. Conclusion: These findings suggest that fermented soymilk taken daily may improve facial wrinkles and elevate urinary isoflavones in healthy postmenopausal women.

  3. Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Spagnuolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.

  4. Functional requirements for the Tumulus I and II cap Waste Area Grouping 6 Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, L.C.

    1991-06-01

    The tumulus method of solid low-level waste (LLW) disposal began in 1989 with the Tumulus Disposal Demonstration (TDD) project, conducted on Tumulus I. LLW is contained in 4-ft x 4-ft x 6-ft boxes which are placed into precast concrete casks. The annular space around the box is grouted with a cementious grout before the lid is installed. The LLW does not contain RCRA materials or liquids. The casks are then stacked two high on the concrete tumulus pad. Prior to filling Tumulus I to capacity Tumulus II was constructed. Tumulus II will be filled to capacity by the end of 1991 at which time the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF) will have been constructed and will provide approximately six years of LLW disposal capacity. This project will provide interim closure of the Tumulus I and II by designing and constructing a multilayered cap, with monitoring capabilities, which will be consistent in purpose with the requirements of a Record of Decision (ROD) which will result from the Waste Area Group (WAG) 6 closure and remediation effort. Capping Tumulus I and II has been a part of the overall tumulus disposal plan since inception in the Low Level Waste Disposal, Development and Demonstration (LLWDDD) program strategy issued in 1988. This project consists of the design and construction of a low permeability cap over the Tumulus I and II disposal units. The cap shall incorporate a drainage system and be maintainable. The monitoring systems now in place will be modified and be utilized for post-closure monitoring of the pads and groundwater. The capability for performance assessment monitoring will be included in the design

  5. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled cis-malonato [(4R,5R)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane] platinum(II) (SKI 2053R)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Kee; Kim, Youngseok; Rim, Jonggill; Kim, Ganghyeok; Gam, Jongsik; Song, Sungkun; Yoo, Kwanghee; Kim, Key H.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of 14 C-labelled cis-malonato[(4R,5R)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolan e]platinum(II) from [1,4- 14 C] D-tartaric acid is described. The overall radiochemical yield of the product in a eight-step sequence was 23.8% and radiochemical purity was 98.5%. (author)

  6. Group Lifting Structures For Multirate Filter Banks, II: Linear Phase Filter Banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brislawn, Christopher M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The theory of group lifting structures is applied to linear phase lifting factorizations for the two nontrivial classes of two-channel linear phase perfect reconstruction filter banks, the whole-and half-sample symmetric classes. Group lifting structures defined for the reversible and irreversible classes of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are shown to satisfy the hypotheses of the uniqueness theorem for group lifting structures. It follows that linear phase lifting factorizations of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are therefore independent of the factorization methods used to compute them. These results cover the specification of user-defined whole-sample symmetric filter banks in Part 2 of the ISO JPEG 2000 standard.

  7. Insights into functional-group-tolerant polymerization catalysis with phosphine-sulfonamide palladium (II) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Jian, Zhongbao

    2014-12-08

    Two series of cationic palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NHC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe}2[A]2 (X1+-A: R1=R2=H: H1+-A; R1=R2=CH(CH3)2: DIPP1+-A; R1=H, R2=CF3: CF31+-A; A=BF4 or SbF6) and neutral palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe(L)} (X1-acetone: L=acetone; X1-dmso: L=dimethyl sulfoxide; X1-pyr: L=pyridine) chelated by a phosphine-sulfonamide were synthesized and fully characterized. Stoichiometric insertion of methyl acrylate (MA) into all complexes revealed that a 2,1 regiochemistry dominates in the first insertion of MA. Subsequently, for the cationic complexes X1+-A, β-H elimination from the 2,1-insertion product X2+-AMA-2,1 is overwhelmingly favored over a second MA insertion to yield two major products X4+-AMA-1,2 and X5+-AMA. By contrast, for the weakly coordinated neutral complexes X1-acetone and X1-dmso, a second MA insertion of the 2,1-insertion product X2MA-2,1 is faster than β-H elimination and gives X3MA as major products. For the strongly coordinated neutral complexes X1-pyr, no second MA insertion and no β-H elimination (except for DIPP2-pyrMA-2,1) were observed for the 2,1-insertion product X2-pyrMA-2,1. The cationic complexes X1+-A exhibited high catalytic activities for ethylene dimerization, affording butenes (C4) with a high selectivity of up to 97.7% (1-butene: 99.3%). Differences in activities and selectivities suggest that the phosphine-sulfonamide ligands remain coordinated to the metal center in a bidentate fashion in the catalytically active species. By comparison, the neutral complexes X1-acetone, X1-dmso, and X1-pyr showed very low activity towards ethylene to give traces of oligomers. DFT analyses taking into account the two possible coordination modes (O or N) of the sulfonamide ligand for the cationic system CF31+ suggested that the experimentally observed high activity in ethylene dimerization is the result of a facile first ethylene insertion into the O-coordinated PdMe isomer and

  8. Clinically Effective Treatment of Fibromyalgia Pain With High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Phase II Open-Label Dose Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Saavedra, Laura; Gebodh, Nigel; Bikson, Marom; Diaz-Cruz, Camilo; Brandao, Rivail; Coutinho, Livia; Truong, Dennis; Datta, Abhishek; Shani-Hershkovich, Revital; Weiss, Michal; Laufer, Ilan; Reches, Amit; Peremen, Ziv; Geva, Amir; Parra, Lucas C; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Despite promising preliminary results in treating fibromyalgia (FM) pain, no neuromodulation technique has been adopted in clinical practice because of limited efficacy, low response rate, or poor tolerability. This phase II open-label trial aims to define a methodology for a clinically effective treatment of pain in FM by establishing treatment protocols and screening procedures to maximize efficacy and response rate. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) provides targeted subthreshold brain stimulation, combining tolerability with specificity. We aimed to establish the number of HD-tDCS sessions required to achieve a 50% FM pain reduction, and to characterize the biometrics of the response, including brain network activation pain scores of contact heat-evoked potentials. We report a clinically significant benefit of a 50% pain reduction in half (n = 7) of the patients (N = 14), with responders and nonresponders alike benefiting from a cumulative effect of treatment, reflected in significant pain reduction (P = .035) as well as improved quality of life (P = .001) over time. We also report an aggregate 6-week response rate of 50% of patients and estimate 15 as the median number of HD-tDCS sessions to reach clinically meaningful outcomes. The methodology for a pivotal FM neuromodulation clinical trial with individualized treatment is thus supported. Registered in Clinicaltrials.gov under registry number NCT01842009. In this article, an optimized protocol for the treatment of fibromyalgia pain with targeted subthreshold brain stimulation using high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation is outlined. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Results of a phase I/II open-label, safety and efficacy trial of coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein in haemophilia B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinowitz, U; Lissitchkov, T; Lubetsky, A; Jotov, G; Barazani-Brutman, T; Voigt, C; Jacobs, I; Wuerfel, T; Santagostino, E

    2015-11-01

    rIX-FP is a coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein with more than fivefold half-life prolongation over other standard factor IX (FIX) products available on the market. This prospective phase II, open-label study evaluated the safety and efficacy of rIX-FP for the prevention of bleeding episodes during weekly prophylaxis and assessed the haemostatic efficacy for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in previously treated patients with haemophilia B. The study consisted of a 10-14 day evaluation of rIX-FP pharmacokinetics (PK), and an 11 month safety and efficacy evaluation period with subjects receiving weekly prophylaxis treatment. Safety was evaluated by the occurrence of related adverse events, and immunogenic events, including development of inhibitors. Efficacy was evaluated by annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR), and the number of injections to achieve haemostasis. Seventeen subjects participated in the study, 13 received weekly prophylaxis and 4 received episodic treatment only. No inhibitors were detected in any subject. The mean and median AsBR were 1.25, and 1.13 respectively in the weekly prophylaxis arm. All bleeding episodes were treated with 1 or 2 injections of rIX-FP. Three prophylaxis subjects who were treated on demand prior to study entry had >85% reduction in AsBR compared to the bleeding rate prior to study entry. This study demonstrated the efficacy for weekly routine prophylaxis of rIX-FP to prevent spontaneous bleeding episodes and for the treatment of bleeding episodes. In addition no safety issues were detected during the study and an improved PK profile was demonstrated. © 2015 CSL Behring. Haemophilia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An open-label, two-stage, phase II study of bevacizumab and lapatinib in children with recurrent or refractory ependymoma: a collaborative ependymoma research network study (CERN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWire, Mariko; Fouladi, Maryam; Turner, David C; Wetmore, Cynthia; Hawkins, Cynthia; Jacobs, Carmen; Yuan, Ying; Liu, Diane; Goldman, Stewart; Fisher, Paul; Rytting, Michael; Bouffet, Eric; Khakoo, Yasmin; Hwang, Eugene I; Foreman, Nicholas; Stewart, Clinton F; Gilbert, Mark R; Gilbertson, Richard; Gajjar, Amar

    2015-05-01

    Co-expression of ERBB2 and ERBB4, reported in 75% of pediatric ependymomas, correlates with worse overall survival. Lapatinib, a selective ERBB1 and ERBB2 inhibitor has produced prolonged disease stabilization in patients with ependymoma in a phase I study. Bevacizumab exposure in ependymoma xenografts leads to ablation of tumor self-renewing cells, arresting growth. Thus, we conducted an open-label, phase II study of bevacizumab and lapatinib in children with recurrent ependymomas. Patients ≤ 21 years of age with recurrent ependymoma received lapatinib orally twice daily (900 mg/m(2)/dose to the first 10 patients, and then 700 mg/m(2)/dose) and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day course. Lapatinib serum trough levels were analyzed prior to each course. Total and phosphorylated VEGFR2 expression was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) before doses 1 and 2 of bevacizumab and 24-48 h following dose 2 of bevacizumab. Twenty-four patients with a median age of 10 years (range 2-21 years) were enrolled; 22 were eligible and 20 evaluable for response. Thirteen had anaplastic ependymoma. There were no objective responses; 4 patients had stable disease for ≥ 4 courses (range 4-14). Grade 3 toxicities included rash, elevated ALT, and diarrhea. Grade 4 toxicities included peri-tracheostomy hemorrhage (n = 1) and elevated creatinine phosphokinase (n = 1). The median lapatinib pre-dose trough concentration was 3.72 µM. Although the combination of bevacizumab and lapatinib was well tolerated in children with recurrent ependymoma, it proved ineffective.

  11. A phase II open label trial evaluating safety and efficacy of a telomerase peptide vaccination in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greten, Tim F; Bruix, Jordi; Forner, Alejandro; Korangy, Firouzeh; N'Kontchou, Gisele; Barget, Nathalie; Ayuso, Carmen; Ormandy, Lars A; Manns, Michael P; Beaugrand, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The sole effective option for patients with advanced HCC is sorafenib and there is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy is a promising option that deserves major investigation. In this open label, single arm clinical trial, we analyzed the effect of a low dose cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with a telomerase peptide (GV1001) vaccination in patients with advanced HCC. 40 patients with advanced HCC were treated with 300 mg/m 2 cyclophosphamide on day -3 followed by GM-CSF + GV1001 vaccinations on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, 22, 36 followed by 4-weekly injections. Primary endpoint of this phase II trial was tumor response; secondary endpoints evaluated were TTP, TTSP, PFS, OS, safety and immune responses. None of the patients had a complete or partial response to treatment, 17 patients (45.9%) demonstrated a stable disease six months after initiation of treatment. The median TTP was 57.0 days; the median TTSP was estimated to be 358.0 days. Cyclophosphamide, GV1001 and GM-CSF treatment were well tolerated and most adverse events, which were of grade 1 or 2, were generally related to the injection procedure and injection site reactions. GV1001 treatment resulted in a decrease in CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells; however, no GV1001 specific immune responses were detected after vaccination. Low dose cyclophosphamide treatment followed by GV1001 vaccinations did not show antitumor efficacy as per tumor response and time to progression. Further studies are needed to analyze the effect of a combined chemo-immunotherapy to treat patients with HCC. NCT00444782

  12. A phase II open label trial evaluating safety and efficacy of a telomerase peptide vaccination in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuso Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sole effective option for patients with advanced HCC is sorafenib and there is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy is a promising option that deserves major investigation. In this open label, single arm clinical trial, we analyzed the effect of a low dose cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with a telomerase peptide (GV1001 vaccination in patients with advanced HCC. Methods 40 patients with advanced HCC were treated with 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide on day -3 followed by GM-CSF + GV1001 vaccinations on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, 22, 36 followed by 4-weekly injections. Primary endpoint of this phase II trial was tumor response; secondary endpoints evaluated were TTP, TTSP, PFS, OS, safety and immune responses. Results None of the patients had a complete or partial response to treatment, 17 patients (45.9% demonstrated a stable disease six months after initiation of treatment. The median TTP was 57.0 days; the median TTSP was estimated to be 358.0 days. Cyclophosphamide, GV1001 and GM-CSF treatment were well tolerated and most adverse events, which were of grade 1 or 2, were generally related to the injection procedure and injection site reactions. GV1001 treatment resulted in a decrease in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells; however, no GV1001 specific immune responses were detected after vaccination. Conclusions Low dose cyclophosphamide treatment followed by GV1001 vaccinations did not show antitumor efficacy as per tumor response and time to progression. Further studies are needed to analyze the effect of a combined chemo-immunotherapy to treat patients with HCC. Trial registration NCT00444782

  13. Phase II open-label study to assess efficacy and safety of lenalidomide in combination with cetuximab in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Siena

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of combination treatment with lenalidomide and cetuximab in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients. This was a phase II multicenter, open-label trial comprising a safety lead-in phase (phase IIa to determine the maximum tolerated dose, and a randomized proof of concept phase (phase IIb to determine the response rate of lenalidomide plus cetuximab combination therapy. Phase IIa treatment comprised oral lenalidomide (starting dose 25 mg/day and intravenous cetuximab (400 mg/m(2 followed by weekly 250 mg/m(2 in 28-day cycles. In phase IIb patients were randomized to either the phase IIa treatment schedule of lenalidomide plus cetuximab combination therapy or lenalidomide 25 mg/day monotherapy. Eight patients were enrolled into phase IIa. One patient developed a dose-limiting toxicity and the maximum tolerated dose of lenalidomide was determined at 25 mg/day. Forty-three patients were enrolled into phase IIb proof of concept. Best response was stable disease in 9 patients and study enrollment was terminated prematurely due to lack of efficacy in both treatment arms and failure to achieve the planned response objective. The majority of adverse events were grade 1 and 2. In both phases, the adverse events most commonly attributed to any study drugs were fatigue, rash and other skin disorders, diarrhea, nausea, and stomatitis. Thirty-nine deaths occurred; none was related to study drug. The combination of lenalidomide and cetuximab appeared to be well tolerated but did not have clinically meaningful activity in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01032291.

  14. 75 FR 807 - Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program II; Revision to General Tolerance Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    .... pubescens Ruiz & Pav., Capsicum spp.; (12) Roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa L.; (13) Scarlet eggplant, Solanum..., specialty crop producers, pesticide registrants, the environment, or human health. No crop group tolerance... Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997) does not apply to this proposed rule...

  15. Papiliochrome II pigment reduces the angle dependency of structural wing colouration in nireus group papilionids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Vukusic, Peter; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    The wings of four papilionid butterfly species of the nireus group, Papilio bromius, P. epiphorbas, P. nireus and P. oribazus, are marked by blue-green coloured bands surrounded by black margins. The cover scales in the coloured bands contain a violet-absorbing, blue-fluorescing pigment. The

  16. Altered expression patterns of group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J. J. G.; Wolswijk, G.; Bö, L.; van der Valk, P.; Polman, C. H.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for glutamate receptors in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we have focused specifically on the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. The expression of group I (mGluR1alpha and

  17. Palladium(II)-catalyzed ortho-olefination of arenes applying sulfoxides as remote directing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binjie; Shen, Chuang; Yao, Jinzhong; Yin, Hong; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-01-03

    A novel palladium-catalyzed ortho-C(sp(2))-H olefination protocol has been developed by the use of sulfoxide as the directing group. Importantly, relatively remote coordination can be accessed to achieve the ortho olefination of benzyl, 2-arylethyl, and 3-arylpropenyl sulfoxide substrates, and the olefinated sulfoxide can be easily transformed to other functionalities.

  18. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Urban Planning and Construction. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European Climate Change Policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to climate change impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national, regional and local level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on urban planning and infrastructure in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the urban planning sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting. Some of the other stakeholder meetings, such as the meeting on human health, have a strong connection with the urban planning agenda. Therefore, some actions in the sector report on adaptation and human health relate to urban planning and infrastructure considerations

  19. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Water Management. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European climate change policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to Climate Change Impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national and regional level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on the water cycle and water resources management and prediction of extreme events in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the Water Resources sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting on 11 April, 2006

  20. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species.

  1. Population genomic analysis of strain variation in Leptospirillum group II bacteria involved in acid mine drainage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sheri L; Dibartolo, Genevieve; Denef, Vincent J; Goltsman, Daniela S Aliaga; Thelen, Michael P; Banfield, Jillian F

    2008-07-22

    Deeply sampled community genomic (metagenomic) datasets enable comprehensive analysis of heterogeneity in natural microbial populations. In this study, we used sequence data obtained from the dominant member of a low-diversity natural chemoautotrophic microbial community to determine how coexisting closely related individuals differ from each other in terms of gene sequence and gene content, and to uncover evidence of evolutionary processes that occur over short timescales. DNA sequence obtained from an acid mine drainage biofilm was reconstructed, taking into account the effects of strain variation, to generate a nearly complete genome tiling path for a Leptospirillum group II species closely related to L. ferriphilum (sampling depth approximately 20x). The population is dominated by one sequence type, yet we detected evidence for relatively abundant variants (>99.5% sequence identity to the dominant type) at multiple loci, and a few rare variants. Blocks of other Leptospirillum group II types ( approximately 94% sequence identity) have recombined into one or more variants. Variant blocks of both types are more numerous near the origin of replication. Heterogeneity in genetic potential within the population arises from localized variation in gene content, typically focused in integrated plasmid/phage-like regions. Some laterally transferred gene blocks encode physiologically important genes, including quorum-sensing genes of the LuxIR system. Overall, results suggest inter- and intrapopulation genetic exchange involving distinct parental genome types and implicate gain and loss of phage and plasmid genes in recent evolution of this Leptospirillum group II population. Population genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms indicate variation between closely related strains is not maintained by positive selection, suggesting that these regions do not represent adaptive differences between strains. Thus, the most likely explanation for the observed patterns of

  2. Population genomic analysis of strain variation in Leptospirillum group II bacteria involved in acid mine drainage formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri L Simmons

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Deeply sampled community genomic (metagenomic datasets enable comprehensive analysis of heterogeneity in natural microbial populations. In this study, we used sequence data obtained from the dominant member of a low-diversity natural chemoautotrophic microbial community to determine how coexisting closely related individuals differ from each other in terms of gene sequence and gene content, and to uncover evidence of evolutionary processes that occur over short timescales. DNA sequence obtained from an acid mine drainage biofilm was reconstructed, taking into account the effects of strain variation, to generate a nearly complete genome tiling path for a Leptospirillum group II species closely related to L. ferriphilum (sampling depth approximately 20x. The population is dominated by one sequence type, yet we detected evidence for relatively abundant variants (>99.5% sequence identity to the dominant type at multiple loci, and a few rare variants. Blocks of other Leptospirillum group II types ( approximately 94% sequence identity have recombined into one or more variants. Variant blocks of both types are more numerous near the origin of replication. Heterogeneity in genetic potential within the population arises from localized variation in gene content, typically focused in integrated plasmid/phage-like regions. Some laterally transferred gene blocks encode physiologically important genes, including quorum-sensing genes of the LuxIR system. Overall, results suggest inter- and intrapopulation genetic exchange involving distinct parental genome types and implicate gain and loss of phage and plasmid genes in recent evolution of this Leptospirillum group II population. Population genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms indicate variation between closely related strains is not maintained by positive selection, suggesting that these regions do not represent adaptive differences between strains. Thus, the most likely explanation for the

  3. IDENTIFYING THE YOUNG LOW-MASS STARS WITHIN 25 pc. II. DISTANCES, KINEMATICS, AND GROUP MEMBERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Anglada-Escude, Guillem [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Reid, I. Neill [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tamura, Motohide, E-mail: shkolnik@lowell.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-10

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of {approx}<300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of {approx}<25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young ({approx}<3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and {beta} Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages {approx}<150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event.

  4. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-01-01

    This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition

  5. Scrambling free combinatorial labeling of alanine-β, isoleucine-δ1, leucine-proS and valine-proS methyl groups for the detection of long range NOEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerfah, Rime [NMR-Bio, IBS/CEA (France); Plevin, Michael J. [University of York, Department of Biology (United Kingdom); Pessey, Ombeline [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2015-01-15

    Specific isotopic labeling of methyl groups in proteins has greatly extended the applicability of solution NMR spectroscopy. Simultaneous labeling of the methyl groups of several different amino acid types can offer a larger number of useful probes that can be used for structural characterisations of challenging proteins. Herein, we propose an improved AILV methyl-labeling protocol in which L and V are stereo-specifically labeled. We show that 2-ketobutyrate cannot be combined with Ala and 2-acetolactate (for the stereo-specific labeling of L and V) as this results in co-incorporation incompatibility and isotopic scrambling. Thus, we developed a robust and cost-effective enzymatic synthesis of the isoleucine precursor, 2-hydroxy-2-(1′-[{sup 2}H{sub 2}], 2′-[{sup 13}C])ethyl-3-keto-4-[{sup 2}H{sub 3}]butanoic acid, as well as an incorporation protocol that eliminates metabolic leakage. We show that application of this labeling scheme to a large 82 kDa protein permits the detection of long-range {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H NOE cross-peaks between methyl probes separated by up to 10 Å.

  6. Hypersurfaces in Pn with 1-parameter symmetry groups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessis, Andrew du; Wall, C.T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We assume V a hypersurface of degree d in with isolated singularities and not a cone, admitting a group G of linear symmetries. In earlier work we treated the case when G is semi-simple; here we analyse the unipotent case. Our first main result lists the possible groups G. In each case we discuss...... the geometry of the action, reduce V to a normal form, find the singular points, study their nature, and calculate the Milnor numbers. The Tjurina number τ(V) ≤ (d − 1) n–2(d 2 − 3d + 3): we call V oversymmetric if this value is attained. We calculate τ in many cases, and characterise the oversymmetric...

  7. Unbounded representations of symmetry groups in gauge quantum field theory. II. Integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelkel, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    Within the gauge quantum field theory of the Wightman--Garding type, the integration of representations of Lie algebras is investigated. By means of the covariance condition (substitution rules) for the basic fields, it is shown that a form skew-symmetric representation of a Lie algebra can be integrated to a form isometric and in general unbounded representation of the universal covering group of a corresponding Lie group provided the conditions (Nelson, Sternheimer, etc.), which are well known for the case of Hilbert or Banach representations, hold. If a form isometric representation leaves the subspace from which the physical Hilbert space is obtained via factorization and completion invariant, then the same is proved to be true for its differential. Conversely, a necessary and sufficient condition is derived for the transmission of the invariance of this subspace under a form skew-symmetric representation of a Lie algebra to its integral

  8. Insights into functional-group-tolerant polymerization catalysis with phosphine-sulfonamide palladium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Zhongbao; Falivene, Laura; Wucher, Philipp; Roesle, Philipp; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Göttker-Schnetmann, Inigo; Mecking, Stefan

    2015-01-26

    Two series of cationic palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6 H4 )2 PC6 H4 SO2 NHC6 H3 (2,6-R(1) ,R(2) )]PdMe}2 [A]2 ((X) 1(+) -A: R(1) =R(2) =H: (H) 1(+) -A; R(1) =R(2) =CH(CH3 )2 : (DIPP) 1(+) -A; R(1) =H, R(2) =CF3 : (CF3) 1(+) -A; A=BF4 or SbF6 ) and neutral palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6 H4 )2 PC6 H4 SO2 NC6 H3 (2,6-R(1) ,R(2) )]PdMe(L)} ((X) 1-acetone: L=acetone; (X) 1-dmso: L=dimethyl sulfoxide; (X) 1-pyr: L=pyridine) chelated by a phosphine-sulfonamide were synthesized and fully characterized. Stoichiometric insertion of methyl acrylate (MA) into all complexes revealed that a 2,1 regiochemistry dominates in the first insertion of MA. Subsequently, for the cationic complexes (X) 1(+) -A, β-H elimination from the 2,1-insertion product (X) 2(+) -AMA-2,1 is overwhelmingly favored over a second MA insertion to yield two major products (X) 4(+) -AMA-1,2 and (X) 5(+) -AMA . By contrast, for the weakly coordinated neutral complexes (X) 1-acetone and (X) 1-dmso, a second MA insertion of the 2,1-insertion product (X) 2MA-2,1 is faster than β-H elimination and gives (X) 3MA as major products. For the strongly coordinated neutral complexes (X) 1-pyr, no second MA insertion and no β-H elimination (except for (DIPP) 2-pyrMA-2,1 ) were observed for the 2,1-insertion product (X) 2-pyrMA-2,1 . The cationic complexes (X) 1(+) -A exhibited high catalytic activities for ethylene dimerization, affording butenes (C4 ) with a high selectivity of up to 97.7 % (1-butene: 99.3 %). Differences in activities and selectivities suggest that the phosphine-sulfonamide ligands remain coordinated to the metal center in a bidentate fashion in the catalytically active species. By comparison, the neutral complexes (X) 1-acetone, (X) 1-dmso, and (X) 1-pyr showed very low activity towards ethylene to give traces of oligomers. DFT analyses taking into account the two possible coordination modes (O or N) of the sulfonamide ligand for the cationic system (CF3) 1(+) suggested

  9. Cu(ii)-catalyzed sulfide construction: both aryl groups utilization of intermolecular and intramolecular diaryliodonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Wei, Jianpeng; Fan, Qiaoling; Jiang, Xuefeng

    2017-03-07

    A sulfur-iodine exchange protocol of diaryliodonium salts with inorganic sulfur salt was developed. Both aryl groups in the diaryliodonium salt were fully exerted in this transformation. Five- to eight-membered sulfur-containing heterocycles were achieved. Note that [1]benzothieno-[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (BTBT) (an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) material) and Zaltoprofen were efficiently established through this method.

  10. GALAXIES IN X-RAY GROUPS. II. A WEAK LENSING STUDY OF HALO CENTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Matthew R.; Ma, Chung-Pei [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Leauthaud, Alexie; Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rykoff, Eli S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tinker, Jeremy L. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Massey, Richard [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Mei, Simona, E-mail: mgeorge@astro.berkeley.edu [Bureau des Galaxies, Etoiles, Physique, Instrumentation (GEPI), University of Paris Denis Diderot, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-09-20

    Locating the centers of dark matter halos is critical for understanding the mass profiles of halos, as well as the formation and evolution of the massive galaxies that they host. The task is observationally challenging because we cannot observe halos directly, and tracers such as bright galaxies or X-ray emission from hot plasma are imperfect. In this paper, we quantify the consequences of miscentering on the weak lensing signal from a sample of 129 X-ray-selected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field with redshifts 0 < z < 1 and halo masses in the range 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. By measuring the stacked lensing signal around eight different candidate centers (such as the brightest member galaxy, the mean position of all member galaxies, or the X-ray centroid), we determine which candidates best trace the center of mass in halos. In this sample of groups, we find that massive galaxies near the X-ray centroids trace the center of mass to {approx}< 75 kpc, while the X-ray position and centroids based on the mean position of member galaxies have larger offsets primarily due to the statistical uncertainties in their positions (typically {approx}50-150 kpc). Approximately 30% of groups in our sample have ambiguous centers with multiple bright or massive galaxies, and some of these groups show disturbed mass profiles that are not well fit by standard models, suggesting that they are merging systems. We find that halo mass estimates from stacked weak lensing can be biased low by 5%-30% if inaccurate centers are used and the issue of miscentering is not addressed.

  11. Identifying the Young Low-mass Stars within 25 pc. II. Distances, Kinematics, and Group Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-01

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of lsim300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of lsim25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young (lsim3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and β Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages lsim150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, the du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Subaru Telescope. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial

  12. Aggressiveness between genetic groups I and II of isolates of Cercospora zeae-maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Mathioni, Sandra Marisa; Carvalho,; Brunelli, Kátia Regiane; Beló, André; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the gray leaf spot disease (GLS) caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, was not considered an important pathogen of maize (Zea mays, L.) in Brazil. However, the recent adoption of agronomical practices such as no-tillage and cultivation under central pivot irrigation systems increased the incidence and severity to the extent that GLS is now one of the most important diseases of maize. Isolates of C. zeae-maydis can be distinguished by two genetic groups (...

  13. Working group II report: Production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main discussions of the Working Group on the Production and Dynamics of High Brightness Beams. The following topics are covered in this paper. Proposed new electron sources and needed research on existing sources is covered. The discussions on issues relating to the description of phase space on non-thermalized electron beam distributions and the theoretical modeling on non-thermalized electron beam distributions is presented. Finally, the present status of the theoretical modeling of beam transport in bends is given

  14. Acetylenes bearing Aromatic Terminal Groups. : II 13C-NMR Spectra of Monosubstituted Diphenylacetylenes

    OpenAIRE

    野本, 健雄; Nomoto, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Six monosubstituted diphenylacetylenes, p-X-C6H4-C≡C-C6H5 1 (Ⅹ=NMe2, NH2, OMe, Cl, and NO2), were synthesized, and 13C-NMR spectra of their acetylenic carbons were measured. Hammett plots of the chemical shifts of the acetylenic α-13C and β-13C (against substituent constants σ) respectively showed a linear relationship, eXCept for β-13C on NMe2 and NH2 groups. The effects of substituents on 13C-Chemical shifts of diphenylacetylenes and effeciency of the C≡C bonds in transmitting the substitue...

  15. Constructive tensorial group field theory II: the {U(1)-T^4_4} model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoche, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we continue our program of non-pertubative constructions of tensorial group field theories (TGFT). We prove analyticity and Borel summability in a suitable domain of the coupling constant of the simplest super-renormalizable TGFT which contains some ultraviolet divergencies, namely the color-symmetric quartic melonic rank-four model with Abelian gauge invariance, nicknamed . We use a multiscale loop vertex expansion. It is an extension of the loop vertex expansion (the basic constructive technique for non-local theories) which is required for theories that involve non-trivial renormalization.

  16. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanobeads containing imidazole groups for removal of Cu(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerkmen, Deniz; Yilmaz, Erkut [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Oztuerk, Nevra; Akgoel, Sinan [Department of Chemistry, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-08-01

    Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) nanobeads with an average size of 300 nm in diameter and with a polydispersity index of 1.156 were produced by a surfactant free emulsion polymerization. Specific surface area of the PHEMA nanobeads was found to be 996 m{sup 2}/g. Imidazole containing 3-(2-imidazoline-1-yl)propyl(triethoxysilane) (IMEO) was used as a metal-chelating ligand. IMEO was covalently attached to the nanobeads. PHEMA-IMEO nanobeads were used for the removal of copper(II) ions from aqueous solutions. To evaluate the degree of IMEO loading, the PHEMA nanobeads were subjected to Si analysis by using flame atomizer atomic absorption spectrometer and it was estimated as 973 {mu}mol IMEO/g of polymer. The PHEMA nanobeads were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in about 8 min. The adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions onto the PHEMA nanobeads was negligible (0.2 mg/g). The IMEO attachment into the PHEMA nanobeads significantly increased the Cu{sup 2+} adsorption capacity (58 mg/g). Adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-IMEO nanobeads increased significantly with increasing concentration. The adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions increased with increasing pH and reached a plateau value at around pH 5.0. Competitive heavy metal adsorption from aqueous solutions containing Cu{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} was also investigated. The adsorption capacities are 61.4 mg/g (966.9 {mu}mol/g) for Cu{sup 2+}; 180.5 mg/g (899.8 {mu}mol/g) for Hg{sup 2+}; 34.9 mg/g (310.5 {mu}mol/g) for Cd{sup 2+} and 14.3 mg/g (69 {mu}mol/g) for Pb{sup 2+}. The affinity order in molar basis is observed as Cu{sup 2+} > Hg{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Pb{sup 2+}. These results may be considered as an indication of higher specificity of the PHEMA-IMEO nanobeads for the Cu{sup 2+} comparing to other ions. Consecutive adsorption and elution operations showed the feasibility of repeated use for PHEMA

  17. Mutations in the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron that retain mobility in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Lisa M

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that form conserved secondary and tertiary structures. In order to determine which of the conserved structural elements are required for mobility, a series of domain and sub-domain deletions were made in the Lactococcus lactis group II intron (Ll.LtrB and tested for mobility in a genetic assay. Point mutations in domains V and VI were also tested. Results The largest deletion that could be made without severely compromising mobility was 158 nucleotides in DIVb(1–2. This mutant had a mobility frequency comparable to the wild-type Ll.LtrB intron (ΔORF construct. Hence, all subsequent mutations were done in this mutant background. Deletion of DIIb reduced mobility to approximately 18% of wild-type, while another deletion in domain II (nts 404–459 was mobile to a minor extent. Only two deletions in DI and none in DIII were tolerated. Some mobility was also observed for a DIVa deletion mutant. Of the three point mutants at position G3 in DV, only G3A retained mobility. In DVI, deletion of the branch-point nucleotide abolished mobility, but the presence of any nucleotide at the branch-point position restored mobility to some extent. Conclusions The smallest intron capable of efficient retrohoming was 725 nucleotides, comprising the DIVb(1–2 and DII(iia,b deletions. The tertiary elements found to be nonessential for mobility were alpha, kappa and eta. In DV, only the G3A mutant was mobile. A branch-point residue is required for intron mobility.

  18. French Case Study: Pluralist Expertise Group on Uranium Mines in Limousin. Annex II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    The uranium mining and milling industry once played a major strategic and economic role in France. After the definitive cessation of mining and milling activities in 2001, more than 200 sites are currently in the closure and post-closure phases. Decisions required in this frame raise particular difficulties because of the sensitivity of some technical issues and the strong scrutiny and requirements of local and national non-governmental organizations. This is particularly true in Limousin, the region that stands at the heart of the national uranium history. In order to deal with this complex and disputed topic, the ministries of environment, health and industry recently decided to set up a Pluralist Expertise Group (GEP) with the aim of analysing and providing a critical point of view on the various technical documents prepared by the operator, AREVA NC, about the surveillance and control of its former mining sites in the department of Haute-Vienne in the Limousin region, and then providing recommendations to public authorities to improve the current situation. This expert group presents their reports to the local committee for nuclear information.

  19. New strings for old Veneziano amplitudes. II. Group-theoretic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, A. L.

    2006-09-01

    In this part of our four parts work we use theory of polynomial invariants of finite pseudo-reflection groups in order to reconstruct both the Veneziano and Veneziano-like (tachyon-free) amplitudes and the generating function reproducing these amplitudes. We demonstrate that such generating function and amplitudes associated with it can be recovered with help of finite dimensional exactly solvableN=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model known earlier from works of Witten, Stone and others. Using the Lefschetz isomorphism theorem we replace traditional supersymmetric calculations by the group-theoretic thus solving the Veneziano model exactly using standard methods of representation theory. Mathematical correctness of our arguments relies on important theorems by Shepard and Todd, Serre and Solomon proven respectively in the early 50s and 60s and documented in the monograph by Bourbaki. Based on these theorems, we explain why the developed formalism leaves all known results of conformal field theories unchanged. We also explain why these theorems impose stringent requirements connecting analytical properties of scattering amplitudes with symmetries of space-time in which such amplitudes act.

  20. Physics implications of flat directions in free fermionic superstring models. II. Renormalization group analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, G.; Cvetic, M.; Everett, L.; Langacker, P.; Wang, J.; Espinosa, J.R.; Everett, L.

    1999-01-01

    We continue the investigation of the physics implications of a class of flat directions for a prototype quasi-realistic free fermionic string model (CHL5), building upon the results of a previous paper in which the complete mass spectrum and effective trilinear couplings of the observable sector were calculated to all orders in the superpotential. We introduce soft supersymmetry breaking mass parameters into the model, and investigate the gauge symmetry breaking patterns and the renormalization group analysis for two representative flat directions, which leave an additional U(1) ' as well as the SM gauge group unbroken at the string scale. We study symmetry breaking patterns that lead to a phenomenologically acceptable Z-Z ' hierarchy, M Z ' ∼O(1 TeV) and 10 12 GeV for electroweak and intermediate scale U(1) ' symmetry breaking, respectively, and the associated mass spectra after electroweak symmetry breaking. The fermion mass spectrum exhibits unrealistic features, including massless exotic fermions, but has an interesting d-quark hierarchy and associated CKM matrix in one case. There are (some) non-canonical effective μ terms, which lead to a non-minimal Higgs sector with more than two Higgs doublets involved in the symmetry breaking, and a rich structure of Higgs particles, charginos, and neutralinos, some of which, however, are massless or ultralight. In the electroweak scale cases the scale of supersymmetry breaking is set by the Z ' mass, with the sparticle masses in the several TeV range. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  1. Associations of anti-beta2-glycoprotein I autoantibodies with HLA class II alleles in three ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, F C; Thiagarajan, P; Ahn, C; Reveille, J D

    1999-02-01

    To determine any HLA associations with anti-beta2-glycoprotein I (anti-beta2GPI) antibodies in a large, retrospectively studied, multiethnic group of 262 patients with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or another connective tissue disease. Anti-beta2GPI antibodies were detected in sera using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HLA class II alleles (DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1) were determined by DNA oligotyping. The HLA-DQB1*0302 (DQ8) allele, typically carried on HLA-DR4 haplotypes, was associated with anti-beta2GPI when compared with both anti-beta2GPI-negative SLE patients and ethnically matched normal controls, especially in Mexican Americans and, to a lesser extent, in whites. Similarly, when ethnic groups were combined, HLA-DQB1*0302, as well as HLA-DQB1*03 alleles overall (DQB1*0301, *0302, and *0303), were strongly correlated with anti-beta2GPI antibodies. The HLA-DR6 (DR13) haplotype DRB1*1302; DQB1*0604/5 was also significantly increased, primarily in blacks. HLA-DR7 was not significantly increased in any of these 3 ethnic groups, and HLA-DR53 (DRB4*0101) was increased in Mexican Americans only. Certain HLA class II haplotypes genetically influence the expression of antibodies to beta2GPI, an important autoimmune response in the APS, but there are variations in HLA associations among different ethnic groups.

  2. Report of the SUGRA Working Group for Run II of the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, V.; Flattum, E.; Falk, T.; Abel, S.; Accomando, E.; Anderson, G.; Arnowitt, R.; Azzi, P.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Beenakker, W.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E.; Berger, M.; Brhlik, M.; Blazek, T.; Blessing, S.; Bokhari, W.; Bruner, N.; Carena, M.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, D.; Chankowski, P.; Chen, C.H.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Cho, G.C.; Claes, D.; Demina, R.; Done, J.; Duflot, L.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Eboli, O.J.P.; Eno, S.; Feng, J.; Ganis, G.; Gold, M.; Gregores, E.M.; Hagiwara, K.; Han, T.; Harris, B.; Hikasa, K.; Holck, C.; Kao, C.; Kato, Y.; Klasen, M.; Keung, W.Y.; Kramer, M.; Lammel, S.; Li, T.J.; Lykken, J.D.; Magro, M.; Mani, S.; Matchev, K.T.; Mangano, M.; Mercadante, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nachtman, J.; Nath, P.; Nojiri, M.M.; Nomerotski, A.; Norman, D.; Oishi, R.; Ono, K.; Paige, F.; Paterno, M.; Parke, S.; Pierce, D.; Pilaftsis, A.; Plehn, T.; Pompos, A.; Polonksy, N.; Pokorski, S.; Quintana, P.; Roco, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Seiya, Y.; Smith, C.; Spira, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Sullivan, Z.; Szalapski, R.; Tannenbaum, B.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Wang, Y.; White, J.; Williams, H.H.; Worcester, M.; Worm, S.; Zhang, R.J.; Zielinski, M.

