WorldWideScience

Sample records for Lyman Alpha Emission

  1. The Lyman alpha reference sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, M.; Östlin, G.; Schaerer, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028

  2. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  3. Lyman alpha emission in nearby star-forming galaxies with the lowest metallicities and the highest [OIII]/[OII] ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Yuri

    2017-08-01

    The Lyman alpha line of hydrogen is the strongest emission line in galaxies and the tool of predilection for identifying and studying star-forming galaxies over a wide range of redshifts, especially in the early universe. However, it has become clear over the years that not all of the Lyman alpha radiation escapes, due to its resonant scattering on the interstellar and intergalactic medium, and absorption by dust. Although our knowledge of the high-z universe depends crucially on that line, we still do not have a complete understanding of the mechanisms behind the production, radiative transfer and escape of Lyman alpha in galaxies. We wish here to investigate these mechanisms by studying the properties of the ISM in a unique sample of 8 extreme star-forming galaxies (SFGs) that have the highest excitation in the SDSS spectral data base. These dwarf SFGs have considerably lower stellar masses and metallicities, and higher equivalent widths and [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 ratios compared to all nearby SFGs with Lyman alpha emission studied so far with COS. They are, however, very similar to the dwarf Lyman alpha emitters at redshifts 3-6, which are thought to be the main sources of reionization in the early Universe. By combining the HST/COS UV data with data in the optical range, and using photoionization and radiative transfer codes, we will be able to study the properties of the Lyman alpha in these unique objects, derive column densities of the neutral hydrogen N(HI) and compare them with N(HI) obtained from the HeI emission-line ratios in the optical spectra. We will derive Lyman alpha escape fractions and indirectly Lyman continuum escape fractions.

  4. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-01-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10 11 photons/cm 2 /s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10 11 photons/cm 2 /s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error

  5. THE LYMAN ALPHA REFERENCE SAMPLE: EXTENDED LYMAN ALPHA HALOS PRODUCED AT LOW DUST CONTENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Matthew [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Oestlin, Goeran; Duval, Florent; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Sandberg, Andreas [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Schaerer, Daniel [CNRS, IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Verhamme, Anne; Orlitova, Ivana [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Oti-Floranes, Hector [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofisica, POB 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada (Spain); Adamo, Angela [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Herenz, E. Christian [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Kunth, Daniel [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Laursen, Peter, E-mail: matthew@astro.su.se [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-03-10

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Ly{alpha}), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028 < z < 0.18 in continuum-subtracted Ly{alpha}, H{alpha}, and the far ultraviolet continuum. We show that Ly{alpha} is emitted on scales that systematically exceed those of the massive stellar population and recombination nebulae: as measured by the Petrosian 20% radius, R{sub P20}, Ly{alpha} radii are larger than those of H{alpha} by factors ranging from 1 to 3.6, with an average of 2.4. The average ratio of Ly{alpha}-to-FUV radii is 2.9. This suggests that much of the Ly{alpha} light is pushed to large radii by resonance scattering. Defining the Relative Petrosian Extension of Ly{alpha} compared to H{alpha}, {xi}{sub Ly{alpha}} = R {sup Ly{alpha}}{sub P20}/R {sup H{alpha}}{sub P20}, we find {xi}{sub Ly{alpha}} to be uncorrelated with total Ly{alpha} luminosity. However, {xi}{sub Ly{alpha}} is strongly correlated with quantities that scale with dust content, in the sense that a low dust abundance is a necessary requirement (although not the only one) in order to spread Ly{alpha} photons throughout the interstellar medium and drive a large extended Ly{alpha} halo.

  6. Detection of 3-Minute Oscillations in Full-Disk Lyman-alpha Emission During A Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, R. O.; Ireland, J.; Fleck, B.; Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.; Dennis, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    We report the detection of chromospheric 3-minute oscillations in disk-integrated EUV irradiance observations during a solar flare. A wavelet analysis of detrended Lyman-alpha (from GOES/EUVS) and Lyman continuum (from SDO/EVE) emission from the 2011 February 15 X-class flare revealed a 3-minute period present during the flare's main phase. The formation temperature of this emission locates this radiation to the flare's chromospheric footpoints, and similar behaviour is found in the SDO/AIA 1600A and 1700A channels, which are dominated by chromospheric continuum. The implication is that the chromosphere responds dynamically at its acoustic cutoff frequency to an impulsive injection of energy. Since the 3-minute period was not found at hard X-ray energies (50-100 keV) in RHESSI data we can state that this 3-minute oscillation does not depend on the rate of energization of, or energy deposition by, non-thermal electrons. However, a second period of 120 s found in both hard X-ray and chromospheric emission is consistent with episodic electron energization on 2-minute timescales. Our finding on the 3-minute oscillation suggests that chromospheric mechanical energy should be included in the flare energy budget, and the fluctuations in the Lyman-alpha line may influence the composition and dynamics of planetary atmospheres during periods of high activity.

  7. Galex Lyman-alpha Emitters: Physical Properties, Luminosity Bimodality, And Morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Ryan P.

    2010-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer spectroscopic survey has uncovered a large statistically significant sample of Lyman-alpha emitters at z sim0.3. ACS imaging of these sources in the COSMOS and AEGIS deep fields reveals that these Lyman-alpha emitters consist of two distinct galaxy morphologies, face on spiral galaxies and compact starburst/merging systems. The morphology bimodality also results in a bimodal distribution of optical luminosity. A comparison between the UV photometry and MIPS 24 micron detections of these sources indicates that they are bluer, and have less dust extinction than similar star forming galaxies that lack Lyman-alpha detection. Our findings show how the global gas and dust distribution of star forming galaxies inhibits Lyman-alpha emission in star forming galaxies. GALEX is a NASA Small Explorer, launched in April 2003. We gratefully acknowledge NASA's support for construction, operation, and science analysis for the GALEX mission, developed in cooperation with the CNES of France and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology.

  8. [O III] EMISSION AND GAS KINEMATICS IN A LYMAN-ALPHA BLOB AT z {approx} 3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLinden, Emily M. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hibon, Pascale [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Tilvi, Vithal [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We present spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] emission line from two subregions of strong Ly{alpha} emission in a radio-quiet Lyman-alpha blob (LAB). The blob under study is LAB1 at z {approx} 3.1, and the [O III] detections are from the two Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) embedded in the blob halo. The [O III] measurements were made with LUCIFER on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope and NIRSPEC on 10 m Keck Telescope. Comparing the redshift of the [O III] measurements to Ly{alpha} redshifts from SAURON allows us to take a step toward understanding the kinematics of the gas in the blob. Using both LUCIFER and NIRSPEC we find velocity offsets between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} redshifts that are modestly negative or consistent with 0 km s{sup -1} in both subregions studied (ranging from -72 {+-} 42- + 6 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1}). A negative offset means Ly{alpha} is blueshifted with respect to [O III] a positive offset then implies Ly{alpha} is redshifted with respect to [O III]. These results may imply that outflows are not primarily responsible for Lyman alpha escape in this LAB, since outflows are generally expected to produce a positive velocity offset. In addition, we present an [O III] line flux upper limit on a third region of LAB1, a region that is unassociated with any underlying galaxy. We find that the [O III] upper limit from the galaxy-unassociated region of the blob is at least 1.4-2.5 times fainter than the [O III] flux from one of the LBG-associated regions and has an [O III] to Ly{alpha} ratio measured at least 1.9-3.4 times smaller than the same ratio measured from one of the LBGs.

  9. Study of interplanetary hydrogen from Lyman alpha emission and absorption determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazes, Serge.

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of the work submitted in this paper is to contribute to the study of interplanetary hydrogen from Lyman alpha emission and absorption measurements, carried out on board the D2A, OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites. This study, which was undertaken from the D2A satellite, moved us to study the interplanetary environment as from observations made from the following experiments placed on board the OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites. The experiment set up on board the OSO-8 satellite made it possible to obtain the profile of the solar alpha Lyman emission. An absorption profile was observed for the first time on these profiles and this made it possible to attribute them to interplanetary hydrogen and enabled us to make a direct and local determination of the solar ionization rate. - The spectrometer set up on board Copernicus made it possible to obtain the emission spectrum of the interplanetary environment at the same time as the geocorona. The overall velocity of the interplanetary environment was deduced from the Doppler shift between the two spectra. In the first part, the principle of the REA and POLAR experiments is recalled but only the REA experiment is described in detail, particularly the problems arising from the construction and calibration of the cell. In the second part, a study of the interplanetary environment made from the D2A determinations is presented in synthesized form. On the other hand, the study to which theses initial results led us is presented in detail. Finally, in the third part, the results obtained by means of the OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites are given [fr

  10. THE LYMAN ALPHA REFERENCE SAMPLE: EXTENDED LYMAN ALPHA HALOS PRODUCED AT LOW DUST CONTENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Sandberg, Andreas; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitová, Ivana; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Adamo, Angela; Atek, Hakim; Cannon, John M.; Herenz, E. Christian; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028 P20 , Lyα radii are larger than those of Hα by factors ranging from 1 to 3.6, with an average of 2.4. The average ratio of Lyα-to-FUV radii is 2.9. This suggests that much of the Lyα light is pushed to large radii by resonance scattering. Defining the Relative Petrosian Extension of Lyα compared to Hα, ξ Lyα = R Lyα P20 /R Hα P20 , we find ξ Lyα to be uncorrelated with total Lyα luminosity. However, ξ Lyα is strongly correlated with quantities that scale with dust content, in the sense that a low dust abundance is a necessary requirement (although not the only one) in order to spread Lyα photons throughout the interstellar medium and drive a large extended Lyα halo.

  11. Development of Flight Slit-Jaw Optics for Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Masahito; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Hara, Hirohisa; Narukage, Noriyuki; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kobiki, Toshihiko; hide

    2015-01-01

    In sounding rocket experiment CLASP, I have placed a slit a mirror-finished around the focal point of the telescope. The light reflected by the mirror surface surrounding the slit is then imaged in Slit-jaw optical system, to obtain the alpha-ray Lyman secondary image. This image, not only to use the real-time image in rocket flight rocket oriented direction selection, and also used as a scientific data showing the spatial structure of the Lyman alpha emission line intensity distribution and solar chromosphere around the observation area of the polarimetric spectroscope. Slit-jaw optical system is a two off-axis mirror unit part including a parabolic mirror and folding mirror, Lyman alpha transmission filter, the optical system magnification 1x consisting camera. The camera is supplied from the United States, and the other was carried out fabrication and testing in all the Japanese side. Slit-jaw optical system, it is difficult to access the structure, it is necessary to install the low place clearance. Therefore, influence the optical performance, the fine adjustment is necessary optical elements are collectively in the form of the mirror unit. On the other hand, due to the alignment of the solar sensor in the US launch site, must be removed once the Lyman alpha transmission filter holder including a filter has a different part from the mirror unit. In order to make the structure simple, stray light measures Aru to concentrate around Lyman alpha transmission filter. To overcome the difficulties of performing optical alignment in Lyman alpha wavelength absorbed by the atmosphere, it was planned following four steps in order to reduce standing time alignment me. 1: is measured in advance refractive index at Lyman alpha wavelength of Lyman alpha transmission filter (121.567nm), to prepare a visible light Firuwo having the same optical path length in the visible light (630nm). 2: The mirror structure CLASP before mounting unit standing, dummy slit and camera standing

  12. Lyman-alpha detector designed for rocket measurements of the direct solar radiation at 121.5 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guineva, V.; Tashev, V.; Witt, G.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.

    2007-01-01

    Rocket measurements of the direct Lyman-alpha radiation penetrating in the atmosphere were planned during the HotPay I rocket experiment, June 2006, Project ASLAF (Attenuation of the Solar Lyman-Alpha Flux), Andoya Rocket Range (ARR), Norway. The basic goal of ASLAF project was the study of the processes in the summer mesosphere and thermosphere (up to 110 km), at high latitudes using the Lyman-alpha measurements. The resonance transition 2 P- 2 S of the atomic hydrogen (Lyman-alpha emission) is the strongest and most conspicuous feature in the solar EUV spectrum. Due to the favourable circumstance, that the Lyman-alpha wavelength (121.5 nm) coincides with a minimum of the O 2 absorption spectrum, the direct Lyman-alpha radiation penetrates well in the mesosphere. The Lyman-alpha radiation is the basic agent of the NO molecules ionization, thus generating the ionospheric D-layer, and of the water vapour photolysis, being one of the main H 2 O loss processes. The Lyman-alpha radiation transfer depends on the resonance scattering from the hydrogen atoms in the atmosphere and on the O 2 absorption. Since the Lyman-alpha extinction in the atmosphere is a measure for the column density of the oxygen molecules, the atmospheric temperature profile can be calculated thereof. The detector of solar Lyman-alpha radiation was manufactured in the Stara Zagora Department of the Solar-Terrestrial Influences Laboratory (STIL). Its basic part is an ionization chamber, filled in with NO. A 60 V power supply is applied to the chamber. The produced photoelectric current from the sensor is fed to a 2-channels amplifier, providing an analogue signal. The characteristics of the Lyman-alpha detector were studied. It passed successfully all tests and the results showed that the instrument could be used in rocket experiments to measure the Lyman-alpha flux. From the measurements of the detector, the Lyman-alpha vertical profile can be obtained. The forthcoming scientific data analysis will

  13. Lyman alpha SMM/UVSP absolute calibration and geocoronal correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    Lyman alpha observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft were analyzed and provide instrumental calibration details. Specific values of the instrument quantum efficiency, Lyman alpha absolute intensity, and correction for geocoronal absorption are presented.

  14. Interpreting HST observations with simulations of reionization: the ionizing photon budget and the decline of Lyman-alpha emission in z>6 dropouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aloisio, Anson

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, HST surveys such as CANDELS, HUDF, BoRG/HIPPIES, ERS, and the Frontier Fields, have made possible the first robust measurements of the rest-frame UV luminosity function of z =6-10 galaxies, spanning much of the redshift range over which reionization likely occurred. These measurements provide an estimate of the galactic ionizing photon output, addressing the critical question of whether these galaxies could have reionized the Universe. In addition, follow-up spectroscopy has measured the fraction of these galaxies that show Lyman-alpha emission. Interestingly, a dramatic decrease in this fraction above z 6 has been observed, and this evolution has (controversially) been interpreted as evidence that much of reionization happened over z=6-8 (as intergalactic neutral gas leads to large damping wings that scatter the Lyman-alpha line). The clumpiness of the IGM and how it self shields to ionizing photons impacts whether the observed population of galaxies can reionize the Universe, as well as the interpretation of the evolving Lyman-alpha emitter fraction. We propose to run fully coupled radiative-hydrodynamics simulations that are the first to resolve the evaporation of small structures by passing ionization fronts and, hence, to accurately assess the level of clumpiness and self-shielding from the IGM. Our study will nail down the clumping factor used to assess whether the observed population of galaxies can drive reionization, and it will address whether neutral self-shielding clumps in recently reionized regions can scatter galaxies' Lyman-alpha lines.

  15. Chromospheric Lyman-alpha spectro-polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryouhei; Bando, Takamasa; Narukage, Noriyuki; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Tsuneta, Saku; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Hara, Hirohisa; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Sakao, Taro; Goto, Motoshi; Kato, Yoshiaki; Imada, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Ken; Holloway, Todd; Winebarger, Amy; Cirtain, Jonathan; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Štepán, Jiří; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Belluzzi, Luca; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Auchère, Frédéric; Carlsson, Mats

    2012-09-01

    One of the biggest challenges in heliophysics is to decipher the magnetic structure of the solar chromosphere. The importance of measuring the chromospheric magnetic field is due to both the key role the chromosphere plays in energizing and structuring the outer solar atmosphere and the inability of extrapolation of photospheric fields to adequately describe this key boundary region. Over the last few years, significant progress has been made in the spectral line formation of UV lines as well as the MHD modeling of the solar atmosphere. It is found that the Hanle effect in the Lyman-alpha line (121.567 nm) is a most promising diagnostic tool for weaker magnetic fields in the chromosphere and transition region. Based on this groundbreaking research, we propose the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) to NASA as a sounding rocket experiment, for making the first measurement of the linear polarization produced by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in the Lyman-alpha line (121.567 nm), and making the first exploration of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun. The CLASP instrument consists of a Cassegrain telescope, a rotating 1/2-wave plate, a dual-beam spectrograph assembly with a grating working as a beam splitter, and an identical pair of reflective polarization analyzers each equipped with a CCD camera. We propose to launch CLASP in December 2014.

  16. Weighing the Low-Redshift Lyman-alpha Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In 2003-2004, our FUSE research group prepared several major surveys of the amount of baryonic matter in the intergalactic medium (IGM), using the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. These surveys include measurements of the Lyman-alpha absorption line of neutral hydrogen (H I), the far-ultraviolet (1032,1038 Angstrom) doublet of highly ionized oxygen ( O VI), the higher Lyman-series lines (Ly-beta, Ly-gamma, etc) of H I, and the 977 Angstrom line of c III. As an overview, our FUSE spectroscopic studies, taken together with data from the Hubble Space Telescope, show that approximately 30% of the normal matter is contained in intergalactic hydrogen gas clouds (the Lyman-alpha forest). Another 5-10% resides in hotter gas at temperatures of 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 6) K, visible in 0 VI and C III absorption. Along with the matter attributed to galaxies, we have now accounted for approximately HALF of all the baryonic matter in the universe. Where is the other half? That matter my exist in even hotter gas, invisible through the ultraviolet absorption lines, but perhaps detectable through X-ray absorption lines of more highly ionized oxygen and neon.

  17. A reliable cw Lyman-{alpha} laser source for future cooling of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, Daniel, E-mail: kolbed@uni-mainz.de; Beczkowiak, Anna; Diehl, Thomas; Koglbauer, Andreas; Sattler, Matthias; Stappel, Matthias; Steinborn, Ruth; Walz, Jochen [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate a reliable continuous-wave (cw) laser source at the 1 S-2 P transition in (anti)hydrogen at 121.56 nm (Lyman-{alpha}) based on four-wave sum-frequency mixing in mercury. A two-photon resonance in the four-wave mixing scheme is essential for a powerful cw Lyman-{alpha} source and is well investigated.

  18. Are the brightest Lyman Alpha Emitters at z=5.7 primeval galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, Christopher; Jones, Heath; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Pompei, Emanuela; Tapken, Christian; Vanzi, Leonardo; Westra, Eduard

    2008-03-01

    Wide-field, narrow-band surveys have proven to be effective at finding very high redshift galaxies that emit brightly in the Lyman alpha line, the so-called Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs). It was through this technique that the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxy, a galaxy at z=6.96, was discovered. Considerable effort is currently being spent on discovering these galaxies at ever higher redshifts by extending this technique into the near-IR. In contrast to this effort, there has been relatively little work on understanding these galaxies. In particular, how do LAEs relate to other high redshift galaxies, such as the galaxies discovered through broad band drop out techniques, and, perhaps, more importantly, what role do LAEs play in re-ionising the universe. We recently discovered two extremely luminous LAEs at z=5.7. These LAEs are among the brightest LAEs ever discovered at this redshift. In a recent paper by Mao et al. the brightest LAEs are associated to the most massive halos. We propose to use the IRAC 3.6 micron imager on Spitzer to measure the rest-frame optical flux of the these LAEs. With additional data from the near-IR (rest-frame UV) and very deep optical spectra around the Lyman alpha line, we propose to make a detailed study of the spectral energy distribution from the Lyman alpha line to the rest frame optical of these exceptional LAEs. These data will enable us to estimate the age and mass of the stellar burst that produces the Lyman alpha line, to estimate the contribution from an older stellar population, if any, and to estimate the fraction of Lyman continuum photons that can escape the galaxy and are thus available to reionise the universe.

  19. Clasp/SJ Observation of Time Variations of Lyman-Alpha Emissions in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, S.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on September 3, 2015 to investigate the solar chromosphere, and the slit-jaw (SJ) optical system took Lya images with the high time cadence of 0.6 s. By the CLASP/SJ observation, many time variations in the solar chromosphere with the time scale of region and investigated the short (regions. As the result, we found the regions. On the other hand, the <30 s time variations had no dependency on the temperature of the loop.

  20. Lyman-alpha clouds as a relic of primordial density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.R.; Szalay, A.S.; Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    Primordial density fluctuations are studied using a CDM model and primordial clouds some of which are expanding, driven by pressure gradients created when the medium is photionized, and some of which are massive enough to continue collapsing in spite of the pressure. Normalization of CDM models to the clustering properties on large scales are used to predict the parameters of collapsing clouds of subgalactic mass at early epochs. It is shown that the abundance and dimensions of these clouds are comparable to those of the Lyman-alpha systems. The evolutionary history of the clouds is computed, utilizing a spherically symmetric hydrodynamics code with the dark matter treated as a collisionless fluid, and the H I column density distribution is evaluated as a function of N(H I) and redshift. The observed cloud parameters come out naturally in the CDM model and suggest that Lyman-alpha clouds are the missing link between primordial density fluctuations and the formation of galaxies. 31 references

  1. Recovering the systemic redshift of galaxies from their Lyman-alpha line profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhamme, A.; Garel, T.; Ventou, E.; Contini, T.; Bouché, N.; Herenz, E. C.; Richard, J.; Bacon, R.; Schmidt, K. B.; Maseda, M.; Marino, R. A.; Brinchmann, J.; Cantalupo, S.; Caruana, J.; Clément, B.; Diener, C.; Drake, A. B.; Hashimoto, T.; Inami, H.; Kerutt, J.; Kollatschny, W.; Leclercq, F.; Patrício, V.; Schaye, J.; Wisotzki, L.; Zabl, J.

    2018-04-01

    The Lyman alpha (Lyα) line of Hydrogen is a prominent feature in the spectra of star-forming galaxies, usually redshifted by a few hundreds of km s-1 compared to the systemic redshift. This large offset hampers follow-up surveys, galaxy pair statistics and correlations with quasar absorption lines when only Lyα is available. We propose diagnostics that can be used to recover the systemic redshift directly from the properties of the Lyα line profile. We use spectroscopic observations of Lyman-Alpha Emitters (LAEs) for which a precise measurement of the systemic redshift is available. Our sample contains 13 sources detected between z ≈ 3 and z ≈ 6 as part of various Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) Guaranteed Time Observations (GTO). We also include a compilation of spectroscopic Lyα data from the literature spanning a wide redshift range (z ≈ 0 - 8). First, restricting our analysis to double-peaked Lyα spectra, we find a tight correlation between the velocity offset of the red peak with respect to the systemic redshift, V_peak^red, and the separation of the peaks. Secondly, we find a correlation between V_peak^red and the full width at half maximum of the Lyα line. Fitting formulas, to estimate systemic redshifts of galaxies with an accuracy of ≤100 km s-1 when only the Lyα emission line is available, are given for the two methods.

  2. The Lyman Alpha Imaging-Monitor Experiment (LAIME) for TESIS/CORONAS-PHOTON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, L.; Koutchmy, S.; Kuzin, S.; Lamy, P.; Malherbe, J.-M.; Noëns, J.-C.

    LAIME the Lyman Alpha Imaging-Monitor Experiment is a remarkably simple no mechanisms and compact 100x100x400 mm full Sun imager to be flown with TESIS on the CORONAS-PHOTON mission launch expected before mid-2008 As such it will be the only true chromospheric imager to be flown in the next years supporting TESIS EUV-XUV imaging SDO and the Belgian LYRA Lyman Alpha flux monitor on the ESA PROBA-2 microsatellite launch expected in September 2007 We will give a short description of this unique O60 mm aperture imaging telescope dedicated to the investigating of the magnetic sources of solar variability in the UV and chromospheric and coronal disruptive events rapid waves Moreton waves disparitions brusques of prominences filaments eruptions and CMEs onset The resolution pixel is 2 7 arcsec the field of view 1 4 solar radius and the acquisition cadence could be as high as 1 image minute The back thinned E2V CCD in the focal plane is using frame transfer to avoid shutter and mechanisms Further more the double Lyman Alpha filtering allows a 40 AA FWHM bandwidth and excellent rejection yet providing a vacuum seal design of the telescope MgF2 entrance window Structural stability of the telescope focal length 1 m is preserved by a 4-INVAR bars design with Aluminium compensation in a large pm 10 o around 20 o

  3. Comparison of Lyman-alpha and LI-COR infrared hygrometers for airborne measurement of turbulent fluctuations of water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Astrid; Hartmann, Jörg; Pätzold, Falk; Lobitz, Lennart; Hecker, Peter; Kohnert, Katrin; Larmanou, Eric; Serafimovich, Andrei; Sachs, Torsten

    2018-05-01

    To investigate if the LI-COR humidity sensor can be used as a replacement of the Lyman-alpha sensor for airborne applications, the measurement data of the Lyman-alpha and several LI-COR sensors are analysed in direct intercomparison flights on different airborne platforms. One vibration isolated closed-path and two non-isolated open-path LI-COR sensors were installed on a Dornier 128 twin engine turbo-prop aircraft. The closed-path sensor provided absolute values and fluctuations of the water vapour mixing ratio in good agreement with the Lyman-alpha. The signals of the two open-path sensors showed considerable high-frequency noise, and the absolute value of the mixing ratio was observed to drift with time in this vibrational environment. On the helicopter-towed sensor system Helipod, with very low vibration levels, the open-path LI-COR sensor agreed very well with the Lyman-alpha sensor over the entire frequency range up to 3 Hz. The results show that the LI-COR sensors are well suited for airborne measurements of humidity fluctuations, provided that a vibrationless environment is given, and this turns out to be more important than close sensor spacing.

  4. Lyman continuum observations of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. E.; Noyes, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of Lyman continuum observations of solar flares, using data obtained by the EUV spectroheliometer on the Apollo Telescope Mount. It is found that there are two main types of flare regions: an overall 'mean' flare coincident with the H-alpha flare region, and transient Lyman continuum kernels which can be identified with the H-alpha and X-ray kernels observed by other authors. It is found that the ground level hydrogen population in flares is closer to LTE than in the quiet sun and active regions, and that the level of Lyman continuum formation is lowered in the atmosphere from a mass column density .000005 g/sq cm in the quiet sun to .0003 g/sq cm in the mean flare, and to .001 g/sq cm in kernels. From these results the amount of chromospheric material 'evaporated' into the high temperature region is derived, which is found to be approximately 10 to the 15th g, in agreement with observations of X-ray emission measures.

  5. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, P.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, D.; Beabout, B.; Stewart, M.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1 percent in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1 percent polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30 percent) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-alpha line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with 10 e-/pixel/second dark current, 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 1.0 percent residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  6. Are the brightest Lyman Alpha Emitters at zD5.7 primeval galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, Christopher; Hayes, Matthew; Jones, Heath; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Tapken, Christian; Westra, Eduard

    2009-04-01

    Wide-field, narrow-band surveys have proven to be effective at finding very high redshift galaxies that emit brightly in the Lyman alpha line - the so-called Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs). It was through this technique that the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxy, a galaxy at zD6.96 (Iye et al. 2006), was discovered. Considerable effort is currently being spent on discovering these galaxies at ever higher redshifts by extending this technique into the near-IR. In contrast to this effort, there has been relatively little work on understanding these galaxies. In particular, how do LAEs relate to other high redshift galaxies, such as those discovered through drop out techniques, and, more importantly, what role LAEs play in re-ionising the universe, if any. We recently discovered two extremely luminous LAEs at zD5.7. These LAEs are among the brightest LAEs ever discovered at this redshift. In a recent paper by Mao et al. (2007), the brightest LAEs are associated to the most massive halos. One of these targets was successfully observed with the IRAC 3.6 micron imager on Spitzer during cycle 5. These data, when combined with constraints that we derive from our deep ground-based spectroscopic data, indicate that the bulk of the flux at 3.6 microns comes from a stellar population that is considserably older than the stars that dominate the flux in the UV. We propose to complete the project and image the second target. These data will enable us to estimate the age and mass of the stellar burst that produces the Lyman alpha line, to estimate the contribution from an older stellar population and to estimate the fraction of Lyman continuum photons that escape the galaxy and are thus available to re-ionise the universe.

  7. The Lyman-alpha signature of the first galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron

    2018-01-01

    Radiation from the first stars and galaxies initiated the dramatic phase transition marking an end to the cosmic dark ages. The emission and absorption signatures from the Lyman-alpha (Lyα) transition of neutral hydrogen have been indispensable in extending the observational frontier for high-redshift galaxies into the epoch of reionization. Lyα radiative transfer provides clues about the processes leading to Lyα escape from individual galaxies and the subsequent transmission through the intergalactic medium. Cosmological simulations incorporating Lyα radiative transfer enhance our understanding of fundamental physics by supplying the inferred spectra and feedback on the gas. In this talk, I will discuss the dynamical impact of Lyα radiation pressure on galaxy formation throughout cosmic reionization with the first fully coupled Lyα radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. Based on a suite of spherically symmetric models and high-resolution ab initio cosmological simulations we find that Lyα radiation pressure is dynamically important during the assembly of direct collapse black holes (DCBHs), which may be the seeds of the first supermassive black holes in the universe. Finally, I will discuss recent advances in Lyα modeling based on current state-of-the-art simulations and observational insights.

  8. A Sounding Rocket Experiment for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Tsuneta, S.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, S.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Goto, M.; Holloway, T.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Casini, R.; Auchère, F.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Belluzzi, L.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Štěpán, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2014-10-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment called the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is presently under development to measure the linear polarization profiles in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) line at 121.567 nm. CLASP is a vacuum-UV (VUV) spectropolarimeter to aim for first detection of the linear polarizations caused by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in the Lyα line with high accuracy (0.1%). This is a fist step for exploration of magnetic fields in the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun. Accurate measurements of the linear polarization signals caused by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in strong UV lines like Lyα are essential to explore with future solar telescopes the strength and structures of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun. The CLASP proposal has been accepted by NASA in 2012, and the flight is planned in 2015.

  9. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, Patrick; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Cirtin, Jonathan; Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Beabout, Brent; Beabout, Dyana; Stewart, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1% in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1% polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30%) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with =10 e- /pixel/second dark current, = 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 and =0.1% residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  10. Lyman series profiles: From laser-plasmas to white dwarf stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielkopf, J.F. [University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40292 (United States); Allard, N.F. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France and Institut d Astrophysique, Paris (France)

    1999-04-01

    The low energy interactions of neutral and ionized hydrogen atoms are fundamental processes which also have important applications to the diagnostics of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Satellites in the far wings of Lyman {alpha} and Lyman {beta} have been identified as ultraviolet absorption features in the spectra of white dwarf and {lambda} Bootis stars, and they are seen in the emission spectra of plasmas produced when a pulsed laser excites a target H{sub 2} gas. The observed Lyman series profiles agree with unified line shape theory which includes variation of the dipole transition moment during the radiative collision. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of ions by Lyman alpha radiation in gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, S; Letokhov, V

    2001-01-26

    One of the mysteries of nebulae in the vicinity of bright stars is the appearance of bright emission spectral lines of ions, which imply fairly high excitation temperatures. We suggest that an ion formation mechanism, based on resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) by intense H Lyman alpha radiation (wavelength of 1215 angstroms) trapped inside optically thick nebulae, can produce these spectral lines. The rate of such an ionization process is high enough for rarefied gaseous media where the recombination rate of the ions formed can be 10(-6) to 10(-8) per second for an electron density of 10(3) to 10(5) per cubic centimeter in the nebula. Under such conditions, the photo-ions formed may subsequently undergo further RETPI, catalyzed by intense He i and He ii radiation, which also gets enhanced in optically thick nebulae that contain enough helium.

  12. Performance Characterization of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, R. K.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A. R.; Champey, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket instrument which is currently being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). The goal of this instrument is to observe and detect the Hanle effect in the scattered Lyman-Alpha UV (121.6nm) light emitted by the Sun's Chromosphere to make measurements of the magnetic field in this region. In order to make accurate measurements of this effect, the performance characteristics of the three on-board charge-coupled devices (CCDs) must meet certain requirements. These characteristics include: quantum efficiency, gain, dark current, noise, and linearity. Each of these must meet predetermined requirements in order to achieve satisfactory performance for the mission. The cameras must be able to operate with a gain of no greater than 2 e-/DN, a noise level less than 25e-, a dark current level which is less than 10e-/pixel/s, and a residual non-linearity of less than 1%. Determining these characteristics involves performing a series of tests with each of the cameras in a high vacuum environment. Here we present the methods and results of each of these performance tests for the CLASP flight cameras.

  13. Correlations in the three-dimensional Lyman-alpha forest contaminated by high column density absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Bird, Simeon; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Pontzen, Andrew; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Leistedt, Boris

    2018-05-01

    Correlations measured in three dimensions in the Lyman-alpha forest are contaminated by the presence of the damping wings of high column density (HCD) absorbing systems of neutral hydrogen (H I; having column densities N(H I) > 1.6 × 10^{17} atoms cm^{-2}), which extend significantly beyond the redshift-space location of the absorber. We measure this effect as a function of the column density of the HCD absorbers and redshift by measuring three-dimensional (3D) flux power spectra in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the Illustris project. Survey pipelines exclude regions containing the largest damping wings. We find that, even after this procedure, there is a scale-dependent correction to the 3D Lyman-alpha forest flux power spectrum from residual contamination. We model this residual using a simple physical model of the HCD absorbers as linearly biased tracers of the matter density distribution, convolved with their Voigt profiles and integrated over the column density distribution function. We recommend the use of this model over existing models used in data analysis, which approximate the damping wings as top-hats and so miss shape information in the extended wings. The simple `linear Voigt model' is statistically consistent with our simulation results for a mock residual contamination up to small scales (|k| account for the effect of the highest column density absorbers on the smallest scales (e.g. |k| > 0.4 h Mpc^{-1} for small damped Lyman-alpha absorbers; HCD absorbers with N(H I) ˜ 10^{21} atoms cm^{-2}). However, these systems are in any case preferentially removed from survey data. Our model is appropriate for an accurate analysis of the baryon acoustic oscillations feature. It is additionally essential for reconstructing the full shape of the 3D flux power spectrum.

  14. Analysis of coronal H I Lyman alpha measurements from a rocket flight on 1979 April 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.; Kohl, J. L.; Weiser, H.; Noci, G.; Munro, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that measurements of the profiles of resonantly scattered hydrogen Lyman-alpha coronal radiation have been used in determining hydrogen kinetic temperatures from 1.5 to 4 solar radii from sun center in a quiet region of the corona. Proton temperatures derived using the line widths decrease with height from 2.6 x 10 to the 6th K at 1.5 solar radii to 1.2 x 10 to the 6th K at 4 solar radii. These measurements, together with temperatures for lower heights determined from earlier Skylab and eclipse data, suggest that there is a maximum in the quiet coronal proton temperature at about 1.5 solar radii. Comparison of measured Lyman-alpha intensities with those calculated using a representative model for the radial variation of the coronal electron density yields information on the magnitude of the electron temperature gradient and suggests that the solar wind flow was subsonic for distances less than 4 solar radii.

  15. Lenses in the forest: cross correlation of the Lyman-alpha flux with cosmic microwave background lensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallinotto, Alberto; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N; Viel, Matteo

    2009-08-28

    We present a theoretical estimate for a new observable: the cross correlation between the Lyman-alpha flux fluctuations in quasar spectra and the convergence of the cosmic microwave background as measured along the same line of sight. As a first step toward the assessment of its detectability, we estimate the signal-to-noise ratio using linear theory. Although the signal-to-noise is small for a single line of sight and peaks at somewhat smaller redshifts than those probed by the Lyman-alpha forest, we estimate a total signal-to-noise of 9 for cross correlating quasar spectra of SDSS-III with Planck and 20 for cross correlating with a future polarization based cosmic microwave background experiment. The detection of this effect would be a direct measure of the neutral hydrogen-matter cross correlation and could provide important information on the growth of structures at large scales in a redshift range which is still poorly probed.

  16. The Faint End of the Lyman Alpha Luminosity Function at 2 < z < 3.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Yaswant; Livermore, Rachael; Indahl, Briana; Wold, Isak; Davis, Dustin; Finkelstein, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Most current models predict that our universe is mostly composed of small, dim galaxies. Due to these galaxies being so faint, it is very difficult to study these types of galaxies outside of our local universe. This is particularly an issue for studying how these small galaxies evolved over their lifetimes. With the benefit of gravitational lensing, however, we are able to observe galaxies that are farther and fainter than ever before possible. In this particular study, we focus on Lyman-Alpha emitting galaxies between the redshifts of 2-3.8, so that we may study these galaxies during the epoch of peak star formation in the universe. We use the McDonald Observatory 2.7, Harlan Smith telescope with the VIRUS-P IFU spectrograph to observe several Hubble Frontier Field lensing clusters to spectroscopically discover faint galaxies over this redshift range. In addition to providing insight into the faint-end slope of the Lyman alpha luminosity function, the spectroscopic redshifts will allow us to better constrain the mass models of the foreground clusters, such as Abell 370, so that we may better understand lensing effects for this and future studies.

  17. Continuous coherent Lyman-alpha excitation of atomic hydrogen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikema, K.S.E.; Waltz, J.; Hänsch, T.

    2001-01-01

    The first near natural linewidth of the 1S-2P transition in atomic hydrogen was reported with a high degree of accuracy. A high yield of continuous Lyman-α radiation based on four wave mixing in mercury was employed. It was shown that laser cooloing and detection with Lyman-α radiation has excellent

  18. Ultraviolet photometry from the orbiting astronomical observatory. XVI - The stellar Lyman-alpha absorption line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, B. D.; Panek, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stellar Lyman-alpha line at 1216 A was observed in 29 lightly reddened stars of spectral type B2.5 to B9 by a far-UV spectrophotometer on OAO-2. The equivalent widths obtained range from 15 A at type B2.5 to 65 A at type B8; in the late-B stars, the L-alpha line removes 2 to 3% of the total stellar flux. In this sampling, the strength of the L-alpha line correlates well with measures of the Balmer discontinuity and Balmer line strengths; luminosity classification does not seem to affect the line strength. The observed line widths also agree with the predictions of Mihala's grid of non-LTE model atmospheres. In some cases, the L-alpha line influences the interstellar column densities reported in the interstellar OAO-2 L-alpha survey. Hence, these data toward lightly reddened B2 and B1.5 stars should be regarded as upper limits only.

  19. The Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of Emission Line-selected z ∼ 2.5 Galaxies Is Less Than 15%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Hayes, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova University Centre, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Scarlata, Claudia; Mehta, Vihang [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Henry, Alaina; Hathi, Nimish; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cohen, Seth; Windhorst, Rogier [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Haardt, Francesco [DiSAT, Università dellInsubria, via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Siana, Brian [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Recent work suggests that strong emission line, star-forming galaxies (SFGs) may be significant Lyman continuum leakers. We combine archival Hubble Space Telescope broadband ultraviolet and optical imaging (F275W and F606W, respectively) with emission line catalogs derived from WFC3 IR G141 grism spectroscopy to search for escaping Lyman continuum (LyC) emission from homogeneously selected z ∼ 2.5 SFGs. We detect no escaping Lyman continuum from SFGs selected on [O ii] nebular emission ( N = 208) and, within a narrow redshift range, on [O iii]/[O ii]. We measure 1 σ upper limits to the LyC escape fraction relative to the non-ionizing UV continuum from [O ii] emitters, f {sub esc} ≲ 5.6%, and strong [O iii]/[O ii] > 5 ELGs, f {sub esc} ≲ 14.0%. Our observations are not deep enough to detect f {sub esc} ∼ 10% typical of low-redshift Lyman continuum emitters. However, we find that this population represents a small fraction of the star-forming galaxy population at z ∼ 2. Thus, unless the number of extreme emission line galaxies grows substantially to z ≳ 6, such galaxies may be insufficient for reionization. Deeper survey data in the rest-frame ionizing UV will be necessary to determine whether strong line ratios could be useful for pre-selecting LyC leakers at high redshift.

  20. The Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of Emission Line-selected z ∼ 2.5 Galaxies Is Less Than 15%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Hayes, Matthew; Scarlata, Claudia; Mehta, Vihang; Henry, Alaina; Hathi, Nimish; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Cohen, Seth; Windhorst, Rogier; Teplitz, Harry I.; Haardt, Francesco; Siana, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Recent work suggests that strong emission line, star-forming galaxies (SFGs) may be significant Lyman continuum leakers. We combine archival Hubble Space Telescope broadband ultraviolet and optical imaging (F275W and F606W, respectively) with emission line catalogs derived from WFC3 IR G141 grism spectroscopy to search for escaping Lyman continuum (LyC) emission from homogeneously selected z ∼ 2.5 SFGs. We detect no escaping Lyman continuum from SFGs selected on [O ii] nebular emission ( N = 208) and, within a narrow redshift range, on [O iii]/[O ii]. We measure 1 σ upper limits to the LyC escape fraction relative to the non-ionizing UV continuum from [O ii] emitters, f _e_s_c ≲ 5.6%, and strong [O iii]/[O ii] > 5 ELGs, f _e_s_c ≲ 14.0%. Our observations are not deep enough to detect f _e_s_c ∼ 10% typical of low-redshift Lyman continuum emitters. However, we find that this population represents a small fraction of the star-forming galaxy population at z ∼ 2. Thus, unless the number of extreme emission line galaxies grows substantially to z ≳ 6, such galaxies may be insufficient for reionization. Deeper survey data in the rest-frame ionizing UV will be necessary to determine whether strong line ratios could be useful for pre-selecting LyC leakers at high redshift.

  1. Generation of continuous coherent radiation at Lyman-alpha and 1S-2P Spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pahl, A.; Fendel, P.; Henrich, B.R.; Walz, J.; Hansch, T.W.; Eikema, K.S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous coherent radiation from wavelengths from 121 to 123 nm in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) was generated by four-wave sum-frequency mixing in mercury vapor. A yield of 20 nW at Lyman-alpha (121.57 nm) was achieved. We describe the experimental setup in detail and present a calculation of the

  2. Diagnostics of the Solar Wind and Global Heliosphere with LymanEmission Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, E. P.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Laming, J. M.; Strachan, L.; Wood, B. E.; Katushkina, O. A.; Ko, Y.-K.; Tun Beltran, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2018-02-01

    We propose to develop an instrument measuring full sky intensity maps and spectra of interplanetary Lymanemission to reveal the global solar wind variability and the nature of the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium.

  3. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE UV-CONTINUUM AND Ly{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z > 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Linhua; Egami, Eiichi; Walth, Gregory [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kashikawa, Nobunari [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Matsuda, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nagao, Tohru [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Ota, Kazuaki [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 77-8582 (Japan)

    2011-12-10

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations of z > 6 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The candidates were selected as i'-dropout objects down to z' = 27 AB magnitudes from an ultra-deep SDF z'-band image. With the Keck spectroscopy we identified 19 LBGs with prominent Ly{alpha} emission lines at 6 {<=} z {<=} 6.4. The median value of the Ly{alpha} rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) is {approx}50 A, with four EWs >100 A. This well-defined spectroscopic sample spans a UV-continuum luminosity range of -21.8 {<=} M{sub UV} {<=} -19.5 (0.6 {approx} 5 L*{sub UV}) and a Ly{alpha} luminosity range of (0.3-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-3 L*{sub Ly{alpha}}). We derive the UV and Ly{alpha} luminosity functions (LFs) from our sample at (z) {approx} 6.2 after we correct for sample incompleteness. We find that our measurement of the UV LF is consistent with the results of previous studies based on photometric LBG samples at 5 < z < 7. Our Ly{alpha} LF is also generally in agreement with the results of Ly{alpha}-emitter surveys at z {approx} 5.7 and 6.6. This study shows that deep spectroscopic observations of LBGs can provide unique constraints on both the UV and Ly{alpha} LFs at z > 6.

  4. Solar Lyman-Alpha Polarization Observation of the Chromosphere and Transition Region by the Sounding Rocket Experiment CLASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Hara, Hiroshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Giono, Gabriel; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman a line (Ly(alpha) line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly(alpha) lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approx. 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly(alpha) line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly(alpha) line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (> 50%) in Lya line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (Science was achieved a high throughput as a device for a vacuum ultraviolet ray of the entire system less than 5% (CCD of QE is not included).

  5. New evidence from the Lyman-alpha forest concerning the formation of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A M

    1986-12-17

    A new type of survey for galaxies with z > 2 is described. The idea is to search for the spectroscopic imprint that the H1 disc of a foreground galaxy leaves on radiation emitted by a background QSO; namely, a Lyman-..cap alpha.. absorption line broadened by radiation damping. A continuing survey has revealed the presence of 15 damped L..cap alpha.. lines with redshifts between 1.8 and 2.8 in the spectra of 68 QSOs. In comparison, no more than three discs with the properties of nearby galaxies should have been detected. Furthermore, the mean column density of the 15 absorbers, = 1.4 x 10/sup 21/cm/sup -2/, is much larger than expected for the outskirts of H1 discs. The statistical and physical evidence accumulated suggests that the damped L..cap alpha.. systems are a distinct population of absorbers with properties reminiscent of H1 discs. It is concluded that the progenitors of the baryon content of nearby galaxies have been detected. The implications for theories of galaxy formations of the discovery of this damped population of absorbers are explained.

  6. Optical Alignment of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter using Sophisticated Methods to Minimize Activities under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket instrument developed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) as a part of an international collaboration. The in- strument main scientific goal is to achieve polarization measurement of the Lyman-alpha line at 121.56 nm emitted from the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region with an unprecedented 0.1% accuracy. For this purpose, the optics are composed of a Cassegrain telescope coated with a "cold mirror" coating optimized for UV reflection and a dual-channel spectrograph allowing for simultaneous observation of the two orthogonal states of polarization. Although the polarization sensitivity is the most important aspect of the instrument, the spatial and spectral resolutions of the instrument are also crucial to observe the chromospheric features and resolve the Ly- pro les. A precise alignment of the optics is required to ensure the resolutions, but experiments under vacuum conditions are needed since Ly-alpha is absorbed by air, making the alignment experiments difficult. To bypass this issue, we developed methods to align the telescope and the spectrograph separately in visible light. We will explain these methods and present the results for the optical alignment of the CLASP telescope and spectrograph. We will then discuss the combined performances of both parts to derive the expected resolutions of the instrument, and compare them with the flight observations performed on September 3rd 2015.

  7. Diagnosing the reionization of the universe - The absorption spectrum of the intergalactic medium and Lyman alpha clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Mark L.; Shapiro, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal and ionization evolution of a uniform intergalactic medium composed of H and He and undergoing reionization is studied. The diagnosis of the metagalactic ionizing radiation background at z of about three using metal line ratios for Lyman limit quasar absorption line systems is addressed. The use of the He II Gunn-Peterson effect to diagnose the reionization source and/or nature of the Hy-alpha forest clouds is considered.

  8. Wandering in the Lyman-alpha forest: a study of dark matter-dark radiation interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krall, Rebecca; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Dvorkin, Cora

    2017-01-01

    The amplitude of large-scale matter fluctuations inferred from the observed Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster mass function and from weak gravitational lensing studies, when taken at face value, is in tension with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). In this work, we revisit whether this possible discrepancy can be attributed to new interactions in the dark matter sector. Focusing on a cosmological model where dark matter interacts with a dark radiation species until the epoch of matter-radiation equality, we find that measurements of the Lyman-alpha flux power spectrum from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey provide no support to the hypothesis that new dark matter interactions can resolve the possible tension between CMB and large-scale structure (LSS). Indeed, while the addition of dark matter-dark radiation interactions leads to an improvement of 2ΔlnL=12 with respect to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model when only CMB, BAO, and LSS data are considered, the inclusion of Lyman-alpha data reduces the improvement of the fit to 2ΔlnL=6 relative to ΛCDM . We thus conclude that the statistical evidence for new dark matter interactions (largely driven by the Planck SZ dataset) is marginal at best, and likely caused by systematics in the data. We also perform a Fisher forecast analysis for the reach of a future dataset composed of a CMB-S4 experiment combined with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope galaxy survey. We find that the constraint on the effective number of fluid-like dark radiation species, Δ N fluid , will be improved by an order of magnitude compared to current bounds.

  9. Performance characterization of UV science cameras developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, P.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, D.; Beabout, B.; Stewart, M.

    2014-07-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-α and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-α polarizationin the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1% in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1% polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with ≤ 10 e-/pixel/second dark current, ≤ 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 +- 0.5 and ≤ 1.0% residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  10. Wandering in the Lyman-alpha forest: a study of dark matter-dark radiation interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krall, Rebecca; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Dvorkin, Cora, E-mail: rkrall@physics.harvard.edu, E-mail: fcyrraci@physics.harvard.edu, E-mail: dvorkin@physics.harvard.edu [Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The amplitude of large-scale matter fluctuations inferred from the observed Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster mass function and from weak gravitational lensing studies, when taken at face value, is in tension with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). In this work, we revisit whether this possible discrepancy can be attributed to new interactions in the dark matter sector. Focusing on a cosmological model where dark matter interacts with a dark radiation species until the epoch of matter-radiation equality, we find that measurements of the Lyman-alpha flux power spectrum from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey provide no support to the hypothesis that new dark matter interactions can resolve the possible tension between CMB and large-scale structure (LSS). Indeed, while the addition of dark matter-dark radiation interactions leads to an improvement of 2ΔlnL=12 with respect to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model when only CMB, BAO, and LSS data are considered, the inclusion of Lyman-alpha data reduces the improvement of the fit to 2ΔlnL=6 relative to ΛCDM . We thus conclude that the statistical evidence for new dark matter interactions (largely driven by the Planck SZ dataset) is marginal at best, and likely caused by systematics in the data. We also perform a Fisher forecast analysis for the reach of a future dataset composed of a CMB-S4 experiment combined with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope galaxy survey. We find that the constraint on the effective number of fluid-like dark radiation species, Δ N {sub fluid}, will be improved by an order of magnitude compared to current bounds.

  11. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lymanemission around a luminous high-redshift quasar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-02-06

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a 'cosmic web', where most baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lymanemission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently illuminated by bright quasars at redshift z ≈ 2.3. With a linear projected size of approximately 460 physical kiloparsecs, the Lymanemission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM 287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark-matter halo and therefore traces intergalactic gas. The estimated cold gas mass of the filament from the observed emission-about 10(12.0 ± 0.5)/C(1/2) solar masses, where C is the gas clumping factor-is more than ten times larger than what is typically found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with subkiloparsec sizes may be missing in current numerical models.

  12. Isotope effect in the photochemical decomposition of CO{sub 2} (ice) by Lyman-{alpha} radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Chunqing; Yates, John T. Jr. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2013-04-21

    The photochemical decomposition of CO{sub 2}(ice) at 75 K by Lyman-{alpha} radiation (10.2 eV) has been studied using transmission infrared spectroscopy. An isotope effect in the decomposition of the CO{sub 2} molecule in the ice has been discovered, favoring {sup 12}CO{sub 2} photodecomposition over {sup 13}CO{sub 2} by about 10%. The effect is caused by electronic energy transfer from the excited CO{sub 2} molecule to the ice matrix, which favors quenching of the heavier electronically-excited {sup 13}CO{sub 2} molecule over {sup 12}CO{sub 2}. The effect is similar to the Menzel-Gomer-Redhead isotope effect in desorption from adsorbed molecules on surfaces when electronically excited. An enhancement of the rate of formation of lattice-trapped CO and CO{sub 3} species is observed for the photolysis of the {sup 12}CO{sub 2} molecule compared to the {sup 13}CO{sub 2} molecule in the ice. Only 0.5% of the primary photoexcitation results in O-CO bond dissociation to produce trapped-CO and trapped-CO{sub 3} product molecules and the majority of the electronically-excited CO{sub 2} molecules return to the ground state. Here either vibrational relaxation occurs (majority process) or desorption of CO{sub 2} occurs (minority process) from highly vibrationally-excited CO{sub 2} molecules in the ice. The observation of the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope effect in the Lyman-{alpha} induced photodecomposition of CO{sub 2} (ice) suggests that over astronomical time scales the isotope enrichment effect may distort historical information derived from isotope ratios in space wherever photochemistry can occur.

  13. Oxygen sensitivity of krypton and Lyman-alpha hygrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.; Kohsiek, W.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The oxygen sensitivity of krypton and Lyman-¿ hygrometers is studied. Using a dewpoint generator and a controlled nitrogen/oxygen flow the extinction coefficients of five hygrometers associated with the third-order Taylor expansion of the Lambert¿Beer law around reference conditions for oxygen and

  14. Constraining the Intergalactic and Circumgalactic Media with Lyman-Alpha Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorini, Daniele; Onorbe, Jose; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lukic, Zarija

    2018-01-01

    Lyman-alpha (Ly-a) absorption features detected in quasar spectra in the redshift range 02Mpc, the simulations asymptotically match the observations, because the ΛCDM model successfully describes the ambient IGM. This represents a critical advantage of studying the mean absorption profile. However, significant differences between the simulations, and between simulations and observations are present on scales 20kpc-2Mpc, illustrating the challenges of accurately modeling and resolving galaxy formation physics. It is noteworthy that these differences are observed as far out as ~2Mpc, indicating that the `sphere-of-influence' of galaxies could extend to approximately ~20 times the halo virial radius (~100kpc). Current observations are very precise on these scales and can thus strongly discriminate between different galaxy formation models. I demonstrate that the Ly-a absorption profile is primarily sensitive to the underlying temperature-density relationship of diffuse gas around galaxies, and argue that it thus provides a fundamental test of galaxy formation models. With near-future high-precision observations of Ly-a absorption, the tools developed in my thesis set the stage for even stronger constraints on models of galaxy formation and cosmology.

  15. Probing HeII Reionization at z>3.5 with Resolved HeII Lyman Alpha Forest Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worseck, Gabor

    2017-08-01

    The advent of GALEX and COS have revolutionized our view of HeII reionization, the final major phase transition of the intergalactic medium. COS spectra of the HeII Lyman alpha forest have confirmed with high confidence the high HeII transmission that signifies the completion of HeII reionization at z 2.7. However, the handful of z>3.5 quasars observed to date show a set of HeII transmission 'spikes' and larger regions with non-zero transmission that suggest HeII reionization was well underway by z=4. This is in striking conflict with predictions from state-of-the-art radiative transfer simulations of a HeII reionization driven by bright quasars. Explaining these measurements may require either faint quasars or more exotic sources of hard photons at z>4, with concomitant implications for HI reionization. However, many of the observed spikes are unresolved in G140L spectra and are significantly impacted by Poisson noise. Current data cannot reliably probe the ionization state of helium at z>3.5.We request 41 orbits to obtain science-grade G130M spectra of the two UV-brightest HeII-transmitting QSOs at z>3.5 to confirm and resolve their HeII transmission spikes as an unequivocal test of early HeII reionization. These spectra are complemented by recently obtained data from 8m telescopes: (1) Echelle spectra of the coeval HI Lya forest to map the underlying density field that modulates the HeII absorption, and (2) Our dedicated survey for foreground QSOs that may source the HeII transmission. Our recent HST programs revealed the only two viable targets to resolve the z>3.5 HeII Lyman alpha forest, and to conclusively solve this riddle.

  16. Solar minimum Lyman alpha sky background observations from Pioneer Venus orbiter ultraviolet spectrometer - Solar wind latitude variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary H I Lyman alpha over a large portion of the celestial sphere were made at the recent solar minimum by the Pioneer Venus orbiter ultraviolet spectrometer. These measurements were performed during a series of spacecraft maneuvers conducted to observe Halley's comet in early 1986. Analysis of these data using a model of the passage of interstellar wind hydrogen through the solar system shows that the rate of charge exchange with solar wind protons is 30 percent less over the solar poles than in the ecliptic. This result is in agreement with a similar experiment performed with Mariner 10 at the previous solar minimum.

  17. Anomalous Temporal Behaviour of Broadband Ly Alpha Observations During Solar Flares from SDO/EVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Ryan O.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is the most prominent emission line in the solar spectrum, there has been a notable lack of studies devoted to variations in Lyman-alpha (Ly-alpha) emission during solar flares in recent years. However, the few examples that do exist have shown Ly-alpha emission to be a substantial radiator of the total energy budget of solar flares (of the order of 10 percent). It is also a known driver of fluctuations in the Earth's ionosphere. The EUV (Extreme Ultra-Violet) Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) now provides broadband, photometric Ly-alpha data at 10-second cadence with its Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph-Photometer (MEGS-P) component, and has observed scores of solar flares in the 5 years since it was launched. However, the MEGS-P time profiles appear to display a rise time of tens of minutes around the time of the flare onset. This is in stark contrast to the rapid, impulsive increase observed in other intrinsically chromospheric features (H-alpha, Ly-beta, LyC, C III, etc.). Furthermore, the emission detected by MEGS-P peaks around the time of the peak of thermal soft X-ray emission and not during the impulsive phase when energy deposition in the chromosphere (often assumed to be in the form of non-thermal electrons) is greatest. The time derivative of Ly-alpha lightcurves also appears to resemble that of the time derivative of soft X-rays, reminiscent of the Neupert effect. Given that spectrally-resolved Ly-alpha observations during flares from SORCE / SOLSTICE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment / Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) peak during the impulsive phase as expected, this suggests that the atypical behaviour of MEGS-P data is a manifestation of the broadband nature of the observations. This could imply that other lines andor continuum emission that becomes enhanced during flares could be contributing to the passband. Users are hereby urged to exercise caution when interpreting

  18. Lyman-alpha transit observations of the warm rocky exoplanet GJ1132b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalkes, William; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Newton, Elisabeth; Dittmann, Jason; Bourrier, Vincent; Ehrenreich, David; Kempton, Eliza; Will

    2018-06-01

    GJ1132b is one of the few known Earth-sized planets, and at 12pc away it is also one of the closest known transiting planets. With an equilibrium temperature of 500 K, this planet is too hot to be habitable but we can use it to learn about the presence and volatile content of rocky planet atmospheres around M dwarf stars. Using Hubble STIS spectra obtained during primary transit, we search for a Lyman-α transit. If we were to observe a deep Lyman-α transit, that would indicate the presence of a neutral hydrogen envelope flowing from GJ1132b. On the other hand, ruling out deep absorption from neutral hydrogen may indicate that this planet has either retained its volatiles or lost them very early in the star’s life. We carry out this analysis by extracting 1D spectra from the STIS pipeline, splitting the time-tagged spectra into higher resolution samples, and producing light curves of the red and blue wings of the Lyman-α line. We fit for the baseline stellar flux and transit depths in order to constrain the characteristics of the cloud of neutral hydrogen gas that may surround the planet. We do not conclusively detect a transit but the results provide an upper limit for the transit depth. We also analyze the stellar variability and Lyman-α spectrum of GJ1132, a slowly-rotating 0.18 solar mass M dwarf with previously uncharacterized UV activity. Understanding the role that UV variability plays in planetary atmospheres and volatile retention is crucial to assess atmospheric evolution and the habitability of cooler rocky planets.

  19. An intensity monitor for solar hydrogen Lyman-alpha radiation (TAIYO SXU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshio, Takanori; Masuoka, Toshio; Higashino, Ichiro; Watanabe, Norihiko.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute intensity of hydrogen Lyman-alpha (1216A) from the total solar disk is currently monitored by an ion chamber as a part of the satellite mission of TAIYO. The apparatus consists of an ion chamber with a special input control mask and associated electronics. The ion chamber with an MgF 2 window and filled with NO gas is sensitive to a narrow spectral band including the Lα. The special mask serves to keep the angular response of the detector constant at the elevation angle of the sun relative to the plane perpendicular to the spinning axis of the satellite within an error of the order of one percent, when the angle is within +-30 0 . A flux reducer attenuates the incident radiation upon the detector by a factor of 20 to lengthen the life of detector. The associated electronics measures the output current of the ion chamber, holds the maximum value of the output every four-second period and sends it to the telemeter. From the currently observed data, the absolute intensity of the solar Lα is 3.2 x 10 11 photons/cm 2 sec and constant within +-4.2% during the period from 24 February to 31 May, 1975. (auth.)

  20. Characterizing the Lyman-alpha forest flux probability distribution function using Legendre polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka; Slosar, Anze

    2018-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha forest has become a powerful cosmological probe at intermediate redshift. It is a highly non-linear field with much information present beyond the power spectrum. The flux probability flux distribution (PDF) in particular has been a successful probe of small scale physics. However, it is also sensitive to pixel noise, spectrum resolution, and continuum fitting, all of which lead to possible biased estimators. Here we argue that measuring the coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the PDF offers several advantages over measuring the binned values as is commonly done. Since the n-th Legendre coefficient can be expressed as a linear combination of the first n moments of the field, this allows for the coefficients to be measured in the presence of noise and allows for a clear route towards marginalization over the mean flux. Additionally, in the presence of noise, a finite number of these coefficients are well measured with a very sharp transition into noise dominance. This compresses the information into a small amount of well-measured quantities. Finally, we find that measuring fewer quasars with high signal-to-noise produces a higher amount of recoverable information.

  1. NO OVERDENSITY OF LYMAN-ALPHA EMITTING GALAXIES AROUND A QUASAR AT z  ∼ 5.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucchelli, C.; Bañados, E.; Decarli, R.; Farina, E. P.; Venemans, B. P.; Walter, F.; Overzier, R.

    2017-01-01

    Bright quasars, observed when the universe was less than one billion years old ( z  > 5.5), are known to host massive black holes (∼10 9 M ⊙ ) and are thought to reside in the center of massive dark matter overdensities. In this picture, overdensities of galaxies are expected around high-redshift quasars. However, observations based on the detection of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) around these quasars do not offer a clear picture: this may be due to the uncertain redshift constraints of LBGs, which are solely selected through broadband filters. To circumvent such uncertainties, we here perform a search for Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the field of the quasar PSO J215.1512–16.0417 at z  ∼ 5.73, through narrowband deep imaging with FORS2 at the Very Large Telescope. We study an area of 37 arcmin 2 , i.e., ∼206 comoving Mpc 2 at the redshift of the quasar. We find no evidence of an overdensity of LAEs in the quasar field with respect to blank-field studies. Possible explanations for these findings may be that our survey volume is too small, or that the strong ionizing radiation from the quasar hinders galaxy formation in its immediate proximity. Another possibility is that these quasars are not situated in the dense environments predicted by some simulations.

  2. NO OVERDENSITY OF LYMAN-ALPHA EMITTING GALAXIES AROUND A QUASAR AT z  ∼ 5.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzucchelli, C.; Bañados, E.; Decarli, R.; Farina, E. P.; Venemans, B. P.; Walter, F. [Max Planck Institute für Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Overzier, R. [Observatório Nacional, Rua José Cristino, 77. CEP 20921-400, São Cristóvão, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    2017-01-01

    Bright quasars, observed when the universe was less than one billion years old ( z  > 5.5), are known to host massive black holes (∼10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙}) and are thought to reside in the center of massive dark matter overdensities. In this picture, overdensities of galaxies are expected around high-redshift quasars. However, observations based on the detection of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) around these quasars do not offer a clear picture: this may be due to the uncertain redshift constraints of LBGs, which are solely selected through broadband filters. To circumvent such uncertainties, we here perform a search for Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the field of the quasar PSO J215.1512–16.0417 at z  ∼ 5.73, through narrowband deep imaging with FORS2 at the Very Large Telescope. We study an area of 37 arcmin{sup 2}, i.e., ∼206 comoving Mpc{sup 2} at the redshift of the quasar. We find no evidence of an overdensity of LAEs in the quasar field with respect to blank-field studies. Possible explanations for these findings may be that our survey volume is too small, or that the strong ionizing radiation from the quasar hinders galaxy formation in its immediate proximity. Another possibility is that these quasars are not situated in the dense environments predicted by some simulations.

  3. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  4. Linearity Analysis and Efficiency Testing of The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) Science Cameras for Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Salma C.; Rachmeler, Laurel; Winebarger, Amy; Champey, Patrick; Bethge, Christian

    2018-01-01

    To unveil the complexity of the solar atmosphere, measurement of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere and transition region is fundamentally important, as this is where the forces transition from plasma to magnetic field dominated. Measurements of the field are also needed to elucidate the energy transport from the lower atmospheric regions to the corona beyond. Such an advance in heliospheric knowledge became possible with the first flight of the international solar sounding rocket mission, CLASP. For the first time, linear polarization was measured in Hydrogen Lyman-Alpha at 121.60 nm in September 2015. For linear polarization measurements in this emission line, high sensitivity is required due to the relatively weak polarization signal compared to the intensity. To achieve this high sensitivity, a low-noise sensor is required with good knowledge of its characterization, including linearity. This work presents further refinement of the linearity characterization of the cameras flown in 2015. We compared the current from a photodiode in the light path to the digital response of the detectors. Pre-flight CCD linearity measurements were taken for all three flight cameras and calculations of the linear fits and residuals were performed. However, the previous calculations included a smearing pattern and a digital saturation region on the detectors which were not properly taken into account. The calculations have been adjusted and were repeated for manually chosen sub-regions on the detectors that were found not to be affected. We present a brief overview of the instrument, the calibration data and procedures, and a comparison of the old and new linearity results. The CLASP cameras will be reused for the successor mission, CLASP2, which will measure the Magnesium II h & k emission lines between 279.45 nm and 280.35 nm. The new approach will help to better prepare for and to improve the camera characterization for CLASP2.

  5. Physical and morphological properties of z ~ 3 Lyman break galaxies: dependence on Lyα line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentericci, L.; Grazian, A.; Scarlata, C.; Fontana, A.; Castellano, M.; Giallongo, E.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the physical and morphological properties of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at redshift ~2.5 to ~3.5, to determine if and how they depend on the nature and strength of the Lyα emission. Methods: We selected U-dropout galaxies from the z-detected GOODS-MUSIC catalog by adapting the classical Lyman break criteria on the GOODS filter set. We kept only those galaxies with spectroscopic confirmation, mainly from VIMOS and FORS public observations. Using the full multi-wavelength 14-bands information (U to IRAC), we determined the physical properties of the galaxies through a standard spectral energy distribution fitting procedure with the updated Charlot & Bruzual (2009) templates. We also added other relevant observations of the GOODS field, i.e. the 24 μm observations from Spitzer/MIPS and the 2 MSec Chandra X-ray observations. Finally, using non parametric diagnostics (Gini, Concentration, Asymmetry, M20 and ellipticity), we characterized the rest-frame UV morphologies of the galaxies. We then analyzed how these physical and morphological properties correlate with the presence of the Lyα emission line in the optical spectra. Results: We find that unlike at higher redshift, the dependence of physical properties on the Lyα line is milder: galaxies without Lyα in emission tend to be more massive and dustier than the rest of the sample, but all other parameters, ages, star formation rates (SFR), X-ray emission and UV morphology do not depend strongly on the presence of the Lyα emission. A simple scenario where all LBGs have intrinsically high Lyα emission, but where the dust and neutral hydrogen content (which shapes the final appearance of the Lyα) depend on the mass of the galaxies, is able to reproduce the majority of the observed properties at z˜3. Some modification might be needed to account for the observed evolution of these properties with cosmic epoch, which is also discussed.

  6. Infrared emission from galactic H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeilik, M. II.

    1975-01-01

    Near-infrared observations are presented of selected galactic HII regions (especially G45.5 + 0.1, G45.1 + 0.1, S88, and W3A) to infer the physical conditions of the dust responsible for the 2 to 25 micron emission. Two-component dust models are developed to match the observed characteristics of the infrared emission from HII regions. The dust, assumed to be bare and well-mixed with the gas in the ionized volume, consists of large (0.1 micron) ''silicate'' grains and small (0.2 micron) graphite grains. The ''silicates'' have their cosmic maximum abundance with respect to hydrogen, but the graphite grains are depleted by factors of 25 to 100 in mass. The Lyman-alpha radiation field predominately heats the ''silicate'' grains, which produce almost all the emission at 20 microns and most of it from 8 to 13 microns. The stellar radiation field predominately heats the graphite grains, which generate most of the emission at 3.5 and 5 microns. Roughly half of the observed 2 to 25 micron luminosity (when corrected for extinction) arises from Lyman-alpha photons and the other half from the Lyman and Balmer continua. The grains are too hot to provide significant emission in the far-infrared; this probably arises from a dust shell around the HII region. This two-component model predicts that HII regions should have smaller sizes at 3.5 and 5 microns than at 10 and 20 microns. The emissivities of fine-structure infrared lines for the regions are calculated. In the one instance where observations of such lines have been published (G29.9 - 0.0), predicted emissivities fall below those observed, especially for the 12.86-micron line of NeII. The discrepancy probably arises from an incorrect modeling of the region's ionization structure, but it might also reflect variations in elemental abundances or deficiencies in model stellar atmospheres for hot stars

  7. Discovery of a very Lyman-α-luminous quasar at z = 6.62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptelova, Ekaterina; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Yu, Po-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Ping; Guo, Jhen-Kuei

    2017-02-02

    Distant luminous quasars provide important information on the growth of the first supermassive black holes, their host galaxies and the epoch of reionization. The identification of quasars is usually performed through detection of their Lyman-α line redshifted to 0.9 microns at z > 6.5. Here, we report the discovery of a very Lyman-α luminous quasar, PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 at redshift z = 6.618, selected based on its red colour and multi-epoch detection of the Lymanemission in a single near-infrared band. The Lyman-α line luminosity of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 is unusually high and estimated to be 0.8 × 10 12 Solar luminosities (about 3% of the total quasar luminosity). The Lymanemission of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 shows fast variability on timescales of days in the quasar rest frame, which has never been detected in any of the known high-redshift quasars. The high luminosity of the Lyman-α line, its narrow width and fast variability resemble properties of local Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies which suggests that the quasar is likely at the active phase of the black hole growth accreting close or even beyond the Eddington limit.

  8. The non-linear power spectrum of the Lyman alpha forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arinyo-i-Prats, Andreu; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Viel, Matteo; Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    The Lyman alpha forest power spectrum has been measured on large scales by the BOSS survey in SDSS-III at z∼ 2.3, has been shown to agree well with linear theory predictions, and has provided the first measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations at this redshift. However, the power at small scales, affected by non-linearities, has not been well examined so far. We present results from a variety of hydrodynamic simulations to predict the redshift space non-linear power spectrum of the Lyα transmission for several models, testing the dependence on resolution and box size. A new fitting formula is introduced to facilitate the comparison of our simulation results with observations and other simulations. The non-linear power spectrum has a generic shape determined by a transition scale from linear to non-linear anisotropy, and a Jeans scale below which the power drops rapidly. In addition, we predict the two linear bias factors of the Lyα forest and provide a better physical interpretation of their values and redshift evolution. The dependence of these bias factors and the non-linear power on the amplitude and slope of the primordial fluctuations power spectrum, the temperature-density relation of the intergalactic medium, and the mean Lyα transmission, as well as the redshift evolution, is investigated and discussed in detail. A preliminary comparison to the observations shows that the predicted redshift distortion parameter is in good agreement with the recent determination of Blomqvist et al., but the density bias factor is lower than observed. We make all our results publicly available in the form of tables of the non-linear power spectrum that is directly obtained from all our simulations, and parameters of our fitting formula

  9. Lyman Break Galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field through Deep U-Band Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafelski, Marc; Wolfe, A. M.; Cooke, J.; Chen, H. W.; Armandroff, T. E.; Wirth, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    We introduce an extremely deep U-band image taken of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), with a one sigma depth of 30.7 mag arcsec-2 and a detection limiting magnitude of 28 mag arcsec-2. The observations were carried out on the Keck I telescope using the LRIS-B detector. The U-band image substantially improves the accuracy of photometric redshift measurements of faint galaxies in the HUDF at z=[2.5,3.5]. The U-band for these galaxies is attenuated by lyman limit absorption, allowing for more reliable selections of candidate Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) than from photometric redshifts without U-band. We present a reliable sample of 300 LBGs at z=[2.5,3.5] in the HUDF. Accurate redshifts of faint galaxies at z=[2.5,3.5] are needed to obtain empirical constraints on the star formation efficiency of neutral gas at high redshift. Wolfe & Chen (2006) showed that the star formation rate (SFR) density in damped Ly-alpha absorption systems (DLAs) at z=[2.5,3.5] is significantly lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt law for nearby galaxies. One caveat to this result that we wish to test is whether LBGs are embedded in DLAs. If in-situ star formation is occurring in DLAs, we would see it as extended low surface brightness emission around LBGs. We shall use the more accurate photometric redshifts to create a sample of LBGs around which we will look for extended emission in the more sensitive and higher resolution HUDF images. The absence of extended emission would put limits on the SFR density of DLAs associated with LBGs at high redshift. On the other hand, detection of faint emission on scales large compared to the bright LBG cores would indicate the presence of in situ star formation in those DLAs. Such gas would presumably fuel the higher star formation rates present in the LBG cores.

  10. Alpha-particle emission probabilities of ²³⁶U obtained by alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H; Benedik, L

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed with an ion-implanted silicon detector in vacuum on a homogeneously electrodeposited (236)U source. The source was measured at different solid angles subtended by the detector, varying between 0.8% and 2.4% of 4π sr, to assess the influence of coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons on the measured alpha-particle emission probabilities. Additional measurements were performed using a bending magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, the results of which coincide with normal measurements extrapolated to an infinitely small solid angle. The measured alpha emission probabilities for the three main peaks - 74.20 (5)%, 25.68 (5)% and 0.123 (5)%, respectively - are consistent with literature data, but their precision has been improved by at least one order of magnitude in this work. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Lyman Alpha Searches at Redshift Z>7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jon

    2007-05-01

    The ZEN survey is a narrow J-band survey for Ly-alpha emitting galaxies at z > 7. I will briefly review the pros and cons of narrow band observations before summarising the ZEN1 and ZEN2 searches based upon deep ISAAC pointings. I will then present ZEN3, consisting of wide field, narrow band observations of two fields using the CFHT WIRCam facility. I will conclude by reviewing the current sample of candidates and what we have learned about the z > 7 Ly-alpha emitting population.

  12. Discovery of Ubiquitous Fast-Propagating Intensity Disturbances by the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J.; Champey, P.; Auchère, F.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Štěpán, J.; Belluzzi, L.; Manso Sainz, R.; De Pontieu, B.; Ichimoto, K.; Carlsson, M.; Casini, R.; Goto, M.

    2016-12-01

    High-cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere or the transition region or both at a speed much higher than the speed of sound. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of two-dimensional images taken with broadband filters centered on the Lyα line at a 0.6 s cadence. The multiple fast-propagating intensity disturbances appear in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and they are clearly detected in at least 20 areas in a field of view of 527″ × 527″ during the 5 minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km s-1, and they are comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed fast-propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is about 10″, and the widths are a few arcseconds, which are almost determined by a pixel size of 1.″03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation for the fast-propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves.

  13. DISCOVERY OF UBIQUITOUS FAST-PROPAGATING INTENSITY DISTURBANCES BY THE CHROMOSPHERIC LYMAN ALPHA SPECTROPOLARIMETER (CLASP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J.; Champey, P.; Auchère, F.; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Ramos, A. Asensio

    2016-01-01

    High-cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere or the transition region or both at a speed much higher than the speed of sound. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of two-dimensional images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly α line at a 0.6 s cadence. The multiple fast-propagating intensity disturbances appear in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and they are clearly detected in at least 20 areas in a field of view of 527″ × 527″ during the 5 minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km s −1 , and they are comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed fast-propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is about 10″, and the widths are a few arcseconds, which are almost determined by a pixel size of 1.″03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation for the fast-propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves.

  14. Carbon stars with alpha-C:H emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbault, Florence; Goebel, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Many carbon stars in the IRS low resolution spectra (LRS) catalog were found which display emission spectra that compare favorable with the absorption spectrum of alpha-C:H. These stars have largely been classified as 4X in the LRS which has led to their interpretation by others in terms of displaying a mixture of the UIRF's 8.6 micron band and SiC at 11.5 microns. It was also found that many of these stars have a spectral upturn at 20+ microns which resembles the MgS band seen in carbon stars and planetary nebulae. It was concluded that this group of carbon stars will evolve into planetary nebulae like NGC 7027 and IC 418. In the presence of hard ultraviolet radiation the UIRF's will light up and be displayed as narrow emission bands on top of the broad alpha-C:H emission bands.

  15. High-Velocity Ly(Alpha) Emission from SMR 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Eli; McCray, Richard; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Pun, Chu S. J.; Sonneborn, George

    1998-01-01

    The high-velocity Ly(Alpha) emission from SN 1987A observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) evidently comes from a reverse shock formed where the outer envelope of SN 1987A strikes ionized gas inside the inner circumstellar ring. The observations can be explained by a simple kinematic model, in which the Ly(Alpha) emission comes from hydrogen atoms with radial velocity approximately 15,000 km s(exp -1) crossing a reverse shock in the shape of a slightly prolate ellipsoid with equatorial radius 4.8 x 10(exp 17) cm or approximately 80% of the distance to the inner surface of the inner ring. N v double Lambda 1239, 1243 emission, if present, has a net luminosity approximately less than 30% times that of the Ly(Alpha) emission. Future STIS observations should enable us to predict the time of impact with the inner ring and to determine unambiguously whether or not N v emission is present. These observations will offer a unique opportunity to probe the structure of SN 1987A's circumstellar environment and the hydrodynamics and kinetics of very fast shocks.

  16. Properties of z ~ 3-6 Lyman break galaxies. II. Impact of nebular emission at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, S.; Schaerer, D.; Stark, D. P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. To gain insight on the mass assembly and place constraints on the star formation history (SFH) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), it is important to accurately determine their properties. Aims: We estimate how nebular emission and different SFHs affect parameter estimation of LBGs. Methods: We present a homogeneous, detailed analysis of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of ~1700 LBGs from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue with deep multi-wavelength photometry from the U band to 8 μm to determine stellar mass, age, dust attenuation, and star formation rate. Using our SED fitting tool, which takes into account nebular emission, we explore a wide parameter space. We also explore a set of different star formation histories. Results: Nebular emission is found to significantly affect the determination of the physical parameters for the majority of z ~ 3-6 LBGs. We identify two populations of galaxies by determining the importance of the contribution of emission lines to broadband fluxes. We find that ~65% of LBGs show detectable signs of emission lines, whereas ~35% show weak or no emission lines. This distribution is found over the entire redshift range. We interpret these groups as actively star-forming and more quiescent LBGs, respectively. We find that it is necessary to considerer SED fits with very young ages (mass, higher dust attenuation, higher star formation rate, and a large scatter in the SFR-M⋆ relation. Our analysis yields a trend of increasing specific star formation rate with redshift, as predicted by recent galaxy evolution models. Conclusions: The physical parameters of approximately two thirds of high redshift galaxies are significantly modified when we account for nebular emission. The SED models, which include nebular emission shed new light on the properties of LBGs with numerous important implications. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Low redshift Lyman alpha absorption lines and the dark matter halos of disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Recent observations using the Hubble Space Telescope of the z = 0.156 QSO 3C 273 have discovered a surprisingly large number of Ly-alpha absorption lines. In particular, Morris et al. found 9 certain and 7 possible Ly-alpha lines with equivalent widths above 25 mA. This is much larger (by a factor of 5-10) than the number expected from extrapolation of the high-redshift behavior of the Ly-alpha forest. Within the context of pressure-confined models for the Ly-alpha clouds, this behavior can be understood if the ionizing background declines sharply between z is approximately 2 and z is approximately 0. However, this requires that the ionizing photon flux drop as rapidly as the QSO volume emissivity; moreover, the absorbers must have a space density n(sub O) is approximately 2.6(N/10)h/((D/100 kpc)(sup 2)) Mpc(sup -3) where D is the present-day diameter of the absorbers. It is somewhat surprising that such necessarily fragile objects could have survived in such numbers to the present day. It is shown that it is plausible that the atomic hydrogen extents of spiral and irregular galaxies are large enough to produce the observed number of Ly-alpha absorption lines toward 3C 273, and that the neutral column densities and doppler b-values expected under these conditions fall in the range found by Morris et al. (1991).

  18. DISCOVERY OF UBIQUITOUS FAST-PROPAGATING INTENSITY DISTURBANCES BY THE CHROMOSPHERIC LYMAN ALPHA SPECTROPOLARIMETER (CLASP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Champey, P. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Bueno, J. Trujillo; Ramos, A. Asensio, E-mail: masahito.kubo@nao.ac.jp [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); and others

    2016-12-01

    High-cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere or the transition region or both at a speed much higher than the speed of sound. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of two-dimensional images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly α line at a 0.6 s cadence. The multiple fast-propagating intensity disturbances appear in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and they are clearly detected in at least 20 areas in a field of view of 527″ × 527″ during the 5 minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km s{sup −1}, and they are comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed fast-propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is about 10″, and the widths are a few arcseconds, which are almost determined by a pixel size of 1.″03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation for the fast-propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves.

  19. Lyman Alpha Camera for Io's SO2 atmosphere and Europa's water plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Sandel, Bill; Schneider, Nick

    2014-05-01

    The Student Lyman-Alpha Mapper (SLAM) was conceived for the Io Volcano Observer (IVO) mission proposal (McEwen et al., 2014) to determine the spatial and temporal variations in Io's SO2 atmosphere by recording the H Ly-α reflection over the disk (Feldman et al., 2000; Feaga et al., 2009). SO2 absorbs at H Ly-α, thereby modulating the brightness of sunlight reflected by the surface, and measures the density of the SO2 atmosphere and its variability with volcanic activity and time of day. Recently, enhancements at the Ly-α wavelength (121.57 nm) were seen near the limb of Europa and interpreted as active water plumes ~200 km high (Roth et al., 2014). We have a preliminary design for a very simple camera to image in a single bandpass at Ly-α, analogous to a simplified version of IMAGE EUV (Sandel et al. 2000). Our goal is at least 50 resolution elements across Io and/or Europa (~75 km/pixel), ~3x better than HST STIS, to be acquired at a range where the radiation noise is below 1E-4 hits/pixel/s. This goal is achieved with a Cassegrain-like telescope with a 10-cm aperture. The wavelength selection is achieved using a simple self-filtering mirror in combination with a solar-blind photocathode. A photon-counting detector based on a sealed image intensifier preserves the poisson statistics of the incoming photon flux. The intensifier window is coated with a solar-blind photocathode material (CsI). The location of each photon event is recorded by a position-sensitive anode based on crossed delay-line or wedge-and-strip technology. The sensitivity is 0.01 counts/pixel/sec/R, sufficient to estimate SO2 column abundances ranging from 1E15 to 1E17 per cm2 in a 5 min (300 sec) exposure. Sensitivity requirements to search for and image Europa plumes may be similar. Io's Ly-α brightness of ~3 kR exceeds the 0.8 kR brightness of Europa's plume reported by Roth et al. (2014), but the plume brightness is a direct measurement rather than inferring column abundance from

  20. Isolating the Lyman alpha forest BAO anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evslin, Jarah, E-mail: jarah@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, NanChangLu 509, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-04-01

    A 2.5-3σ discrepancy has been reported between the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak (BAO) in the Lyman α forest at z ∼ 2.34 and the best fit Planck ΛCDM cosmology. To isolate the origin of the tension, we consider unanchored BAO, in which the standard BAO ruler is not calibrated, eliminating any dependence on cosmology before redshift z ∼ 2.34. We consider BOSS BAO measurements at z ∼ 0.32, 0.57 and 2.34, using the full 2-dimensional constraints on the angular and line of sight BAO scale, as well as isotropic BAO measurements by 6dF and SDSS at z ∼ 0.106 and z ∼ 0.15. We find that the z >0.43 data alone is in 2.9σ of tension with ΛCDM with or without the Planck best fit values of the mass fraction Ω {sub m} and the BAO scale r {sub d} H {sub 0}, indicating that the tension arises not from the ΛCDM parameters but from the dark energy evolution itself at 0.57< z <2.34. This conclusion is supported when the acoustic scale measured by the CMB is included, which further increases the tension and excludes a solution with a constant dark energy equation of state. Including the low z BAO data, which is itself consistent with ΛCDM, reduces the tension to just over 2σ, however in this case a CPL parametrization of the dark energy evolution yields only a modest improvement.

  1. The Development of Replicated Optical Integral Field Spectrographs and their Application to the Study of Lyman-alpha Emission at Moderate Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonis, Taylor Steven

    In the upcoming era of extremely large ground-based astronomical telescopes, the design of wide-field spectroscopic survey instrumentation has become increasingly complex due to the linear growth of instrument pupil size with telescope diameter for a constant spectral resolving power. The upcoming Visible Integral field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS), a baseline array of 150 copies of a simple integral field spectrograph that will be fed by 3:36 x 104 optical fibers on the upgraded Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) at McDonald Observatory, represents one of the first uses of large-scale replication to break the relationship between instrument pupil size and telescope diameter. By dividing the telescope's field of view between a large number of smaller and more manageable instruments, the total information grasp of a traditional monolithic survey spectrograph can be achieved at a fraction of the cost and engineering complexity. To highlight the power of this method, VIRUS will execute the HET Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and survey & 420 degrees2 of sky to an emission line flux limit of ˜ 10-17 erg s-1 cm -2 to detect ˜ 106 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) as probes of large-scale structure at redshifts of 1:9 production of the suite of volume phase holographic (VPH) diffraction gratings for VIRUS is presented, which highlights the challenge and success associated with producing of a very large number of highly customized optical elements whose performance is crucial to meeting the efficiency requirements of the spectrograph system. To accommodate VIRUS, the HET is undergoing a substantial wide-field upgrade to increase its field of view to 22' in diameter. The previous HET facility Low Resolution Spectrograph (LRS), which was directly fed by the telescope's previous spherical aberration corrector, must be removed from the prime focus instrument package as a result of the telescope upgrades and instead be fiber-coupled to the telescope focal plane. For a

  2. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  3. Far-UV Spectral Mapping of Lunar Composition, Porosity, and Space Weathering: LRO Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, K. D.; Greathouse, T. K.; Mandt, K.; Gladstone, R.; Liu, Y.; Hendrix, A. R.; Hurley, D.; Cahill, J. T.; Stickle, A. M.; Egan, A.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Grava, C.; Pryor, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Far ultraviolet reflectance measurements of the Moon, icy satellites, comets, and asteroids obtained within the last decade have ushered in a new era of scientific advancement for UV surface investigations. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) has demonstrated an innovative nightside observing technique, putting a new light on permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) and other features on the Moon. Dayside far-UV albedo maps complement the nightside data, and LRO's polar orbit and high data downlink capabilities enable searches for diurnal variations in spectral signals. We'll discuss the strengths of the far-UV reflectance imaging spectroscopy technique with respect to several new LAMP results. Detections of water frost and hydration signatures near 165 nm, for example, provide constraints on composition that complement infrared spectroscopy, visible imaging, neutron spectroscopy, radar, and other techniques. At far-UV wavelengths a relatively blue spectral slope is diagnostic of space weathering, which is opposite of the spectral reddening indicator of maturity at wavelengths longward of 180 nm. By utilizing natural diffuse illumination sources on the nightside the far-UV technique is able to identify relative increases in porosity within the PSRs, and provides an additional tool for determining relative surface ages. Prospects for future studies are further enabled by a new, more sensitive dayside operating mode enacted during the present LRO mission extension.

  4. DISSECTION OF H{alpha} EMITTERS : LOW-z ANALOGS OF z > 4 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyunjin [Department of Earth Science Education, Kyungpook National University (Korea, Republic of); Chary, Ranga-Ram, E-mail: hjshim@knu.ac.kr [U.S. Planck Data Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Strong H{alpha} emitters (HAEs) dominate the z {approx} 4 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) population. We have identified local analogs of these HAEs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. At z < 0.4, only 0.04% of the galaxies are classified as HAEs with H{alpha} equivalent widths ({approx}> 500 A) comparable to that of z {approx} 4 HAEs. Local HAEs have lower stellar mass and lower ultraviolet (UV) luminosity than z {approx} 4 HAEs, yet the H{alpha}-to-UV luminosity ratio, as well as their specific star formation rate, is consistent with that of z {approx} 4 HAEs, indicating that they are scaled-down versions of high-z star-forming galaxies. Compared to the previously studied local analogs of LBGs selected using rest-frame UV properties, local HAEs show similar UV luminosity surface density, weaker D{sub n} (4000) break, lower metallicity, and lower stellar mass. This implies that the local HAEs are less evolved galaxies than the traditional Lyman break analogs. In the stacked spectrum, local HAEs show a significant He II {lambda}4686 emission line suggesting a population of hot, massive stars similar to that seen in some Wolf-Rayet galaxies. Low [N II]/[O III] line flux ratios imply that local HAEs are inconsistent with being systems that host bright active galactic nuclei. Instead, it is highly likely that local HAEs are galaxies with an elevated ionization parameter, either due to a high electron density or large escape fraction of hydrogen ionizing photons as in the case of Wolf-Rayet galaxies.

  5. The large-scale cross-correlation of Damped Lyman alpha systems with the Lyman alpha forest: first measurements from BOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Arnau, Eduard [Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (IEEC/UB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Carithers, Bill; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lee, Khee-Gan [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Rollinde, Emmanuel [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Université Paris 6 et CNRS, 98bis blvd. Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Rich, James [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: font@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and The Fermi Institute, Chicago University, 5640 So. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We present the first measurement of the large-scale cross-correlation of Lyα forest absorption and Damped Lyman α systems (DLA), using the 9th Data Release of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The cross-correlation is clearly detected on scales up to 40h{sup −1}Mpc and is well fitted by the linear theory prediction of the standard Cold Dark Matter model of structure formation with the expected redshift distortions, confirming its origin in the gravitational evolution of structure. The amplitude of the DLA-Lyα cross-correlation depends on only one free parameter, the bias factor of the DLA systems, once the Lyα forest bias factors are known from independent Lyα forest correlation measurements. We measure the DLA bias factor to be b{sub D} = (2.17±0.20)β{sub F}{sup 0.22}, where the Lyα forest redshift distortion parameter β{sub F} is expected to be above unity. This bias factor implies a typical host halo mass for DLAs that is much larger than expected in present DLA models, and is reproduced if the DLA cross section scales with halo mass as M{sub h}{sup α}, with α = 1.1±0.1 for β{sub F} = 1. Matching the observed DLA bias factor and rate of incidence requires that atomic gas remains extended in massive halos over larger areas than predicted in present simulations of galaxy formation, with typical DLA proper sizes larger than 20 kpc in host halos of masses ∼ 10{sup 12}M{sub ☉}. We infer that typical galaxies at z ≅ 2 to 3 are surrounded by systems of atomic clouds that are much more extended than the luminous parts of galaxies and contain ∼ 10% of the baryons in the host halo.

  6. LYMAN : a new window on the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopita, M.A.; Tuohy, I.R.; Mathewson, D.S.; Hunstead, R.W.; Waterworth, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    This document is the final Phase A Science Report of the Australian LYMAN Science Working Group, and describes in detail the scientific objectives, technical feasibility, and engineering implementation of the LYMAN mission as developed in the Australian studies. LYMAN represents the next generation, high-orbit, UV space observatory, and is designed to operate over the wavelength range λ 100 - 1900 Angstrom. The prime spectral range is λ 900 - 1250 Angstrom, which will be covered at a resolution of λ/Δ λ = 30000, and the sensitivity of the instrumentation will be orders of magnitude better than previous missions. In this region we find the Lyman series of molecular and atomic hydrogen, as well as a whole host of atomic and ionic lines of great diagnostic power. LYMAN will be able to accomplish uniquely valuable astrophysics as a result, and will be applied to the study of all types of astronomical targets in the fields of cosmology, galactic research, the interstellar medium, stars in all stages of their evolution, and to particular solar system objects. The LYMAN Mission was the subject of a $1M study contract awarded by the Australian Space Office, a section of DITAC, to Auspace Pty. Ltd. The Phase A study was conduced in parallel with the ESA Phase A Study, and with a strong scientific and technical liaison between the two groups. LYMAN is now likely to be launched as a joint ESA/NASA project, but the future Australian role in the mission, as determined by current policy, would be minimal. Australia would therefore be effectively locked out of the very exciting front-line science described in this document, and the valuable university - industry liaison that has been developed over the last eight years will be lost

  7. Witnessing the assembly of galaxies in an extended gas-rich structure at z 3.25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Ruari

    2017-08-01

    The direct study of star formation in Damped Lyman Alpha systems (DLAs), the reservoirs of the majority of neutral gas at high redshift, has previously been hampered by the lack of deep integral field spectroscopy for sensitive searches of faint host galaxies. Building on our successful HST shot-in-the-dark survey that has probed the in-situ star formation rate of z 2-3 DLAs, we have initiated a MUSE follow-up of 6 DLA signlines to overcome this bottleneck. In the first sightline we have studied, we have uncovered a 40 kpc Lyman alpha emitting nebula, composed of two clumps within 50 kpc of the DLA, suggestive of a merger or an extended protodisk. Within this structure, which is the largest nebula known to be associated with a z 3 DLA, we also found a compact continuum source with spectrophotometry consistent with a Lyman Break Galaxy at the same redshift. Aside from the LBG, the rest of the Lyman alpha structure has no continuum counterpart in deep UV and visible imaging. The LBG alone seems unable to power the Lyman alpha nebula and the morphology supports our conclusion that, most likely, this structure is powered by in-situ star formation below detection limit. However, from the Lyman alpha alone the origin of this incredible structure remains ambiguous. With this proposal, we aim to acquire high resolution, deep infrared imaging with HST to probe the rest-frame optical emission to search for the underlying stellar emission of this object and to infer the stellar mass of the LBG. With the powerful combination of HST and MUSE data, we will unravel the nature of this unique system.

  8. Negative ion emission at field electron emission from amorphous (alpha-C:H) carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Bernatskij, D P; Ivanov-Omskij, V I; Pavlov, V G; Zvonareva, T K

    2001-01-01

    The study on the electrons field emission from the plane cathode surface on the basis of the amorphous carbon film (alpha-C:H) is carried out. The methodology, making it possible to accomplish simultaneously the registration of the emission currents and visually observe the distribution of the emission centers on the plane emitter surface is developed. The analysis of the oscillograms indicated that apart from the proper electron constituent the negative ions of hydrogen (H sup - and H sub 2 sup -), carbon (C sup -) and hydrocarbon (CH sub n sup -) are observed. The ions emission is connected with the processes of formation and degradation of the local emission centers

  9. Bremsstrahlung emission probability in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boie, Hans-Hermann

    2009-06-03

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed. The measured differential emission probabilities, which could be followed up to {gamma}-energies of {proportional_to} 500 keV, allow for the first time for a serious test of various model calculations of the bremsstrahlung accompanied {alpha} decay. It is shown that corrections to the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation due to the interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole amplitudes and due to the relativistic character of the process have to be taken into account. With the experimentally derived angular correlation the measured energydifferential bremsstrahlung emission probabilities show excellent agreement with the fully quantum mechanical calculation. (orig.)

  10. Consideration of Real World Factors Influencing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in ALPHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discuss a variety of factors that influence the simulated fuel economy and GHG emissions that are often overlooked and updates made to ALPHA based on actual benchmarking data observed across a range of vehicles and transmissions. ALPHA model calibration is also examined, focusin...

  11. LRO Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Far-UV Investigations of Lunar Composition, Porosity, and Space Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, K. D.; Greathouse, T. K.; Mandt, K. E.; Gladstone, R.; Hendrix, A.; Cahill, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Grava, C.; Hurley, D.; Egan, A.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Raut, U.; Byron, B. D.; Magana, L. O.; Stickle, A. M.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Pryor, W. R.

    2017-12-01

    Far ultraviolet reflectance measurements of the Moon, icy satellites, comets, and asteroids have proven surprisingly useful for advancing our understanding of planetary surfaces. This new appreciation for planetary far-UV imaging spectroscopy is provided in large part thanks to nearly a decade of investigations with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP). LAMP has demonstrated an innovative nightside observing technique, putting a new light on permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) and other features on the Moon. Dayside far-UV albedo maps complement the nightside data, enabling comparisons of direct and hemispheric (diffuse) illumination derived albedos. We'll discuss the strengths of the far-UV reflectance imaging spectroscopy technique with respect to several new LAMP results. Detections of water frost and hydration signatures near 165 nm, for example, provide constraints on composition that complement infrared spectroscopy, visible imaging, neutron spectroscopy, radar, and other techniques. LRO's polar orbit and high data downlink capabilities enable searches for diurnal variations in spectral signals. At far-UV wavelengths a relatively blue spectral slope is diagnostic of space weathering, which is opposite of the spectral reddening indicator of maturity at wavelengths longward of 180 nm. By utilizing natural diffuse illumination sources on the nightside the far-UV technique is able to identify relative increases in porosity within the PSRs, and provides an additional tool for determining relative surface ages. On October 6, 2016 LAMP enacted a new, more sensitive dayside operating mode that expands its ability to search for diurnally varying hydration signals associated with different regions and features.

  12. Disturbance from Am-241 Photons of the Cellular Dose by Am-241 Alpha Emissions: Am-241 as an alternative source of alpha particles to radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki-Man; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Bioengineering Laboratory (RadBio Lab) at Seoul National University (SNU) has built an Am-241 alpha particle irradiator for study of cellular responses to radiation from radon daughters. The radon daughters of concern that cause internal exposure from inhalation of radon-contaminated air are Po-218, Po-214 and Po-210. In their alpha decay schemes, the yields of photon emissions are negligible. Unfortunately, Am-241, the source of alpha irradiator in RadBio Lab, emits photons at every alpha decay while transforming to Np-237 of long half-life. Employing Am-241 as the source simulating radon daughters, therefore, requires that photon emissions from Am-241 be specified in term of dose contribution. In this study, Monte Carlo calculations have been made to characterize dose contributions of Am-241 photon emissions. This study confirms that disturbance from Am-241 photon emissions of the cellular dose by Am-241 alpha emissions is negligible. Dose contamination fraction from photon emissions was 8.02 .. 10 -6 at 25 mm SSD at maximum. Also, note that LET in tissue-equivalent medium varies within about 20% for alpha particles at energies over 5 MeV

  13. The use of the long-range alpha detector (LRAD) for alpha emission surveys at active and inactive firing sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Garner, S.E.; Walter, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    Surveys were carried out at five different firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure residual alpha emissions in earth contaminated with natural and depleted uranium. This contamination is caused by controlled experimental explosions during testing of the non fissile components of nuclear weapons. Two conclusions were reached: the first is that post shot clearing of the experimental areas is effective at removing contamination and the second is that the diminution of alpha emissions due to aging is small

  14. A study of excess H-alpha emission in chromospherically active M dwarf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Skumanich, A.; Stauffer, J.R.; Harlan, E.; Bopp, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations from three observatories are combined to study the properties of the excess H-alpha emission which characterizes the most chromospherically active subset of the M dwarf stars, known as the dMe stars. It is demonstrated that the excess H-alpha luminosity from these stars is a monotonically decreasing function of their (R-I) color, and evidence is presented which suggests that the product of the mean surface brightness and the mean filling factor of the emissive regions is essentially constant with color. Another significant result of the study is a linear correlation between the excess luminosity in H-alpha and the coronal X-ray luminosity. 39 refs

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF z {approx} 7 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: PROBING THE EARLIEST GALAXIES AND THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Castellano, M.; Grazian, A.; Boutsia, K.; Giallongo, E.; Maiolino, R.; Paris, D.; Santini, P. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33,00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Vanzella, E.; Cristiani, S. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Dijkstra, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany); Dickinson, M. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Giavalisco, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Moorwood, A., E-mail: laura.pentericci@oa-roma.inaf.it [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-12-20

    We present the final results from our ultra-deep spectroscopic campaign with FORS2 at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) for the confirmation of z {approx_equal} 7 'z-band dropout' candidates selected from our VLT/Hawk-I imaging survey over three independent fields. In particular, we report on two newly discovered galaxies at redshift {approx}6.7 in the New Technology Telescope Deep Field. Both galaxies show an Ly{alpha} emission line with rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of the order of 15-20 A and luminosities of (2-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. We also present the results of ultra-deep observations of a sample of i-dropout galaxies, from which we set a solid upper limit on the fraction of interlopers. Out of the 20 z-dropouts observed we confirm 5 galaxies at 6.6 < z < 7.1. This is systematically below the expectations drawn on the basis of lower redshift observations: in particular, there is a significant lack of objects with intermediate Ly{alpha} EWs (between 20 and 55 A). We conclude that the observed trend for the rising fraction of Ly{alpha} emission in Lyman break galaxies from z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 6 is most probably reversed from z {approx} 6 to z {approx} 7. Explaining the observed rapid change in the Ly{alpha} emitter fraction among the dropout population with reionization requires a fast evolution of the neutral fraction of hydrogen in the universe. Assuming that the universe is completely ionized at z = 6 and adopting a set of semi-analytical models, we find that our data require a change of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the order of {Delta}{chi}{sub H{sub i}}{approx}0.6 in a time {Delta}z {approx} 1, provided that the escape fraction does not increase dramatically over the same redshift interval.