    2000-01-01

    We present an analysis of the discovery reach for supersymmetric particles at the upgraded Tevatron collider, assuming that SUSY breaking results in universal soft breaking parameters at the grand unification scale, and that the lightest supersymmetric particle is stable and neutral. We first present a review of the literature, including the issues of unification, renormalization group evolution of the supersymmetry breaking parameters and the effect of radiative corrections on the effective low energy couplings and masses of the theory. We consider the experimental bounds coming from direct searches and those arising indirectly from precision data, cosmology and the requirement of vacuum stability. The issues of flavor and CP-violation are also addressed. The main subject of this study is to update sparticle production cross sections, make improved estimates of backgrounds, delineate the discovery reach in the supergravity framework, and examine how this might vary when assumptions about universality of soft...

  3. Hydrogen storage materials with focus on main group I-II elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2005-07-01

    variations in the observed apparent activation energies of hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation of magnesium based systems, as generally found in the literature. Further, concurrent changes apparent prefactors i.e. a compensation effect (CE) is found. A detailed analysis leads to the general conclusion that any observed CE based on an Arrhenius analysis is false and a direct consequence of the data analysis. The effect of both particle/crystallite size reductions along with the effect of Ti-doping on the two-step dehydrogenation kinetics of lithium aluminum hydride is investigated. It is found that only the kinetics the first reaction step is sensitive to a reduction in the crystallite size. In order to achieve improved kinetics of the second reaction step as well, Ti-doping is found to be very effective. The main results of these investigations are; i) the first dehydrogenation step is subject to transport limitations probably diffusional limitations ii) the apparent activation energy of both dehydrogenation steps is insensitive to Ti-doping, suggesting that a prefactor effect is responsible for the kinetic improvements i.e. the number of reaction sites is probably increased e.g. by creation of lattice defects such as atomic vacancies. Finally, the hydrogen mobility in sodium aluminum hydride, potentially limiting the overall kinetics of hydrogenation/dehydrogenation, is studies with neutron scattering experiments. Both the hydrogen jump frequency and the mean square atomic displacement of hydrogen atoms are estimated. (au)

  4. Comparison of three labeled silica nanoparticles used as tracers in transport experiments in porous media. Part II: Transport experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M.-F.; Barthès, Véronique; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Three types of labeled silica nanoparticles were used in transport experiments in saturated sand. The goal of this study was to evaluate both the efficiency of labeling techniques (fluorescence (FITC), metal (Ag(0) core) and radioactivity ( 110m Ag(0) core)) in realistic transport conditions and the reactive transport of silica nanocolloids of variable size and concentration in porous media. Experimental results obtained under contrasted experimental conditions revealed that deposition in sand is controlled by nanoparticles size and ionic strength of the solution. A mathematical model is proposed to quantitatively describe colloid transport. Fluorescent labeling is widely used to study fate of colloids in soils but was the less sensitive one. Ag(0) labeling with ICP-MS detection was found to be very sensitive to measure deposition profiles. Radiolabeled ( 110m Ag(0)) nanoparticles permitted in situ detection. Results obtained with radiolabeled nanoparticles are wholly original and might be used for improving the modeling of deposition and release dynamics. -- Highlights: • Three kinds of labeled nanotracers were used in transport experiments in sand columns. • They were used as surrogates of silica nanoparticles or mineral colloid. • Deposition depending on colloid size and ionic strength was observed and modeled. • Fluorescence labeling had the worse detection limit but was the more convenient. • Radiolabeled nanotracers were detected in situ in a non destructive way. -- Follow the kinetics of transport, deposition and release of silica nanoparticles with suitably labeled nanoparticles

  5. A Complex Multiherbal Regimen Based on Ayurveda Medicine for the Management of Hepatic Cirrhosis Complicated by Ascites: Nonrandomized, Uncontrolled, Single Group, Open-Label Observational Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish V; Patel, Kalapi B; Gupta, Shivenarain; Michalsen, Andreas; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Kessler, Christian S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, especially if complicated by ascites. This chronic condition can be related to the classical disease entity jalodara in Traditional Indian Medicine (Ayurveda). The present paper aims to evaluate the general potential of Ayurvedic therapy for overall clinical outcomes in hepatic cirrhosis complicated by ascites (HCcA). In form of a nonrandomized, uncontrolled, single group, open-label observational clinical study, 56 patients fulfilling standardized diagnostic criteria for HCcA were observed during their treatment at the P. D. Patel Ayurveda Hospital, Nadiad, India. Based on Ayurvedic tradition, a standardized treatment protocol was developed and implemented, consisting of oral administration of single and compound herbal preparations combined with purificatory measures as well as dietary and lifestyle regimens. The outcomes were assessed by measuring liver functions through specific clinical features and laboratory parameters and by evaluating the Child-Pugh prognostic grade score. After 6 weeks of treatment and a follow-up period of 18 weeks, the outcomes showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements. Further larger and randomized trials on effectiveness, safety, and quality of the Ayurvedic approach in the treatment of HCcA are warranted to support these preliminary findings.

  6. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  7. Group theoretical approach to quantum fields in de Sitter space II. The complementary and discrete series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Euihun; Mourad, Jihad; Parentani, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    We use an algebraic approach based on representations of de Sitter group to construct covariant quantum fields in arbitrary dimensions. We study the complementary and the discrete series which correspond to light and massless fields and which lead new feature with respect to the massive principal series we previously studied (hep-th/0606119). When considering the complementary series, we make use of a non-trivial scalar product in order to get local expressions in the position representation. Based on these, we construct a family of covariant canonical fields parametrized by SU(1, 1)/U(1). Each of these correspond to the dS invariant alpha-vacua. The behavior of the modes at asymptotic times brings another difficulty as it is incompatible with the usual definition of the in and out vacua. We propose a generalized notion of these vacua which reduces to the usual conformal vacuum in the conformally massless limit. When considering the massless discrete series we find that no covariant field obeys the canonical commutation relations. To further analyze this singular case, we consider the massless limit of the complementary scalar fields we previously found. We obtain canonical fields with a deformed representation by zero modes. The zero modes have a dS invariant vacuum with singular norm. We propose a regularization by a compactification of the scalar field and a dS invariant definition of the vertex operators. The resulting two-point functions are dS invariant and have a universal logarithmic infrared divergence

  8. Different centre of pressure patterns within the golf stroke II: group-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, K A; Best, R J

    2007-05-01

    Although the golf coaching literature stresses the importance of weight transfer during the swing, research has been conflicting or lacking statistical support. A potential problem with previous studies is that no attempt was made to account for different movement strategies in the golf swing. This study evaluated the relationship between centre of pressure measures and club head velocity within two previously identified swing styles, the "Front Foot" and "Reverse" styles. Thirty-nine Front Foot golfers and 19 Reverse golfers performed swings with a driver while standing on two force plates. From the force plate data, centre of pressure displacement, velocity, range, and timing parameters were calculated. Correlation and regression analysis indicated that a larger range of centre of pressure and a more rapid centre of pressure movement in the downswing was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact for the Front Foot group. For the Reverse golfers, positioning the centre of pressure further from the back foot at late backswing and a more rapid centre of pressure transfer towards the back foot at ball contact was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact. This study has highlighted the importance of identifying different movement strategies before evaluating performance measures, as different parameters were found to be important for the Front Foot and Reverse styles.

  9. Preoperative therapy with pazopanib in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma: a phase II window-of-opportunity study by the German Interdisciplinary Sarcoma Group (GISG-04/NOPASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Jakob, Jens; Kasper, Bernd; Nowak, Kai; Pilz, Lothar R; Attenberger, Ulrike; Gaiser, Timo; Egerer, Gerlinde; Fröhling, Stefan; Derigs, Hans-Günter; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Hohenberger, Peter

    2016-01-06

    For resectable soft tissue sarcoma (STS), radical surgery, usually combined with radiotherapy, is the mainstay of treatment and the only potentially curative modality. Since surgery is often complicated by large tumour size and extensive tumour vasculature, preoperative treatment strategies with the aim of devitalising the tumour are being explored. One option is treatment with antiangiogenic drugs. The multikinase inhibitor pazopanib, which possesses pronounced antiangiogenic effects, has shown activity in metastatic and unresectable STS, but has so far not been tested in the preoperative setting. This open-label, multicentre phase II window-of-opportunity trial assesses pazopanib as preoperative treatment of resectable STS. Participants receive a 21-day course of pazopanib 800 mg daily during wait time for surgery. Major eligibility criteria are resectable, high-risk adult STS of any location, or metachronous solitary STS metastasis for which resection is planned, and adequate organ function and performance status. The trial uses an exact single-stage design. The primary end point is metabolic response rate (MRR), that is, the proportion of patients with >50% reduction of the mean standardised uptake value (SUVmean) in post-treatment compared to pre-treatment fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT. The MRR below which the treatment is considered ineffective is 0.2. The MRR above which the treatment warrants further exploration is 0.4. With a type I error of 5% and a power of 80%, the sample size is 35 evaluable patients, with 12 or more responders as threshold. Main secondary end points are histopathological and MRI response, resectability, toxicity, recurrence-free and overall survival. In a translational substudy, endothelial progenitor cells and vascular epithelial growth factor receptor are analysed as potential prognostic and predictive markers. Approval by the ethics committee II, University of Heidelberg, Germany (2012-019F-MA), German Federal

  10. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA - II. Non-thermal diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Marco; Richter, Laura; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; de Blok, W. J. G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2015-04-01

    Our closest neighbours, the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, are extremely quiescent and dim objects, where thermal and non-thermal diffuse emissions lack, so far, of detection. In order to possibly study the dSph interstellar medium, deep observations are required. They could reveal non-thermal emissions associated with the very low level of star formation, or to particle dark matter annihilating or decaying in the dSph halo. In this work, we employ radio observations of six dSphs, conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in the frequency band 1.1-3.1 GHz, to test the presence of a diffuse component over typical scales of few arcmin and at an rms sensitivity below 0.05 mJy beam-1. We observed the dSph fields with both a compact array and long baselines. Short spacings led to a synthesized beam of about 1 arcmin and were used for the extended emission search. The high-resolution data mapped background sources, which in turn were subtracted in the short-baseline maps, to reduce their confusion limit. We found no significant detection of a diffuse radio continuum component. After a detailed discussion on the modelling of the cosmic ray (CR) electron distribution and on the dSph magnetic properties, we present bounds on several physical quantities related to the dSphs, such that the total radio flux, the angular shape of the radio emissivity, the equipartition magnetic field, and the injection and equilibrium distributions of CR electrons. Finally, we discuss the connection to far-infrared and X-ray observations.

  11. Threshold and flavor effects in the renormalization group equations of the MSSM. II. Dimensionful couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, Andrew D.; Tata, Xerxes

    2009-01-01

    We reexamine the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGEs) for the dimensionful parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with broken supersymmetry, allowing for arbitrary flavor structure of the soft SUSY-breaking parameters. We include threshold effects by evaluating the β-functions in a sequence of (nonsupersymmetric) effective theories with heavy particles decoupled at the scale of their mass. We present the most general form for high-scale, soft SUSY-breaking parameters that obtains if we assume that the supersymmetry-breaking mechanism does not introduce new intergenerational couplings. This form, possibly amended to allow additional sources of flavor-violation, serves as a boundary condition for solving the RGEs for the dimensionful MSSM parameters. We then present illustrative examples of numerical solutions to the RGEs. We find that in a SUSY grand unified theory with the scale of SUSY scalars split from that of gauginos and higgsinos, the gaugino mass unification condition may be violated by O(10%). As another illustration, we show that in mSUGRA, the rate for the flavor-violating t-tilde 1 →cZ-tilde 1 decay obtained using the complete RGE solution is smaller than that obtained using the commonly used 'single-step' integration of the RGEs by a factor 10-25, and so may qualitatively change expectations for topologies from top-squark pair production at colliders. Together with the RGEs for dimensionless couplings presented in a companion paper, the RGEs in Appendix 2 of this paper form a complete set of one-loop MSSM RGEs that include threshold and flavor-effects necessary for two-loop accuracy.

  12. Exon sequence requirements for excision in vivo of the bacterial group II intron RmInt1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Nicolás

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II intron splicing proceeds through two sequential transesterification reactions in which the 5' and 3'-exons are joined together and the lariat intron is released. The intron-encoded protein (IEP assists the splicing of the intron in vivo and remains bound to the excised intron lariat RNA in a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP that promotes intron mobility. Exon recognition occurs through base-pairing interactions between two guide sequences on the ribozyme domain dI known as EBS1 and EBS2 and two stretches of sequence known as IBS1 and IBS2 on the 5' exon, whereas the 3' exon is recognized through interaction with the sequence immediately upstream from EBS1 [(δ-δ' interaction (subgroup IIA] or with a nucleotide [(EBS3-IBS3 interaction (subgroup IIB and IIC] located in the coordination-loop of dI. The δ nucleotide is involved in base pairing with another intron residue (δ' in subgroup IIB introns and this interaction facilitates base pairing between the 5' exon and the intron. Results In this study, we investigated nucleotide requirements in the distal 5'- and 3' exon regions, EBS-IBS interactions and δ-δ' pairing for excision of the group IIB intron RmInt1 in vivo. We found that the EBS1-IBS1 interaction was required and sufficient for RmInt1 excision. In addition, we provide evidence for the occurrence of canonical δ-δ' pairing and its importance for the intron excision in vivo. Conclusions The excision in vivo of the RmInt1 intron is a favored process, with very few constraints for sequence recognition in both the 5' and 3'-exons. Our results contribute to understand how group II introns spread in nature, and might facilitate the use of RmInt1 in gene targeting.

  13. A Draft Science Management Plan for Returned Samples from Mars: Recommendations from the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltigin, T.; Lange, C.; Mugnuolo, R.; Smith, C.

    2018-04-01

    This paper summarizes the findings and recommendations of the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group, an international team comprising 38 members from 16 countries and agencies.

  14. On Orbit Immuno-Based, Label-Free, White Blood Cell Counting System with MicroElectroMechanical Sensor (MEMS) Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on-orbit immuno-based label-free white blood cell counting system using MEMS...

  15. Influence of group II metals on Radium-226 concentration ratios in the native green plum (Buchanania obovata) from the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, Peter; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, uptake of Ra from soil, and the influence of group II metals on Ra uptake, into the stones and edible flesh of the fruit of the wild green plum, Buchanania obovata, was investigated. Selective extraction of the exchangeable fraction of the soil samples was undertaken but was not shown to more reliably predict Ra uptake than total soil Ra activity concentration. Comparison of the group II metal to Ca ratios (i.e. Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Ra/Ca) in the flesh with exchangeable Ca shows that Ca outcompetes group II metals for root uptake and that the uptake pathway discriminated against group II metals relative to ionic radius, with uptake of Ca > Sr > Ba >> Ra. Flesh and stone analysis showed that movement of group II metals to these components of the plant, after root uptake, was strongly related. This supports the hypothesis that Sr, Ba and Ra are being taken up as analogue elements, and follow the same uptake and translocation pathways, with Ca. Comparison with previously reported data from a native passion fruit supports the use of total soil CRs on natural, undisturbed sites. As exchangeable CRs for Ra reach a saturation value it may be possible to make more precise predictions using selective extraction techniques for contaminated or disturbed sites. - Highlights: • We studied uptake of Ra-226 from soil into Buchanania obovata. • The influence of group II metals (Sr, Ba and Ca) on Ra uptake was investigated. • The exchangeable Ra fraction of the soil was not a more reliable predictor of Ra uptake than total soil Ra. • Ca outcompetes group II metals Sr, Ba and Ra for root uptake. • Uptake discriminated against group II metals relative to ionic radius, with uptake of Ca > Sr > Ba >> Ra.

  16. Permian plants from the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, Northern Altiplano of Bolivia: II. The morphogenus Glossopteris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Iannuzzi

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Fossil plants belonging to the morphogenera Glossopteris, Pecopteris and Asterotheca were collected from the upper part of the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, near the town of San Pablo de Tiquina, on the southeastern shore of Lake Titicaca (northern Altiplano, Bolivia. This paper presents the first description of specimens of the morphogenus Glossopteris from Bolivia. The Bolivian specimens of Glossopteris consist of poorly-preserved impressions, although they present the diagnostic features of this morphogenus. They are fragments of leaves with secondary veins of taeniopterid-type, typical of glossopterids from Late Permian deposits of Gondwana. The only species of Pecopteris confirmed in the first part of this study, i.e. P. dolianitii Rösler and Rohn (see Vieira et al. 2004, was previously reported from the Late Permian beds of the Rio do Rasto and Estrada Nova formations in the Paraná Basin (southern Brazil. Therefore, a Late Permian age is proposed for the fossil plant-bearing beds of the Chutani Formation based on the analyzed assemblage. The phytogeographic implications of this new find are briefly analyzed.Plantas fósseis, pertencentes aos morfo-gêneros Glossopteris, Pecopteris e Asterotheca, foram coletadas na porção superior da seção aflorante da Formação Chutani, próxima ao povoado de San Pablo de Tiquina, sudeste do lago Titicaca (Altiplano norte, Bolívia. Este trabalho apresenta a primeira descrição de espécimes do morfo-gênero Glossopteris provenientes da Bolívia. Os espécimes estudados de Glossopteris consistem em impressões foliares pobremente preservadas nas quais feições diagnósticas estão presentes. Os fragmentos foliares apresentam venação secundária do tipo teniopteróide, uma característica típica de glossopterídeas encontradas em depósitos do Permiano Superior do Gondwana. Por sua vez, a única espécie de Pecopteris confirmada para estes níveis da Formação Chutani, i.e. P. dolianitii

  17. Evolutionary Profiling of Group II Pyridoxal-Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylases Suggests Expansion and Functional Diversification of Histidine Decarboxylases in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP-dependent enzymes are one of the most important enzymes involved in plant N metabolism. Here, we explored the evolution of group II PLP-dependent decarboxylases (PLP_deC, including aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, glutamate decarboxylase, and histidine decarboxylase in the plant lineage. Gene identification analysis revealed a higher number of genes encoding PLP_deC in higher plants than in lower plants. Expression profiling of PLP_deC orthologs and syntelogs in (L. Heynh., pepper ( L., and tomato ( L. pointed toward conserved as well as distinct roles in developmental processes such as fruit maturation and ripening and abiotic stress responses. We further characterized a putative promoter of tomato ripening-associated gene ( operating in a complex regulatory circuit. Our analysis provides a firm basis for further in-depth exploration of the PLP_deC gene family, particularly in the economically important Solanaceae family.

  18. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  19. A critical quantum chemical and experimental study of the potentiality of direct labeling of the CN group with [99mTc(CO)3]+ or [186/188Re(CO)3]+ in CN containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safi, Benasser; Mertens, John; Kersemans, Ken; Geerlings, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: It was determined recently that [ 99m Tc(OH 2 ) 2 (X - )(CO 3 ) 3 ] could strongly bind to the CN group, allowing direct labeling of CN in vitamin B 12 despite the presence of a benzimidazole group. The aim of this paper was to perform a critical study of this potentiality, coupling quantum chemical calculations to experimental evidence. Methods: Computational methods: Within the density functional theory calculations, the 6-31+G** basis set (C, H, O, N atoms) and the LANL2DZ basis set (Tc,Re) were used. Stability calculations of the [RCNM(CO) 3 ] + ) (M=Tc,Re) complexes were performed with the Gaussian 03 suite of programs, while for the evaluation of relative stability substitution reactions were used. Radiochemistry: Vitamin B 12 , 4-hydroxy-benzylcyanide and 4-methoxy-benzonitrile were labeled at 100 deg. C during 30 min. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis was performed using radioactive and UV detection. Results: Computational methods: The influence of different ligands on the stability yielded a sequence: imidazole>tBuCN>NH 3 ∼CH 3 CN>HCN (mimicking the best CoCN)>H 2 O. The transmetalation reaction indicates that all ligands prefer Re to Tc. The preference for the nitrogen atom of imidazole to the cyanide nitrogen atom for complex formation with [Tc(CO) 3 (H 2 O) 3 ] + is interpreted in terms of the hard and soft acid and base properties principle. Radiochemistry: 4-Hydroxy-benzylcyanide and 4-methoxy-benzonitrile did not show any labeling. An excess of acetonitrile did not inhibit the labeling of vitamin B 12 as expected if the CN group should be involved, indicating that the labeling occurs on a stronger complexing group present like benzimidazole. Conclusion: Both theory and experiments prove that [CN-Tc(CO) 3 (H 2 O) (2-x) L x ] + complexes are weak and that in vitamin B 12 most probably the benzimidazole group is involved

  20. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with a 67Ga-phenolic aminocarboxylic acid chelate. Part II. Comparison of immunoreactivity and biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies labeled with the 67Ga-chelate or with 131I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzku, S; Schuhmacher, J; Kirchgessner, H; Brüggen, J

    1986-01-01

    Coupling of the 67Ga-P-EDDHA chelate via carbodiimide to the anti-melanoma monoclonal antibody (Mab) M.2.9.4 resulted in a low degree of oligomerization, but a considerable degree of intra-molecular (inter-chain) cross-linking. However, this did not impair immunoreactivity, nor did the half-life in vivo differ substantially from that of 131I-M.2.9.4. Biodistribution analysis in normal mice showed Ga:I ratios near 1 in the blood and other tissues not involved in degradation and label excretion. In tissues of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES) and the kidneys, Ga:I ratios up to 2.51 were reached within 4 days of administration. In antigen-positive MeWo tumor tissue, retention of 67Ga also excreted that of 131I, so that tumor; organ ratios (except tumor:liver) were superior for the 67Ga-labeled MAb. It is concluded that the method of coupling pre-established 67Ga-P-EDDHA chelate to antibody results in a functionally intact tracer molecule, whose persistence in vivo is not significantly impaired. The major difference to I-labeled MAbs may be a prolonged retention of Ga in tissues (cells) physiologically involved in antibody catabolism.

  1. Recycling of an amino acid label with prolonged isotope infusion: Implications for kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, W.F.; Tsalikian, E.; Beaufrere, B.; Haymond, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate whether recycling of a labeled amino acid would occur after 24 h of infusion, two groups of normal volunteers were infused with [ 3 H]leucine and alpha-[ 14 C]-ketoisocaproate for 4 h and [ 2 H 3 ]leucine for either 4 or 24 h (groups I and II, respectively). Entry of [ 2 H 3 ]leucine at steady state into the plasma space was indistinguishable from its infusion rate for group I but 30% higher (P less than 0.001) than this rate for group II, demonstrating significant recycling of label. After discontinuation of the infusions, isotope disappearance from the plasma space was followed for 2 h. The 3 H and 14 C decay data for both groups suggest that plasma leucine and alpha- ketoisocaproate are derived from a single intracellular pool in the postabsorptive state. In group I, the 3 H and 2 H labels decayed identically; whereas, in group II, the decay of [ 2 H 3 ]-leucine and alpha- [ 2 H 3 ]ketoisocaproate was slower (P less than 0.01) than the decay of [ 3 H]leucine and alpha-[ 3 H]ketoisocaproate, confirming re-entry of label after a 24-h infusion. Therefore kinetic values calculated from models assuming no recycling of labeled amino acids are most likely not quantitative and must be interpreted with care when flux does not change or decreases

  2. Private Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmačková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    This Bachelor Thesis titled Private labels deals with distribution strategy based on the introduction of private labels especially in retail chains. At the beginning it is focused on the general concept of private label offered by retailers, where is mentioned basic characteristics, history and structuring of distribution brands. Subsequently this thesis informs readers about the introduction of new special distribution brands, which focus primarily on the new consumption habits of customers....

  3. Design of a dual-function peptide probe as a binder of angiotensin II and an inducer of silver nanoparticle aggregation for use in label-free colorimetric assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Kuboyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Label-free colorimetric assays using metallic nanoparticles have received much recent attention, for their application in simple and sensitive methods for detection of biomolecules. Short peptide probes that can bind to analyte biomolecules are attractive ligands in molecular nanotechnology; however, identification of biological recognition motifs is usually based on trial-and-error experiments. Herein, a peptide probe was screened for colorimetric detection of angiotensin II (Ang II) using a mechanism for non-crosslinking aggregation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The dual-function peptides, which bind to the analyte and induce AgNP aggregation, were identified using a two-step strategy: (1) screening of an Ang II-binding peptide from an Ang II receptor sequence library, using SPOT technology, which enable peptides synthesis on cellulose membranes via an Fmoc method and (2) selection of peptide probes that effectively induce aggregation of AgNPs using a photolinker modified peptide array. Using the identified peptide probe, KGKNKRRR, aggregation of AgNPs was detected by observation of a pink color in the absence of Ang II, whereas AgNPs remained dispersed in the presence of Ang II (yellow). The color changes were not observed in the presence of other hormone molecules. Ang II could be detected within 15 min, with a detection limit of 10 µM, by measuring the ratio of absorbance at 400 nm and 568 nm; the signal could also be observed with the naked eye. These data suggest that the peptide identified here could be used as a probe for simple and rapid colorimetric detection of Ang II. This strategy for the identification of functional peptides shows promise for the development of colorimetric detection of various diagnostically important biomolecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. CT coronary angiography in patients with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease (SCOT-HEART): an open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-13

    The benefit of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients presenting with stable chest pain has not been systematically studied. We aimed to assess the effect of CTCA on the diagnosis, management, and outcome of patients referred to the cardiology clinic with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. In this prospective open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial, we recruited patients aged 18-75 years referred for the assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease from 12 cardiology chest pain clinics across Scotland. We randomly assigned (1:1) participants to standard care plus CTCA or standard care alone. Randomisation was done with a web-based service to ensure allocation concealment. The primary endpoint was certainty of the diagnosis of angina secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. All analyses were intention to treat, and patients were analysed in the group they were allocated to, irrespective of compliance with scanning. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01149590. Between Nov 18, 2010, and Sept 24, 2014, we randomly assigned 4146 (42%) of 9849 patients who had been referred for assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. 47% of participants had a baseline clinic diagnosis of coronary heart disease and 36% had angina due to coronary heart disease. At 6 weeks, CTCA reclassified the diagnosis of coronary heart disease in 558 (27%) patients and the diagnosis of angina due to coronary heart disease in 481 (23%) patients (standard care 22 [1%] and 23 [1%]; pheart disease increased (1·09, 1·02-1·17; p=0·0172), the certainty increased (1·79, 1·62-1·96; pheart disease. This changed planned investigations (15% vs 1%; pheart disease, CTCA clarifies the diagnosis, enables targeting of interventions, and might reduce the future risk of myocardial infarction. The Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates funded the trial with supplementary awards

  5. Tritiated-nicotine- and 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin-labeled nicotinic receptors in the interpeduncular nucleus of rats. II. Effects of habenular destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, P.B.; Hamill, G.S.; Nadi, N.S.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Pert, A.

    1986-01-01

    The cholinergic innervation of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) is wholly extrinsic and is greatly attenuated by bilateral habenular destruction. We describe changes in the labeling of putative nicotinic receptors within this nucleus at 3, 5, or 11 days after bilateral habenular lesions. Adjacent tissue sections of the rat IPN were utilized for 3 H-nicotine and 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin ( 125 I-BTX) receptor autoradiography. Compared to sham-operated controls, habenular destruction significantly reduced autoradiographic 3 H-nicotine labeling in rostral (-25%), intermediate (-13%), and lateral subnuclei (-36%). Labeling in the central subnucleus was unchanged. Loss of labeling was maximal at the shortest survival time (3 days) and did not change thereafter. In order to establish whether this loss was due to a reduction in the number or the affinity of 3 H-nicotine-binding sites, a membrane assay was performed on microdissected IPN tissue from rats that had received surgery 3 days previously. Bilateral habenular lesions produced a 35% reduction of high-affinity 3 H-nicotine-binding sites, with no change in binding affinity. Bilateral habenular lesions reduced 125 I-BTX labeling in the intermediate subnuclei, and a slight increase occurred in the rostral subnucleus. In the lateral subnuclei, 125 I-BTX labeling was significantly reduced (27%) at 3 days but not at later survival times. In view of the known synaptic morphology of the habenulointerpeduncular tract, it is concluded that a subpopulation of 3 H-nicotine binding sites within the IPN is located on afferent axons and/or terminals. This subpopulation, located within rostral, intermediate, and lateral subnuclei, may correspond to presynaptic nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Sites that bind 125 I-BTX may include a presynaptic subpopulation located in the lateral and possibly the intermediate subnuclei

  6. Open-label phase II clinical trial in 75 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma receiving daily dose of tableted liver cancer vaccine, hepcortespenlisimut-L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarakanovskaya MG

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Marina G Tarakanovskaya,1 Jigjidsuren Chinburen,2 Purev Batchuluun,2 Chogsom Munkhzaya,2 Genden Purevsuren,2 Dorjiin Dandii,3 Tsogkhuu Hulan,3 Dandii Oyungerel,4 Galyna A Kutsyna,5 Alan A Reid,6 Vika Borisova,6 Allen I Bain,7 Vichai Jirathitikal,7 Aldar S Bourinbaiar6–8 1Ekomed LLC, 2National Cancer Center, 3Monserum LLC, 4National Center for Public Health, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 5Department of Infectious Diseases, Luhansk State Medical University, Luhansk, Ukraine; 6Immunitor China Ltd, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Immunitor Inc, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 8Immunitor LLC, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Background: An increasing number of studies is now devoted to immunotherapy of cancer. We evaluated the clinical benefit of hepcortespenlisimut-L (Hepko-V5 [formerly known as V5]—an oral therapeutic vaccine designated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA as an orphan drug for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. V5 was initially developed by us in 2002 to treat hepatitis B or C viral infections and liver cirrhosis.Methods: The outcome of open-label Phase II trial of daily dose of V5 pill was analyzed retrospectively. Over a period of 5 years, 75 patients with advanced HCC were enrolled, consisting of 29 (38.7% females and 46 (61.3% males with a median age of 60 years (mean 61.6±8.1 years. Out of these, 23 (30.7% had hepatitis B and 34 (45.3% had hepatitis C infections, including 9 (12% with dual infection, 4 (5.3% negative for both viruses, and 5 (6.7% without established viral diagnosis. Most patients (94.7% had underlying liver cirrhosis of varying severity.Results: After a median of 2 months of treatment, 50 out of 75 patients had experienced a decline in serum levels of the tumor marker, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP (66.7%; P=0.006 by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Baseline median AFP levels were 245.2 IU/mL (mean 4,233; range 7.2–92,407; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1,186–7,280 and post-treatment values were 102.3 IU

  7. PRISM II: an open-label study to assess effectiveness of dextromethorphan/quinidine for pseudobulbar affect in patients with dementia, stroke or traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M; Alexander, David N; Cutler, Andrew J; D'Amico, Stephen; Doody, Rachelle S; Sauve, William; Zorowitz, Richard D; Davis, Charles S; Shin, Paul; Ledon, Fred; Yonan, Charles; Formella, Andrea E; Siffert, Joao

    2016-06-09

    Phase 3 trials supporting dextromethorphan/quinidine (DM/Q) use as a treatment for pseudobulbar affect (PBA) were conducted in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or multiple sclerosis (MS). The PRISM II study provides additional DM/Q experience with PBA secondary to dementia, stroke, or traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants in this open-label, multicenter, 90-day trial received DM/Q 20/10 mg twice daily. The primary outcome was the Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS), assessing change in PBA episode frequency and severity. The CNS-LS final visit score was compared to baseline (primary analysis) and to the response in a previously conducted placebo-controlled trial with DM/Q in patients with ALS or MS. Secondary outcomes included change in PBA episode count and Clinical Global Impression of Change with respect to PBA as rated by a clinician (CGI-C) and by the patient or caregiver (PGI-C). The study enrolled 367 participants with PBA secondary to dementia, stroke, or TBI. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) CNS-LS score improved significantly from 20.4 (4.4) at baseline to 12.8 (5.0) at Day 90/Final Visit (change, -7.7 [6.1]; P < .001, 95 % CI: -8.4, -7.0). This magnitude of improvement was consistent with DM/Q improvement in the earlier phase-3, placebo-controlled trial (mean [95 % CI] change from baseline, -8.2 [-9.4, -7.0]) and numerically exceeds the improvement seen with placebo in that study (-5.7 [-6.8, -4.7]). Reduction in PBA episode count was 72.3 % at Day 90/Final Visit compared with baseline (P < .001). Scores on CGI-C and PGI-C showed that 76.6 and 72.4 % of participants, respectively, were "much" or "very much" improved with respect to PBA. The most frequently occurring adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea (5.4 %), headache (4.1 %), urinary tract infection (2.7 %), and dizziness (2.5 %); 9.8 % had AEs that led to discontinuation. Serious AEs were reported in 6.3 %; however, none were considered treatment

  8. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2014-01-01

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  9. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-03-10

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  10. Sustainability Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability labeling originated from a need to protect the identity of alternative systems of food production and to increase market transparency. From the 1980s onwards sustainability labeling has changed into a policy instrument replacing direct government regulation of the food market, and a

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization, and thermal stability studies of heteroleptic cadmium(II) dithiocarbamate with different pyridyl groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Hosten, Eric C.

    2018-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization and crystal structures of three chloroform solvated adducts of cadmium with mixed ligands of N-alkyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate and pyridine, 2,2-bipyridine and 1, 10 phenanthroline represented as [CdL1L2 (py)2]·CHCl3(1), [CdL1L2bpy]•CHCl3(2), and [CdL1L2phen]•CHCl3(3) (LI = N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate, L2 = N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate, py = pyridine, bpy = 2,2-bipyridine and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) respectively are reported. Complex 1, which crystallized in the monoclinic space group P-1, is a centrosymmetric dimeric structure where each Cd center is bonded to two monodentate pyridine, a bidentate terminal dithiocarbamate, and another bidentate bridging dithiocarbamate to form a four-membered ring. Complex 2 crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with four discrete monomeric molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure presents a cadmium atom coordinated by two sulphur atoms of a dithiocarbamate ligand and two nitrogen atoms of the 2,2‧-bipyridine to form a CdS4N2 fragment, thus giving the structure around the Cd atom a distorted trigonal prism geometry. Complex 3 contains two discrete monomeric molecules of (phenanthroline) (N, N-methyl phenyl-N, N-ethyl phenyl dithiocarbamato)cadmium (II) per unit cell, and the complex crystallized in the triclinic space group P-1. The structure showed that the Cd atom is bonded to two bidentate dithiocarbamate ligands and to one bidentate phenanthroline ligand in a distorted trigonal prism geometry. All the compounds resulted in CdS as residue upon thermal decomposition process conducted under inert atmosphere.

  12. Cobalamin Protection against Oxidative Stress in the Acidophilic Iron-oxidizing Bacterium Leptospirillum group II CF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Paz Levicán

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Leptospirillum are aerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the phylum Nitrospira. They are important members of microbial communities that catalyze the biomining of sulfidic ores, thereby solubilizing metal ions. These microorganisms live under extremely acidic and metal-loaded environments and thus must tolerate high concentrations of reactive oxygen species. Cobalamin (vitamin B12 is a cobalt-containing tetrapyrrole cofactor involved in intramolecular rearrangement reactions and has recently been suggested to be an intracellular antioxidant. In this work, we investigated the effect of the exogenous addition of cobalamin on oxidative stress parameters in Leptospirillum group II strain CF-1. Our results revealed that the external supplementation of cobalamin reduces the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the damage to biomolecules, and also stimulates the growth and survival of cells exposed to oxidative stress exerted by ferric ion, hydrogen peroxide, chromate and diamide. Furthermore, exposure of strain CF-1 to oxidative stress elicitors resulted in the transcriptional activation of the cbiA gene encoding CbiA of the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. Altogether, these data suggest that cobalamin plays an important role in redox protection of Leptospirillum strain CF-1, supporting survival of this microorganism under extremely oxidative environmental conditions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of cobalamin against oxidative stress may help to develop strategies to make biomining processes more effective.

  13. Members of the amylovora group of Erwinia are cellulolytic and possess genes homologous to the type II secretion pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riekki, R; Palomäki, T; Virtaharju, O; Kokko, H; Romantschuk, M; Saarilahti, H T

    2000-07-01

    A cellulase-producing clone was isolated from a genomic library of the Erwinia rhapontici (Millard) Burkholder strain NCPPB2989. The corresponding gene, named celA, encodes an endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) with the extremely low pH optimum of 3.4 and a temperature optimum between 40 and 50 degrees C. A single ORF of 999 nt was found to be responsible for the Cel activity. The corresponding protein, named CelA, showed 67% identity to the endoglucanase Y of E. chrysanthemi and 51.5% identity to the endoglucanase of Cellulomonas uda, and thus belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase family 8. The celA gene, or its homologue, was found to be present in all E. rhapontici isolates analysed, in E. chrysanthemi, and in E. amylovora. The presence of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in the amylovora group of Erwinia spp. had not previously been established. Furthermore, the DNA of both E. rhapontici and E. amylovora was found to exhibit homology to genes encoding the type II (GSP) secretion pathway, which is known to be responsible for extracellular targeting of cellulases and pectinases in Erwinia spp. that cause soft rotting, such as E. carotovora and E. chrysanthemi. Secretion of the CelA protein by E. rhapontici could not be verified. However, the CelA protein itself was found to include the information necessary for heterologous secretion by E. chrysanthemi.

  14. Novel chelating resin with cyanoguanidine group: Useful recyclable materials for Hg(II) removal in aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaojie; Li Yanfeng; Ye Zhengfang; Yang Liuqing; Zhou Lincheng; Wang Liyuan

    2011-01-01

    A novel chelating resin containing cyanoguanidine moiety has been successfully prepared by the functionalizing reaction of a macroporous bead based on chloromethylated copolymer of styrene-divinylbenzene (CMPS) with dicyandiamide (DCDA) in the presence of phase transfer catalyst. The Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed in the characterization of the resulting chelating resin, meanwhile, the adsorption properties of the resin for Hg(II) were investigated by batch and column methods. The results indicated that the resin displayed a marked advantage in Hg(II) binding capacity, and the saturated adsorption capacity estimated from the Langmuir model was dramatically up to 1077 mg g -1 at 45 deg. C. Furthermore, it was found that the resin was able to selectively separate Hg(II) from multicomponent solutions with Zn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Mg(II). The desorption process of Hg(II) was tested with different eluents and the ratio of the highest recovery reached to 96% under eluting condition of 1 M HCl + 10% thiourea. Consequently, the resulting chelating resin would provide a potential application for treatment process of Hg(II) containing wastewater.

  15. HEXAGA-II. A two-dimensional multi-group neutron diffusion programme for a uniform triangular mesh with arbitrary group scattering for the IBM/370-168 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicki, Z.