  16. Fluorescence Lyman-Alpha Stratospheric Hygrometer (FLASH): application on meteorological balloons, long duration balloons and unmanned aerial vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykov, Alexey; Khaykin, Sergey; Yushkov, Vladimir; Efremov, Denis; Formanyuk, Ivan; Astakhov, Valeriy

    The FLASH instrument is based on the fluorescent method, which uses H2O molecules photodissociation at a wavelength lambda=121.6 nm (Lalpha - hydrogen emission) followed by the measurement of the fluorescence of excited OH radicals. The source of Lyman-alpha radiation is a hydrogen discharge lamp while the detector of OH fluorescence at 308 -316 nm is a photomultiplier run in photon counting mode. The intensity of the fluorescent light as well as the instrument readings is directly proportional to the water vapor mixing ratio under stratospheric conditions with negligible oxygen absorption. Initially designed for rocket-borne application, FLASH has evolved into a light-weight balloon sonde (FLASH-B) for measurements in the upper troposphere and stratosphere on board meteorological and small plastic balloons. This configuration has been used in over 100 soundings at numerous tropical mid-latitude and polar locations within various international field campaigns. An airborne version of FLASH instrument is successfully utilized onboard stratospheric M55-Geophysica aircraft and tropospheric airborne laboratory YAK42-Roshydromet. The hygrometer was modified for application onboard stratospheric long-duration balloons (FLASH-LDB version). This version was successfully used onboard CNES super-pressure balloon launched from SSC Esrange in March 2007 and flown during 10 days. Special design for polar long duration balloon PoGOLite was created for testing work during polar day in June 2013. Installation and measurement peculiarities as well as observational results are presented. Observations of water vapour using FLASH-B instrument, being of high quality are rather costly as the payload recovery is often complicated and most of the time impossible. Following the goal to find a cost-efficient solution, FLASH was adapted for use onboard Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). This solution was only possible thanks to compactness and light-weight (0.5 kg) of FLASH instrument. The

  17. Constraints on Neutral Hydrogen Outflow from the Warm Rocky Planet GJ1132b using Lyman-alpha Transit Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalkes, William; Berta-Thompson, Zachory; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Newton, Elisabeth; Dittmann, Jason; Bourrier, Vincent; Ehrenreich, David; Kempton, Eliza

    2018-01-01

    GJ1132b is one of the few known Earth-sized planets, and at 12 pc away it is also one of the closest known transiting planets. With an equilibrium temperature of 500 K, this planet is too hot to be habitable but we can use it to learn about the presence and volatile content of rocky planet atmospheres around M dwarf stars. Using Hubble STIS spectra during primary transit, we explore the potential for UV transit detections of GJ1132b. If we were to observe a deep Lyman-α transit, that would indicate the presence of a neutral hydrogen envelope flowing from GJ1132b. On the other hand, ruling out deep absorption from neutral hydrogen may indicate that this planet has either retained its volatiles or lost them very early in the star’s life. We carry out this analysis by extracting 1D spectra from the STIS pipeline, splitting the time-tagged spectra into higher resolution samples, and producing light curves of the red and blue wings of the Lyman-α line. We fit for the baseline stellar flux and transit depths in order to constrain the characteristics of the cloud of neutral hydrogen gas that may surround the planet. Our work extends beyond the transit study into an analysis of the stellar variability and Lyman-α spectrum of GJ1132, a slowly-rotating 0.18 MSun M dwarf with previously uncharacterized UV activity. Understanding the role that UV variability plays in planetary atmospheres and volatile retention is crucial to assess atmospheric evolution and the habitability of cooler rocky planets.

  18. Analysis of coronal H I Lyman alpha measurements from a rocket flight on 1979 April 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withbroe, G.L.; Kohl, J.L.; Weiser, H.; Noci, G.; Munro, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the profiles of resonantly scattered hydrogen Lyman-α coronal radiation have been used to determine hydrogen kinetic temperatures from 1.5 to 4 R/sub sun/ from Sun center in a quiet region of the corona. Proton temperatures derived from the line widths decrease with height from 2.6 x 10 6 K at r = 1.5 R/sub sun/ to 1.2 x 10 6 K at r = 4 R/sub sun/. These measurements combined with temperatures for lower heights determined from earlier Skylab and eclipse data suggest that there is a maximum in the quiet coronal proton temperature at about 1.5 R/sub sun/. Comparison of measured Lyman-α intensities with those calculated using a representative model for the radial variation of the coronal electron density provides information on the magnitude of the electron temperature gradient and suggests that the solar wind flow was subsonic for r<4 R/sub sun/ in the observed region. Comparison of the measured kinetic temperatures to the predictions of a simple two fluid model suggests that there is a small amount of proton heating and/or a nonthermal contribution to the motions of coronal protons between 1.5 and 4 R/sub sun/

  19. The Lyman alpha reference sample. II. Hubble space telescope imaging results, integrated properties, and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Adamo, Angela [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schaerer, Daniel [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Verhamme, Anne; Orlitová, Ivana [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Otí-Floranes, Héctor [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofísica, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain); Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire dAstrophysique, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Kunth, Daniel [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Laursen, Peter [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Herenz, E. Christian, E-mail: matthew@astro.su.se [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    We report new results regarding the Lyα output of galaxies, derived from the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample, and focused on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. For 14 galaxies we present intensity images in Lyα, Hα, and UV, and maps of Hα/Hβ, Lyα equivalent width (EW), and Lyα/Hα. We present Lyα and UV radial light profiles and show they are well-fitted by Sérsic profiles, but Lyα profiles show indices systematically lower than those of the UV (n ≈ 1-2 instead of ≳ 4). This reveals a general lack of the central concentration in Lyα that is ubiquitous in the UV. Photometric growth curves increase more slowly for Lyα than the far ultraviolet, showing that small apertures may underestimate the EW. For most galaxies, however, flux and EW curves flatten by radii ≈10 kpc, suggesting that if placed at high-z only a few of our galaxies would suffer from large flux losses. We compute global properties of the sample in large apertures, and show total Lyα luminosities to be independent of all other quantities. Normalized Lyα throughput, however, shows significant correlations: escape is found to be higher in galaxies of lower star formation rate, dust content, mass, and nebular quantities that suggest harder ionizing continuum and lower metallicity. Six galaxies would be selected as high-z Lyα emitters, based upon their luminosity and EW. We discuss the results in the context of high-z Lyα and UV samples. A few galaxies have EWs above 50 Å, and one shows f{sub esc}{sup Lyα} of 80%; such objects have not previously been reported at low-z.

  20. The Lyman alpha reference sample. II. Hubble space telescope imaging results, integrated properties, and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger; Adamo, Angela; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitová, Ivana; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen; Atek, Hakim; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Herenz, E. Christian

    2014-01-01

    We report new results regarding the Lyα output of galaxies, derived from the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample, and focused on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. For 14 galaxies we present intensity images in Lyα, Hα, and UV, and maps of Hα/Hβ, Lyα equivalent width (EW), and Lyα/Hα. We present Lyα and UV radial light profiles and show they are well-fitted by Sérsic profiles, but Lyα profiles show indices systematically lower than those of the UV (n ≈ 1-2 instead of ≳ 4). This reveals a general lack of the central concentration in Lyα that is ubiquitous in the UV. Photometric growth curves increase more slowly for Lyα than the far ultraviolet, showing that small apertures may underestimate the EW. For most galaxies, however, flux and EW curves flatten by radii ≈10 kpc, suggesting that if placed at high-z only a few of our galaxies would suffer from large flux losses. We compute global properties of the sample in large apertures, and show total Lyα luminosities to be independent of all other quantities. Normalized Lyα throughput, however, shows significant correlations: escape is found to be higher in galaxies of lower star formation rate, dust content, mass, and nebular quantities that suggest harder ionizing continuum and lower metallicity. Six galaxies would be selected as high-z Lyα emitters, based upon their luminosity and EW. We discuss the results in the context of high-z Lyα and UV samples. A few galaxies have EWs above 50 Å, and one shows f esc Lyα of 80%; such objects have not previously been reported at low-z.

  1. Fluctuations in radiation backgrounds at high redshift and the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzbauer, Lauren Nicole

    The first stars to light up our universe are as yet unseen, but there have been many attempts to elucidate their properties. The characteristics of these stars (`Population/Pop III' stars) that we do know lie mostly within theory; they formed out of metal-free hydrogen and helium gas contained in dark matter minihalos at redshifts z 20-30. The extent to which Pop III star formation reached into later times is unknown. Current and near future instruments are incapable of resolving individual Pop III stars. Consequently, astronomers must devise creative means with which to indirectly predict and measure and their properties. In this thesis, we will investigate a few of those means. We use a new method to model fluctuations of the Lyman-Werner (LW) and Lyman-alpha radiation backgrounds at high redshift. At these early epochs the backgrounds are symptoms of a universe newly lit with its first stars. LW photons (11.5-13.6 eV) are of particular interest because they dissociate molecular hydrogen, the primary coolant in the first minihalos that is necessary for star formation. By using a variation of the `halo model', which describes the spatial distribution and clustering of halos, we can efficiently generate power spectra for these backgrounds. Spatial fluctuations in the LW and (indirectly) the Lyman-alpha BG can tell us about the transition from primordial star formation to a more metal-enriched mode that marks the beginning of the second generation of stars in our Universe. The Near Infrared Background (NIRB) has for some time been considered a potential tool with which to indirectly observe the first stars. Ultraviolet (UV) emission from these stars is redshifted into the NIR band, making the NIRB amenable for hunting Pop III stellar signatures. There have been several measurements of the NIRB and subsequent theoretical studies attempting to explain them in recent years. Though controversial, residual levels of the mean NIRB intensity and anisotropies have been

  2. The Ca II resonance lines in M dwarf stars without H-alpha emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampapa, M.S.; Cram, L.E.; Wild, W.J. (National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA) Sydney Univ. (Australia) Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Spectra of the Ca II H and K lines in a sample of 31 M dwarf stars without H-alpha emission are used to calculate chromospheric K line radiative losses, F(k), and to study the joint response of Ca II K and H-alpha to chromospheric heating in dwarf M stars. It is suggested that the poor correlation found in the equivalent width - log F(K) diagram may be due either to radial segregation of the H-alpha and K line forming regions or to lateral inhomogeneities in the chromospheres. The results confirm the existence of dM stars with weak H-alpha absorption and K line emission only slightly weaker than that of the dMe stars, and show that dM stars with weak H-alpha but kinematics and metallicities representative of the young disk population belong to a class characterized by a comparatively high degree of chromospheric activity. 32 refs.

  3. Emission of Lyman α radiation in H2 + H*(2s) collisions at thermal energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, B.

    1991-01-01

    A previously-published study of the thermal-energy collision between H 2 and metastable H*(2s), which could lead to the emission of Lyman α radiation, is reconsidered to take into account possible polarization effects. The total was function of the system is expanded in terms of the molecular states of the intermediate complex H 2 * , which constitute the minimal basis of the four adiabatic states dissociating into H 2 + H*(n=2) where they are normally degenerate in energy. The results of the calculation show the existence, between three of those states, of average values of the separation distance R (R ≅ 10 atomic units) of long range (ΔR ≅ 2 au) electronic interactions which depend on the geometric form of the H 2 * molecule. From the molecular data the hypothesis of no longer considering H 2 with H*(2s) as a rigid rotator is postulated and justified, after a purely quantum mechanical treatment of the radial equations. The mean ratio of the (oscillating) polarization angular differential cross sections tot he elastic ones is found important (> ∼ 1/10). The inelastic phenomena are anticipated to be more marked in the ortho than in the para hydrogen at a low collision energy (75 meV). (15 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.)

  4. Rocket-borne EUV-visible emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Baker, K.D.; Stasek, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two rocket-borne experiments for measuring EUV atmospheric emissions have been conducted. The first measured emissions at 391.4 nm and 557.7 nm, and the second measured emissions in the range from 50 to 650 nm. Height profiles of selected auroral emissions from atomic oxygen at 130.4 nm (exhibiting resonant radiation diffusion) and from atomic oxygen at 557.7 nm, and from neutral and ionized molecular nitrogen are shown. Some details of the recorded spectra are given. In the shorter wavelength regions, emissions from atomic oxygen and nitrogen dominate. Over 140 nm, Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands, second positive bands and Vegard-Kaplan bands of molecular nitrogen contribute most strongly except for some atomic lines. The Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands of molecular nitrogen are relatively weak during the auroral arc as compared to the diffuse aurora

  5. Clustering of galaxies near damped Lyman-alpha systems with (z) = 2.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A. M

    1993-01-01

    The galaxy two-point correlation function, xi, at (z) = 2.6 is determined by comparing the number of Ly-alpha-emitting galaxies in narrowband CCD fields selected for the presence of damped L-alpha absorption to their number in randomly selected control fields. Comparisons between the presented determination of (xi), a density-weighted volume average of xi, and model predictions for (xi) at large redshifts show that models in which the clustering pattern is fixed in proper coordinates are highly unlikely, while better agreement is obtained if the clustering pattern is fixed in comoving coordinates. Therefore, clustering of Ly-alpha-emitting galaxies around damped Ly-alpha systems at large redshifts is strong. It is concluded that the faint blue galaxies are drawn from a parent population different from normal galaxies, the presumed offspring of damped Ly-alpha systems.

  6. Structure of the radio emission from the NGC 1579/LkH. cap alpha. 101 region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R L [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Va. (USA); Broderick, J J; Knapp, G R

    1976-06-01

    Radio-frequency observations at 3.7 and 11 cm of the NGC 1579/LkH..cap alpha..101 region show that the radio emission arises in a compact, < 1'' core concentric with a more extended approximately 1' emission region. At these wavelengths the compact component is optically thick, with a spectrum increasing as ..nu.., whereas the extended region is optically thin and contributes at least 80 per cent of the total flux density. LkH..cap alpha..101 appears to be the source of excitation for all of the radio emission; this result, together with the total infrared luminosity, suggests that an appropriate spectral classification for LkH..cap alpha..101 is B1 IIe.

  7. Scattered light characterization of FORTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Carter, Anna; Redwine, Keith; Teste, Stephane; Pelton, Russell; Hagopian, John; Kutyrev, Alexander; Li, Mary J.; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2017-08-01

    We describe our efforts to build a Wide-Field Lyman alpha Geocoronal simulator (WFLaGs) for characterizing the end-to-end sensitivity of FORTIS (Far-UV Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) to scattered Lyman α emission from outside of the nominal (1/2 degree)2 field-of-view. WFLaGs is a 50 mm diameter F/1 aluminum parabolic collimator fed by a hollow cathode discharge lamp with a 80 mm clear MgF2 window housed in a vacuum skin. It creates emission over a 10 degree FOV. WFLaGS will allow us to validate and refine a recently developed scattered light model and verify our scatter light mitigation strategies, which will incorporate low scatter baffle materials, and possibly 3-d printed light traps, covering exposed scatter centers. We present measurements of scattering intensity of Lyman alpha as a function of angle with respect to the specular reflectance direction for several candidate baffle materials. Initial testing of WFLaGs will be described.

  8. Evidence for Black Hole Growth in Local Analogs to Lyman Break Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Hornschemeier, Ann; LaMassa, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used XMM-Newton to observe six Lyman break analogs (LBAs): members of the rare population of local galaxies that have properties that are very similar to distant Lyman break galaxies. Our six targets were specifically selected because they have optical emission-line properties that are intermediate between starbursts and Type 2 (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our new X-ray data provide an important diagnostic of the presence of an AGN. We find X-ray luminosities of order 10(sup 42) erg per second and ratios of X-ray to far-IR lummositles that are higher than values in pure starburst galaxies by factors ranging from approximately 3 to 30. This strongly suggests the presence of an AGN in at least some of the galaxies. The ratios of the luminosities of the hard (2-10 keV) X-ray to [O III] emission line are low by about an order of magnitude compared with Type 1 AGN, but are consistent with the broad range seen in Type 2 AGN. Either the AGN hard X-rays are significantly obscured or the [O III] emission is dominated by the starburst. We searched for an iron emission line at approximately 6.4 ke V, which is a key feature of obscured AGNs, but only detected emission at the approximately 2sigma level. Finally, we find that the ratios of the mid-infrared (24 micrometer) continuum to [O III]lambda 5007 luminosities in these LBAs are higher than the values for Type 2 AGN by an average of 0.8 dex. Combining all these clues, we conclude that an AGN is likely to be present, but that the bolometric luminosity is produced primarily by an intense starburst. If these black holes are radiating at the Eddington limit, their masses would lie in the range of 10(sup 5) - 10(sup 6) solar mass. These objects may offer ideal local laboratories to investigate the processes by which black holes grew in the early universe.

  9. GAS MOTION STUDY OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 2 USING FUV AND OPTICAL SPECTRAL LINES {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Rauch, Michael; Janice Lee [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Okamura, Sadanori, E-mail: thashimoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Hosei University, 3-7-2 Kajino-cho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of Magellan/MMIRS and Keck/NIRSPEC spectroscopy for five Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z {approx_equal} 2.2 for which high-resolution FUV spectra from Magellan/MagE are available. We detect nebular emission lines including H{alpha} on the individual basis and low-ionization interstellar (LIS) absorption lines in a stacked FUV spectrum, and measure average offset velocities of the Ly{alpha} line, {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}}, and LIS absorption lines, {Delta}v {sub abs}, with respect to the systemic velocity defined by the nebular lines. For a sample of eight z {approx} 2-3 LAEs without active galactic nucleus from our study and the literature, we obtain {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} = 175 {+-} 35 km s{sup -1}, which is significantly smaller than that of Lyman-break Galaxies (LBGs), {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx_equal} 400 km s{sup -1}. The stacked FUV spectrum gives {Delta}v {sub abs} = -179 {+-} 73 km s{sup -1}, comparable to that of LBGs. These positive {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} and negative {Delta}v {sub abs} suggest that LAEs also have outflows. In contrast to LBGs, however, the LAEs' {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} is as small as |{Delta}v {sub abs}|, suggesting low neutral hydrogen column densities. Such a low column density with a small number of resonant scattering may cause the observed strong Ly{alpha} emission of LAEs. We find an anti-correlation between Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) and {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} in a compilation of LAE and LBG samples. Although its physical origin is not clear, this anti-correlation result appears to challenge the hypothesis that a strong outflow, by means of a reduced number of resonant scattering, produces a large EW. If LAEs at z > 6 have similarly small {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} values, constraints on the reionization history derived from the Ly{alpha} transmissivity may need to be revised.

  10. The solar ionisation rate deduced from Ulysses measurements and its implications to interplanetary Lyman alpha-intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summanen, T.; Kyroelae, E.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a computer code which can be used to study 3-dimensional and time-dependent effects of the solar cycle on the interplanetary (IP) hydrogen distribution. The code is based on the inverted Monte Carlo simulation. In this work we have modelled the temporal behaviour of the solar ionisation rate. We have assumed that during the most of the time of the solar cycle there is an anisotopic latitudinal structure but right at the solar maximum the anisotropy disappears. The effects of this behaviour will be discussed both in regard to the IP hydrogen distribution and IP Lyman a a-intensity.

  11. Constraining Lyman continuum escape using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Sambit K.; Zackrisson, Erik; Binggeli, Christian; Pelckmans, Kristiaan; Cubo, Rubén; Mellema, Garrelt

    2018-05-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will observe the rest-frame ultraviolet/optical spectra of galaxies from the epoch of reionization (EoR) in unprecedented detail. While escaping into the intergalactic medium, hydrogen-ionizing (Lyman continuum; LyC) photons from the galaxies will contribute to the bluer end of the UV slope and make nebular emission lines less prominent. We present a method to constrain leakage of the LyC photons using the spectra of high redshift (z >~ 6) galaxies. We simulate JWST/NIRSpec observations of galaxies at z =6-9 by matching the fluxes of galaxies observed in the Frontier Fields observations of galaxy cluster MACS-J0416. Our method predicts the escape fraction fesc with a mean absolute error Δfesc ~ 0.14. The method also predicts the redshifts of the galaxies with an error .

  12. Linearity Analysis and Efficiency Testing of The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) Science Cameras for Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. C.; Rachmeler, L.; Winebarger, A. R.; Champey, P. R.; Bethge, C.

    2017-12-01

    To unveil the complexity of the solar atmosphere, measurement of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere and transition region is fundamentally important, as this is where the forces transition from plasma to magnetic field dominated. Measurements of the field are also needed to shed light on the energy transport from the lower atmospheric regions to the corona beyond. Such an advance in heliospheric knowledge became possible with the first flight of the international solar sounding rocket mission, CLASP. For the first time, linear polarization was measured in H Lyman-Alpha at 121.60 nm in September 2015. For linear polarization measurements in this line, high sensitivity is required due to the relatively weak polarization signal compared to the intensity. To achieve this high sensitivity, a low-noise sensor is required with good knowledge of its characterization, including linearity. This work presents further refinement of the linearity characterization of the cameras flown in 2015. We compared the current from a photodiode in the light path to the digital response of the detectors. Pre-flight CCD linearity measurements were taken for all three flight cameras and calculations of the linear fits and residuals were performed. However, the previous calculations included a smearing pattern and a digital saturation region on the detectors which were not properly taken into account. The calculations have been adjusted and were repeated for manually chosen sub-regions on the detectors that were found not to be affected. We present a brief overview of the instrument, the calibration data and procedures, and a comparison of the old and new linearity results. The CLASP cameras will be reused for the successor mission, CLASP2, which will measure the Mg II h & k lines between 279.45 nm and 280.35 nm. The new approach will help to better prepare for and to improve the camera characterization for CLASP2.

  13. The development of an innovative, real-time monitor for airborne alpha emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritzo, R.; Fowler, M.; Wouters, J.

    1994-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is developing a technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of incinerator stacks for low levels of airborne alpha activity. Referred to as the Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System (LVFTDS), this technology uses a unique design for sensitive, real-time measurements of alpha particle emissions. Scintillating plates are stacked close together so that alpha-particle emissions in the flowing gas stream strike a plate. The light pulses produced when the alpha particle strikes the plate are registered by photomultiplier tubes and processed to determine the concentration of alpha emitting radionuclides present in the air. This technology directly addresses the public's demand for fast responding, high sensitivity effluent monitoring systems. With Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 funding LANL has fabricated a beach-top proof of concept detector system and is conducting tests to evaluate its performance. A second generation prototype is being designed, based on requirements driven by potential field test sites. An industrial partner is being solicited to license the technology. Field trials of a full-scale detector system are planned for fiscal year 1995. In this paper the LVFTDS technology is explained, including the measured performance of a prototype detector. The advantages, disadvantages, and other ramifications of applying this technology to incinerator effluent monitoring are also discussed. An overview of the development effort is also provided

  14. Impact of Lyman alpha pressure on metal-poor dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Haehnelt, Martin; Blaizot, Jérémy; Katz, Harley; Michel-Dansac, Léo; Garel, Thibault; Rosdahl, Joakim; Teyssier, Romain

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the origin of strong galactic outflows and the suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies is a key problem in galaxy formation. Using a set of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated dwarf galaxy embedded in a 1010 M⊙ halo, we show that the momentum transferred from resonantly scattered Lyman-α (Lyα) photons is an important source of stellar feedback which can shape the evolution of galaxies. We find that Lyα feedback suppresses star formation by a factor of two in metal-poor galaxies by regulating the dynamics of star-forming clouds before the onset of supernova explosions (SNe). This is possible because each Lyα photon resonantly scatters and imparts ˜10-300 times greater momentum than in the single scattering limit. Consequently, the number of star clusters predicted in the simulations is reduced by a factor of ˜5, compared to the model without the early feedback. More importantly, we find that galactic outflows become weaker in the presence of strong Lyα radiation feedback, as star formation and associated SNe become less bursty. We also examine a model in which radiation field is arbitrarily enhanced by a factor of up to 10, and reach the same conclusion. The typical mass-loading factors in our metal-poor dwarf system are estimated to be ˜5-10 near the mid-plane, while it is reduced to ˜1 at larger radii. Finally, we find that the escape of ionizing radiation and hence the reionization history of the Universe is unlikely to be strongly affected by Lyα feedback.

  15. Improving the limits of detection of low background alpha emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Brendan D.; Coleman, Stuart; Harris, Jack T.; Warburton, William K.

    2018-01-01

    Alpha particle emission - even at extremely low levels - is a significant issue in the search for rare events (e.g., double beta decay, dark matter detection). Traditional measurement techniques require long counting times to measure low sample rates in the presence of much larger instrumental backgrounds. To address this, a commercially available instrument developed by XIA uses pulse shape analysis to discriminate alpha emissions produced by the sample from those produced by other surfaces of the instrument itself. Experience with this system has uncovered two residual sources of background: cosmogenics and radon emanation from internal components. An R&D program is underway to enhance the system and extend the pulse shape analysis technique further, so that these residual sources can be identified and rejected as well. In this paper, we review the theory of operation and pulse shape analysis techniques used in XIA's alpha counter, and briefly explore data suggesting the origin of the residual background terms. We will then present our approach to enhance the system's ability to identify and reject these terms. Finally, we will describe a prototype system that incorporates our concepts and demonstrates their feasibility.

  16. SCORE - Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Moses, Dan; Romoli, Marco

    The Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment - SCORE - is a The Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment - SCORE - is a coronagraph for multi-wavelength imaging of the coronal Lyman-alpha lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and for the broad.band visible-light emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009 acquiring the first images of the HeII line-emission from the extended corona. The simultaneous observation of the coronal Lyman-alpha HI 121.6 nm, has allowed the first determination of the absolute helium abundance in the extended corona. This presentation will describe the lesson learned from the first flight and will illustrate the preparations and the science perspectives for the second re-flight approved by NASA and scheduled for 2016. The SCORE optical design is flexible enough to be able to accommodate different experimental configurations with minor modifications. This presentation will describe one of such configurations that could include a polarimeter for the observation the expected Hanle effect in the coronal Lyman-alpha HI line. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV) can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Thus, space-based UV spectro-polarimetry would provide an additional new tool for the diagnostics of coronal magnetism.

  17. Helium burning: a further measurement of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    The 12 C (α,γ) 16 O is a key (but still unknown) reaction in helium burning. Several attempts to constrain the p-wave S-factor at Helium burning temperatures (200 M K) using the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N have been made. However, some discrepancy exists between the spectra measured at Settle and that of TRIUMF. We have improved our previous study of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N by improving our statistical sample (by more than a factor of 5), improving the energy resolution of the experiment (by 20%), and in understanding our line shape, deduced from measured quantities. Our newly measured spectrum of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N is consistent with the Seattle ('95) data, as well as an earlier experiment performed at Mains ('71) and is not consistent with the TRIUMF ('94) data. (author)

  18. Incorporating Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Into the Lyman Model to Improve Prediction of Radiation Pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li Minghuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Ting; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yuan Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yu Jinming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Zhensheng; Yin Ming; Guan Xiaoxiang; Wang Lie; Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Martel, Mary [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with DNA repair, cell cycle, transforming growth factor-{beta}, tumor necrosis factor and receptor, folic acid metabolism, and angiogenesis can significantly improve the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen SNPs from 10 different genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX1, MDM2, TGF{beta}, TNF{alpha}, TNFR, MTHFR, MTRR, and VEGF) were genotyped in 141 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy. The LKB model was used to estimate the risk of severe (grade {>=}3) RP as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with SNPs and patient smoking status incorporated into the model as dose-modifying factors. Multivariate analyses were performed by adding significant factors to the MLD model in a forward stepwise procedure, with significance assessed using the likelihood-ratio test. Bootstrap analyses were used to assess the reproducibility of results under variations in the data. Results: Five SNPs were selected for inclusion in the multivariate NTCP model based on MLD alone. SNPs associated with an increased risk of severe RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, TNF{alpha}, XRCC1 and APEX1. With smoking status included in the multivariate model, the SNPs significantly associated with increased risk of RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, and XRCC3. Bootstrap analyses selected a median of 4 SNPs per model fit, with the 6 genes listed above selected most often. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that SNPs can significantly improve the predictive ability of the Lyman MLD model. With a small number of SNPs, it was possible to distinguish cohorts with >50% risk vs <10% risk of RP when they were exposed to high MLDs.

  19. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Torano, E.; Acena, M.L.; Bortels, G.; Mouchel, D.

    1993-01-01

    The alpha-particle emission probabilities (P α ) of 239 Pu have been measured using material of highest enrichment and radiochemical purity, thin sources produced by vacuum sublimation, and high-resolution α spectroscopy with ion-implanted Si detectors (PIPS). The results for the major emissions are P α0.07 =0.7077±0.0014, P α13 =0.1711±0.0014 and P α51 =0.1194±0.0007, which for the P α0.07 is about 3.6% lower than the recent evaluated value in the literature. (orig.)

  20. Sources of Sodium in the Lunar Exosphere: Modeling Using Ground-Based Observations of Sodium Emission and Spacecraft Data of the Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sharma, A. Surjalal; Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the equatorial lunar sodium emission are examined to quantify the effect of precipitating ions on source rates for the Moon's exospheric volatile species. Using a model of exospheric sodium transport under lunar gravity forces, the measured emission intensity is normalized to a constant lunar phase angle to minimize the effect of different viewing geometries. Daily averages of the solar Lyman alpha flux and ion flux are used as the input variables for photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and ion sputtering, respectively, while impact vaporization due to the micrometeoritic influx is assumed constant. Additionally, a proxy term proportional to both the Lyman alpha and to the ion flux is introduced to assess the importance of ion-enhanced diffusion and/or chemical sputtering. The combination of particle transport and constrained regression models demonstrates that, assuming sputtering yields that are typical of protons incident on lunar soils, the primary effect of ion impact on the surface of the Moon is not direct sputtering but rather an enhancement of the PSD efficiency. It is inferred that the ion-induced effects must double the PSD efficiency for flux typical of the solar wind at 1 AU. The enhancement in relative efficiency of PSD due to the bombardment of the lunar surface by the plasma sheet ions during passages through the Earth's magnetotail is shown to be approximately two times higher than when it is due to solar wind ions. This leads to the conclusion that the priming of the surface is more efficiently carried out by the energetic plasma sheet ions.

  1. Spin-polarized x-ray emission of 3d transition-metal ions : A comparison via K alpha and K beta detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; deGroot, F.M.F.; Cramer, SP

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that spin-polarized x-ray-excitation spectra can be obtained using K alpha emission as well as K beta lines. A spin-polarized analysis of K alpha x-ray emission and the excitation spectra by K alpha detection on a Ni compound is reported. A systematic analysis of the

  2. The Ultraviolet Radiation Environment around M Dwarf Exoplanet Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Stocke, John T.; Tian, Feng; Bushinsky, Rachel; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Mauas, Pablo; hide

    2013-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No "UV-quiet" M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Lyman-alpha emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Lyman-alpha line fluxes comprise approximately 37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; approximately greater than 10(exp3) times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Lyman-alpha and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Lyman-alpha. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Lyman-alpha)/F(Mg II) = 10(exp3). The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, is shown to be approximately 0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, greather than 10(exp3) times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%.500% on 10(exp2)-10(exp3) s timescales. This effect should be taken

  3. Continuous emission from the gaseous nebula beyond the Lyman limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolgova, G.T.; Khromov, G.S.

    1975-01-01

    Models of spherically-symmetric isothermic hydrogen nebula with an exciting star in the centre are considered. Spectra and energies of diffuse radiation of nebula and of direct radiation of its kernel are calculated in the Lyman continuum for the external boundary of the object. The spectrum of the diffuse radiation is shown to be to a great extent invariant in relation to all parameters of models except for Tsub(e). The total loss in energy of Lsub(c)-radiation of kernel through the external border of the ionized nebula, amounts to 20-30% in the average even at a considerable optical thickness of the object tausub(0). The greater part of this energy is transferred via direct ionizing radiation, though the relative contribution of the diffuse Lsub(c)-radiation of nebula reaches 30% at low temperatures of the exciting star and at large tausub(0). The results of this work may be applied to calculating the energy balance of the star-nebula system, the heating of dust particles and ionization of the neighbouring interstellar medium, and also for determining the conditions of observation of the far ultra-violet radiation of similar objects

  4. Lyman-continuum leakage as dominant source of diffuse ionized gas in the Antennae galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilbacher, Peter M.; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Verhamme, Anne; Sandin, Christer; Steinmetz, Matthias; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Krajnović, Davor; Kamann, Sebastian; Roth, Martin M.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Maseda, Michael V.; Wendt, Martin; Bacon, Roland; Dreizler, Stefan; Richard, Johan; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2018-04-01

    The Antennae galaxy (NGC 4038/39) is the closest major interacting galaxy system and is therefore often studied as a merger prototype. We present the first comprehensive integral field spectroscopic dataset of this system, observed with the MUSE instrument at the ESO VLT. We cover the two regions in this system which exhibit recent star formation: the central galaxy interaction and a region near the tip of the southern tidal tail. In these fields, we detect HII regions and diffuse ionized gas to unprecedented depth. About 15% of the ionized gas was undetected by previous observing campaigns. This newly detected faint ionized gas is visible everywhere around the central merger, and shows filamentary structure. We estimate diffuse gas fractions of about 60% in the central field and 10% in the southern region. We are able to show that the southern region contains a significantly different population of HII regions, showing fainter luminosities. By comparing HII region luminosities with the HST catalog of young star clusters in the central field, we estimate that there is enough Lyman-continuum leakage in the merger to explain the amount of diffuse ionized gas that we detect. We compare the Lyman-continuum escape fraction of each HII region against emission line ratios that are sensitive to the ionization parameter. While we find no systematic trend between these properties, the most extreme line ratios seem to be strong indicators of density bounded ionization. Extrapolating the Lyman-continuum escape fractions to the southern region, we conclude that simply from the comparison of the young stellar populations to the ionized gas there is no need to invoke other ionization mechanisms than Lyman-continuum leaking HII regions for the diffuse ionized gas in the Antennae. FITS images and Table of HII regions are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A95 and at http://muse-vlt.eu/science/antennae/

  5. POLARIZED EXTENDED Ly{alpha} EMISSION FROM A z = 2.3 RADIO GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, A. [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Vernet, J.; Fosbury, R. A. E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Villar-Martin, M. [Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Di Serego Alighieri, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Cimatti, A., E-mail: andrew.humphrey@astro.up.pt [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We present spatially resolved spectropolarimetric measurements of the 100 kpc scale gaseous environment of the z = 2.34 radio galaxy TXS 0211-122. The polarization level of the narrow Ly{alpha} emission is low centrally (P < 5%), but rises to P = 16.4% {+-} 4.6% in the eastern part of the nebula, indicating that the nebula is at least partly powered by the scattering of Ly{alpha} photons by H I. Not only is this the first detection of polarized Ly{alpha} around a radio-loud active galaxy, it is also the second detection to date for any kind of Ly{alpha} nebula. We also detect a pair of diametrically opposed UV continuum sources along the slit, at the outer edges of the Ly{alpha} nebula, which we suggest may be the limb of a dusty shell, related to the large-scale H I absorbers often associated with high-z radio galaxies.

  6. Detection of Lyman/alpha emission from a DLA galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Fynbo, Johan Peter Uldall; Fall, S.M

    2004-01-01

    HIGH-REDSHIFT; BREAK GALAXIES; STARFORMATION; DISK GALAXIES; METAL ENRICHMENT; HOST GALAXY; ABSORPTION; ABSORBER; SYSTEMS; SPECTROSCOPY......HIGH-REDSHIFT; BREAK GALAXIES; STARFORMATION; DISK GALAXIES; METAL ENRICHMENT; HOST GALAXY; ABSORPTION; ABSORBER; SYSTEMS; SPECTROSCOPY...

  7. High-resolution Lyman-alpha filtergrams of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, R. M.; Decaudin, M.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an experiment, conducted jointly by the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory and the Laboratoire de Physique Stellaire et Planetaire du CNRS, which investigated the transition-region plasma and the geometry of coronal active regions, in relation to models of the high-temperature layers, are presented. A Black Brant rocket was used to obtain 1-arc sec resolution L-alpha pictures of the sun, which revealed small scale features not seen previously at this wavelength, that delineate the geometry of the magnetic field in the chromosphere and in the corona. It is concluded that these observations might provide a new way of observing the upper chromosphere and corona, and that they provide direct evidence of the inhomogeneous character of the chromosphere and of the dominant role of the magnetic field

  8. Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Donald F; Dyve, Suzan; Minuzzi, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain......Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain...

  9. Haro 11: Where is the Lyman Continuum Source?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, Ryan P.; Oey, M. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Jaskot, Anne E. [Department of Astronomy, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); James, Bethan L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    Identifying the mechanism by which high-energy Lyman continuum (LyC) photons escaped from early galaxies is one of the most pressing questions in cosmic evolution. Haro 11 is the best known local LyC-leaking galaxy, providing an important opportunity to test our understanding of LyC escape. The observed LyC emission in this galaxy presumably originates from one of the three bright, photoionizing knots known as A, B, and C. It is known that Knot C has strong Ly α emission, and Knot B hosts an unusually bright ultraluminous X-ray source, which may be a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus. To clarify the LyC source, we carry out ionization-parameter mapping (IPM) by obtaining narrow-band imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 and ACS cameras to construct spatially resolved ratio maps of [O iii]/[O ii] emission from the galaxy. IPM traces the ionization structure of the interstellar medium and allows us to identify optically thin regions. To optimize the continuum subtraction, we introduce a new method for determining the best continuum scale factor derived from the mode of the continuum-subtracted, image flux distribution. We find no conclusive evidence of LyC escape from Knots B or C, but instead we identify a high-ionization region extending over at least 1 kpc from Knot A. This knot shows evidence of an extremely young age (≲1 Myr), perhaps containing very massive stars (>100 M {sub ⊙}). It is weak in Ly α , so if it is confirmed as the LyC source, our results imply that LyC emission may be independent of Ly α emission.

  10. Faint H-alpha emission objects near the equatorial selected areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, T.H.; Jordan, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    An objective-prism survey of fields centered on the 24 Kapteyn Selected Areas along the celestial equator has resulted in the detection of 120 faint H-alpha emission-line objects. Diffuse objects and stars having molecular bands in their spectra are not included. Only 18 of these stars were identified in previous lists of emission-line objects. Identifications were found for an additional three stars. Images of these objects appear to be stellar on direct plates. The magnitude range for these stars is V = 10.1-19.00. Positions and V magnitudes of these objects are provided, as are identifications of objects which have been reported in other lists. Frequency distributions of the apparent magnitudes and Galactic latitudes of these emission-line objects are discussed, and finding charts are provided. 14 refs

  11. Comparison of photospheric electric current and ultraviolet and x-ray emission in a solar active region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisch, B.M.; Bruner, M.E.; Hagyard, M.J.; Bonnet, R.M.; NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; ESA, Paris, France)

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive set of coordinated observations of a solar active region, taking into account spectroheliograms obtained with the aid of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument, SMM soft x-ray polychromator (XRP) raster maps, and high spatial resolution ultraviolet images of the sun in Lyman-alpha and in the 1600 A continuum. These data span together the upper solar atmosphere from the temperature minimum to the corona. The data are compared to maps of the inferred photospheric electric current derived from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph observations. Some empirical correlation is found between regions of inferred electric current density and the brightest features in the ultraviolet continuum and to a lesser extent those seen in Lyman-alpha within an active region. 29 references

  12. A reliable cw Lyman-α laser source for future cooling of antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbe, Daniel; Beczkowiak, Anna; Diehl, Thomas; Koglbauer, Andreas; Sattler, Matthias; Stappel, Matthias; Steinborn, Ruth; Walz, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a reliable continuous-wave (cw) laser source at the 1 S–2 P transition in (anti)hydrogen at 121.56 nm (Lyman-α) based on four-wave sum-frequency mixing in mercury. A two-photon resonance in the four-wave mixing scheme is essential for a powerful cw Lyman-α source and is well investigated.

  13. Galaxy interactions and star formation: Results of a survey of global H-alpha emission in spiral galaxies in 8 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C.

    1990-01-01

    Kennicutt and Kent (1983) have shown that the global H alpha emission from a spiral galaxy is an indicator of the formation rate of massive stars. Moss, Whittle and Irwin (1988) have surveyed two clusters (Abell 347 and 1367) for galaxies with H alpha emission using a high dispersion objective prism technique. The purpose of the survey is to investigate environmental effects on star formation in spiral galaxies, and in particular to ascertain whether star formation is enhanced in cluster spirals. Approximately 20 percent of CGCG galaxies were detected in emission. Two plates of excellent quality were obtained for each of the two clusters, and galaxies were only identified to have emission if this was detected on both plates of a plate pair. In this way, plate flaws and other spurious identifications of emission could be rejected, and weak emission confirmed. The results of this survey have been discussed by Moss (1987). The detected galaxies are of types SO-a and later. The frequency with which galaxies are detected in emission increases towards later morphological type as expected (cf. Kennicutt and Kent 1983). There is no evidence of any dependence of the frequency of detected emission on the absolute magnitude of the galaxy (cf. Moss and Whittle 1990), but there is a strong correlation between a disturbed morphological appearance of the galaxy and the detection of emission. Furthermore it is found that the emission is more centrally concentrated in those galaxies which show a disturbed morphology. It may be noted that the objective prism plate gives a spectrum of a 400 A region around rest wavelength H alpha, but superposed on this is the H alpha emission from the galaxy which, because the light is essentially monochromatic, results in a true two-dimensional image of the H alpha distribution. The visual appearance of the emission on the prism plates was classified according to its diffuseness on a 5 point scale (very diffuse, diffuse, intermediate, compact, and

  14. A comparison of photospheric electric current and ultraviolet and X-ray emission in a solar active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, B. M.; Bruner, M. E.; Hagyard, M. J.; Bonnet, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive set of coordinated observations of a solar active region, taking into account spectroheliograms obtained with the aid of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument, SMM soft X-ray polychromator (XRP) raster maps, and high spatial resolution ultraviolet images of the sun in Lyman-alpha and in the 1600 A continuum. These data span together the upper solar atmosphere from the temperature minimum to the corona. The data are compared to maps of the inferred photospheric electric current derived from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph observations. Some empirical correlation is found between regions of inferred electric current density and the brightest features in the ultraviolet continuum and to a lesser extent those seen in Lyman-alpha within an active region.

  15. First Results from the Lyman Alpha Galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (LAGER) Survey: Cosmological Reionization at z ∼ 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Jiang, Chunyan [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai 200030 (China); Wang, Junxian; Hu, Weida; Kong, Xu [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Rhoads, James; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Gonzalez, Alicia [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Infante, Leopoldo; Galaz, Gaspar; Barrientos, L. Felipe [Institute of Astrophysics and Center for Astroengineering, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago 7820436 (Chile); Walker, Alistair R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Jiang, Linhua [The Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hibon, Pascale [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Zheng, XianZhong, E-mail: zhengzy@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: Sangeeta.Malhotra@asu.edu, E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-06-20

    We present the first results from the ongoing Lyman Alpha Galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (LAGER) project, which is the largest narrowband survey for z ∼ 7 galaxies to date. Using a specially built narrowband filter NB964 for the superb large-area Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the NOAO/CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope, LAGER has collected 34 hr NB964 narrowband imaging data in the 3 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field. We have identified 23 Ly α Emitter candidates at z = 6.9 in the central 2-deg{sup 2} region, where DECam and public COSMOS multi-band images exist. The resulting luminosity function (LF) can be described as a Schechter function modified by a significant excess at the bright end (four galaxies with L {sub Lyα∼} 10{sup 43.4±0.2} erg s{sup −1}). The number density at L {sub Ly} {sub α} ∼ 10{sup 43.4±0.2} erg s{sup −1} is little changed from z = 6.6, while at fainter L {sub Lyα} it is substantially reduced. Overall, we see a fourfold reduction in Ly α luminosity density from z = 5.7 to z = 6.9. Combined with a more modest evolution of the continuum UV luminosity density, this suggests a factor of ∼3 suppression of Ly α by radiative transfer through the z ∼ 7 intergalactic medium (IGM). It indicates an IGM neutral fraction of x {sub Hi} ∼ 0.4–0.6 (assuming Ly α velocity offsets of 100–200 km s{sup −1}). The changing shape of the Ly α LF between z ≲ 6.6 and z = 6.9 supports the hypothesis of ionized bubbles in a patchy reionization at z ∼ 7.

  16. X-ray heating and ionization of broad-emission-line regions in QSO's and active galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisheit, J.C.; Shields, G.A.; Tarter, C.B.

    1980-07-01

    Absorption of x-rays deep within the broad-line emitting clouds in QSO's and the nuclei of active galaxies creates extensive zones of warm (T approx. 10 4 K), partially ionized N/sub e//N approx. 0.1) gas. Because Lyman alpha photons are trapped in these regions, the x-ray energy is efficiently channeled into Balmer lines collisionally excited from the n = 2 level. The HI regions plus the HII regions created by ultraviolet photons illuminating the surfaces of the clouds give rise to integrated Lα/Hα line emission ratios between 1 and 2. Enhanced MgII line emission from the HI regions gives rise to integrated MgII/Hα ratios near 0.5. The OI line lambda 8446 is efficiently pumped by trapped Hα photons and in the x-ray heated zone an intensity ratio I (lambda 8446)/I(Hα) approx. < 0.1 is calculated. All of these computed ratios now are in agreement with observations

  17. Exploring the Structure of the Distant Universe with MUSE Data Cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Mason; Christensen, Lise

    2018-01-01

    The mass distribution in intergalactic and circumgalactic space is not well known since it is difficult to characterize objects in the distant universe. An ideal tool for studying such distant structure is the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) of the Very Large Telescope array, which employs a wide field-of-view and a large spectral range to produce high spatial resolution datasets. Here we exploit the 2 spatial dimensions and 1 spectral dimension of a particular MUSE “data cube” to identify and characterize emission line sources near the line-of-sight to quasar PKS1937-101, which lies at a redshift of z=3.787. In particular, we search for galaxy companions to a z=3.572 Lyman-limit system measured in the quasar spectrum and find an associated Lyman-alpha emitter at z=3.556 with a projected distance of 30.2 kpc from the quasar line-of-sight. Through a combination of automated source extraction and manual investigation, we also identify 25 emission line galaxies and 1 other Lyman-alpha emitter in our field. The proximity of several of these objects to the quasar line-of-sight allows us to reliably identify absorption lines in the quasar spectrum that can be associated with observed emission lines with resolved fluxes. This will help characterize the metallicities and kinematics of galaxy halos and circumgalactic media in the early universe.

  18. Development of a Lyman-α Imaging Solar Telescope for the Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jang

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Long term observations of full-disk Lyman-α irradiance have been made by the instruments on various satellites. In addition, several sounding rockets dating back to the 1950s and up through the present have measured the Lyman-α irradiance. Previous full disk Lyman-α images of the sun have been very interesting and useful scientifically, but have been only five-minute ``snapshots" obtained on sounding rocket flights. All of these observations to date have been snapshots, with no time resolution to observe changes in the chromospheric structure as a result of the evolving magnetic field, and its effect on the Lyman-α intensity. The Lyman-α Imaging Solar Telescope(LIST can provide a unique opportunity for the study of the sun in the Lyman-α region with the high time and spatial resolution for the first time. Up to the 2nd year development, the preliminary design of the optics, mechanical structure and electronics system has been completed. Also the mechanical structure analysis, thermal analysis were performed and the material for the structure was chosen as a result of these analyses. And the test plan and the verification matrix were decided. The operation systems, technical and scientific operation, were studied and finally decided. Those are the technical operation, mechanical working modes for the observation and safety, the scientific operation and the process of the acquired data. The basic techniques acquired through the development of satellite based solar telescope are essential for the construction of space environment forecast system in the future. The techniques which we developed through this study, like mechanical, optical and data processing techniques, could be applied extensively not only to the process of the future production of flight models of this kind, but also to the related industries. Also, we can utilize the scientific achievements which are obtained throughout the project. And these can be utilized to build a high

  19. Probable alpha and 14C cluster emission from hyper Ac nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhosh, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic study on the probability for the emission of 4 He and 14 C cluster from hyper Λ 207-234 Ac and non-strange normal 207-234 Ac nuclei are performed for the first time using our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The predicted half lives show that hyper Λ 207-234 Ac nuclei are unstable against 4 He emission and 14 C emission from hyper Λ 217-228 Ac are favorable for measurement. Our study also show that hyper Λ 207-234 Ac are stable against hyper Λ 4 He and Λ 14 C emission. The role of neutron shell closure (N = 126) in hyper Λ 214 Fr daughter and role of proton/neutron shell closure (Z ∼ 82, N = 126) in hyper Λ 210 Bi daughter are also revealed. As hyper-nuclei decays to normal nuclei by mesonic/non-mesonic decay and since most of the predicted half lives for 4 He and 14 C emission from normal Ac nuclei are favourable for measurement, we presume that alpha and 14 C cluster emission from hyper Ac nuclei can be detected in laboratory in a cascade (two-step) process. (orig.)

  20. VOYAGER 1&2 JUPITER BRIGHTNESS NORTH/SOUTH MAP SET V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Voyager 1 and 2 measurements of the brightness of Jupiter at H Lyman alpha and in the H2 Lyman and Werner bands shortward of H Lyman alpha....