    1976-05-01

    This report presents the AGA two-sweep iterative methods belonging to the family of factorization techniques in their practical application in the HEXAGA-II two-dimensional programme to obtain the numerical solution to the multi-group, time-independent, (real and/or adjoint) neutron diffusion equations for a fine uniform triangular mesh. An arbitrary group scattering model is permitted. The report written for the users provides the description of input and output. The use of HEXAGA-II is illustrated by two sample reactor problems. (orig.) [de

  16. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  17. Beck Depression Inventory-II: Factor Analyses with Three Groups of Midlife Women of African Descent in the Midwest, the South, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Faye A; Yarandi, Hossein; Evans, Edris; Still, Carolyn; Mickels, Prince; Hassan, Mona; Campbell, Doris; Conic, Ruzica

    2018-03-01

    This research encompasses a factor analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), which involves three groups of midlife women of African descent who reside in the Midwest, the South, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The purpose of the study was to determine the factor structure of the BDI-II when administered to a sample of women aged 40-65 of African descent who reside in the three distinct geographical regions of the United States. A correlational, descriptive design was used, and 536 women of African descent were invited to participate in face-to-face interviews that transpired in community settings. Results of the factor analysis revealed a two-factor explanation. Factor one included symptoms such as punishment feelings and pessimism (cognitive), and the second factor included symptoms such as tiredness and loss of energy (somatic-affective). The application of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among the three groups of women generated specific information about each group and common findings across the groups. Knowledge gained from the research could help to guide specific intervention programs for the three groups of women, and explicate the common approaches that could be used for the three groups.

  18. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  19. Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  20. Fully integrated graphene electronic biosensor for label-free detection of lead (II) ion based on G-quadruplex structure-switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijun; Wang, Cheng; Zhu, Yibo; Zhou, Xiaohong; Xiang, Yu; He, Miao; Zeng, Siyu

    2017-03-15

    This work presents a fully integrated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) biosensor for the label-free detection of lead ions (Pb 2+ ) in aqueous-media, which first implements the G-quadruplex structure-switching biosensing principle in graphene nanoelectronics. We experimentally illustrate the biomolecular interplay that G-rich DNA single-strands with one-end confined on graphene surface can specifically interact with Pb 2+ ions and switch into G-quadruplex structures. Since the structure-switching of electrically charged DNA strands can disrupt the charge distribution in the vicinity of graphene surface, the carrier equilibrium in graphene sheet might be altered, and manifested by the conductivity variation of GFET. The experimental data and theoretical analysis show that our devices are capable of the label-free and specific quantification of Pb 2+ with a detection limit down to 163.7ng/L. These results first verify the signaling principle competency of G-quadruplex structure-switching in graphene electronic biosensors. Combining with the advantages of the compact device structure and convenient electrical signal, a label-free GFET biosensor for Pb 2+ monitoring is enabled with promising application potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of colchicine on rat small intestinal absorptive cells. II. Distribution of label after incorporation of [3H]fucose into plasma membrane glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellinger, A.; Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-01-01

    By means of radioautography the influence was tested of various periods (5, 15, 30, 40 min, 2 hr) of pretreatment with colchicine, administered intraperitoneally to rats at a dosage of 0.5 mg/100 g of body weight, on the intracellular pathway of [ 3 H]fucose in absorptive cells of the small intestine. Administration of colchicine for 30 min and longer time intervals causes delay in the insertion of [ 3 H]fucose into the oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates in the Golgi apparatus, and results in redistribution of the label apparent over the different portions of the plasma membrane. In controls, at 2 and 4 hr after administration of [ 3 H]fucose the apical plasma membrane is strongly labeled. Colchicine causes equalization of the reaction of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane: the number of silver grains attributable to the apical plasma membrane is reduced; following treatment with colchicine, apical portions of the plasma membrane comprise 31.6 +/- 1.8% of the silver grains, 38.6 +/- 3.8% are attributable to basolateral membrane regions. The colchicine-induced equalization of the density of label of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane, in addition to the occurrence of basolateral microvillus borders, suggests microtubules to be important in the maintenance of the polar organization of small intestinal absorptive cells

  2. Labelling patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strudwick, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at how diagnostic radiographers label their patients. An ethnographic study of the workplace culture in one diagnostic imaging department was undertaken using participant observation for four months and semi-structured interviews with ten key informants. One of the key themes; the way in which radiographers label their patients, is explored in this article. It was found from the study that within the department studied the diagnostic radiographers labelled or categorised their patients based on the information that they had. This information is used to form judgements and these judgements were used to assist the radiographers in dealing with the many different people that they encountered in their work. This categorisation and labelling of the patient appears to assist the radiographer in their decision-making processes about the examination to be carried out and the patient they are to image. This is an important aspect of the role of the diagnostic radiographer. - Highlights: • I have studied the culture in one imaging department. • Radiographers label or categorise their patients. • These labels/categories are used to manage the patient. • This is an important aspect of the way in which radiographers work.

  3. Site-specific, insertional inactivation of incA in Chlamydia trachomatis using a group II intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cayla M; Fisher, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate, intracellular bacterial pathogen that has until more recently remained recalcitrant to genetic manipulation. However, the field still remains hindered by the absence of tools to create selectable, targeted chromosomal mutations. Previous work with mobile group II introns demonstrated that they can be retargeted by altering DNA sequences within the intron's substrate recognition region to create site-specific gene insertions. This platform (marketed as TargeTron™, Sigma) has been successfully employed in a variety of bacteria. We subsequently modified TargeTron™ for use in C. trachomatis and as proof of principle used our system to insertionally inactivate incA, a chromosomal gene encoding a protein required for homotypic fusion of chlamydial inclusions. C. trachomatis incA::GII(bla) mutants were selected with ampicillin and plaque purified clones were then isolated for genotypic and phenotypic analysis. PCR, Southern blotting, and DNA sequencing verified proper GII(bla) insertion, while continuous passaging in the absence of selection demonstrated that the insertion was stable. As seen with naturally occurring IncA(-) mutants, light and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of non-fusogenic inclusions in cells infected with the incA::GII(bla) mutants at a multiplicity of infection greater than one. Lack of IncA production by mutant clones was further confirmed by Western blotting. Ultimately, the ease of retargeting the intron, ability to select for mutants, and intron stability in the absence of selection makes this method a powerful addition to the growing chlamydial molecular toolbox.

  4. Avelumab in patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma: a multicentre, single-group, open-label, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Howard L; Russell, Jeffery; Hamid, Omid; Bhatia, Shailender; Terheyden, Patrick; D'Angelo, Sandra P; Shih, Kent C; Lebbé, Céleste; Linette, Gerald P; Milella, Michele; Brownell, Isaac; Lewis, Karl D; Lorch, Jochen H; Chin, Kevin; Mahnke, Lisa; von Heydebreck, Anja; Cuillerot, Jean-Marie; Nghiem, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive skin cancer with poor prognosis in patients with advanced disease. Current standard care uses various cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens, but responses are seldom durable. Tumour oncogenesis is linked to Merkel cell polyomavirus integration and ultraviolet-radiation-induced mutations, providing rationale for treatment with immunotherapy antibodies that target the PD-L1/PD-1 pathway. We assessed treatment with avelumab, an anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with stage IV Merkel cell carcinoma that had progressed after cytotoxic chemotherapy. In this multicentre, international, prospective, single-group, open-label, phase 2 trial, patients with stage IV chemotherapy-refractory, histologically confirmed Merkel cell carcinoma (aged ≥18 years) were enrolled from 35 cancer treatment centres and academic hospitals in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia. Key eligibility criteria were an ECOG performance status of 0 or 1, measurable disease by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1, adequate haematological, hepatic, and renal function, and immune-competent status (patients with HIV, immunosuppression, haematological malignancies, and previous organ transplantation were excluded). Patient selection was not based on PD-L1 expression or Merkel cell polyomavirus status. Collection of biopsy material or use of archival tissue for these assessments was mandatory. Avelumab was given intravenously at a dose of 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. The primary endpoint was confirmed objective response (complete response or partial response) assessed according to RECIST version 1.1 by an independent review committee. Safety and clinical activity were assessed in all patients who received at least one dose of study drug (the modified intention-to-treat population). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT02155647. Between July 25, 2014, and Sept 3, 2015, 88 patients were enrolled and received at

  5. The orphan germinant receptor protein GerXAO (but not GerX3b) is essential for L-alanine induced germination in Clostridium botulinum Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Jason; Carter, Andrew T; Pye, Hannah V; Peck, Michael W

    2018-05-04

    Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic spore forming bacterium that produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin that causes a severe and fatal neuro-paralytic disease of humans and animals (botulism). C. botulinum Group II is a psychrotrophic saccharolytic bacterium that forms spores of moderate heat resistance and is a particular hazard in minimally heated chilled foods. Spore germination is a fundamental process that allows the spore to transition to a vegetative cell and typically involves a germinant receptor (GR) that responds to environmental signals. Analysis of C. botulinum Group II genomes shows they contain a single GR cluster (gerX3b), and an additional single gerA subunit (gerXAO). Spores of C. botulinum Group II strain Eklund 17B germinated in response to the addition of L-alanine, but did not germinate following the addition of exogenous Ca 2+ -DPA. Insertional inactivation experiments in this strain unexpectedly revealed that the orphan GR GerXAO is essential for L-alanine stimulated germination. GerX3bA and GerX3bC affected the germination rate but were unable to induce germination in the absence of GerXAO. No role could be identified for GerX3bB. This is the first study to identify the functional germination receptor of C. botulinum Group II.

  6. International Implications of Labeling Foods Containing Engineered Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Khara D; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Mortensen, Ninell P; Cates, Sheryl; Kowalcyk, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    To provide greater transparency and comprehensive information to consumers regarding their purchase choices, the European Parliament and the Council have mandated via Regulation 1169/2011 that foods containing engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) be labeled. This review covers the main concerns related to the use of ENMs in foods and the potential impacts that this type of food labeling might have on diverse stakeholder groups, including those outside the European Union (EU), e.g., in the United States. We also provide recommendations to stakeholders for overcoming existing challenges related to labeling foods containing ENMs. The revised EU food labeling requirements will likely result in a number of positive developments and a number of challenges for stakeholders in both EU and non-EU countries. Although labeling of foods containing ENMs will likely improve transparency, provide more information to facilitate consumer decisions, and build trust among food safety authorities and consumers, critical obstacles to the successful implementation of these labeling requirements remain, including the need for (i) harmonized information requirements or regulations between countries in different regions of the world, (ii) clarification of the regulatory definitions of the ENMs to be used for food labeling, (iii) robust techniques to detect, measure, and characterize diverse ENMs in food matrices, and (iv) clarification of the list of ENMs that may be exempt from labeling requirements, such as several food additives used for decades. We recommend that food industries and food safety authorities be more proactive in communicating with the public and consumer groups regarding the potential benefits and risks of using ENMs in foods. Efforts should be made to improve harmonization of information requirements between countries to avoid potential international trade barriers.

  7. Micro-syntheses for the use of carbon 13 or carbon 14. Micro-preparations of methyl alcohol, methyl iodide, and sodium acetate labeled in the methyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baret, C.; Pichat, L.

    1951-11-01

    Apparatus and technique are described in detail for (1) reduction of CO 2 to CH 3 OH with LiAlH 4 , (2) conversion of the methanol to CH 3 I by HI, (3) formation of the Mg Grignard reagent, and (4) addition of inactive CO 2 to form CH 3 COOH. All these operations have been carried out on 0.005 moles. Methyl-labeled Na acetate has been prepared in 67% yield based on the Ba 14 CO 3 used as starting material. (author) [fr

  8. Biosphere modelling for the assessment of radioactive waste repositories: the development of a common basis by the BIOMOVS II working group on reference biospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanDorp, F.

    1996-01-01

    Performance criteria for radioactive waste repositories are often expressed in terms of dose or risk. The characteristics of biosphere modelling for performance assessment are that: a) potential release occurs in the distant future, b) reliable predictions of human behaviour at the time of release are impracticable, and c) the biosphere is not considered to be a barrier. For these and other reasons, many unexplained differences have arisen in the approaches to biosphere modelling. The BIOMOVS II Working Group on Reference Biospheres has developed a) a recommended methodology for biosphere model development, b) a structured electronic list of features, events and processes (FEPs), and c) an illustrative example of the recommended methodology. The Working Group has successfully tested the Interaction Matrix (or Rock Engineering Systems, RES) approach for developing conceptual models. The BIOMOVS II Working Groups on Reference Biospheres and Complementary Studies have achieved considerable harmonisation in approaches to biosphere modelling. (author)

  9. Selective and sensitive fluorescence-shift probes based on two dansyl groups for mercury(ii) ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Jun; Liu, Jialun; Deng, Lefang; Zhao, Meili; Deng, Zhifu; Li, Xutian; Tang, Jian; Yang, Liting

    2014-11-01

    Two probes ( and ) bearing two dansyl fluorophores were synthesized and applied to the detection of mercury(ii) ions in aqueous solution. These probes exhibited a selective response to Hg(2+) in a buffered solution, with high sensitivity and a unique fluorescence response signal which displayed a blue-shift effect in the fluorescence emission peak. The Hg(2+) recognition mechanisms of the probes were determined by NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that probe and mercury(ii) ions formed an unusual 2:2 stoichiometric ratio complex, while probe and Hg(2+) formed a multidentate complex with a stoichiometric ratio of 2:1.

  10. A group find of the bronze coins struck under Philip II and Alexander III from Svoboda near Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Militký, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2013), s. 147-160 ISSN 0546-9414 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24707S Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : Macedonia * Bulgaria * Philip II * hoard Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  11. Isotopically labelled benzodiazepines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebman, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the benzodiazepines which are a class of therapeutic agents. Improvements in the analytical methodology in the areas of biochemistry and pharmacology were significant, particularly in the application of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. In addition, the discovery and subsequent development of tritium and carbon-14 as an analytical tool in the biological sciences were essentially post-world war II phenomena. Thus, as these new chemical entities were found to be biologically active, they could be prepared in labeled form for metabolic study, biological half-life determination (pharmacokinetics), tissue distribution study, etc. This use of tracer methodology has been liberally applied to the benzodiazepines and also more recently to the study of receptor-ligand interactions, in which tritium, carbon-11 or fluorine-18 isotopes have been used. The history of benzodiazepines as medicinal agents is indeed an interesting one; an integral part of that history is their use in just about every conceivable labeled form

  12. Preparation and surface labeling of murine eosinophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, A.W.; Cruise, K.M.; Mitchell, G.F.; Watt, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    Eosinophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice infected with the parasite Mesocestoides corti. Approximately 4 x 10 7 eosinophils (purity, 50%) could be harvested from each mouse. A high yield and purity of eosinophils was obtained from the peritoneal cells of infected male BALB/c mice using density centrifugation on a gradient of slightly hypotonic colloidal silica sol (Percoll). After initial irradiation of the mice to lower the lymphocyte contamination, subsequent density gradient (and where nescessary sedimentation velocity) centrifugation yielded 10 8 eosinophils (purity >95%) from six to eight mice. It was also possible to isolate small numbers of eosinophils (2 x 10 4 cells/minute, purity >99%) without irradiating the mice. This could be achieved by separating the density gradient purified peritoneal cells by light-scatter on a Becton-Dickinson cell sorter (FACS II). Analysis of proteins extracted from eosinophils using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed a group of high molecular weight proteins (between 250K and 160K) which were not as distinctive in the neutrophil profile. Surface labeling was performed, before the cell separation, by using 125 I and 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3α,6α-diphenylglycoluril. Only five 125 I-labeled proteins were detected initially (all with apparent molecular weights >50,000). No 125 I appeared to be associated with actin under the conditions used for surface labeling. Four of the eosinophil surface labeled proteins corresponded to surface labeled proteins on neutrophils, but the major surface component of the eosinophils (MW 79,000) appeared to be smaller than the major neutrophil protein (MW 90,000). (author)

  13. Safety comparison of four types of rabies vaccines in patients with WHO category II animal exposure: An observation based on different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Lu, Sha; Zhu, Zhenggang; Zhang, Man; Hu, Quan; Fang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the safeties of 4 types of rabies vaccines for patients with WHO category II animal exposure, especially in different age groups.A total of 4000 patients with WHO category II animal exposure were randomly divided into 4 vaccine groups, and were respectively given with Vaccines A, B, C, and D. And subjects in each vaccine group were divided into 4 age groups (≤5, 5-18, 19-60, and ≥60-year-old groups). Then adverse events (including local and systemic ones) were recorded and compared. Consequently, except for Vaccine B, patients under the age of 5 in Groups A, C, and D suffered from more adverse reactions than those in other age groups. Furthermore, for the children aged less than 5 years, incidence of adverse events following administration of Vaccine B, with the dose of 0.5 mL and production of bioreactor systems, was significantly lower than Vaccines A and D.Our data showed that rabies vaccines with smaller doses and more advanced processing techniques are of relatively high safety for the patients, especially for the young children.

  14. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site's self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy

  15. Rhodium(II) Proximity-Labeling Identifies a Novel Target Site on STAT3 for Inhibitors with Potent Anti-Leukemia Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minus, Matthew B; Liu, Wei; Vohidov, Farrukh; Kasembeli, Moses M; Long, Xin; Krueger, Michael J; Stevens, Alexandra; Kolosov, Mikhail I; Tweardy, David J; Sison, Edward Allan R; Redell, Michele S; Ball, Zachary T

    2015-10-26

    Nearly 40 % of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) suffer relapse arising from chemoresistance, often involving upregulation of the oncoprotein STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Herein, rhodium(II)-catalyzed, proximity-driven modification identifies the STAT3 coiled-coil domain (CCD) as a novel ligand-binding site, and we describe a new naphthalene sulfonamide inhibitor that targets the CCD, blocks STAT3 function, and halts its disease-promoting effects in vitro, in tumor growth models, and in a leukemia mouse model, validating this new therapeutic target for resistant AML. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Aggressiveness between genetic groups I and II of isolates of Cercospora zeae-maydis Agressividade entre isolados dos grupos genéticos I e II de Cercospora zeae-maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Marisa Mathioni

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years, the gray leaf spot disease (GLS caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, was not considered an important pathogen of maize (Zea mays, L. in Brazil. However, the recent adoption of agronomical practices such as no-tillage and cultivation under central pivot irrigation systems increased the incidence and severity to the extent that GLS is now one of the most important diseases of maize. Isolates of C. zeae-maydis can be distinguished by two genetic groups (I and II based on AFLP markers and on polymorphisms of the ITS and 5.8S rDNA regions. Until now, however, the biological implications of this distinction remain unclear. This study investigated whether isolates from the two genetic groups differ in aggressiveness towards maize. For this, symptoms of a susceptible hybrid were evaluated under greenhouse conditions with 9 and 11 isolates of C. zeae-maydis from groups I and II, respectively. Plants in the V3 growth stage were inoculated by placing sorghum seeds colonized with the pathogen in the leaf whorl and symptoms were evaluated with a visual rating scale 30 days later. On average, isolates of genetic group II were more aggressive than those of group I, with mean disease scores of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively. Differences were also observed between experiments, which suggested that group I and II might also differ in their fitness under different environments. This is the first report on differences in aggressiveness between the two genetic groups of C. zeae-maydis.Durante muitos anos, a cercosporiose, causada pelo fungo Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, não foi considerada importante para a cultura do milho (Zea mays, L. no Brasil. Entretanto, a recente utilização de práticas culturais como o plantio direto e o cultivo sob pivôs centrais favoreceram o aumento de sua severidade e incidência, de forma que a doença é hoje considerada uma das mais importantes da cultura. Isolados de C. zeae

  17. Food labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsøe Sørensen, Henrik; Clement, Jesper; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    evidence for dividing consumers into two profiles: one relying on general food knowledge and another using knowledge related to signpost labels. In a combined eyetracking and questionnaire survey we analyse the influence of background knowledge and identify different patterns of visual attention......The food industry develops tasty and healthy food but fails to deliver the message to all consumers. The consumers’ background knowledge is essential for how they find and decode relevant elements in the cocktail of signs which fight for attention on food labels. In this exploratory study, we find...... for the two consumer profiles. This underlines the complexity in choosing and designing the ‘right’ elements for a food package that consumers actually look at and are able to make rational use of. In spite of any regulation of food information provided by authorities, consumers will still be confronted...

  18. Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy as a Debulking Agent for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An open-label prospective phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Lindahl, Lise Maria; Gniadecki, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a powerful treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Based on the occurrence of relapses with low radiation doses, doses of 30-36 Gy are commonly used but most patients still eventually relapse and repeat treatment courses are limited...... due to the cumulative toxicity. Complete response rates are about 60-90% for T2-4 stages with a 5-year relapse-free survival of 10-25% for stages IB-III. Objectives: To evaluate prospectively the efficacy of low-dose TSEBT (10 Gy) in terms of complete cutaneous response rate, overall response rate...... and response duration in CTCL. Methods: Ten patients with stage IB-IV mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated in an open-label manner with 4 fractions of 1 Gy/week TSEB to a total skin dose of 10 Gy. Treatment responses were assessed at 1 and 3 months after treatment and subsequently at least every 6 months...

  19. Interaction of 125I-labeled botulinum neurotoxins with nerve terminals. II. Autoradiographic evidence for its uptake into motor nerves by acceptor-mediated endocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.D.; Dolly, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    Using pharmacological and autoradiographic techniques it has been shown that botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is translocated across the motor nerve terminal membrane to reach a postulated intraterminal target. In the present study, the nature of this uptake process was investigated using electron microscopic autoradiography. It was found that internalization is acceptor-mediated and that binding to specific cell surface acceptors involves the heavier chain of the toxin. In addition, uptake was shown to be energy and temperature-dependent and to be accelerated by nerve stimulation, a treatment which also shortens the time course of the toxin-induced neuroparalysis. These results, together with the observation that silver grains were often associated with endocytic structures within the nerve terminal, suggested that acceptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for toxin uptake. Possible recycling of BoNT acceptors (an important aspect of acceptor-mediated endocytosis of toxins) at motor nerve terminals was indicated by comparing the extent of labeling in the presence and absence of metabolic inhibitors. On the basis of these collective results, it is concluded that BoNT is internalized by acceptor-mediated endocytosis and, hence, the data support the proposal that this toxin inhibits release of acetylcholine by interaction with an intracellular target

  20. Metabolic and improved organ scan studies. II. Nitrogen-13 labeled compounds used as in-vivo probes for enzyme therapy and as tumor localizing and organ imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A number of 13 N-labeled compounds have been enzymatically synthesized and are being evaluated as tumor and/or organ localizing agents. 13 N-Ammonia, produced after cyclotron generation of 13 N-nitrate and subsequent reduction was used to enzymatically aminate the appropriate substrate to yield 13 N-L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-asparagine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-alanine. The use of 13 N-asparagine as a myocardial scanning agent and as a tumor localizing agent in asparaginase-sensitive tumors is discussed. Two imaging devices were used to study the effectiveness of the compounds as localizing agents. For static whole body distribution studies, a dual-detector high energy gamma ray (HEG) rectilinear scanner, equipped with constant response collimators was employed. The uniformity of response of this system permits quantitative determination of the amount of 13 N activity present in the organ or tumor of interest. The total organ kinetic imaging monitor (TOKIM) gamma camera system was used for dynamic studies covering smaller areas of the subject's body

  1. A Eu(III) doped metal-organic framework conjugated with fluorescein-labeled single-stranded DNA for detection of Cu(II) and sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Han; Yan, Bing

    2017-10-02

    In this paper, Bio-MOF-1 is prepared as reported and then Eu 3+ is introduced into it via cation exchange method. A FAM-labeled ssDNA is chosen to fabricate with the obtained Eu 3+ @Bio-MOF-1. A luminescent hybrid material is assembled, which can exhibit the fluorescence of Eu 3+ and FAM simultaneously by adjusting the ratio of FAM-ssDNA and Eu 3+ @Bio-MOF-1. The sample is then used for the detecting of metal ions, results shows which has good selectively for Cu 2+ (LOD = 0.14 μM, 0-250 μM). The introduction of Cu 2+ can quench the fluorescence of FAM while the luminescent intensity of Eu 3+ enhancing. After the detection of Cu 2+ , the Cu 2+ involved hybrid system can then be further employed for the detection of S 2- (LOD = 1.3 μM, 0-50 μM). Low concentration of S 2- can make the luminescent intensity of Eu 3+ decrease gradually while high concentration of S 2- can further recover the luminescent of FAM, which is quenched by Cu 2+ . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating Production of Cyclopentyl Tetraethers by Marine Group II Euryarchaeota in the Pearl River Estuary and Coastal South China Sea: Potential Impact on the TEX86 Paleothermometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xiang Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available TEX86 [TetraEther indeX of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs with 86 carbon atoms] has been widely applied to reconstruct (paleo- sea surface temperature. Marine Group I (MG-I Thaumarchaeota were thought to be the primary source of GDGTs constituting the TEX86 formula; however, recent research has suggested that Marine Group II (MG-II Euryarchaeota may also contribute significantly to the GDGT pool in the ocean. Little is known regarding the potential impact of MG-II Euryarchaeota-derived GDGTs on TEX86 values recorded in marine sediments. In this study, we assessed the relationship between distributions of GDGTs and MG-II Euryarchaeota and evaluated its potential effect on the TEX86 proxy. Lipid and DNA analyses were performed on suspended particulate matter and surface sediments collected along a salinity gradient from the lower Pearl River (river water and its estuary (mixing water to the coastal South China Sea (SCS, seawater. TEX86-derived temperatures from the water column and surface sediments were significantly correlated and both were lower than satellite-based temperatures. The ring index (RI values in these environments were higher than predicted from the calculated TEX86-RI correlation, indicating that the GDGT pool in the water column of the PR estuary and coastal SCS comprises relatively more cyclopentane rings, which thereby altered TEX86 values. Furthermore, the abundance of MG-II Euryarchaeota 16S rRNA gene in the mixing water was two to three orders of magnitude higher than those observed in the river or seawater. Significant linear correlations were observed between the gene abundance ratio of MG-II Euryarchaeota to total archaea and the fractional abundance of GDGTs with cyclopentane rings. Collectively, these results suggest that MG-II Euryarchaeota likely produce a large proportion of GDGTs with 1–4 cyclopentane moieties, which may bias TEX86 values in the water column and sediments. As such, valid

  3. ERP II: Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2004-01-01

    ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: e...... impact on extended enterprise architecture.....

  4. ERP II - Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2003-01-01

    ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: e...... impact on extended enterprise architecture....

  5. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 11: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    President Clinton has directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy, Hazel O'Leary, has directed that a Department of Energy project be initiated to develop options and recommendations for the safe storage of these materials in the interim. A step in the process is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of facilities throughout the Department. The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group was formed to produce the Project and Assessment Plans, to manage the assessments and to produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The plans established the approach and methodology for the assessment. The Project Plan specifies a Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to examine each of the twelve DOE sites with significant holdings of plutonium. The Assessment Plan describes the methodology that the Site Assessment Team (SAT) used to report on the plutonium holdings for each specific site.This report provides results of the assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  6. THE VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION OF NEARBY STARS FROM HIPPARCOS DATA. II. THE NATURE OF THE LOW-VELOCITY MOVING GROUPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo; Hogg, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The velocity distribution of nearby stars (∼<100 pc) contains many overdensities or 'moving groups', clumps of comoving stars, that are inconsistent with the standard assumption of an axisymmetric, time-independent, and steady-state Galaxy. We study the age and metallicity properties of the low-velocity moving groups based on the reconstruction of the local velocity distribution in Paper I of this series. We perform stringent, conservative hypothesis testing to establish for each of these moving groups whether it could conceivably consist of a coeval population of stars. We conclude that they do not: the moving groups are neither trivially associated with their eponymous open clusters nor with any other inhomogeneous star formation event. Concerning a possible dynamical origin of the moving groups, we test whether any of the moving groups has a higher or lower metallicity than the background population of thin disk stars, as would generically be the case if the moving groups are associated with resonances of the bar or spiral structure. We find clear evidence that the Hyades moving group has higher than average metallicity and weak evidence that the Sirius moving group has lower than average metallicity, which could indicate that these two groups are related to the inner Lindblad resonance of the spiral structure. Further, we find weak evidence that the Hercules moving group has higher than average metallicity, as would be the case if it is associated with the bar's outer Lindblad resonance. The Pleiades moving group shows no clear metallicity anomaly, arguing against a common dynamical origin for the Hyades and Pleiades groups. Overall, however, the moving groups are barely distinguishable from the background population of stars, raising the likelihood that the moving groups are associated with transient perturbations.

  7. Blockade of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors produces hyper-locomotion in cocaine pre-exposed rats by interactions with dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung Shin; Jang, Ju Kyong; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    2008-09-01

    It was previously reported that blockade of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) produces hyper-locomotion in rats previously exposed to amphetamine, indicating that group II mGluRs are well positioned to modulate the expression of behavioral sensitization by amphetamine. The present study further examined the locomotor activating effects of specific blockade of these receptors after cocaine pre-exposures. First, rats were pre-exposed to seven daily injections of cocaine (15mg/kg, IP). When challenged the next day with an injection of either saline or the group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 (0.5, 1.0 or 2.5mg/kg, IP), they produced hyper-locomotor activity, measured by infrared beam interruptions, to LY341495 compared to saline in a dose-dependent manner. Second, rats were pre-exposed to either saline or seven daily injections of cocaine (15mg/kg, IP). Three weeks later, when they were challenged with an injection of either saline or LY341495 (1.0mg/kg, IP), only rats pre-exposed to cocaine produced hyper-locomotor activity to LY341495 compared to saline. These effects, however, were not present when dopamine D1 (SCH23390; 5 or 10microg/kg), but not D2 (eticlopride; 10 or 50microg/kg), receptor antagonist was pre-injected, indicating that this cocaine-induced hyper-locomotor activity to LY341495 may be mediated in dopamine D1 receptor-dependent manner. These results suggest that group II mGluRs may be adapted to interact with dopaminergic neuronal signaling in mediating the sensitized locomotor activity produced by repeated cocaine pre-exposures.

  8. Production of Group II and III base oils by hybrid route using brazilian crude; Producao de oleos basicos lubrificantes dos grupos II e III pela rota hibrida ou mista a partir de petroleo brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Wlamir Soares; Fontes, Anita Eleonora Ferreira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a series of pilot plant tests made at PETROBRAS Research Centre, considering hydrotreatment and solvent dewaxing steps, to produce group II and group III lube base oils from Baiano Light crude feeds (Brazilian crude). RLAM Refinery has been using Baiano light crude to produce group I base oils by conventional route and in the pilot plant studies, two types of process scheme were tested. In the first one, an industrial run was performed at RLAM Refinery, including distillation, dewaxing and extraction and the light raffinate was used as a feed for a hydrotreatment pilot plant, followed by a distillation to remove the front ends. In the second scheme, another industrial run was performed, including distillation and dewaxing steps and the medium dewaxed oil was used as a charge for a hydrotreatment followed by distillation and dewaxing pilot plant tests. Products of excellent quality were obtained. Due to their high viscosity indexes (from 96 to 126), low contaminants levels (sulfur < 5 ppm and nitrogen < 5 ppm) and low aromatic content (CA < 2 %), the lube base oils produced are therefore classified as group II and group III. The main advantages of this route are related to the base oils quality improvements with low investment and more flexibility in terms of crude source. (author)

  9. Host Factors Influencing the Retrohoming Pathway of Group II Intron RmInt1, Which Has an Intron-Encoded Protein Naturally Devoid of Endonuclease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Nisa-Martínez

    Full Text Available Bacterial group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs and mobile retroelements that have an open reading frame encoding an intron-encoded protein (IEP with reverse transcriptase (RT and RNA splicing or maturase activity. Some IEPs carry a DNA endonuclease (En domain, which is required to cleave the bottom strand downstream from the intron-insertion site for target DNA-primed reverse transcription (TPRT of the inserted intron RNA. Host factors complete the insertion of the intron. By contrast, the major retrohoming pathway of introns with IEPs naturally lacking endonuclease activity, like the Sinorhizobium meliloti intron RmInt1, is thought to involve insertion of the intron RNA into the template for lagging strand DNA synthesis ahead of the replication fork, with possible use of the nascent strand to prime reverse transcription of the intron RNA. The host factors influencing the retrohoming pathway of such introns have not yet been described. Here, we identify key candidates likely to be involved in early and late steps of RmInt1 retrohoming. Some of these host factors are common to En+ group II intron retrohoming, but some have different functions. Our results also suggest that the retrohoming process of RmInt1 may be less dependent on the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration than those of other group II introns.

  10. Low-cost route for synthesis of mesoporous silica materials with high silanol groups and their application for Cu(II) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yangang; Huang Sujun; Kang Shifei; Zhang Chengli; Li Xi

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple and low-cost route to synthesize mesoporous silica materials with high silanol groups has been demonstrated by means of a sol–gel process using citric acid as the template and acid catalyst, further studies on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto the representative amine-functionalized mesoporous silica showed that it had a high Cu(II) removal efficiency. Highlights: ► A low-cost route to synthesize mesoporous silica with high silanol groups was demonstrated. ► Citric acid as the template and acid catalyst for the reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate. ► Water extraction method was an effective technique to remove template which can be recycled. ► The mesoporous silica with high silanol groups was easily modified by functional groups. ► A high Cu(II) removal efficiency on the amine-functionalized mesoporous silica. - Abstract: We report a simple and low-cost route for the synthesis of mesoporous silica materials with high silanol groups by means of a sol–gel process using citric acid as the template, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the silica source under aqueous solution system. The citric acid can directly work as an acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of TEOS besides the function as a pore-forming agent in the synthesis. It was found that by using a water extraction method the citric acid template in as-prepared mesoporous silica composite can be easily removed and a high degree of silanol groups were retained in the mesopores, moreover, the citric acid template in the filtrate can be recycled after being dried. The structural properties of the obtained mesoporous silica materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and nitrogen adsorption–desorption analysis. Furthermore, an adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution on the representative amine-functionalized mesoporous silica was investigated

  11. Evaluation of wet-cupping therapy for persistent non-specific low back pain: a randomised, waiting-list controlled, open-label, parallel-group pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-In; Kim, Tae-Hun; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kang, Jung Won; Kim, Kun Hyung; Choi, Jun-Yong; Kang, Kyung-Won; Kim, Ae-Ran; Shin, Mi-Suk; Jung, So-Young; Choi, Sun-mi

    2011-06-10

    Persistent non-specific low back pain (PNSLBP) is one of the most frequently experienced types of back pain around the world. Wet-cupping is a common intervention for various pain conditions, especially in Korea. In this context, we conducted a pilot study to determine the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatment for PNSLBP. We recruited 32 participants (21 in the wet-cupping group and 11 in the waiting-list group) who had been having PNSLBP for at least 3 months. The participants were recruited at the clinical research centre of the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Korea. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to wet-cupping and waiting-list groups. Following the practice of traditional Korean medicine, the treatment group was provided with wet-cupping treatment at two acupuncture points among the BL23, BL24 and BL25 6 times within 2 weeks. Usual care, including providing brochures for exercise, general advice for PNSLBP and acetaminophen, was allowed in both groups. Separate assessors participated in the outcome assessment. We used the 0 to 100 numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain, the McGill Pain Questionnaire for pain intensity (PPI) and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ), and we assessed acetaminophen use and safety issues. The results showed that the NRS score for pain decreased (-16.0 [95% CI: -24.4 to -7.7] in the wet-cupping group and -9.1 [-18.1 to -0.1] in the waiting-list group), but there was no statistical difference between the groups (p = 0.52). However, the PPI scores showed significant differences between the two groups (-1.2 [-1.6 to -0.8] for the wet-cupping group and -0.2 [-0.8 to 0.4] for the waiting-list group, p cupping group during 4 weeks (p = 0.09). The ODQ score did not show significant differences between the two groups (-5.60 [-8.90 to -2.30] in the wet-cupping group and -1.8 [-5.8 to 2.2] in the waiting-list group, p = 0.14). There was no report of adverse events due to wet-cupping. This pilot study may

  12. Safety and hemostatic efficacy of fibrin pad in partial nephrectomy: Results of an open-label Phase I and a randomized, standard-of-care-controlled Phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nativ Ofer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bleeding severity, anatomic location, tissue characteristics, and visibility are common challenges encountered while managing intraoperative bleeding, and conventional hemostatic measures (suture, ligature, and cautery may sometimes be ineffective or impractical. While topical absorbable hemostats (TAH are useful hemostatic adjuvants, each TAH has associated disadvantages. Methods We evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a new advanced biologic combination product―fibrin pad―to potentially address some gaps associated with TAHs. Fibrin pad was assessed as adjunctive hemostat in open partial nephrectomy in single-center, open-label, Phase I study (N = 10, and as primary hemostat in multicenter, single-blind, randomized, standard-of-care (SOC-controlled Phase I/II study (N = 7 in Israel. It was used to control mild-to-moderate bleeding in Phase I and also spurting arterial bleeding in Phase I/II study. Phase I study assessed safety and Phase I/II study, proportion of successes at 10 min following randomization, analyzed by Fisher exact tests at 5% significance level. Results Phase I (N = 10: All patients completed the study. Hemostasis was achieved within 3–4 min (average = 3.1 min of a single application in all patients. Fibrin pad was found to be safe for human use, with no product-related adverse events reported. Phase I/II (N = 7: Hemostatic success at 10 min (primary endpoint was achieved in 3/4 patients treated with fibrin pad versus 0/3 patients treated with SOC. No clinically significant change in laboratory or coagulation parameters was recorded, except a case of post-procedural hemorrhage with fibrin pad, which was considered serious and related to the fibrin pad treatment, and required re-operation. Although Data Safety Monitoring Board authorized trial continuation, the sponsor decided against proceeding toward an indication for primary treatment of severe arterial

  13. Substituted group and side chain effects for the porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin derivatives: A DFT and TD-DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Chin-Kuen; Chuang, Wen-Hua; Wang, Bo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The DFT/B3LYP/LANL2DZ and TD-DFT calculations have been performed to generate the optimized structures, electronic and photo-physical properties for the porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin (metalloporphyrin) derivatives. The substituted group and side chain effects for these derivatives are discussed in this study. According to the calculation results, the side chain moiety extends the π-delocalization length from the porphyrin core to the side chain moiety. The substituted group with a stronger electron-donating ability increases the energy level of highest occupied molecular orbital (E HOMO ). The side chain moiety with a lower resonance energy decreases E HOMO , the energy level of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ), and the energy gap (E g ) between HOMO and LUMO in the porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin derivatives. The natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis determines the possible electron transfer mechanism from the electron-donating to -withdrawing groups (the side chain moiety) in these porphyrin derivatives. The projected density of state (PDOS) analysis shows that the electron-donating group affects the electron density distribution in both HOMO and LUMO, and the side chain moiety influence the electron density distribution in LUMO. The calculated photo-physical properties (absorption wavelengths and the related oscillator strength, f) in dichloromethane environment for porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin derivatives have been simulated by using the TD-DFT method within the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM). The present of both of the substituted group and the side chain moiety in these derivatives results in a red shift and broadening of the range of the absorption peaks of the Q/Soret band as compared to porphin. -- Highlights: • Side chain moiety extends the π-delocalization for the porphyrins. • Substituted group increases the energy of highest occupied molecular orbital. • Side chain moiety influences the Q/Soret band of

  14. Intraoperative avidination for radionuclide treatment as a radiotherapy boost in breast cancer: results of a phase II study with 90Y-labeled biotin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganelli, Giovanni; De Cicco, Concetta; Carbone, Giuseppe; Pacifici, Monica; Ferrari, Mahila E.; Cremonesi, Marta; Di Dia, Amalia; Pagani, Gianmatteo; Galimberti, Viviana; Luini, Alberto; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ferrari, Annamaria; Orecchia, Roberto; De Santis, Rita; Zurrida, Stefano; Veronesi, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after conservative surgery for early breast cancer requires 5-7 weeks. For elderly patients and those distant from an RT center, attending for EBRT may be difficult or impossible. We investigated local toxicity, cosmetic outcomes, and quality of life in a new breast irradiation technique - intraoperative avidination for radionuclide therapy (IART) - in which avidin is administered to the tumor bed and 90 Y-labelled biotin later administered intravenously to bind the avidin and provide irradiation. Reduced duration EBRT (40 Gy) is given subsequently. After surgery, 50 (ten patients), 100 (15 patients) or 150 mg (ten patients) of avidin was injected into the tumor bed. After 12-24 h, 3.7 GBq 90 Y-biotin (beta source for therapeutic effect) plus 185 MBq 111 In-biotin (gamma source for imaging and dosimetry) was infused slowly. Whole-body scintigraphy and SPECT/CT images were taken for up to 30 h. Shortened EBRT started 4 weeks later. Local toxicity was assessed by RTOG scale; quality of life was assessed by EORTC QOL-30. Of 35 patients recruited (mean age 63 years; range 42-74) 32 received IART plus EBRT. 100 mg avidin provided 19.5 ± 4.0 Gy to the tumor bed and was considered the optimum dose. No side-effects of avidin or 90 Y-biotin occurred, with no hematological or local toxicity. Local G3 toxicity occurred in 3/32 patients during EBRT. IART plus EBRT was well accepted, with good cosmetic outcomes and maintained quality of life. IART plus reduced EBRT can accelerate irradiation after conservative breast surgery. (orig.)

  15. Brightest group galaxies - II: the relative contribution of BGGs to the total baryon content of groups at z < 1.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozaliasl, Ghassem; Finoguenov, Alexis; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Ilbert, Olivier; Wuyts, Stijn; McCracken, Henry J.; Montanari, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    We performed a detailed study of the evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) and their relative contribution to the total baryon budget within R200 (f^{BGG}_{b,200}). The sample comprises 407 BGGs selected from X-ray groups (M200 = 1012.8-1014 M⊙) out to z ˜ 1.3 identified in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), XMM Large-Scale Structure survey (XMM-LSS), and the All-Wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) fields. We find that BGGs constitute two distinct populations of quiescent and star-forming galaxies and their mean SFR is ˜2 dex higher than the median SFR at z 2 dex. We take into account the halo mass growth of groups in selecting the sample of BGGs and find that the mean (median) stellar mass of BGGs has grown by 0.3 dex since z = 1.3 to the present day. We show that up to ˜ 45 per cent of the stellar mass growth in a star-forming BGG can be due to its star formation activity. With respect to f^{BGG}_{b,200}, we find it to increase with decreasing redshift by ˜0.35 dex, while decreasing with halo mass in a redshift-dependent manner. We show that the slope of the relation between f^{BGG}_{b,200} and halo mass increases negatively with decreasing redshift. This trend is driven by an insufficient star formation in BGGs, compared to the halo growth rate. We separately show the BGGs with the 20 per cent highest f^{BGG}_{b,200} are generally non-star-forming galaxies and grow in mass by processes not related to star formation (e.g. dry mergers and tidal striping). We present the M⋆-Mh and M⋆/Mh-Mh relations and compare them with semi-analytic model predictions and a number of results from the literature. We quantify the intrinsic scatter in stellar mass of BGGs at fixed halo mass (σ _{log M_{\\star}}) and find that σ _{{log }M_{\\star}} increases from 0.3 dex at z ˜ 0.2-0.5 dex at z ˜ 1.0 due to the bimodal distribution of stellar mass.

  16. Biotechnological applications of mobile group II introns and their reverse transcriptases: gene targeting, RNA-seq, and non-coding RNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyeart, Peter J; Mohr, Georg; Ellington, Andrew D; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2014-01-13

    Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons that combine the activities of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a ribozyme) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase to insert site-specifically into DNA. They recognize DNA target sites largely by base pairing of sequences within the intron RNA and achieve high DNA target specificity by using the ribozyme active site to couple correct base pairing to RNA-catalyzed intron integration. Algorithms have been developed to program the DNA target site specificity of several mobile group II introns, allowing them to be made into 'targetrons.' Targetrons function for gene targeting in a wide variety of bacteria and typically integrate at efficiencies high enough to be screened easily by colony PCR, without the need for selectable markers. Targetrons have found wide application in microbiological research, enabling gene targeting and genetic engineering of bacteria that had been intractable to other methods. Recently, a thermostable targetron has been developed for use in bacterial thermophiles, and new methods have been developed for using targetrons to position recombinase recognition sites, enabling large-scale genome-editing operations, such as deletions, inversions, insertions, and 'cut-and-pastes' (that is, translocation of large DNA segments), in a wide range of bacteria at high efficiency. Using targetrons in eukaryotes presents challenges due to the difficulties of nuclear localization and sub-optimal magnesium concentrations, although supplementation with magnesium can increase integration efficiency, and directed evolution is being employed to overcome these barriers. Finally, spurred by new methods for expressing group II intron reverse transcriptases that yield large amounts of highly active protein, thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases from bacterial thermophiles are being used as research tools for a variety of applications, including qRT-PCR and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The

  17. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 12: Working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of March 15, 1994, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the ES ampersand H vulnerabilities of the inventory of plutonium (Pu) in storage. Pu in intact nuclear weapons, spent fuel and transuranic (TRU) waste not colocated with other Pu was excluded from this assessment. The DOE Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project and Assessment Plans, will also manage the overall DOE complex assessments and produce a final report for the Secretary of Energy by September 30, 1994. The Project Plan and Assessment Plan for this assessment, and which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study, were issued on April 25, 1994. This report contains the assessment of the Pantex Plant

  18. Tritium labelled steroids, preparation process and application to synthesis of tritium labelled estrane derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Process for preparing new steroids labelled with tritium in 6.7 and comprising in 3 a blocked ketonic group as ketal, thioketal or derivatives. Application of these products to the synthesis of tritium labelled estrane derivatives [fr

  19. Evaluation of wet-cupping therapy for persistent non-specific low back pain: a randomised, waiting-list controlled, open-label, parallel-group pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent non-specific low back pain (PNSLBP is one of the most frequently experienced types of back pain around the world. Wet-cupping is a common intervention for various pain conditions, especially in Korea. In this context, we conducted a pilot study to determine the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatment for PNSLBP. Methods We recruited 32 participants (21 in the wet-cupping group and 11 in the waiting-list group who had been having PNSLBP for at least 3 months. The participants were recruited at the clinical research centre of the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Korea. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to wet-cupping and waiting-list groups. Following the practice of traditional Korean medicine, the treatment group was provided with wet-cupping treatment at two acupuncture points among the BL23, BL24 and BL25 6 times within 2 weeks. Usual care, including providing brochures for exercise, general advice for PNSLBP and acetaminophen, was allowed in both groups. Separate assessors participated in the outcome assessment. We used the 0 to100 numerical rating scale (NRS for pain, the McGill Pain Questionnaire for pain intensity (PPI and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ, and we assessed acetaminophen use and safety issues. Results The results showed that the NRS score for pain decreased (-16.0 [95% CI: -24.4 to -7.7] in the wet-cupping group and -9.1 [-18.1 to -0.1] in the waiting-list group, but there was no statistical difference between the groups (p = 0.52. However, the PPI scores showed significant differences between the two groups (-1.2 [-1.6 to -0.8] for the wet-cupping group and -0.2 [-0.8 to 0.4] for the waiting-list group, p Conclusion This pilot study may provide preliminary data on the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatments for PNSLBP. Future full-scale randomised controlled trials will be needed to provide firm evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention

  20. Label triangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Label Triangulation (LT) with neutrons allows the investigation of the quaternary structure of biological multicomponent complexes under native conditions. Provided that the complex can be fully separated into and reconstituted from its single - protonated and deuterated - components, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can give selective information on shapes and pair distances of these components. Following basic geometrical rules, the spatial arrangement of the components can be reconstructed from these data. LT has so far been successfully applied to the small and large ribosomal subunits and the transcriptase of E. coli. (author)

  1. Radioiodination of melagenine-II with I-125 (preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caso, R.; Ruiz, M.

    1996-01-01

    Radioiodination of Melagenine-II with I-125 farmacokinetic studies was made, using Chloramine-T method. Radiochemical purity and stability of the labelled product were determined by radiochromatography. The labelled Melagenine-II showed two radioactive fractions

  2. Fluorescence detection of DNA, adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), and telomerase activity by zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX/G-quadruplex labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanxia; Sharon, Etery; Freeman, Ronit; Liu, Xiaoqing; Willner, Itamar

    2012-06-05

    The zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) fluorophore binds to G-quadruplexes, and this results in the enhanced fluorescence of the fluorophore. This property enabled the development of DNA sensors, aptasensors, and a sensor following telomerase activity. The DNA sensor is based on the design of a hairpin structure that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence. Upon opening the hairpin by the analyte DNA, the resulting fluorescence of the ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex provides the readout signal for the sensing event (detection limit 5 nM). Addition of Exonuclease III to the system allows the recycling of the analyte and its amplified analysis (detection limit, 200 pM). The association of the ZnPPIX to G-quadruplex aptamer-substrate complexes allowed the detection of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP, detection limit 10 μM). Finally, the association of ZnPPIX to the G-quadruplex repeat units of telomers allowed the detection of telomerase activity originating from 380 ± 20 cancer 293T cell extract.

  3. Self-assembly of novel manganese (II) compounds based on bifunctional-group ligands: Synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Juan-zhi; Lu, Li-ping; Zhu, Miao-li; Feng, Si-si

    2018-06-01

    Four manganese (II) compounds are obtained by the reaction of manganese salts, triazole-derivatives and auxiliary reagents in aqueous solution or mix-solvents by routine or hydrothermal reactions. X-ray crystal structure analyses reveal that a neutral 0D compound [Mn(Hmctrz)2(H2O)2] (1) (H2mctrz = 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid) displays a centro-symmetric mononuclear octahedral entity with two Hmctrz- anions and two water molecules; two neutral 2D clusters [Mn(Hdctrz)(H2O)2]n (2) (H3dctrz = 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dicarboxylic acid) and [Mn2(pbtrz)(btca)]n·4nH2O (3) (pbtrz = 1,3-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-propane&H4btca = benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid) possess layer structures with Hdctrz2- linkers (2) and Mn(II)-pbtrz-Mn(II) building blocks periodically extended by μ-btca4- connectors (3); [Mn(pbtrz)]n·nOAc·nOH (4) shows a 3D diamond-shaped cationic framework with the anion void volume of 49.2%. Nitrogenous bases are used as the auxiliary ligand in compound 3 and the temple ligand in compounds 1, 2, and 4. Compounds 1-4 show antiferromagnetic coupling that has been fitted by different models with the molecular field approximate with D = - 0.129(1) cm-1 for 1, J = - 0.354(4) cm-1 for 2 and J = - 0.696(6) cm-1 for 3, respectively. The magnetic differences can be related to different superexchange interactions transmitted by the crystal lattice and/or the zero field splitting (ZFS) of the 6A1g single-ion states of 1 and the syn-anti-COO- of 2 as well as the mixed magnetic bridges of μ1-O and μ-pbtrz-μ-COO- of 3.

  4. Co-Labeling for Multi-View Weakly Labeled Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinxing; Li, Wen; Xu, Dong; Tsang, Ivor W

    2016-06-01

    It is often expensive and time consuming to collect labeled training samples in many real-world applications. To reduce human effort on annotating training samples, many machine learning techniques (e.g., semi-supervised learning (SSL), multi-instance learning (MIL), etc.) have been studied to exploit weakly labeled training samples. Meanwhile, when the training data is represented with multiple types of features, many multi-view learning methods have shown that classifiers trained on different views can help each other to better utilize the unlabeled training samples for the SSL task. In this paper, we study a new learning problem called multi-view weakly labeled learning, in which we aim to develop a unified approach to learn robust classifiers by effectively utilizing different types of weakly labeled multi-view data from a broad range of tasks including SSL, MIL and relative outlier detection (ROD). We propose an effective approach called co-labeling to solve the multi-view weakly labeled learning problem. Specifically, we model the learning problem on each view as a weakly labeled learning problem, which aims to learn an optimal classifier from a set of pseudo-label vectors generated by using the classifiers trained from other views. Unlike traditional co-training approaches using a single pseudo-label vector for training each classifier, our co-labeling approach explores different strategies to utilize the predictions from different views, biases and iterations for generating the pseudo-label vectors, making our approach more robust for real-world applications. Moreover, to further improve the weakly labeled learning on each view, we also exploit the inherent group structure in the pseudo-label vectors generated from different strategies, which leads to a new multi-layer multiple kernel learning problem. Promising results for text-based image retrieval on the NUS-WIDE dataset as well as news classification and text categorization on several real-world multi

  5. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 9, Oak Ridge Site working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Plutonium Environmental Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) Vulnerability Assessment at the Oak Ridge (OR) Site was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the ES ampersand H vulnerabilities arising from the storage and handling of its current plutonium holdings. The term open-quotes ES ampersand H Vulnerabilityclose quotes is defined for the purpose of this project to mean conditions or weaknesses that could lead to unnecessary or increased radiation exposure of workers, release of radioactive materials to the environment, or radiation exposure to the public. This assessment was intended to take a open-quotes snap-shotclose quotes of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Y-12 Plant's plutonium holdings and associated ES ampersand H vulnerabilities in the time frame of June 1 994. This vulnerability assessment process began with the OR Site Assessment Team (SAT) generating a self-assessment report including proposed vulnerabilities. The SAT identified 55 facilities which contain plutonium and other transuranics they considered might be in-scope for purposes of this study. The Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT), however, determined that 37 of the facilities actually contained only out-of-scope material (e.g., transuranic material not colocated with plutonium or transuranic (TRU) waste). The WGAT performed an independent assessment of the SATs report, conducted facility walkdowns, and reviewed reference documents such as Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), emergency preparedness plans, and procedures. The results of the WGAT review and open-quotes walkdownsclose quotes (a term as used here incorporating tours, document reviews, and detailed discussions with cognizant personnel) are discussed in Section 3.0. The ES ampersand H vulnerabilities that were identified are documented in Appendix A

  6. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedreza Mazlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type II diabetes mellitus, who had been referred to Parsian Diabetes clinic of Mashhad in 2014, were divided into two groups of intervention and control. The group counseling program was performed in five 1.5-hour sessions with 3-day intervals, and each groups consisted of 8 to 10 people. The content of the meetings was problems in nutrition, exercise, diabetes mellitus disease, diabetes-related mental health problems, diabetes medications, and self-control of blood glucose. Researcher-made diabetes care questionnaire was filled and HbA1c test was measured before and two months after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 11.5 using paired sample and independent t-tests. Results: In this study,27.3 percent of the subjects were male and 72.7 were female with the mean age of 49.1 ± 8.3. The scores of physiological aspect of self-care and HbA1C of the diabetic patients before the intervention was not significantly different between the groups; but in the post-intervention phase, the self-care in intervention group (49.1±5.8 significantly increased compared to the control group (31.8±12.2 (p

  7. Synthesis and characterization of near-IR absorbing metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines modified with aromatic azo groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes Özçeşmeci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanine complexes bearing peripheral (E-4-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yldiazenyl units have been synthesized. Novel phthalonitrile derivative required for the preparation of phthalocyanine complexes was prepared by coupling 4-aminophthalonitrile and 2-naphthol. The structures of these new compounds were characterized by using elemental analyses, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In the UV-Vis spectra a broad absorption band appears for phthalocyanine complexes at around 450–500 nm resulting from azo-group introduced onto the phthalocyanine ring. The photophysical properties of metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines were studied in tetrahydrofuran.

  8. Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt theorems and generalized Casimir invariants for some infinite-dimensional Lie groups: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ton-That, Tuong

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper we gave a generalization of the notion of Casimir invariant differential operators for the infinite-dimensional Lie groups GL ∞ (C) (or equivalently, for its Lie algebra gj ∞ (C)). In this paper we give a generalization of the Casimir invariant differential operators for a class of infinite-dimensional Lie groups (or equivalently, for their Lie algebras) which contains the infinite-dimensional complex classical groups. These infinite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, are inductive limits of finite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, with some additional properties. These groups or their Lie algebras act via the generalized adjoint representations on projective limits of certain chains of vector spaces of universal enveloping algebras. Then the generalized Casimir operators are the invariants of the generalized adjoint representations. In order to be able to explicitly compute the Casimir operators one needs a basis for the universal enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra. The Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) theorem gives an explicit construction of such a basis. Thus in the first part of this paper we give a generalization of the PBW theorem for inductive limits of Lie algebras. In the last part of this paper a generalization of the very important theorem in representation theory, namely the Chevalley-Racah theorem, is also discussed

  9. A 6-week, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, parallel-group study comparing travoprost 0.004% to latanoprost 0.005% followed by 6-week, open-label treatment with travoprost 0.004%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, Eugenio; Carrasco, Félix Gil; Costa, Vital Paulino; Casiraghi, Javier F; Vargas, Enrique; Sarmina, Judith S; Mayol, Renato

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the tolerability and efficacy of once-daily travoprost 0.004% versus latanoprost 0.005% for 6 weeks followed by 6 weeks of once-daily travoprost 0.004% in decreasing intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OH). This multicenter, randomized, doublemasked, active-controlled, parallel-group trial was conducted at 32 centers across Latin America. Patients aged > or =18 years with OAG or OH were randomly assigned to receive topical travoprost 0.004% or latanoprost 0.005% 1 drop QD (9 PM) for 6 weeks (masked phase). At 6 weeks, all patients were assigned to receive open-label travoprost 0.004% 1 drop QD (9 PM) for 6 additional weeks (open-label phase). Study visits were scheduled at weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12. At each study visit, IOP was measured at 5 PM (+/-1 hour; approximately 20 hours after study drug administration). IOP changes from baseline were combined (pooled) from the 1-, 2-, 4-, and 6-week data to provide a comparison between the 2 treatment groups. Ocular adverse events (AEs) were monitored using slit-lamp examination. A total of 302 patients were enrolled (travoprost group, 155 patients; latanoprost group, 147 patients). The mean (SD) age of the travoprost group was 61.9 (10.6) years; 60.6% were female; and 47.1% were white. The mean (SD) age of the latanoprost group was 60.5 (12.4) years; 62.6% were female; and 49.0% were white. Mean IOP values were not significantly different between the travoprost and latanoprost groups at baseline (24.7 vs 24.2 mm Hg) or 6 weeks; however, the between-group difference in reductions from baseline in pooled IOP during the masked phase of the study was statistically significant (-8.3 vs -7.5 mm Hg; P = 0.009). At weeks 6 and 12, mean lOP levels were 16.1 and 16.2 mm Hg, respectively, in the travoprost group and 16.4 and 16.1 mm Hg in the group that was switched from latanoprost to travoprost (all, P = NS). The most common ocular AEs

  10. Local injection of the 90Y-labelled peptidic vector DOTATOC to control gliomas of WHO grades II and III: an extended pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, T.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Hofer, S.; Wasner, M.; Zimmerer, S.; Gratzl, O.; Merlo, A.; Eichhorn, K.; Freitag, P.; Probst, A.; Reubi, J.-C.; Maecke, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously presented preliminary observations on targeting somatostatin receptor-positive malignant gliomas of all grades by local injection of the radiolabelled peptidic vector 90 Y-DOTATOC. We now report on our more thorough clinical experience with this novel compound, focussing on low-grade and anaplastic gliomas. Small peptidic vectors have the potential to target invisible infiltrative disease within normal surrounding brain tissue, thereby opening a window of opportunity for early intervention. Five progressive gliomas of WHO grades II and III and five extensively debulked low-grade gliomas were treated with varying fractions of 90 Y-DOTATOC. The vectors were locally injected into the resection cavity or into solid tumour. The activity per single injection ranged from 555 to 1,875 MBq, and the cumulative activity from 555 to 7,030 MBq, according to tumour volumes and eloquence of the affected brain area, yielding dose estimates from 76±15 to 312±62 Gy. Response was assessed by the clinical status, by steroid dependence and, every 4-6 months, by magnetic resonance imaging and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. In the five progressive gliomas, lasting responses were obtained for at least 13-45 months without the need for steroids. Radiopeptide brachytherapy had been the only modality applied to counter tumour progression. Interestingly, we observed the slow transformation of a solid, primarily inoperable anaplastic astrocytoma into a resectable multi-cystic lesion 2 years after radiopeptide brachytherapy. Based on these observations, we also assessed the feasibility of local radiotherapy following extensive debulking, which was well tolerated. Targeted beta-particle irradiation based on diffusible small peptidic vectors appears to be a promising modality for the treatment of malignant gliomas. (orig.)

  11. Substitution of ethambutol with linezolid during the intensive phase of treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: study protocol for a prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jung-Kyu; Yoon, Ho Il; Jeong, Ina; Heo, Eunyoung; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jinwoo; Choi, Sun Mi; Park, Jong Sun; Joh, Joon-Sung; Cho, Young-Jae; Lee, Yeon Joo; Kim, Se Joong; Hwang, Young Ran; Kim, Hyeonjeong; Ki, Jongeun; Choi, Hyungsook; Han, Jiyeon; Ahn, Heejung; Hahn, Seokyung; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2017-02-13

    Linezolid, an oxazolidinone, substantially improves treatment outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. We started a trial to test whether the use of linezolid instead of ethambutol could increase the rate of sputum culture conversion as of 8 weeks of treatment in patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis. This is a phase II, multicenter, randomized study with three arms. We are enrolling patients with pulmonary tuberculosis without rifampicin resistance screened by the Xpert MTB/RIF® assay. The standard treatment arm uses isoniazid (6 months), rifampicin (6 months), pyrazinamide (2 months), and ethambutol (2 months). Experimental arm 1 uses linezolid (600 mg/day) for 4 weeks instead of ethambutol. Experimental arm 2 uses linezolid (600 mg/day) for 2 weeks instead of ethambutol. The primary outcome is the sputum culture conversion rate on liquid media after 2 months of treatment. Secondary outcomes include the sputum culture conversion rate on solid media after 2 months of treatment, time to sputum culture conversion on liquid and solid media, cure rate, and treatment success rate. The frequencies of total adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs will be described and documented. Based on an α = 0.05 level of significance, a power of 85%, a 15% difference in the culture conversion rate after 2 months between the control arm and experimental arm 1 (75% vs. 90%), a 10% default (loss to follow-up) rate, and a 10% culture failure, the required number per arm was calculated to be 143 (429 in total). This trial will reveal the effectiveness and safety of 2 or 4 weeks of use of linezolid instead of ethambutol for patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. If a new regimen including linezolid shows a higher culture conversion rate by week 8, and is safe, it could be tested as a 4-month antituberculosis treatment regimen in the future. ClincalTrials.gov, NCT01994460 . Registered on 13 November 2013.

  12. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, and phosphate ester cleavage properties of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine copper(II) complexes with guanidinium pendant groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousoff, Matthew J; Tjioe, Linda; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone

    2008-10-06

    Three new derivatives of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (DPA) featuring ethylguanidinium (L (1)), propylguanidinium (L (2)), or butylguanidinium (L (3)) pendant groups have been prepared by the reaction of N, N- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)alkane-alpha,omega-diamines with 1 H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine hydrochloride. The corresponding mononuclear copper(II) complexes were prepared by reacting the ligands with copper(II) nitrate and were isolated as [Cu(LH (+))(OH 2)](ClO 4) 3. xNaClO 4. yH 2O ( C1: L = L (1), x = 2, y = 3; C2: L = L (2), x = 2, y = 4; C3: L = L (3), x = 1, y = 0) following cation exchange purification. Recrystallization yielded crystals of composition [Cu(LH (+))(X)](ClO 4) 3.X ( C1': L = L (1), X = MeOH; C2': L = L (2), X = H 2O; C3': L = L (3), X = H 2O), which were suitable for X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of C1', C2', and C3' indicate that the DPA moieties of the ligands coordinate to the copper(II) centers in a meridional fashion, with a water or methanol molecule occupying the fourth basal position. Weakly bound perchlorate anions located in the axial positions complete the distorted octahedral coordination spheres. The noncoordinating, monoprotonated guanidinium groups project away from the Cu(II)-DPA units and are involved in extensive charge-assisted hydrogen-bonding interactions with cocrystallized water/methanol molecules and perchlorate anions within the crystal lattices. The copper(II) complexes were tested for their ability to promote the cleavage of two model phosphodiesters, bis( p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) and uridine-3'- p-nitrophenylphosphate (UpNP), as well as supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBR 322). While the presence of the guanidine pendants was found to be detrimental to BNPP cleavage efficiency, the functionalized complexes were found to cleave plasmid DNA and, in some cases, the model ribose phosphate diester, UpNP, at a faster rate than the parent copper(II) complex of DPA.

  13. ML-MG: Multi-label Learning with Missing Labels Using a Mixed Graph

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan

    2015-12-07

    This work focuses on the problem of multi-label learning with missing labels (MLML), which aims to label each test instance with multiple class labels given training instances that have an incomplete/partial set of these labels (i.e. some of their labels are missing). To handle missing labels, we propose a unified model of label dependencies by constructing a mixed graph, which jointly incorporates (i) instance-level similarity and class co-occurrence as undirected edges and (ii) semantic label hierarchy as directed edges. Unlike most MLML methods, We formulate this learning problem transductively as a convex quadratic matrix optimization problem that encourages training label consistency and encodes both types of label dependencies (i.e. undirected and directed edges) using quadratic terms and hard linear constraints. The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) can be used to exactly and efficiently solve this problem. To evaluate our proposed method, we consider two popular applications (image and video annotation), where the label hierarchy can be derived from Wordnet. Experimental results show that our method achieves a significant improvement over state-of-the-art methods in performance and robustness to missing labels.

  14. Diagnosis of infection by preoperative scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wukich, D.K.; Abreu, S.H.; Callaghan, J.J.; Van Nostrand, D.; Savory, C.G.; Eggli, D.F.; Garcia, J.E.; Berrey, B.H.

    1987-01-01

    Scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells has been reported to be sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of low-grade sepsis of the musculoskeletal system. We reviewed the records of fifty patients who had suspected osteomyelitis or suspected infection about a total joint prosthesis and who underwent scintigraphy with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and scintigraphy with indium-111 oxine-labeled white blood cells before an open surgical procedure. Any patient who received preoperative antibiotics was not included in the study. For all of the patients, gram-stain examination of smears, evaluation of a culture of material from the operative site, and histological examination were done. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I was composed of twenty-four patients, each of whom had a prosthesis in place and complained of pain. Group II was composed of twenty-six patients for whom a diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis had to be considered. With the indium scans alone, there was only one false-negative result (in Group II), but there were eighteen false-positive results (eight patients in Group II and ten patients in Group I). Although scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells is quite sensitive, it is not specific in detecting chronic osteomyelitis; a negative scan should be considered highly suggestive that osteomyelitis is not present. Specificity can be increased by interpreting the indium scan in conjunction with the technetium scan

  15. A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Labeled, Parallel Group Trial of Sildenafil in Alcohol-Associated Erectile Dysfunction: The Impact on Psychosocial Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Grinshpoon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To examine the effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction (ED and psychosocial outcomes in alcohol-dependent (AD men, 108 men with these diagnoses were randomly assigned to either take sildenafil (50 mg as add-on to standard treatment for AD, or the same treatment without sildenafil, for 12 weeks. Only 50 patients in sildenafil group and 51 in control group twice completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF and a battery of self-report questionnaires. IIEF scores and psychosocial functioning, self-esteem and support from friends improved only for sildenafil-treated patients (P < 0.001. The high effect sizes suggest that the observed benefits are unlikely to be a placebo effect, although their unspecific nature could not be ruled out. In men with ED associated with AD, sildenafil improves both ED and psychosocial outcomes. Further placebo-controlled clinical trial is warranted.

  16. Mono-uridylation of pre-microRNA as a key step in the biogenesis of group II let-7 microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Inha; Ha, Minju; Lim, Jaechul; Yoon, Mi-Jeong; Park, Jong-Eun; Kwon, S Chul; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V Narry

    2012-10-26

    RNase III Drosha initiates microRNA (miRNA) maturation by cleaving a primary miRNA transcript and releasing a pre-miRNA with a 2 nt 3' overhang. Dicer recognizes the 2 nt 3' overhang structure to selectively process pre-miRNAs. Here, we find that, unlike prototypic pre-miRNAs (group I), group II pre-miRNAs acquire a shorter (1 nt) 3' overhang from Drosha processing and therefore require a 3'-end mono-uridylation for Dicer processing. The majority of let-7 and miR-105 belong to group II. We identify TUT7/ZCCHC6, TUT4/ZCCHC11, and TUT2/PAPD4/GLD2 as the terminal uridylyl transferases responsible for pre-miRNA mono-uridylation. The TUTs act specifically on dsRNAs with a 1 nt 3' overhang, thereby creating a 2 nt 3' overhang. Depletion of TUTs reduces let-7 levels and disrupts let-7 function. Although the let-7 suppressor, Lin28, induces inhibitory oligo-uridylation in embryonic stem cells, mono-uridylation occurs in somatic cells lacking Lin28 to promote let-7 biogenesis. Our study reveals functional duality of uridylation and introduces TUT7/4/2 as components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biosphere modelling for the assessment of radioactive waste repositories; the development of a common basis by the BIOMOVS II reference biospheres working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, F. van; Egan, M.; Kessler, J.H.; Nilsson, S.; Pinedo, P.; Smith, G.; Torres, C.

    1998-01-01

    Performance criteria for radioactive waste repositories are often expressed in terms of dose or risk. The characteristics of biosphere modelling for performance assessment are that: (a) potential release occurs in the distant future, (b) reliable predictions of human behaviour at the time of release are impracticable, and (c) the biosphere is not considered to be a barrier as the geosphere and the engineered barriers. For these and other reasons, differences have arisen in the approaches to biosphere modelling for repository dose and risk assessment. The BIOMOVS II Reference Biospheres Working Group has developed (a) a recommended methodology for biosphere model development, (b) a structured list of features, events and processes (FEPs) which the model should describe, and (c) an illustrative example of the recommended methodology. The Working Group has successfully tested the Interaction Matrix (or Rock Engineering Systems, RES) approach for developing conceptual models. The BIOMOVS II Working Groups on Reference Biospheres and Complementary Studies have laid the basis for considerable harmonisation in approaches to biosphere modelling of long term radionuclide releases. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  18. Bridge Busters: The 397th Bombardment Group (Medium) and the B-26 Marauder in World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    wooded area of Foret de Blois , the group delivered relatively accurate attacks but noted no secondary explosions. Poor weather stopped them from bombing...Loire 88 7-Aug-44 Ammunition Dump Foret De Blois 89 8-Aug-44 Railroad Bridge/ Embankment Mantes Gassicourt 90 8-Aug-44 Coastal Defense

  19. Phase II trial of cisplatin in advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, J T; Blessing, J A; Homesley, H D; Berek, J S; Creasman, W T

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina no longer amenable to control with surgery and/or radiotherapy were entered into a phase II study of cisplatin 50 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks. Two were deemed ineligible because of a primary site of origin other than vagina. Two were deemed inevaluable, one because of the lack of measurable disease and the other because she never received drug. The remaining 22 included a variety of histologies (16 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenosquamous carcinomas, 1 clear cell carcinoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, and 2 carcinomas not otherwise specified). One complete responder was observed among the 16 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Adverse effects were tolerable and were essentially those reported in other series. These results suggest that cisplatin has insignificant activity in advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina at least at the dose and schedule tested. No comment can be made regarding the activity of cisplatin in other histologies.

  20. Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara-Bavarian Nordic Smallpox Vaccine in Vaccinia-Naive and Experienced Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals: An Open-Label, Controlled Clinical Phase II Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Edgar Turner; Stapleton, Jack; Frank, Ian; Hassler, Shawn; Goepfert, Paul A.; Barker, David; Wagner, Eva; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Virgin, Garth; Meyer, Thomas Peter; Müller, Jutta; Bädeker, Nicole; Grünert, Robert; Young, Philip; Rösch, Siegfried; Maclennan, Jane; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Chaplin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background. First- and second-generation smallpox vaccines are contraindicated in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A new smallpox vaccine is needed to protect this population in the context of biodefense preparedness. The focus of this study was to compare the safety and immunogenicity of a replication-deficient, highly attenuated smallpox vaccine modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) in HIV-infected and healthy subjects. Methods. An open-label, controlled Phase II trial was conducted at 36 centers in the United States and Puerto Rico for HIV-infected and healthy subjects. Subjects received 2 doses of MVA administered 4 weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events, focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings, and safety laboratories. Immune responses were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Results. Five hundred seventy-nine subjects were vaccinated at least once and had data available for analysis. Rates of ELISA seropositivity were comparably high in vaccinia-naive healthy and HIV-infected subjects, whereas PRNT seropositivity rates were higher in healthy compared with HIV-infected subjects. Modified vaccinia Ankara was safe and well tolerated with no adverse impact on viral load or CD4 counts. There were no cases of myo-/pericarditis reported. Conclusions. Modified vaccinia Ankara was safe and immunogenic in subjects infected with HIV and represents a promising smallpox vaccine candidate for use in immunocompromised populations. PMID:26380340

  1. Patient identification and tube labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dongen-Lases, Edmée C; Cornes, Michael P; Grankvist, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    of phlebotomy procedures with the CLSI H3-A6 guideline was unacceptably low, and that patient identification and tube labelling are amongst the most critical steps in need of immediate attention and improvement. The process of patient identification and tube labelling is an essential safety barrier to prevent...... patient identity mix-up. Therefore, the EFLM Working Group aims to encourage and support worldwide harmonisation of patient identification and tube labelling procedures in order to reduce the risk of preanalytical errors and improve patient safety. With this Position paper we wish to raise awareness...... and provide recommendations for proper patient and sample identification procedures....

  2. A comparative gene analysis with rice identified orthologous group II HKT genes and their association with Na(+) concentration in bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Oldach, Klaus H; Francki, Michael G

    2016-01-19

    Although the HKT transporter genes ascertain some of the key determinants of crop salt tolerance mechanisms, the diversity and functional role of group II HKT genes are not clearly understood in bread wheat. The advanced knowledge on rice HKT and whole genome sequence was, therefore, used in comparative gene analysis to identify orthologous wheat group II HKT genes and their role in trait variation under different saline environments. The four group II HKTs in rice identified two orthologous gene families from bread wheat, including the known TaHKT2;1 gene family and a new distinctly different gene family designated as TaHKT2;2. A single copy of TaHKT2;2 was found on each homeologous chromosome arm 7AL, 7BL and 7DL and each gene was expressed in leaf blade, sheath and root tissues under non-stressed and at 200 mM salt stressed conditions. The proteins encoded by genes of the TaHKT2;2 family revealed more than 93% amino acid sequence identity but ≤52% amino acid identity compared to the proteins encoded by TaHKT2;1 family. Specifically, variations in known critical domains predicted functional differences between the two protein families. Similar to orthologous rice genes on chromosome 6L, TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;2 genes were located approximately 3 kb apart on wheat chromosomes 7AL, 7BL and 7DL, forming a static syntenic block in the two species. The chromosomal region on 7AL containing TaHKT2;1 7AL-1 co-located with QTL for shoot Na(+) concentration and yield in some saline environments. The differences in copy number, genes sequences and encoded proteins between TaHKT2;2 homeologous genes and other group II HKT gene families within and across species likely reflect functional diversity for ion selectivity and transport in plants. Evidence indicated that neither TaHKT2;2 nor TaHKT2;1 were associated with primary root Na(+) uptake but TaHKT2;1 may be associated with trait variation for Na(+) exclusion and yield in some but not all saline environments.

  3. A Tentative Research on the Education of Teacher by "Adlerian Psychology" (II) : Using Structured Group Encounter Method

    OpenAIRE

    柴山, 謙二; シバヤマ, ケンジ; Shibayama, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    This is a tentative research on the education of teacher explored in Adlerian Psychology that used the structured group encounter method. The purpose of teacher education by Adlerian Psychology is to develop and deepen social interests of teachers, and to learn this theory and psychological techniques at school. The process of short-time workshop for teachers who were specialized in guidance for pupils was designed and documented for the education of teacher, and the author participated in th...

  4. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Hidefumi, E-mail: mimura@marianna-u.ac.jp [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki, E-mail: arai-y3111@mvh.biglobe.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com; Takeuchi, Yoshito, E-mail: yotake62@qg8.so-net.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Miki, Tsuneharu, E-mail: tmiki@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Urology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo, E-mail: gobara@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sakuhara, Yusuke, E-mail: yusaku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamamoto, Takanobu, E-mail: tyamamot@tcc.pref.tochigi.lg.jp [Tochigi Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sato, Yozo, E-mail: ysato@aichi-cc.jp [Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu, E-mail: susumu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  5. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Hidefumi; Arai, Yasuaki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Sone, Miyuki; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Miki, Tsuneharu; Gobara, Hideo; Sakuhara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Sato, Yozo; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  6. Ajout d’équivalents des groupes alimentaires au Questionnaire canadien de fréquence alimentaire II pour estimer l’Indice canadien de saine alimentation-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria McInerney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Il a été prouvé qu’un régime alimentaire de piètre qualité augmente le risque de maladies chroniques courantes susceptibles de nuire à la qualité de vie et d'alourdir le fardeau qui pèse sur le système de santé. Les recommandations fondées sur des données probantes du Guide alimentaire canadien (GAC fournissent des conseils nutritionnels destinés à améliorer la qualité du régime alimentaire. L’Indice canadien de saine alimentation (ICSA, un outil de mesure de la qualité du régime alimentaire, permet d'évaluer la conformité au GAC. Le Questionnaire canadien de fréquence alimentaire II (QFA-C II [Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II, C-DHQ II], mis au point récemment, pourrait quant à lui servir à estimer l’ICSA au sein de la population canadienne si on pouvait ajouter à sa base de données sur les éléments nutritifs les équivalents des groupes alimentaires (correspondant aux portions du GAC. Nous décrivons dans cet article des méthodes destinées à enrichir cette base de données sur les éléments nutritifs du QFA-C II en vue d’estimer l’ICSA. Méthodologie : Nous avons créé des équivalents des groupes alimentaires à partir de données provenant de diverses bases de données sur les aliments et les éléments nutritifs, en particulier l’Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes, cycle 2.2 Nutrition de 2004. Nous avons ajouté ces variables à la base de données sur les éléments nutritifs du QFA-C II. Nous avons déterminé les scores de l’ICSA et avons effectué des analyses descriptives pour les participants qui ont répondu au QFA-C II dans le cadre d’une étude transversale canadienne. Résultats : Le score moyen de l’ICSA dans notre échantillon de 446 adultes de 20 à 83 ans était de 64,4 (écart-type : 10,8. Les femmes, les non-fumeurs et les personnes ayant un niveau de scolarité supérieur au secondaire ont obtenu de manière statistiquement

  7. High-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 affect estrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, C S; Roodi, N; Yee, C J; Bailey, L R; Jensen, R A; Bustin, M; Parl, F F

    1997-07-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to a family of ligand-inducible nuclear receptors that exert their effects by binding to cis-acting DNA elements in the regulatory region of target genes. The detailed mechanisms by which ER interacts with the estrogen response element (ERE) and affects transcription still remain to be elucidated. To study the ER-ERE interaction and transcription initiation, we employed purified recombinant ER expressed in both the baculovirus-Sf9 and his-tagged bacterial systems. The effect of high-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and purified recombinant TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 on ER-ERE binding and transcription initiation were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vitro transcription from an ERE-containing template (pERE2LovTATA), respectively. We find that purified, recombinant ER fails to bind to ERE in spite of high ligand-binding activity and electrophoretic and immunological properties identical to ER in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. HMG-1 interacts with ER and promotes ER-ERE binding in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The effectiveness of HMG-1 to stimulate ER-ERE binding in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay depends on the sequence flanking the ERE consensus as well as the position of the latter in the oligonucleotide. We find that TAF(II)30 has no effect on ER-ERE binding either alone or in combination with ER and HMG-1. Although HMG-1 promotes ER-ERE binding, it fails to stimulate transcription initiation either in the presence or absence of hormone. In contrast, TAF(II)30, while not affecting ER-ERE binding, stimulates transcription initiation 20-fold in the presence of HMG-1. These results indicate that HMG-1 and TAF(II)30 act in sequence, the former acting to promote ER-ERE binding followed by the latter to stimulate transcription initiation.