  1. X-ray emission on hybird stars: ROSAT observations of alpha Trianguli Australis and iota Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, V.; Rosner, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on deep ROSAT observations of two Hybrid atmosphere stars, alpha TrA and iota Aur, and our analysis of these observations. We detect high-energy transient phenomena on alpha TrA and consider the implications of this discovery to the atmospheres of Hybrid stars. We detect iota Aur in the high-energy passband of ROSAT, implying the existence of multimillion degree plasma on the star. Our major results include the following: discovery of two large flare events, detected during pointed observations of alpha TrA; the demonstration that the flare emission most likely comes from the giant itself, rather than from a previously unseen low-mass companion star; the demonstration that the plasma characteristics associated with the flares and with the 'quiescent' component are essentially indistinguishable; and that the geometric dimensions of the emitting plasma are considerably smaller than the critical dimension characterizing stable 'hot' coronal loop structures. Our results suggest that alpha TrA does not have any steady X-ray emission consistent with theoretical expectations, and support the argument that Hybrid stars constitute a transitional type of object in which large-scale magnetic dynamo activity ceases, and the dominant spatial scales characterizing coronal structure rapidly decline as such stars evolve across the X-ray 'Dividing Line' in the H-R diagram.

  2. Minihalo Model for the Low-Redshift Lyman alpha Absorbers Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalović, A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We reconsider the basic properties of the classical minihalo model of Rees and Milgrom in light of the new work, both observational (on "dark galaxies" and masses of baryonic haloes and theoretical (on the cosmological mass function and the history of star formation. In particular, we show that more detailed models of ionized gas in haloes of dark matter following isothermal and Navarro-Frenk-White density profile can effectively reproduce particular aspects of the observed column density distribution function in a heterogeneous sample of low-and intermediate-redshift Ly$alpha$ forest absorption lines.

  3. Low-redshift Lyman continuum leaking galaxies with high [O III]/[O II] ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Worseck, G.; Schaerer, D.; Guseva, N. G.; Thuan, T. X.; Fricke, K. J.; Verhamme, A.; Orlitová, I.

    2018-05-01

    We present observations with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope of five star-forming galaxies at redshifts z in the range 0.2993 - 0.4317 and with high emission-line flux ratios O32 = [O III]λ5007/[O II]λ3727 ˜ 8 - 27 aiming to detect the Lyman continuum (LyC) emission. We detect LyC emission in all galaxies with the escape fractions fesc(LyC) in a range of 2 - 72 per cent. A narrow Lyα emission line with two peaks in four galaxies and with three peaks in one object is seen in medium-resolution COS spectra with a velocity separation between the peaks Vsep varying from ˜153 km s-1 to ˜ 345 km s-1. We find a general increase of the LyC escape fraction with increasing O32 and decreasing stellar mass M⋆, but with a large scatter of fesc(LyC). A tight anti-correlation is found between fesc(LyC) and Vsep making Vsep a good parameter for the indirect determination of the LyC escape fraction. We argue that one possible source driving the escape of ionizing radiation is stellar winds and radiation from hot massive stars.

  4. arXiv Neutrino masses and cosmology with Lyman-alpha forest power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Baur, Julien; Magneville, Christophe; Rossi, Graziano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Borde, Arnaud; Burtin, Etienne; LeGoff, Jean-Marc; Rich, James; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David

    2015-11-06

    We present constraints on neutrino masses, the primordial fluctuation spectrum from inflation, and other parameters of the $\\Lambda$CDM model, using the one-dimensional Ly$\\alpha$-forest power spectrum measured by Palanque-Delabrouille et al. (2013) from SDSS-III/BOSS, complemented by Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and other cosmological probes. This paper improves on the previous analysis by Palanque-Delabrouille et al. (2015) by using a more powerful set of calibrating hydrodynamical simulations that reduces uncertainties associated with resolution and box size, by adopting a more flexible set of nuisance parameters for describing the evolution of the intergalactic medium, by including additional freedom to account for systematic uncertainties, and by using Planck 2015 constraints in place of Planck 2013. Fitting Ly$\\alpha$ data alone leads to cosmological parameters in excellent agreement with the values derived independently from CMB data, except for a weak tension on the scalar index ...

  5. Measurement of Gross Alpha and Beta Emission Rates from Ceramic Tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wudthicharoonpun, Piyasak; Chankow, Nares

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Ceramic tiles normally used to cover floors and walls contain naturally occurring radioactive elements i.e. potassium-40, uranium, thorium and their daughters from raw materials. Thus, radioactivity was dependent upon source of raw materials and the amount used. The objective of this research was to measure gross alpha and beta emission rates to be used as a database for safety assessment and for selection of rooms to measure radioactive radon-222 gas

  6. Direct method gas-phase oxygen abundances of four Lyman break analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jonathan S.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We measure the gas-phase oxygen abundances in four Lyman break analogs using auroral emission lines to derive direct abundances. The direct method oxygen abundances of these objects are generally consistent with the empirically derived strong-line method values, confirming that these objects are low oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation defined by star forming Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. We find slightly anomalous excitation conditions (Wolf-Rayet features) that could potentially bias the empirical estimates toward high values if caution is not exercised in the selection of the strong-line calibration. The high rate of star formation and low oxygen abundance of these objects is consistent with the predictions of the fundamental metallicity relation, in which the infall of relatively unenriched gas simultaneously triggers an episode of star formation and dilutes the interstellar medium of the host galaxy.

  7. Stationary inverted Lyman population formed from incandescently heated hydrogen gas with certain catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Randell L; Ray, Paresh C; Mayo, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    A new chemically generated plasma source is reported. The presence of gaseous Rb + or K + ions with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a low applied temperature, extremely low voltage plasma called a resonant transfer or rt-plasma having strong vacuum ultraviolet emission. We propose an energetic catalytic reaction involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and Rb + or 2K + since Rb + to Rb 2+ , 2K + to K + K 2+ , and K to K 3+ each provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to the potential energy of atomic hydrogen. Remarkably, a stationary inverted Lyman population was observed; thus, these catalytic reactions may pump a cw HI laser as predicted by a collisional radiative model used to determine that the observed overpopulation was above threshold

  8. Damped Lyman-alpha absorption by disk galaxies with large redshifts. III. Intermediate-resolution spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnshek, D.A.; Wolfe, A.M.; Lanzetta, K.M.; Briggs, F.H.; Cohen, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    New intermediate-resolution spectroscopy for six members of a sample of 68 moderate- to high-redshift QSOs is presented. Evidence is reported which indicates that seven strong absorption features in the QSO spectra are due to damped Ly-alpha absorption. A standard curve-of-growth analysis on five of the damped systems is performed, and relevant properties are tabulated and discussed. Six of the seven damped Ly-alpha systems have H I column densities of 2 x 10 to the 20th/sq cm or larger, while the remaining system has an H I column density of about 10 to the 20th/sq cm. It is suggested that damped Ly-alpha systems arise when a sight line intercepts a high-redshift protogalaxy disk containing a quiescent cloud component characterized by high column density and low effective velocity dispersion. At the same time, the sight line usually intercepts a broader turbulent component, which is identified as the halo, characterized by much lower column density and higher effective velocity dispersion. 42 refs

  9. Evolution in the Continuum Morphological Properties of Ly alpha-Emitting Galaxies from Z=3.1 to Z=2.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Gawiser, Eric; Guaita, Lucia; Padilla, Nelson; Gronwall, Chile Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Lai, Kamson

    2011-01-01

    We present a rest-frame ultraviolet morphological analysis of 108 z = 2.1 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) and compare it to a similar sample of 171 LAEs at z = 3.1 . Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken as part of the Galaxy Evolution From Morphology and SEDs survey, Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, and Hubble Ultradeep Field surveys, we measure the size and photometric component distributions, where photo- metric components are defined as distinct clumps of UV-continuum emission. At both redshifts, the majority of LAEs have observed half-light radii physical properties derived from its SED. LAEs are found to be larger for galaxies with larger stellar mass, larger star formation rate, and larger dust obscuration, but there is no evidence for a trend between equivalent width and half-light radius at either redshift. The presence of these correlations suggests that a wide range of objects are being selected by LAE surveys at that redshift, including a significant fraction of objects for which a massive and moderately extended population of old stars underlies the young starburst giving rise to the Lya emission.

  10. Chemical Abundances in SFG and DLA

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; König, Brigitte; Cherinka, Brian

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the chemical abundances of local star-forming galaxies which cause Damped Lyman Alpha lines. A metallicity versus redshift diagram is constructed, on which the chemical abundances of low-redshift star-forming galaxy populations are compared with those of high-redshift Damped Lyman Alpha systems. We disucss two types of experiments on individual star-forming galaxies. In the first, the Damped Lyman Alpha line is created against an internal ultraviolet light source generated by a...

  11. Fragmentation inside atomic cooling haloes exposed to Lyman-Werner radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, John A.; Downes, Turlough P.

    2018-04-01

    Supermassive stars born in pristine environments in the early Universe hold the promise of being the seeds for the supermassive black holes observed as high redshift quasars shortly after the epoch of reionisation. H2 suppression is thought to be crucial in order to negate normal Population III star formation and allow high accretion rates to drive the formation of supermassive stars. Only in the cases where vigorous fragmentation is avoided will a monolithic collapse be successful, giving rise to a single massive central object. We investigate the number of fragmentation sites formed in collapsing atomic cooling haloes subject to various levels of background Lyman-Werner flux. The background Lyman-Werner flux manipulates the chemical properties of the gas in the collapsing halo by destroying H2. We find that only when the collapsing gas cloud shifts from the molecular to the atomic cooling regime is the degree of fragmentation suppressed. In our particular case, we find that this occurs above a critical Lyman-Werner background of J ˜ 10 J21. The important criterion being the transition to the atomic cooling regime rather than the actual value of J, which will vary locally. Once the temperature of the gas exceeds T ≳ 104 K and the gas transitions to atomic line cooling, then vigorous fragmentation is strongly suppressed.

  12. Stationary inverted Lyman population formed from incandescently heated hydrogen gas with certain catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Randell L; Ray, Paresh C; Mayo, Robert M [BlackLight Power, Inc., 493 Old Trenton Road, Cranbury, NJ 08512 (United States)

    2003-07-07

    A new chemically generated plasma source is reported. The presence of gaseous Rb{sup +} or K{sup +} ions with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a low applied temperature, extremely low voltage plasma called a resonant transfer or rt-plasma having strong vacuum ultraviolet emission. We propose an energetic catalytic reaction involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and Rb{sup +} or 2K{sup +} since Rb{sup +} to Rb{sup 2+}, 2K{sup +} to K + K{sup 2+}, and K to K{sup 3+} each provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to the potential energy of atomic hydrogen. Remarkably, a stationary inverted Lyman population was observed; thus, these catalytic reactions may pump a cw HI laser as predicted by a collisional radiative model used to determine that the observed overpopulation was above threshold.

  13. Small-scale structure and the Lyman-α forest baryon acoustic oscillation feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Christopher M.

    2018-02-01

    The baryon-acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the Lyman-α forest is a key probe of the cosmic expansion rate at redshifts z ˜ 2.5, well before dark energy is believed to have become significant. A key advantage of the BAO as a standard ruler is that it is a sharp feature and hence is more robust against broad-band systematic effects than other cosmological probes. However, if the Lyman-α forest transmission is sensitive to the initial streaming velocity of the baryons relative to the dark matter, then the BAO peak position can be shifted. Here we investigate this sensitivity using a suite of hydrodynamic simulations of small regions of the intergalactic medium with a range of box sizes and physics assumptions; each simulation starts from initial conditions at the kinematic decoupling era (z ˜ 1059), undergoes a discrete change from neutral gas to ionized gas thermal evolution at reionization (z ˜ 8), and is finally processed into a Lyman-α forest transmitted flux cube. Streaming velocities suppress small-scale structure, leading to less violent relaxation after reionization. The changes in the gas distribution and temperature-density relation at low redshift are more subtle, due to the convergent temperature evolution in the ionized phase. The change in the BAO scale is estimated to be of the order of 0.12 per cent at z = 2.5; some of the major uncertainties and avenues for future improvement are discussed. The predicted streaming velocity shift would be a subdominant but not negligible effect (of order 0.26σ) for the upcoming DESI Lyman-α forest survey, and exceeds the cosmic variance floor.

  14. Projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Shadi Mohammad Ibrahim

    2010-03-16

    This work reports on the study of the projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions. Excitation of K-shell in He-like uranium ions, electron capture into H-like uranium ions and Simultaneous ionization and excitation of initially He-like uranium ions have been studied using the experimental storage ring at GSI. For the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} and K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} transitions originating from the excitation of the He-like uranium ions, no alignment was observed. In contrast, the Ly{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} radiation from the simultaneous ionization-excitation process of the He-like uranium ions shows a clear alignment. The experimental value leads to the inclusion of a magnetic term in the interaction potential. The capture process of target electrons into the highly-charged heavy ions was studied using H-like uranium ions at an incident energy of 220 MeV/u, impinging on N{sub 2} gas-target. It was shown that, the strongly aligned electrons captured in 2p{sub 3/2} level couple with the available 1s{sub 1/2} electron which shows no initial directional preference. The magnetic sub-state population of the 2p{sub 3/2} electron is redistributed according to the coupling rules to the magnetic sub-states of the relevant two-electron states. This leads to the large anisotropy in the corresponding individual ground state transitions contributing to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} emission. From the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}/K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} ratio, the current results show that the incoherent addition of the E1 and M2 transition components yield to an almost isotropic emission of the total K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}. In contrast to the radiative electron capture, the experimental results for the K-shell single excitation of He-like uranium ions indicate that only the {sup 1}P{sub 1} level contributes to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} transition. For this case, the anisotropy parameter {beta}{sub 20} was found to be -0.20{+-}0.03. This work also reports on the study of a two

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF FAINT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES NEAR REDSHIFT FIVE IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Cohen, Seth; Grogin, Norman; Hathi, Nimish; Ryan, Russell; Straughn, Amber; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Xu Chun; Koekemoer, Anton; Panagia, Nino; Dickinson, Mark; Ferreras, Ignacio; Gronwall, Caryl; Kuemmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy; Meurer, Gerhardt; Pasquali, Anna; Yan, H.-J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the faintest spectroscopically confirmed sample of z ∼ 5 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) to date. The sample is based on slitless grism spectra of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field region from the Grism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) and Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) projects, using the G800L grism on the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. We report here confirmations of 39 galaxies, preselected as candidate LBGs using photometric selection criteria. We compare a 'traditional' V-dropout selection, based on the work of Giavalisco et al., to a more liberal one (with V - i > 0.9), and find that the traditional criteria are about 64% complete and 81% reliable. We also study the Lyα emission properties of our sample. We find that Lyα emission is detected in ∼1/4 of the sample, and that the liberal V-dropout color selection includes ∼55% of previously published line-selected Lyα sources. Finally, we examine our stacked two-dimensional spectra. We demonstrate that strong, spatially extended (∼1'') Lyα emission is not a generic property of these LBGs, but that a modest extension of the Lyα photosphere (compared to the starlight) may be present in those galaxies with prominent Lyα emission.

  16. Quantitative autoradiography of alpha particle emission in geo-materials using the Beaver™ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardini, Paul; Angileri, Axel; Descostes, Michael; Duval, Samuel; Oger, Tugdual; Patrier, Patricia; Rividi, Nicolas; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Toubon, Hervé; Donnard, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    In rocks or artificial geo-materials, radioactive isotopes emitting alpha particles are dispersed according to the mineralogy. At hand specimen scale, the achievement of quantitative chemical mapping of these isotopes takes on a specific importance. Knowledge of the distribution of the uranium and thorium series radionuclides is of prime interest to several disciplines, from the geochemistry of uranium deposits, to the dispersion of uranium mill tailings in the biosphere. The disequilibrium of these disintegration chains is also commonly used for dating. However, some prime importance isotopes, such as 226 Ra, are complicated to localize in geo-materials. Because of its high specific activity, 226 Ra is found in very low concentrations (~ppq), preventing its accurate localization in rock forming minerals. This paper formulates a quantitative answer to the following question: at hand specimen scale, how can alpha emitters in geo-materials be mapped quantitatively? In this study, we tested a new digital autoradiographic method (called the Beaver™) based on a Micro Patterned Gaseous Detector (MPGD) in order to quantitatively map alpha emission at the centimeter scale rock section. Firstly, for two thin sections containing U-bearing minerals at secular equilibrium, we compared the experimental and theoretical alpha count rates, measured by the Beaver™ and calculated from the uranium content, respectively. We found that they are very similar. Secondly, for a set of eight homemade standards made up of a mixture of inactive sand and low-radioactivity mud, we compared the count rates obtained by the Beaver™ and by an alpha spectrometer. The results indicate (i) a linearity between both count rates, and (ii) that the count obtained by the Beaver™ can be estimated from the count obtained by the alpha spectrometry using a factor of 0.82.

  17. Quantitative autoradiography of alpha particle emission in geo-materials using the Beaver™ system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardini, Paul; Angileri, Axel [IC2MP Equipe HydrASA, 6 Rue Michel Brunet, B35, TSA 51106 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Descostes, Michael [AREVA Mines, R& D Department, Paris (France); Duval, Samuel; Oger, Tugdual [AI4R SAS, Nantes (France); Patrier, Patricia [IC2MP Equipe HydrASA, 6 Rue Michel Brunet, B35, TSA 51106 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Rividi, Nicolas [Service Camparis, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Siitari-Kauppi, Marja [Radiochemistry Laboratory, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Toubon, Hervé [AREVA Mines, R& D Department, Paris (France); Donnard, Jérôme [AI4R SAS, Nantes (France)

    2016-10-11

    In rocks or artificial geo-materials, radioactive isotopes emitting alpha particles are dispersed according to the mineralogy. At hand specimen scale, the achievement of quantitative chemical mapping of these isotopes takes on a specific importance. Knowledge of the distribution of the uranium and thorium series radionuclides is of prime interest to several disciplines, from the geochemistry of uranium deposits, to the dispersion of uranium mill tailings in the biosphere. The disequilibrium of these disintegration chains is also commonly used for dating. However, some prime importance isotopes, such as {sup 226}Ra, are complicated to localize in geo-materials. Because of its high specific activity, {sup 226}Ra is found in very low concentrations (~ppq), preventing its accurate localization in rock forming minerals. This paper formulates a quantitative answer to the following question: at hand specimen scale, how can alpha emitters in geo-materials be mapped quantitatively? In this study, we tested a new digital autoradiographic method (called the Beaver™) based on a Micro Patterned Gaseous Detector (MPGD) in order to quantitatively map alpha emission at the centimeter scale rock section. Firstly, for two thin sections containing U-bearing minerals at secular equilibrium, we compared the experimental and theoretical alpha count rates, measured by the Beaver™ and calculated from the uranium content, respectively. We found that they are very similar. Secondly, for a set of eight homemade standards made up of a mixture of inactive sand and low-radioactivity mud, we compared the count rates obtained by the Beaver™ and by an alpha spectrometer. The results indicate (i) a linearity between both count rates, and (ii) that the count obtained by the Beaver™ can be estimated from the count obtained by the alpha spectrometry using a factor of 0.82.

  18. Optical observations of molecular dissociation in thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.G.; Gay, T.J.; Brooks, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have measured the intensity and polarizations of light emitted from atomic excited states of dissociated molecular ions. Using HeH + projectiles, we have observed factors of 1-5 enhancements of the light from n=3, sup(1,3)P,D states of He I and some He II and H I emissions. Observations of Lyman alpha emission after dissociation of H 2 + and H 3 + show rapid variations in light yield for small internuclear separations at the foil surface. (author)

  19. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  20. Late Rectal Toxicity on RTOG 94-06: Analysis Using a Mixture Lyman Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei; Bosch, Walter R.; Michalski, Jeff; Winter, Kathryn; Mohan, Radhe; Purdy, James A.; Kuban, Deborah; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, M. Rex; Thames, Howard D.; Cox, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the parameters of the Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model using censored time-to-event data for Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity among patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06, a dose-escalation trial designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model was fitted to data from 1,010 of the 1,084 patients accrued on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06 using an approach that accounts for censored observations. Separate fits were obtained using dose-volume histograms for whole rectum and dose-wall histograms for rectal wall. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.2 years, the crude incidence of Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity was 15% (n = 148). The parameters of the Lyman model fitted to dose-volume histograms data, with 95% profile-likelihood confidence intervals, were TD 50 = 79.1 Gy (75.3 Gy, 84.3 Gy), m = 0.146 (0.107, 0.225), and n = 0.077 (0.041, 0.156). The fit based on dose-wall histogram data was not significantly different. Patients with cardiovascular disease had a significantly higher incidence of late rectal toxicity (p = 0.015), corresponding to a dose-modifying factor of 5.3%. No significant association with late rectal toxicity was found for diabetes, hypertension, rectal volume, rectal length, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, or prescribed dose per fraction (1.8 Gy vs. 2 Gy). Conclusions: These results, based on a large cohort of patients from a multi-institutional trial, are expected to be widely representative of the ability of the Lyman model to describe the long-term risk of Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  1. THE Lyα LINE PROFILES OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: FAST WINDS AND LYMAN CONTINUUM LEAKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Crystal L.; Wong, Joseph [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106 (United States); Dijkstra, Mark [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, Postboks 1029, 0858 Oslo (Norway); Henry, Alaina [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Soto, Kurt T. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Danforth, Charles W., E-mail: cmartin@physics.ucsb.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309 (United States)

    2015-04-10

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph far-ultraviolet (far-UV) spectroscopy and Keck Echellete optical spectroscopy of 11 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), a rare population of local galaxies experiencing massive gas inflows, extreme starbursts, and prominent outflows. We detect Lyα emission from eight ULIRGs and the companion to IRAS09583+4714. In contrast to the P Cygni profiles often seen in galaxy spectra, the Lyα profiles exhibit prominent, blueshifted emission out to Doppler shifts exceeding −1000 km s{sup −1} in three H ii-dominated and two AGN-dominated ULIRGs. To better understand the role of resonance scattering in shaping the Lyα line profiles, we directly compare them to non-resonant emission lines in optical spectra. We find that the line wings are already present in the intrinsic nebular spectra, and scattering merely enhances the wings relative to the line core. The Lyα attenuation (as measured in the COS aperture) ranges from that of the far-UV continuum to over 100 times more. A simple radiative transfer model suggests the Lyα photons escape through cavities which have low column densities of neutral hydrogen and become optically thin to the Lyman continuum in the most advanced mergers. We show that the properties of the highly blueshifted line wings on the Lyα and optical emission-line profiles are consistent with emission from clumps of gas condensing out of a fast, hot wind. The luminosity of the Lyα emission increases nonlinearly with the ULIRG bolometric luminosity and represents about 0.1–1% of the radiative cooling from the hot winds in the H ii-dominated ULIRGs.

  2. Laser-produced lithium plasma as a narrow-band extended ultraviolet radiation source for photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriever, G; Mager, S; Naweed, A; Engel, A; Bergmann, K; Lebert, R

    1998-03-01

    Extended ultraviolet (EUV) emission characteristics of a laser-produced lithium plasma are determined with regard to the requirements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The main features of interest are spectral distribution, photon flux, bandwidth, source size, and emission duration. Laser-produced lithium plasmas are characterized as emitters of intense narrow-band EUV radiation. It can be estimated that the lithium Lyman-alpha line emission in combination with an ellipsoidal silicon/molybdenum multilayer mirror is a suitable EUV source for an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy microscope with a 50-meV energy resolution and a 10-mum lateral resolution.

  3. DETECTIONS OF LYMAN CONTINUUM FROM STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z ∼ 3 THROUGH SUBARU/SUPRIME-CAM NARROW-BAND IMAGING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, I.; Inoue, A. K.; Matsuda, Y.; Furusawa, H.; Akiyama, M.; Hayashino, T.; Kousai, K.; Yamada, T.; Burgarella, D.; Deharveng, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Knowing the amount of ionizing photons from young star-forming galaxies is of particular importance to understanding the reionization process. Here we report initial results of a Subaru/Suprime-Cam deep imaging observation of the SSA22 proto-cluster region at z = 3.09, using a special narrow-band filter to optimally trace ionizing radiation from galaxies at z ∼ 3. The unique wide field-of-view of Suprime-Cam enabled us to search for ionizing photons from 198 galaxies (73 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and 125 Lyα emitters (LAEs)) with spectroscopically measured redshifts z ≅ 3.1. We detected ionizing radiation from 7 LBGs, as well as from 10 LAE candidates. Some of the detected galaxies show significant spatial offsets of ionizing radiation from nonionizing UV emission. For some LBGs the observed nonionizing UV to Lyman continuum flux density ratios are smaller than values expected from population synthesis models with a standard Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) with moderate dust attenuation (which is suggested from the observed UV slopes), even if we assume very transparent intergalactic medium along the sightlines of these objects. This implies an intrinsically bluer spectral energy distribution, e.g., that produced by a top-heavy IMF, for these LBGs. The observed flux density ratios of nonionizing UV to ionizing radiation of 7 detected LBGs range from 2.4 to 23.8 and the median is 6.6. The observed flux density ratios of the detected LAEs are even smaller than LBGs, if they are truly at z ≅ 3.1. We find that the median value of the flux density ratio for the detected LBGs suggests that their escape fractions are likely to be higher than 4%, if the Lyman continuum escape is isotropic. The results imply that some of the LBGs in the proto-cluster at z ∼ 3 have escape fraction significantly higher than that of galaxies (in a general field) at z ∼ 1 studied previously.

  4. Spectro-polarimetric observation in UV with CLASP to probe the chromosphere and transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryouhei; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Winebarger, Amy R.; Auchère, Frédéric; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Bando, Takamasa; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Tsuneta, Saku; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Goto, Motoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-05-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a NASA sounding-rocket experiment that was performed in White Sands in the US on September 3, 2015. During its 5-minute ballistic flight, CLASP successfully made the first spectro-polarimetric observation in the Lyman-alpha line (121.57 nm) originating in the chromosphere and transition region. Since the Lyman-alpha polarization is sensitive to magnetic field of 10-100 G by the Hanle effect, we aim to infer the magnetic field information in such upper solar atmosphere with this experiment.The obtained CLASP data showed that the Lyman-alpha scattering polarization is about a few percent in the wings and the order of 0.1% in the core near the solar limb, as it had been theoretically predicted, and that both polarization signals have a conspicuous spatio-temporal variability. CLASP also observed another upper-chromospheric line, Si III (120.65 nm), whose critical field strength for the Hanle effect is 290 G, and showed a measurable scattering polarization of a few % in this line. The polarization properties of the Si III line could facilitate the interpretation of the scattering polarization observed in the Lyman-alpha line.In this presentation, we would like to show how the upper chromosphere and transition region are seen in the polarization of these UV lines and discuss the possible source of these complicated polarization signals.

  5. Summary of alpha-neutron sources in GADRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Dean James; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.

    2012-01-01

    A common source of neutrons for calibration and testing is alpha-neutron material, named for the alpha-neutron nuclear reaction that occurs within. This material contains a long-lived alpha-emitter and a lighter target element. When the alpha particle from the emitter is absorbed by the target, neutrons and gamma rays are released. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) includes built-in alpha-neutron source definitions for AcC, AmB, AmBe, AmF, AmLi, CmC, and PuC. In addition, GADRAS users may create their own alpha-neutron sources by placing valid alpha-emitters and target elements in materials within their one-dimensional models (1DModel). GADRAS has the ability to use pre-built alpha-neutron sources for plotting or as trace-sources in 1D models. In addition, if any material (existing or user-defined) specified in a 1D model contains both an alpha emitter in conjunction with a target nuclide, or there is an interface between such materials, then the appropriate neutron-emission rate from the alpha-neutron reaction will be computed. The gamma-emissions from these sources are also computed, but are limited to a subset of nine target nuclides. If a user has experimental data to contribute to the alpha-neutron gamma emission database, it may be added directly or submitted to the GADRAS developers for inclusion. The gadras.exe.config file will be replaced when GADRAS updates are installed, so sending the information to the GADRAS developers is the preferred method for updating the database. This is also preferable because it enables other users to benefit from your efforts.

  6. DB-1900 low-background measuring device of alpha and beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongquan; Gan Jinbang; Chen Qi; Zhao Yunqing

    1997-08-01

    The device is a box-type detector used to measure the emissivity of Alpha and Beta from dry samples under 2π geometry in radionuclide metrology. It is composed of a high efficiency αβ detector with electrostatic screen of zero potential [patent ZL92111938.0 (in China)] and anticoincidence detector in lead chamber, and has been reasonably combined with double anticoincidence technique to form integral equipment. The characteristics of the device are as follows: It can stably measure the emissivity of Alpha and Beta from dry samples with less surface conductivity (the surface resistance of the samples: 13 Ω) in detector. It can measure Beta emissivity from samples in which Alpha coexist with Beta, and discrimination between Alpha and Beta emissivities can be made simultaneously by two paths. It is a good quantitative means for measuring Alpha and Beta radiation in radiometry, radiation protection and environmental protection. It could be used to measure weak radiativity of Alpha and Beta samples from scientific research, minerals, building materials, plastics, medicinal materials, seas and oceans biology, et al. (7 refs., 8 tabs., 17 figs.)

  7. Resonant line transfer in a fog: using Lyman-alpha to probe tiny structures in atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark; McCourt, Michael; Peng Oh, S.

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by observational and theoretical work that suggest very small-scale (≲ 1 pc) structure in the circumgalactic medium of galaxies and in other environments, we study Lyman-α (Lyα) radiative transfer in an extremely clumpy medium with many clouds of neutral gas along the line of sight. While previous studies have typically considered radiative transfer through sightlines intercepting ≲ 10 clumps, we explored the limit of a very large number of clumps per sightline (up to fc 1000). Our main finding is that, for covering factors greater than some critical threshold, a multiphase medium behaves similarly to a homogeneous medium in terms of the emergent Lyα spectrum. The value of this threshold depends on both the clump column density and the movement of the clumps. We estimated this threshold analytically and compare our findings to radiative transfer simulations with a range of covering factors, clump column densities, radii, and motions. Our results suggest that (I) the success in fitting observed Lyα spectra using homogeneous "shell models" (and the corresponding failure of multiphase models) hints at the presence of very small-scale structure in neutral gas, which is in agreement within a number of other observations; and (II) the recurrent problems of reproducing realistic line profiles from hydrodynamical simulations may be due to their inability to resolve small-scale structure, which causes simulations to underestimate the effective covering factor of neutral gas clouds. The movie associated to Fig. B.2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Observations of chromospheric lines from OSO-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann-Doerth, U.; Kneer, F.; Uexkuell, M.; Artzner, G. E.; Vial, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Results of OSO-8 measurements of the line profiles of the solar Lyman alpha, Ca II K and Mg II k lines are presented. Observations were obtained with the Laboratoire de Physique Stellaire et Planetaire spectrometer at spectral resolutions of 0.25 and 0.060 A for Lyman alpha and 0.025 A for the Mg II and Ca II lines. The Lyman alpha profiles are found to be highly variable according to spatial position with the intensities of the three lines well correlated, and confirm previous observations of the quiet solar chromosphere. Data suggest that the quiet chromosphere is a dynamical phenomenon whose description in terms of a static model atmosphere is only qualitatively valid at best.

  9. New constraints on Lyman-α opacity using 92 quasar lines of sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Sarah E. I.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Reed, Sophie; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Becker, George; Rorai, Albert

    2018-05-01

    The large scatter in Lyman-α opacity at z > 5.3 has been an ongoing mystery, prompting a flurry of numerical models. A uniform ultra-violet background has been ruled out at those redshifts, but it is unclear whether any proposed models produce sufficient inhomogeneities. In this paper we provide an update on the measurement which first highlighted the issue: Lyman-α effective optical depth along high-z quasar lines of sight. We nearly triple on the previous sample size in such a study thanks to the cooperation of the DES-VHS, SHELLQs, and SDSS collaborations as well as new reductions and spectra. We find that a uniform UVB model is ruled out at 5.1 < z < 5.3, as well as higher redshifts, which is perplexing. We provide the first such measurements at z ~ 6. None of the numerical models we confronted to this data could reproduce the observed scatter.

  10. Ly-alpha polarimeter design for CLASP rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Watanabe, H.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Tsuneta, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Ichimoto, K.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Song, D.

    2011-12-01

    A sounding-rocket program called the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is proposed to be launched in the Summer of 2014. CLASP will observe the upper solar chromosphere in Ly-alpha (121.567 nm), aiming to detect the linear polarization signal produced by scattering processes and the Hanle effect for the first time. The CLASP needs a rotating half-waveplate and a polarization analyzer working at the Ly-alpha wavelength to measure the linear polarization signal. We select Magnesium Fluoride (MgF2) as a material of the optical components because of its birefringent property and high transparency at UV wavelength. We have confirmed that the reflection at the Brewster's Angle of MgF2 plate is a good polarization analyzer for the Ly-alpha line by deriving its ordinary refractive index and extinction coefficient along the ordinary and extraordinary axes. These optical parameters are calculated with a least-square fitting in such a way that the reflectance and transmittance satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relation. The reflectance and transmittance against oblique incident angles for the s-polarized and the p-polarized light are measured using the synchrotron beamline at the Ultraviolet Synchrotron Orbital Radiation Facility (UVSOR). We have also measured a retardation of a zeroth-order waveplate made of MgF2. The thickness difference of the waveplate is 14.57 um.This waveplate works as a half-waveplate at 121.74 nm. From this measurement, we estimate that a waveplate with the thickness difference of 15.71 um will work as a half-waveplate at the Ly-alpha wavelength. We have developed a rotating waveplate - polarization analyzer system called a prototype of CLASP polarimeter, and input the perfect Stokes Q and U signals. The modulation patterns that are consistent with the theoretical prediction are successfully obtained in both cases.

  11. The Intergalactic Medium as a Cosmological Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viel, Matteo, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.i [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); INFN/National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    In this talk I will review the capabilities of high-resolution (UVES and Keck) and low resolution (Sloan Digital Sky Survey - SDSS) quasar (QSO) Lyman-alpha absorption spectra as cosmological tools to probe the dark matter distribution in the high redshift universe. I will first summarize the results in terms of cosmological parameters and then discuss consistency with the parameters derived from other large scale structure observable such as the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and weak lensing surveys. When the Lyman-alpha forest data are combined with CMB data and the weak lensing results of the z-COSMOS survey the constraints are: sigma{sub 8}=0.800+-0.023, n{sub s}=0.971+-0.011OMEGA{sub m}=0.247+-0.016 (1-sigma error bars), in perfect agreement with the CMB results of WMAP year five alone. I will briefly address the importance of Lyman-alpha for constraining the neutrino mass fraction. Furthermore, I will present constraints on the mass of warm dark matter (WDM) particles derived from the Lyman-alpha flux power spectrum of 55 high-resolution HIRES Lyman-alpha forest spectra at 2.0=1.2keV (2sigma) if the WDM consists of early decoupled thermal relics and m{sub WDM}>=5.6keV (2sigma) for sterile neutrinos. Adding the SDSS Lyman-alpha flux power spectrum at 2.2=4keV and m{sub WDM}>=28keV (2sigma) for thermal relics and sterile neutrinos. These results improve previous findings by a factor two and are currently the tightest constraints on the coldness of cold dark matter. Finally, I will discuss: i) recent results for a mixture of cold and warm dark matter and the constraints for sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates in a physically motivated framework (resonant production); ii) perspectives of cross-correlating the Lyman-alpha forest with convergence maps of the cosmic microwave background; iii) fitting of the flux probability distribution function.

  12. STAR FORMATION FROM DLA GAS IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafelski, Marc; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence for spatially extended low surface brightness emission around Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in the V-band image of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, corresponding to the z ∼ 3 rest-frame far-UV (FUV) light, which is a sensitive measure of star formation rates (SFRs). We find that the covering fraction of molecular gas at z ∼ 3 is not adequate to explain the emission in the outskirts of LBGs, while the covering fraction of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at high redshift is sufficient. We develop a theoretical framework to connect this emission around LBGs to the expected emission from neutral H I gas, i.e., damped Lyα systems (DLAs), using the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation. Working under the hypothesis that the observed FUV emission in the outskirts of LBGs is from in situ star formation in atomic-dominated hydrogen gas, the results suggest that the SFR efficiency in such gas at z ∼ 3 is between factors of 10 and 50 lower than predictions based on the local KS relation. The total SFR density in atomic-dominated gas at z ∼ 3 is constrained to be ∼10% of that observed from the inner regions of LBGs. In addition, the metals produced by in situ star formation in the outskirts of LBGs yield metallicities comparable to those of DLAs, which is a possible solution to the 'Missing Metals' problem for DLAs. Finally, the atomic-dominated gas in the outskirts of galaxies at both high and low redshifts has similar reduced SFR efficiencies and is consistent with the same power law.

  13. Quantum 1/f noise in non-degerate semiconductors and emission statistics of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousik, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Charged particle scattering is accompanied by the emission of soft photons. Handel's theory of 1/f noise, based on the infrared divergent coupling of the system to the electromagnetic field or other elementary excitations, states that the current associated with a beam of scattered particles will exhibit 1/f noise. The fraction of the particles scattered with an energy loss epsilon to soft photon emission is proportional to 1/epsilon and herein lies the origin of the quantum theory of 1/f noise. The 1/f noise caused by mobility fluctuations in semiconductors is related to the scattering cross section fluctuation given by Handel's theory, through the relaxation time. Chapters Two through Five of this dissertation presents the results of the detailed calculation of mobility fluctuation 1/f noise and Hooge parameter in nondegenerate semiconductors. Numerical results are given for silicon and gallium arsenide. Data obtained from extensive measurements on counting techniques for alpha-particles radioactive decay from a source containing 94 Pu 239 , 95 Am 241 and 96 Cm 244 are presented in Chapters Six and Seven of this dissertation. These data show that the statistics are non-Poissonian for large counting times (of the order of 1000 minutes) contrary to the popular belief that alpha-decay is an example of Poissonian statistics. Measurements of the Allan variance indicated the presence of a slow Lorentzian flicker noise and 1/f noise and the magnitude of the noise for large counting times is considerably larger than that predicted by Poissonian statistics

  14. Investigating the Lyman photon escape in local starburst galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph ★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Svea; Leitherer, Claus; Boquien, Médéric; Buat, Véronique; Burgarella, Denis; Calzetti, Daniela; Noll, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    We present a study of 7 star-forming galaxies from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The galaxies are located at relatively low redshifts, z ˜0.3, with morphologies ranging from extended and disturbed to compact and smooth. To complement the HST observations we also analyze observations taken with the VIMOS spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). In our galaxy sample we identify three objects with double peak Lyman-α profiles similar to those seen in Green Pea compact galaxies and measure peak separations of 655, 374, and 275 km s-1. We measure Lyman-α escape fractions with values ranging between 5-13%. Given the low flux levels in the individual COS exposures we apply a weighted stacking approach to obtain a single spectrum. From this COS combined spectrum we infer upper limits for the absolute and relative Lyman continuum escape fractions of f_abs(LyC) = 0.4^{+10.1}_{-0.4}% and f_res(LyC) = 1.7^{+15.2}_{-1.7}%, respectively. Finally, we find that most of these galaxies have moderate UV and optical SFRs (SFRs ≲ 10 M⊙ yr-1).

  15. Study of the thermoluminescence emission of a natural {alpha}-cristobalite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Sanchez M, L. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J.; Bustillo, M.A.; Garcia, R. [MNCN-CSIC, J. Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: The thermoluminescence properties of a well-characterised natural cristobalite from Lanzarote (Canary Islands, Spain) have been studied. The natural blue emission (at 400 nm) of this silica polymorph of quartz, reveals the appearance of three groups of components appearing at 150, 230-240 and 370 C that could be associated, respectively, with (i) structural defects (similar to quartz), (ii) the reversible phase transition that converts {alpha}-cristobalite into , {beta} cristobalite and (iii) electron recombination with unstable holes trapped at oxygen vacancies next to Al ions linked to the formation of {beta}-cristobalite. The dose dependence of the induced TL (ITL emission of {beta}-irradiated samples at room temperature exhibits a linear increase in the glow intensity of the whole curve with increasing the dose (r{sup 2}= 0.999) in the range 0.5-10 Gy. Similar than quartz, the ITL glow curves display four maxim peaked at 90, 110, 180 and 220 C that could be respectively linked to (i) oxygen vacancies, (ii) recombination of electrons with (H{sub 3}O{sub 4}){sup 0} centres that can act as hole traps, (iii) [GeO{sub 4}]{sup -} centres that are stabilised with monovalent cations (H{sup +}, Li{sup +} or Na{sup +}) and (iv) [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 0} hole-like centres which-are created when alkali ions are moving away from Al sites related also probably to the aforementioned reversible phase transition. (Author)

  16. The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample: Extended Lyman Alpha Halos Produced at Low Dust Content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hayes, M.; Oestlin, G.; Schaerer, D.; Verhamme, A.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Adamo, A.; Atek, H.; Cannon, J.M.; Duval, F.; Guaita, L.; Herenz, E.Ch.; Kunth, D.; Laursen, P.; Melinder, J.; Orlitová, Ivana; Oti-Floranes, H.; Sandberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 765, č. 2 (2013), L27/1-L27/6 ISSN 2041-8205 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : cosmology observations * galaxies * evolution Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.602, year: 2013

  17. Response approach to the squeezed-limit bispectrum: application to the correlation of quasar and Lyman-α forest power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chi-Ting [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton, NY 11375 (United States); Schmidt, Fabian, E-mail: chi-ting.chiang@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: acieplak@bnl.gov, E-mail: fabians@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    The squeezed-limit bispectrum, which is generated by nonlinear gravitational evolution as well as inflationary physics, measures the correlation of three wavenumbers, in the configuration where one wavenumber is much smaller than the other two. Since the squeezed-limit bispectrum encodes the impact of a large-scale fluctuation on the small-scale power spectrum, it can be understood as how the small-scale power spectrum ''responds'' to the large-scale fluctuation. Viewed in this way, the squeezed-limit bispectrum can be calculated using the response approach even in the cases which do not submit to perturbative treatment. To illustrate this point, we apply this approach to the cross-correlation between the large-scale quasar density field and small-scale Lyman-α forest flux power spectrum. In particular, using separate universe simulations which implement changes in the large-scale density, velocity gradient, and primordial power spectrum amplitude, we measure how the Lyman-α forest flux power spectrum responds to the local, long-wavelength quasar overdensity, and equivalently their squeezed-limit bispectrum. We perform a Fisher forecast for the ability of future experiments to constrain local non-Gaussianity using the bispectrum of quasars and the Lyman-α forest. Combining with quasar and Lyman-α forest power spectra to constrain the biases, we find that for DESI the expected 1−σ constraint is err[ f {sub NL}]∼60. Ability for DESI to measure f {sub NL} through this channel is limited primarily by the aliasing and instrumental noise of the Lyman-α forest flux power spectrum. The combination of response approach and separate universe simulations provides a novel technique to explore the constraints from the squeezed-limit bispectrum between different observables.

  18. Determination of magnetic field direction in tokamaks from laser-induced Lyman-α fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1988-04-01

    Resonant laser scattering in the Lyman-α line of hydrogen is investigated as a possible tool for measuring the magnetic field direction in tokamak plasmas. The method is based on the depolarisation-dependence of the scattering process. Limitations arising from depolarising collisions are studied in detail by employing a previously developed theory for the collisional redistribution of light. An error analysis is performed to derive the expected experimental precision under various plasma conditions and for laser energies ranging between 1 micronJ and 10 mJ. This analysis also includes the measurement of neutral hydrogen densities. It is shown that with presently available laser powers application of the method would be restricted to the border regions of the plasma. Application to the central regions would require further developments in laser technology, especially with regard to higher powers at the wavelength of Lyman-α and (or) to fast repetition rates

  19. IMF control of cusp proton emission intensity and dayside convection: implications for component and anti-parallel reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We study a brightening of the Lyman-a emission in the cusp which occurred in response to a short-lived south-ward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF during a period of strongly enhanced solar wind plasma concentration. The cusp proton emission is detected using the SI-12 channel of the FUV imager on the IMAGE spacecraft. Analysis of the IMF observations recorded by the ACE and Wind spacecraft reveals that the assumption of a constant propagation lag from the upstream spacecraft to the Earth is not adequate for these high time-resolution studies. The variations of the southward IMF component observed by ACE and Wind allow for the calculation of the ACE-to-Earth lag as a function of time. Application of the derived propagation delays reveals that the intensity of the cusp emission varied systematically with the IMF clock angle, the relationship being particularly striking when the intensity is normalised to allow for the variation in the upstream solar wind proton concentration. The latitude of the cusp migrated equatorward while the lagged IMF pointed southward, confirming the lag calculation and indicating ongoing magnetopause reconnection. Dayside convection, as monitored by the SuperDARN network of radars, responded rapidly to the IMF changes but lagged behind the cusp proton emission response: this is shown to be as predicted by the model of flow excitation by Cowley and Lockwood (1992. We use the numerical cusp ion precipitation model of Lockwood and Davis (1996, along with modelled Lyman-a emission efficiency and the SI-12 instrument response, to investigate the effect of the sheath field clock angle on the acceleration of ions on crossing the dayside magnetopause. This modelling reveals that the emission commences on each reconnected field line 2–2.5 min after it is opened and peaks 3–5 min after it is opened. We discuss how comparison of the Lyman-a intensities with oxygen emissions observed simultaneously by the SI-13

  20. SN 1987 A: A Unique Laboratory for Shock Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George

    2012-01-01

    Supernova 1987 A has given us an unprecedented view of the evolution of the explosion debris and its interaction with circumstellar matter. The outer supernova debris, now expanding with velocities approx.8000 km/s, encountered the relatively dense circumstellar ring formed by presupernova mass loss in the early 1990s. The shock interaction is manifested by UV-optical "hotspots", an expanding X-ray ring, an expanding ring of knotty non-thermal radio emission, and a ring of thermal IR emission from silicate dust Recent ultraviolet observations of the emissions from the reverse shock and the ring with the HST/COS reveal new details about the shock interaction. Lyman alpha emission from the reverse shock is much stronger than H alpha and they have different emission morphologies, pointing to different emission mechanisms. The reverse shock was detected for the first time in C IV 1550. The N V to C IV brightness ratio indicates the N/C abundance ratio in the expanding debris is about 100X solar, about 3X N/C in the inner ring.

  1. Non-LTE effects on the strength of the Lyman edge in quasar accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoerzer, H.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Allard, F.

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated UV/EUV (300 A which is less than or equal to lambda which is less than or equal to 1500 A) continuous energy distributions of accretion disks in the centers of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for disk luminosities in the range 0.1 L(sub Edd) less than or equal to L(sub acc) less than 1.0 L(sub Edd) and central masses ranging from 10(exp 8) solar mass to 10(exp 9) solar mass. The vertical gas pressure structure of the disk and the disk height are obtained analytically; the temperature stratification and the resulting continuum radiation fields are calculated numerically. We have included non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) effects of both the ionization equilibrium and the level populations of hydrogen and helium. We show that these non-LTE effects reduce the strength of the Lyman edge when comapred to the LTE case. In non-LTE we find that the edge can be weakly in emission or absorption for disks seen face-on, depending on the disk parameters.

  2. Alpha particle emission as a probe of the level density in highly excited A∼200 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, D.; Fioretto, E.; Viesti, G.; Cinausero, M.; Gelli, N.; Hagel, K.; Lucarelli, F.; Natowitz, J.B.; Nebbia, G.; Prete, G.; Wada, R.

    1994-01-01

    The alpha particle emission from 90 to 140 MeV 19 F+ 181 Ta fusion-evaporation reactions has been studied. The comparisons of the experimental spectral shapes and multiplicities with statistical model predictions indicate a need to use an excitation energy dependent level-density parameter a=A/K in which K increases with excitation energy. This increase is more rapid than that in lower mass nuclei. The effect of this change in level density on the prescission multiplicities in fission is significant

  3. Broad Paschen-alpha emission in two extremely infrared luminous Seyfert 2 galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Paschen-alpha emission line in the extremely luminous IRAS-selected galaxies IRAS 20460 + 1925 and IRAS 23060 + 0505 is observed. The observed width of H-α of Pa-α in IRAS 20460 + 1925 is 3300 km/s, with a possible broader component of about 3860 km/s, while the observed width of H-α of Pa-α in IRAS 23060 + 0505 is 3270 km/s, with a possible broader component of about 4780 km/s. Considering these results as well as their bolometric luminosities, IRAS 20460 + 1925 and IRAS 23060 + 0505 are proposed to be classified as QSO's. It is suggested that there is a population of obscured QSO's, and that they can be selected by their warmth infrared energy distributions and QSO-like luminosities. 17 refs

  4. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  5. Bias of damped Lyman-α systems from their cross-correlation with CMB lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, D.; Colosimo, J.; Font-Ribera, A.; Slosar, A.

    2018-04-01

    We cross-correlate the positions of damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs) and their parent quasar catalog with a convergence map derived from the Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature data. We make consistent measurements of the lensing signal of both samples in both Fourier and configuration space. By interpreting the excess signal present in the DLA catalog with respect to the parent quasar catalog as caused by the large scale structure traced by DLAs, we are able to infer the bias of these objects: bDLA=2.6±0.9. These results are consistent with previous measurements made in cross-correlation with the Lyman-α forest, although the current noise in the lensing data and the low number density of DLAs limits the constraining power of this measurement. We discuss the robustness of the analysis with respect to a number different systematic effects and forecast prospects of carrying out this measurement with data from future experiments.

  6. Physical properties of z ~ 4 LBGs: differences between galaxies with and without Lyα emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentericci, L.; Grazian, A.; Fontana, A.; Salimbeni, S.; Santini, P.; de Santis, C.; Gallozzi, S.; Giallongo, E.

    2007-08-01

    Aims:We analysed the physical properties of z ˜4 Lyman Break Galaxies observed in the GOODS-S survey, in order to investigate possible differences between galaxies where the Lyα is present in emission, and those where the line is absent or in absorption. Methods: The objects were selected from their optical color and then spectroscopically confirmed by Vanzella et al. (2005). From the public spectra we assessed the nature of the Lyα emission and divided the sample into galaxies with Lyα in emission and objects without a Lyα line (i.e. either absent or in absorption). We then used complete photometry, from U band to mid-infrared from the GOODS-MUSIC database, to study the observational properties of the galaxies, such as UV spectral slopes and optical to mid-infrared colors, and the possible differences between the two samples. Lastly, we used standard spectral fitting techniques to determine the physical properties of the galaxies, such as total stellar mass, stellar ages and so on, and again we looked at the possible differences between the two samples. Results: Our results indicate that LBG with Lyα in emission are on average a much younger and less massive population than the LBGs without Lyα emission. Both populations are forming stars very actively and are relatively dust free, although those with line emission seem to be even less dusty on average. We briefly discuss these results in the context of recent models for the evolution of Lyman break galaxies and Lyα emitters.