  8. Pharmacokinetic comparison of controlled-release and immediate-release oral formulations of simvastatin in healthy Korean subjects: a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, single- and multiple-dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong Bok; Lee, Yoon Jung; Lim, Lay Ahyoung; Park, Kyung-Mi; Kwon, Bong-Ju; Woo, Jong Soo; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Min Soo; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Kyungsoo

    2010-01-01

    A controlled-release (CR) formulation of simvastatin was recently developed in Korea. The formulation is expected to yield a lower C(max) and similar AUC values compared with the immediate-release (IR) formulation. The goal of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of the new CR formulation and an IR formulation of simvastatin after single- and multiple-dose administration in healthy Korean subjects. This study was developed as part of a product development project at the request of the Korean regulatory agency. This was a randomized, open-label, parallelgroup, 2-part study. Eligible subjects were healthy male or female volunteers between the ages of 19 and 55 years and within 20% of their ideal weight. In part I, each subject received a single dose of the CR or IR formulation of simvastatin 40 mg orally (20 mg x 2 tablets) after fasting. In part II, each subject received the same dose of the CR or IR formulation for 8 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained for 48 hours after the dose in part I and after the first and the last dose in part II. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for both simvastatin (the inactive prodrug) and simvastatin acid (the active moiety). An adverse event (AE) was defined as any unfavorable sign (including an abnormal laboratory finding) or symptom, regardless of whether it had a causal relationship with the study medication. Serious AEs were defined as any events that are considered life threatening, require hospitalization or prolongation of existing hospitalization, cause persistent or significant disability or incapacity, or result in congenital abnormality, birth defect, or death. AEs were determined based on patient interviews and physical examinations. Twenty-four healthy subjects (17 men, 7 women; mean [SD] age, 29 [7] years; age range, 22-50 years) were enrolled in part I, and 29 subjects (17 men, 12 women; mean age, 33 [9] years; age range, 19-55 years) were enrolled in part II. For simvastatin acid, C

  9. A Chemical Eight Group Separation Method for Routine Use in Gamma Spectrometric Analysis. II. Detailed analytical schema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K

    1961-06-15

    A detailed ion-exchange procedure for the separation of chemical elements in eight groups suitable for subsequent gamma spectrometric analysis is described. The method has been in use for gamma spectrometry of some inorganic - but mostly organic - samples for one year. The separation time for inorganic samples, is usually about 1.5 hours and for organic samples as least 2 hours. One man can separate and count three samples per day. In comparative measurements of short-lived isotopes in biological material 10-12 elements can be analysed thus making possible 30 - 35 determinations per day for one man.

  10. Cetuximab as second-line therapy in patients with metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma: A phase II Southwest Oncology Group Study (S0415)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Philip J.; Goldman, Bryan; Iqbal, Syma; Leichman, Lawrence P.; Zhang, Wu; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Blanke, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal adenocarcinomas commonly express the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). This trial assessed the six month overall survival probability in metastatic esophageal cancer patients treated with cetuximab as second line therapy. Methods This was a multicenter, open-label phase II study of single agent cetuximab for metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma patients who failed one prior chemotherapy regimen. Adequate organ function and Zubrod performance status of 0-2 were required. Patients received cetuximab 400mg/m2 IV on week one, and 250 mg/m2 IV weekly thereafter. The primary objective was to determine 6 month overall survival. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, response rate, and toxicity. Tumor tissue was collected for correlative studies. Results Sixty-three patients were registered, with 8 ineligible or never treated. Fifty-five eligible patients (male=49, female=6; median age=61.2 years [range 30.7-88.5]) were enrolled. Twenty patients survived > 6 months for a 6-month overall survival rate of 36% (95% CI: 24%, 50%). The median overall survival was 4.0 months (95% CI: 3.2, 5.9). Median progression-free survival was 1.8 months (95% CI: 1.7, 1.9). One partial response and 2 unconfirmed partial responses were observed. Two patients experienced grade 4 fatigue. There was one treatment-related death due to pneumonitis. Germline polymorphisms of EGFR, EGF, IL-8, COX-2, VEGF, CCND1, NRP1 and Kras mutational status were not associated with response or survival. Conclusions The 6-month overall survival rate of 36% observed on this study failed to meet the primary survival objective. Thus, cetuximab alone cannot be recommended in the second-line treatment of metastatic esophageal cancer. PMID:20631636

  11. Vorinostat in refractory soft tissue sarcomas - Results of a multi-centre phase II trial of the German Soft Tissue Sarcoma and Bone Tumour Working Group (AIO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas; Mayer-Steinacker, Regine; Mayer, Frank; Grünwald, Viktor; Schütte, Jochen; Hartmann, Jörg T; Kasper, Bernd; Hüsing, Johannes; Hajda, Jacek; Ottawa, Gregor; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Mikus, Gerd; Burhenne, Jürgen; Lehmann, Lorenz; Heilig, Christoph E; Ho, Anthony D; Egerer, Gerlinde

    2016-09-01

    New treatment options for patients with metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma are urgently needed. Preclinical studies suggested activity of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. A multi-centre, open-label, non-randomised phase II trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of vorinostat in patients with locally advanced or metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma failing 1st-line anthracycline-based chemotherapy was initiated. Patients were treated with vorinostat 400 mg po qd for 28 d followed by a treatment-free period of 7 d, representing a treatment cycle of 5 weeks. Restaging was performed every three cycles or at clinical progression. Between 06/10 and 09/13, 40 Soft Tissue Sarcoma patients were treated with vorinostat at seven participating centres. Patients had received 1 (n=8, 20%), 2 (n=10, 25%) or ≥3 (n=22, 55%) previous lines of chemotherapy. Best response after three cycles of treatment was stable disease (n=9, 23%). Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 3.2 and 12.3 months, respectively. Six patients showed long-lasting disease stabilisation for up to ten cycles. Statistical analyses failed to identify baseline predictive markers in this subgroup. Major toxicities (grade ≥III) included haematological toxicity (n=6, 15%) gastrointestinal disorders (n=5, 13%), fatigue (n=4, 10%), musculoskeletal pain (n=4, 10%), and pneumonia (n=2, 5%). In a heavily pre-treated patient population, objective response to vorinostat was low. However, a small subgroup of patients had long-lasting disease stabilisation. Further studies aiming to identify predictive markers for treatment response as well as exploration of combination regimens are warranted. NCT00918489 (ClinicalTrials.gov) EudraCT-number: 2008-008513-19. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - II. AGB, RSG stars and dust production in IC10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Ventura, P.; Limongi, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Marini, E.; Rossi, C.

    2018-06-01

    We study the evolved stellar population of the Local Group galaxy IC10, with the aim of characterizing the individual sources observed and to derive global information on the galaxy, primarily the star formation history and the dust production rate. To this aim, we use evolutionary sequences of low- and intermediate-mass (M account for 40% of the sources brighter than the tip of the red giant branch. Most of these stars descend from ˜1.1 - 1.3 M⊙ progenitors, formed during the major epoch of star formation, which occurred ˜2.5 Gyr ago. The presence of a significant number of bright stars indicates that IC10 has been site of significant star formation in recent epochs and currently hosts a group of massive stars in the core helium-burning phase. Dust production in this galaxy is largely dominated by carbon stars; the overall dust production rate estimated is 7 × 10-6 M⊙/yr.

  13. Flavonoid content in ethanolic extracts of selected raw and traditionally processed indigenous foods consumed by vulnerable groups of Kenya: antioxidant and type II diabetes-related functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunyanga, Catherine N; Imungi, Jasper K; Okoth, Michael W; Biesalski, Hans K; Vadivel, Vellingiri

    2011-08-01

    The present study evaluated the flavonoid content, antioxidant as well as type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition activities of ethanolic extract of certain raw and traditionally processed indigenous food ingredients including cereals, legumes, oil seeds, tubers, vegetables and leafy vegetables, which are commonly consumed by vulnerable groups in Kenya. The vegetables exhibited higher flavonoid content (50-703 mg/100 g) when compared with the grains (47-343 mg/100 g). The ethanolic extract of presently studied food ingredients revealed 33-93% DPPH radical scavenging capacity, 486-6,389 mmol Fe(II)/g reducing power, 19-43% α-amylase inhibition activity and 14-68% α-glucosidase inhibition activity. Among the different food-stuffs, the drumstick and amaranth leaves exhibited significantly higher flavonoid content with excellent functional properties. Roasting of grains and cooking of vegetables were found to be suitable processing methods in preserving the functional properties. Hence, such viable processing techniques for respective food samples will be considered in the formulation of functional supplementary foods for vulnerable groups in Kenya.

  14. Inhibition of toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B in meat products by using a reduced level of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Lindström, Miia; Puolanne, Eero; Niemistö, Markku; Korkeala, Hannu

    2012-07-01

    The effect of three different concentrations of sodium nitrite (0, 75, and 120 mg/kg) on growth and toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B was studied in Finnish wiener-type sausage, bologna-type sausage, and cooked ham. A low level of inoculum (2.0 log CFU/g) was used for wiener-type sausage and bologna-type sausage, and both low (2.0 log CFU/g) and high (4.0 log CFU/g) levels were used for cooked ham. The products were formulated and processed under simulated commercial conditions and stored at 8°C for 5 weeks. C. botulinum counts were determined in five replicate samples of each nitrite concentration at 1, 3, and 5 weeks after thermal processing. All samples were positive for C. botulinum type B. The highest C. botulinum counts were detected in nitrite-free products. Toxigenesis was observed in nitrite-free products during storage, but products containing either 75 or 120 mg/kg nitrite remained nontoxic during the 5-week study period, suggesting that spores surviving the heat treatment were unable to germinate and develop into a toxic culture in the presence of nitrite. The results suggest that the safety of processed meat products with respect to group II C. botulinum type B can be maintained even with a reduced concentration (75 mg/kg) of sodium nitrite.

  15. School-based mindfulness intervention for stress reduction in adolescents: Design and methodology of an open-label, parallel group, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette M. Johnstone

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents are in a high-risk period developmentally, in terms of susceptibility to stress. A mindfulness intervention represents a potentially useful strategy for developing cognitive and emotion regulation skills associated with successful stress coping. Mindfulness strategies have been used successfully for emotional coping in adults, but are not as well studied in youth. This article details a novel proposal for the design of an 8-week randomized study to evaluate a high school-based mindfulness curriculum delivered as part of a two semester health class. A wellness education intervention is proposed as an active control, along with a waitlist control condition. All students enrolled in a sophomore (10th grade health class at a private suburban high school will be invited to participate (n = 300. Pre-test assessments will be obtained by youth report, parent ratings, and on-site behavioral testing. The assessments will evaluate baseline stress, mood, emotional coping, controlled attention, and working memory. Participants, divided into 13 classrooms, will be randomized into one of three conditions, by classroom: A mindfulness intervention, an active control (wellness education, and a passive control (waitlist. Waitlisted participants will receive one of the interventions in the following term. Intervention groups will meet weekly for 8 weeks during regularly scheduled health classes. Immediate post-tests will be conducted, followed by a 60-day post-test. It is hypothesized that the mindfulness intervention will outperform the other conditions with regard to the adolescents' mood, attention and response to stress.

  16. Understanding Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy eating for girls Understanding food labels Understanding food labels There is lots of info on food ... need to avoid because of food allergies. Other food label terms top In addition to the Nutrition ...

  17. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); LeCompte, Tom [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Marshall, Zach [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borgland, Anders [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Viren, Brett [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nugent, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Asai, Makato [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bauerdick, Lothar [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Finkel, Hal [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gottlieb, Steve [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Hoeche, Stefan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sheldon, Paul [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vay, Jean-Luc [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Elmer, Peter [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kirby, Michael [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Patton, Simon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Potekhin, Maxim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gutsche, Oliver [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lyon, Adam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Petravick, Don [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)

    2015-10-29

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  18. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  19. Efficacy of interpersonal therapy-group format adapted to post-traumatic stress disorder: an open-label add-on trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanini, Rosaly F B; Schoedl, Aline F; Pupo, Mariana C; Costa, Ana Clara H; Krupnick, Janice L; Mello, Marcelo F

    2010-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly prevalent condition, yet available treatments demonstrate only modest efficacy. Exposure therapies, considered by many to be the "gold-standard" therapy for PTSD, are poorly tolerated by many patients and show high attrition. We evaluated interpersonal therapy, in a group format, adapted to PTSD (IPT-G PTSD), as an adjunctive treatment for patients who failed to respond to conventional psychopharmacological treatment. Research participants included 40 patients who sought treatment through a program on violence in the department of psychiatry of Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP). They had received conventional psychopharmacological treatment for at least 12 weeks and failed to have an adequate clinical response. After signing an informed consent, approved earlier by the UNIFESP Ethics Review Board, they received a semi-structured diagnostic interview (SCID-I), administered by a trained mental health worker, to confirm the presence of a PTSD diagnosis according to DSM-IV criteria. Other instruments were administered, and patients completed out self-report instruments at baseline, and endpoint to evaluate clinical outcomes. Thirty-three patients completed the trial, but all had at least one second outcome evaluation. There were significant improvements on all measures, with large effect sizes. IPT-G PTSD was effective not only in decreasing symptoms of PTSD, but also in decreasing symptoms of anxiety and depression. It led to significant improvements in social adjustment and quality of life. It was well tolerated and there were few dropouts. Our results are very preliminary; they need further confirmation through randomized controlled clinical trials.

  20. Environmental Sensitivity in Nuclear Emergencies in Rural and Semi-natural Environments. Report of Working Group 8, Environmental Sensitivity of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by comparison with measured values in the environment or by comparing them with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. The programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in transfer data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. The following topics were addressed in nine working groups: Reference Approaches for Human Dose Assessment - Working Group 1: Reference Methodologies for Controlling Discharges of Routine Releases; - Working Group 2: Reference Approaches to Modelling for Management and Remediation at NORM and Legacy Sites; - Working Group 3: Reference Models for Waste Disposal Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment; - Working Group 4: Biota Modelling; - Working Group 5: Wildlife Transfer Coefficient Handbook; - Working Group 6: Biota Dose

  1. Obstacles to nutrition labeling in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, B A; Nelson, D; Chai, S

    1997-02-01

    This study determined the major obstacles that foodservices face regarding nutrition labeling. Survey questionnaire was conducted in May 1994. In addition to demographic questions, the directors were asked questions addressing willingness, current practices, and perceived obstacles related to nutrition labeling. Sixty-eight research and development directors of the largest foodservice corporations as shown in Restaurants & Institutions magazine's list of the top 400 largest foodservices (July 1993). P tests were used to determine significance within a group for the number of foodservices that were currently using nutrition labeling, perceived impact of nutrition labeling on sales, and perceived responsibility to add nutrition labels. Regression analysis was used to determine the importance of factors on willingness to label. Response rate was 45.3%. Most companies were neutral about their willingness to use nutrition labeling. Two thirds of the respondents were not currently using nutrition labels. Only one third thought that it was the foodservice's responsibility to provide such information. Several companies perceived that nutrition labeling would have a potentially negative effect on annual sales volume. Major obstacles were identified as menu or personnel related, rather than cost related. Menu-related obstacles included too many menu variations, limited space on the menu for labeling, and loss of flexibility in changing the menu. Personnel-related obstacles included difficulty in training employees to implement nutrition labeling, and not enough time for foodservice personnel to implement nutrition labeling. Numerous opportunities will be created for dietetics professionals in helping foodservices overcome these menu- or personnel-related obstacles.

  2. Labelled compounds. (Pt. B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Jones, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of World War II there has been a tremendous increase in the number of compounds that have been synthesized with radioactive or stable isotopes. They have found application in many diverse fields, so much so, that hardly a single area in pure and applied science has not benefited. Not surprisingly it has been reflected in appearance of related publications. The early proceedings of the Symposia on Advances in Trace Methodology were soon followed by various Euratom sponsored meetings in which methods of preparing and storing labelled compounds featured prominently. In due course a resurgence of interest in stable isotopes, brought about by their greater availability (also lower cost) and partly by development of new techniques such as gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (gc-ms), led to the publication of proceedings of several successful conferences. More recently conferences dealing with the synthesis and applications of isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds have been established on a regular basis. In addition to the proceedings of conferences and journal publications individuals left their mark by producing definitive texts, usually on specific nuclides. Only the classic two volume publication of Murray and Williams (Organic syntheses with isotopes, New York 1985), now over 30 years old and out of print, attempted to do justice to several nuclides. With the large amount of work that has been undertaken since then it seems unlikely that an updated edition could be produced. The alternative strategy was to ask scientists currently active to review specific areas and this is the approach adopted in the present series of monographs. In this way it is intended to cover the broad advances that have been made in the synthesis and applications of isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds in the physical and biomedical sciences. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  3. Pharmacokinetic comparison of acetaminophen elixir versus suppositories in vaccinated infants (aged 3 to 36 months): a single-dose, open-label, randomized, parallel-group design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walson, Philip D; Halvorsen, Mark; Edge, James; Casavant, Marcel J; Kelley, Michael T

    2013-02-01

    Because of practical problems and ethical concerns, few studies of the pharmacokinetics (PK) of acetaminophen (ACET) in infants have been published. The goal of this study was to compare the PK of an ACET rectal suppository with a commercially available ACET elixir to complete a regulatory obligation to market the suppository. This study was not submitted previously because of numerous obstacles related to both the investigators and the commercial entities associated with the tested product. Thirty infants (age 3-36 months) prescribed ACET for either fever, pain, or postimmunization prophylaxis of fever and discomfort were randomized to receive a single 10- to 15-mg/kg ACET dose either as the rectal suppository or oral elixir. Blood was collected at selected times for up to 8 hours after administration. ACET concentrations were measured by using a validated HPLC method, and PK behavior and bioavailability were compared for the 2 preparations. All 30 infants enrolled were prescribed ACET for postimmunization prophylaxis. PK samples were available in 27 of the 30 enrolled infants. Subject enrollment (completed in January 1995) was rapid (8.3 months) and drawn entirely from a vaccinated infant clinic population. There were no statistically significant differences between the subjects (elixir, n = 12; suppository, n = 15) in either mean (SD) age (10.0 [6.3] vs 12.4 [8.1] months), weight (8.6 [2.3] vs 9.4 [2.4] kg), sex (7 of 12 males vs 7 of 15 males), or racial distribution (5 white, 5 black, and 2 biracial vs 4 white and 11 black) between the 2 dosing groups (oral vs rectal, respectively). The oral and rectal preparations produced similar, rapid peak concentrations (T(max), 1.16 vs 1.17 hours; P = 0.98) and elimination t(½) (1.84 vs 2.10 hours; P = 0.14), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between either C(max) (7.65 vs 5.68 μg/mL) or total drug exposure (AUC(0-∞), 23.36 vs 20.45 μg-h/mL) for the oral versus rectal preparations

  4. Effectiveness of a ‘Workshop on Decluttering and Organising’ programme for teens and middle-aged adults with difficulty decluttering: a study protocol of an open-label, randomised, parallel-group, superiority trial in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yasuko; Yamaoka, Kazue; Nemoto, Asuka; Naganuma, Yuki; Saito, Masashige

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hoarding disorder can cause problems with work performance, personal hygiene, health and well-being. The disorder is a growing social problem in Japan. Having difficulty discarding rubbish, decluttering and organising can signal a future hoarding disorder, and early intervention is important. We developed an educational workshop on decluttering and organising for teens and adults with difficulty organising. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a workshop for reducing clutter and improving quality of life among younger people with difficulty decluttering and organising. Methods and analysis An open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial will be conducted among volunteers aged 12–55 years with mild difficulty decluttering and organising. Those in the intervention group will attend the workshop and receive a visit from a professional cleaning company to declutter their living space. The control group will have only the latter. The primary outcome will be the score on the Japanese version of the Saving Inventory-Revised. Secondary outcomes will be scores on the Clutter Image Rating Scale, the Japanese version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Roles of Private Space Scale. The results will be examined for differences between the two groups in changes from baseline to 7 months. We will examine crude effects and adjust for gender and age using a general linear model for continuous variables and a logistic regression model for dichotomous variables. Sample size was calculated assuming a significance level of 5% (two tailed), a power of 80% and an effect size of 0.75. In total, 60 subjects (30 in each group) will be required. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethical Committee of Teikyo University (No. 15-065). The findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations. Trial registration number UMIN000020568. Issue date: 16

  5. Human mtDNA hypervariable regions, HVR I and II, hint at deep common maternal founder and subsequent maternal gene flow in Indian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swarkar; Saha, Anjana; Rai, Ekta; Bhat, Audesh; Bamezai, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    We have analysed the hypervariable regions (HVR I and II) of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in individuals from Uttar Pradesh (UP), Bihar (BI) and Punjab (PUNJ), belonging to the Indo-European linguistic group, and from South India (SI), that have their linguistic roots in Dravidian language. Our analysis revealed the presence of known and novel mutations in both hypervariable regions in the studied population groups. Median joining network analyses based on mtDNA showed extensive overlap in mtDNA lineages despite the extensive cultural and linguistic diversity. MDS plot analysis based on Fst distances suggested increased maternal genetic proximity for the studied population groups compared with other world populations. Mismatch distribution curves, respective neighbour joining trees and other statistical analyses showed that there were significant expansions. The study revealed an ancient common ancestry for the studied population groups, most probably through common founder female lineage(s), and also indicated that human migrations occurred (maybe across and within the Indian subcontinent) even after the initial phase of female migration to India.

  6. Phagocytosis of 131I labelled Salmonella typhymurium in splenic remnants. Experimental study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, A.J.; Yamamuro, E.; Camargo, E.; Sato, M.; Rodrigues, C.J.; Birolini, D.; Manlio, B.S.; Oliveira, M.R. de

    1988-01-01

    Forty-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Group I - Normal animals; Group II - Animals submitted to total splenectomy with subsequent intraperitoneal splenic autotransplantion; Group III - Animals submitted to partial 50% splenectomy with subsequent autotransplantation of the removed fragment. After 40 weeks of close observation all animals were administred 70 Micro Ci of an 131 I - labelled ''Salmonella Typhymurium'' suspension. Twelve hours later all animals were sacrificed and a complete peritoneal cavity inventory was performed. Samples of both topic spleen and regenerated autotransplant were obtained, processed and autoradiographed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Roget's II the new thesaurus

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Roget’s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition, allows the user to find the right synonym with a minimum of effort. Unlike many thesauruses, this easy-to-use reference lists main entry words alphabetically, as in a dictionary, for quick lookup. Each entry is divided into senses, with brief definitions and a full list of synonyms for each sense, to ensure that the selected usage is the most appropriate one. All special usages, such as slang terms, are labeled and grouped together at the end of each synonym list. Following each list is a cross-reference to a related entry in the thesaurus’s unique Category Index. This index leads the reader from the starting word to dozens of others that have related or opposite meanings. All these features make Roget’s II the best resource for finding the right word every time.

  8. Synthesis, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of terpyridine Zn(II) complexes based on carbazole derivative with polyether group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming; Liu, Yanqiu; Wang, Hui; Luo, Junshan; Li, Dandan; Zhang, Shengyi; Li, Shengli; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    Four novel Zn(II) terpyridine complexes (ZnLCl2, ZnLBr2, ZnLI2, ZnL(SCN)2) based on carbazole derivative group were designed, synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including absorption and one-photon excited fluorescence, two-photon absorption (TPA) and optical power limiting (OPL) were further investigated systematically and interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations (TD-DFT). The influences of different solvents on the absorption and One-Photon Excited Fluorescence (OPEF) spectral behavior, quantum yields and the lifetime of the chromophores have been investigated in detail. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by open/closed aperture Z-scan measurements using femtosecond pulse laser in the range from 680 to 1080 nm. These results revealed that ZnLCl2 and ZnLBr2 exhibited strong two-photon absorption and ZnLCl2 showed superior optical power limiting property.

  9. Issues in Data Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowie, Roddy; Cox, Cate; Martin, Jeam-Claude; Batliner, Anton; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Karpouzis, Kostas; Cowie, Roddy; Pelachaud, Catherine; Petta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Labelling emotion databases is not a purely technical matter. It is bound up with theoretical issues. Different issues affect labelling of emotional content, labelling of the signs that convey emotion, and labelling of the relevant context. Linked to these are representational issues, involving time

  10. The mitochondrial LSU rRNA group II intron of Ustilago maydis encodes an active homing endonuclease likely involved in intron mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Pfeifer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The a2 mating type locus gene lga2 is critical for uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance during sexual development of Ustilago maydis. Specifically, the absence of lga2 results in biparental inheritance, along with efficient transfer of intronic regions in the large subunit rRNA gene between parental molecules. However, the underlying role of the predicted LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene I-UmaI located within the group II intron LRII1 has remained unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the enzymatic activity of I-UmaI in vitro based on expression of a tagged full-length and a naturally occurring mutant derivative, which harbors only the N-terminal LAGLIDADG domain. This confirmed Mg²⁺-dependent endonuclease activity and cleavage at the LRII1 insertion site to generate four base pair extensions with 3' overhangs. Specifically, I-UmaI recognizes an asymmetric DNA sequence with a minimum length of 14 base pairs (5'-GACGGGAAGACCCT-3' and tolerates subtle base pair substitutions within the homing site. Enzymatic analysis of the mutant variant indicated a correlation between the activity in vitro and intron homing. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that putatively functional or former functional I-UmaI homologs are confined to a few members within the Ustilaginales and Agaricales, including the phylogenetically distant species Lentinula edodes, and are linked to group II introns inserted into homologous positions in the LSU rDNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data provide strong evidence that intron homing efficiently operates under conditions of biparental inheritance in U. maydis. Conversely, uniparental inheritance may be critical to restrict the transmission of mobile introns. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that I-UmaI-associated introns have been acquired independently in distant taxa and are more widespread than anticipated from available genomic data.

  11. Biologic determinants of tumor recurrence in stage II colon cancer: validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score in cancer and leukemia group B (CALGB) 9581.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venook, Alan P; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lopatin, Margarita; Ye, Xing; Lee, Mark; Friedman, Paula N; Frankel, Wendy; Clark-Langone, Kim; Millward, Carl; Shak, Steven; Goldberg, Richard M; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Warren, Robert S; Schilsky, Richard L; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2013-05-10

    A greater understanding of the biology of tumor recurrence should improve adjuvant treatment decision making. We conducted a validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score (RS), a quantitative assay integrating stromal response and cell cycle gene expression, in tumor specimens from patients enrolled onto Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581. CALGB 9581 randomly assigned 1,713 patients with stage II colon cancer to treatment with edrecolomab or observation and found no survival difference. The analysis reported here included all patients with available tissue and recurrence (n = 162) and a random (approximately 1:3) selection of nonrecurring patients. RS was assessed in 690 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using prespecified genes and a previously validated algorithm. Association of RS and recurrence was analyzed by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. Continuous RS was significantly associated with risk of recurrence (P = .013) as was mismatch repair (MMR) gene deficiency (P = .044). In multivariate analyses, RS was the strongest predictor of recurrence (P = .004), independent of T stage, MMR, number of nodes examined, grade, and lymphovascular invasion. In T3 MMR-intact (MMR-I) patients, prespecified low and high RS groups had average 5-year recurrence risks of 13% (95% CI, 10% to 16%) and 21% (95% CI, 16% to 26%), respectively. The 12-gene RS predicts recurrence in stage II colon cancer in CALGB 9581. This is consistent with the importance of stromal response and cell cycle gene expression in colon tumor recurrence. RS appears to be most discerning for patients with T3 MMR-I tumors, although markers such as grade and lymphovascular invasion did not add value in this subset of patients.

  12. IR spectroscopy study of SBA-15 silicas functionalized with the ethylthiocarbamidepropyl groups and their interactions with Ag(I) and Hg(II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Inna V.; Nazarchuk, Galyna I.; Václavíková, Miroslava; Zub, Yuriy L.

    2018-04-01

    Mesoporous structure of silica is determined by the type of template, but the introduction of functional groups during the synthesis has additional influence. The structure of SBA-15 may be violated by the introduction of long functions, such as ≡Si(CH2)3NHC(=S)NHC2H5. These ethylthiocarbamidepropyl groups can form complexes with metal ions in thiol or thione tautomeric forms. We determined that the 2D hexagonal p6 mm structure is preserved for SBA-15 with thiourea groups at maximal TEOS:trifunctional silane ratio (mol) = 10:2, which was confirmed by TEM and by the presence of an intense reflex in the small-angle region of diffractograms of the final product. It was shown that the obtained sorbents possess high kinetic characteristics. The experimental data fit pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, but the rate constants depend on the content of functional groups in the surface layer. Template Pluronic P-123 defines the porosity of functional mesoporous silica materials even at increasing content of trifunctional silane in the initial solution. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that thione form of thiourea ligand is prevalent on the surface of pores of mesoporous samples. However, during the sorption of silver(I) ions, there are both thione and thiol forms on the surface. Thione form is transformed into thiol with increasing concentration of mercury(II) ions in the sorption solution. Adsorption experiments showed that the SBA-15 silicas functionalized with ethylthiocarbamidepropyl groups had high selectivity for silver(I) ions and could concentrate Ag(I) ions from metal ions mixture at pH 2.

  13. COMPARISON OF THE INFLUENCE OF LONG-TERM TREATMENT BASED ON CARVEDILOL OR BISOPROLOL ON METABOLIC PARAMETERS IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS WITH OVERWEIGHT OR OBESITY RESULTS OF THE RANDOMIZED OPEN-LABEL PARALLEL-GROUPS STEPPED TRIAL CABRIOLET (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive and metabolic effects of long-term treatment with carvedilol or bisoprolol in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree and overweight/obesity. Material and methods. A total of 105 patients were enrolled into open-label comparative stepped trial in two parallel groups. The patients were randomized into two groups: the group 1 (n=53 started treatment with carvedilol 25 mg daily and the group 2 (n=52 – with bisoprolol 5 mg daily. If the effect was insufficient a dose of a beta-blocker was doubled, then amlodipine was added in the dose of 5 mg daily with its further increase if necessary or indapamide in dose 1.5 mg daily. The follow-up for each patient was 24 weeks. At the start and then 12 and 24 weeks later the frequency of target blood pressure (BP achievement, body mass index, biochemical indices, ECG and treatment safety were evaluated. Results. Significant distinctions in antihypertensive therapy effect between the groups were absent (ΔBP=-29.5±11.3/17.8±8.4 and -30.4±12.8/18.7±8 mm Hg for groups 1 and 2, respectively , p<0.001 for the both groups as well as the necessity for additional therapy. All the patients completed the study had achieved target BP level. The patients of the both groups decreased body mass index after 6-month treatment (-0.57±1.1, p=0.001 and -0.53±0.8 kg/m2, p<0.001 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Patients of the group 1 demonstrated significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose level (-0.45±1.2 mM/l, p=0.01, uric acid (-0.05±0.01 mM/l, p<0.001 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (-0.28±0.9 mM/l, p<0.05 as well as a trend for HOMA index decrease. Serum creatinine level increased in patients of the group 2 (6.35±22.4 mcM/l, p=0.05 with no significant dynamics in metabolic indices. Glomerular filtration rate did not change significantly in the group 1, while there was significant decrease in the group 2 (Δ-3.8±15.2 ml/min/1,73m2, р=0.01. The

  14. COMPARISON OF THE INFLUENCE OF LONG-TERM TREATMENT BASED ON CARVEDILOL OR BISOPROLOL ON METABOLIC PARAMETERS IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS WITH OVERWEIGHT OR OBESITY RESULTS OF THE RANDOMIZED OPEN-LABEL PARALLEL-GROUPS STEPPED TRIAL CABRIOLET (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive and metabolic effects of long-term treatment with carvedilol or bisoprolol in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree and overweight/obesity. Material and methods. A total of 105 patients were enrolled into open-label comparative stepped trial in two parallel groups. The patients were randomized into two groups: the group 1 (n=53 started treatment with carvedilol 25 mg daily and the group 2 (n=52 – with bisoprolol 5 mg daily. If the effect was insufficient a dose of a beta-blocker was doubled, then amlodipine was added in the dose of 5 mg daily with its further increase if necessary or indapamide in dose 1.5 mg daily. The follow-up for each patient was 24 weeks. At the start and then 12 and 24 weeks later the frequency of target blood pressure (BP achievement, body mass index, biochemical indices, ECG and treatment safety were evaluated. Results. Significant distinctions in antihypertensive therapy effect between the groups were absent (ΔBP=-29.5±11.3/17.8±8.4 and -30.4±12.8/18.7±8 mm Hg for groups 1 and 2, respectively , p<0.001 for the both groups as well as the necessity for additional therapy. All the patients completed the study had achieved target BP level. The patients of the both groups decreased body mass index after 6-month treatment (-0.57±1.1, p=0.001 and -0.53±0.8 kg/m2, p<0.001 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Patients of the group 1 demonstrated significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose level (-0.45±1.2 mM/l, p=0.01, uric acid (-0.05±0.01 mM/l, p<0.001 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (-0.28±0.9 mM/l, p<0.05 as well as a trend for HOMA index decrease. Serum creatinine level increased in patients of the group 2 (6.35±22.4 mcM/l, p=0.05 with no significant dynamics in metabolic indices. Glomerular filtration rate did not change significantly in the group 1, while there was significant decrease in the group 2 (Δ-3.8±15.2 ml/min/1,73m2, р=0.01. The

  15. Mixed Map Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Löffler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Point feature map labeling is a geometric visualization problem, in which a set of input points must be labeled with a set of disjoint rectangles (the bounding boxes of the label texts. It is predominantly motivated by label placement in maps but it also has other visualization applications. Typically, labeling models either use internal labels, which must touch their feature point, or external (boundary labels, which are placed outside the input image and which are connected to their feature points by crossing-free leader lines. In this paper we study polynomial-time algorithms for maximizing the number of internal labels in a mixed labeling model that combines internal and external labels. The model requires that all leaders are parallel to a given orientation θ ∈ [0, 2π, the value of which influences the geometric properties and hence the running times of our algorithms.

  16. Rationale, Design, and Baseline Characteristics of the Utopia Trial for Preventing Diabetic Atherosclerosis Using an SGLT2 Inhibitor: A Prospective, Randomized, Open-Label, Parallel-Group Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Naoto; Mita, Tomoya; Yoshii, Hidenori; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Okada, Yosuke; Umayahara, Yutaka; Kaneto, Hideaki; Osonoi, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tsunehiko; Kuribayashi, Nobuichi; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Kosugi, Keisuke; Ohtoshi, Kentaro; Hayashi, Isao; Sumitani, Satoru; Tsugawa, Mamiko; Ohashi, Makoto; Taki, Hideki; Nakamura, Tadashi; Kawashima, Satoshi; Sato, Yasunori; Watada, Hirotaka; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2017-10-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are anti-diabetic agents that improve glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia and ameliorate a variety of cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the ongoing study described herein is to investigate the preventive effects of tofogliflozin, a potent and selective SGLT2 inhibitor, on the progression of atherosclerosis in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) using carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), an established marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as a marker. The Study of Using Tofogliflozin for Possible better Intervention against Atherosclerosis for type 2 diabetes patients (UTOPIA) trial is a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, multicenter, and parallel-group comparative study. The aim was to recruit a total of 340 subjects with T2DM but no history of apparent CVD at 24 clinical sites and randomly allocate these to a tofogliflozin treatment group or a conventional treatment group using drugs other than SGLT2 inhibitors. As primary outcomes, changes in mean and maximum IMT of the common carotid artery during a 104-week treatment period will be measured by carotid echography. Secondary outcomes include changes in glycemic control, parameters related to β-cell function and diabetic nephropathy, the occurrence of CVD and adverse events, and biochemical measurements reflecting vascular function. This is the first study to address the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors on the progression of carotid IMT in subjects with T2DM without a history of CVD. The results will be available in the very near future, and these findings are expected to provide clinical data that will be helpful in the prevention of diabetic atherosclerosis and subsequent CVD. Kowa Co., Ltd. UMIN000017607.

  17. Comparison of latanoprost with fixed-combination dorzolamide and timolol in adult patients with elevated intraocular pressure: an eight-week, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter study in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanna, Remo; Sussana, Remo; Sheu, Wang-Pui

    2004-05-01

    The newer ocular hypotensive agents available to treat glaucoma and ocular hypertension (OHT) include latanoprost, a prostaglandin F(2alpha) analogue, and the fixed combination of dorzolamide hydrochloride, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, and timolol maleate, a beta-blocker. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of latanoprost with that of the fixed combination of dorzolamide and timolol over 8 weeks. This interventional, 8-week, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study was conducted at 18 centers in 6 Latin American countries. Patients with unilateral or bilateral primary open-angle, pigmentary, or exfoliative glaucoma or OHT were randomized to receive latanoprost, 1 drop in the affected eye QD (evening), or fixed-combination dorzolamide/timolol, 1 drop in the affected eye BID (morning and evening). Medications were self-administered, 1 drop per affected eye. At baseline and week 8, intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured 3 times each at 8:30 am, 10:00 am, 2:00 pm, and 5:00 pm and after the water-drinking test, which estimates the IOP peak of diurnal tension curve, performed following the 5:00 pm IOP assessment. The primary efficacy outcome was change in diurnal IOP (the mean of IOP measurements) from baseline to week 8. Adverse effect (AE) data were recorded at each visit. A total of 229 patients were randomized (latanoprost, n = 112; dorzolamide/timolol, n = 117). Mean baseline diurnal IOP values were similar between the 2 groups. Mean (SD) diurnal IOP reductions at week 8 before the water-drinking test were 6.9 (3.0) mm Hg for the latanoprost group and 6.4 (3.2) mm Hg for the dorzolamide/timolol group. Mean IOP values were similar at all time points except at 5:00 pm, when levels were significantly lower in latanoprost-treated patients (P = 0.025). After the water-drinking test, the increase in IOP values was similar between groups at baseline but lower in latanoprost-treated patients at week 8 (adjusted difference, 1.08 mm Hg

  18. An Ionic 1,4-Bis(styrylbenzene-Based Fluorescent Probe for Mercury(II Detection in Water via Deprotection of the Thioacetal Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sang Le

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Highly sensitive and selective mercury detection in aqueous media is urgently needed because mercury poisoning usually results from exposure to water-soluble forms of mercury by inhalation and/or ingesting. An ionic conjugated oligoelectrolye (M1Q based on 1,4-bis(styrylbenzene was synthesized as a fluorescent mercury(II probe. The thioacetal moiety and quaternized ammonium group were incorporated for Hg2+ recognition and water solubility. A neutral Hg2+ probe (M1 was also prepared based on the same molecular backbone, and their sensor characteristics were investigated in a mixture of acetonitrile/water and in water. In the presence of Hg2+, the thioacetal group was converted to aldehyde functionality, and the resulting photoluminescence intensity decreased. In water, M1Q successfully demonstrated highly sensitive detection, showing a binding toward Hg2+ that was ~15 times stronger and a signal on/off ratio twice as high, compared to M1 in acetonitrile/water. The thioacetal deprotection by Hg2+ ions was substantially facilitated in water without an organic cosolvent. The limit of detection was measured to be 7 nM with a detection range of 10–180 nM in 100% aqueous medium.