  7. Space- and Ground-based Coronal Spectro-Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Bemporad, Alessandro; Rybak, Jan; Capobianco, Gerardo

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives of ultraviolet and visible-light spectro-polarimetric instrumentation for probing coronal magnetism from space-based and ground-based observatories. Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter - has been recently installed on the Lomnicky Peak Observatory 20cm Zeiss coronagraph. The preliminary results from CorMag will be presented. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-alpha, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. This presentation will describe how in future re-flights SCORE could observe the expected Hanle effect in corona with a HI Lyman-alpha polarimeter.

  8. Dark energy and curvature from a future baryonic acoustic oscillation survey using the Lyman-α forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Patrick; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    We explore the requirements for a Lyman-α forest survey designed to measure the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter at 2 or approx. 250 spectrograph is sufficient to measure both the radial and transverse oscillation scales to 1.4% from the Lyα forest (or better, if fainter magnitudes and possibly Lyman-break galaxies can be used). At fixed integration time and in the sky-noise-dominated limit, a wider, noisier survey is generally more efficient; the only fundamental upper limit on noise being the need to identify a quasar and find a redshift. Because the Lyα forest is much closer to linear and generally better understood than galaxies, systematic errors are even less likely to be a problem

  9. Using Lyman-alpha to detect galaxies that leak Lyman continuum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verhamme, A.; Orlitová, Ivana; Schaerer, D.; Hayes, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 578, June (2015), A7/1-A7/13 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-20666P Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : line profiles * radiative transfer * galaxies Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  10. Quasar Absorption in the UV: Probing the Intergalactic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, David; Katz, Neal

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to model the low-redshift Lyman-alpha forest and exploration of the relation between Lyman-alpha absorbers and galaxies. This paper shows that the simulation models that are so successful at explaining properties of the high-redshift forest also account for the most important results of observational studies of the low-redshift forest, from HST (especially the Quasar Absorption Line Key Project) and ground-based follow-up.

  11. Chromospheric Ca II H and K and H-alpha emission in single and binary stars of spectral types F6-M2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strassmeier, K.G.; Fekel, F.C.; Bopp, B.W.; Dempsey, R.C.; Henry, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    New observations of the Ca II H and K and H-epsilon region and/or the Balmer H-alpha line are presented for 100 mostly very active stars but also for weak or inactive stars with suspected activity. Correlations between chromospheric activity at Ca II H and K and H-alpha and effective surface temperature and rotation are identified, and several new stars with chromospheric Ca II H and K emission are discovered. No single activity-rotation relation can be derived for all luminosity classes, and there is clear evidence that evolved stars are generally more active than main-sequence stars of the same rotation period. Binary within the evolved stars appears to play no role, while main-sequence binary stars show generally higher levels of activity than their single counterparts. Chromospheric emission in the Ca II H and K lines depends on surface temperature in that flux declines with cooler temperature. 63 refs

  12. The Sunburst Arc: Direct Lyman α escape observed in the brightest known lensed galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Thorsen, T. E.; Dahle, H.; Gronke, M.; Bayliss, M.; Rigby, J. R.; Simcoe, R.; Bordoloi, R.; Turner, M.; Furesz, G.

    2017-11-01

    We present rest-frame ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy of the brightest lensed galaxy yet discovered, at redshift z = 2.4. The source reveals a characteristic triple-peaked Lyman α profile that has been predicted in various theoretical works, but to our knowledge has not been unambiguously observed previously. The feature is well fit by a superposition of two components: a double-peak profile emerging from substantial radiative transfer, and a narrow, central component resulting from directly escaping Lyman α photons, but it is poorly fit by either component alone. We demonstrate that the feature is unlikely to contain contamination from nearby sources, and that the central peak is unaffected by radiative transfer effects except for very slight absorption. The feature is detected at signal-to-noise ratios exceeding 80 per pixel at line center, and bears strong resemblance to synthetic profiles predicted by numerical models. Based on observations obtained at the Magellan-I (Baade) Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. IMF control of cusp proton emission intensity and dayside convection: implications for component and anti-parallel reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available We study a brightening of the Lyman-a emission in the cusp which occurred in response to a short-lived south-ward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF during a period of strongly enhanced solar wind plasma concentration. The cusp proton emission is detected using the SI-12 channel of the FUV imager on the IMAGE spacecraft. Analysis of the IMF observations recorded by the ACE and Wind spacecraft reveals that the assumption of a constant propagation lag from the upstream spacecraft to the Earth is not adequate for these high time-resolution studies. The variations of the southward IMF component observed by ACE and Wind allow for the calculation of the ACE-to-Earth lag as a function of time. Application of the derived propagation delays reveals that the intensity of the cusp emission varied systematically with the IMF clock angle, the relationship being particularly striking when the intensity is normalised to allow for the variation in the upstream solar wind proton concentration. The latitude of the cusp migrated equatorward while the lagged IMF pointed southward, confirming the lag calculation and indicating ongoing magnetopause reconnection. Dayside convection, as monitored by the SuperDARN network of radars, responded rapidly to the IMF changes but lagged behind the cusp proton emission response: this is shown to be as predicted by the model of flow excitation by Cowley and Lockwood (1992. We use the numerical cusp ion precipitation model of Lockwood and Davis (1996, along with modelled Lyman-a emission efficiency and the SI-12 instrument response, to investigate the effect of the sheath field clock angle on the acceleration of ions on crossing the dayside magnetopause. This modelling reveals that the emission commences on each reconnected field line 2–2.5 min after it is opened and peaks 3–5 min after it is opened. We discuss how comparison of the Lyman-

  14. The effect of stellar evolution uncertainties on the rest-frame ultraviolet stellar lines of C IV and He II in high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, John J.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Young, massive stars dominate the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectra of star-forming galaxies. At high redshifts (z > 2), these rest-frame UV features are shifted into the observed-frame optical and a combination of gravitational lensing, deep spectroscopy and spectral stacking analysis allows the stellar population characteristics of these sources to be investigated. We use our stellar population synthesis code Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) to fit two strong rest-frame UV spectral features in published Lyman-break galaxy spectra, taking into account the effects of binary evolution on the stellar spectrum. In particular, we consider the effects of quasi-homogeneous evolution (arising from the rotational mixing of rapidly rotating stars), metallicity and the relative abundance of carbon and oxygen on the observed strengths of He IIλ1640 Å and C IVλ1548, 1551 Å spectral lines. We find that Lyman-break galaxy spectra at z ˜ 2-3 are best fitted with moderately sub-solar metallicities, and with a depleted carbon-to-oxygen ratio. We also find that the spectra of the lowest metallicity sources are best fitted with model spectra in which the He II emission line is boosted by the inclusion of the effect of massive stars being spun-up during binary mass transfer so these rapidly rotating stars experience quasi-homogeneous evolution.

  15. A SUCCESSFUL BROADBAND SURVEY FOR GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULAE. II. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, Moire K. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Broida Hall, Mail Code 9530, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T., E-mail: mkpresco@physics.ucsb.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic broadband search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Ly{alpha} nebulae (or Ly{alpha} {sup b}lobs{sup )} at 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 within 8.5 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} h {sup -3} {sub 70} Mpc{sup 3}. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Ly{alpha} nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Ly{alpha} emission at 1.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.7, 4 of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Ly{alpha} nebulae span a range of Ly{alpha} equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Ly{alpha} nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broadband imaging to search for the bright end of the Ly{alpha} nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.

  16. The escape of Lyman photons from a young starburst: the case of Haro11†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Atek, Hakim; Kunth, Daniel; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Leitherer, Claus; Jiménez-Bailón, Elena; Adamo, Angela

    2007-12-01

    Lyman α (Lyα) is one of the dominant tools used to probe the star-forming galaxy population at high redshift (z). However, astrophysical interpretations of data drawn from Lyα alone hinge on the Lyα escape fraction which, due to the complex radiative transport, may vary greatly. Here, we map the Lyα emission from the local luminous blue compact galaxy Haro11, a known emitter of Lyα and the only known candidate for low-z Lyman continuum emission. To aid in the interpretation, we perform a detailed ultraviolet and optical multiwavelength analysis and model the stellar population, dust distribution, ionizing photon budget, and star-cluster population. We use archival X-ray observations to further constrain properties of the starburst and estimate the neutral hydrogen column density. The Lyα morphology is found to be largely symmetric around a single young star-forming knot and is strongly decoupled from other wavelengths. From general surface photometry, only very slight correlation is found between Lyα and Hα, E(B - V), and the age of the stellar population. Only around the central Lyα bright cluster do we find the Lyα/Hα ratio at values predicted by the recombination theory. The total Lyα escape fraction is found to be just 3 per cent. We compute that ~90 per cent of the Lyα photons that escape do so after undergoing multiple resonance scattering events, masking their point of origin. This leads to a largely symmetric distribution and, by increasing the distance that photons must travel to escape, decreases the escape probability significantly. While dust must ultimately be responsible for the destruction of Lyα, it plays a little role in governing the observed morphology, which is regulated more by interstellar medium kinematics and geometry. We find tentative evidence for local Lyα equivalent width in the immediate vicinity of star clusters being a function of cluster age, consistent with hydrodynamic studies. We estimate the intrinsic production

  17. Autoradiography Imaging in Targeted Alpha Therapy with Timepix Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya AL Darwish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB, with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy.

  18. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of {sup 238,239}Pu and {sup 241}Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, Michael P., E-mail: michael.dion@pnnl.gov; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-11

    A technique to determine the isotopic constituents of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by a coincident alpha-conversion electron measurement. This presents a unique signature to allow the unfolding of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy and reduce backgrounds of an unseparated sample. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm{sup 2} silicon drift detector and alpha spectroscopy with a passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20–55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information and calibration to aid in the coincident measurement approach. Furthermore, an alpha-conversion electron spectrometer was assembled using the silicon based detectors described and results of a coincident spectrum analysis is reported for {sup 241}Am.

  19. Frequency tripling with multimode-lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, H.; Roehr, H.; Wrobel, W.G.

    1978-10-01

    The presence of different modes with random phases in a laser beam leads to fluctuations in nonlinear optical interactions. This paper describes the influence of the linewidth of a dye laser on the generation of intensive Lyman-alpha radiation by frequency tripling. Using this Lyman-alpha source for resonance scattering on strongly doppler-broadened lines in fusion plasmas the detection limit of neutral hydrogen is nearly two orders higher with the multimode than the singlemode dye laser. (orig.) [de

  20. The Lyman-α forest in three dimensions: measurements of large scale flux correlations from BOSS 1st-year data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciències, torre C5 parell 2, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Pieri, Matthew M. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rich, James; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Charlassier, Romain [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric; Busca, Nicolas; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe [APC, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rue A. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Carithers, Bill; Cortês, Marina; Ho, Shirley; McDonald, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Croft, Rupert [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S. [University of Utah, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Lee, Khee-Gan; Lupton, Robert [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Medolin, Bumbarija, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov [104-20 Queens Blvd 17A, Forest Hills, NY 11375 (United States); and others

    2011-09-01

    Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z > 2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-α forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = e{sup −τ}) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 h{sup −1}Mpc, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-α forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard ΛCDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16 < b < 0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44 < β < 1.20, at central redshift z = 2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+β) = 0.336±0.012. The errors on β are asymmetric, with β = 0 excluded at over 5σ confidence level. The value of β is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-α forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-α forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.

  1. Central powering of the largest Lyman-α nebula is revealed by polarized radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Matthew; Scarlata, Claudia; Siana, Brian

    2011-08-17

    High-redshift Lyman-α (Lyα) blobs are extended, luminous but rare structures that seem to be associated with the highest peaks in the matter density of the Universe. Their energy output and morphology are similar to those of powerful radio galaxies, but the source of the luminosity is unclear. Some blobs are associated with ultraviolet or infrared bright galaxies, suggesting an extreme starburst event or accretion onto a central black hole. Another possibility is gas that is shock-excited by supernovae. But not all blobs are associated with galaxies, and these ones may instead be heated by gas falling into a dark-matter halo. The polarization of the Lyα emission can in principle distinguish between these options, but a previous attempt to detect this signature returned a null detection. Here we report observations of polarized Lyα from the blob LAB1 (ref. 2). Although the central region shows no measurable polarization, the polarized fraction (P) increases to ∼20 per cent at a radius of 45 kiloparsecs, forming an almost complete polarized ring. The detection of polarized radiation is inconsistent with the in situ production of Lyα photons, and we conclude that they must have been produced in the galaxies hosted within the nebula, and re-scattered by neutral hydrogen.

  2. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopics of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by measuring the coincidence of the alpha particle during radioactive decay with the conversion electron (or Auger) emitted during the relaxation of the daughter isotope. This presents a unique signature to allow the deconvolution of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector. A passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector provided measurements of alpha spectroscopy. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20–55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information to aid in the coincident measurement approach.

  3. Alpha decay and nuclear deformation: the case for favoured alpha transitions of even-even emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, F.; Goncalves, M.; Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.

    2000-02-01

    Alpha-decay half-life for ground-state transitions of 174 even-even alpha emitters has been calculated from a simple, Gamow-like model in which the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus (assumed to have an ellipsoidal shape) is taken into account. The assumption made is that before tunneling through a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillates isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average polar direction θ (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoid) for alpha emission. It is shown that the experimental half-life data are much better reproduced by the present description than in the spherical-shaped approximation for the daughter nucleus. (author)

  4. Alpha decay and nuclear deformation: the case for favoured alpha transitions of even-even emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Rodriguez, O.; Guzman, F. [Instituto Superior de Ciencias y Tecnologia Nucleares (ISCTN), La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E-mail: sbd@cbpf.br

    2000-02-01

    Alpha-decay half-life for ground-state transitions of 174 even-even alpha emitters has been calculated from a simple, Gamow-like model in which the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus (assumed to have an ellipsoidal shape) is taken into account. The assumption made is that before tunneling through a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillates isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average polar direction {theta} (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoid) for alpha emission. It is shown that the experimental half-life data are much better reproduced by the present description than in the spherical-shaped approximation for the daughter nucleus. (author)

  5. GALEX-SELECTED LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: COMPARISON WITH OTHER POPULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberzettl, L.; Williger, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, Louisville KY 20492 (United States); Lehnert, M. D. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8111 du CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Nesvadba, N. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 120-121, 91405 Orsay (France); Davies, L. [Department of Physics, H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-20

    We present results of a search for bright Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 1.5 {<=} z {<=} 2.5 in the GOODS-S field using an NUV-dropout technique in combination with color selection. We derived a sample of 73 LBG candidates. We compare our selection efficiencies to BM/BX and BzK methods (techniques solely based on ground-based data sets), and find the NUV data to provide greater efficiency for selecting star-forming galaxies. We estimate LBG candidate ages, masses, star formation rates, and extinction from fitting PEGASE synthesis evolution models. We find that about 20% of our LBG candidates are comparable to infrared-luminous LBGs or submillimeter galaxies which are thought to be precursors of massive elliptical galaxies today. Overall, we can show that although BM/BX and BzK methods do identify star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, the sample they provide biases against those star-forming galaxies which are more massive and contain sizeable red stellar populations. A true Lyman break criterion at z {approx} 2 is therefore more directly comparable to the populations found at z {approx} 3, which does contain a red fraction.

  6. GALEX-SELECTED LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2: COMPARISON WITH OTHER POPULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberzettl, L.; Williger, G.; Lehnert, M. D.; Nesvadba, N.; Davies, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present results of a search for bright Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 1.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.5 in the GOODS-S field using an NUV-dropout technique in combination with color selection. We derived a sample of 73 LBG candidates. We compare our selection efficiencies to BM/BX and BzK methods (techniques solely based on ground-based data sets), and find the NUV data to provide greater efficiency for selecting star-forming galaxies. We estimate LBG candidate ages, masses, star formation rates, and extinction from fitting PEGASE synthesis evolution models. We find that about 20% of our LBG candidates are comparable to infrared-luminous LBGs or submillimeter galaxies which are thought to be precursors of massive elliptical galaxies today. Overall, we can show that although BM/BX and BzK methods do identify star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 2, the sample they provide biases against those star-forming galaxies which are more massive and contain sizeable red stellar populations. A true Lyman break criterion at z ∼ 2 is therefore more directly comparable to the populations found at z ∼ 3, which does contain a red fraction.

  7. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ( 211 At) and natural bismuth-212 ( 212 Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ( 223 Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs

  8. CLASP: A UV Spectropolarimeter on a Sounding Rocket for Probing theChromosphere-Corona Transition Regio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryohko; Kano, Ryouhei; Winebarger, Amy; Auchere, Frederic; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Bando, Takamasa; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Tsuneta, Saku; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca

    2015-08-01

    The wish to understand the energetic phenomena of the outer solar atmosphere makes it increasingly important to achieve quantitative information on the magnetic field in the chromosphere-corona transition region. To this end, we need to measure and model the linear polarization produced by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in strong UV resonance lines, such as the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line. A team consisting of Japan, USA, Spain, France, and Norway has been developing a sounding rocket experiment called the Chromospheric Lyman-alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP). The aim is to detect the scattering polarization produced by anisotropic radiation pumping in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line (121.6 nm), and via the Hanle effect to try to constrain the magnetic field vector in the upper chromosphere and transition region. In this talk, we will present an overview of our CLASP mission, its scientific objectives, ground tests made, and the latest information on the launch planned for the Summer of 2015.

  9. The z~4 Lyman Break Galaxies: Colors and Theoretical Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzi, Rafal; Somerville, Rachel; Papovich, Casey; Ferguson, Henry C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Kretchmer, Claudia; Lotz, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    We investigate several fundamental properties of z~4 Lyman break galaxies by comparing observations with the predictions of a semianalytic model based on the cold dark matter theory of hierarchical structure formation. We use a sample of B435-dropouts from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey and complement the Advanced Camera for Surveys optical B435, V606, i775, and z850 data with the Very Large Telescope Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera J, H, and Ks observations. We extract B435-dropouts from our semianalytic mock catalog using the same color criteria and magnitude limits that were applied to the observed sample. We find that the i775-Ks colors of the model-derived and observed B435-dropouts are in good agreement. However, we find that the i775-z850 colors differ significantly, indicating perhaps that either too little dust or an incorrect extinction curve has been used. Motivated by the reasonably good agreement between the model and observed data, we present predictions for the stellar masses, star formation rates, and ages for the z~4 Lyman break sample. We find that according to our model, the color selection criteria used to select our z~4 sample surveys 67% of all galaxies at this epoch down to z850Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO programmes 168.A-0485, 64.0-0643, 66.A-0572, and 68.A-0544).

  10. Gnevyshev peaks in solar radio emissions at different frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kane

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Sunspots have a major 11-year cycle, but the years near the sunspot maximum show two or more peaks called GP (Gnevyshev Peaks. In this communication, it was examined whether these peaks in sunspots are reflected in other parameters such as Lyman-α (the chromospheric emission 121.6 nm, radio emissions 242–15 400 MHz emanating from altitude levels 2000–12 000 km, the low latitude (+45° to −45° solar open magnetic flux and the coronal green line emission (Fe XIV, 530.3 nm. In the different solar cycles 20–23, the similarity extended at least upto the level of 609 MHz, but in cycle 22, the highest level was of 242 MHz. The extension to the higher level in cycle 22 does not seem to be related to the cycle strength Rz(max, or to the cycle length.

  11. Relative Contribution of the Hydrogen 2 s Two-Photon Decay and Lyman- α Escape Channels during the Epoch of Cosmological Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the evolution of the ratio in number of recombinations due to 2 s two photon escape and due to the escape of Lyman- α photons from the resonance during the epoch of cosmological recombination, within the width of the last scattering surface and near its boundaries. We discuss how this ratio evolves in time, and how it defines the profile of the Lyman- α line in the spectrum of CMB. One of the key reasons for explaining its time dependence is the strong overpopulation of the 2 p level relative to the 2 s level at redshifts z ≲ 750.

  12. Development of a real-time monitor for airborne alpha emissions. First quarter report, TTP AL 142003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritzo, R.E.; Fowler, M.M.

    1994-02-01

    This is the first quarterly report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 for TTP AL 142003, Development of a Real-Time Monitor for Airborne Alpha Emissions. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is developing a new technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of incinerator stacks for low levels of airborne alpha activity. While initially developed for incinerators, this new technology may well find other applications in continuous air monitoring, process monitoring, and monitoring during remediation activities. Referred to as the Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System (LVFTDS), this technology responds directly to the need for fast responding, high sensitivity effluent monitoring systems. With DOE EM-50 funding, LANL has fabricated a bench-top proof of concept detector system and is conducting tests to evaluate its performance. A second- generation prototype is being designed, based on requirements driven by potential field test sites. An industrial partner is being solicited to license the technology. Field trials of a full-scale detector system are planned for FY 95. Accomplishments during the first quarter of FY 94 are chronicled in this report, including budgetary data. A schedule for the remainder of the fiscal year is also provided.

  13. Lyman-alpha spectral properties of five newly discovered Lyman continuum emitters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verhamme, A.; Orlitová, Ivana; Schaerer, D.; Izotov, Y.I.; Worseck, G.; Thuan, T.X.; Guseva, N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 597, January (2017), A13/1-A13/13 E-ISSN 1432-0746 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-20666P Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : radiative transfer * dark ages * reionization Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy , Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.014, year: 2016

  14. Unweighted event generation in hadronic WZ production at order $(\\alpha_{S})$

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, Matt; Lefebvre, Michel

    2001-01-01

    We present an algorithm for unweighted event generation in the partonic process pp -> WZ (j) with leptonic decays at next-to-leading order in alpha_S. Monte Carlo programs for processes such as this frequently generate events with negative weights in certain regions of phase space. For simulations of experimental data one would like to have unweighted events only. We demonstrate how the phase space from the matrix elements can be combined to achieve unweighted event generation using a second stage Monte Carlo integration over a volume of real emissions (jets). Observable quantities are kept fixed in the laboratory frame throughout the integration. The algorithm is applicable to a broader class of processes and is CPU intensive.

  15. In vitro bioactivity of 17alpha-estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievernich, André; Wildt, Ludwig; Lichtenberg-Fraté, Hella

    2004-12-01

    A miniaturised short-term in vitro assay based on the activation of the human estrogen receptor alpha and genetically modified yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells was performed to explore the capacity of this system to monitor the bioactivity of estrogenic compounds, particularly 17alpha- and 17beta-estradiol. Together with the human estrogen receptor (hER)-alpha plasmid, the reporter plasmid containing a yeast-optimised version of the green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) linked to three repeats of the cis-acting estrogen hormone-responsive element (ERE) were expressed in a strain being deleted in the pleiotropic drug resistance transporters Pdr5, Snq2 and Yor1, known to facilitate efflux of organic compounds including steroids and chemotherapeutics. Agonists that bind to hER in vitro trigger estrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional activation of the GFP reporter gene monitored by fluorescence emission at 535 nm. The sensitivity of the assay was tested with various 17alpha- and 17beta-estradiol concentrations, yielding a detection limit of 5 pg/ml (0.018 nM) for the agonist 17beta-E2 in solvent and in human charcoal-stripped serum using a S. cerevisiae pdr5, snq2 and yor1 mutant strain. For 17alpha-estradiol only, at approximately 1500 pg/ml a similar fluorescence response compared to 100 pg/ml 17beta-E2 was observed implicating a much weaker potency of this stereoisomer. The specificity of the system was tested by expression of a truncated hER lacking the ligand-binding domain E and by administration of the androgen, 4-androsten 3,17 dione. Both controls did not yield an increase in fluorescence emission. This fluorescence emission assay enables detection of estrogenic biological activity induced by direct agonists, such as 17beta-E2 at concentrations similar to those found in human sera or by estrogen-like chemicals.

  16. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almayahi, B.A.; Tajuddin, A.A.; Jaafar, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm −2 and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm −2 , whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm −2 and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm −2 , respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm −2 , whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm −2 . The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm −2 ) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm −2 ). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01). - Highlights: • Alpha emission rates in teeth from smokers slightly higher than non-smokers. • Difference between alpha rates in male and female tooth not statistically significant. • Alpha particles have the same effect at any age. • Difference between alpha rates in bones was statistically significant

  17. Treatment of alpha bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report deals with the current state of the art of alpha waste treatment, which is an integral part of the overall nuclear waste management system. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines alpha bearing waste as 'waste containing one or more alpha emitting radionuclides, usually actinides, in quantities above acceptable limits'. The limits are established by national regulatory bodies. The limits above which wastes are considered as alpha contaminated refer to the concentrations of alpha emitters that need special consideration for occupational exposures and/or potential safety, health, or environmental impact during one or more steps from generation through disposal. Owing to the widespread use of waste segregation by source - that is, based upon the 'suspect origin' of the material - significant volumes of waste are being handled as alpha contaminated which, in fact, do not require such consideration by reason of risk or environmental concern. The quantification of de minimis concepts by national regulatory bodies could largely contribute to the safe reduction of waste volumes and associated costs. Other factors which could significantly contribute to the reduction of alpha waste arisings are an increased application of assaying and sorting, instrumentation and the use of feedback mechanisms to control or modify the processes which generate these wastes. Alpha bearing wastes are generated during fabrication and reprocessing of nuclear fuels, decommissioning of alpha contaminated facilities, and other activities. Most alpha wastes are contact handled, but a small portion may require shielding or remote handling because of high levels of neutron (n), beta (β), or gamma (γ) emissions associated with the waste material. This report describes the sources and characteristics of alpha wastes and strategies for alpha waste management. General descriptions of treatment processes for solid and liquid alpha wastes are included. 71 refs, 14 figs, 9 tabs

  18. The Lyman alpha reference sample VI. Lyman alpha escape from the edge-on disk galaxy Mrk 1486

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duval, F.; Ostlin, G.; Hayes, M.; Zackrisson, E.; Verhamme, A.; Orlitová, Ivana; Adamo, A.; Guaita, L.; Melinder, J.; Cannon, J.M.; Laursen, P.; Rivera-Thorsen, T.; Herenz, E.Ch.; Gruyters, P.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Kunth, D.; Sandberg, A.; Schaerer, D.; Mansson, J.-E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 587, March (2016), A77/1-A77/24 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-20666P Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : galaxies * starburst * submillimeter Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  19. The effect of Lyman α self-absorption on population inversions between quantum states 2 and 3 of hydrogen-like ions in recombining plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallents, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    The effect in recombining plasmas of Lyman α self-absorption on quasi-steady-state population inversions between quantum states n = 2 and 3 of hydrogen-like ions is theoretically investigated. It is shown how the electron density range over which population inversion is possible diminishes as Lyman α self-absorption increases. The highest degree of absorption which can be tolerated and still achieve an inversion is shown to occur when the thermal limit corresponds to n approximately equal to 4. The results of the computations are related to the conditions to be found in the expansion plume of laser-produced plasmas. (author)

  20. Noninvasive visualization and quantification of tumor {alpha}{sub V{beta}3} integrin expression using a novel positron emission tomography probe, {sup 64}Cu-cyclam-RAFT-c(-RGDfK-){sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Zhao-Hui [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Furukawa, Takako, E-mail: tfuru@nirs.go.j [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Galibert, Mathieu; Boturyn, Didier [Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5250, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Coll, Jean-Luc [INSERM U823, Institut Albert Bonniot and Universite Joseph Fourier, 38706 La Tronche Cedex, Grenoble (France); Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Saga, Tsuneo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Dumy, Pascal [Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5250, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: The {alpha}{sub V{beta}3} integrin is a well-known transmembrane receptor involved in tumor invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our aim was to evaluate a novel positron emission tomography (PET) probe, {sup 64}Cu-cyclam-RAFT-c(-RGDfK-){sub 4}, for noninvasive visualization and quantification of {alpha}{sub V{beta}3} integrin expression. Methods: RAFT-c(-RGDfK-){sub 4}, a tetrameric cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-based peptide, was conjugated with a bifunctional chelator, 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam), radiolabeled with the positron emitter {sup 64}Cu and evaluated in vitro by cell binding and competitive inhibition assays and in vivo by biodistribution and receptor blocking studies, and PET imaging. The following cell lines, human embryonic kidney HEK293({beta}{sub 1}) [{alpha}{sub V{beta}3}-negative] and HEK293({beta}{sub 3}) [{alpha}{sub V{beta}3}-overexpressing] and human glioblastoma U87MG [naturally expressing {alpha}{sub V{beta}3}], together with their subcutaneous xenografts in athymic nude mice, were used for the present study. The expression levels of {alpha}{sub V{beta}3} on these cell lines and tumor xenografts were analyzed by flow cytometry and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography, respectively. Results: {sup 64}Cu-cyclam-RAFT-c(-RGDfK-){sub 4} demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo specificity for the {alpha}{sub V{beta}3} integrin and displayed rapid blood clearance, predominantly renal excretion and low uptake in nontumor tissues. Tumor uptake of {sup 64}Cu-cyclam-RAFT-c(-RGDfK-){sub 4} (3 h postinjection) in HEK293({beta}{sub 3}) (high levels of {alpha}{sub V{beta}3}), U87MG (moderate levels of {alpha}{sub V{beta}3}) and HEK293({beta}{sub 1}) (undetectable levels of {alpha}{sub V{beta}3}) tumors was 9.35%{+-}1.19%, 3.46%{+-}0.45% and 1.18%{+-}0.30% injected dose per gram, respectively, with a strong and positive correlation with the tumor {alpha}{sub V{beta}3} expression levels

  1. Anisotropy of favoured alpha transitions producing even-even deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, O.A.P.

    1997-05-01

    The anisotropy in favoured alpha transitions which produce even-even deformed nuclei is discussed. A simple, Gamow's-like model which takes into account the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus has been formulated to calculate the alpha decay half-life. It is assumed that before tunneling into a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillated isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average preferential polar direction θ 0 (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoidal shape of the product nucleus) for alpha emission in favoured alpha transitions of even-even nuclei. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo particle-trajectory models for neutral cometary gases. I. Models and equations. II. The spatial morphology of the Lyman-alpha coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combi, M.R.; Smyth, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical derivations of various methods employed in the Monte Carlo particle-trajectory model (MCPTM) are presented, and the application of the MCPTM to the calculation of the photochemical heating of the inner coma through the partial thermalization of cometary hydrogen atoms produced by the photodissociation of water is discussed. This model is then used to explain the observed morphology of the spatially extended Ly-alpha comas of comets. The rocket and Skylab images of the Ly-alpha coma of Comet Kohoutek are examined. 90 references

  3. A RESOLVED MAP OF THE INFRARED EXCESS IN A LYMAN BREAK GALAXY AT z = 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koprowski, M. P.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Geach, J. E.; Hine, N. K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Violino, G. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Bremer, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2 (Canada); Davies, L. J. M. [ICRAR, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Hayashino, T. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Knudsen, K. K. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Kubo, M.; Matsuda, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Lehmer, B. D. [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, 226 Physics Building, 835 West Dickson Street, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Van der Werf, P. P. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Yamada, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, 252-5210 Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2016-09-10

    We have observed the dust continuum of 10 z = 3.1 Lyman break galaxies with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at ∼450 mas resolution in Band 7. We detect and resolve the 870 μ m emission in one of the targets with a flux density of S {sub 870} = 192 ± 57 μ Jy, and measure a stacked 3 σ signal of S {sub 870} = 67 ± 23 μ Jy for the remaining nine. The total infrared luminosities are L {sub 8–1000} = (8.4 ± 2.3) × 10{sup 10} L {sub ⊙} for the detection and L {sub 8–1000} = (2.9 ± 0.9) × 10{sup 10} L {sub ⊙} for the stack. With Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys I -band imaging we map the rest-frame UV emission on the same scale as the dust, effectively resolving the “infrared excess” (IRX = L {sub FIR}/ L {sub UV}) in a normal galaxy at z = 3. Integrated over the galaxy we measure IRX = 0.56 ± 0.15, and the galaxy-averaged UV slope is β = −1.25 ± 0.03. This puts the galaxy a factor of ∼10 below the IRX– β relation for local starburst nuclei of Meurer et al. However, IRX varies by more than a factor of 3 across the galaxy, and we conclude that the complex relative morphology of the dust relative to UV emission is largely responsible for the scatter in the IRX– β relation at high- z . A naive application of a Meurer-like dust correction based on the UV slope would dramatically overestimate the total star formation rate, and our results support growing evidence that when integrated over the galaxy, the typical conditions in high- z star-forming galaxies are not analogous to those in the local starburst nuclei used to establish the Meurer relation.

  4. The Canada-France deep fields survey-II: Lyman-break galaxies and galaxy clustering at z ~ 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucaud, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Le Fèvre, O.; Arnouts, S.; Brodwin, M.; Lilly, S. J.; Crampton, D.; Mellier, Y.

    2003-10-01

    We present a large sample of z ~ 3 U-band dropout galaxies extracted from the Canada-France deep fields survey (CFDF). Our catalogue covers an effective area of ~ 1700 arcmin2 divided between three large, contiguous fields separated widely on the sky. To IAB=24.5, the survey contains 1294 Lyman-break candidates, in agreement with previous measurements by other authors, after appropriate incompleteness corrections have been applied to our data. Based on comparisons with spectroscopic observations and simulations, we estimate that our sample of Lyman-break galaxies is contaminated by stars and interlopers (lower-redshift galaxies) at no more than { ~ } 30%. We find that omega (theta ) is well fitted by a power-law of fixed slope, gamma =1.8, even at small (theta University of Hawaii, and at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and Mayall 4-meter Telescopes, divisions of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  5. Alpha-particle and electron capture decay of 209Po

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schima, F.J.; Colle, R.

    1996-01-01

    Gamma-ray and Kα X-ray emissions have been measured from a very pure 209 Po source containing less than 0.13% 208 Po activity and no detectable 210 Po (≤2 x 10 -4 %). The alpha-particle emission rate for this source has previously been determined. Data are presented that confirm alpha decay to the 205 Pb excited level at 262.8 keV, with an alpha-particle emission probability (±standard uncertainty) of 0.00559±0.00008. The ratio of K-shell electron capture to total electron capture for the second forbidden unique electron capture decay to the 896.6 keV level in 209 Bi was determined to be 0.594±0.018. The electron capture decay fraction was found to be 0.00454±0.00007, while the probabilities per decay for the 896.6, 262.8, and 260.5 keV gamma rays and the Bi Kα and Pb Kα X-rays were measured as 0.00445±0.00007, 0.00085±0.00002, 0.00254±0.00003, 0.00202±0.00005, and 0.00136±0.00005, respectively. (orig.)

  6. Optical Observations of M81 Galaxy Group in Narrow Band [SII] and H_alpha Filters: Holmberg IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbutina, B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of the nearby tidal dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX in M81 galaxy group in narrow band [SII] and H$alpha$ filters, carried out in March and November 2008 with the 2m RCC telescope at NAO Rozhen, Bulgaria. Our search for resident supernova remnants (identified as sources with enhanced [SII] emission relative to their H$alpha$ emission in this galaxy yielded no sources of this kind, besides M&H 10-11 or HoIX X-1. Nevertheless, we found a number of objects with significant H$alpha$ emission that probably represent uncatalogued HII regions.

  7. Activity monitoring of alpha-bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhoff, G.; Bondar, L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper aims at the survey on the actual situation in activity monitoring of alpha-bearing wastes. Homogeneous materials such as liquid-, gaseous- and homogeneous solid wastes are amenable to destructive analyses of representative samples. Available destructive analyses methods are sensitive and precise enough to cope with all requirements in alpha-waste monitoring. The more difficult problems are encountered with alpha-contaminated solids, when representative sampling is not practicable. Non-destructive analysis techniques are applied for monitoring this category of solid wastes. The techniques for nondestructive analysis of alpha-bearing wastes are based on the detection of gamma and/or neutron-emission of actinides. Principles and a theory of non-destructive radiometric assay of plutonium contaminated solid waste streams are explained. Guidelines for the calibration of instruments and interpretation of experimental data are given. Current theoretical and experimental development work in this problem area is reviewed. Evaluations concerning capabilities and limitations of monitoring systems for alpha-bearing solid wastes are very complex and out of the scope of this paper

  8. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF THREE z-DROPOUT GALAXIES AT z = 6.844-7.213: DEMOGRAPHICS OF Ly{alpha} EMISSION IN z {approx} 7 GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko, E-mail: ono@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S. [National Optical Astronomical Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Penner, Kyle [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kashikawa, Nobunari [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Spinrad, Hyron [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of our ultra-deep Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of z-dropout galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey's northern field. For 3 out of 11 objects, we detect an emission line at {approx}1 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}10. The lines show asymmetric profiles with high weighted skewness values, consistent with being Ly{alpha}, yielding redshifts of z = 7.213, 6.965, and 6.844. Specifically, we confirm the z = 7.213 object in two independent DEIMOS runs with different spectroscopic configurations. The z = 6.965 object is a known Ly{alpha} emitter, IOK-1, for which our improved spectrum at a higher resolution yields a robust skewness measurement. The three z-dropouts have Ly{alpha} fluxes of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and rest-frame equivalent widths EW{sup Ly{alpha}}{sub 0} = 33-43 A. Based on the largest spectroscopic sample of 43 z-dropouts, which is the combination of our and previous data, we find that the fraction of Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxies (EW{sup Ly{alpha}}{sub 0} > 25 A) is low at z {approx} 7; 17% {+-} 10% and 24% {+-} 12% for bright (M{sub UV} {approx_equal} -21) and faint (M{sub UV} {approx_equal} -19.5) galaxies, respectively. The fractions of Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxies drop from z {approx} 6 to 7 and the amplitude of the drop is larger for faint galaxies than for bright galaxies. These two pieces of evidence would indicate that the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium increases from z {approx} 6 to 7 and that the reionization proceeds from high- to low-density environments, as suggested by an inside-out reionization model.

  9. CLASP2: The Chromospheric LAyer Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmeler, Laurel; E McKenzie, David; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Auchère, Frédéric; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Bethge, Christian; Kano, Ryouhei; Kubo, Masahito; Song, Donguk; Narukage, Noriyuki; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Yoshida, Masaki; Belluzzi, Luca; Stepan, Jiri; del Pino Alemná, Tanausú; Ballester, Ernest Alsina; Asensio Ramos, Andres

    2017-08-01

    We present the instrument, science case, and timeline of the CLASP2 sounding rocket mission. The successful CLASP (Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter) sounding rocket flight in 2015 resulted in the first-ever linear polarization measurements of solar hydrogen Lyman-alpha line, which is sensitive to the Hanle effect and can be used to constrain the magnetic field and geometric complexity of the upper chromosphere. Ly-alpha is one of several upper chromospheric lines that contain magnetic information. In the spring of 2019, we will re-fly the modified CLASP telescope to measure the full Stokes profile of Mg II h & k near 280 nm. This set of lines is sensitive to the upper chromospheric magnetic field via both the Hanle and the Zeeman effects.

  10. Lyα-Lyman continuum connection in 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 4.3 star-forming galaxies from the VUDS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, F.; Pentericci, L.; Guaita, L.; Schaerer, D.; Verhamme, A.; Castellano, M.; Ribeiro, B.; Garilli, B.; Fèvre, O. Le; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassata, P.; Durkalec, A.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Lemaux, B. C.; Maccagni, D.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.

    2018-06-01

    Context. To identify the galaxies responsible for the reionization of the Universe, we must rely on the investigation of the Lyman continuum (LyC) properties of z ≲ 5 star-forming galaxies, where we can still directly observe their ionizing radiation. Aims: The aim of this work is to explore the correlation between the LyC emission and some of the proposed indirect indicators of LyC radiation at z 4 such as a bright Lyα emission and a compact UV continuum size. Methods: We selected a sample of 201 star-forming galaxies from the Vimos Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) at 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 4.3 in the COSMOS, ECDFS, and VVDS-2h fields, including only those with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, a clean spectrum in the LyC range and clearly not contaminated by bright nearby sources in the same slit. For all galaxies we measured the Lyα EW, the Lyα velocity shift with respect to the systemic redshift, the Lyα spatial extension and the UV continuum effective radius. We then selected different sub-samples according to the properties predicted to be good LyC emission indicators: in particular we created sub-samples of galaxies with EW(Lyα) ≥ 70 Å, Lyαext ≤ 5.7 kpc, rUV ≤ 0.30 kpc and |ΔvLyα|≤ 200 km s-1. We stacked all the galaxies in each sub-sample and measured the flux density ratio (fλ(895)/fλ(1470)), that we considered to be a proxy for LyC emission. We then compared these ratios to those obtained for the complementary samples. Finally, to estimate the statistical contamination from lower redshift inter-lopers in our samples, we performed dedicated Monte Carlo simulations using an ultradeep U-band image of the ECDFS field. Results: We find that the stacks of galaxies which are UV compact (rUV ≤ 0.30 kpc) and have bright Lyα emission (EW(Lyα) ≥ 70 Å), have much higher LyC fluxes compared to the rest of the galaxy population. These parameters appear to be good indicators of LyC radiation in agreement with theoretical studies and previous observational

  11. Deconvolution of H-alpha profiles measured by Thompson scattering collecting optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Grek, B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses that optically fast multichannel Thomson scattering optics that can be used for H-alpha emission profile measurement. A technique based on the fact that a particular volume element of the overall field of view can be seen by many channels, depending on its location, is discussed. It is applied to measurement made on PDX with the vertically viewing TVTS collecting optics (56 channels). The authors found that for this case, about 28 Fourier modes are optimum to represent the spatial behavior of the plasma emissivity. The coefficients for these modes are obtained by doing a least-square-fit to the data subjet to certain constraints. The important constraints are non-negative emissivity, the assumed up and down symmetry and zero emissivity beyond the liners. H-alpha deconvolutions are presented for diverted and circular discharges

  12. Calculation of nuclear radius using alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.B. de.

    1988-01-01

    Using a Quantum Theory approach for the Alpha-Decay process, a formula is deduced for determination of the nuclear radius of the s-state, that is, a nuclear model with a spherical shell. The hypothesis that it is possible to individualize the alpha particle and the daughter nucleus at the moment of the alpha particle emission is considered. In considered in these conditions, the treatment of a two body problem considered as point particles, repelling each other by Coulomb's Law. Using the new values of the fundamental physical constants, experimentally determinated, by substitution of their numerical values in the proposed, new values of nuclear radii are obtained. These values are compared with those found in the literature. (author) [pt

  13. Episodic Dust Emission from Alpha Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, W. C.; Greenhill, L. J.; Bester, M.; Degiacomi, C.; Townes, C. H.

    1993-05-01

    The spatial distribution of dust surrounding alpha Orionis has been observed with the Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI) operating at a wavelength of 11.15 microns. Radiative transfer modeling of the visibility curves obtained by the ISI has yielded estimates of the physical parameters of the dust surrounding the star and new details of the dust distribution. The visibility curves taken in 1992 can be fitted best by a model with two dust shells. One shell has an inner radius of 1.0+/- 0.1{ }('') , a thickness between 50-200 milliarcsec, and a temperature of about 380 K. The second shell has an inner radius of 2.0+/-0.1{ }('') , a thickness less than about 200 milliarcsec, and a temperature of 265 K. These results are consistent with the recent spatially resolved spectroscopy of alpha Orionis reported by Sloan et al. (1993, Ap.J., 404, 303). The dust was modelled with the MRN size distribution with radius varying from 0.005--0.25 microns. The star was assumed to be a blackbody with a temperature of 3500 K and angular radius of 21.8 milliarcsec, consistent with recent interferometric determinations of its diameter (cf. Dyck et al., 1992, A.J., 104, 1992). For an adopted distance of 150 pc, the model for the 1992 data was evolved backward in time for a comparison with previous visibility data of Sutton (1979, Ph.D. Thesis, U.C. Berkeley) and Howell et al. (1981, Ap.J., 251, L21). The velocities, 11 km \\ s(-1) and 18 km \\ s(-1) , were used for the first and second shells respectively, which are the CO velocities measured by Bernat et al. (1979, Ap.J.,233, L135). We find excellent agreement if the dust shells were at approximately 0.80{ }('') and 1.67{ }('') at the epoch of the previous measurements. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that inner dust shell was emitted during the unusual variations in radial velocity and visual magnitude in the early 1940's, described by Goldberg (1984, PASP, 96, 366).

  14. Ultraviolet continuum and H2 fluorescent emission in Herbig-Haro objects 43 and 47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) short-wavelength spectra of the low-excitation Herbig-Haro objects HH 43 and HH 47 are reported. In HH 43 a number of emission lines in the Lyman band of H 2 from the excited state 1 μ + /sub u/, #betta#' = 1, J' = 4 are observed. The lines are produced by fluorescence from the H Lyα line which pumps the lower state 1 μ + /sub g/, #betta#'' = 2.J'' = 5 which in turn is excited by a low-velocity shock wave. No evidence of emission from highly ionized gas is present in the UV spectra. Both objects exhibit a UV continuum which peaks in the vicinity of 1500 A and which is probably caused by hydrogen two-photon emission enhanced by collisional excitation in a low-velocity shock

  15. Alpha radioactivity for proton-rich even Pb isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alpha radioactivity; proton-rich nuclei; half-life. PACS Nos 23.60.+e; 23.90. ... Z/N ∼= 0.65 to the region close to proton drip line with Z/N ∼= 0.82. The existing ... In the present work we have studied the systematic for alpha emission ..... 80. 0.200. 0.402. 0.497. 8.0. 320.51. 0.333. 0.754. 0.441. 16.0. 1300.72. 0.414. 0.927.

  16. Characterization of actinide targets by low solid-angle alpha particle counting

    CERN Document Server

    Denecke, B; Pauwels, J; Robouch, P; Gilliam, D M; Hodge, P; Hutchinson, J M R; Nico, J S

    1999-01-01

    Actinide samples were characterized in an interlaboratory comparison between IRMM and NIST, including alpha-particle counting at defined low solid angle and counting in a 2 pi proportional gas counter. For this comparison, nine sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 UF sub 4 samples with high uniformity in the layer thickness were prepared at IRMM by deposition under vacuum. Polished silicon wafers were used as source substrates, and these were rotated during the deposition using a planetary rotation system. The estimated uncertainties for the defined low solid-angle methods were about 0.1% at both NIST and IRMM. The agreement of reported alpha-particle emission rates in the energy range 2.5-5.09 MeV was better than or equal to 0.02% for the defined solid-angle methods. When comparing total alpha-particle emission rates over the larger energy range 0-9 MeV (which includes all emissions from the daughter nuclides and the impurities), the agreement of the defined solid-angle methods was better than or equal to 0.05%. The 2 pi propo...

  17. Alpha particle studies during JET DT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The 1997 DT experiment (DTE1) at the Joint European Torus included studies of the behaviour of alpha particles in high temperature plasmas. Clear alpha particle heating was observed in a series of otherwise similar 10MW hot-ion H-modes by scanning the DT mixture from 0%T to 93%T. Maxima in central temperature and energy content were obtained which corresponded with the maximum in fusion yield. Alfven Eigenmodes (AEs) have been detected in JET, driven by NBI or ICRH fast ions. However, in agreement with theory, no AE activity was observed in DT plasmas which could be attributed to alpha particle drive, except in the afterglow of some Optimised Shear pulses. Ion Cyclotron Emission (ICE) was detected at harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency at the outer edge of the plasma. The ICE is interpreted as being close to magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, driven by inverted alpha distributions at the plasma edge. The high-energy neutral particle spectra showed features, which are ascribed to a mixture of alphas, neutralised by helium-like impurities, and deuterons, born from elastic collisions with alpha particles and neutralised by hydrogen-like impurities. The results of all these studies are consistent with classical alpha particle trapping and slowing-down. Future DT experiments will aim to increase alpha particle pressure, so interactions with plasma instabilities can be studied. The measurement of knock-on neutral triton spectra offers a clean way to determine confined alpha densities in these future experiments. (author)

  18. Alpha particle studies during JET DT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The 1997 DT experiment (DTE1) at the Joint European Torus included studies of the behaviour of alpha particles in high temperature plasmas. Clear alpha particle heating was observed in a series of otherwise similar 10MW hot-ion H-modes by scanning the DT mixture from 0%T to 93%T. Maxima in central temperature and energy content were obtained which corresponded with the maximum in fusion yield. Alfven Eigenmodes (AEs) have been detected in JET, driven by NBI or ICRH fast ions. However, in agreement with theory, no AE activity was observed in DT plasmas which could be attributed to alpha particle drive, except in the afterglow of some Optimised Shear pulses. Ion Cyclotron Emission (ICE) was detected at harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency at the outer edge of the plasma. The ICE is interpreted as being close to magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, driven by inverted alpha distributions at the plasma edge. The high-energy neutral particle spectra showed features, which are ascribed to a mixture of alphas, neutralised by helium-like impurities, and deuterons, born from elastic collisions with alpha particles and neutralised by hydrogen-like impurities. The results of all these studies are consistent with classical alpha particle trapping and slowing-down. Future DT experiments will aim to increase alpha particle pressure, so interactions with plasma instabilities can be studied. The measurement of knock-on neutral triton spectra offers a clean way to determine confined alpha densities in these future experiments. (author)

  19. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almayahi, B A; Tajuddin, A A; Jaafar, M S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm(-2) and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm(-2), whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm(-2) and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm(-2), respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2), whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm(-2). The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Suppression of Hydrogen Emission in an X-class White-light Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházka, Ondrej; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Allred, Joel C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, 2000 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Kotrč, Pavel, E-mail: oprochazka01@qub.ac.uk [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2017-03-01

    We present unique NUV observations of a well-observed X-class flare from NOAA 12087 obtained at the Ondřejov Observatory. The flare shows a strong white-light continuum but no detectable emission in the higher Balmer and Lyman lines. Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Fermi observations indicate an extremely hard X-ray spectrum and γ -ray emission. We use the RADYN radiative hydrodynamic code to perform two types of simulations: one where an energy of 3 × 10{sup 11} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} is deposited by an electron beam with a spectral index of ≈3, and a second where the same energy is applied directly to the photosphere. The combination of observations and simulations allows us to conclude that the white-light emission and the suppression or complete lack of hydrogen emission lines is best explained by a model where the dominant energy deposition layer is located in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere, rather than the chromosphere.