  19. A Multicenter, Open-Label, Controlled Phase II Study to Evaluate Safety and Immunogenicity of MVA Smallpox Vaccine (IMVAMUNE in 18-40 Year Old Subjects with Diagnosed Atopic Dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Greenberg

    Full Text Available Replicating smallpox vaccines can cause severe complications in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD. Prior studies evaluating Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA, a non-replicating vaccine in humans, showed a favorable safety and immunogenicity profile in healthy volunteers.This Phase II study compared the safety and immunogenicity of MVA enrolling groups of 350 subjects with AD (SCORAD ≤ 30 and 282 healthy subjects.Subjects were vaccinated twice with MVA, each dose given subcutaneously 4 weeks apart. Adverse events, cardiac parameters, and the development of vaccinia virus humoral immune responses were monitored.The overall safety of the vaccine was similar in both groups. Adverse events affecting skin were experienced significantly more often in subjects with AD, but the majority of these events were mild to moderate in intensity. Seroconversion rates and geometric mean titers for total and neutralizing vaccinia-specific antibodies in the AD group were non-inferior compared to the healthy subjects.The size of the study population limited the detection of serious adverse events occurring at a frequency less than 1%.MVA has a favorable safety profile and the ability to elicit vaccinia-specific immune responses in subjects with AD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00316602.

  20. Effectiveness of a 'Workshop on Decluttering and Organising' programme for teens and middle-aged adults with difficulty decluttering: a study protocol of an open-label, randomised, parallel-group, superiority trial in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yasuko; Yamaoka, Kazue; Nemoto, Asuka; Naganuma, Yuki; Saito, Masashige

    2017-06-10

    Hoarding disorder can cause problems with work performance, personal hygiene, health and well-being. The disorder is a growing social problem in Japan. Having difficulty discarding rubbish, decluttering and organising can signal a future hoarding disorder, and early intervention is important. We developed an educational workshop on decluttering and organising for teens and adults with difficulty organising. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a workshop for reducing clutter and improving quality of life among younger people with difficulty decluttering and organising. An open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial will be conducted among volunteers aged 12-55 years with mild difficulty decluttering and organising. Those in the intervention group will attend the workshop and receive a visit from a professional cleaning company to declutter their living space. The control group will have only the latter. The primary outcome will be the score on the Japanese version of the Saving Inventory-Revised. Secondary outcomes will be scores on the Clutter Image Rating Scale, the Japanese version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Roles of Private Space Scale. The results will be examined for differences between the two groups in changes from baseline to 7 months. We will examine crude effects and adjust for gender and age using a general linear model for continuous variables and a logistic regression model for dichotomous variables. Sample size was calculated assuming a significance level of 5% (two tailed), a power of 80% and an effect size of 0.75. In total, 60 subjects (30 in each group) will be required. The study protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethical Committee of Teikyo University (No. 15-065). The findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations. UMIN000020568. Issue date: 16 January 2016. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  1. Rock Music Gets a Label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutietta, Robert

    1986-01-01

    A group called Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC) has captured the media spotlight with a proposal to have warning labels placed on music albums containing sexually explicit or violent lyrics. Major record companies have agreed to a version of the PMRC's demands for a one-year trial period, beginning in 1986. (RM)

  2. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    . In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  3. Reductive methods for isotopic labeling of antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champney, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for the reductive methylation of the amino groups of eight different antibiotics using 3 HCOH or H 14 COH are presented. The reductive labeling of an additional seven antibiotics by NaB 3 H 4 is also described. The specific activity of the methyl-labeled drugs was determined by a phosphocellulose paper binding assay. Two quantitative assays for these compounds based on the reactivity of the antibiotic amino groups with fluorescamine and of the aldehyde and ketone groups with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine are also presented. Data on the cellular uptake and ribosome binding of these labeled compounds are also presented

  4. Photoaffinity labeling of myosin subfragment-one-with 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, R.

    1985-01-01

    The photoaffinity analogue 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (Bz 2 ATP) contains the photoreactive benzophenone group esterified at the 2' or 3' hydroxyl groups of ribose. MgBz 2 ADP has a single binding site on skeletal myosin chymotryptic subfragment-one (SF 1 ) with a binding constant of 3.2 x 10 5 M -1 . Bz 2 ATP is also a substrate for the ATPase activity of SF 1 in the presence of different cations. The irradiation of SF 1 with [ 3 H]Bz 2 ATP photoinactivates the ATPase activity with concomitant incorporation of the analogue into the enzyme. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photolabeled SF 1 after milk trypsin digestion shows that all three tryptic peptides, 25 K, 50K, and 20 K, and both light chains are labeled. The presence of ATP during irradiation reduces labeling of the 50 K peptide only indicating that the other peptides are non-specifically labeled. To reduce the non-specific labeling [ 3 H]Bz 2 ATP is trapped on SF 1 by cross-linking the two reactive thiols, SH 1 and SH 2 , by N,N'-p-phenylene dimaleimide or Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline complexes. The Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline modified [ 14 C]Bz 2 ATP-SF 1 , after proteolytic digestion, yields five labeled peptides which were purified by gel filtration and high performance liquid chromatography

  5. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  6. Transfer of Tritium in the Environment after Accidental Releases from Nuclear Facilities. Report of Working Group 7 Tritium Accidents of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (Emras II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Tritium Accidents Working Group

  7. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-15

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group.

  8. A prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multi-centric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, S; Hariharan, R S; Madhavan, R; Periyandavar, I; Samra, S S

    2010-11-01

    The present study was a prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multicentric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 229 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled at 5 medical centers across India. They received either acarbose (50 mg) + metformin (500 mg) bid/tid (n=115) or metformin monotherapy (500 mg) bid/ tid (n=114) for 12 weeks. Primary objective was to evaluate safety and tolerability based on the adverse events reported. Secondary objective was efficacy assessment based on changes in fasting, post prandial blood glucose and HbA1c values. In the acarbose + metformin group 10 patients reported 14 adverse events while in metformin group 9 patients reported 10 adverse events. No patient reported any serious adverse event or was withdraw from study because of adverse events. In the acarbose plus metformin group fasting blood glucose (FBG) decreased from a baseline of 158.85 +/- 18.14 mg/dl to 113.55 +/- 19.38 mg/dl (p fasting blood glucose decreased from a baseline of 158.31 +/- 26.53 mg/dl to 130.55 +/- 28.31 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 27.76 +/- 22.91 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) decreased from a baseline of 264.65 +/- 34.03 mg/dl to 173.22 +/- 31.40 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 91.43 +/- 28.65 mg/dl) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group PPBG decreased from a baseline of 253.56 +/- 36.28 mg/dl to 205.36 +/- 39.49 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 48.20 +/- 32.72 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) decreased from a baseline of 9.47 +/- 0.69% to 7.71 +/- 0.85% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.76 +/- 1.11) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group HbAlc decreased from a baseline of 9.32 +/- 0.65% to 8.26 +/- 0.68% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.06 +/- 0.66) at 12 weeks. The

  9. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  10. Robust Active Label Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremer, Jan; Sha, Fei; Igel, Christian

    2018-01-01

    for the noisy data lead to different active label correction algorithms. If loss functions consider the label noise rates, these rates are estimated during learning, where importance weighting compensates for the sampling bias. We show empirically that viewing the true label as a latent variable and computing......Active label correction addresses the problem of learning from input data for which noisy labels are available (e.g., from imprecise measurements or crowd-sourcing) and each true label can be obtained at a significant cost (e.g., through additional measurements or human experts). To minimize......). To select labels for correction, we adopt the active learning strategy of maximizing the expected model change. We consider the change in regularized empirical risk functionals that use different pointwise loss functions for patterns with noisy and true labels, respectively. Different loss functions...

  11. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  12. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  13. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  14. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  15. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  16. Structure and conformational dynamics of the domain 5 RNA hairpin of a bacterial group II intron revealed by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlaner, Maria; Sigel, Roland K O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2013-10-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) data obtained for a 35-nucleotide RNA segment of a bacterial group II intron indicate a helical hairpin structure in which three parts, a terminal pentaloop, a bulge, and a G-A mismatch, display no Watson-Crick base pairing. The 668 NOE upper distance bounds for atom pairs are insufficient to uniquely determine the conformation of these segments. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations including time-averaged distance restraints have been used to obtain a conformational ensemble compatible with the observed NMR data. The ensemble shows alternating hydrogen bonding patterns for the mentioned segments. In particular, in the pentaloop and in the bulge, the hydrogen bonding networks correspond to distinct conformational clusters that could not be captured by using conventional single-structure refinement techniques. This implies that, to obtain a realistic picture of the conformational ensemble of such flexible biomolecules, it is necessary to properly account for the conformational variability in the structure refinement of RNA fragments.

  17. Phase II trial of paclitaxel and cisplatin in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 9430.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Mauer, Ann M; Hodgson, Lydia D; Herndon, James E; Lynch, Thomas J; Green, Mark R; Vokes, Everett E

    2008-11-01

    Cancer and Leukemia Group B trial 9430 was a randomized phase II trial which investigated the safety and activity of four novel doublets in untreated extensive stage small cell lung cancer. The results of the paclitaxel and cisplatin arm have not been reported. Patients received paclitaxel 230 mg/m followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m on day 1 every 21 days. All patients received granulocyte colony stimulating factor 5 microg/kg/d beginning on day 3 of each cycle. The patient characteristics of the 34 patients assigned to this treatment arm were: median age 61.5 years (range 41-82), male (76%), performance status 0 (41%), 1 (32%), and 2 (26%). An objective response was observed in 23 patients (68%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 49-83%); 2 complete responses (6%) and 21 partial responses (62%). Median progression-free survival time was 5.6 months (95% CI: 4.8-7.1 month), and median overall survival time was 7.7 months (95% CI: 7.2-12.6 months). The 1-year survival rate observed was 29% (95% CI: 15-45%). Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia was observed in 5 (15%) and 4 (12%) patients, respectively. Two patients developed febrile neutropenia including one patient who died of neutropenic sepsis. Grade 3/4 nonhematologic observed were: sensory neuropathy in eight patients (24%); and hyperglycemia, malaise and nausea were all observed in four patients (12%). Cancer and Leukemia Group B will not pursue further investigation of paclitaxel and cisplatin due to the modest activity and the toxicity observed on this trial.

  18. Continuous quality improvement interventions to improve long-term outcomes of antiretroviral therapy in women who initiated therapy during pregnancy or breastfeeding in the Democratic Republic of Congo: design of an open-label, parallel, group randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotebieng, Marcel; Behets, Frieda; Kawende, Bienvenu; Ravelomanana, Noro Lantoniaina Rosa; Tabala, Martine; Okitolonda, Emile W

    2017-04-26

    Despite the rapid adoption of the World Health Organization's 2013 guidelines, children continue to be infected with HIV perinatally because of sub-optimal adherence to the continuum of HIV care in maternal and child health (MCH) clinics. To achieve the UNAIDS goal of eliminating mother-to-child HIV transmission, multiple, adaptive interventions need to be implemented to improve adherence to the HIV continuum. The aim of this open label, parallel, group randomized trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) interventions implemented at facility and health district levels to improve retention in care and virological suppression through 24 months postpartum among pregnant and breastfeeding women receiving ART in MCH clinics in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Prior to randomization, the current monitoring and evaluation system will be strengthened to enable collection of high quality individual patient-level data necessary for timely indicators production and program outcomes monitoring to inform CQI interventions. Following randomization, in health districts randomized to CQI, quality improvement (QI) teams will be established at the district level and at MCH clinics level. For 18 months, QI teams will be brought together quarterly to identify key bottlenecks in the care delivery system using data from the monitoring system, develop an action plan to address those bottlenecks, and implement the action plan at the level of their district or clinics. If proven to be effective, CQI as designed here, could be scaled up rapidly in resource-scarce settings to accelerate progress towards the goal of an AIDS free generation. The protocol was retrospectively registered on February 7, 2017. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03048669 .

  19. The Influence of Hepatic and Renal Impairment on the Pharmacokinetics of a Treatment for Herpes Zoster, Amenamevir (ASP2151): Phase 1, Open-Label, Single-Dose, Parallel-Group Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusawake, Tomohiro; Kowalski, Donna; Takada, Akitsugu; Kato, Kota; Katashima, Masataka; Keirns, James J; Lewand, Michaelene; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Marbury, Thomas C; Preston, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    Amenamevir (ASP2151) is a nonnucleoside human herpesvirus helicase-primase inhibitor that was approved in Japan for the treatment of herpes zoster (shingles) in 2017. This article reports the results of two clinical trials that investigated the effects of renal and hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of amenamevir. These studies were phase 1, open-label, single-dose (oral 400 mg), parallel-group studies evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of amenamevir in healthy participants and participants with moderate hepatic impairment and mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment. In the hepatic impairment study, the pharmacokinetic profile of amenamevir in participants with moderate hepatic impairment was generally similar to that of participants with normal hepatic function. In the renal impairment study, the area under the amenamevir concentration versus time curve from the time of dosing up to the time of the last sample with extrapolation to infinity of the terminal phase was increased by 78.1% in participants with severe renal impairment. There was a positive relationship between creatinine clearance and oral and renal clearance for amenamevir in the renal impairment study. In both studies, amenamevir was safe and well tolerated. The findings of the hepatic impairment study indicate that no dosing adjustment is required in patients with moderate hepatic impairment. In the renal impairment study, systemic amenamevir exposure was increased by renal impairment. However, it is unlikely that renal impairment will have a significant effect on the safety of amenamevir given that in previous pharmacokinetic and safety studies in healthy individuals amenamevir was safe and well tolerated after a single dose (5-2400 mg, fasted condition) and repeated doses for 7 days (300 or 600 mg, fed condition), and the amount of amenamevir exposure in the renal impairment study was covered by those studies. These findings suggest that amenamevir does not

  20. A Label to Regulate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoire, Aurélie; Boxenbaum, Eva; Laurent, Brice

    This paper examines the role labelling plays in the government of the contemporary economy.1Drawing on a detailed study of BBC-Effinergy, a French label for sustainable construction, we showhow the adoption and evolution of voluntary labels can be seen as emblematic of a governmentthrough experim...

  1. Labelling subway lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, M.A.; Iturriaga, C.; Márquez, A.; Portillo, J.R.; Reyes, P.; Wolff, A.; Eades, P.; Takaoka, T.

    2001-01-01

    Graphical features on map, charts, diagrams and graph drawings usually must be annotated with text labels in order to convey their meaning. In this paper we focus on a problem that arises when labeling schematized maps, e.g. for subway networks. We present algorithms for labeling points on a line

  2. Quality control for a group of pyrophosphate-Sn kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, M.; Gamboa, R.; Hernandez, I.; Leyva, R.; Turino, D.

    1994-01-01

    The quality control for a group of Pyrophosphate-Sn kits for labeling with 99 m Tc is carry out at the Isotope Center. A general discussion takes place about the instrumental techniques for the determination of the kit constituent such as ligands, Sn(II), water, etc, as well as the control table for the evaluation of the warranty time. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  13. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.

  14. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  15. Improving the Grading Accuracy of Astrocytic Neoplasms Noninvasively by Combining Timing Information with Cerebral Blood Flow: A Multi-TI Arterial Spin-Labeling MR Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Zhao, B; Wang, G; Xiang, J; Xu, S; Liu, Y; Zhao, P; Pfeuffer, J; Qian, T

    2016-12-01

    Systematic and accurate glioma grading has clinical significance. We present the utility of multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging and provide the bolus arrival time maps for grading astrocytomas. Forty-three patients with astrocytomas (21 men; mean age, 51 years) were recruited. The classification abilities of conventional MR imaging features, normalized CBF value derived from multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging, normalized bolus arrival time, and normalized CBF derived from single-TI arterial spin-labeling were compared in patients with World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, III, and IV astrocytomas. The normalized CBF value derived from multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging was higher in patients with higher grade astrocytoma malignancies compared with patients with lower grade astrocytomas, while the normalized bolus arrival time showed the opposite tendency. The normalized CBF value derived from the multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging showed excellent performance with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.813 (WHO II versus III), 0.964 (WHO II versus IV), 0.872 (WHO III versus IV), and 0.883 (low-grade-versus-high-grade gliomas). The normalized CBF value derived from single-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging could statistically differentiate the WHO II and IV groups (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.826). The normalized bolus arrival time effectively identified the WHO grades II and III with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.836. Combining the normalized CBF value derived from multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging and normalized bolus arrival time improved the diagnostic accuracy from 65.10% to 72.10% compared with the normalized CBF value derived from multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging being applied independently. The combination of multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging and conventional MR imaging had the best performance, with a diagnostic accuracy of 81

  16. 75 FR 52601 - Food Labeling; Labeling of Food Made From AquAdvantage Salmon; Public Hearing; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... summary of an oral presentation: Juanita Yates, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and... Part II Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling... 26, 2010 / Notices#0;#0; [[Page 52602

  17. Do nutrition labels influence healthier food choices? Analysis of label viewing behaviour and subsequent food purchases in a labelling intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Eyles, Helen; Jiang, Yannan; Blakely, Tony

    2018-02-01

    There are few objective data on how nutrition labels are used in real-world shopping situations, or how they affect dietary choices and patterns. The Starlight study was a four-week randomised, controlled trial of the effects of three different types of nutrition labels on consumer food purchases: Traffic Light Labels, Health Star Rating labels, or Nutrition Information Panels (control). Smartphone technology allowed participants to scan barcodes of packaged foods and receive randomly allocated labels on their phone screen, and to record their food purchases. The study app therefore provided objectively recorded data on label viewing behaviour and food purchases over a four-week period. A post-hoc analysis of trial data was undertaken to assess frequency of label use, label use by food group, and association between label use and the healthiness of packaged food products purchased. Over the four-week intervention, study participants (n = 1255) viewed nutrition labels for and/or purchased 66,915 barcoded packaged products. Labels were viewed for 23% of all purchased products, with decreasing frequency over time. Shoppers were most likely to view labels for convenience foods, cereals, snack foods, bread and bakery products, and oils. They were least likely to view labels for sugar and honey products, eggs, fish, fruit and vegetables, and meat. Products for which participants viewed the label and subsequently purchased the product during the same shopping episode were significantly healthier than products where labels were viewed but the product was not subsequently purchased: mean difference in nutrient profile score -0.90 (95% CI -1.54 to -0.26). In a secondary analysis of a nutrition labelling intervention trial, there was a significant association between label use and the healthiness of products purchased. Nutrition label use may therefore lead to healthier food purchases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. In vivo autoradiographic demonstration of β-adrenergic binding sites in adult rat type II alveolar epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.M.; Sidhu, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    Adult male rats were injected intravenously with the muscarinic binding probe 3 H-Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) or the β-adrenergic probe 3 H-dihydroalprenolol (DHA). Other rats were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of a 500-fold excess of L-isoproterenol prior to the DHA. Light microscopic autoradiography of 0.5 μm sections of lung from the QNB group demonstrated very little labelling even after 6 months of exposure. In constrast, trachealis smooth muscle from these animals contained substantial labelling. Autoradiographs of lung from rats injected with DHA demonstrated labelling which was well localized over alveolar septa and concentrated over the cytoplasm of type II cells. Quantitative analysis of labelling in the DHA groups indicated a significant reduction of labelling in animals treated with L-isoproterenol prior to DHA, in both the alveolar parenchyma in general and over type II cells. The results of this study provide morphologic evidence for the uptake and specific binding of β-adrenergic antagonists by the adult lung in vivo, while failing to demonstrate similar binding of a muscarinic probe. In addition, the results demonstrate specific β-adrenergic receptors on type II cells in vivo and substantiate the view of a direct effect of β-adrenergic agonists on alveolar type II cells

  19. Enhancing the contribution and role of practitioner knowledge in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC Working Group (WG II process: Insights from UK workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Howarth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective critically assesses how the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC could facilitate a closer alignment of its activities and include lessons drawn from the policy and decision-making communities working on the ground at the regional/local levels. The objective is to facilitate practitioner input into the detailed choice of topics and priorities for IPCC review and in the conclusions drawn (we define practitioners as those engaged in the development and application of practical responses to climate change on the ground. By means of a series of workshops with academics, policy officials and decision-makers in the United Kingdom, the research reported here illuminates how the IPCC’s Working Group II (WGII has been used in the past to inform decision-making and how practitioner responses to climate change could better inform the IPCC process in the future. In particular, we recommend three key actions. Firstly that IPCC WGII should incorporate more practitioners as authors to improve the awareness and understanding amongst the writing teams of the nature and detail of decisions being made in response to climate change; secondly a practitioner-led IPCC Special Report should be commissioned on good-practice responses to climate change; and thirdly a new body should be created, attached to the IPCC, to synthesise and report on good practice on climate response strategies in a timely manner. By adopting these recommendations, the IPCC could become more directly useful to decision-makers working on adaptation at the national, regional and local levels and enable more actionable decision-making.

  20. Safety and efficacy of high-dose tamoxifen and sulindac for desmoid tumor in children: results of a Children's Oncology Group (COG) phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X; Anderson, James R; Hill, D Ashley; Henry, David; Spunt, Sheri L; Meyer, William; Kao, Simon; Hoffer, Fredric A; Grier, Holcombe E; Hawkins, Douglas S; Raney, R Beverly

    2013-07-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor, DT) is a soft tissue neoplasm prone to recurrence despite complete surgical resection. Numerous small retrospective reports suggest that non-cytotoxic chemotherapy using tamoxifen and sulindac may be effective for DT. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of tamoxifen and sulindac in a prospective phase II study within the Children's Oncology Group. Eligible patients were <19 years of age who had measurable DT that was recurrent or not amenable to surgery or radiation. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received tamoxifen and sulindac daily for 12 months or until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Fifty-nine eligible patients were enrolled from 2004 to 2009; 78% were 10-18 years old. Twenty-two (38%) were previously untreated; 15 (41%) of the remaining 37 enrolling with recurrent DT had prior systemic chemotherapy and six (16%) had prior radiation. No life-threatening toxicity was reported. Twelve (40%) of 30 females developed ovarian cysts, which were asymptomatic in 11 cases. Ten patients completed therapy without disease progression or discontinuing treatment. Responses included four partial and one complete (5/59, 8%). The estimated 2-year PFS and survival rates were 36% (95% confidence interval: 0.23-0.48) and 96%, respectively. All three deaths were due to progressive DT. Tamoxifen and sulindac caused few serious side effects in children with DT, although ovarian cysts were common. However, the combination showed relatively little activity as measured by response and PFS rates. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of High-Dose Tamoxifen and Sulindac for Desmoid Tumor in Children: Results of a Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Phase II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X.; Anderson, James R.; Hill, D. Ashley; Henry, David; Spunt, Sheri L.; Meyer, William; Kao, Simon; Hoffer, Fredric A.; Grier, Holcombe E.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Raney, R. Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Background Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor, DT) is a soft tissue neoplasm prone to recurrence despite complete surgical resection. Numerous small retrospective reports suggest that non-cytotoxic chemotherapy using tamoxifen and sulindac may be effective for DT. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of tamoxifen and sulindac in a prospective phase II study within the Children’s Oncology Group. Procedures Eligible patients were <19 years of age who had measurable DT that was recurrent or not amenable to surgery or radiation. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received tamoxifen and sulindac daily for 12 months or until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results Fifty-nine eligible patients were enrolled from 2004 to 2009; 78% were 10–18 years old. Twenty-two (38%) were previously untreated; 15 (41%) of the remaining 37 enrolling with recurrent DT had prior systemic chemotherapy and six (16%) had prior radiation. No life-threatening toxicity was reported. Twelve (40%) of 30 females developed ovarian cysts, which were asymptomatic in 11 cases. Ten patients completed therapy without disease progression or discontinuing treatment. Responses included four partial and one complete (5/59, 8%). The estimated 2-year PFS and survival rates were 36% (95% confidence interval: 0.23–0.48) and 96%, respectively. All three deaths were due to progressive DT. Conclusions Tamoxifen and sulindac caused few serious side effects in children with DT, although ovarian cysts were common. However, the combination showed relatively little activity as measured by response and PFS rates. PMID:23281268

  2. Misonidazole and unconventional radiation in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a phase II study of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ydrach, A.A.; Marcial, V.A.; Parsons, J.; Concannon, J.; Asbell, S.O.; George, F.

    1982-01-01

    This is a report on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Protocol78-32, a Phase I/II prospective study aimed at determining tolerance, tumor response, and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus treated with unorthodox fractionation radiotherapy combined with misonidazole. Misonidazole was administered by mouth 4 to 6 hr prior to radiation, at a dose of 1.0 to 1.25 Gm/.m 2 ; blood levels were measured at about 4 hr after intake of the drug and reported in micrograms/ml. Radiotherapy was administered at 4 to 6 hr post-misonidazole dose and given with 400 rad fractions, alternating 2 or 3 times/week, up to 4,800 rad. A total of 43 patients were entered; 26 are evaluated for survival at 1 year post accession. Thirty patients (88%) received the planned radiation course. Twenty-eight patients (78%) received the planned misonidazole dosage. Tumor response, evaluated in 18 patients, showed a complete regression (C.R.) in only 2 patients (11%); and partial response (P.R.) in 6 patients (33%). Eight patients (44%) showed no tumor response to planned therapy. Toxicity was acceptable and in 38 evaluated patients only 4 reported (11%) nausea and vomiting, 7 reported mild paresthesias (18%). The median survival was only five months. In 26 patients evaluated for 1 year survival determination, only 1 survived (3.8%) this period. In view of the poor tumor response and low survival observed, we do not recommend that this particular fractionation regimen with misonidazole be used in a Phase III randomized trial in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

  3. A long-term self-managed handwriting intervention for people with Parkinson's disease: results from the control group of a phase II randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Johnny; Franssen, Marloes; Winward, Charlotte; Izadi, Hooshang; Meaney, Andy; Mahmoud, Wala; Bogdanovic, Marko; Tims, Martin; Wade, Derick; Dawes, Helen

    2017-12-01

    To report on the control group of a trial primarily designed to investigate exercise for improving mobility in people with Parkinson's disease (pwP). The control group undertook a handwriting intervention to control for attention and time spent practising a specific activity. Secondary analysis of a two-arm parallel phase II randomized controlled trial with blind assessment. Community. PwP able to walk ⩾100 m and with no contraindication to exercise were recruited from the Thames Valley, UK, and randomized (1:1) to exercise or handwriting, via a concealed computer-generated list. Handwriting was undertaken at home and exercise in community facilities; both were delivered through workbooks with monthly support visits and involved practice for 1 hour, twice weekly, over a period of six months. Handwriting was assessed, at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months, using a pangram giving writing speed, amplitude (area) and progressive reduction in amplitude (ratio). The Movement Disorder Society (MDS)-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) item 2.7 measured self-reported handwriting deficits. In all, 105 pwP were recruited (analysed: n  = 51 handwriting, n  = 54 exercise). A total of 40 pwP adhered to the handwriting programme, most completing ⩾1 session/week. Moderate effects were found for amplitude (total area: d = 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.11 to 0.7; P = 0.13) in favour of handwriting over a period of12 months; effects for writing speed and ratio parameters were small ≤0.11. Self-reported handwriting difficulties also favoured handwriting (UPDRS 2.7: odds ratio (OR) = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.91; P = 0.02). No adverse effects were reported. PwP generally adhere to self-directed home handwriting which may provide benefit with minimal risk. Encouraging effects were found in writing amplitude and, moreover, perceived ability.

  4. Prospective randomized phase II study of FOLFIRI versus FOLFOX7 in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a Chinese Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Wen, Feng; Zhou, Chengya; Qiu, Meng; Liu, Jiyan; Chen, Jing; Yi, Cheng; Li, Zhiping; Luo, Deyun; Xu, Feng; Cai, Xiaohong; Bi, Feng

    2017-11-17

    Until now, no standard chemotherapy has been widely accepted for advanced gastric cancer (GC). The current research aimed to compare folinic acid, fluorouracil with irinotecan (mFOLFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX7) as first-line treatments in patients with locally advanced GC in an open, randomized, phase II study. Previously untreated metastatic or recurrent GC patients with measurable disease received mFOLFIRI (arm A) or mFOLFOX7 (arm B) every 2 weeks. The defined second-line treatment was mFOLFOX7 for arm A and mFOLFIRI for arm B. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease control rate (DCR) and toxicity. The evaluable population consisted of 128 patients (54 in arm A; 74 in arm B). Median PFS of arm A was 2.9 months (m) (95% confidence interval, CI , 1.9 to 4.1 m) versus 4.1 m (95% CI , 3.2 to 4.8 m) for arm B ( p = 0.109). Median OS was 9.9 months (95% CI , 6.0 to 13.5 m) for arm A versus 12.0 m for arm B (95% CI , 10.3 to 13.7m; p = 0.431). DCRs for arm A and arm B were 59.3% and 66.3%, respectively ( p = 0.850). In subgroup analysis of the patients who completed both treatment lines per protocol, the median first-line PFS was 2.1 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7arm versus 8.0 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI arm ( p = 0.053), and the median second-line PFS values were 1.2 m versus 5.1 m ( p = 0.287). Total PFS and OS were 8.1m and 11.0 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7 group compared with 12.2m and 20.2 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI group ( p = 0.008, p = 0.030). Both regimens were well-tolerated with acceptable and manageable toxicities. Hence, there was no significant difference in the PFS or DCR. However, mFOLFOX7 followed by mFOLFIRI might have a better OS.

  5. FDA Consumer Nutrition Knowledge Survey. Report II, 1975. A Nationwide Study of Food Shopper's Knowledge, Beliefs, Attitudes and Reported Behavior Regarding Food and Nutrition. Factors Related to Nutrition Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Herbert; And Others

    During 1973, a nationwide study for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was conducted which provided information on nutrition knowledge, beliefs about nutrition, and first reactions to nutrition labeling among food shoppers. This initial research provided a baseline measurement of nutrition knowledge and attitudes among consumers, and in 1975…

  6. Attitude and Behavior Factors Associated with Front-of-Package Label Use with Label Users Making Accurate Product Nutrition Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Mary G; Joung, Hyun-Woo; Littlejohn, Emily I

    2018-05-01

    Front-of-package (FOP) labels are increasing in popularity on retail products. Reductive FOP labels provide nutrient-specific information, whereas evaluative FOP labels summarize nutrient information through icons. Better understanding of consumer behavior regarding FOP labels is beneficial to increasing consumer use of nutrition labeling when making grocery purchasing decisions. We aimed to determine FOP label format effectiveness in aiding consumers at assessing nutrient density of food products. In addition, we sought to determine relationships between FOP label use and attitude toward healthy eating, diet self-assessment, self-reported health and nutrition knowledge, and label and shopping behaviors. A between-subjects experimental design was employed. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four label conditions: Facts Up Front, Facts Up Front Extended, a binary symbol, and no-label control. One hundred sixty-one US primary grocery shoppers, aged 18 to 69 years. Participants were randomly invited to the online study. Participants in one of four label condition groups viewed three product categories (cereal, dairy, and snacks) with corresponding questions. Adults' nutrition assessment of food products based on different FOP label formats, along with label use and attitude toward healthy eating, diet self-assessment, self-reported health and nutrition knowledge, and label and shopping behaviors. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, χ 2 tests, and logistical regression. Significant outcomes were set to α=.05. Participants selected the more nutrient-dense product in the snack food category when it contained an FOP label. Subjective health and nutrition knowledge and frequency of selecting food for healthful reasons were associated with FOP label use (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). Both Facts Up Front (reductive) and binary (evaluative) FOP labels appear effective for nutrition assessment of snack products compared with no label. Specific

  7. Structure and Heme-Independent Peroxidase Activity of a Fully-Coordinated Mononuclear Mn(II) Complex with a Schiff-Base Tripodal Ligand Containing Three Imidazole Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Shuranjan; Lee, Hong In [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Do Hyun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lah, Myoung Soo [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    New complex [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sub 2}[Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 5}·3H{sub 2}O, where H{sub 3}L is tris{2-(4-imidazolyl)methyliminoethyl} amine (imtren), has been prepared by reacting manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate with the imtren ligand in methanol. X-ray crystallographic study revealed that the imtren ligand hexadentately binds to Mn(II) ion through the three Schiff-base imine N atoms and three imidazole N atoms with a distorted octahedral geometry, and the apical tertiary amine N atom of the ligand pseudo-coordinates to Mn(II), forming overall a pseudo-seven coordination environment. The hydrogen-bonds between imidazole and imidazolate of [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sup 0.5+} complex ions are extended to build a 2D puckered network with trigonal voids. [Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sup 2+} complex ions constitutes another extended 2D puckered layer without hydrogen bonds. Two layers are wedged each other to constitute overall stack of the crystal. Peroxidase activity of complex 1 was examined by observing the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)- 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of complex 1. Generation of ABTS{sup +·} was observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies, indicating that the complex 1, a fully-coordinated mononuclear Mn(II) complex with nitrogen-only ligand, has a heme-independent peroxidase activity.

  8. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris have characteristics in common with LMW RNA group II Sinorhizobium meliloti of Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella from soils of mainland Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several isolates from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canaries, had electrophoretic LMW RNA patterns identical with a less common pattern within S. meliloti (assigned as group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northe...

  9. Results of a collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding the reproducibility and robustness of the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS390 and DYS393 in a PCR pentaplex format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carracedo, A; Beckmann, A; Bengs, A

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative exercise was carried out by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in the frame work of the STADNAP program, i.e. standardization of DNA profiling in Europe, in order to evaluate the performance of a Y-chromosome STR pentaplex, which includes the loci DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS...

  10. Preparation of 188Re labelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Minghua; Cao Rongzhen; Li Wenxin; Sheng Rong; Yin Duanzhi; He Weiyu; Zhou Wei; Wang Yongxian

    1998-01-01

    A simple technique of directly labelling antibodies with 188 Re has been developed. The reduction of antibody disulfide groups was achieved by incubation of antibody with ascorbic acid (pH = 6.5) for an hour at room temperature and a solution of excess SnCl 2 in sodium gluconate was added to the AA-reduced antibody followed by the addition of perrhenate. Some factors that influence labelling efficiency, such as the pH of the reaction mixture, the labelling time, and the amount of antibodies and reductive agent, were studied experimentally and a better labelling method was established. The labelling yields, as determined by paper chromatography, were greater than 80%

  11. Real-time RT-PCR high-resolution melting curve analysis and multiplex RT-PCR to detect and differentiate grapevine leafroll-associated associated virus 3 variant groups I, II, III and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Rachelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3 is the main contributing agent of leafroll disease worldwide. Four of the six GLRaV-3 variant groups known have been found in South Africa, but their individual contribution to leafroll disease is unknown. In order to study the pathogenesis of leafroll disease, a sensitive and accurate diagnostic assay is required that can detect different variant groups of GLRaV-3. Methods In this study, a one-step real-time RT-PCR, followed by high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and identification of GLRaV-3 variants of groups I, II, III and VI, was developed. A melting point confidence interval for each variant group was calculated to include at least 90% of all melting points observed. A multiplex RT-PCR protocol was developed to these four variant groups in order to assess the efficacy of the real-time RT-PCR HRM assay. Results A universal primer set for GLRaV-3 targeting the heat shock protein 70 homologue (Hsp70h gene of GLRaV-3 was designed that is able to detect GLRaV-3 variant groups I, II, III and VI and differentiate between them with high-resolution melting curve analysis. The real-time RT-PCR HRM and the multiplex RT-PCR were optimized using 121 GLRaV-3 positive samples. Due to a considerable variation in melting profile observed within each GLRaV-3 group, a confidence interval of above 90% was calculated for each variant group, based on the range and distribution of melting points. The intervals of groups I and II could not be distinguished and a 95% joint confidence interval was calculated for simultaneous detection of group I and II variants. An additional primer pair targeting GLRaV-3 ORF1a was developed that can be used in a subsequent real-time RT-PCR HRM to differentiate between variants of groups I and II. Additionally, the multiplex RT-PCR successfully validated 94.64% of the infections detected with the real-time RT-PCR HRM

  12. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  13. Menakar Label Fundamentalisme Untuk Muslim

    OpenAIRE

    Wibisono, Susilo

    2014-01-01

    This study was developed referring to the negative connotation in using the word “fundamentalism ” and its using as an individual or group label. The method used in this study were literature review using many literatures about Islam and fundamentalism in any perspectives. Based on psychology perspective, it said that fundamentalism is an individual psychological construct associated with beliefs and individual interpretation of something, such as ideology, nationality, and religion. Accordin...

  14. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure and conductometry studying of a number of new Schiff base complexes; a new example of binuclear square pyramidal geometry of Cu(II) complex bridged with an oxo group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Alavipour, Ehsan

    2015-11-01

    Three new binuclear Cu(II), Mn(II), Co(II) complexes [Cu2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (1), [Mn2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (2), and [Co2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (3), {L = 1,3-bis(2-((Z)-(2-aminopropylimino)methyl)phenoxy)propan-2-ol} have been synthesized. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis of complex 1 showed that the complex is binuclear and all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of ligand (N4O3) are coordinated to two Cu(II) center ions. In addition, the crystal structure studying shows, a perchlorate ion has been bridged to the Cu(II) metal centers. However, two distorted square pyramidal Cu(II) ions are bridged asymmetrically by a perchlorate ion and oxygen of hydroxyl group of Schiff base ligand. In addition, the conductometry behaviors of all complexes were studied in acetonitrile solution.

  15. Labelling of equipment dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D C

    1993-01-01

    A new labelling system for use on medical equipment dispensers is tested. This system uses one of the objects stored in each unit of the dispenser as the 'label', by attaching it to the front of the dispenser with tape. The new system was compared to conventional written labelling by timing subjects asked to select items from two dispensers. The new system was 27% quicker than the conventional system. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8110335

  16. Deuterium labeled cannabinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driessen, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Complex reactions involving ring opening, ring closure and rearrangements hamper complete understanding of the fragmentation processes in the mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of cannabinoids. Specifically labelled compounds are very powerful tools for obtaining more insight into fragmentation mechanisms and ion structures and therefore the synthesis of specifically deuterated cannabinoids was undertaken. For this, it was necessary to investigate the preparation of cannabinoids, appropriately functionalized for specific introduction of deuterium atom labels. The results of mass spectrometry with these labelled cannabinoids are described. (Auth.)

  17. Microwave assistance of labeling hippuric acid by I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Wu, Kou-Hung; Ko, Pi-Wen; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Chou, Shih-Ching; Shieh, Fa-Kuen; Sureshbabu, Radhakrishnan; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach for labeling hippuric acid with I-131 using microwaves. It utilizes copper(II) acetate as a catalyst of the labeling. The process involves the use of this catalytic copper(II) acetate at low dilutions that were nevertheless sufficient to produce labeled hippuric acid with high radiochemical purity in a short time. Therefore, the novel technique overcomes the limitations of previously reported conventional methods that involve heating. - Highlights: • We report the microwave assisted radiochemical labeling of hippuric acid by I-131. • Cu(OAc) 2 can be used as catalyst to get labeled product in lower dilution condition. • Advantages of our method are lesser time scale and high radiochemical purity.

  18. Effective sample labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, J.T.; Bryce, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-water samples collected for hazardous-waste and radiological monitoring have come under strict regulatory and quality assurance requirements as a result of laws such as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. To comply with these laws, the labeling system used to identify environmental samples had to be upgraded to ensure proper handling and to protect collection personnel from exposure to sample contaminants and sample preservatives. The sample label now used as the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is a complete sample document. In the event other paperwork on a labeled sample were lost, the necessary information could be found on the label

  19. Part I. Analyzing the distribution of gas law questions in chemistry textbooks. Part II. Chlorine-35 NQR spectra of group 1 and silver dichloromethanesulfonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Gabriel

    Part I. Two studies involving the gas law questions in eight high school and Advanced Placement/college chemistry textbooks were performed using loglinear analysis to look for associations among six variables. These variables included Bloom's Taxonomy (higher-order, lower-order), Book Type (high school, college), Question Format (multiple-choice, problem, short answer), Question Placement (in-chapter, end-of-chapter, test bank), Representation (macroscopic, microscopic, symbolic), and Arkansas Science Standard (conceptual, mathematical; gas laws, pressure conversion, stoichiometry). The first study, involving the conceptual gas law questions, found the Book Type and Question Placement variables had the biggest impact, each appearing in 5 of the 11 significant associations. The second study, involving the mathematical gas law questions, found the Question Placement had the biggest impact, appearing in 7 of the 11 significant associations, followed by Book Type and the Arkansas Science Standard variables, which appeared in 5 of the 11 significant associations. These studies showed that compared to the high school books, college books have fewer multiple-choice questions (compared to short-answer and problem questions), fewer in-chapter questions (compared to end-of-chapter and test bank questions), fewer questions in the chapters and more questions at the end of the chapters and fewer multiple-choice questions in and at the end of the books and more multiple-choice questions in the test banks. Part II. The dichloromethanesulfonate salts of several +1 charged cations, M+Cl2CHSO3 - (M = Li, Na, K, Rb Ag, Cs Tl) were synthesized and studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Dichloromethanesulfonic acid was prepared by the methanolysis of dichloromethanesulfonyl chloride, which was neutralized with the metal carbonates to produce the corresponding metal dichloromethanesulfonate salts. This study completed the NQR investigation of the family of chloroacetates

  20. In vivo imaging and quantitation of renal transplant rejection using indium-111 labelled anti-lymphocyte and anti-MHC class I and II monoclonal antibodies in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loutfi, I.; Batchelor, J.R.; Lavender, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been described in this report, non-invasive and specific method for imaging and assessment of acute kidney transplant rejection in rat model. This model can serve as a basis for application in man using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies with different specificities starting with monoclonal antibodies labelled with indium-111 which have been used in this technique. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  1. Dynamic map labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Ken; Daiches, Eli; Yap, Chee

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of filtering, selecting and placing labels on a dynamic map, which is characterized by continuous zooming and panning capabilities. This consists of two interrelated issues. The first is to avoid label popping and other artifacts that cause confusion and interrupt navigation, and the second is to label at interactive speed. In most formulations the static map labeling problem is NP-hard, and a fast approximation might have O(nlogn) complexity. Even this is too slow during interaction, when the number of labels shown can be several orders of magnitude less than the number in the map. In this paper we introduce a set of desiderata for "consistent" dynamic map labeling, which has qualities desirable for navigation. We develop a new framework for dynamic labeling that achieves the desiderata and allows for fast interactive display by moving all of the selection and placement decisions into the preprocessing phase. This framework is general enough to accommodate a variety of selection and placement algorithms. It does not appear possible to achieve our desiderata using previous frameworks. Prior to this paper, there were no formal models of dynamic maps or of dynamic labels; our paper introduces both. We formulate a general optimization problem for dynamic map labeling and give a solution to a simple version of the problem. The simple version is based on label priorities and a versatile and intuitive class of dynamic label placements we call "invariant point placements". Despite these restrictions, our approach gives a useful and practical solution. Our implementation is incorporated into the G-Vis system which is a full-detail dynamic map of the continental USA. This demo is available through any browser.

  2. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled fluphenazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, H U; Hawes, E M; Midha, K K

    1984-01-01

    The propylpiperazine side chain of fluphenazine has been labeled with two, four, and six deuterium atoms by lithium aluminum deuteride reduction of the appropriate ester or imide. The gamma-carbon of the propyl group was labeled with two deuterium atoms by reduction of 10- (2-methoxycarbonylethyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-10H-phenothiazine, while four deuterium atoms were incorporated into the piperazine ring by reduction of 10-[3-(3,5-dioxo-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-2-trifluoromethyl-10H-pheno thiazine. The latter reduction gave the d4-labeled N-deshydroxyethyl metabolite of fluphenazine.

  3. Labelling of castor oil for myocardial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaba, E.; Al-Suhybani, A.; Zaki, F.S.; Abdullah, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The labelling of castor oil, hydrolyzed castor oil and oleic acid by iodine monochloride and chloramine-T was investigated. The effect of iodinating agent and concentration of castor oil on labelling yield was studied. A comparative pharmacological study with analog aliphatic acids was carried out. Castor oil labelled with iodine monochloride concentrates in heart and liver in good proportion, better than other natural fatty acids and nearly equal to analog fatty acids. Infrared study revealed that the OH group in ricinoleic acid may protect the sup(125)I added across the double bond with minor changes in biochemical properties causing better extraction by muscle of the heart. (author)

  4. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  5. Edge colouring by total labellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Rautenbach, D.; Stiebitz, M.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of an edge-colouring total k-labelling. This is a labelling of the vertices and the edges of a graph G with labels 1, 2, ..., k such that the weights of the edges define a proper edge colouring of G. Here the weight of an edge is the sum of its label and the labels of its...

  6. Radioiodine and its labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Ana Maria

    1994-01-01

    Chemical characteristics and their nuclear characteristics, types of labelled molecules,labelling procedures, direct labelling with various oxidizing agents, indirect labelling with various conjugates attached to protein molecules, purification and quality control. Iodination damage.Safe handling of labelling procedures with iodine radioisotopes.Bibliography

  7. 'Naturemade' -- a new label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederhaeusern, A.

    2001-01-01

    This short article discusses the introduction of the 'Naturemade' two-level labelling scheme in the Swiss electricity market, which is to help provide transparency in the market for green power and promote the building of facilities for its production. In the form of an interview with the CEO of Swissolar and the president of Greenpeace Switzerland, the pros and contras of these labels are discussed. In particular, the interview partners' opinions on the possible misuse of the less stringent label and the influence of the labels on the construction of new installations for the generation of electricity from renewable sources are presented. The basic principles of the promotional model behind the labels are listed

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review: clarity, accuracy, consistency with EPA policy, and enforceability.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is a quiz on Module 1.

  10. Lineage II (Serovar 1/2a and 1/2c) Human Listeria monocytogenes Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Types Divided into PFGE Groups Using the Band Patterns Below 145.5 kb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valladares, Gloria; Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise; Goering, Richard V; Tham, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Among 504 clinical lineage II isolates of Listeria monocytogenes isolated during 1958-2010 in Sweden, 119 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types (AscI) have been identified based on the number and distribution of all banding patterns in each DNA profile. In this study, these types were further divided into PFGE groups based on the configuration of small bands with sizes kb. The 504 isolates included 483 serovar 1/2a isolates distributed into 114 PFGE types and 21 serovar 1/2c isolates distributed into 9 PFGE types; these were further divided into 21 PFGE groups. PFGE group, that is, configuration of small bands below 145.5 kb, and serovars were correlated. L. monocytogenes isolates belonging to PFGE groups A, B, C, E, F, H, K, L, M, S, V, W, Y, and Ö-6 to Ö-12 shared serovar 1/2a, with one exception. PFGE group E also included two PFGE types sharing serovar 1/2c and four PFGE types belonging to either serovar 1/2a or 1/2c. Isolates belonging to PFGE group N shared serovar 1/2c. In contrast to lineage I isolates, small fragments kb were visible in all L. monocytogenes isolates belonging to lineage II. In the results from both the present and previous studies, the genomic region of small bands was genetically more conservative than in large bands. The distribution of these small bands established the relatedness of strains and defined a genetic marker for both lineages I and II, while also establishing their serogroup. The division of L. monocytogenes PFGE types into PFGE groups is advantageous as the profile of every new isolate can be identified easily and quickly through first studying the PFGE group affiliation of the isolate based on the smaller band patterns kb, and then identifying the PFGE type based on the band patterns >145.5 kb.

  11. labelling and quality control of some 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals of expected biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, A.B.I.

    2009-01-01

    this thesis addresses the labelling and quality control of some 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals which could be used for infection imaging. this study focuses on the labelling of sarafloxation, gatifloxation and cefepine with technetium-99m and biological evaluation of these labeled complexes and biodistribution in both normal and inflamed mice. the thesis is organized into two chapters: chapter I :labelling of some antibiotics chapter II :biological evaluation.

  12. Synthesis of carbon-13 labeled ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Stelzer, L.S.; Stolle, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the synthesis of 2-[4-(2-methyl)propyl-phenyl]propionic acid (ibuprofen) labeled with carbon-13 either at the terminal methyl carbons, or at the methine carbon of the isobutyl side chain. The synthetic route involves the removal of the isopropyl group in the isobutyl side-chain of ibuprofen via 2-[4-(2-methyl-1-propenyl)phenyl]propionic acid, followed by restoration of the isopropyl group with a Wittig reaction, using appropriate carbon-13 labeled acetone as the precursor of the isopropyl group. Interesting NMR coupling data attributable to phosphorous and carbon-13 are presented in the experimental section. (author)

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of bacteriorhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Weidong; Tsipouras, Athanasios; Ok, Hyun; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Gawinowicz, M.A.; Nakanishi, Koji

    1990-01-01

    14 C-Labeled optically pure 3S- and 3R-(diazoacetoxy)-all-trans-retinals were incorporated separately into bacterioopsin to reconstitute functional bacteriorhodopsin (bR) analogues, 3S- and 3R-diazo-bRs. UV irradiation at 254 nm generated highly reactive carbenes, which cross-linked the radiolabeled retinals to amino acid residues in the vicinity of the β-ionone ring. The 3S- and 3R-diazo analogues were found to cross-link, respectively, to cyanogen bromide fragments CN 7/CN 9 and CN 8/CN 9. More specifically, Thr121 and Gly122 in fragment CN 7 were found to be cross-linked to the 3S-diazo analogue. The identification of cross-linked residues and fragments favors assignments of the seven helices A-G-F-E-D-C-B or B-C-D-E-F-G-A to helices 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 in the two-dimensional electron density map. The present results show that the chromophore chain is oriented with the ionone ring inclined toward the outside of the membrane (the 9-methyl group also faces the extracellular side of the membrane)

  14. Soil Fumigant Labels - Methyl Bromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search soil fumigant pesticide labels by EPA registration number, product name, or company, and follow the link to The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  15. Consumer preferences for food allergen labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Carlo A; Harvard, Stephanie; Grubisic, Maja; Galo, Jessica; Clarke, Ann; Elliott, Susan; Lynd, Larry D

    2017-01-01

    Food allergen labeling is an important tool to reduce risk of exposure and prevent anaphylaxis for individuals with food allergies. Health Canada released a Canadian food allergen labeling regulation (2008) and subsequent update (2012) suggesting that research is needed to guide further iterations of the regulation to improve food allergen labeling and reduce risk of exposure. The primary objective of this study was to examine consumer preferences in food labeling for allergy avoidance and anaphylaxis prevention. A secondary objective was to identify whether different subgroups within the consumer population emerged. A discrete choice experiment using a fractional factorial design divided into ten different versions with 18 choice-sets per version was developed to examine consumer preferences for different attributes of food labeling. Three distinct subgroups of Canadian consumers with different allergen considerations and food allergen labeling needs were identified. Overall, preferences for standardized precautionary and safety symbols at little or no increased cost emerged. While three distinct groups with different preferences were identified, in general the results revealed that the current Canadian food allergen labeling regulation can be improved by enforcing the use of standardized precautionary and safety symbols and educating the public on the use of these symbols.

  16. Irinotecan in patients with relapsed or cisplatin-refractory germ cell cancer: a phase II study of the German Testicular Cancer Study Group

    OpenAIRE

    Kollmannsberger, C; Rick, O; Klaproth, H; Kubin, T; Sayer, H G; Hentrich, M; Welslau, M; Mayer, F; Kuczyk, M; Spott, C; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2002-01-01

    Despite generally high cure rates in patients with metastatic germ cell cancer, patients with progressive disease on first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy or with relapsed disease following high-dose salvage therapy exhibit a very poor prognosis. Irinotecan has shown antitumour activity in human testicular tumour xenografts in nude mice. We have performed a phase II study examining the single agent activity of irinotecan in patients with metastatic relapsed or cisplatin-refractory germ cell...

  17. U-Pb (SHRIMP II) Age of zircons from ash tuffs of the upper vendian Chernyi Kamen formation (Sylvitsa group, Middle Urals)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronkin, Yu.L.; Grazhdankin, D.V.; Maslov, A.V.; Mizens, G.A.; Matukov, D.I.; Krupenin, M.T.; Petrov, G.A.; Lepikhina, O.P.; Kornilova, A.Yu.

    2006-01-01

    To make more precise the model of correlation of the Middle Urals western slope upper vendian layers with the White Sea remote layers one carried out the SHRIMP-II procedure base U-Pb-dating of the volcanogenic zircons from the ash tuffs and of the volcanogenic zircon enclosing argillites of the Middle Urals Chernyi Kamen formation. The obtained age value of the studied zircons equal to 557+-13 million years is in line with the geological data [ru

  18. Radioactive labelled orgotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The preparation and use of radioactively labelled orgotein, i.e. water-soluble protein congeners in pure, injectable form, is described. This radiopharmaceutical is useful in scintigraphy, especially for visualization of the kidneys where the orgotein is rapidly concentrated. Details of the processes for labelling bovine orgotein with sup(99m)Tc, 60 Co, 125 I or 131 I are specified. The pharmaceutical preparation of the labelled orgotein for intravenous and parenteral administration is also described. Examples using either sup(99m)TC or 125 I-orgotein in scintiscanning dogs' kidneys are given. (UK)

  19. On Online Labeling with Polynomially Many Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babka, Martin; Bulánek, Jan; Cunat, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    be necessary to change the labels of some items; such changes may be done at any time at unit cost for each change. The goal is to minimize the total cost. An alternative formulation of this problem is the file maintenance problem, in which the items, instead of being labeled, are maintained in sorted order...... in an array of length m, and we pay unit cost for moving an item. For the case m = cn for constant c > 1, there are known algorithms that use at most O(n log(n)2) relabelings in total [9], and it was shown recently that this is asymptotically optimal [1]. For the case of m = θ(nC) for C > 1, algorithms...

  20. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  1. FDA Online Label Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The drug labels and other drug-specific information on this Web site represent the most recent drug listing information companies have submitted to the Food and Drug...

  2. Figuring Out Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It's also displayed in grocery stores near fresh foods, like fruits, vegetables, and fish. The nutrition facts label includes: a ... found in citrus fruits, other fruits, and some vegetables. Food companies might also list the amounts of other ...

  3. Energy efficiency labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This research assesses the likely effects on UK consumers of the proposed EEC energy-efficiency labeling scheme. Unless (or until) an energy-labeling scheme is introduced, it is impossible to do more than postulate its likely effects on consumer behavior. This report shows that there are indeed significant differences in energy consumption between different brands and models of the same appliance of which consumers are unaware. Further, the report suggests that, if a readily intelligible energy-labeling scheme were introduced, it would provide useful information that consumers currently lack; and that, if this information were successfully presented, it would be used and could have substantial effects in reducing domestic fuel consumption. Therefore, it is recommended that an energy labeling scheme be introduced.

  4. Like your labels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off.

  5. Labelling of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettli, R.; Markard, J.

    2001-01-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents a possible course of action to be taken to provide a means of declaring the sources of electrical power, as is foreseen in the draft of new Swiss electricity market legislation. The report presents the basic ideas behind the idea and defines the terms used such as labelling, certificates and declarations. Also, the legal situation in the European Union and in Switzerland is examined and a quantitative overview of electricity production and consumption is presented. Suggestions for a labelling scheme are made and some of the problems to be expected are looked at. The report also presents a series of examples of labelling schemes already implemented in other countries, such as Austria, Great Britain, Sweden and Germany. Tradable certificates and tracking systems are discussed as are initial quality labels like the Swiss 'Naturemade' label for green power. A concrete recommendation for the declaration and labelling of electricity in Switzerland is presented and various factors to be considered such as import/export, pumped storage, distribution losses, small-scale producers as well as the time-scales for introduction are discussed

  6. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... raising of animals, such as ``no antibiotics administered'' or ``vegetarian fed''; (4) instructional or... Standards and Labeling Policy Book includes animal production claims; omega fatty acid guidance; allergen... inclusion of Country of Origin Labeling on all labels; the production and sale of labels by USDA; developing...

  7. Effect of pre-pyrolysis mode on simultaneous introduction of nitrogen/oxygen-containing functional groups into the structure of bagasse-based mesoporous carbon and its influence on Cu(II) adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zeqing; Li, Kunquan

    2018-03-01

    A convenient effective microwave pre-pyrolysis treatment to synthesize biomass-based mesoporous carbon with higher nitrogen/oxygen-chelating adsorption for Cu(II) is reported here, in which phosphoric acid impregnated bagasse was used as a microwave absorber and porogen. For comparison, conventional electric-heating pyrolyzed carbon was prepared and doped with nitrogen/oxygen groups. Nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and batch adsorption were employed to investigate the effects of the two pre-pyrolysis modes on the sample physicochemical and Cu(II) adsorptive properties. The 22-min-microwave-pyrolyzed bagasse mesoporous activated carbon (MBAC, 85.32% mesoporosity) contained 10.52% O, which is 3.94% more than electric-heating pyrolyzed mesoporous activated carbon (89.52% mesoporosity). After electrophilic aromatic substitutions of N/O doping, the former possessed more N (5.83%) and more O (21.40%), confirming that time-saving energy-efficient microwave pyrolysis favors the formation of defective C/O atoms in or at the edges of the graphite layer of MBAC, which are highly active and tend to act as preferred reactive positions for the doping of N/O-containing groups simultaneously compared with conventional electric-heating pyrolysis. These N and O species existed mainly as COOH, OH, NH and NH 2 functional groups, and were confirmed by XPS to be active sites for metal binding via electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding, a chelate effect and complexation, resulting in the great enhancement of Cu(II) adsorption. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic fitting further proved that Cu(II) adsorption by N/O-doped MBAC is ascribed mainly to chemisorption. Therefore, rapid microwave pre-pyrolysis provides a promising route to prepare excellent-performance N/O-doped carbon adsorbents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Capillary gas chromatography of alkylbenzenes II. Correlations between the structures and methylene group increments and differences in retention indices of isomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sojak, L.; Janak, J.; Rijks, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The contribution to gas chromatographic retention behaviour of methylene group increments and differences in the retention indices (dI) of isomers of alkylbenzenes up to C16 on squalane and acetyltri-n-butyl citrate was studied. The methylene group increments appear to vary over a wide range (60–100

  9. Temozolomide in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer with and without brain metastases. a phase II study of the EORTC Lung Cancer Group (08965).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziadziuszko, R; Ardizzoni, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Smit, E.F.; Price, A; Debruyne, C.; Legrand, C; Giaccone, G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the activity of single-agent temozolomide in two groups of chemotherapy-naive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, with (12 patients) and without (13 patients) brain metastases (BM). Patients in both groups were treated with temozolomide 200 mg/m(2)/day,

  10. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  11. INFUSION OF THIRD-PARTY MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS (MSC) AFTER KIDNEY AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: A PHASE I-II, OPEN-LABEL, CLINICAL STUDY (EudraCT 2011-001822-81 & NCT01429038)

    OpenAIRE

    DETRY, Olivier; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène; LECHANTEUR, Chantal; SOMJA, Joan; DE ROOVER, Arnaud; WEEKERS, Laurent; SQUIFFLET, Jean-Paul; Honoré, Pierre; DELVENNE, Philippe; MEURISSE, Michel; BAUDOUX, Etienne; BEGUIN, Yves

    2013-01-01

    MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing...

  12. Inter-labeler and intra-labeler variability of condition severity classification models using active and passive learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Nir; Shahar, Yuval; Elovici, Yuval; Hripcsak, George; Moskovitch, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Labeling instances by domain experts for classification is often time consuming and expensive. To reduce such labeling efforts, we had proposed the application of active learning (AL) methods, introduced our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, and shown its significant reduction of labeling efforts. The use of any of three AL methods (one well known [SVM-Margin], and two that we introduced [Exploitation and Combination_XA]) significantly reduced (by 48% to 64%) condition labeling efforts, compared to standard passive (random instance-selection) SVM learning. Furthermore, our new AL methods achieved maximal accuracy using 12% fewer labeled cases than the SVM-Margin AL method. However, because labelers have varying levels of expertise, a major issue associated with learning methods, and AL methods in particular, is how to best to use the labeling provided by a committee of labelers. First, we wanted to know, based on the labelers' learning curves, whether using AL methods (versus standard passive learning methods) has an effect on the Intra-labeler variability (within the learning curve of each labeler) and inter-labeler variability (among the learning curves of different labelers). Then, we wanted to examine the effect of learning (either passively or actively) from the labels created by the majority consensus of a group of labelers. We used our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, the three AL methods and the passive learning method, as mentioned above, to induce the classifications models. We used a dataset of 516 clinical conditions and their severity labeling, represented by features aggregated from the medical records of 1.9 million patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center. We analyzed the variance of the classification performance within (intra-labeler), and especially among (inter-labeler) the classification models that were induced by using the labels provided by seven

  13. European consumers and nutrition labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling of food in Europe is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made for the product. The European Commission is proposing mandatory nutrition labelling, even front of pack labelling with nutrition information. Yet, how widespread is nutrition labelling in the EU...

  14. Genetic algorithms for map labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Steven Ferdinand van

    2001-01-01

    Map labeling is the cartographic problem of placing the names of features (for example cities or rivers) on the map. A good labeling has no intersections between labels. Even basic versions of the problem are NP-hard. In addition, realistic map-labeling problems deal with many cartographic

  15. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  16. Sunitinib in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a clinical and pharmacodynamic phase II multicenter study of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckstein, Rena; Kuruvilla, John; Chua, Neil; Lee, Christina; Macdonald, David A; Al-Tourah, Abdulwahab J; Foo, Alison H; Walsh, Wendy; Ivy, S Percy; Crump, Michael; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A

    2011-05-01

    There are limited effective therapies for most patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We conducted a phase II trial of the multi-targeted vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, 37.5 mg given orally once daily in adult patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. Of 19 enrolled patients, 17 eligible patients were evaluable for toxicity and 15 for response. No objective responses were seen and nine patients achieved stable disease (median duration 3.4 months). As a result, the study was closed at the end of the first stage. Grades 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 29% and 35%, respectively. There was no relationship between change in circulating endothelial cell numbers (CECs) and bidimensional tumor burden over time. Despite some activity in solid tumors, sunitinib showed no evidence of response in relapsed/refractory DLBCL and had greater than expected hematologic toxicity.

  17. Exatecan in pretreated adult patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: results of a phase II--study of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichardt, P; Nielsen, Ole Steen; Bauer, S

    2007-01-01

    No standard treatment is established for patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma after previous chemotherapy with anthracyclines and ifosfamide, given either in combination or sequentially. Exatecan (DX-8951f) is a totally synthetic analogue of the topoisomerase I-inhibitor camptothecin, which...... was synthesised to impart increased aqueous solubility, greater tumour efficacy, and less toxicity than camptothecin itself, topotecan or irinotecan. Since some activity against soft tissue sarcomas, especially leiomyosarcomas, has been reported for topoisomerase I-inhibitors, a study with a new and more potent...... agent seemed justified. We report on a prospective multicentre phase II study of Exatecan in adult soft tissue sarcomas failing 1 or 2 lines of chemotherapy in advanced phase, performed within the STBSG of EORTC. Thirty-nine patients (16 leiomyosarcomas and 23 other histologies) were included in two...

  18. Radioactive labelling of peptidic hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromageot, P.; Pradelles, P.; Morgat, J.L.; Levine, H.

    1976-01-01

    The labelling of peptidic hormones requires stability, specificity and sensitivity of the label. Introduction of a radioactive atome is one way to satisfy these criteria. Several processes have been described to prepare radioactive TRF: synthesis of the peptide with labelled aminoacids or introduction of the label into the hormone. In that approach, tritium can be substituted in the imidazole ring, via precursors activating the proper carbon. Monoiodo TRF leads essentially to tritium labelling of the 5 positions whereas monoazo TRF allows the preparation of 3 H TRF labelled in the 2 positions. Di-substituted TRF leads to labelling into the 2 and 5 carbons. Labelled analogs of TRF can be prepared with labelled iodine; further developments of peptide labelling, will be presented. In particular, the homolytic scission of the C-iodine, bond by photochemical activation. The nascent carbon radical can be stabilized by a tritiated scavenger. This approach eliminates the use of heavy metal catalysts

  19. The Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic Survey (SIMES). II. Enhanced Nuclear Accretion Rate in Galaxy Groups at z ∼ 0.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, I.; Rodighiero, G.; Teplitz, H. I.; Scarlata, C. M.; Franceschini, A.; Berta, S.; Barrufet, L.; Vaccari, M.; Bonato, M.; Ciesla, L.; Zanella, A.; Carraro, R.; Mancini, C.; Puglisi, A.; Malkan, M.; Mei, S.; Marchetti, L.; Colbert, J.; Sedgwick, C.; Serjeant, S.; Pearson, C.; Radovich, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Covone, G.

    2018-04-01

    For a sample of star-forming galaxies in the redshift interval 0.15 < z < 0.3, we study how both the relative strength of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) infrared emission, compared to that due to the star formation (SF), and the numerical fraction of AGNs change as a function of the total stellar mass of the hosting galaxy group ({M}group}* ) between 1010.25 and 1011.9 M ⊙. Using a multicomponent spectral energy distribution SED fitting analysis, we separate the contribution of stars, AGN torus, and star formation to the total emission at different wavelengths. This technique is applied to a new multiwavelength data set in the SIMES field (23 not-redundant photometric bands), spanning the wavelength range from the UV (GALEX) to the far-IR (Herschel) and including crucial AKARI and WISE mid-IR observations (4.5 μm < λ < 24 μm), where the black hole thermal emission is stronger. This new photometric catalog, which includes our best photo-z estimates, is released through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). Groups are identified through a friends-of-friends algorithm (∼62% purity, ∼51% completeness). We identified a total of 45 galaxies requiring an AGN emission component, 35 of which are in groups and 10 in the field. We find the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) ∝ ({M}group}* {)}1.21+/- 0.27 and (BHAR/SFR) ∝ ({M}group}* {)}1.04+/- 0.24, while, in the same range of {M}group}* , we do not observe any sensible change in the numerical fraction of AGNs. Our results indicate that the nuclear activity (i.e., the BHAR and the BHAR/SFR ratio) is enhanced when galaxies are located in more massive and richer groups.

  20. Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved Using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource-Constrained Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Henry; Morrow, Melanie; Davis, Thomas; Borger, Sarah; Weiss, Jennifer; DeCoster, Mary; Ricca, Jim; Ernst, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The Care Group approach, described in detail in a companion paper in this journal, uses volunteers to convey health promotion messages to their neighbors. This article summarizes the available evidence on the effectiveness of the Care Group approach, drawing on articles published in the peer-reviewed literature as well as data from unpublished but publicly available project evaluations and summary analyses of these evaluations. When implemented by strong international NGOs with adequate fundi...

  1. Seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid and the associated brain damage are prevented by group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mares, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-04-01

    The present study has examined the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC) in the model of seizures induced in immature 12-day-old rats by bilateral intracerebroventricular infusion of dl-homocysteic acid (DL-HCA, 600 nmol/side). For biochemical analyses, rat pups were sacrificed during generalized clonic-tonic seizures, approximately 45-50 min after infusion. Comparable time intervals were used for sacrificing the pups which had received 2R,4R-APDC. Low doses of 2R,4R-APDC (0.05 nmol/side) provided a pronounced anticonvulsant effect which was abolished by pretreatment with a selective group II mGluR antagonist LY341495. Generalized clonic-tonic seizures were completely suppressed and cortical energy metabolite changes which normally accompany these seizures were either normalized (decrease of glucose and glycogen) or markedly reduced (an accumulation of lactate). EEG recordings support the marked anticonvulsant effect of 2R,4R-APDC, nevertheless, this was only partial. In spite of the absence of obvious motor phenomena, isolated spikes or even short periods of partial ictal activity could be observed. Isolated spikes could also be seen in some animals after application of 2R,4R-APDC alone, reflecting most likely subclinical proconvulsant activity of this agonist. The neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-APDC was evaluated after 24 h and 6 days of survival following DL-HCA-induced seizures. Massive neuronal degeneration, as revealed by Fluoro-Jade B staining, was observed in a number of brain regions following infusion of DL-HCA alone (seizure group), whereas 2R,4R-APDC pretreatment provided substantial neuroprotection. The present findings support the possibility that group II mGluRs are a promising target for a novel approach to treating epilepsy.

  2. Radiopharmaceutical labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop methods of attaching radionuclides to monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments for use in tumor imaging and internal radiation therapy. Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments are of interest because they enable the selective targeting of tumors. The labeled antibodies could be employed as carriers to transport radioisotopes to tumors, thus minimizing total-body radiation dose and radiation damage to normal tissue. Because the time required for labeled antibodies to find the tumor antigen and deliver the dose to the tumor is estimated to be about 1-3 days, radionuclides with a l- to 3-day half-life would be optimum for this purpose. Two of the radionuclides produced at LAMPF, 67 Cu and 77 Br, have the suitable half-life and nuclear-decay properties for use in tumor imaging or therapy with radiolabeled antibodies. These radionuclides and the efforts to prepare radiolabeled antibodies with them are described. We have used three different approaches to meet this objective of labeling antibodies: (1) labeling chelating agents with metal radionuclides, then conjugating the labeled chelating agents to antibodies; (2) conjugating activated chelating agents to antibodies, followed by metalation with metal radionuclides; and (3) radiobrominating small molecules that can be conjugated to antibodies

  3. Submissions to the Australian and New Zealand Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy support traffic light nutrition labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John; Signal, Louise

    2012-10-01

    Food labels to support healthier choices are an important potential intervention for improving population health by reducing obesity and diet-related disease. This study examines the use of research evidence about traffic light nutrition labelling in submissions to the Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy conducted in Australia and New Zealand. Content analysis of final submissions to the Review and a literature review of documents reporting research evidence about traffic light labelling. Sixty-two submitters to the Review were categorised as 'supporters' of traffic light labelling and 29 as 'opponents'. Supporters focused on studies showing traffic light labels were better than other systems at helping consumers identify healthier food options. Opponents cited evidence that traffic light labels were no better than other systems in this respect and noted a lack of evidence that they led to changes in food consumption. A literature review demonstrated that, as a group, submitters had drawn attention to most of the relevant research evidence on traffic light labelling. Both supporters and opponents were, however, selective in their use of evidence. The weight of evidence suggested that traffic light labelling has strengths in helping consumers to identify healthier food options. Further research would be valuable in informing the development of an interpretive front-of-pack labelling system. The findings have significant implications for the development of front-of-pack nutrition labelling currently being considered in Australia and New Zealand. © 2012 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2012 Public Health Association of Australia.

  4. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 6: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    President Clinton directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary directed the Department of Energy to develop options and plans for the interim safe storage of these materials. One step in this direction is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of DOE facilities by a open-quotes Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group.close quotes In this effort, the working group developed a Project Plan and an Assessment Plan which basically laid out the approach and methodology for the assessments. The plans were issued on April 25, 1994. The Project Plan specifies a WGAT for each site with significant holdings of plutonium. Also, the plan requires that each site form a Site Assessment Team (SAT) to provide the self assessment for the project. Additionally, the working group was tasked with managing the assessments at each site, and providing the results in a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994

  5. Fluorine-18 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijn, J.P. de

    1978-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis deals with the problems involved in the adaption of reactor-produced fluorine-18 to the synthesis of 18 F-labelled organic fluorine compounds. Several 18 F-labelling reagents were prepared and successfully applied. The limitations to the synthetic possibilities of reactor-produced fluoride- 18 become manifest in the last part of the thesis. An application to the synthesis of labelled aliphatic fluoro amino acids has appeared to be unsuccessful as yet, although some other synthetic approaches can be indicated. Seven journal articles (for which see the availability note) are used to compose the four chapters and three appendices. The connecting text gives a survey of known 18 F-compounds and methods for preparing such compounds. (Auth.)

  6. Synthesis of labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, T.W.

    1977-01-01

    Intermediate compounds labeled with 13 C included methane, sodium cyanide, methanol, ethanol, and acetonitrile. A new method for synthesizing 15 N-labeled 4-ethylsulfonyl-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide was developed. Studies were conducted on pathways to oleic-1- 13 C acid and a second pathway investigated was based on carbonation of 8-heptadecynylmagnesium bromide with CO 2 to prepare sterolic acid. Biosynthetic preparations included glucose- 13 C from starch isolated from tobacco leaves following photosynthetic incubation with 13 CO 2 and galactose- 13 C from galactosylglycerol- 13 C from kelp. Research on growth of organisms emphasized photosynthetic growth of algae in which all cellular carbon is labeled. Preliminary experiments were performed to optimize the growth of Escherichia coli on sodium acetate- 13 C

  7. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII): Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII) and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII) is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative) selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII. Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00) programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00). Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3). A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (π) with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative) selection, geographical clustering of haplotypes

  8. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII: Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Yik Fong

    Full Text Available Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII.Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00 programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00. Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3.A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd and nucleotide diversity (π with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative selection, geographical clustering of

  9. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  10. Environmental Labels and Declarations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Jeppe; Hansen, Lisbeth; Bonou, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    Based on the terminology and structure developed by the International Organization for Standardization, a description is given on the types of ecolabels that build on life cycle assessments. Focus is on type I labels that point out products and services with an overall environmental preferability...... of labelling, the use of ecolabels in marketing, and the way ecolabels help build a market for “greener products”. Type III labels—or Environmental Product Declarations—are also briefly described with indicative examples from the building sector, a declaration for office furniture, and an introduction is given...... to the European Commission’s programme for product—and organisational environmental footprints ....

  11. Semantic Role Labeling

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Martha; Xue, Nianwen

    2011-01-01

    This book is aimed at providing an overview of several aspects of semantic role labeling. Chapter 1 begins with linguistic background on the definition of semantic roles and the controversies surrounding them. Chapter 2 describes how the theories have led to structured lexicons such as FrameNet, VerbNet and the PropBank Frame Files that in turn provide the basis for large scale semantic annotation of corpora. This data has facilitated the development of automatic semantic role labeling systems based on supervised machine learning techniques. Chapter 3 presents the general principles of applyin

  12. Large-scale parallel configuration interaction. II. Two- and four-component double-group general active space implementation with application to BiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Fleig, Timo

    2010-01-01

    We present a parallel implementation of a large-scale relativistic double-group configuration interaction CIprogram. It is applicable with a large variety of two- and four-component Hamiltonians. The parallel algorithm is based on a distributed data model in combination with a static load balanci...

  13. Pan-enteric dysmotility, impaired quality of life and alexithymia in a large group of patients meeting ROME II criteria for irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Portincasa, Piero; Moschetta, Antonio; Baldassarre, Giuseppe; Altomare, Donato F.; Palasciano, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Psychological factors, altered motility and sensation disorders of the intestine can be variably associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Such aspects have not been investigated simultaneously. The aim of this paper was to evaluate gastrointestinal motility and symptoms, psychological spectrum and quality of life in a large group of IBS patients in southern Italy.

  14. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXIV. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties of two Cu(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with tetradentate N-donor ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, M.; Potočňák, I.; Dušek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 409, JAN (2014), s. 441-448 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : structure analysis * low-dimensional compounds * cyanido group Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.046, year: 2014

  15. A phase II study of sunitinib in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian and primary peritoneal carcinoma: an NCIC Clinical Trials Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, J J; Oza, A M; Chalchal, H I; Grimshaw, R; Ellard, S L; Lee, U; Hirte, H; Sederias, J; Ivy, S P; Eisenhauer, E A

    2011-02-01

    Sunitinib is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We conducted a two-stage phase II study to evaluate the objective response rate of oral sunitinib in recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Eligibility required measurable disease and one or two prior chemotherapies, at least one platinum based. Platinum-sensitive or -resistant disease was allowed. Initial dose schedule was sunitinib 50 mg daily, 4 of 6 weeks. Observation of fluid accumulations during off-treatment periods resulted in adoption of continuous 37.5 mg daily dosing in the second stage of accrual. Of 30 eligible patients, most had serous histology (67%), were platinum sensitive (73%) and had two prior chemotherapies (60%). One partial response (3.3%) and three CA125 responses (10%) were observed, all in platinum-sensitive patients using intermittent dosing. Sixteen (53%) had stable disease. Five had >30% decrease in measurable disease. Overall median progression-free survival was 4.1 months. Common adverse events included fatigue, gastrointestinal symptoms, hand-foot syndrome and hypertension. No gastrointestinal perforation occurred. Single-agent sunitinib has modest activity in recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, but only at the 50 mg intermittent dose schedule, suggesting that dose and schedule may be vital considerations in further evaluation of sunitinib in this cancer setting.

  16. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part II: 2-Methylfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed. PMID:24518895

  17. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part II: 2-Methylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed.