  1. INFERENCES ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} EMISSION OF z {approx} 7 AND z {approx} 8 GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Trenti, Michele [University of Colorado, Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo; Bradley, Larry D., E-mail: tt@physics.ucsb.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr, Baltimore MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Spectroscopic confirmation of galaxies at z {approx} 7 and above has been extremely difficult, owing to a drop in intensity of Ly{alpha} emission in comparison with samples at z {approx} 6. This crucial finding could potentially signal the ending of cosmic reionization. However, it is based on small data sets, often incomplete and heterogeneous in nature. We introduce a flexible Bayesian framework, useful to interpret such evidence. Within this framework, we implement two simple phenomenological models: a smooth one where the distribution of Ly{alpha} is attenuated by a factor {epsilon}{sub s} with respect to z {approx} 6 and a patchy one where a fraction {epsilon}{sub p} is absorbed/non-emitted while the rest is unabsorbed. From a compilation of 39 observed z {approx} 7 galaxies, we find {epsilon}{sub s} = 0.69 {+-} 0.12 and {epsilon}{sub p} = 0.66 {+-} 0.16. The models can be used to compute fractions of emitters above any equivalent width W. For W > 25 A, we find X{sup 25}{sub z=7} = 0.37 {+-} 0.11 (0.14 {+-} 0.06) for galaxies fainter (brighter) than M{sub UV} = -20.25 for the patchy model, consistent with previous work, but with smaller uncertainties by virtue of our full use of the data. At z {approx} 8 we combine new deep (5{sigma} flux limit 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) Keck/NIRSPEC observations of a bright Y-dropout identified by our Brightest of Reionization Galaxies Survey, with those of three objects from the literature and find that the inference is inconclusive. We compute predictions for future near-infrared spectroscopic surveys and show that it is challenging but feasible to constrain the distribution of Ly{alpha} emitters at z {approx} 8 and distinguish between models.

  2. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE UV-CONTINUUM AND Lyα LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z > 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Linhua; Egami, Eiichi; Walth, Gregory; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Matsuda, Yuichi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Tohru; Ota, Kazuaki; Ouchi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations of z > 6 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The candidates were selected as i'-dropout objects down to z' = 27 AB magnitudes from an ultra-deep SDF z'-band image. With the Keck spectroscopy we identified 19 LBGs with prominent Lyα emission lines at 6 ≤ z ≤ 6.4. The median value of the Lyα rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) is ∼50 Å, with four EWs >100 Å. This well-defined spectroscopic sample spans a UV-continuum luminosity range of –21.8 ≤ M UV ≤ –19.5 (0.6 ∼ 5 L* UV ) and a Lyα luminosity range of (0.3-3) × 10 43 erg s –1 (0.3-3 L* Lyα ). We derive the UV and Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) from our sample at (z) ∼ 6.2 after we correct for sample incompleteness. We find that our measurement of the UV LF is consistent with the results of previous studies based on photometric LBG samples at 5 6.

  3. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT REDSHIFTS ∼4, 5, AND 6 IN THE GOODS-SOUTH FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanzella, E.; Cristiani, S.; Nonino, M.; Giavalisco, M.; Dickinson, M.; Kuntschner, H.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Popesso, P.; Rosati, P.; Cesarsky, C.; Renzini, A.; Stern, D.; Ferguson, H. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report on observations of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey at mean redshifts z ∼ 4, 5, and 6 (B 435 -, V 606 -, and i 775 -band dropouts, respectively), obtained with the red-sensitive FORS2 spectrograph at the ESO VLT. This program has yielded spectroscopic identifications for 114 galaxies (∼60% of the targeted sample), of which 51 are at z ∼ 4, 31 at z ∼ 5, and 32 at z ∼ 6. We demonstrate that the adopted selection criteria are effective, identifying galaxies at the expected redshift with minimal foreground contamination. Of the 10% interlopers, 83% turn out to be Galactic stars. Once selection effects are properly accounted for, the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the higher redshift LBGs appear to be similar to their counterparts at z ∼ 3. As at z ∼ 3, LBGs at z ∼ 4 and z ∼ 5 are observed with Lyα both in emission and in absorption; when in absorption, strong interstellar lines are also observed in the spectra. The stacked spectra of Lyα absorbers and emitters also show that the former have redder UV spectra and stronger but narrower interstellar lines, a fact also observed at z ∼ 2 and 3. At z ∼ 6, sensitivity issues bias our sample toward galaxies with Lyα in emission; nevertheless, these spectra appear to be similar to their lower redshift counterparts. As in other studies at similar redshifts, we find clear evidence that brighter LBGs tend to have weaker Lyα emission lines. At fixed rest-frame UV luminosity, the equivalent width of the Lyα emission line is larger at higher redshifts. At all redshifts where the measurements can be reliably made, the redshift of the Lyα emission line turns out to be larger than that of the interstellar absorption lines (ISLs), with a median velocity difference ΔV ∼ 400 km s -1 at z ∼ 4 and 5, consistent with results at lower redshifts. This shows that powerful, large-scale winds are common at high redshift. In general, there is no

  4. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of alpha manganese sesquioxide ({alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanodumb-bells: Structural, magnetic, optical and photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanam, S., E-mail: gnanam.nanoscience@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai 600005, Tamilnadu (India); Rajendran, V. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai 600005, Tamilnadu (India)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles sizes of 35-42 nm have been prepared by hydrothermal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shapes of {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Dumb-bell, Cauliflower, spherical with rod, spherical with wires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strong UV emission can be attributed to high purity and perfect crystallinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic activity of {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied by degradation of Remazol red B dye. - Abstract: Nanometer scale cubic bixbyite {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, at a temperature of 450 Degree-Sign C in the presence of various surfactants. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the average crystallite size of the sample is {approx}35-42 nm. The shapes of the {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles include: Dumb-bell-like (anionic surfactant), Cauliflower-like (nonionic surfactant), spherical with rods (cationic surfactant) and spherical with wires (surface modifier). The shapes of {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles depend on the type of surfactant used in the synthesis. The magnetic property of the anionic surfactant assisted sample was primarily studied, using the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The optical absorption spectra confirmed the effectiveness of the selected capping agents, as the anionic capped {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} colloids absorbed at shorter wavelength than the other agents, indicating a much smaller crystallite size. The property of strong UV emissions may be attributed to the high purity and perfect crystallinity of the as-prepared {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The surfactants-assisted catalyst was tested for its photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of the harmful organic dye Remazol Red B, using a multilamp photo reactor. Possible formation mechanisms have also been proposed for the as-synthesized anionic surfactant assisted samples.

  5. Twenty years of research on fungal-plant interactions on Lyman Glacier forefront—lessons learned and questions yet unanswered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari Jumpponen; Shawn P. Brown; James M. Trappe; Efrén Cázares; Rauni. Strömmer

    2012-01-01

    Retreating glaciers and the periglacial areas that they vacate produce a harsh environment of extreme radiation, nutrient limitations and temperature oscillations. They provide a model system for studying mechanisms that drive the establishment and early assembly of communities. Here, we synthesize more than 20 years of research at the Lyman Glacier forefront in the...

  6. Contamination of Broad-Band Photometry by Nebular Emission in High Redshift Galaxies: Investigations with Keck's MOSFIRE Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Konidaris, Nick P.; Stark, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Earlier work has raised the potential importance of nebular emission in the derivation of the physical characteristics of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. Within certain redshift ranges, and especially at z ≃ 6-7, such lines may be strong enough to reduce estimates of the stellar masses and ages of galaxies compared with those derived assuming the broadband photometry represents stellar light alone. To test this hypothesis at the highest redshifts where such lines can be probed with ground...

  7. Study of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction by transfer reaction for application to {gamma}-ray emission from Novae; Etude de la reaction {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O par reaction de transfert pour application a l'emission {gamma} des Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sereville, N. de

    2003-12-15

    The gamma emission from novae at/or below 511 keV is due to the annihilation of the positrons produced in the beta + decay of F{sup 18}. The interpretation of this emission through observations made by the Integral satellite for instance, requires a good knowledge of F{sup 18} nucleosynthesis. The reaction rate of the F{sup 18}(p,{alpha})O{sup 15} is the least known because of 2 resonances corresponding to the levels 6.419 and 6.449 MeV of Ne{sup 19} whose proton widths are completely unknown. We have determined these proton widths via the study of one-nucleon transfer reaction D(F{sup 18},p{alpha})N{sup 15} populating equivalent levels in F{sup 19}. We have used a 14 MeV F{sup 18} radioactive beam on a CD{sub 2} target for inverse kinematics studies and the multi-track silicon detector LEDA. A DWBA (Distorted Wave Bound Approximation) has enabled us to determine the proton width of both resonances and has showed that they have an impact in the calculation of the reaction rate. A thorough study of the remaining uncertainties of the reaction rate has been undertaken, particularly for those concerning interferences between these resonances and a higher resonance of Ne{sup 19}. The reaction rate that we have obtained is very similar to the previous rate used but now it rests on a more solid basis.

  8. Overview of neutron and confined escaping alpha diagnostics planned for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, M [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Krasilnikov, A V [TRINITI, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Nishitani, T [JAERI, Tokai (Japan); Batistoni, P [ENEA, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Zaveryaev, V [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kaschuck, Yu A [TRINITI, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Popovichev, S [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Iguchi, T [Nagoya University, Nagoya, (Japan); Jarvis, O N [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Kallne, J [Department of Neutron Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Fiore, C L [PPL, MIT, Cambridge (United States); Roquemore, L [PPPL, Princeton (United States); Heidbrink, W W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UC Irvine (United States); Donne, A J H [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica (Netherlands); Costley, A E [ITER IT, Naka Joint Work Site (Japan); Walker, C [ITER IT, Garching Joint Work Site (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Fusion product measurements planned for ITER are reviewed from the viewpoint of alpha particle-related physics studies. Recent advances in fusion plasma physics have extended the desirable measurement requirements to the megahertz region for neutron emission rate, better resolution of neutron profiles for the study of internal transport barriers (ITBs), etc. Employing threshold counters and/or scintillation detectors confers megahertz capability on neutron emission rate measurement. The changes in the neutron/alpha particle birth profile due to the formation of ITB and its deviation from uniformity on the magnetic flux surface can be measured by addition of eight viewing chords in an equatorial port plug and seven viewing chords from the divertor to the original radial neutron camera. On the other hand, it is still difficult to measure the distributions of confined and escaping alpha particles. Several proposals to resolve these difficulties are currently under investigation.

  9. NEBULAR ATTENUATION IN H{alpha}-SELECTED STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z = 0.8 FROM THE NewH{alpha} SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Lee, Janice C.; Ouchi, Masami [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Ly, Chun [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Salim, Samir [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Finn, Rose [Physics Department, Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States); Ono, Yoshiaki, E-mail: ivelina.momcheva@yale.edu [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    We present measurements of the dust attenuation of H{alpha}-selected emission-line galaxies at z = 0.8 from the NewH{alpha} narrowband survey. The analysis is based on deep follow-up spectroscopy with Magellan/IMACS, which captures the strong rest-frame optical emission lines from [O II] {lambda}3727 to [O III] {lambda}5007. The spectroscopic sample used in this analysis consists of 341 confirmed H{alpha} emitters. We place constraints on the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction using diagnostics that can be applied at intermediate redshift. We find that at least 5% of the objects in our spectroscopic sample can be classified as AGNs and 2% are composite, i.e., powered by a combination of star formation and AGN activity. We measure the dust attenuation for individual objects from the ratios of the higher order Balmer lines. The H{beta} and H{gamma} pair of lines is detected with S/N > 5 in 55 individual objects and the H{beta} and H{delta} pair is detected in 50 individual objects. We also create stacked spectra to probe the attenuation in objects without individual detections. The median attenuation at H{alpha} based on the objects with individually detected lines is A(H{alpha}) = 0.9 {+-} 1.0 mag, in good agreement with the attenuation found in local samples of star-forming galaxies. We find that the z = 0.8 galaxies occupy a similar locus of attenuation as a function of magnitude, mass, and star formation rate (SFR) as a comparison sample drawn from the SDSS DR4. Both the results from the individual z = 0.8 galaxies and from the stacked spectra show consistency with the mass-attenuation and SFR-attenuation relations found in the local universe, indicating that these relations are also applicable at intermediate redshift.

  10. High-Resolution Electron-Impact Study of the Far-Ultraviolet Emission Spectrum of Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-Ming; Ahmed, Syed M.; Multari, Rosalie A.; James, Geoffrey K.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    The emission spectrum of molecular hydrogen produced by electron-impact excitation at 100 eV has been measured in the wavelength range 1140-1690 A. High-resolution, optically thin spectra (delta(lambda) = 0.136 A) of the far-ultraviolet (FUV) Lyman and Werner band systems have been obtained with a newly constructed 3 m spectrometer. Synthetic spectral intensities based on the transition probabilities calculated by Abgrall et al. are in very good agreement with experimentally observed intensities. Previous modeling that utilized Allison & Daigarno band transition probabilities with Hoenl-London factors breaks down when the transition moment has significant J dependence or when ro-vibrational coupling is significant. Ro-vibrational perturbation between upsilon = 14 of the B(sup 1)Sigma(sup +, sub u) state and upsilon = 3 of the C(sup 1)Pi(sub u) state and the rotational dependence of the transition moment in the bands of the Lyman system are examined. Complete high-resolution experimental reference FUV spectra, together with the model synthetic spectra based on the Abgrall transition probabilities, are presented. An improved calibration standard is obtained, and an accurate calibration of the 3 m spectrometer has been achieved.

  11. First Accurate Normalization of the $\\beta$-delayed $\\alpha$ Decay of $^{16}$N and Implications for the $^{12}$C$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^{16}$O Astrophysical Reaction Rate arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsebom, O.S.; Lica, R.; Munch, M.; Riisager, K.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Borge, M.J.G.; Madurga, M.; Marroquin, I.; Andreyev, A.N.; Berry, T.A.; Christensen, E.R.; Fernández, P. Díaz; Doherty, D.T.; Van Duppen, P.; Fraile, L.M.; Gallardo, M.C.; Greenlees, P.T.; Harkness-Brennan, L.J.; Hubbard, N.; Huyse, M.; Jensen, J.H.; Johansson, H.; Jonson, B.; Judson, D.S.; Konki, J.; Lazarus, I.; Lund, M.V.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Perea, A.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Page, R.D.; Pucknell, V.; Rahkila, P.; Sorlin, O.; Sotty, C.; Swartz, J.A.; Sørensen, H.B.; Törnqvist, H.; Vedia, V.; Warr, N.; De Witte, H.

    The $^{12}$C$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^{16}$O reaction plays a central role in astrophysics, but its cross section at energies relevant for astrophysical applications is only poorly constrained by laboratory data. The reduced $\\alpha$ width, $\\gamma_{11}$, of the bound $1^-$ level in $^{16}$O is particularly important to determine the cross section. The magnitude of $\\gamma_{11}$ is determined via sub-Coulomb $\\alpha$-transfer reactions or the $\\beta$-delayed $\\alpha$ decay of $^{16}$N, but the latter approach is presently hampered by the lack of sufficiently precise data on the $\\beta$-decay branching ratios. Here we report improved branching ratios for the bound $1^-$ level and for $\\beta$-delayed $\\alpha$ emission. In the case of the $\\beta$-delayed $\\alpha$ branch, we find a $5\\sigma$ deviation from the literature value. With our new branching ratios, the constraints imposed on $\\gamma_{11}$ by the $\\beta\\alpha$-decay and $\\alpha$-transfer data are of similar precision and, for the first time, in good agreement. Th...

  12. The first continuous coherent Lyman-alpha source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walz, J.; Pahl, A.; Eikema, K.S.E.; Hansch, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrahigh-resolution laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic trap could open a new field of challenging tests of the fundamental CPT theorem. The required laser cooling and laser spectroscopy techniques are also essential for future experiments on the gravitational acceleration of

  13. Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu ZhiYong; Liang Shixiong; Zhu Ji; Zhu Xiaodong; Zhao Jiandong; Lu Haijie; Yang Yunli; Chen Long; Wang Anyu; Fu Xiaolong; Jiang Guoliang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD 5 (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD 5 ) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended

  14. EFFECT OF HALO BIAS AND LYMAN LIMIT SYSTEMS ON THE HISTORY OF COSMIC REIONIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-01-01

    We extend the existing analytical model of reionization by Furlanetto et al. to include the biasing of reionization sources and additional absorption by Lyman limit systems. Both effects enhance the original model in non-trivial ways, but do not change its qualitative features. Our model is, by construction, consistent with the observed evolution of the galaxy luminosity function at z ∼ 6 galaxies, the inadequacy of simulations and/or some of the observational constraints, or indicates an additional source of ionizing radiation at z > 8 remains to be seen.

  15. Radial-velocity variations in Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco, and Alpha Her

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.A.; Patten, B.M.; Goldberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radial-velocity observations of Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco A, and Alpha Her A are used to study radial-velocity periodicities in M supergiants. The data refer to several metallic lines in the H-alpha region and to H-alpha itself. It is shown that Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco A have cycle lengths of about 1 yr and semiamplitudes of 2 km/s. It is suggested that many semiregular red supergiant varibles such as Alpha Ori may be heading toward chaos. All three stars show short-term stochastic flucutations with an amplitude of 1-2 km/s. It is found that the long-term variability of H-alpha velocities may be a consequence of intermittent failed ejections. 58 refs

  16. Energy deposition and GDR emission in inelastic alpha particle scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Viesti, G; Fabris, D; Nebbia, G; Cinausero, M; Fioretto, E; Napoli, D R; Prete, G; Hagel, K; Natowitz, J B; Wada, R; Gonthier, P; Majka, Z; Alfarro, R; Zhao, Y; Mdeiwayeh, N; Ho, T

    1999-01-01

    Neutron fold distributions measured for the reaction sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi(alpha,alpha') at 240 MeV have been analyzed with the help of Statistical Model calculations to determine the distribution of excitation energy in the primary target fragments as a function of the projectile energy loss, EL. Results show that the distributions in excitation energy feature a plateau which extends from the kinematical limit E sub x =EL to very small excitations, suggesting a variety of interactions of the beam particles with the target nucleus. Requiring an additional coincidence with a light charged particle leads to selection of a significant higher average excitation energy. This effect is extrapolated to explore results of previous GDR decay measurements in the case of a sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb target. Corrections of derived GDR parameters due to the partial transfer of excitation energy are suggested.

  17. Ion cyclotron emission in tokamak plasmas; Emission cyclotronique ionique dans les plasmas de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraboulet, D.

    1996-09-17

    Detection of {alpha}(3.5 MeV) fusion products will be of major importance for the achievement of self sustained discharges in fusion thermonuclear reactors. Due to their cyclotronic gyration in the confining magnetic field of a tokamak, {alpha} particles are suspected to radiate in the radio-frequency band [RF: 10-500 MHz]. Our aim is to determine whether detection of RF emission radiated from a reactor plasma can provide information concerning those fusion products. We observed experimentally that the RF emission radiated from fast ions situated in the core of the discharge is detectable with a probe located at the plasma edge. For that purpose, fast temporal acquisition of spectral power was achieved in a narrow frequency band. We also propose two complementary models for this emission. In the first one, we describe locally the energy transfer between the photon population and the plasma and we compute the radiation equilibrium taking place in the tokamak. {alpha} particles are not the unique species involved in the equilibrium and it is necessary to take into account all other species present in the plasma (Deuterium, Tritium, electrons,...). Our second model consists in the numerical resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov with the use of a variational formulation, in which all polarizations are considered and the 4 first cyclotronic harmonics are included in a 1-D slab geometry. The development of this second model leads to the proposal for an experimental set up aiming to the feasibility demonstration of a routine diagnostic providing the central {alpha} density in a reactor. (author). 166 refs.

  18. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided

  19. Alpha Anisotropy Studies of Near-Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Duppen, P

    2002-01-01

    % IS329 \\\\ \\\\ Although it was the first decay mode to be discovered, the process of $\\alpha$-particle emission is still poorly understood. A few years ago the first systematic study of anisotropic $\\alpha$-decay triggered renewed theoretical interest. Nevertheless, today the theories are still not adequate enough and more experimental data are urgently needed. We therefore measure the $\\alpha$-anisotropies of the favoured transitions of a number of near-spherical Rn and At isotopes, and of deformed nuclei near A=220. As the different models yield contradictory predictions for the transitions that are investigated, the measurements will allow to discern on their validity. They will at the same time provide the necessary basis for further theoretical developments.

  20. Spectroscopy of the extreme ultraviolet dayglow at 6.5A resolution - Atomic and ionic emissions between 530 and 1240A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentieu, E. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Meier, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    EUV spectra (530-1500A) of the day airglow in up, down and horizontal aspect orientations have been obtained with 6.5A resolution and a limiting sensitivity of 5R from a rocket experiment. Below 834A the spectrum is rich in previously unobserved OII transitions connecting with 4S(0), 2D(0), and 2P(0) states. Recent broad-band photometric observations of geocoronal HeI 584A emission in terms of the newly observed OII emissions are shown. The OI 989A and OI 1304A emissions exhibit similar dependence on altitude and viewing geometry with the OI 989A brightness 1/15 that of OI 1340. Emission at 1026A is identified as geocoronal HI Lyman beta rather than OI multiplet emission and observed intensities agree well with model estimates. An unexpectedly high NI 1200/NI 1134A brightness ratio is evidence of a significant contribution from photodissociative excitation of N2 to the NI 1200A source function.

  1. The Lyman alpha reference sample VII. Spatially resolved H alpha kinematics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herenz, E.Ch.; Gruyters, P.; Orlitová, Ivana; Hayes, M.; Ostlin, G.; Cannon, J.M.; Roth, M.M.; Bik, A.; Pardy, S.; Oti-Floranes, H.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Adamo, A.; Atek, H.; Duval, F.; Guaita, L.; Kunth, D.; Laursen, P.; Melinder, J.; Puschnig, J.; Rivera-Thorsen, T.; Schaerer, D.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 587, March (2016), A78/1-A78/27 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-20666P Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : galaxies * ISM * starburst Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  2. Lyman Limit Absorbers in GALEX Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williger, Gerard M.; Haberzettl, Lutz G.; Ribaudo, Joseph; Kuchner, Marc J.; Burchett, Joseph; Clowes, Roger G.; Lauroesch, James T.; Mills, Brianna; Borden, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    We describe the method and early results for crowdsourcing a search for low-redshift partial and complete Lyman Limit Systems (pLLSs and LLSs) in the GALEX spectral archive. LLSs have been found in large numbers at z>3 and traced to lower redshift through a relatively small number of QSO spectra from spaced-based telescopes. From a sample of 44 pLLSs and 11 LLSs at 0.1 = -0.32 +/- 0.07 and the low-metallicity portion centered at = -1.87 +/- 0.11.The GALEX spectral archive offers a vast dataset potentially containing hundreds of LLSs, which may be leveraged to search for such a bimodality and track its evolution within the unconstrained near-UV gap at 1data coverage and signal-to-noise ratio are highly variable, which hampers an automated search. We have therefore begun crowdsourcing a subset of the GALEX archive for LLSs and pLLSs via a Zooniverse project. Initially, undergraduate physics majors are performing a pilot project before releasing to citizen scientists in the public at large. We will then vet candidate systems and estimate column densities in a follow-up analysis. Upon assessing the accuracy of the physics majors’ identifications, the results will be used to devise a larger program with the help of the general public. The resulting data set would then provide the best available link between the HST-selected far-UV and ground-based pLLS+LLS samples and provide an ideal sample for consequent metallicity determinations.

  3. Lyman Break Analogs: Constraints on the Formation of Extreme Starbursts at Low and High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Thiago S.; Overzier, Roderik; Basu-Zych, Antara; Martin, D. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs), characterized by high far-UV luminosities and surface brightnesses as detected by GALEX, are intensely star-forming galaxies in the low-redshift universe (z approximately equal to 0.2), with star formation rates reaching up to 50 times that of the Milky Way. These objects present metallicities, morphologies and other physical properties similar to higher redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), motivating the detailed study of LBAs as local laboratories of this high-redshift galaxy population. We present results from our recent integral-field spectroscopy survey of LBAs with Keck/OSIRIS, which shows that these galaxies have the same nebular gas kinematic properties as high-redshift LBGs. We argue that such kinematic studies alone are not an appropriate diagnostic to rule out merger events as the trigger for the observed starburst. Comparison between the kinematic analysis and morphological indices from HST imaging illustrates the difficulties of properly identifying (minor or major) merger events, with no clear correlation between the results using either of the two methods. Artificial redshifting of our data indicates that this problem becomes even worse at high redshift due to surface brightness dimming and resolution loss. Whether mergers could generate the observed kinematic properties is strongly dependent on gas fractions in these galaxies. We present preliminary results of a CARMA survey for LBAs and discuss the implications of the inferred molecular gas masses for formation models.

  4. Deep rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy of the giant Lyman α emitter 'Himiko'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Fynbo, J. P. U.

    2015-01-01

    We present deep 10 h VLT/XSHOOTER spectroscopy for an extraordinarily luminous and extended Ly alpha emitter at z = 6.595 referred to asHimiko and first discussed by Ouchi et al., with the purpose of constraining the mechanisms powering its strong emission. Complementary to the spectrum, we discuss...... near-infrared imaging data from the CANDELS survey. We find neither for He II nor any metal line a significant excess, with 3 σ upper limits of 6.8, 3.1, and 5.8 x 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 for C IV λ 1549, He II λ 1640, C III] λ 1909, respectively, assuming apertures with 200 km s-1 widths and offset by -250...

  5. Penetration of HEPA filters by alpha recoil aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.; Ryan, M.T.

    1976-01-01

    The self-scattering of alpha-active substances has long been recognized and is attributed to expulsion of aggregates of atoms from the surface of alpha-active materials by alpha emission recoil energy, and perhaps to further propulsion of these aggregates by subsequent alpha recoils. Workers at the University of Lowell recently predicted that this phenomenon might affect the retention of alpha-active particulate matter by HEPA filters, and found support in experiments with 212 Pb. Tests at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have confirmed that alpha-emitting particulate matter does penetrate high-efficiency filter media, such as that used in HEPA filters, much more effectively than do non-radioactive or beta-gamma active aerosols. Filter retention efficiencies drastically lower than the 99.9 percent quoted for ordinary particulate matter were observed with 212 Pb, 253 Es, and 238 Pu sources, indicating that the phenomenon is common to all of these and probably to all alpha-emitting materials of appropriate half-life. Results with controlled air-flow through filters in series are consistent with the picture of small particles dislodged from the ''massive'' surface of an alpha-active material, and then repeatedly dislodged from positions on the filter fibers by subsequent alpha recoils. The process shows only a small dependence on the physical form of the source material. Oxide dust, nitrate salt, and plated metal all seem to generate the recoil particles effectively. The amount penetrating a series of filters depends on the total amount of activity in the source material, its specific activity, and the length of time of air flow

  6. HYDRO2GEN: Non-thermal hydrogen Balmer and Paschen emission in solar flares generated by electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druett, M. K.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. Sharp rises of hard X-ray (HXR) emission accompanied by Hα line profiles with strong red-shifts up to 4 Å from the central wavelength, often observed at the onset of flares with the Specola Solare Ticinese Telescope (STT) and the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), are not fully explained by existing radiative models. Moreover, observations of white light (WL) and Balmer continuum emission with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRISH) reveal strong co-temporal enhancements and are often nearly co-spatial with HXR emission. These effects indicate a fast effective source of excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms in flaring atmospheres associated with HXR emission. In this paper, we investigate electron beams as the agents accounting for the observed hydrogen line and continuum emission. Methods: Flaring atmospheres are considered to be produced by a 1D hydrodynamic response to the injection of an electron beam defining their kinetic temperatures, densities, and macro velocities. We simulated a radiative response in these atmospheres using a fully non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) approach for a 5-level plus continuum hydrogen atom model, considering its excitation and ionisation by spontaneous, external, and internal diffusive radiation and by inelastic collisions with thermal and beam electrons. Simultaneous steady-state and integral radiative transfer equations in all optically thick transitions (Lyman and Balmer series) were solved iteratively for all the transitions to define their source functions with the relative accuracy of 10-5. The solutions of the radiative transfer equations were found using the L2 approximation. Resulting intensities of hydrogen line and continuum emission were also calculated for Balmer and Paschen series. Results: We find that inelastic collisions with beam electrons strongly increase excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms from the chromosphere to photosphere. This leads to an increase in Lyman continuum

  7. Galaxy-Wide Shocks in the H$\\alpha$ Emission of Nearby Galaxy Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S. Alireza; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2018-01-01

    We examine the properties of shocked gas produced as a result of binary galaxy interactions, using H$\\alpha$ emission in a sample 22 mergers observed with SparsePak Integral Field Unit (IFU) at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Our sample consists of major and minor tidally interacting galaxies (mass ratio $1text{f}_\\text{shocked}$, and examine the spatial distribution of shocks. We find that close galaxy pairs have, on average, a higher shock fraction than wide pairs, and our coalesced mergers have the highest average $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$. Additionally, we find for the first time, correlations between mass ratio, mass of the companion, and $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$ in tidally interacting galaxy pairs. Among the non-coalesced systems in our sample, the galaxy pairs with more equal light ratio (stellar mass ratio) tend to have a higher average $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$. Also, the primary (more massive) companions are on average slightly more shocked than the secondary (less massive) ones. Utilizing dynamical models in the literature and this work, we inspect trends between $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$ and the reconstructed encounter parameters. In this very limited sample, we find that the orbital pericentric separation is correlated with shock fraction, consistent with shocks being produced by the chain of events caused by the tidal impulse during the first passage. These results lay a basis for furture analysis using the higher statistics provided by the on-going and future IFU galaxy surveys.

  8. Benchmarking and Modeling of a Conventional Mid-Size Car Using ALPHA (SAE Paper 2015-01-1140)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) modeling tool was created by EPA to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of light-duty vehicles. ALPHA is a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation capable of analyzing various vehicle type...

  9. Spectroscopic Observations of Lyman Break Galaxies at Redshifts ~4, 5, and 6 in the Goods-South Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzella, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Dickinson, M.; Cristiani, S.; Nonino, M.; Kuntschner, H.; Popesso, P.; Rosati, P.; Renzini, A.; Stern, D.; Cesarsky, C.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fosbury, R. A. E.

    2009-04-01

    We report on observations of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey at mean redshifts z ~ 4, 5, and 6 (B 435-, V 606-, and i 775-band dropouts, respectively), obtained with the red-sensitive FORS2 spectrograph at the ESO VLT. This program has yielded spectroscopic identifications for 114 galaxies (~60% of the targeted sample), of which 51 are at z ~ 4, 31 at z ~ 5, and 32 at z ~ 6. We demonstrate that the adopted selection criteria are effective, identifying galaxies at the expected redshift with minimal foreground contamination. Of the 10% interlopers, 83% turn out to be Galactic stars. Once selection effects are properly accounted for, the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the higher redshift LBGs appear to be similar to their counterparts at z ~ 3. As at z ~ 3, LBGs at z ~ 4 and z ~ 5 are observed with Lyα both in emission and in absorption; when in absorption, strong interstellar lines are also observed in the spectra. The stacked spectra of Lyα absorbers and emitters also show that the former have redder UV spectra and stronger but narrower interstellar lines, a fact also observed at z ~ 2 and 3. At z ~ 6, sensitivity issues bias our sample toward galaxies with Lyα in emission; nevertheless, these spectra appear to be similar to their lower redshift counterparts. As in other studies at similar redshifts, we find clear evidence that brighter LBGs tend to have weaker Lyα emission lines. At fixed rest-frame UV luminosity, the equivalent width of the Lyα emission line is larger at higher redshifts. At all redshifts where the measurements can be reliably made, the redshift of the Lyα emission line turns out to be larger than that of the interstellar absorption lines (ISLs), with a median velocity difference ΔV ~ 400 km s-1 at z ~ 4 and 5, consistent with results at lower redshifts. This shows that powerful, large-scale winds are common at high redshift. In general, there is no strong correlation between the

  10. Direct Detection of The Lyman Continuum of Star-forming Galaxies at z~3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasei, Kaveh; Siana, Brian; Shapley, Alice; Alavi, Anahita; Rafelski, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Star-forming galaxies are widely believed to be responsible for the reionization of the Universe and much of the ionizing background at z>3. Therefore, there has been much interest in quantifying the escape fraction of the Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of the star-forming galaxies. Yet direct detection of LyC has proven to be exceptionally challenging. Despite numerous efforts only 7 galaxies at z2 have been robustly confirmed as LyC leakers. To avoid these challenges many studies use indirect methods to infer the LyC escape fraction. We tested these indirect methods by attempting to detect escaping LyC with a 10-orbit Hubble near-UV (F275W) image that is just below the Lyman limit at the redshift of the Cosmic Horseshoe (a lensed galaxy at z=2.4). We concluded that the measured escape fraction is lower, by more than a factor of five, than the expected escape fraction based on the indirect methods. This emphasizes that indirect determinations should only be interpreted as upper-limits. We also investigated the deepest near-UV Hubble images of the SSA22 field to detect LyC leakage from a large sample of candidate star-forming galaxies at z~3.1, whose redshift was obtained by deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy and for which Keck narrow-band imaging was showing possible LyC leakage. The high spatial resolution of Hubble images is crucial to confirm our detections are clean from foreground contaminating galaxies, and also to ascertain the escape fraction of our final candidates. We identify five clean LyC emitting star-forming galaxies. The follow up investigation of these galaxies will significantly increase our knowledge of the LyC escape fraction and the mechanisms allowing for LyC escape.

  11. In-situ Long-range Alpha Particles and X-ray Detection for Thin-film Pd Cathodes During Electrolysis in Li_2SO_4/H_2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, A. G.; Roussetski, A. S.; Castano, C. H.; S-O, Kim; Miley, G. H.

    2002-03-01

    Measurements of long-range alpha and soft X-ray emissions have been performed using cyclotron calibrated CR-39 plastic track and LiF/Al_2O_3:C-Thermo-Luminescent (TLD) detectors. Application of CR-39 and TLD detectors to the surface of the thin Pd film-cathodes sputtered on the insulator substrate (glass, Al_2O_3, PMMA) allows detection of both alpha and soft X-ray emissions simultaneously with excess heat measurements during electrolysis using 1 Molar Li_2SO_4/H_20 electrolyte. The alpha particles in the range of 8.0 d> 6.0 μm) were detected upon the electrolysis. Those alpha-tracks are quite unique, never having been observed during CR-39 exposure with trans-uranium alpha -sources (Am^241, Pu^239). The TLD measurement shows generation of the low intensity 5.0-10.0 keV X-ray quanta (Φx < 5.0 s -1*cm-2) accompanying the alpha emission.

  12. IPHAS: Surveying the North Galactic Plane in H-alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drew, J.E.; Groot, P.J.; Morales-Rueda, L.; Roelofs, G.H.A.

    2005-01-01

    H-alpha emission is ubiquitous in our Galaxy. It traces ionised gas of assorted nebulae such as HII regions, planetary nebulae, Wolf-Rayet nebulae, and supernova remnants. It is a strong signature of active stars, interacting binaries, very massive stars (especially supergiants, Luminous Blue

  13. Deuterium Abundance Toward G191-B2B: Results from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Hebrard, G.; Desert, J.-M.; Ferlet, R.; LecavelierdesEtangs, A.; Howk, J. C.; Andre, M.; Blair, W. P.; Friedman, S. D.; hide

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of the hot white dwarf G191-B2B covering the wavelength region 905-1187A were obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). This data was used in conjunction with existing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope STIS observations to evaluate the total H(sub I), D(sub I), O(sub I) and N(sub I) column densities along the line of sight. Previous determinations of N(D(sub I)) based upon GHRS (Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph) and STIS (Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph) observations were controversial due to the saturated strength of the D(sub I) Lyman alpha line. In the present analysis the column density of D(sub I) has been measured using only the unsaturated Lyman beta and Lyman gamma lines observed by FUSE. A careful inspection of possible systematic uncertainties tied to the modeling of the stellar continuum or to the uncertainties in the FUSE instrumental character series has been performed. The column densities derived are: log N(D(sub I)) = 13.40+/-0.07, log N(O(sub I)) = 14.86+/-0.07, and log N(N(sub I)) = 13.87+/-0.07 quoted with 2sigma, uncertainties. The measurement of the H(sub I) column density by profile fitting of the Lyman alpha line has been found to be unsecure. If additional weak hot interstellar components are added to the three detected clouds along the line of sight, the H(sub I)) column density can be reduced quite significantly, even though the signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution at Lyman alpha are excellent. The new estimate of N(H(sub I)) toward G191-B2B reads: logN(H (sub I)) = 18.18+/-0.18 (2sigma uncertainty), so that the average (D/H) ratio on the line of sight is: (D/H)= 1.66(+0.9/-0.6) x 10(exp -5) (2sigma uncertainty).

  14. TWO LENSED z ≅ 3 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN THE SDSS GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, Benjamin P.; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Wuyts, Eva; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Rigby, J. R.; Dahle, Hakon

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of two strongly lensed z ∼ 3 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) discovered as u-band dropouts as part of the SDSS Giant Arcs Survey (SGAS). The first, SGAS J122651.3+215220 at z = 2.9233, is lensed by one of several sub-clusters, SDSS J1226+2152, in a complex massive cluster at z = 0.43. Its (g, r, i) magnitudes are (21.14, 20.60, 20.51) which translate to surface brightnesses, μ g,r,i , of (23.78, 23.11, 22.81). The second, SGAS J152745.1+065219, is an LBG at z = 2.7593 lensed by the foreground SDSS J1527+0652 at z = 0.39, with (g, r, z) = (20.90, 20.52, 20.58) and μ g,r,z = (25.15, 24.52, 24.12). Moderate resolution spectroscopy confirms the redshifts suggested by photometric breaks and shows both absorption and emission features typical of LBGs. Lens mass models derived from combined imaging and spectroscopy reveal that SGAS J122651.3+215220 is a highly magnified source (M ≅ 40), while SGAS J152745.1+065219 is magnified by no more than M ≅ 15. Compared with LBG survey results, the luminosities and lensing-corrected magnitudes suggest that SGAS J122651.3+215220 is among the faintest ≅20% of LBGs in that sample. SGAS J152745.1+065219, on the other hand, has an unlensed r-band apparent magnitude similar to that of the 'Cosmic Eye', which places it near the mean of LBG survey results over similar redshifts.

  15. First Constraints on Fuzzy Dark Matter from Lyman-α Forest Data and Hydrodynamical Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iršič, Vid; Viel, Matteo; Haehnelt, Martin G; Bolton, James S; Becker, George D

    2017-07-21

    We present constraints on the masses of extremely light bosons dubbed fuzzy dark matter (FDM) from Lyman-α forest data. Extremely light bosons with a de Broglie wavelength of ∼1  kpc have been suggested as dark matter candidates that may resolve some of the current small scale problems of the cold dark matter model. For the first time, we use hydrodynamical simulations to model the Lyman-α flux power spectrum in these models and compare it to the observed flux power spectrum from two different data sets: the XQ-100 and HIRES/MIKE quasar spectra samples. After marginalization over nuisance and physical parameters and with conservative assumptions for the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) that allow for jumps in the temperature of up to 5000 K, XQ-100 provides a lower limit of 7.1×10^{-22}  eV, HIRES/MIKE returns a stronger limit of 14.3×10^{-22}  eV, while the combination of both data sets results in a limit of 20×10^{-22}  eV (2σ C.L.). The limits for the analysis of the combined data sets increases to 37.5×10^{-22}  eV (2σ C.L.) when a smoother thermal history is assumed where the temperature of the IGM evolves as a power law in redshift. Light boson masses in the range 1-10×10^{-22}  eV are ruled out at high significance by our analysis, casting strong doubts that FDM helps solve the "small scale crisis" of the cold dark matter models.

  16. The effect of asymmetric solar wind on the Lyman α sky background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joselyn, J.A.; Holzer, T.E.

    1975-01-01

    The Lyman α (Ly α) sky background arises from the scattering of solar Ly α from a spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen in interplanetary space. This distribution is partially determined by the solar wind proton flux, which provides the principal mechanism of loss by charge exchange of the neutral hydrogen. By generating isophotal maps of scattered Ly α for several choices of interstellar wind direction and solar wind proton flux distributions, the results show that latitudinal variations of the solar wind proton flux can have a significant effect on the observed location and shape of the Ly α intensity maximum. This fact should aid in the interpretation of Ly α maps and also indicates a possible method for inferring values for the average solar wind proton flux out of the ecliptic plane

  17. Energy balance in solar and stellar chromospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrett, E. H.

    1981-01-01

    Net radiative cooling rates for quiet and active regions of the solar chromosphere and for two stellar chromospheres are calculated from corresponding atmospheric models. Models of chromospheric temperature and microvelocity distributions are derived from observed spectra of a dark point within a cell, the average sun and a very bright network element on the quiet sun, a solar plage and flare, and the stars Alpha Boo and Lambda And. Net radiative cooling rates due to the transitions of various atoms and ions are then calculated from the models as a function of depth. Large values of the net radiative cooling rate are found at the base of the chromosphere-corona transition region which are due primarily to Lyman alpha emission, and a temperature plateau is obtained in the transition region itself. In the chromospheric regions, the calculated cooling rate is equal to the mechanical energy input as a function of height and thus provides a direct constraint on theories of chromospheric heating.

  18. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Yuki [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Izaki, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-11-11

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM.

  19. Absorbed fractions for alpha particles in ellipsoidal volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Baldari, Sergio; Italiano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Internal dosimetry of alpha particles is gaining attention due to the increasing applications in cancer treatment and also for the assessment of environmental contamination from radionuclides. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic alpha particles in the energy interval between 0.1 and 10 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made of soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, three oblate and three prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a ‘generalized radius’ was found; and the dependence of the fit parameters on the alpha energy is discussed and fitted by parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for alpha particles in the energy range explored can be calculated for volumes and for ellipsoidal shapes of practical interest. This method can be applied to the evaluation of absorbed fraction from alpha-emitting radionuclides. The contribution to the deposited energy coming from electron and photon emissions can be accounted for exploiting the specific formulations previously introduced. As an example of application, the dosimetry of 213 Bi and its decay chain in ellipsoids is reported. (paper)

  20. CONTAMINATION OF BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY BY NEBULAR EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES: INVESTIGATIONS WITH KECK'S MOSFIRE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenker, Matthew A; Ellis, Richard S; Konidaris, Nick P; Stark, Daniel P

    2013-01-01

    Earlier work has raised the potential importance of nebular emission in the derivation of the physical characteristics of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. Within certain redshift ranges, and especially at z ≅ 6-7, such lines may be strong enough to reduce estimates of the stellar masses and ages of galaxies compared with those derived assuming the broadband photometry represents stellar light alone. To test this hypothesis at the highest redshifts where such lines can be probed with ground-based facilities, we examine the near-infrared spectra of a representative sample of 28 3.0 < z < 3.8 Lyman break galaxies using the newly commissioned MOSFIRE near-infrared spectrograph at the Keck I telescope. We use these data to derive the rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of [O III] emission and show that these are comparable with estimates derived using the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique introduced for sources of known redshift by Stark et al. Although our current sample is modest, its [O III] EW distribution is consistent with that inferred for Hα based on SED fitting of Stark et al.'s larger sample of 3.8 < z < 5 galaxies. For a subset of survey galaxies, we use the combination of optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to quantify kinematics of outflows in z ≅ 3.5 star-forming galaxies and discuss the implications for reionization measurements. The trends we uncover underline the dangers of relying purely on broadband photometry to estimate the physical properties of high-redshift galaxies and emphasize the important role of diagnostic spectroscopy

  1. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Guzman, F.; Dimarco, A.; Garcia, F.; Goncalves, M.

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer with Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient V MAS /WW. The calculated half-lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for the proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. Results have shown that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified theoretical framework. A Table listing the predicted half-life values, τ c is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear break-up such that -7.30 10 τ c [S] 10 (τ/τ c ) > -17.0, where τ is the total half-life of the parent nucleus. (author)

  2. Effect of surface contaminants on the light emission spectrum of LiF TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhold, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent results show the differences between the light emissions spectra from LiF Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs) for gamma vs. alpha irradiations to be due to contaminants on the surface of the TLD. The light emission spectrum for thermal neutron irradiations was observed to be identical to that for a Cs-137 gamma irradiation in Harshaw TLD-100. Further experiments with surface treatments on TLD-100 indicate trace contaminants introduced by the standard methanol cleansing rinse in reagent grade methanol to have a substantial effect on the light emission spectrum for Am-241 alpha irradiations

  3. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c{alpha}}. This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies {omega} {approx} m{omega}{sub c{alpha}}.

  4. Weak lensing of the Lyman α forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Rupert A. C.; Romeo, Alessandro; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2018-06-01

    The angular positions of quasars are deflected by the gravitational lensing effect of foreground matter. The Lyman α (Lyα) forest seen in the spectra of these quasars is therefore also lensed. We propose that the signature of weak gravitational lensing of the Lyα forest could be measured using similar techniques that have been applied to the lensed cosmic microwave background (CMB), and which have also been proposed for application to spectral data from 21-cm radio telescopes. As with 21-cm data, the forest has the advantage of spectral information, potentially yielding many lensed `slices' at different redshifts. We perform an illustrative idealized test, generating a high-resolution angular grid of quasars (of order arcminute separation), and lensing the Lyα forest spectra at redshifts z = 2-3 using a foreground density field. We find that standard quadratic estimators can be used to reconstruct images of the foreground mass distribution at z ˜ 1. There currently exists a wealth of Lyα forest data from quasar and galaxy spectral surveys, with smaller sightline separations expected in the future. Lyα forest lensing is sensitive to the foreground mass distribution at redshifts intermediate between CMB lensing and galaxy shear, and avoids the difficulties of shape measurement associated with the latter. With further refinement and application of mass reconstruction techniques, weak gravitational lensing of the high-redshift Lyα forest may become a useful new cosmological probe.

  5. Metallicities of Emission-Line Galaxies from HST ACS PEARS and HST WFC3 ERS Grism Spectroscopy at 0.6 is less than z is less than 2.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lifang; Malhotra, Sangetta; Rhoads, James; Pirzkal, Nor; Straughn, Amber; Finkelstein, Steven; Cohen, Seth; Kuntschner, Harald; Walsh, Jeremy; Windhorst, Rogier A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Galaxies selected on the basis of their emission line strength. show low metallicities, regardless of their redshifts. We conclude this from a sample of faint galaxies at redshifts between 0.6 optiCa.i with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and in the near-infrared using Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Using a sample of 11 emission line galaxies (ELGs) at 0.6 < z < 2.4 with luminosities of -22 approx < MB approx -19 which have [OII], H-Beta, and [OIII] line flux measurements from the combination of two grism spectral surveys, we use the R23 method to derive the gas-phase oxygen abundances: 7.5 <12+log(0/H)<8.5. The galaxy stellar masses are derived using Bayesian based Markov Chain Monte Carlo (pi MC(exp 2)) fitting of their Spectral Energy Distribution (SED), and span the mass range 8.1 < log(M(stellar)/M(solar)) < 10.1. These galaxies show a mass-metal1icity (M-L) and Luminosity-Metallicity (LZ) relation, which is offset by -emission-line selected galaxies most resemble the local "green peas" galaxies and Lyman-alpha galaxies at z approx = 0.3 and z approx = 2.3 in the M-Z and L-Z relations and their morphologies. The G - M(sub 20) morphology analysis shows that 10 out of 11 show disturbed morphology, even as the star-forming regions are compact. These galaxies may be intrinsically metal poor, being at early stages of formation, or the low metallicities may be due to gas infall and accretion due to mergers.

  6. Contingency of alpha decay in 287-306120 isotopes of SHE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmel Vigila Bai, G.M.; Umai Parvathiy, J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the synthesis and identification of super heavy nuclei has a particular attention in the field of nuclear physics. Many theoretical calculations have been done to study the properties of even-Z Super heavy elements (SHE). Durate et al. applied the effective liquid drop model to predict the alpha decay, cluster emission and cold fission half-life values of nuclei on the region of super heavy elements, defined by 155 ≤ N ≤ 220 and 110 ≤ Z ≤ 135. In the case of super heavy elements spontaneous fission and alpha decay are the main decay modes. Super heavy nuclei which have relatively small alpha decay half times compared to spontaneous fission half lives will survive fission and thus can be detected in the laboratory through α-decay. The present paper aims to predict possibility of alpha decay in the element Z = 120 isotopes using CYE model and the spontaneous fission half lives are computed using the phenomenological formula

  7. CAMEX-4 NOAA LYMAN-ALPHA HYGROMETER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ozone is measured in situ using a photometer consisting of a mercury lamp, two sample chambers and two detectors. The detectors measure the 254nm radiation...

  8. High-resolution Lyman-alpha filtergrams of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, R.M.; Bruner, E.C. Jr.; Acton, L.W.; Brown, W.A.; Decaudin, M.

    1980-01-01

    1'' resolution Lα pictures of the Sun have been obtained during the flight of a Black Brant rocket which took place on 1979 July 3. These pictures reveal many new structures never seen before on Lα spectroheliograms. The instrumentation, flight conditions, and preliminary results are described

  9. Gender differences in alpha-[(11)C]MTrp brain trapping, an index of serotonin synthesis, in medication-free individuals with major depressive disorder: a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Benicio N; Skelin, Ivan; Sakai, Yojiro; Nishikawa, Masami; Diksic, Mirko

    2010-08-30

    Women are at higher risk than men for developing major depressive disorder (MDD), but the mechanisms underlying this higher risk are unknown. Here, we report proportionally normalized alpha-[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan brain trapping constant (alpha-[(11)C]MTrp K*(N)), an index of serotonin synthesis, in 25 medication-free individuals with MDD and in 25 gender- and age-matched healthy subjects who were studied using positron emission tomography (PET). Comparisons of alpha-[(11)C]MTrp K*(N) values between the men and women were conducted at the voxel and cluster levels using Statistical Parametric Mapping 2 (SPM2) analysis. In addition, the alpha-[(11)C]MTrp K*(N) values on both sides of the brain were extracted and compared to identify the left to right differences, as well as the gender differences. Women with MDD displayed higher alpha-[(11)C]MTrp K*(N) than men in the inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), parahippocampal gyrus, precuneus, superior parietal lobule, and occipital lingual gyrus. In a matched group of normal subjects the gender differences were opposite from those found in MDD patients. Significant hemispheric differences in fronto-limbic structures between men and women with MDD were also observed. The K*(N) extracted from the volumes identified in MDD patients and in male and female normal subjects suggested no significant differences between males and females. In conclusion, depressed women have higher serotonin synthesis in multiple regions of the prefrontal cortex and limbic system involved with mood regulation, as compared with depressed men. Gender differences in brain serotonin synthesis may be related to higher risk for MDD in women. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The HDUV Survey: Six Lyman Continuum Emitter Candidates at z ˜ 2 Revealed by HST UV Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, R. P.; Oesch, P. A.; Reddy, N.; Holden, B.; Steidel, C. C.; Montes, M.; Atek, H.; Bouwens, R. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Cibinel, A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Labbé, I.; Magee, D.; Morselli, L.; Nelson, E. J.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Wilkins, S.