  18. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip = 2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5 ± 1.4) × 105 M-1 in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  19. The Staphylococcus aureus group II biotin protein ligase BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and requires the DNA binding domain for full enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Sarah K; Cronan, John E

    2016-11-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that functions in transcriptional regulation of the genes of biotin biosynthesis and transport. The Staphylococcus aureus Group II BPL which is called BirA has been reported to bind an imperfect inverted repeat located upstream of the biotin synthesis operon. DNA binding by other Group II BPLs requires dimerization of the protein which is triggered by synthesis of biotinoyl-AMP (biotinoyl-adenylate), the intermediate in the ligation of biotin to its cognate target proteins. However, the S. aureus BirA was reported to dimerize and bind DNA in the absence of biotin or biotinoyl-AMP (Soares da Costa et al. (2014) Mol Microbiol 91: 110-120). These in vitro results argued that the protein would be unable to respond to the levels of biotin or acceptor proteins and thus would lack the regulatory properties of the other characterized BirA proteins. We tested the regulatory function of the protein using an in vivo model system and examined its DNA binding properties in vitro using electrophoretic mobility shift and fluorescence anisotropy analyses. We report that the S. aureus BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and that the prior data can be attributed to artifacts of mobility shift analyses. We also report that deletion of the DNA binding domain of the S. aureus BirA results in loss of virtually all of its ligation activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Part 5: Argonne National Laboratory - west working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Based on the site visit and walkdowns, the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) considers the Site Assessment Team (SAT) report and question sets to be a factual assessment of the facilities. As a result of the Site and WGAT's reviews, six vulnerabilities were identified for further consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group preparing the final report. All six vulnerabilities were discussed among the respective site teams members and facility experts and agreement was reached. The vulnerabilities by facility identified by the SAT and WGAT are described below. No ranking or priority is implied by the order in which they are listed. In addition the WGAT identified and included issues for the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) and DOE line management organizations that are not explicit Environment Safety ampersand Health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities

  1. Inter-Labeler and Intra-Labeler Variability of Condition Severity Classification Models Using Active and Passive Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Nir; Shahar, Yuval; Boland, Mary Regina; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Elovici, Yuval; Hripcsak, George; Moskovitch, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Background and Objectives Labeling instances by domain experts for classification is often time consuming and expensive. To reduce such labeling efforts, we had proposed the application of active learning (AL) methods, introduced our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, and shown its significant reduction of labeling efforts. The use of any of three AL methods (one well known [SVM-Margin], and two that we introduced [Exploitation and Combination_XA]) significantly reduced (by 48% to 64%) condition labeling efforts, compared to standard passive (random instance-selection) SVM learning. Furthermore, our new AL methods achieved maximal accuracy using 12% fewer labeled cases than the SVM-Margin AL method. However, because labelers have varying levels of expertise, a major issue associated with learning methods, and AL methods in particular, is how to best to use the labeling provided by a committee of labelers. First, we wanted to know, based on the labelers’ learning curves, whether using AL methods (versus standard passive learning methods) has an effect on the Intra-labeler variability (within the learning curve of each labeler) and inter-labeler variability (among the learning curves of different labelers). Then, we wanted to examine the effect of learning (either passively or actively) from the labels created by the majority consensus of a group of labelers. Methods We used our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, the three AL methods and the passive learning method, as mentioned above, to induce the classifications models. We used a dataset of 516 clinical conditions and their severity labeling, represented by features aggregated from the medical records of 1.9 million patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center. We analyzed the variance of the classification performance within (intra-labeler), and especially among (inter-labeler) the classification models that were induced by

  2. Preparation of radioactive labelled (57Co) sulfitocobalamin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, J.A.; Horch, C.; Hall, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    Farquharson and Adams have identified sulfitocobalamin (SO3-Cb1) as one of the naturally occurring cobalamins (Cb1s) in foods. We have devised a method of making radioactive labelled SO3-Cb1 for in vivo and in vitro studies of this form of Cb1. Cobalt-57 labelled cyanocobalamin (57Co CN-Cb1) was acid photolyzed to 57Co hydroxocobalamin (57Co OH-Cb1) followed by ligand substitution with SO3-2 ion from aqueous sodium (meta) bisulfite in the dark. The resulting 57Co SO3-Cb1 was purified by organic extraction and cation exchange chromatography. The final preparation was greater than 99% 57Co SO3-Cb1 with an overall yield of greater than 70%, stable for up to four weeks at 20 degrees C in the dark, and capable of binding to the human Cb1 binding proteins Transcobalamin II (TC II), Intrinsic factor (IF), and Salivary R. This method allows a simple 1 day preparation of high specific activity labelled 57Co SO3-Cb 1 for biological studies

  3. Aggressiveness between genetic groups I and II of isolates of Cercospora zeae-maydis Agressividade entre isolados dos grupos genéticos I e II de Cercospora zeae-maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Marisa Mathioni; Carvalho; Kátia Regiane Brunelli; André Beló; Luis Eduardo Aranha Camargo

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the gray leaf spot disease (GLS) caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, was not considered an important pathogen of maize (Zea mays, L.) in Brazil. However, the recent adoption of agronomical practices such as no-tillage and cultivation under central pivot irrigation systems increased the incidence and severity to the extent that GLS is now one of the most important diseases of maize. Isolates of C. zeae-maydis can be distinguished by two genetic groups (...

  4. Influence of Labeling on Ratings of Infants: A Prematurity Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael D.; Ottinger, Donald R.

    Two full term and two preterm infants were videotaped while being administered six items from the Brazelton Scale. Infants were assigned alternately the labels "preterm" and "fullterm" and shown to a group of 256 undergraduate students. It was hypothesized that: (1) subjects who view infants labeled as preterm would rate them lower on objective…

  5. Synthesis of 35S-labeled caerulein (FI 6934)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Ieaki; Murakami, Hironori

    1975-01-01

    FI6934 (Caerulein) is a biologically active decapeptide extracted from the skin of Australian amphibians (Hyla caerulea). For metabolic study of FI6934, we have attempted to label the sulfo group of tyrosine of FI6934 with 35 S. The starting decapeptide was sulfonated with an excess of pyridine-N-sulfonate 35 S, and the 35 S-labelled peptide resulted was deacetylated by hydrolysis in alkaline, purified by paper chromatography to obtained radio chemically pure 35 S-labelled FI6934. The 35 S-labelled FI6934 was identified as a standard FI6934 in physiological activity to contract guinea pig gallbladders. (author)

  6. 15N-labelled pyrazines of triterpenic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlk, Martin; Micolova, Petra; Sarek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Triterpenoid pyrazines from our research group were found selectively cytotoxic on several cancer cell lines with IC 50 in low micromolar range. This sparked our interest in preparing their labeled analogs for metabolic studies. In this work, we prepared a set of non-labeled pyrazines from seven triterpenoid skeletal types along with their 15 N labelled analogs. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of the target 15 N labelled pyrazines. Currently, these compounds are being studied in complex metabolic studies. (author)

  7. Synthesis of /sup 35/S-labeled caerulein (FI 6934)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, I; Murakami, H [Nomura Research Institute, Kanagawa (Japan). Life Sciences Division

    1975-05-01

    FI6934 (Caerulein) is a biologically active decapeptide extracted from the skin of Australian amphibians (Hyla caerulea). For metabolic study of FI6934, we have attempted to label the sulfo group of tyrosine of FI6934 with /sup 35/S. The starting decapeptide was sulfonated with an excess of pyridine-N-sulfonate/sup 35/S, and the /sup 35/S-labelled peptide resulted was deacetylated by hydrolysis in alkaline, purified by paper chromatography to obtained radio chemically pure /sup 35/S-labelled FI6934. The /sup 35/S-labelled FI6934 was identified as a standard FI6934 in physiological activity to contract guinea pig gallbladders.

  8. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  9. Ior-CEA-1: Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    Within the Co-ordinated Programme on Labelling, Quality Control and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies, the IAEA has made a great effort to expand efficient labelling methods, mainly those with radioisotopes which have been used for radioimmunoscintigraphy. In this sense, more recently 99 Tc m has been mostly employed in the majority of the investigations due to its ideal physical characteristics. Efficient labelling of monoclonal antibodies depends on a number of factors including the method and way of the label incorporation into the protein. During the last years several direct labelling approaches have been developed, which led to attain simple and inexpensive methods for medical practice, as well as safe and stable techniques which bring accurate and good quality images. Accordingly, this paper describes the results obtained during last five years which come from the comparison among different labelling systems, passing through the quality control to test the labelled monoclonal stability and the protein bioreactivity, to continue in the clinical evaluation of ior-CEA-1, as well as the evaluation of other antibodies. Up to now we have evaluated more than 70 patients with the anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ior-CEA-1), examined in different clinical assays such as: pilot, phase I-II and extensive phase III-IV trials, whose results are encouraging. It confirms that the employed labelling approach was safe and adequate

  10. Outcome of Children With Metastatic Medulloblastoma Treated With Carboplatin During Craniospinal Radiotherapy: A Children's Oncology Group Phase I/II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakacki, Regina I.; Burger, Peter C.; Zhou, Tianni; Holmes, Emiko J.; Kocak, Mehmet; Onar, Arzu; Goldwein, Joel; Mehta, Minesh; Packer, Roger J.; Tarbell, Nancy; Fitz, Charles; Vezina, Gilbert; Hilden, Joanne; Pollack, Ian F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the feasibility of administering carboplatin as a radiosensitizer during craniospinal radiation therapy (CSRT) to patients with high-risk medulloblastomas (MBs) and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and we report the outcome in the subset with metastatic (M+) MB. Patients and Methods After surgery, patients received 36 Gy CSRT with boosts to sites of disease. During radiation, patients received 15 to 30 doses of carboplatin (30-45 mg/m2/dose), along with vincristine (VCR) once per week for 6 weeks. Patients on regimen A received 6 months of maintenance chemotherapy (MC) with cyclophosphamide and VCR. Once the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of carboplatin was determined, cisplatin was added to the MC (regimen B). Results In all, 161 eligible patients (median age, 8.7 years; range, 3.1 to 21.6 years) were enrolled. Myelosuppression was dose limiting and 35 mg/m2/dose × 30 was determined to be the RP2D of carboplatin. Twenty-nine (36%) of 81 patients with M+ MB had diffuse anaplasia. Four patients were taken off study within 11 months of completing radiotherapy for presumed metastatic progression and are long-term survivors following palliative chemotherapy. Excluding these four patients, 5-year overall survival ± SE and progression-free survival ± SE for M+ patients treated at the RP2D on regimen A was 82% ± 9% and 71% ± 11% versus 68% ± 10% and 59% ± 10% on regimen B (P = .36). There was no difference in survival by M stage. Anaplasia was a negative predictor of outcome. Conclusion The use of carboplatin as a radiosensitizer is a promising strategy for patients with M+ MB. Early progression should be confirmed by biopsy. PMID:22665539

  11. Neuroprotective effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor group II and III activators against MPP(+)-induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: the impact of cell differentiation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantas, D; Greda, A; Golda, S; Korostynski, M; Grygier, B; Roman, A; Pilc, A; Lason, W

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have documented that metabotropic glutamate receptors from group II and III (mGluR II/III) are a potential target in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, the neuroprotective effects of particular mGluR II/III subtypes in relation to PD pathology are recognized only partially. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various mGluR II/III activators in the in vitro model of PD using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line and mitochondrial neurotoxin MPP(+). We demonstrated that all tested mGluR ligands: mGluR II agonist - LY354740, mGluR III agonist - ACPT-I, mGluR4 PAM - VU0361737, mGluR8 agonist - (S)-3,4-DCPG, mGluR8 PAM - AZ12216052 and mGluR7 allosteric agonist - AMN082 were protective against MPP(+)-evoked cell damage in undifferentiated (UN-) SH-SY5Y cells with the highest neuroprotection mediated by mGluR8-specific agents. However, in retinoic acid- differentiated (RA-) SH-SY5Y cells we found protection mediated only by mGluR8 activators. We also demonstrated the cell proliferation stimulating effect for mGluR4 and mGluR8 PAMs. Next, we showed that the protection mediated by mGluR II/III activators in UN-SH-SY5Y was not accompanied by the modulation of caspase-3 activity, however, a decrease in the number of apoptotic nuclei was found. Finally, we showed that the inhibitor of necroptosis, necrostatin-1 blocked the mGluR III-mediated protection. Altogether our comparative in vitro data add a further proof to neuroprotective effects of mGluR agonists or PAMs and point to mGluR8 as a promising target for neuroprotective interventions in PD. The results also suggest the participation of necroptosis-related molecular pathways in neuroprotective effects of mGluR III activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 10: Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of March 15, 1994, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of the inventory of plutonium in storage. Plutonium in intact nuclear weapons and spent fuel were excluded from this study. The DOE Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project and Assessment Plans, will also manage the open-quote snap-shot close-quote assessments and produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The Project Plan and Assessment Plan to accomplish this study, and which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study, were issued on April 25, 1994

  13. Recent progress in fluorine-18 labelled peptide radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okarvi, S.M. [Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2001-07-01

    The application of biologically active peptides labelled with positron-emitting nuclides has emerged as a useful and interesting field in nuclear medicine. Small synthetic receptor-binding peptides are currently the preferred agents over proteins and antibodies for diagnostic imaging of various tumours. Due to the smaller size of peptides, both higher target-to-background ratios and rapid blood clearance can often be achieved with radiolabelled peptides. Hence, short-lived positron emission tomography (PET) isotopes are potential candidates for labelling peptides. Among a number of positron-emitting nuclides, fluorine-18 appears to be the best candidate for labelling bioactive peptides by virtue of its favourable physical and nuclear characteristics. The major disadvantage of labelling peptides with {sup 18}F is the laborious and time-consuming preparation of the {sup 18}F labelling agents. In recent years, various techniques have been developed which allow efficient labelling of peptides with {sup 18}F without affecting their receptor-binding properties. Moreover, the development of a variety of prosthetic groups has facilitated the efficient and site-specific labelling of peptides with {sup 18}F. The {sup 18}F-labelled peptides hold enormous clinical potential owing to their ability to quantitatively detect and characterise a wide variety of human diseases when using PET. Recently, a number of {sup 18}F-labelled bioactive peptides have shown great promise as diagnostic imaging agents. This review presents the recent developments in {sup 18}F-labelled biologically active peptides used in PET. (orig.)

  14. Recent progress in fluorine-18 labelled peptide radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okarvi, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of biologically active peptides labelled with positron-emitting nuclides has emerged as a useful and interesting field in nuclear medicine. Small synthetic receptor-binding peptides are currently the preferred agents over proteins and antibodies for diagnostic imaging of various tumours. Due to the smaller size of peptides, both higher target-to-background ratios and rapid blood clearance can often be achieved with radiolabelled peptides. Hence, short-lived positron emission tomography (PET) isotopes are potential candidates for labelling peptides. Among a number of positron-emitting nuclides, fluorine-18 appears to be the best candidate for labelling bioactive peptides by virtue of its favourable physical and nuclear characteristics. The major disadvantage of labelling peptides with 18 F is the laborious and time-consuming preparation of the 18 F labelling agents. In recent years, various techniques have been developed which allow efficient labelling of peptides with 18 F without affecting their receptor-binding properties. Moreover, the development of a variety of prosthetic groups has facilitated the efficient and site-specific labelling of peptides with 18 F. The 18 F-labelled peptides hold enormous clinical potential owing to their ability to quantitatively detect and characterise a wide variety of human diseases when using PET. Recently, a number of 18 F-labelled bioactive peptides have shown great promise as diagnostic imaging agents. This review presents the recent developments in 18 F-labelled biologically active peptides used in PET. (orig.)

  15. Competing Environmental Labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Carolyn; Lyon, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    We study markets in which consumers prefer green products but cannot determine the environmental quality of any given firm's product on their own. A nongovernmental organization (NGO) can establish a voluntary standard and label products that comply with it. Alternatively, industry can create its

  16. The Language of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Darcy

    2005-01-01

    The author describes how the language of labels and her own cultural biases affect how she approaches teaching her students with disabilities. The author examines how the mythopoetic narratives of our past force us to examine the underlying assumptions of our culture that are expressed within our language and how understanding our own linguistic…

  17. Labeling of Cosmetic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Lionetti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The labeling of cosmetic products provides a set of obligations, as reported in the Regulation 1223/2009, which came into force in Europe in July 2013. The indications reported on the label are intended to enable the clear identification of the functionality and proper use of cosmetics, ensure the protection of the consumer from the commercial aspects and, above all, from the safety point of view. Moreover, it should allow quick tracing of the product details and all info of toxicological relevance. However, the misuse of this tool often leads, on one side, to confusion among cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and biocides. On the other side, it gives rise to fanciful interpretations by a huge number of web users, who pretend to be able to judge the quality of a cosmetic product just by reading the ingredients list. This article points out the concrete purpose of cosmetic labels, in order to shed light on the use of certain categories of ‘controversial’ ingredients and on the real quality concepts of cosmetic products. Indeed, when properly interpreted, cosmetic labels represent a good tool for the professional investigation of adverse reactions to cosmetics.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page 7, Label Training, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  19. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXVIII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of two copper(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with 1,2-diaminopropane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, Martin; Potočňák, Ivan; Dušek, Michal; Čižmár, Erik; Ozerov, Mykhaylo; Zvyagin, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Violet crystals of ([Cu(pn) 2 ] 2 [Pt(CN) 4 ])[Pt(CN) 4 ]·2H 2 O (1, pn=1,2-diaminopropane) and blue crystals of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n ·nH 2 O (2) were prepared under hydrothermal conditions and characterized using elemental analysis, IR and UV–vis spectroscopy and by X-ray crystal structure analysis. Different number of ν(C≡N) absorption bands of these two compounds reflects their different structures. An X-ray crystal structure analysis has shown that complex 1 is of ionic character and is formed from trinuclear [Cu(pn) 2 –Pt(CN) 4 –Cu(pn) 2 ] 2+ complex cation and discrete [Pt(CN) 4 ] 2– anion together with two molecules of crystal water. On the other hand, complex 2 is of polymeric character and is formed by 2D networks of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n composition and completed by n molecules of crystal water. Magnetic measurements show the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange interaction in complex 1 (Θ=–0.2 K), while the magnetic susceptibility of complex 2 is well described by the model of uniform S=1/2 spin chain with exchange interaction J/k B =–1.64 K. - Graphical abstract: Two complexes of different structural types from the system Cu(II) – 1,2–diaminopropane – [Pt(CN) 4 ] 2– have been isolated. These were characterized by IR and UV–VIS spectroscopy, X–ray crystal structure analysis together with the magnetic measurements. On one hand ([Cu(pn) 2 ] 2 [Pt(CN) 4 ])[Pt(CN) 4 ]∙2H 2 O is of ionic character and is formed from trinuclear complex cation and discrete anion together with two molecules of crystal water. On the other hand, [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n ∙nH 2 O is of polymeric character and is formed by 2D networks of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n composition and completed by n molecules of crystal water. - Highlights: • Two complexes of different compositions from one system have been isolated. • First complex is of ionic character and second one is of polymeric character. • Polymeric complex described as a spin chain in contrast to

  20. Physical aspects of total-body irradiation at the Middlesex Hospital (UCL group of hospitals), London 1988 - 1993: II. In vivo planning and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planskoy, B.; Tapper, P. D.; Bedford, A. M.; Davis, F. M.

    1996-11-01

    Part II of this paper gives the results of applying the TBI methods described in part I, to in vivo patient planning and dosimetry. Patients are planned on nine CT based body slices, five of which pass through the lungs. Planned doses are verified with ten silicon diodes applied bi-laterally to five body sites, at each treatment. LiF TLDs are applied to seven other body sites at the first treatment only. For 84 patients and at least 1016 measurements per body site with the diodes, the mean measured total doses agreed with planned doses within at most 2% except at lung levels, where the mean measured dose was 3% too low. Standard deviations of the measurements about the mean were between 2.4 and 3.1%. For the LiF TLDs, the mean measured doses for all seven body sites were within of planned doses. A separate assessment of measured entrance and transmitted doses showed that the former agreed well with planned doses, but that the latter tended to be low, especially over the lungs, and that they had a wider dispersion. Possible reasons for this are discussed. These results show measurement uncertainties similar to those for non-TBI treatments of Nilsson et al, Leunens et al and Essers et al. An analysis of the treatment plans showed a mean dose inhomogeneity in the body (75 patients, nine slices) of (1 s.d.) and in the lungs (40 patients, five slices) of (1 s.d.). The conclusions are that, overall, the methods are reasonably satisfactory but that, with an extra effort, even closer agreement between measured and planned doses and a further limited reduction in the body dose inhomogeneity could be obtained. However, if it were thought desirable to make a substantial reduction in the dose inhomogeneity in the body and lungs, this could only be achieved with the available equipment by changing from lateral to anterior - posterior irradiation and any potential advantages of this change would have to be balanced against a likely deterioration in patient comfort and an

  1. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus carboplatin plus paclitaxel in platinum sensitive ovarian cancer patients: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briasoulis Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-based combinations are the standard second-line treatment for platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC. This randomized phase II study was undertaken in order to compare the combination of carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (LD with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP in this setting. Methods Patients with histologically confirmed recurrent OC, at the time of or more than 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy, were randomized to six cycles of CP (carboplatin AUC5 + paclitaxel 175 mg/m2, d1q21 or CLD (carboplatin AUC5 + pegylated LD 45 mg/m2, d1q28. Results A total of 189 eligible patients (CP 96, CLD 93, with a median age of 63 years, median Performance Status (PS 0 and a median platinum free interval (PFI of 16.5 months, entered the study. Discontinuation due to toxicity was higher in the CP patients (13.5% versus 3%, P = 0.016. The overall response rate was similar: CP 58% versus CLD 51%, P = 0.309 (Complete Response; CR 34% versus 23% and there was no statistical difference in time-to-progression (TTP or overall survival (OS; TTP 10.8 months CP versus 11.8 CLD, P = 0.904; OS 29.4 months CP versus 24.7 CLD, P = 0.454. No toxic deaths were recorded. Neutropenia was the most commonly seen severe toxicity (CP 30% versus CLD 35%. More frequent in CLD were severe thrombocytopenia (11% versus 2%, P = 0.016, skin toxicity and Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE grade 1-2 (38% versus 9%, PP = 0.029, 20% versus 5%, P = 0.003. PS and PFI were independent prognostic factors for TTP and OS. Conclusions The combination of pegylated LD with carboplatin is effective, showing less neurotoxicity and alopecia than paclitaxel-carboplatin. It thus warrants a further phase III evaluation as an alternative treatment option for platinum-sensitive OC patients. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000436279

  2. Mature Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing 5-Flourouracil with Leucovorin to 5-Flourouracil with Levamisole as Adjuvant Therapy of Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer- The Israel Cooperative Oncology Group (ICOG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Figer, Aviram Nissan, Adi Shani, Riva Borovick, Mariana Stiener, Mario Baras, Herbert R. Freund, Aaron Sulkes, Alexander Stojadinovic, Tamar Peretz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was shown in patients with Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. This study evaluates long-term (10-year outcome in patients with CRC randomly assigned to adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5FU+LV or 5-FU/Levamisole (5FU+LEV.Methods: Between 1990 and 1995, 398 patients with curatively resected Stage II-III CRC were randomly assigned to adjuvant 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV for 12 months.Results: No difference was evident in 10-year relapse-free or overall survival between study groups. Grade III toxicity was similar between groups; however, neurotoxicity was significantly greater with 5FU+LEV (p=0.02 and gastrointestinal toxicity with 5FU+LV (p=0.03. Female patients treated with 5FU+LEV had improved overall survival.Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment of CRC is still based on leucovorin modulated fluorouracil. The long-term follow-up results of this trial indicate that the adjuvant treatment of Stage II-III CRC with 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV is equally effective. The finding of improved survival in female subjects treated with 5FU+LEV warrants further study to determine if Levamisole is a better modulator of 5-FU than Leucovorin in this patient subset.

  3. Patient-reported outcomes of deferasirox (Exjade, ICL670) versus deferoxamine in sickle cell disease patients with transfusional hemosiderosis. Substudy of a randomized open-label phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Pakbaz, Zahra; Onyekwere, Onyinye; Porter, John; Swerdlow, Paul; Coates, Thomas; Lane, Peter; Files, Beatrice; Mueller, Brigitta U; Coïc, Lena; Forni, Gian Luca; Fischer, Roland; Marks, Peter; Rofail, Diana; Abetz, Linda; Baladi, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence demonstrating the value of transfusions in sickle cell disease (SCD). However, resultant iron overload can be life threatening if untreated. Chelation therapy with deferoxamine requires parenteral infusions that can negatively impact quality of life and adherence to treatment. As part of a phase II trial, SCD patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. One hundred and ninety-five patients were randomized (2:1) to receive oral deferasirox (5-30 mg/kg/day) or deferoxamine (20-50 mg/kg, 5 days per week); 121 had previously received deferoxamine. At each time point, significantly more patients who had previously received deferoxamine were 'satisfied/very satisfied' with deferasirox, or found treatment to be 'convenient/very convenient' compared with deferoxamine (p < 0.001). In these patients, fewer hours were lost from daily activities with deferasirox than deferoxamine treatment. Most patients (77%) preferred deferasirox, and more were willing to continue taking deferasirox than deferoxamine at end-of-study (84 vs. 11%, respectively). Patients with SCD are therefore more satisfied with deferasirox, which has a lower impact on daily activities than deferoxamine. Given the high levels of satisfaction, it is likely that quality of life will be improved. These results also suggest that treatment adherence with deferasirox may be better than with deferoxamine, which should lead to improved long-term outcomes. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Innovation management based on proactive engagement of customers: A case study on LEGO Group. Part II: Challenge of engaging the digital customer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasilcăi, S.; Rusu, G.

    2015-11-01

    To foster the development of innovative products and new technologies, nowadays companies use an open innovation system, encouraging stakeholders to contribute, using the companies’ online platforms for open innovation or social media, bringing and sharing creative solutions and ideas in order to respond to challenging needs the company directly expresses. Accordingly, the current research continues the analysis of the LEGO Group innovation efforts, aiming to provide a case study approach based on describing the most important projects and online instruments company uses to interact with customers and other external stakeholders. Thus, by analysing the experience of the company in developing projects of involving stakeholders in the innovation processes, the article emphasizes the objective of these past projects developed by LEGO Group, outlining their objectives regarding the focus on the product or process innovation, the team management and stakeholders involved in the innovation actions and the results they obtained. Moreover, the case study highlights the features of the most important online instruments LEGO Group uses at the moment for engaging LEGO fans, children, parents, and other external stakeholders in developing new LEGO sets. Thus, LEGO online instruments provide the opportunity for customers to be creative and to respond to LEGO management team challenges. Accordingly, LEGO involve customers in bringing innovative ideas for LEGO sets through LEGO Ideas instrument, which aims to engage customers in submitting projects, voting and supporting ideas and also sharing them on social media. Also, the research emphasizes the role of supporting the open dialogue and interaction with customers and other external stakeholders through LEGO.com Create & Share Galleries instrument, using their creativity to upload innovative models in the public galleries. The continuous challenges LEGO launches for their fans create a long-term connection between company and

  5. Spin labels. Applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangopol, T.P.; Frangopol, M.; Ionescu, S.M.; Pop, I.V.; Benga, G.

    1980-11-01

    The main applications of spin labels in the study of biomembranes, enzymes, nucleic acids, in pharmacology, spin immunoassay are reviewed along with the fundamentals of the spin label method. 137 references. (author)

  6. Development of labelled biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga de Murphy, C.

    2000-01-01

    The scope of the co-ordinated research project (Dec 15 1997) included the following activities: 1) develop coupling techniques using bifunctional chelating agents for monoclonal antibodies and peptides, 2) optimised radiolabelling procedures and reaction parameters using Sm-153 and Re-188, 3) investigate direct methods of labelling monoclonal antibodies and peptides with Re-188. 4) initiate animal distribution studies. The modifications specified for the period 1999/02/15 to 2000/02/14 are as follows: a) continue with the optimisation of Re-188-peptide labelling, b) continue with the work to prepare a kit, c) in-vivo and in-vitro studies, d) lanreotide labelling. The group formed by researchers from several Mexican Institutions have worked together and in different aspects of the CRP in order to fulfil the proposed aims (our published work listed)

  7. Labelling of castor oil for myocardial studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaba, E.; Al-Suhybani, A.; Zaki, F.S.; Abdullah, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The labelling of castor oil, hydrolysed castor oil and oleic acid was investigated by the iodine monochloride and chloramine-T methods. The effect of the iodinating agent and the concentration of castor oil on the labelling yield was studied. A comparative pharmacological study with analog aliphatic fatty acids was carried out. Castor oil labelled with iodine monochloride concentrated in the heart and liver in good proportion, better than other natural fatty acids and nearly equal to analog aliphatic fatty acids. An infra-red study showed that the OH group of the ricinoleic acid apparently protects the 125 I added on the double bond, with minor changes in biochemical properties and better uptake by the heart muscle. (author)

  8. Development of labelled biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga de Murphy, C [Instituto Nacional de la Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, Mexico D.F. (Mexico). E-mail: cmurphy at data.net.mx

    2000-07-01

    The scope of the co-ordinated research project (Dec 15 1997) included the following activities: 1) develop coupling techniques using bifunctional chelating agents for monoclonal antibodies and peptides, 2) optimised radiolabelling procedures and reaction parameters using Sm-153 and Re-188, 3) investigate direct methods of labelling monoclonal antibodies and peptides with Re-188. 4) initiate animal distribution studies. The modifications specified for the period 1999/02/15 to 2000/02/14 are as follows: a) continue with the optimisation of Re-188-peptide labelling, b) continue with the work to prepare a kit, c) in-vivo and in-vitro studies, d) lanreotide labelling. The group formed by researchers from several Mexican Institutions have worked together and in different aspects of the CRP in order to fulfil the proposed aims (our published work listed)

  9. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  10. Highly sensitive, colorimetric detection of mercury(II) in aqueous media by quaternary ammonium group-capped gold nanoparticles at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingbin; Qu, Weisi; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Jiang, Xingyu

    2010-12-01

    We provide a highly sensitive and selective assay to detect Hg(2+) in aqueous solutions using gold nanoparticles modified with quaternary ammonium group-terminated thiols at room temperature. The mechanism is the abstraction of thiols by Hg(2+) that led to the aggregation of nanoparticles. With the assistance of solar light irradiation, the detection limit can be as low as 30 nM, which satisfies the guideline concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water set by the WHO. In addition, the dynamic range of detection is wide (3 × 10(-8)-1 × 10(-2) M). This range, to our best knowledge, is the widest one that has been reported so far in gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based assays for Hg(2+).

  11. Evaluation of Countermeasures Effectiveness in a Radioactively Contaminated Urban Area Using METRO-K : The Implementation of Scenarios Designed by the EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Jeong, Hae Sun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2012-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group within the EMRAS-2 (Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety, Phase 2), which has been supported by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), has designed some types of accidental scenarios to test and improve the capabilities of models used for evaluation of radioactive contamination in urban areas. For the comparison of the results predicted from the different models, the absorbed doses in air were analyzed as a function of time following the accident with consideration of countermeasures to be taken. Two kinds of considerations were performed to find the dependency of the predicted results. One is the 'accidental season', i.e. summer and winter, in which an event of radioactive contamination takes place in a specified urban area. Likewise, the 'rainfall intensity' on the day of an event was also considered with the option of 1) no rain, 2) light rain, and 3) heavy rain. The results predicted using a domestic model of METRO-K have been submitted to the Urban Areas Working Group for the intercomparison with those of other models. In this study, as a part of these results using METRO-K, the countermeasures effectiveness in terms of dose reduction was analyzed and presented for the ground floor of a 24-story business building in a specified urban area. As a result, it was found that the countermeasures effectiveness is distinctly dependent on the rainfall intensity on the day of an event, and season when an event takes place. It is related to the different deposition amount of the radionuclides to the surfaces and different behavior on the surfaces following a deposition, and different effectiveness from countermeasures. In conclusion, a selection of appropriate countermeasures with consideration of various environmental conditions may be important to minimize and optimize the socio-economic costs as well as radiation-induced health detriments.

  12. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 8: Argonne National Laboratory - East and New Brunswick Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group Assessment Team No. 1 (WGAT-1) visited Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), located at the ANL-Illinois site, from May 23 through May 27 and June 6 through June 10, 1994. The objective of the WGAT-1, the ANL-E Site Assessment Team (SAT), and the NBL SAT was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities arising at ANL-E and NBL from the storage and handling of the Department's current plutonium holdings. During the first visit to the site (May 23-27), WGAT-1 toured various site facilities and, after each tour, met with SAT members to conduct 'table-top' discussions. In addition, various briefings were given to ANL-E management, NBL management, and DOE management. During the second visit (June 6-10), WGAT-1 completed their assessment report, and met with various site technical representatives

  13. Albumin microspheres labeled with Ga-67 by chelation: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Schlegel, P.

    1981-01-01

    Albumin microspheres have been synthesized with EDTA and DTPA chelating groups covalently bound to their surface. The microspheres may be labeled with Ga-67 at high yield (97 +- 2%) by transcomplexation from a 0.1 M Ga-67 acetate solution. With EDTA microspheres the resulting label dissociates only slightly after 24 hr in 50% plasma at 37 0 C, whereas with DTPA microspheres the label shows no detectable dissociation over this period. By contrast, microspheres without chelating groups lose their label virtually completely under these conditions. Following intravenous administration of sized Ga-67 DTPA microspheres in mice, about (84 +- 16)% of the activity localizes in the lungs at 5 min, with (60 +- 7)% remaining after 2 h. Since labeling is by chelation, the microspheres may also be tagged with other metallic radionuclides

  14. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  15. Effect of an interactive text-messaging service on patient retention during the first year of HIV care in Kenya (WelTel Retain): an open-label, randomised parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kop, Mia Liisa; Muhula, Samuel; Nagide, Patrick I; Thabane, Lehana; Gelmon, Lawrence; Awiti, Patricia Opondo; Abunah, Bonface; Kyomuhangi, Lennie Bazira; Budd, Matthew A; Marra, Carlo; Patel, Anik; Karanja, Sarah; Ojakaa, David I; Mills, Edward J; Ekström, Anna Mia; Lester, Richard Todd

    2018-03-01

    Retention of patients in HIV care is crucial to ensure timely treatment initiation, viral suppression, and to avert AIDS-related deaths. We did a randomised trial to determine whether a text-messaging intervention improved retention during the first year of HIV care. This unmasked, randomised parallel-group study was done at two clinics in informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya. Eligible participants were aged 18 years or older, HIV-positive, had their own mobile phone or access to one, and were able to use simple text messaging (or have somebody who could text message on their behalf). Participants were randomly assigned (1:1), with random block sizes of 2, 4, and 6, to the intervention or control group. Participants in the intervention group received a weekly text message from the automated WelTel service for 1 year and were asked to respond within 48 h. Participants in the control group did not receive text messages. Participants in both groups received usual care, which comprised psychosocial support and counselling; patient education; CD4 cell count; treatment; screening for tuberculosis, opportunistic infections, and sexually transmitted infections; prevention of mother-to-child transmission and family planning services; and up to two telephone calls for missed appointments. The primary outcome was retention in care at 12 months (ie, clinic attendance 10-14 months after the first visit). Participants who did not attend this 12-month appointment were traced, and we considered as retained those who were confirmed to be active in care elsewhere. The data analyst and clinic staff were masked to the group assignment, whereas participants and research nurses were not. We analysed the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01630304. Between April 4, 2013, and June 4, 2015, we screened 1068 individuals, of whom 700 were recruited. 349 people were allocated to the intervention group and 351 to the control group

  16. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy in rectal cancer Until Surgery (BACCHUS): a phase II, multicentre, open-label, randomised study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone in patients with high-risk cancer of the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glynne-Jones, R.; Hava, N.; Goh, V.; Bosompem, S.; Bridgewater, J.

    2015-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) is the standard of care, but the risk of local recurrence is low with good quality total mesorectal excision (TME), although many still develop metastatic disease. Current challenges in treating rectal cancer include the development of effective organ-preserving approaches and the prevention of subsequent metastatic disease. Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy (NACT) alone may reduce local and systemic recurrences, and may be more effective than postoperative treatments which often have poor compliance. Investigation of intensified NACT is warranted to improve outcomes for patients with LARC. The objective is to evaluate feasibility and efficacy of a four-drug regimen containing bevacizumab prior to surgical resection. This is a multi-centre, randomized phase II trial. Eligible patients must have histologically confirmed LARC with distal part of the tumour 4–12 cm from anal verge, no metastases, and poor prognostic features on pelvic MRI. Sixty patients will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive folinic acid + flurourcil + oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) + bevacizumab (BVZ) or FOLFOX + irinotecan (FOLFOXIRI) + BVZ, given in 2 weekly cycles for up to 6 cycles prior to TME. Patients stop treatment if they fail to respond after 3 cycles (defined as ≥ 30 % decrease in Standardised Uptake Value (SUV) compared to baseline PET/CT). The primary endpoint is pathological complete response rate. Secondary endpoints include objective response rate, MRI tumour regression grade, involved circumferential resection margin rate, T and N stage downstaging, progression-free survival, disease-free survival, overall survival, local control, 1-year colostomy rate, acute toxicity, compliance to chemotherapy. In LARC, a neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen - if feasible, effective and tolerable would be suitable for testing as the novel arm against the current standards of short course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT

  17. Modeling the effects of labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Fjord, Thomas Ahle; Poulsen, Carsten Stig

    A new approach to evaluate the consequences of labeling is presented and applied to test the potential effect of a label on fresh fish. Labeling effects on quality perceptions and overall quality are studied. The empirical study is based on an experimental design and nearly 500 respondents...

  18. Evaluating Varied Label Designs for Use with Medical Devices: Optimized Labels Outperform Existing Labels in the Correct Selection of Devices and Time to Select.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bix

    Full Text Available Effective standardization of medical device labels requires objective study of varied designs. Insufficient empirical evidence exists regarding how practitioners utilize and view labeling.Measure the effect of graphic elements (boxing information, grouping information, symbol use and color-coding to optimize a label for comparison with those typical of commercial medical devices.Participants viewed 54 trials on a computer screen. Trials were comprised of two labels that were identical with regard to graphics, but differed in one aspect of information (e.g., one had latex, the other did not. Participants were instructed to select the label along a given criteria (e.g., latex containing as quickly as possible. Dependent variables were binary (correct selection and continuous (time to correct selection.Eighty-nine healthcare professionals were recruited at Association of Surgical Technologists (AST conferences, and using a targeted e-mail of AST members.Symbol presence, color coding and grouping critical pieces of information all significantly improved selection rates and sped time to correct selection (α = 0.05. Conversely, when critical information was graphically boxed, probability of correct selection and time to selection were impaired (α = 0.05. Subsequently, responses from trials containing optimal treatments (color coded, critical information grouped with symbols were compared to two labels created based on a review of those commercially available. Optimal labels yielded a significant positive benefit regarding the probability of correct choice ((P<0.0001 LSM; UCL, LCL: 97.3%; 98.4%, 95.5%, as compared to the two labels we created based on commercial designs (92.0%; 94.7%, 87.9% and 89.8%; 93.0%, 85.3% and time to selection.Our study provides data regarding design factors, namely: color coding, symbol use and grouping of critical information that can be used to significantly enhance the performance of medical device labels.

  19. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group II - Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Fikret Tözüm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 2 was to review and update the existing data concerning clinical and genetic methods of diagnostics of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF overview including analysis of enzymes and biomarkers and microbial profiles from implants. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  20. Ion Sensor Properties of Fluorescent Schiff Bases Carrying Dipicolylamine Groups. A Simple Spectrofluorimetric Method to Determine Cu (II) in Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlı, Elvan; Mısır, Miraç Nedim; Alp, Hakan; Ak, Tuğba; Özbek, Nurhayat; Ocak, Ümmühan; Ocak, Miraç

    2017-09-01

    Four fluorescent Schiff bases carrying dipicolylamine groups were designed and synthesized to determine their ion sensor properties in partial aqueous solution. The corresponding amine compound and the aldehyde compounds such as 1-naphthaldehyde, 9-anthraldehyde, phenanthrene-9-carboxaldehyde and 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde were used to prepare the new Schiff bases. The influence of many metal cations and anions on the spectroscopic properties of the ligands was investigated in ethanol-water (1:1) by means of emission spectrometry. From the spectrofluorimetric titrations, the complexation stoichiometry and complex stability constants of the ligands with Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ and Hg 2+ ions were determined. The ligands did not interact with the anions. However, the Schiff base derived from phenanthrene-9-carboxaldehyde showed sensitivity for Cu 2+ among the tested metal ions. The phenanthrene-based Schiff base was used as analytical ligand for the simple and fast determination of Cu 2+ ion in water samples. A modified standard addition method was used to eliminate matrix effect. The linear range was from 0.3 mg/L to 3.8 μg/L. Detection and quantification limits were 0.14 and 0.43 mg/L, respectively. Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) for copper in drinking water according to EPA is 1.3 mg/L. The proposed method has high sensitivity to determine copper in drinking waters.