    2017-09-01

    We present six galaxies at z˜ 2 that show evidence of Lyman continuum (LyC) emission based on the newly acquired UV imaging of the Hubble Deep UV legacy survey (HDUV) conducted with the WFC3/UVIS camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). At the redshift of these sources, the HDUV F275W images partially probe the ionizing continuum. By exploiting the HST multiwavelength data available in the HDUV/GOODS fields, models of the UV spectral energy distributions, and detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the intergalactic medium absorption, we estimate the absolute ionizing photon escape fractions of these galaxies to be very high—typically > 60 % (> 13 % for all sources at 90% likelihood). Our findings are in broad agreement with previous studies that found only a small fraction of galaxies with high escape fraction. These six galaxies compose the largest sample yet of LyC leaking candidates at z˜ 2 whose inferred LyC flux has been observed at HST resolution. While three of our six candidates show evidence of hosting an active galactic nucleus, two of these are heavily obscured and their LyC emission appears to originate from star-forming regions rather than the central nucleus. Extensive multiwavelength data in the GOODS fields, especially the near-IR grism spectra from the 3D-HST survey, enable us to study the candidates in detail and tentatively test some recently proposed indirect methods to probe LyC leakage. High-resolution spectroscopic follow-up of our candidates will help constrain such indirect methods, which are our only hope of studying f esc at z˜ 5-9 in the JWST era. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  11. The Lyman continuum escape fraction of galaxies at z = 3.3 in the VUDS-LBC/COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazian, A.; Giallongo, E.; Gerbasi, R.; Fiore, F.; Fontana, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Pentericci, L.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Durkalec, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Lemaux, B. C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Bonchi, A.; Boutsia, K.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; de la Torre, S.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; Guaita, L.; Koekemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Merlin, E.; Paris, D.; Pforr, J.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The ionizing Lyman continuum flux escaping from high-redshift galaxies into the intergalactic medium is a fundamental quantity to understand the physical processes involved in the reionization epoch. However, from an observational point of view, direct detections of HI ionizing photons at high redshifts are feasible for galaxies mainly in the interval z ~ 3-4. Aims: We have investigated a sample of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 3.3 to search for possible detections of Lyman continuum ionizing photons escaping from galaxy halos. Methods: We used deep ultraviolet (UV) imaging in the COSMOS field, obtained with the prime focus camera LBC at the LBT telescope, along with a catalogue of spectroscopic redshifts obtained by the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) to build a sample of 45 galaxies at z ~ 3.3 with L> 0.5 L∗. We obtained deep LBC images of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the interval 3.27 28%, but a detailed analysis of their properties reveals that, with the exception of two marginal detections (S/N ~ 2) in the U-band, all the other eight galaxies are most likely contaminated by the UV flux of low-redshift interlopers located close (in angular position) to the high-z targets. The average escape fraction derived from the stacking of the cleaned sample was constrained to fescrel Chile, under Large Programme 185.A-0791 and on observations made at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) at Mt. Graham (Arizona, USA).

  12. Imaging of alpha(v)beta(3) expression by a bifunctional chimeric RGD peptide not cross-reacting with alpha(v)beta(5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannetti, Antonella; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Iommelli, Francesca; Del Gatto, Annarita; De Luca, Stefania; Zaccaro, Laura; Papaccioli, Angela; Sommella, Jvana; Panico, Mariarosaria; Speranza, Antonio; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Saviano, Michele; Pedone, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2009-08-15

    To test whether a novel bifunctional chimeric peptide comprising a cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp pentapeptide covalently bound to an echistatin domain can discriminate alpha(v)beta(3) from alpha(v)beta(5) integrin, thus allowing the in vivo selective visualization of alpha(v)beta(3) expression by single-photon and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The chimeric peptide was preliminarily tested for inhibition of alpha(v)beta(3)-dependent cell adhesion and competition of 125I-echistatin binding to membrane of stably transfected K562 cells expressing alpha(v)beta(3) (Kalpha(v)beta(3)) or alpha(v)beta(5) (Kalpha(v)beta(5)) integrin. The chimeric peptide was then conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and labeled with 111In for single-photon imaging, whereas a one-step procedure was used for labeling the full-length peptide and a truncated derivative, lacking the last five C-terminal amino acids, with 18F for PET imaging. Nude mice bearing tumors from Kalpha(v)beta(3), Kalpha(v)beta(5), U87MG human glioblastoma, and A431 human epidermoid cells were subjected to single-photon and PET imaging. Adhesion and competitive binding assays showed that the novel chimeric peptide selectively binds to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin and does not cross-react with alpha(v)beta(5). In agreement with in vitro findings, single-photon and PET imaging studies showed that the radiolabeled chimeric peptide selectively localizes in tumor xenografts expressing alphavbeta3 and fails to accumulate in those expressing alpha(v)beta(5) integrin. When 18F-labeled truncated derivative was used for PET imaging, alphavbeta3- and alpha(v)beta(5)-expressing tumors were visualized, indicating that the five C-terminal amino acids are required to differentially bind the two integrins. Our findings indicate that the novel chimeric Arg-Gly-Asp peptide, having no cross-reaction with alphavbeta5 integrin, allows highly selective alphavbeta3 expression imaging and monitoring.

  13. In-flight performance of the polarization modulator in the CLASP rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Giono, Gabriel; Beabout, Dyana L.; Beabout, Brent L.; Nakayama, Satoshi; Tajima, Takao

    2016-07-01

    We developed a polarization modulation unit (PMU), a motor system to rotate a waveplate continuously. In polarization measurements, the continuous rotating waveplate is an important element as well as a polarization analyzer to record the incident polarization in a time series of camera exposures. The control logic of PMU was originally developed for the next Japanese solar observation satellite SOLAR-C by the SOLAR-C working group. We applied this PMU for the Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP). CLASP is a sounding rocket experiment to observe the linear polarization of the Lyman-alpha emission (121.6 nm vacuum ultraviolet) from the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun with a high polarization sensitivity of 0.1 % for the first time and investigate their vector magnetic field by the Hanle effect. The driver circuit was developed to optimize the rotation for the CLASP waveplate (12.5 rotations per minute). Rotation non- uniformity of the waveplate causes error in the polarization degree (i.e. scale error) and crosstalk between Stokes components. We confirmed that PMU has superior rotation uniformity in the ground test and the scale error and crosstalk of Stokes Q and U are less than 0.01 %. After PMU was attached to the CLASP instrument, we performed vibration tests and confirmed all PMU functions performance including rotation uniformity did not change. CLASP was successfully launched on September 3, 2015, and PMU functioned well as designed. PMU achieved a good rotation uniformity, and the high precision polarization measurement of CLASP was successfully achieved.

  14. Self-absorption and self-scattering in emitter source of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terini, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary results on spectrometric analysis and activity measurements of alpha-emitting sources prepared by evaporation on mylar. The measurements were made with a Si surface barrier detector. By the analysis of the angular distribuition of the alpha particles emitted, it was possible to observe that the width of the spectrum low energy tail increases with the emission angle θ, due to the energy degradation in the source material, which affects the measured particles energy. The source activity was also measured from detection solid angles of approx. 10 -1 and aprox. 10 -3 Sr, as a function of θ. The absolute activity of the alpha source was determined and a discussion is present on the ideal conditions necessary for such measurements. (author) [pt

  15. A comprehensive alpha-heating model for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopherson, A. R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Campbell, E. M.; Sanz, J.; Spears, B. K.

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to study alpha-heating in inertially confined plasmas. It describes the time evolution of a central low-density hot spot confined by a compressible shell, heated by fusion alphas, and cooled by radiation and thermal losses. The model includes the deceleration, stagnation, and burn phases of inertial confinement fusion implosions, and is valid for sub-ignited targets with ≤10 × amplification of the fusion yield from alpha-heating. The results of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are used to derive realistic initial conditions and dimensionless parameters for the model. It is found that most of the alpha energy (˜90%) produced before bang time is deposited within the hot spot mass, while a small fraction (˜10%) drives mass ablation off the inner shell surface and its energy is recycled back into the hot spot. Of the bremsstrahlung radiation emission, ˜40% is deposited in the hot spot, ˜40% is recycled back in the hot spot by ablation off the shell, and ˜20% leaves the hot spot. We show here that the hot spot, shocked shell, and outer shell trajectories from this analytical model are in good agreement with simulations. A detailed discussion of the effect of alpha-heating on the hydrodynamics is also presented.

  16. J1154+2443: a low-redshift compact star-forming galaxy with a 46 per cent leakage of Lyman continuum photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Schaerer, D.; Worseck, G.; Guseva, N. G.; Thuan, T. X.; Verhamme, A.; Orlitová, I.; Fricke, K. J.

    2018-03-01

    We report the detection of the Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of the compact star-forming galaxy (SFG) J1154+2443 observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. This galaxy, at a redshift of z = 0.3690, is characterized by a high emission-line flux ratio O32 = [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727 = 11.5. The escape fraction of the LyC radiation fesc(LyC) in this galaxy is 46 per cent, the highest value found so far in low-redshift SFGs and one of the highest values found in galaxies at any redshift. The narrow double-peaked Ly α emission line is detected in the spectrum of J1154+2443 with a separation between the peaks Vsep of 199 km s-1, one of the lowest known for Ly α-emitting galaxies, implying a high fesc(Ly α). Comparing the extinction-corrected Ly α/H β flux ratio with the case B value, we find fesc(Ly α) = 98 per cent. Our observations, combined with previous detections in the literature, reveal an increase of O32 with increasing fesc(LyC). We also find a tight anticorrelation between fesc(LyC) and Vsep. The surface brightness profile derived from the COS acquisition image reveals a bright star-forming region in the centre and an exponential disc in the outskirts with a disc scale length α = 1.09 kpc. J1154+2443, compared to other known low-redshift LyC leakers, is characterized by the lowest metallicity, 12+log O/H = 7.65 ± 0.01, the lowest stellar mass M⋆ = 108.20 M⊙, a similar star formation rate SFR = 18.9 M⊙ yr-1, and a high specific SFR of 1.2 × 10-7 yr-1.

  17. Lyman continuum escape fraction of faint galaxies at z 3.3 in the CANDELS/GOODS-North, EGS, and COSMOS fields with LBC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazian, A.; Giallongo, E.; Paris, D.; Boutsia, K.; Dickinson, M.; Santini, P.; Windhorst, R. A.; Jansen, R. A.; Cohen, S. H.; Ashcraft, T. A.; Scarlata, C.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Vanzella, E.; Cusano, F.; Cristiani, S.; Giavalisco, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Koekemoer, A.; Grogin, N. A.; Castellano, M.; Fiore, F.; Fontana, A.; Marchi, F.; Pedichini, F.; Pentericci, L.; Amorín, R.; Barro, G.; Bonchi, A.; Bongiorno, A.; Faber, S. M.; Fumana, M.; Galametz, A.; Guaita, L.; Kocevski, D. D.; Merlin, E.; Nonino, M.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pilo, S.; Ryan, R. E.; Sani, E.; Speziali, R.; Testa, V.; Weiner, B.; Yan, H.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The reionization of the Universe is one of the most important topics of present-day astrophysical research. The most plausible candidates for the reionization process are star-forming galaxies, which according to the predictions of the majority of the theoretical and semi-analytical models should dominate the H I ionizing background at z ≳ 3. Aims: We measure the Lyman continuum escape fraction, which is one of the key parameters used to compute the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the UV background. It provides the ratio between the photons produced at λ ≤ 912 Å rest-frame and those that are able to reach the inter-galactic medium, I.e. that are not absorbed by the neutral hydrogen or by the dust of the galaxy's inter-stellar medium. Methods: We used ultra-deep U-band imaging (U = 30.2 mag at 1σ) from Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBC/LBT) in the CANDELS/GOODS-North field and deep imaging in the COSMOS and EGS fields in order to estimate the Lyman continuum escape fraction of 69 star-forming galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshifts at 3.27 ≤ z ≤ 3.40 to faint magnitude limits (L = 0.2L∗, or equivalently M1500 - 19). The narrow redshift range implies that the LBC U-band filter exclusively samples the λ ≤ 912 Å rest-frame wavelengths. Results: We measured through stacks a stringent upper limit (L∗), while for the faint population (L = 0.2L∗) the limit to the escape fraction is ≲ 10%. We computed the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the observed UV background at z 3 and find that it is not sufficient to keep the Universe ionized at these redshifts unless their escape fraction increases significantly (≥ 10%) at low luminosities (M1500 ≥ - 19). Conclusions: We compare our results on the Lyman continuum escape fraction of high-z galaxies with recent estimates in the literature, and discuss future prospects to shed light on the end of the Dark Ages. In the future, strong gravitational

  18. A galaxy rapidly forming stars 700 million years after the Big Bang at redshift 7.51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, S L; Papovich, C; Dickinson, M; Song, M; Tilvi, V; Koekemoer, A M; Finkelstein, K D; Mobasher, B; Ferguson, H C; Giavalisco, M; Reddy, N; Ashby, M L N; Dekel, A; Fazio, G G; Fontana, A; Grogin, N A; Huang, J-S; Kocevski, D; Rafelski, M; Weiner, B J; Willner, S P

    2013-10-24

    Of several dozen galaxies observed spectroscopically that are candidates for having a redshift (z) in excess of seven, only five have had their redshifts confirmed via Lyman α emission, at z = 7.008, 7.045, 7.109, 7.213 and 7.215 (refs 1-4). The small fraction of confirmed galaxies may indicate that the neutral fraction in the intergalactic medium rises quickly at z > 6.5, given that Lyman α is resonantly scattered by neutral gas. The small samples and limited depth of previous observations, however, makes these conclusions tentative. Here we report a deep near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 43 photometrically-selected galaxies with z > 6.5. We detect a near-infrared emission line from only a single galaxy, confirming that some process is making Lyman α difficult to detect. The detected emission line at a wavelength of 1.0343 micrometres is likely to be Lyman α emission, placing this galaxy at a redshift z = 7.51, an epoch 700 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy's colours are consistent with significant metal content, implying that galaxies become enriched rapidly. We calculate a surprisingly high star-formation rate of about 330 solar masses per year, which is more than a factor of 100 greater than that seen in the Milky Way. Such a galaxy is unexpected in a survey of our size, suggesting that the early Universe may harbour a larger number of intense sites of star formation than expected.

  19. CONTAMINATION OF BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY BY NEBULAR EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES: INVESTIGATIONS WITH KECK'S MOSFIRE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenker, Matthew A; Ellis, Richard S; Konidaris, Nick P [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stark, Daniel P, E-mail: schenker@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Earlier work has raised the potential importance of nebular emission in the derivation of the physical characteristics of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. Within certain redshift ranges, and especially at z ≅ 6-7, such lines may be strong enough to reduce estimates of the stellar masses and ages of galaxies compared with those derived assuming the broadband photometry represents stellar light alone. To test this hypothesis at the highest redshifts where such lines can be probed with ground-based facilities, we examine the near-infrared spectra of a representative sample of 28 3.0 < z < 3.8 Lyman break galaxies using the newly commissioned MOSFIRE near-infrared spectrograph at the Keck I telescope. We use these data to derive the rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of [O III] emission and show that these are comparable with estimates derived using the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique introduced for sources of known redshift by Stark et al. Although our current sample is modest, its [O III] EW distribution is consistent with that inferred for Hα based on SED fitting of Stark et al.'s larger sample of 3.8 < z < 5 galaxies. For a subset of survey galaxies, we use the combination of optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to quantify kinematics of outflows in z ≅ 3.5 star-forming galaxies and discuss the implications for reionization measurements. The trends we uncover underline the dangers of relying purely on broadband photometry to estimate the physical properties of high-redshift galaxies and emphasize the important role of diagnostic spectroscopy.

  20. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z ≅ 1-3 IN THE HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Yan, H.; O'Connell, R. W.; Straughn, A. N.; Kimble, R. A.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ≅ 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 arcmin 2 in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z ≅ 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high-redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout-selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope β is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z ≅ 1-3 are massive, dustier, and more highly star forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L* ∼ 3, a true Lyman break selection at z ≅ 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties and their evolution.

  1. A high-redshift IRAS galaxy with huge luminosity - hidden quasar or protogalaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowan-Robinson, M; Broadhurst, T [Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). School of Mathematical Sciences; Lawrence, A [Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics; McMahon, R G [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy; Lonsdale, C J [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA). Infrared Processing and Analysis Center; Oliver, S J; Taylor, A N [Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). School of Mathematical Sciences; Hacking, P B; Conrow, T [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA). Infrared Processing and Analysis Center; Saunders, W [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics; Ellis, R S [Durham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics; Efstathiou, G P [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics; Condon, J J [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (USA)

    1991-06-27

    During a survey intended to measure redshifts for 1,400 galaxies identified with faint sources detected by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite, we found an emission-line galaxy at a redshift of 2.286, and with the enormous far-infrared luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 14} times that of the sun (L{sub sun}) The spectrum is very unusual, showing lines of high excitation but with very weak Lyman-{alpha} emission. A self-absorbed synchrotron model for the infrared energy distribution cannot be ruled out, but a thermal origin seems more plausible. A radio-quiet quasar embedded in a very dusty galaxy could account for the infrared emission, as might a starburst embedded in 1-10 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} of dust. The latter case demands so much dust that the object would probably be a massive galaxy in the process of formation. In either case, this is a remarkable object, and the presence of a large amount of dust in an object of such high redshift implies the generation of heavy elements at an early cosmological epoch. (author).

  2. Geocoronal imaging with Dynamics Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rairden, R. L.; Frank, L. A.; Craven, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The ultraviolet photometer of the University of Iowa spin-scan auroral imaging instrumentation on board Dynamics Explorer-1 has returned numerous hydrogen Lyman alpha images of the geocorona from altitudes of 570 km to 23,300 km (1.09 R sub E to 4.66 R sub E geocentric radial distance). The hydrogen density gradient is shown by a plot of the zenith intensities throughout this range, which decrease to near celestial background values as the spacecraft approaches apogee. Characterizing the upper geocorona as optically thin (single-scattering), the zenith intensity is converted directly to vertical column density. This approximation loses its validity deeper in the geocorona, where the hydrogen is demonstrated to be optically thick in that there is no Lyman alpha limb brightening. Further study of the geocoronal hydrogen distribution will require computer modeling of the radiative transfer.

  3. Dynamo dominated accretion and energy flow: The mechanism of active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, S.A.; Li, H.

    1998-12-31

    An explanation of the magnetic fields of the universe, the central mass concentration of galaxies, the massive black hole of every galaxy, and the AGN phenomena has been an elusive goal. The authors suggest here the outlines of such a theoretical understanding and point out where the physical understanding is missing. They believe there is an imperative to the sequence of mass flow and hence energy flow in the collapse of a galactic mass starting from the first non-linearity appearing in structure formation following decoupling. This first non-linearity of a two to one density fluctuation, the Lyman-{alpha} clouds, ultimately leads to the emission spectra of the phenomenon of AGN, quasars, blazars, etc. The over-arching physical principle is the various mechanisms for the transport of angular momentum. They believe they have now understood the new physics of two of these mechanisms that have previously been illusive and as a consequence they impose strong constraints on the initial conditions of the mechanisms for the subsequent emission of the gravitational binding energy. The new phenomena described are: (1) the Rossby vortex mechanism of the accretion disk {alpha}-viscosity, and (2) the mechanism of the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo in the accretion disk. The Rossby vortex mechanism leads to a prediction of the black hole mass and rate of energy release and the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo leads to the generation of the magnetic flux of the galaxy (and the far greater magnetic flux of clusters) and separately explains the primary flux of energy emission as force-free magnetic energy density. This magnetic flux and magnetic energy density separately are the necessary consequence of the saturation of a dynamo created by the accretion disk with a gain greater than unity.

  4. Distribution of alpha3, alpha5 and alpha(v) integrin subunits in mature and immature human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, G; Mart, M; Santaló, J; Bolton, V N

    1998-10-01

    The distribution of three integrin subunits, alpha3, alpha5 and alpha(v), in immature and mature human oocytes has been examined using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The results demonstrate that both alpha5 and alpha(v) are present at the germinal vesicle stage, while alpha3 was only detected in oocytes after germinal vesicle breakdown, in metaphase I and II stage oocytes. The cortical concentration of integrin subunits alpha3 and alpha5 is consistent with their localization in the oolemma. In contrast, the homogeneous distribution of alpha(v) throughout the oocyte suggests the existence of cytoplasmic reservoirs of this protein in the oocyte.

  5. COLLIMATION AND SCATTERING OF THE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS EMISSION IN THE SOMBRERO GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V., E-mail: robertobm@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP CEP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2013-03-10

    We present an analysis of a data cube of the central region of M104, the Sombrero galaxy, obtained with the GMOS-IFU of the Gemini-South telescope, and report the discovery of collimation and scattering of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission in the circumnuclear region of this galaxy. Analysis with PCA Tomography and spectral synthesis revealed the existence of collimation and scattering of the AGN featureless continuum and also of a broad component of the H{alpha} emission line. The collimation and scattering of this broad H{alpha} component was also revealed by fitting the [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6583 and H{alpha} emission lines as a sum of Gaussian functions. The spectral synthesis, together with a V-I image obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, showed the existence of circumnuclear dust, which may cause the light scattering. We also identify a dusty feature that may be interpreted as a torus/disk structure. The existence of two opposite regions with featureless continuum (P.A. = -18 Degree-Sign {+-} 13 Degree-Sign and P.A. = 162 Degree-Sign {+-} 13 Degree-Sign ) along a direction perpendicular to the torus/disk (P.A. = 72 Degree-Sign {+-} 14 Degree-Sign ) suggests that this structure is approximately edge-on and collimates the AGN emission. The edge-on torus/disk also hides the broad-line region. The proposed scenario is compatible with the unified model and explains why only a weak broad component of the H{alpha} emission line is visible and also why many previous studies detected no broad H{alpha}. The technique used here proved to be an efficient method not only for detecting scattered light, but also for testing the unified model in low-luminosity AGNs.

  6. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission; Detection des fragments de fission par emission secondaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audias, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author) [French] Le detecteur de fragments de fission que nous avons realise est base sur le principe de l'emission secondaire produite par les fragments de fission traversant une feuille mince: les electrons secondaires emis sont acceleres a des tensions telles (de l'ordre de 10 kV), qu'ils soient directement detectables par un scintillateur plastique associe a un photomultiplicateur. L'interet d'un tel detecteur reside: dans sa rapidite, sa tres bonne discrimination alpha, fission, la possibilite de detecter les fragments de fission avec une perte d'energie pouvant rester relativement faible, et la possibilite d'introduire des quantites de matiere fissile plus importantes que dans les autres types de detecteurs. Ce travail comporte: -) un apercu bibliographique de la theorie du phenomene, -) realisation et mise au point du detecteur avec etude experimentale de quelques parametres intervenant dans l'emission secondaire, -) etude de l'emission secondaire (sur la face d'emergence des fragments de fission) en fonction de l'energie du fragment et en fonction de l'epaisseur de matiere traversee avant emission secondaire, et -) une etude comparative de l'emission secondaire sur la face d'incidence et sur la face d'emergence des fragments de

  7. Reducing radon daughter background in alpha continuous air monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, J.C.; McFarland, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Alpha continuous air monitors are instruments designed to sample aerosols which may contain alpha-emitting radionuclides and, in near-real time, to monitor the sample for alpha emissions. This process is subject to interference from radon decay products. The usual method for overcoming this interference is by signal processing or data processing in such a manner as to accurately subtract a portion of the background from the transuranic count. An innovative alternative approach has been jointly developed in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Texas A ampersand M University. The concept is to attempt to physically remove a portion of the interfering radon daughters from the incoming sample by a diffusion screen before the sample is collected. The results of laboratory tests indicate that a very high removal efficiency for unattached radon progeny can be obtained without excessive loss of efficiency for collection of the contaminant aerosols of concern. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Guzman, F.; Dimarco, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Rodriguez, O. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Instituto Superior de Ciencias e Tecnologia Nucleares, La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer with Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient V{sub MAS}/WW. The calculated half-lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for the proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. Results have shown that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified theoretical framework. A Table listing the predicted half-life values, {tau}{sub c} is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear break-up such that -7.30 <{approx_equal} log{sub 10} {tau}{sub c} [S] <{approx_equal} 27.50 and log {sub 10}({tau}/{tau}{sub c}) > -17.0, where {tau} is the total half-life of the parent nucleus. (author)

  9. Real-Time Monitoring of Alpha Emissions. Final report, FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritzo, R.; Fowler, M.; Wouters, J.

    1994-01-01

    A technology is being developed for on-line, real-time monitoring of mixed and low-level incinerator stacks for levels of airborne alpha activity. The Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System uses a detector composed of multiple parallel plates of scintillating material fabricated so that the entire stack gas stream flows directly through the inter-plate volume. This report is largely a compilation of 3 reports on background reduction, once-through flow tests, and the aeronautical/mechanical engineering work. The full text of each report is included as an appendix

  10. Photoionization pathways and thresholds in generation of Lyman-α radiation by resonant four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg A. Louchev; Norihito Saito; Yu Oishi; Koji Miyazaki; Kotaro Okamura; Jumpei Nakamura; Masahiko Iwasaki; Satoshi Wada

    2016-01-01

    We develop a set of analytical approximations for the estimation of the combined effect of various photoionization processes involved in the resonant four-wave mixing generation of ns pulsed Lyman-α (L-α) radiation by using 212.556 nm and 820-845 nm laser radiation pulses in Kr-Ar mixture: (i) multi-photon ionization, (ii) step-wise (2+1)-photon ionization via the resonant 2-photon excitation of Kr followed by 1-photon ionization and (iii) laser-induced avalanche ionization produced by genera...

  11. Angular correlation between short-range. cap alpha. particles and. gamma. quanta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kul' chitskii, L A; Latyshev, G D; Bulyginskii, D G

    1949-01-01

    Chang (Phys. Rev. 69, 60(1946); 70, 632(1946)) has found that the intensities of short-range ..cap alpha.. rays of Po and Ra are considerably higher than the values given by the Geiger-Nuttall law. This can be explained by assuming surface vibrations of ..cap alpha..-radioactive nuclei, which produce deformations and corresponding lowerings of the potential barrier in certain directions. In this case an angular correlation should exist between the short-range ..cap alpha.. ray and the accompanying ..gamma.. quantum. The authors checked this conclusion by applying the coincidence method to the ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. radiations of a mixture of RdTh (/sup 228/Th) and ThC (/sup 212/Bi). Maxima of coincidence numbers occur at angles 45 and 135 deg., with lesser maxima at 0 and 180 deg. Theoretical considerations show that in cases (like the one investigated) where the nuclear spin before and after the ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. emissions is zero, the angular correlations are uniquely determined whatever the deformation caused by the vibration; in other cases, the correlation depends on the kind of deformation. Therefore, it would be interesting to investigate the case of Pa, whose nuclear spin is not zero and the decay exhibits intensive groups of short-range ..cap alpha.. particles.

  12. Nuclei far from the beta stability line. High-energy beta decay and delayed-particle emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, R.G.; Hornshj, P.

    1976-01-01

    Progress in on-line mass separation together with improved proton accelerators now permit the production of secondary ion-beams of the order of 10 11 atoms per second. Applications to the study of delayed-proton and delayed-alpha emission are discussed. These effects have been used for the estimation of alpha-emission strength functions at 4-6 MeV excitation energy, and for the determination of level densities through fluctuation analysis

  13. The microwave and H-alpha sources of the 1992 January 13 flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Gary, D. E.; Zirin, H.; Kosugi, T.; Schwartz, R. A.; Linford, G.

    1995-01-01

    We compare X-ray, microwave and H-alpha observations for the 1992 January 13 limb flare. The soft and hard X-ray images of the flare have been studied thoroughly by Masuda et al. (1994) with Yohkoh SXT and HXT images. We find that during the hard X-ray emission peak there is no H-alpha brightening on the disk nor at the limb, so the main ribbons of this flare must be beyond the limb. The microwave source maintains a fixed distance about 10 arcsecs from the optical limb in the frequency range 2.8-14.0 GHz. We interpret this limit in source position as due to the presence of a microwave limb that extends higher than the white-light limb -- to a height of 7300 +/- 1500 km. We believe that the high-frequency microwave emissions are occulted by this extended limb, while the soft and hard X-ray emissions are able to pass through largely unaffected. We also believe, however, that the hard X-ray footpoints are also partially occulted by the photospheric limb, despite the appearance of 'footpoint sources' in HXT data shown by Masuda et al. The smooth X-ray and microwave time profiles, microwave-rich emission relative to hard X-rays, and progressive hard X-ray spectral hardening through the flare peak are all characteristics that we interpret as being a direct result of the occultation of footpoint emission.

  14. A survey of northern Bok globules for H-alpha emission stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Katsuo; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko.

    1983-01-01

    Northern globules in the catalog of Bok and Cordwell (1973) have been surveyed for Hα-emission stars of T Tau type by using the Kiso Schmidt telescope with an objective prism. The results for 15 globules are presented here. A total of 60 emission-line stars, of which 80 % are new, and 17 suspected ones have been discovered. Some of them are known T Tau stars; one star shows Ca 2 H and K lines in emission on objective-prism plates in the blue-violet and presumably is a new T Tau star. The celestial coordinates and rough estimates of magnitude and color are given for all of the objects. (author)

  15. Star formation rate and extinction in faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, Chun-Hao; Wang, Wei-Hao [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Owen, Frazer N. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present a statistical detection of 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission from a sample of faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). To constrain their extinction and intrinsic star formation rate (SFR), we combine the latest ultradeep Very Large Array 1.5 GHz radio image and the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images in the GOODS-N. We select a large sample of 1771 z ∼ 4 LBGs from the ACS catalog using B {sub F435W}-dropout color criteria. Our LBG samples have I {sub F775W} ∼ 25-28 (AB), ∼0-3 mag fainter than M{sub UV}{sup ⋆} at z ∼ 4. In our stacked radio images, we find the LBGs to be point-like under our 2'' angular resolution. We measure their mean 1.5 GHz flux by stacking the measurements on the individual objects. We achieve a statistical detection of S {sub 1.5} {sub GHz} = 0.210 ± 0.075 μJy at ∼3σ for the first time on such a faint LBG population at z ∼ 4. The measurement takes into account the effects of source size and blending of multiple objects. The detection is visually confirmed by stacking the radio images of the LBGs, and the uncertainty is quantified with Monte Carlo simulations on the radio image. The stacked radio flux corresponds to an obscured SFR of 16.0 ± 5.7 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, and implies a rest-frame UV extinction correction factor of 3.8. This extinction correction is in excellent agreement with that derived from the observed UV continuum spectral slope, using the local calibration of Meurer et al. This result supports the use of the local calibration on high-redshift LBGs to derive the extinction correction and SFR, and also disfavors a steep reddening curve such as that of the Small Magellanic Cloud.

  16. The determination of $\\alpha_s$ by the ALPHA collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    We review the ALPHA collaboration strategy for obtaining the QCD coupling at high scale. In the three-flavor effective theory it avoids the use of perturbation theory at $\\alpha > 0.2$ and at the same time has the physical scales small compared to the cutoff $1/a$ in all stages of the computation. The result $\\Lambda_\\overline{MS}^{(3)}=332(14)$~MeV is translated to $\\alpha_\\overline{MS}(m_Z)=0.1179(10)(2)$ by use of (high order) perturbative relations between the effective theory couplings at the charm and beauty quark "thresholds". The error of this perturbative step is discussed and estimated as $0.0002$.

  17. Star Formation Rates in Lyman Break Galaxies: Radio Stacking of LBGs in the COSMOS Field and the Sub-μJy Radio Source Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, C. L.; Lee, Nicholas; Capak, P.; Schinnerer, E.; Lee, K.-S.; McCraken, H.; Yun, M. S.; Scoville, N.; Smolčić, V.; Giavalisco, M.; Datta, A.; Taniguchi, Y.; Urry, C. Megan

    2008-12-01

    We present an analysis of the radio properties of large samples of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 3, 4, and 5 from the COSMOS field. The median stacking analysis yields a statistical detection of the z ~ 3 LBGs (U-band dropouts), with a 1.4 GHz flux density of 0.90 +/- 0.21 μJy. The stacked emission is unresolved, with a size = 3 is smaller than at lower redshifts. Conversely, the radio luminosity for a given star formation rate may be systematically lower at very high redshift. Two possible causes for a suppressed radio luminosity are (1) increased inverse Compton cooling of the relativistic electron population due to scattering off the increasing CMB at high redshift or (2) cosmic-ray diffusion from systematically smaller galaxies. The radio detections of individual sources are consistent with a radio-loud AGN fraction of 0.3%. One source is identified as a very dusty, extreme starburst galaxy (a "submillimeter galaxy"). Based on observations in the COSMOS Legacy Survey including those taken on the HST, Keck, NRAO-VLA, Subaru, KPNO 4 m, CTIO 4 m, and CFHT 3.6 m. The Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  18. Rocket borne solar eclipse experiment to measure the temperature structure of the solar corona via lyman-α line profile observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argo, H.V.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket borne experiment to measure the temperature structure of the inner solar corona via the doppler broadening of the resonance hydrogen Lyman-α (lambda1216A) radiation scattered by ambient neutral hydrogen atoms was attempted during the 16 Feb 1980 solar eclipse. Two Nike-Black Brant V sounding rockets carrying instrumented payloads were launched into the path of the advancing eclipse umbra from the San Marco satellite launch platform 3 miles off the east coast of Kenya

  19. Polarization Calibration of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter for a 0.1% Polarization Sensitivity in the VUV Range. Part II: In-Flight Calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giono, G.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Tsuneta, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Cirtain, J.; Champey, P.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Štěpán, Jiří; Belluzzi, L.; Sainz, R.M.; de Pontieu, B.; Ichimoto, K.; Carlsson, M.; Casini, R.; Goto, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 4 (2017), 57/1-57/19 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-16861S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar transition region * ly-alpha * magnetohydrodynamic model Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  20. Localisation of malignant germ-cell tumours by external scanning after injection of radiolabelled anti-alpha-fetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, A.K.; Fairweather, D.S.; Bradwell, A.R.; Blackburn, J.C.; Howell, A.; Dykes, P.W.; Reeder, A.; Hine, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sheep IgG antibody to alpha-fetoprotein was labelled with 131 I and used to identify human germ-cell tumours by emission scanning. Eleven patients were studied after resection of their primary tumours. Ten had malignant teratoma and one an endodermal sinus tumour. All eight patients with raised serum alpha-fetoprotein concentrations had metastases apparent in the antibody scans. Of the remaining three patients with normal serum alpha-fetoprotein concentrations, two had positive scans. Three of the patients with positive results were scanned twice; the second scans were negative after treatment, when the alpha-fetoprotein concentrations had returned to normal. These results suggest that antibody scans are useful in the clinical management of patients with germ-cell tumours. (author)

  1. Energetic Charged Particle Emission from Hydrogen-Loaded pd and ti Cathodes and its Enhancement by He-4 Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, A. G.; Miley, G. H.; Lipson, A. G.; Lyakhov, B. F.; Roussetski, A. S.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reproducible emissions of energetic alphas and protons appearing in an energy range where both cosmic ray interference and possible alpha emissions from contamination (e.g., radon) is assumed to be negligible. We also show that He4 doping of Pd and Ti cathodes leads to a significant enhancement of the energetic charged particles emission (ECPE). This measurement of the emissions of energetic (MeV) particles, in a region of low background interference plus their enhancement by He4 doping provides very strong support for the existence of LENR processes in the crystalline lattice of deuterated metals.

  2. Energetic charged particle emission from hydrogen-loaded Pd and Ti cathodes and its enhancement by He-4 implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, A.G.; Miley, G.H.; Lipson, A.G.; Lyakhov, B.F.; Roussetski, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reproducible emissions of energetic alphas and protons appearing in an energy range where both cosmic ray interference and possible alpha emissions from contamination (e.g., radon) is assumed to be negligible. We also show that, 4 He doping of Pd and Ti cathodes leads to a significant enhancement of the energetic charged particles emission (ECPE). This measurement of the emissions of energetic (MeV) particles, in a region of low background interference plus their enhancement by 4 He doping provides very strong support for the existence of LENR processes in the crystalline lattice of deuterated metals. (authors)

  3. Geocoronal imaging with Dynamics Explorer - A first look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rairden, R. L.; Frank, L. A.; Craven, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The ultraviolet photometer of the University of Iowa spin-scan auroral imaging instrumentation on board Dynamics Explorer-1 has returned numerous hydrogen Lyman alpha images of the geocorona from altitudes of 570 km to 23,300 km (1.09 R sub E to 4.66 R sub E geocentric radial distance). The hydrogen density gradient is shown by a plot of the zenith intensities throughout this range, which decrease to near celestial background values as the spacecraft approaches apogee. Characterizing the upper geocorona as optically thin (single-scattering), the zenith intensity is converted directly to vertical column density. This approximation loses its validity deeper in the geocorona, where the hydrogen is demonstrated to be optically thick in that there is no Lyman alpha limb brightening. Further study of the geocoronal hydrogen distribution will require computer modeling of the radiative transfer. Previously announced in STAR as N83-20889

  4. Chromospheric LAyer SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier; De Pontieu, Bart; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Kano, Ryohei; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Masaki; hide

    2016-01-01

    The sounding rocket Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) was launched on September 3rd, 2015, and successfully detected (with a polarization accuracy of 0.1 %) the linear polarization signals (Stokes Q and U) that scattering processes were predicted to produce in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line (Ly; 121.567 nm). Via the Hanle effect, this unique data set may provide novel information about the magnetic structure and energetics in the upper solar chromosphere. The CLASP instrument was safely recovered without any damage and we have recently proposed to dedicate its second ight to observe the four Stokes profiles in the spectral region of the Mg II h and k lines around 280 nm; in these lines the polarization signals result from scattering processes and the Hanle and Zeeman effects. Here we describe the modifications needed to develop this new instrument called the "Chromospheric LAyer SpectroPolarimeter" (CLASP2).

  5. Differentiation of the mRNA transcripts originating from the alpha 1- and alpha 2-globin loci in normals and alpha-thalassemics.

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhaber, S A; Kan, Y W

    1981-01-01

    The alpha-globin polypeptide is encoded by two adjacent genes, alpha 1 and alpha 2. In the normal diploid state (alpha alpha/alpha alpha) all four alpha-globin genes are expressed. Loss or dysfunction of one or more of these genes leads to deficient alpha-globin production and results in alpha-thalassemia. We present a technique to differentially assess the steady-state levels of the alpha 1- and alpha-2-globin messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts and thus delineate the relative level of expressi...

  6. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  7. A New Population of High-z, Dusty Lyman-alpha Emitters and Blobs Discovered by WISE: Feedback Caught in the Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Carrie R.; Blain, Andrew; Borys, Colin J. K.; Petty, Sara; Benford, Dominic; Eisenhardt, Peter; Farrah, Duncan; Griffith, Roger, L.; Jarrett, Tom; Lonsdale, Carol; hide

    2013-01-01

    By combining data from the NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission with optical spectroscopy from the W. M. Keck telescope, we discover a mid-IR color criterion that yields a 78% success rate in identifying rare, typically radio-quiet, 1.6 approx. 10(exp 13)-10(exp 14) Solar L) and have warm colors. They are typically more luminous and warmer than other dusty, z approx.. 2 populations such as submillimeter-selected galaxies and dust-obscured galaxies. These traits are commonly associated with the dust being illuminated by intense active galactic nucleus activity. We hypothesize that the combination of spatially extended Ly-alpha, large amounts of warm IR-luminous dust, and rarity (implying a short-lived phase) can be explained if the galaxies are undergoing brief, intense "feedback" transforming them from an extreme dusty starburst/QSO into a mature galaxy.

  8. Measurement of differential (n,x{alpha}) cross section using 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Kiyosumi, Takehide; Nauchi, Yasushi; Saito, Keiichiro; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawano, Toshihiko

    1997-03-01

    We carried out the measurements of high resolution {alpha} emission spectra of {sup 58}Ni and {sup nat}Ni between 4.5 and 6.5 MeV, and {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) cross section using a 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber. In Ni measurement, overall energy resolution was improved to around 200 keV by optimizing a sample thickness and a neutron source width. Measured alpha spectra showed separate peaks corresponding to the ground and low-lying excited states of the residual nucleus ({sup 55}Fe). These results were compared with another direct measurement and statistical model calculations. In {sup 12}C measurement, GIC was applied for (n,x{alpha}) reactions of light nuclei. This application is difficult to (n,x{alpha}) cross sections of light nuclei, because of the influences of large recoil energy and multi-body break-up. We developed new methods which eliminate the effects of recoil nuclei and multi-body break-up and applied them to {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) reaction at En=14.1 MeV. In our experiment, the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be angular differential cross section and {sup 12}C(n,n`3{alpha}) cross section were obtained. (author)

  9. Sensitivity of upper atmospheric emissions calculations to solar/stellar UV flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthelemy Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar UV (UltraViolet flux, especially the EUV (Extreme UltraViolet and FUV (Far UltraViolet components, is one of the main energetic inputs for planetary upper atmospheres. It drives various processes such as ionization, or dissociation which give rise to upper atmospheric emissions, especially in the UV and visible. These emissions are one of the main ways to investigate the upper atmospheres of planets. However, the uncertainties in the flux measurement or modeling can lead to biased estimates of fundamental atmospheric parameters, such as concentrations or temperatures in the atmospheres. We explore the various problems that can be identified regarding the uncertainties in solar/stellar UV flux by considering three examples. The worst case appears when the solar reflection component is dominant in the recorded spectrum as is seen for outer solar system measurements from HST (Hubble Space Telescope. We also show that the estimation of some particular line parameters (intensity and shape, especially Lyman α, is crucial, and that both total intensity and line profile are useful. In the case of exoplanets, the problem is quite critical since the UV flux of their parent stars is often very poorly known.

  10. Design and device construction for plane tables preparation for counter alpha/beta total

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia C, F. J.; Monroy G, F.

    2014-10-01

    This work presents the design and assembly of a device for plane tables preparation for quantification alpha/beta total of radioactive waste samples. The determination of the activity index alpha/beta total is used to detect a wide variety of matrices quickly and the concentration of alpha and/or beta emitters of the contained radionuclides in different samples. In particular, the determination of the activity index alpha and beta total of radioactive wastes involves the digestion of samples in aggressive means that will be evaporated to dryness for its quantification. With the purpose of controlling the emission of corrosive gases during the preparation of the plane tables for the quantification of the index alpha and beta total, was designed and built the device in the Radioactive Waste Laboratory that allows to prepare plane tables for proportional counters in a sure and efficient way. The device is constituted by heating equipment, evaporation cylinder and a gases cleaning system. The self-absorption curve got ready starting from the device. (Author)

  11. Alternative splicing of T cell receptor (TCR) alpha chain transcripts containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahotka, C; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Bartram, C R

    1995-10-01

    Human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines represent valuable tools to investigate distinct steps of the complex regulatory pathways underlying T cell receptor recombination and expression. A case in point are V delta 2D delta 3 and subsequent V delta 2D delta 3J alpha rearrangements observed in human leukemic pre-B cells as well as in normal lymphopoiesis. The functional expression of these unusual (VD) delta (JC) alpha hybrids is almost exclusively prevented by alternative splicing events. In this report we show that alternative splicing at cryptic splice donor sites within V elements is not a unique feature of hybrid TCR delta/alpha transcripts. Among seven V alpha families analyzed by RT-PCR, alternatively spliced products were observed in TCR alpha recombinations containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements. In contrast to normal peripheral blood cells and thymocytes, the leukemia cell line JM expressing functional V alpha 1J alpha 3C alpha transcripts lacked evidence of aberrant TCR alpha RNA species.

  12. Target characterization by PIXE, alpha spectrometry and X-ray absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheswa, N.Y.; Papka, P.; Pineda-Vargas, C.A.; Newman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the thickness and homogeneity characterization of thin metallic targets of Zr-96 by means of alpha absorption spectrometry, Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and X-ray absorption. The target thicknesses determined by means of the above mentioned methods are critically compared. The thicknesses were determined before and after irradiation with a 70 MeV beam of 14 N ions.

  13. ALPHA/AMPU, Radionuclide Radioactivity from Alpha Spectrometer Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sill, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The two computer programs, ALPHA and AMPU, take raw data obtained from alpha spectrometry and from these calculate activities and uncertainties of the radionuclides present in the sample. ALPHA determines activities of any alpha emitter in a sample that has been directly precipitated with NdF 3 . AMPU determines the Pu-239, Pu-238,and Am-241 activities using Pu-236 and Am-243 tracers. 2 - Method of solution: These programs propagate all random and systematic uncertainties, found anywhere in the experimental process, to the final result. The result is rounded and is in decimal agreement with the uncertainty. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: In ALPHA, a chemical yield of 98% is assumed

  14. Resting alpha activity predicts learning ability in alpha neurofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya eNan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their ability to learn how to regulate the alpha activity by neurofeedback. This study aimed to investigate whether the resting alpha activity is related to the learning ability of alpha enhancement in neurofeedback and could be used as a predictor. A total of 25 subjects performed 20 sessions of individualized alpha neurofeedback in order to learn how to enhance activity in the alpha frequency band. The learning ability was assessed by three indices respectively: the training parameter changes between two periods, within a short period and across the whole training time. It was found that the resting alpha amplitude measured before training had significant positive correlations with all learning indices and could be used as a predictor for the learning ability prediction. This finding would help the researchers in not only predicting the training efficacy in individuals but also gaining further insight into the mechanisms of alpha neurofeedback.

  15. First Results of Using a UVTron Flame Sensor to Detect Alpha-Induced Air Fluorescence in the UVC Wavelength Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita J. Crompton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a robust stand-off alpha detection method using the secondary effects of alpha radiation has been sought. Alpha particles ionise the surrounding atmosphere as they travel. Fluorescence photons produced as a consequence of this can be used to detect the source of the alpha emissions. This paper details experiments carried out to detect this fluorescence, with the focus on photons in the ultraviolet C (UVC wavelength range (180–280 nm. A detector, UVTron R9533 (Hamamatsu, 325-6, Sunayama-cho, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Pref., 430-8587, Japan, designed to detect the UVC emissions from flames for fire alarm purposes, was tested in various gas atmospheres with a 210Po alpha source to determine if this could provide an avenue for stand-off alpha detection. The results of the experiments show that this detector is capable of detecting alpha-induced air fluorescence in normal indoor lighting conditions, as the interference from daylight and artificial lighting is less influential on this detection system which operates below the UVA and UVB wavelength ranges (280–315 nm and 315–380 nm respectively. Assuming a standard 1 r 2 drop off in signal, the limit of detection in this configuration can be calculated to be approximately 240 mm, well beyond the range of alpha-particles in air, which indicates that this approach could have potential for stand-off alpha detection. The gas atmospheres tested produced an increase in the detector count, with xenon having the greatest effect with a measured 52% increase in the detector response in comparison to the detector response in an air atmosphere. This type of alpha detection system could be operated at a distance, where it would potentially provide a more cost effective, safer, and faster solution in comparison with traditional alpha detection methods to detect and characterise alpha contamination in nuclear decommissioning and security applications.

  16. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions from Abies alba in a French forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukhtar, S; Couret, C; Rouil, L; Simon, V

    2006-02-01

    Air quality studies need to be based on accurate and reliable data, particularly in the field of the emissions. Biogenic emissions from forests, crops, and grasslands are now considered as major compounds in photochemical processes. Unfortunately, depending on the type of vegetation, these emissions are not so often reliably defined. As an example, although the silver fir (Abies alba) is a very widespread conifer tree in the French and European areas, its standard emission rate is not available in the literature. This study investigates the isoprene and monoterpenes emission from A. alba in France measured during the fieldwork organised in the Fossé Rhénan, from May to June 2003. A dynamic cuvette method was used. Limonene was the predominant monoterpene emitted, followed by camphene, alpha-pinene and eucalyptol. No isoprene emission was detected. The four monoterpenes measured showed different behaviours according to micrometeorological conditions. In fact, emissions of limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene were temperature-dependant while eucalyptol emissions were temperature and light dependant. Biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions were modeled using information gathered during the field study. Emissions of the three monoterpenes previously quoted were achieved using the monoterpenes algorithm developed by Tingey et al. (1980) [Tingey D, Manning M, Grothaus L, Burns W. Influence of light and temperature on monoterpene emission rates from slash pine. Plant Physiol 1980;65: 797-801.] and the isoprene algorithm [Guenther, A., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1991. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: observations with eucalyptus and emission rate algorithm development. J Geophys Res 26A: 10799-10808.]; [Guenther, A., Zimmerman, P., Harley, P., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1993. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: model evaluation and sensitivity analysis. J Geophys Res 98D: 12609-12617.]) was used for the eucalyptol emission. With these

  17. Energetic charged particle emission from hydrogen-loaded Pd and Ti cathodes and its enhancement by He-4 implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipson, A.G.; Miley, G.H. [University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign, lL (United States); Lipson, A.G.; Lyakhov, B.F. [lnstitute of Physical Chemistry, The Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Roussetski, A.S. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, The Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reproducible emissions of energetic alphas and protons appearing in an energy range where both cosmic ray interference and possible alpha emissions from contamination (e.g., radon) is assumed to be negligible. We also show that, {sup 4}He doping of Pd and Ti cathodes leads to a significant enhancement of the energetic charged particles emission (ECPE). This measurement of the emissions of energetic (MeV) particles, in a region of low background interference plus their enhancement by {sup 4}He doping provides very strong support for the existence of LENR processes in the crystalline lattice of deuterated metals. (authors)

  18. Detection of {alpha} particles with the aid of a fluorescence counter; Detection des particules {alpha} a l'aide d'un compteur a fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koechlin, Y

    1951-07-01

    The operation principle of the fluorescence counter, used as {alpha} particles detector, is analyzed in the first part. Detection can be done in two ways: by counting the pulses due to each {alpha} particle, or by integrating all pulses and measuring the average current obtained. In the second part, three series of measurements are presented: 1 - two fluorescent substances (zinc sulfate and anthracene) are placed in front of the photocathode of three types of photomultipliers (RCA 931A, EMI 4588, and EMI 5311). These substances are bombarded with the {alpha} radiations of a Po source and then irradiated by the {beta} and {gamma} radiations of a Ra source in order to study the light emission of these thin film substances when submitted to the three types of radiations. The results show that thanks to the amplitude of the emitted light pulses, the fluorescence counter, when submitted to the three types of radiations, allows to distinguish between the {alpha} radiations of the polonium and the {beta} and {gamma} radiations of the radium source. The output current of a 931A, when measured with a galvanometer, allows to detect Po sources with an intensity of about 10{sup -6} curie. This is observed when its photocathode receives the light from a ZnS-Ag coating bombarded by the {alpha} particles of Po. The quantum efficiency of the counter is close to 100% for the {alpha} particles of Po. This efficiency is evaluated by comparison with the efficiency of a thin wall Geiger-Mueller counter. Moreover, when a thin crystal of anthracene is used as detector, the energy of the incident particles can be measured with a 2% preciseness. (J.S.)

  19. Molecular basis for nondeletion alpha-thalassemia in American blacks. Alpha 2(116GAG----UAG).

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhaber, S A; Coleman, M B; Adams, J G; Cash, F E; Steinberg, M H

    1987-01-01

    An American black woman was found to have the phenotype of moderately severe alpha-thalassemia normally associated with the loss of two to three alpha-globin genes despite an alpha-globin gene map that demonstrated the loss of only a single alpha-globin gene (-alpha/alpha alpha). Several individuals in her kindred with normal alpha-globin gene mapping studies (alpha alpha/alpha alpha) had mild alpha-thalassemia hematologic values consistent with the loss of one to two alpha-globin genes. Thes...

  20. On planetary nebulae as sources of carbon dust: Infrared emission from planetary nebulae of the galactic halo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinerstein, H.L.; Lester, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers examine here the characteristics of the infrared emission from the four planetary nebulae which are believed on the basis of their low overall metallicities to belong to the halo population. These nebulae are of particular interest because they are the most metal-poor ionized nebulae known in our Galaxy, and offer the opportunity to probe possible dependences of the dust properties on nebular composition. Researchers present fluxes extracted from co-addition of the IRAS data, as well as ground-based near infrared measurements. Each of the four halo objects, including the planetary nebula in the globular cluster M15, is detected in at least one infrared band. Researchers compare the estimated infrared excesses of these nebulae (IRE, the ratio of measured infrared power to the power available in the form of resonantly-trapped Lyman alpha photons) to those of disk planetary nebulae with similar densities but more normal abundances. Three of the halo planetaries have IRE values similar to those of the disk nebulae, despite the fact that their Fe- and Si-peak gas phase abundances are factors of 10 to 100 lower. However, these halo nebulae have normal or elevated C/H ratios, due to nuclear processing and mixing in their red giant progenitors. Unlike the other halo planetaries, DDDM1 is deficient in carbon as well as in the other light metals. This nebula has a substantially lower IRE than the other halo planetaries, and may be truly dust efficient. Researchers suggest that the deficiency is due to a lack of the raw material for producing carbon-based grains, and that the main bulk constituent of the dust in these planetary nebulae is carbon

  1. Alpha particle emitters in cancer therapy: establishing the rationale and overcoming the difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    rapidly accessible disease. Alpha particles will be most useful in situations in which targeting is rapid, killing of isolated single-cells is important and access to normal tissue is minimized. The latter may be achieved by intracavitary administration or by labeling an agent that does not reach normal tissues before the radionuclide has decayed below an acceptable level. Although alpha-particle emitters have shown promise in animal models, they have not been examined in patients. The decay of 212 Bi is accompanied by emission of high energy (2.6 MeV) photons which are difficult to shield; 211 At is cyclotron produced and of limited availability. The initial obstacles to the use of alpha-particle emitters for therapy are availability, handling and radiochemistry. These are being overcome with the introduction of new radionuclides and better radiochemistry. Bismuth-213, for example, is similar to Bi-212 in its alpha particle emissions but does not emit the highly energetic photon seen with Bi-212. Once the initial, logistical obstacles are surmounted, the dosimetry and normal tissue toxicity must be investigated

  2. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  3. Determination of alpha activity and fissile mass content in solid waste by systems using neutron interrogation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeyer Dherbey, J.; Lacruche, G.; Berne, R.; Auge, J.; Martin Deidier, L.; Butez, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Quantitative control (determination of heavy nuclides and alpha activity) of alpha radioactive wastes is necessary, particularly to determine if the waste is in accordance with the surface storage limits. In order to reduce the uncertainty on the alpha activity resulting from unknown isotopic composition, inhomogeneity of heavy nuclides in the matrix, combination of several methods is necessary. In the paper we present the Cadarache development work in the NDA of solid waste using the Californium shuffler, 14 Mev neutron generator, and also passive techniques such as neutron emission measurement and gamma spectrometry. Experimental systems combining active and passive methods are presented (COSAC, BANCO, DANAIDE, PROMETHEE)

  4. Optimizing BAO measurements with non-linear transformations of the Lyman-α forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinkang; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Seljak, Uroš, E-mail: xinkang.wang@berkeley.edu, E-mail: afont@lbl.gov, E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, South Hall Rd, Berkeley (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We explore the effect of applying a non-linear transformation to the Lyman-α forest transmitted flux F=e{sup −τ} and the ability of analytic models to predict the resulting clustering amplitude. Both the large-scale bias of the transformed field (signal) and the amplitude of small scale fluctuations (noise) can be arbitrarily modified, but we were unable to find a transformation that increases significantly the signal-to-noise ratio on large scales using Taylor expansion up to the third order. In particular, however, we achieve a 33% improvement in signal to noise for Gaussianized field in transverse direction. On the other hand, we explore an analytic model for the large-scale biasing of the Lyα forest, and present an extension of this model to describe the biasing of the transformed fields. Using hydrodynamic simulations we show that the model works best to describe the biasing with respect to velocity gradients, but is less successful in predicting the biasing with respect to large-scale density fluctuations, especially for very nonlinear transformations.

  5. Evolution of the intergalactic medium - What happened during the epoch z = 3-10?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, S.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to model consistently the thermal and dynamic history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) from the era of reheating (z = 10-5) to the present, and to provide a unified explanation for the origin of ordinary galaxies, blue compact objects, and Lyman-alpha clouds. The evolution of the intergalactic gas is analyzed, treating the IGM as perfectly homogeneous at every epoch and taking into account radiative and Compton cooling, adiabatic cooling, shock heating, and heating produced by the diffuse UV flux. It is suggested that the IGM must have been heated to higher than a 10 to the 6th K by shock heasting caused either by explosions of pregalactic objects or expanding voids. The formation of intergalactic clouds by fragmentation of the resulting shells and the subsequent collapse of the shells to form galaxies are studied. An attempt is made to determine model parameters on the basis of an analysis of Lyman-alpha absorption lines.

  6. Stacking the Cosmic Web in fluorescent Ly α emission with MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Sofia G.; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lilly, Simon; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Pezzulli, Gabriele; Schaye, Joop; Wisotzki, Lutz; Bacon, Roland; Inami, Hanae; Akhlaghi, Mohammad; Tacchella, Sandro; Richard, Johan; Bouche, Nicolas F.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Carollo, Marcella

    2018-04-01

    Cosmological simulations suggest that most of the matter in the Universe is distributed along filaments connecting galaxies. Illuminated by the cosmic UV background (UVB), these structures are expected to glow in fluorescent Ly α emission with a surface brightness (SB) that is well below current limits for individual detections. Here, we perform a stacking analysis of the deepest MUSE/VLT data using three-dimensional regions (subcubes) with orientations determined by the position of neighbouring Ly α galaxies at 3 < z < 4. Our method increase the probability of detecting filamentary Ly α emission, provided that these structures are Lyman-limit systems (LLSs). By stacking 390 oriented subcubes we reach a 2σ sensitivity level of SB ≈ 0.44 × 10-20 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2 in an aperture of 1 arcsec2 × 6.25 Å, three times below the expected fluorescent Ly α signal from the Haardt & Madau UVB at z ˜ 3.5. No detectable emission is found on intergalactic scales, implying that at least two thirds of our subcubes do not contain oriented LLSs. On the other hand, significant emission is detected in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) in the direction of the neighbours. The signal is stronger for galaxies with a larger number of neighbours and appears to be independent of any other galaxy properties. We estimate that preferentially oriented satellite galaxies cannot contribute significantly to this signal, suggesting instead that gas densities in the CGM are typically larger in the direction of neighbouring galaxies on cosmological scales.

  7. Autoradiographic measurement of low concentrations of alpha-active nuclides using CR-39 track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, K.; Dietze, K.; Weisse, S.; Kummer, G.

    1991-01-01

    An autoradiographic method for the determination of alpha emission rates from plastic packaging materials for VLSI silicon memory devices based on long-time exposure of the samples on CR-39 detectors has been tested. The lower limit of detection will be strongly influenced by the background of the detector material and amounts at times to 0.002 alpha particles cm -2 h -1 after 200 days exposure. A mathematical method for the interpretation of very low track densities is discussed. The first results of its application are presented. (author)

  8. Lyman NTCP model analysis of radiation-induced liver disease in hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy for primary liver carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiyong; Zhu Yi; Zhao Jiaodong; Fu Xiaolong; Jiang Guoliang; Liang Shixiong; Zhu Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify the factors associated with radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) and to describe the probability of RILD using the Lyman normal tissue complication(NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma(PLC) treated with hypofractionated conformal therapy (CRT). Methods: A total of 109 PLC patients treated with hypofractionated CRT were prospectively followed according to the Child-Pugh classification for liver cirrhosis, 93 patients in class A and 16 in class B. The mean dose of radiation to the isocenter was (53.5±5.5) Gy, fractions of (4.8±0.5) Gy, with interfraction interval of 48 hours and irradiation 3 times per week. Maximal likelihood analysis yielded the best estimates of parameters of the Lyman NTCP model for all patients; Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients, respectively. Results: Of all the patients, 17 developed RILD (17/109), 8 in Child-Pugh A (8/93) and 9 in Child-Pugh B (9/16). By multivariate analysis, only the Child-Pugh Grade of liver cirrhosis was the independent factor (P=0.000) associated with the developing of BILD. The best estimates of the NTCP parameters for all 109 patients were n=1.1, m=0.35 and TD 50 (1)=38.5 Gy. The n, m, TD 50 (1) estimated from patients with Child-Pugh A was 1.1, 0.28, 40.5 Gy, respectively, compared with 0.7, 0.43, 23 Gy respectively, for patients with Child-Pugh B. Conclusions: Primary liver cancer patients who possess Child-Pugh B cirrhosis would present a significantly greater susceptibility to RILD after hypofractionated CRT than patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. The predominant risk factor for developing RILD is the severity of hepatic cirrhosis in the liver of PLC patients. (authors)

  9. A quadruple quasar coincident with a giant Ly-alpha nebula and a protocluster at z=2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignali, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    We propose to observe the only known quadruple AGN system in the Universe, embedded in a giant Ly-alpha nebula at z 2. These active nuclei and the large number of Ly-alpha emitting galaxies at the same redshift are clear indications that this is one of the most overdense protoclusters known z 2. We request a 140 ks Chandra exposure to (a) define the basic X-ray properties of all the AGN and then their bolometric luminosities and Eddington ratios, and compare these with those of "isolated" quasars at similar redshifts/luminosities; (b) detect the hot gas emission in the protocluster. Chandra is unique for this investigation: the close (few arcsec) distance of some of the AGN needs high spatial resolution, and the extended emission requires low background contribution.

  10. Anti-pp,. cap alpha cap alpha. and p. cap alpha. elastic scattering at high energies and Chou-Yang conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem; Rifique, M.

    1987-03-01

    The recent experimental measurements for anti-pp and ..cap alpha cap alpha.. elastic scattering at high energies have shown that the Chou-Yang conjecture regarding the relationship between the electromagnetic and the hadronic form factor of a particle is only an approximation. A new ansatz has been proposed to obtain hadronic form factors of proton and the ..cap alpha..-particle. These form factors have been used to explain the various characteristics of anti-pp, ..cap alpha cap alpha.. and p..cap alpha.. elastic scattering at high energies.

  11. Contribution to the study of alpha-alpha interaction; Contribution a l'etude de l'interaction alpha - alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darriulai, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-03-01

    Two sets of measurements of the {alpha}-{alpha} elastic scattering differential cross section are presented. The first set - angular distributions from 50 up to 120 MeV - shows two new resonances, 6{sup +} and 8{sup +}, at 25 and 57 MeV. Complex phase shifts are extracted from the data and a phenomenological potential is given. A description of the 3 {alpha}-particle 0{sup +} states in C{sup 12} is made with this interaction potential. The second set - excitation curves between 20 and 50 MeV - allows investigation of the Be{sup 8} level structure within this energy range - It identifies the 16.6 and 16.9 MeV states as 2{sup +}, but the rise of inelastic processes at higher energies makes further identification of spins and parities more and more difficult. (author) [French] Deux series de mesures de la section efficace differentielle de diffusion {alpha}-{alpha} sont presentees. La premiere - distributions angulaires entre 50 et 120 MeV - fait apparaitre deux nouvelles resonances, 6{sup +} et 8{sup +}, a 25 et 57 MeV d'excitation. Des dephasages complexes en sont extraits et un potentiel phenomenologique est presente. Une etude des etats 0{sup +} a parentage (3{alpha}) de {sup 12}C est faite a partir de ce potentiel. La seconde - courbes d'excitation s'etendant de 20 a 50 MeV - met en evidence la structure de {sup 8}Be dans cette region. Elle montre que les niveaux a 16,6 et 16,9 MeV sont des 2{sup +} mais l'importance des processus inelastiques rend difficile l'identification des niveaux d'excitation plus elevee. (auteur)

  12. Fitting methods for baryon acoustic oscillations in the Lyman-α forest fluctuations in BOSS data release 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkby, David; Margala, Daniel; Blomqvist, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 92697 (United States); Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Bailey, Stephen; Carithers, Bill [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Busca, Nicolás G.; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rue A. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Delubac, Timothée; Rich, James; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Croft, Rupert A.C. [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick, E-mail: dkirkby@uci.edu [Université Paris 6 et CNRS, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis blvd. Arago, 75014 Paris (France); and others

    2013-03-01

    We describe fitting methods developed to analyze fluctuations in the Lyman-α forest and measure the parameters of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We apply our methods to BOSS Data Release 9. Our method is based on models of the three-dimensional correlation function in physical coordinate space, and includes the effects of redshift-space distortions, anisotropic non-linear broadening, and broadband distortions. We allow for independent scale factors along and perpendicular to the line of sight to minimize the dependence on our assumed fiducial cosmology and to obtain separate measurements of the BAO angular and relative velocity scales. Our fitting software and the input files needed to reproduce our main BOSS Data Release 9 results are publicly available.

  13. Coincidence measurement between. cap alpha. -particles and projectile-like fragments in reaction of 82. 7 MeV /sup 16/O on /sup 27/Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen-Qing, Shen; Wen-long, Zhan; Yong-tai, Zhu; Shu-zhi, Yin; Zhong-yan, Guo; Wei-min, Qiao; Guo-ying, Fan; Gen-ming, Jin; Song-ling, Li; Zhen, Zhang; others, and

    1987-01-01

    In the coincidence measurement between ..cap alpha..-particles and projectile-like fragments in the reaction of 82.7 MeV /sup 16/O on /sup 27/Al, the contour plot of the C-..cap alpha.. coincidence in the velocity plane and the coincident angular correlation are obtained. Different mechanisms of ..cap alpha..-particle emission are analysed. A possible reaction mechanism of incomplete DIC is discussed.

  14. Diagnostics of MCF plasmas using Lyman-α fluorescence excited by one or two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1998-11-01

    Laser-induced Lyman-α fluorescence of the hydrogen isotopes is investigated with regard to diagnostic applications in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A formal analysis is presented for two excitation schemes: one-photon and Doppler-free two-photon excitation. The analysis includes estimates of the expected experimental errors arising from the photon noise and from the sensitivity of the observed fluorescence signals to variations of the plasma and laser parameters. Both excitation schemes are suitable primarily for application in the plasma edge, but even in the plasma bulk of large machines they can still be applied in combination with a diagnostic neutral beam. The two-photon excitation scheme is particularly attractive because it involves absorption spectra that are resolved within the Doppler width. This implies a large diagnostic potential and in particular offers a way to measure the deuterium-tritium fuel mix in fusion reactors. (author)

  15. OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-11-02

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

  16. Alpha detection in pipes using an inverting membrane scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendrick, D.T.; Cremer, C.D.; Lowry, W.; Cramer, E.

    1995-01-01

    Characterization of surface alpha emitting contamination inside enclosed spaces such as piping systems presents an interesting radiological measurement challenge. Detection of these alpha particles from the exterior of the pipe is impossible since the alpha particles are completely absorbed by the pipe wall. Traditional survey techniques, using hand-held instruments, simply can not be used effectively inside pipes. Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. is currently developing an enhancement to its Pipe Explorer trademark system that will address this challenge. The Pipe Explorer trademark uses a unique sensor deployment method where an inverted tubular membrane is propagated through complex pipe runs via air pressure. The inversion process causes the membrane to fold out against the pipe wall, such that no part of the membrane drags along the pipe wall. This deployment methodology has been successfully demonstrated at several DOE sites to transport specially designed beta and gamma scintillation detectors into pipes ranging in length up to 250 ft. The measurement methodology under development overcomes the limitations associated with conventional hand-held survey instruments by remotely emplacing an alpha scintillator in direct contact with the interior pipe surface over the entire length to be characterized. This is accomplished by incorporating a suitable scintillator into the otherwise clear membrane material. Alpha particles emitted from the interior pipe surface will intersect the membrane, resulting in the emission of light pulses from the scintillator. A photodetector, towed by the inverting membrane, is used to count these light pulses as a function of distance into the pipe, thereby producing a log of the surface alpha contamination levels. It is anticipated that the resulting system will be able to perform measurements in pipes as small as two inches in diameter, and several hundred feet in length

  17. Luminiscent emission of molecular levels excited by ionizant radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Ramis, M.

    1977-01-01

    The emission spectra and the time dependence of scintillations produced by alpha particles, gamma rays and ultraviolet light in some organic compounds crystals and liquids solutions normally used as radiation detectors has been studied. (author) [es

  18. A study of solar flare energy transport based on coordinated H-alpha and X-ray observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfield, R.C.; Wulser, J.; Zarro, D.M.; Dennis, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the ratio between H-alpha to nonthermal hard X-ray emission was investigated using coordinated H-alpha and hard- and soft-X-ray observations of five solar flares (on May 7, June 23, June 24, and June 25, 1980 and on April 30, 1985). These observations were used to estimate the emitted flare energy flux F(H-alpha) in H-alpha, the flux of F(2O) energy deposited by nonthermal electrons with energies above 20 keV, and the pressure p(c) of soft X-ray-emitting plasma as functions of time during the impulsive phase of each flare. It was found that the F(H-alpha)/F(2O) ratio shows a power-law dependence on F(2O), with a slope that differs slightly from that predicted by the static thick-target model of solar transport. Results also indicate that the power-law dependence is modified by hydrostatic pressure effects. 25 refs

  19. Investigation of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in (alpha, alpha 'gamma) coincidence experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savran, D.; Babilon, M.; van den Berg, A. M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hasper, J.; Wortche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on first results from experiments using the (alpha, alpha'gamma) reaction at E alpha = 136 MeV to investigate bound electric dipole (El) excitations building the so-called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) in the semi-magic nucleus Ce-140. The method of (alpha, alpha'gamma) allows the

  20. Increased virulence and competitive advantage of a/alpha over a/a or alpha/alpha offspring conserves the mating system of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Wu, Wei; Radke, Joshua B; Zhao, Rui; Soll, David R

    2005-04-01

    The majority of Candida albicans strains in nature are a/alpha and must undergo homozygosis to a/a or alpha/alpha to mate. Here we have used a mouse model for systemic infection to test the hypothesis that a/alpha strains predominate in nature because they have a competitive advantage over a/a and alpha/alpha offspring in colonizing hosts. Single-strain injection experiments revealed that a/alpha strains were far more virulent than either their a/a or alpha/alpha offspring. When equal numbers of parent a/alpha and offspring a/a or alpha/alpha cells were co-injected, a/alpha always exhibited a competitive advantage at the time of extreme host morbidity or death. When equal numbers of an engineered a/a/alpha2 strain and its isogenic a/a parent strain were co-injected, the a/a/alpha2 strain exhibited a competitive advantage at the time of host morbidity or death, suggesting that the genotype of the mating-type (MTL) locus, not associated genes on chromosome 5, provides a competitive advantage. We therefore propose that heterozygosity at the MTL locus not only represses white-opaque switching and genes involved in the mating process, but also affects virulence, providing a competitive advantage to the a/alpha genotype that conserves the mating system of C. albicans in nature.

  1. DISCOVERY OF AN H{alpha} EMITTING DISK AROUND THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OF M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V., E-mail: robertobm@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP CEP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2013-01-10

    Due to its proximity, the mass of the supermassive black hole in the nucleus of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the most massive black hole in the Local Group of galaxies, has been measured by several methods involving the kinematics of a stellar disk which surrounds it. We report here the discovery of an eccentric H{alpha} emitting disk around the black hole at the center of M31 and show how modeling this disk can provide an independent determination of the mass of the black hole. Our model implies a mass of 5.0{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} for the central black hole, consistent with the average of determinations by methods involving stellar dynamics, and compatible (at 1{sigma} level) with measurements obtained from the most detailed models of the stellar disk around the central black hole. This value is also consistent with the M-{sigma} relation. In order to make a comparison, we applied our simulation on the stellar kinematics in the nucleus of M31 and concluded that the parameters obtained for the stellar disk are not formally compatible with the parameters obtained for the H{alpha} emitting disk. This result suggests that the stellar and the H{alpha} emitting disks are intrinsically different from each other. A plausible explanation is that the H{alpha} emission is associated with a gaseous disk. This hypothesis is supported by the detection of traces of weaker nebular lines in the nuclear region of M31. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that the H{alpha} emission is, at least partially, generated by stars.

  2. Design of a D-alpha beam-ion profile diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Burrell, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    Injected neutral beams ionize to create a population of beam ions. As they orbit around the tokamak and pass through the heating beams, some beam ions re-neutralize and emit D-alpha light. The intensity of this emission is weak compared to the signals from the injected neutrals, the warm (halo) neutrals, and the edge recombination neutrals but, for a favorable viewing geometry, the emission is Doppler shifted away from these bright interfering signals. Preliminary data from the DIII-D tokamak show that signals from re-neutralized beam ions have already been detected. A three-channel prototype instrument consisting of a spectrometer, mask, camera lenses, and frame-transfer charge coupled device is under development for measurements of the spatial profile of the beam ions

  3. Development of biogenic VOC emission inventories for the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, V.

    2008-07-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegetation, especially forests, can affect local and regional atmospheric photochemistry through their reactions with atmospheric oxidants. Their reaction products may also participate in the formation and growth of new particles which affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and thus climate, by scattering and absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation and by modifying the radiative properties, amount and lifetime of clouds. Globally, anthropogenic VOC emissions are far surpassed by the biogenic ones, making biogenic emission inventories an integral element in the development of efficient air quality and climate strategies. The inventories are typically constructed based on landcover information, measured emissions of different plants or vegetation types, and empirical dependencies of the emissions on environmental variables such as temperature and light. This thesis is focused on the VOC emissions from the boreal forest, the largest terrestrial biome with characteristic vegetation patterns and strong seasonality. The isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of the most prevalent boreal tree species in Finland, Scots pine, have been measured and their seasonal variation and dependence on temperature and light have been studied. The measured emission data and other available observations of the emissions of the principal boreal trees have been used in a biogenic emission model developed for the boreal forests in Finland. The model utilizes satellite landcover information, Finnish forest classification and hourly meteorological data to calculate isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and other VOC emissions over the growing season. The principal compounds emitted by Scots pine are DELTA3-carene and alpha-pinene in the south boreal zone and alpha- and beta-pinene in the north boreal zone. The monoterpene emissions are dependent on temperature and have a clear seasonal cycle with high emissions in spring

  4. Phase I Final Report: Ultra-Low Background Alpha Activity Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warburton, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    In certain important physics experiments that search for rare-events, such as neutrino or double beta decay detections, it is critical to minimize the number of background events that arise from alpha particle emitted by the natural radioactivity in the materials used to construct the experiment. Similarly, the natural radioactivity in materials used to connect and package silicon microcircuits must also be minimized in order to eliminate ''soft errors'' caused by alpha particles depositing charges within the microcircuits and thereby changing their logic states. For these, and related reasons in the areas of environmental cleanup and nuclear materials tracking, there is a need that is important from commercial, scientific, and national security perspectives to develop an ultra-low background alpha counter that would be capable of measuring materials' alpha particle emissivity at rates well below 0.00001 alpha/cm 2 /hour. This rate, which corresponds to 24 alpha particles per square meter per day, is essentially impossible to achieve with existing commercial instruments because the natural radioactivity of the materials used to construct even the best of these counters produces background rates at the 0.005 alpha/cm 2 /hr level. Our company (XIA) had previously developed an instrument that uses electronic background suppression to operate at the 0.0005 0.005 alpha/cm 2 /hr level. This patented technology sets up an electric field between a large planar sample and a large planar anode, and fills the gap with pure Nitrogen. An alpha particle entering the chamber ionizes the Nitrogen, producing a ''track'' of electrons, which drift to the anode in the electric field. Tracks close to the anode take less than 10 microseconds (us) to be collected, giving a preamplifier signal with a 10 us risetime. Tracks from the sample have to drift across the full anode-sample gap and produce a 35 us risetime signal. By analyzing the preamplifier signals with a digital signal

  5. Predicting Atmospheric Ionization and Excitation by Precipitating SEP and Solar Wind Protons Measured By MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, Rebecca; Dong, Chuanfei; Lee, Christina; Lillis, Rob; Brain, David; Curry, Shannon; Halekas, Jasper; Bougher, Stephen W.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    Precipitating energetic particles ionize and excite planetary atmospheres, increasing electron content and producing aurora. At Mars, the solar wind and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmosphere because solar wind protons can charge exchange to become neutral and pass the magnetosheath, and SEPs are sufficiently energetic to cross the magnetosheath unchanged. We will compare ionization and Lyman alpha emission rates for solar wind and SEP protons during nominal solar activity and a CME shock front impact event on May 16 2016. We will use the Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals (ASPEN) model to compare excitation and ionization rates by SEPs and solar wind protons currently measured by the SWIA (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer) and SEP instruments aboard the MAVEN spacecraft. Results will help quantify how SEP and solar wind protons influence atmospheric energy deposition during solar minimum.

  6. Neutral hydrogen in the post-reionization universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2018-05-01

    The evolution of neutral hydrogen (HI) across redshifts is a powerful probe of cosmology, large scale structure in the universe and the intergalactic medium. Using a data-driven halo model to describe the distribution of HI in the post-reionization universe (z ~ 5 to 0), we obtain the best-fitting parameters from a rich sample of observational data: low redshift 21-cm emission line studies, intermediate redshift intensity mapping experiments, and higher redshift Damped Lyman Alpha (DLA) observations. Our model describes the abundance and clustering of neutral hydrogen across redshifts 0 - 5, and is useful for investigating different aspects of galaxy evolution and for comparison with hydrodynamical simulations. The framework can be applied for forecasting future observations with neutral hydrogen, and extended to the case of intensity mapping with molecular and other line transitions at intermediate redshifts.

  7. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ta' ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber, E-mail: hassankirkukly@gmail.com, E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Al-Muthana, Al-Muthana 66001 (Iraq); Periasamy, Vengadesh, E-mail: hassankirkukly@gmail.com, E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Amin, Yusoff Mohd [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-21

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current–voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  8. Measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations in the Lyman-α forest fluctuations in BOSS data release 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Iršič, Vid [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kirkby, David; Blomqvist, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bailey, Stephen; Carithers, Bill [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Busca, Nicolás G.; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rue A. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Delubac, Timothée; Rich, James; Goff, J.-M. Le [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bhardwaj, Vaishali [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 09195 (United States); Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Croft, Rupert A.C.; Ho, Shirley [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Font-Ribera, Andreu, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2013-04-01

    We use the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) to detect and measure the position of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the three-dimensional correlation function in the Lyman-α flux fluctuations at a redshift z{sub eff} = 2.4. The feature is clearly detected at significance between 3 and 5 sigma (depending on the broadband model and method of error covariance matrix estimation) and is consistent with predictions of the standard ΛCDM model. We assess the biases in our method, stability of the error covariance matrix and possible systematic effects. We fit the resulting correlation function with several models that decouple the broadband and acoustic scale information. For an isotropic dilation factor, we measure 100 × (α{sub iso} − 1) = −1.6{sup +2.0+4.3+7.4}{sub −2.0−4.1−6.8} (stat.) ±1.0 (syst.) (multiple statistical errors denote 1,2 and 3 sigma confidence limits) with respect to the acoustic scale in the fiducial cosmological model (flat ΛCDM with Ω{sub m} = 0.27, h = 0.7). When fitting separately for the radial and transversal dilation factors we find marginalised constraints 100 × (α{sub ||} − 1) = −1.3{sup +3.5+7.6+12.3}{sub −3.3−6.7−10.2} (stat.) ±2.0 (syst.) and 100 × (α{sub p}erpendicular − 1) = −2.2{sup +7.4+17}{sub −7.1−15} (stat.) ±3.0 (syst.). The dilation factor measurements are significantly correlated with cross-correlation coefficient of ∼ −0.55. Errors become significantly non-Gaussian for deviations over 3 standard deviations from best fit value. Because of the data cuts and analysis method, these measurements give tighter constraints than a previous BAO analysis of the BOSS DR9 Lyman-α sample, providing an important consistency test of the standard cosmological model in a new redshift regime.

  9. Models of infrared emission from dusty and diffuse H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aannestad, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    Models for the infrared emission from amorphous core-mantle dust within diffuse (n/sub e/ 3 cm -3 ) H II regions with neutral shells that are optically thin in the infrared have been calculated. The icy mantles sublimate only within a fractional radius of 0.2--0.5, affecting the overall gas-to-dust ratio only slightly. A region with variable grain composition may have a much smaller infrared luminosity than a similar region with uniform grain properties. Calculations of the total infrared luminosity, the relative contribution by Lα photons, the infrared spectral distribution, and the size of the dust-depleted regions are presented as functions of the ultraviolet optical depths in the ionized and neutral regions and for stellar temperatures of 35,000 and 48,000 K. Comparison with observations indicate that at least 20% of the Lyman-continuum photons are absorbed by the dust, and that the dust optical depth in the Lyman continuum is likely to be of the order of unity. For core-mantle grains most of the infrared energy is emitted between 30 and 70 μm, relatively independent of whether the dust is within or outside the H II region. Amorphous silicate particles tend to emit more energy below 30 μm, but also emit efficiently at far-infrared wavelengths. In order to illustrate the model calculations, we present infrared spectra for the Orion A region and compare them with observed fluxed, accounting for beam-width effects. A reasonable agreement is obtained with most of the near- to middle-infrared observations if the total ultraviolet optical depth is about unity and about equally divided between the ionized region and an outside neutral shell. Intensity profiles for Orion A are presented for wavelengths in the ragne 20--1000 μm, and show a strong increase in width beyond 20 μm

  10. Synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of new 3-alkyl/aryl-2-[((alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxy)acetyl)hydrazono]-5-methyl-4-thiazolidinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzeldemirci, Nuray Ulusoy; Ilhan, Eser; Küçükbasmaci, Omer; Satana, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    New 4-thiazolidinone derivatives of benzilic acid (alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxyacetic acid) have been synthesized and evaluated for antibacterial and antifungal activities. The reaction of 1- (alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxy)acetyl-4-alkyl/arylthiosemicarbazides with ethyl 2-bromopropionate gave 3-alkyl/aryl-2-[((alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxy)acetyl)hydrazono]-5-methyl-4-thiazolidinone derivatives. Their antibacterial and antifungal activities were evaluated against S. aureus ATCC 29213, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, E. coli ATCC 25922, C. albicans ATCC 10231, C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019, C. krusei ATCC 6258, T. mentagrophytes var. erinacei NCPF 375, M. gypseum NCPF 580 and T. tonsurans NCPF 245. 3e, 3f, 3g and 3h showed the highest antibacterial activity. Particularly 3a and 3e showed the highest antifungal activities against C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019, T. tonsurans NCPF 245 and M. gypseum NCPF 580.

  11. Life cycle assessment of the offshore wind farm alpha ventus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Hermann-Josef; Baack, Christoph; Eickelkamp, Timo; Epe, Alexa; Lohmann, Jessica; Troy, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Due to better wind conditions at sea, offshore wind farms have the advantage of higher electricity production compared to onshore and inland wind farms. In contrast, a greater material input, leading to increased energy consumptions and emissions during the production phase, is required to build offshore wind farms. These contrary effects are investigated for the first German offshore wind farm alpha ventus in the North Sea. In a life cycle assessment its environmental influence is compared to that of Germany's electricity mix. In comparison to the mix, alpha ventus had better indicators in nearly every investigated impact category. One kilowatt-hour electricity, generated by the wind farm, was burdened with 0.137 kWh Primary Energy-Equivalent and 32 g CO 2 -Equivalent, which represented only a small proportion of the accordant values for the mix. Furthermore, the offshore foundations as well as the submarine cable were the main energy intensive components. The energetic and greenhouse gas payback period was less than one year. Therefore, offshore wind power, even in deep water, is compatible with the switch to sustainable electricity production relying on renewable energies. Additional research, taking backup power plants as well as increasingly required energy storage systems into account, will allow further calculation. -- Highlights: → Offshore wind energy represents an environmentally friendly way of power generation. → The offshore foundations and the submarine cable are energy intensive components. → Alpha ventus emits 30 g CO 2 per kWh electricity over the entire life cycle. → Less specific emissions occur in comparison to the existing German electricity grid. → The energetic and greenhouse gas payback periods are less than one year.

  12. The Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionisation with SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, L.; Pritchard, J.; Mellema, G.; Aguirre, J.; Ahn, K.; Barkana, R.; van Bemmel, I.; Bernardi, G.; Bonaldi, A.; Briggs, F.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Chang, T. C.; Chapman, E.; Chen, X.; Ciardi, B.; Dayal, P.; Ferrara, A.; Fialkov, A.; Fiore, F.; Ichiki, K.; Illiev, I. T.; Inoue, S.; Jelic, V.; Jones, M.; Lazio, J.; Maio, U.; Majumdar, S.; Mack, K. J.; Mesinger, A.; Morales, M. F.; Parsons, A.; Pen, U. L.; Santos, M.; Schneider, R.; Semelin, B.; de Souza, R. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Takeuchi, T.; Vedantham, H.; Wagg, J.; Webster, R.; Wyithe, S.; Datta, K. K.; Trott, C.

    2014-01-01

    Concerted effort is currently ongoing to open up the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) ($z\\sim$15-6) for studies with IR and radio telescopes. Whereas IR detections have been made of sources (Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters, quasars and drop-outs) in this redshift regime in relatively small fields of view, no

  13. The Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionisation with SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, L.; Pritchard, J.; Mellema, G.; Aguirre, J.; Ahn, K.; Barkana, R.; van Bemmel, I.; Bernardi, G.; Bonaldi, A.; Briggs, F.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Chang, T. C.; Chapman, E.; Chen, X.; Ciardi, B.; Dayal, P.; Ferrara, A.; Fialkov, A.; Fiore, F.; Ichiki, K.; Illiev, I. T.; Inoue, S.; Jelic, V.; Jones, M.; Lazio, J.; Maio, U.; Majumdar, S.; Mack, K. J.; Mesinger, A.; Morales, M. F.; Parsons, A.; Pen, U. L.; Santos, M.; Schneider, R.; Semelin, B.; de Souza, R. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Takeuchi, T.; Vedantham, H.; Wagg, J.; Webster, R.; Wyithe, S.; Datta, K. K.; Trott, C.

    2015-01-01

    Concerted effort is currently ongoing to open up the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) ($z\\sim$15-6) for studies with IR and radio telescopes. Whereas IR detections have been made of sources (Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters, quasars and drop-outs) in this redshift regime in relatively small fields of view, no

  14. Relation of EEG alpha background to cognitive fuction, brain atrophy, and cerebral metabolism in Down's syndrome. Age-specific changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devinsky, O.; Sato, S.; Conwit, R.A.; Schapiro, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    We studied 19 young adults (19 to 37 years old) and 9 older patients (42 to 66 years old) with Down's syndrome (DS) and a control group of 13 healthy adults (22 to 38 years old) to investigate the relation of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha background to cognitive function and cerebral metabolism. Four of the older patients with DS had a history of mental deterioration, disorientation, and memory loss and were demented. Patients and control subjects had EEGs, psychometric testing, quantitative computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18. A blinded reader classified the EEGs into two groups--those with normal alpha background or those with abnormal background. All the control subjects, the 13 young adult patients with DS, and the 5 older patients with DS had normal EEG backgrounds. In comparison with the age-matched patients with DS with normal alpha background, older patients with DS with decreased alpha background had dementia, fewer visuospatial skills, decreased attention span, larger third ventricles, and a global decrease in cerebral glucose utilization with parietal hypometabolism. In the young patients with DS, the EEG background did not correlate with psychometric or positron emission tomographic findings, but the third ventricles were significantly larger in those with abnormal EEG background. The young patients with DS, with or without normal EEG background, had positron emission tomographic findings similar to those of the control subjects. The mechanism underlying the abnormal EEG background may be the neuropathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease in older patients with DS and may be cerebral immaturity in younger patients with DS

  15. Solid state characterization of {alpha}-chitin from Vanessa cardui Linnaeus wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffman, Jessica D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schauer, Caroline L., E-mail: cschauer@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2009-05-05

    Material properties of the painted lady butterfly, Vanessa cardui Linnaeus were investigated using typical material science techniques. The examined butterflies were raised and hatched from the larvae stage and their chemical and crystalline structure evaluated and compared to that of crab shell ({alpha}-chitin) and squid pens from Notodarus sloanii and Loligo pealei ({beta}-chitin). Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that the painted lady butterflies are composed of {alpha}-chitin. Additionally, macro- and microstructure characterization of the chitins was conducted utilizing digital photography and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). This work demonstrates that common characterization techniques combined with simple sample preparation of biological materials can yield successful material characterization, which could aide the fabrication of biomimetic materials.

  16. Electrodeposition of Zn-doped {alpha}-nickel hydroxide with flower-like nanostructure for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Zheng [Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen Kui; Wu Zhicheng [Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang Xiaofeng [Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kong Xianghua, E-mail: kongxh@ustb.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Zn-doped {alpha}-nickel hydroxide materials with flower-like nanostructures are synthesized by electrochemical deposition method. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electrochemical measurements. XRD spectra indicate nickel hydroxide doped with Zn is {alpha}-Ni(OH){sub 2} with excellent crystallization. The SEM observation shows that the formation of Zn-doped Ni(OH){sub 2} includes two steps: a honeycomb-like film forms on the substrate first, then flower-like particles forms on the films. The nickel hydroxide doped with 5% Zn can maintain a maximum specific capacitance of 860 F g{sup -1}, suggesting its potential application in electrochemical capacitors.

  17. THE BIVARIATE SIZE-LUMINOSITY RELATIONS FOR LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx} 4-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Su, Jian [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ravindranath, Swara, E-mail: kuanghan@pha.jhu.edu [The Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007, Maharashtra (India)

    2013-03-01

    We study the bivariate size-luminosity distribution of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected at redshifts around 4 and 5 in GOODS and the HUDF fields. We model the size-luminosity distribution as a combination of log-normal distribution (in size) and Schechter function (in luminosity), therefore it enables a more detailed study of the selection effects. We perform extensive simulations to quantify the dropout-selection completenesses and measurement biases and uncertainties in two-dimensional size and magnitude bins, and transform the theoretical size-luminosity distribution to the expected distribution for the observed data. Using maximum-likelihood estimator, we find that the Schechter function parameters for B {sub 435}-dropouts and are consistent with the values in the literature, but the size distributions are wider than expected from the angular momentum distribution of the underlying dark matter halos. The slope of the size-luminosity (RL) relation is similar to those found for local disk galaxies, but considerably shallower than local early-type galaxies.

  18. THE BIVARIATE SIZE-LUMINOSITY RELATIONS FOR LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 4-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Su, Jian; Ferguson, Henry C.; Ravindranath, Swara

    2013-01-01

    We study the bivariate size-luminosity distribution of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected at redshifts around 4 and 5 in GOODS and the HUDF fields. We model the size-luminosity distribution as a combination of log-normal distribution (in size) and Schechter function (in luminosity), therefore it enables a more detailed study of the selection effects. We perform extensive simulations to quantify the dropout-selection completenesses and measurement biases and uncertainties in two-dimensional size and magnitude bins, and transform the theoretical size-luminosity distribution to the expected distribution for the observed data. Using maximum-likelihood estimator, we find that the Schechter function parameters for B 435 -dropouts and are consistent with the values in the literature, but the size distributions are wider than expected from the angular momentum distribution of the underlying dark matter halos. The slope of the size-luminosity (RL) relation is similar to those found for local disk galaxies, but considerably shallower than local early-type galaxies.

  19. THE IONIZED CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPES OF ORION SOURCE I AND THE BECKLIN-NEUGEBAUER OBJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plambeck, R. L.; Wright, M. C. H. [Radio Astronomy Lab, Hearst Field Annex, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A. D.; Pound, M. W.; Teuben, P. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Carpenter, J. M.; Perez, L. M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Eisner, J. A.; Marrone, D. P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lamb, J. W.; Leitch, E. M.; Muchovej, S. J.; Volgenau, N. H.; Woody, D. P. [Owens Valley Radio Observatory, California Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 968, Big Pine, CA 93513 (United States); Zauderer, B. A. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The 229 GHz ({lambda}1.3 mm) radio emission from Orion-KL was mapped with up to 0.''14 angular resolution with CARMA, allowing measurements of the flux densities of Source I ({sup S}rcI{sup )} and the Becklin-Neugebauer Object (BN), the two most massive stars in this region. We find integrated flux densities of 310 {+-} 45 mJy for SrcI and 240 {+-} 35 mJy for BN. SrcI is optically thick even at 229 GHz. No trace of the H30{alpha} recombination line is seen in its spectrum, although the v {sub 2} = 1, 5(5,0)-6(4,3) transition of H{sub 2}O, 3450 K above the ground state, is prominent. SrcI is elongated at position angle 140 Degree-Sign , as in 43 GHz images. These results are most easily reconciled with models in which the radio emission from SrcI arises via the H{sup -} free-free opacity in a T < 4500 K disk, as considered by Reid et al. By contrast, the radio spectrum of BN is consistent with p {sup +}/e {sup -} free-free emission from a dense (n{sub e} {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}), but otherwise conventional, hypercompact H II region. The source is becoming optically thin at 229 GHz, and the H30{alpha} recombination line, at V {sub LSR} = 23.2 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1}, is prominent in its spectrum. A Lyman continuum flux of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 45} photons s{sup -1}, consistent with that expected from a B star, is required to maintain the ionization. Supplementary 90 GHz observations were made to measure the H41{alpha} and H42{alpha} recombination lines toward BN. Published 43 and 86 GHz data suggest that SrcI brightened with respect to BN over the 15 year period from 1994 to 2009.

  20. Alpha - Skew Pi - Armendariz Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej M Abduldaim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce a new concept called Alpha-skew Pi-Armendariz rings (Alpha - S Pi - ARas a generalization of the notion of Alpha-skew Armendariz rings.Another important goal behind studying this class of rings is to employ it in order to design a modern algorithm of an identification scheme according to the evolution of using modern algebra in the applications of the field of cryptography.We investigate general properties of this concept and give examples for illustration. Furthermore, this paperstudy the relationship between this concept and some previous notions related to Alpha-skew Armendariz rings. It clearly presents that every weak Alpha-skew Armendariz ring is Alpha-skew Pi-Armendariz (Alpha-S Pi-AR. Also, thisarticle showsthat the concepts of Alpha-skew Armendariz rings and Alpha-skew Pi- Armendariz rings are equivalent in case R is 2-primal and semiprime ring.Moreover, this paper proves for a semicommutative Alpha-compatible ringR that if R[x;Alpha] is nil-Armendariz, thenR is an Alpha-S Pi-AR. In addition, if R is an Alpha - S Pi -AR, 2-primal and semiprime ring, then N(R[x;Alpha]=N(R[x;Alpha]. Finally, we look forwardthat Alpha-skew Pi-Armendariz rings (Alpha-S Pi-ARbe more effect (due to their properties in the field of cryptography than Pi-Armendariz rings, weak Armendariz rings and others.For these properties and characterizations of the introduced concept Alpha-S Pi-AR, we aspire to design a novel algorithm of an identification scheme.

  1. Water quality - Measurement of gross alpha activity in non-saline water - Thick source method. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of gross alpha activity in non-saline waters for alpha-emitting radionuclides which are not volatile at 350 degree Centigrade. It is possible to determine supported volatile radionuclides measured to an extent determined by half-life, matrix retention (of the volatile species) and the duration of measurement (counting time). The method is applicable to raw and potable waters. The range of application depends on the amount of suspended matter in the water and on the performance characteristics (background count rate and counting efficiency) of the counter. Gross alpha radioactivity is determined by using proportional counting or solid scintillation counting on water residue deposited on a planchet. Due to the strong absorption of the residue deposit, it is considered that the alpha emission from the surface is proportional to the alpha activity of the deposit. Gross alpha determination is not an absolute determination of the sample alpha radioactive content, but a relative determination referring to a specific alpha emitter which constitutes the standard calibration source. This type of determination is also known as alpha index. The sample is acidified to stabilize it, evaporated almost to dryness, converted to the sulfate form and then ignited at 350 degree Centigrade. A portion of the residue is transferred to a planchet and the alpha activity measured by counting in an alpha-particle detector or counting system previously calibrated against an alpha-emitting standard and the alpha activity concentration calculated. The paper provides information about scope, normative references, symbols, definitions and units, principle, reagents and equipment, procedure, contamination check, expression of results and test report

  2. The tree-alpha Faddeev calculation on 12C bound states with a Pauli correct alpha-alpha potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Hiroyuki; Oryu, Shinsho

    1986-01-01

    The three-alpha model of 12 C is investigated by the Faddeev formalism with the UIM alpha-alpha potential, in which the Pauli effect between two-alpha system was taken into account adequately. The potential can reproduce the on- and off-shell effects of the alpha-alpha interaction by the rank-4 separable type for the S-wave, the rank-3 one for the D-wave, and the rank-2 one for the G-wave, in which two of the ranks in the S-wave, and one in the D-wave are prepared to eliminate the Pauli forbidden states. We obtained three even states J π = 0 + , 2 + , 4 + , and two odd states 1 - , 3 - , below the alpha- 8 Be(0 + g.s) threshold energy. The even parity states gain larger binding energies than those which have been obtained by former Faddeev calculation with the rank-1 Kukulin and Neudatchin (KN) potential. On the other hand, for the odd parity states, we obtained smaller binding energies than the former one. It is found that our Faddeev calculation with the UIM potential does not miss any important low-lying levels of 12 C, in which any spurious states do not appear. (author)

  3. Deuterium content of the Venus atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertaux, -J.-L.; Clarke, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance of deuterium in the atmosphere of Venus is an important clue to the planet's history, because ordinary and deuterated water escape at different rates. Using the high-resolution mode of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), we measured hydrogen Lyman-α-emission but found only an upper limit on deuterium Lyman-α-emission, from which we inferred a D/H ratio of less than 2-5 x 10 -3 . This is smaller by a factor of 3-8 than the D/H ratio derived from measurements by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe, and may indicate either a stratification of D/H ratio with altitude or a smaller overall ratio than previously thought. (author)

  4. Calibration and operation of continuous air monitors for alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    Spectrometer-based continuous air monitors have improved our capabilities for detecting aerosols of alpha-emitting radionuclides. This paper describes basic requirements and statistical limitations in the sensitivity of alpha continuous air monitors, and presents a technical basis for selecting the energy window for detection of uranium and plutonium aerosols, correcting for interference from airborne dust, selecting filters with low pressure drop and good front surface collection characteristics, and properly using electroplated calibration sources. Sensitivity limits are described for detecting uranium or plutonium aerosols in the presence of increased concentrations of naturally occurring, alpha-emitting radon progeny radionuclides. Decreasing the lower energy boundary of the detection window from 4.3 MeV to 2.7 MeV improves by a factor of three the detection of plutonium in the presence of dust, while causing minimal additional interference from ambient radon progeny. Selection of the Millipore Fluoropore teflon membrane filter reduces both pressure drop and interference from ambient radon progeny by up to a factor of two. Field collection of ambient radon progeny can be used to verify the proper energy of alpha emissions from electroplated calibration sources. In the absence of energy verification, errors in instrument calibration may result from solid state diffusion of the electroplated calibration radionuclide into the substrate plate

  5. How to estimate the 3D power spectrum of the Lyman-α forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Slosar, Anže

    2018-01-01

    We derive and numerically implement an algorithm for estimating the 3D power spectrum of the Lyman-α (Lyα) forest flux fluctuations. The algorithm exploits the unique geometry of Lyα forest data to efficiently measure the cross-spectrum between lines of sight as a function of parallel wavenumber, transverse separation and redshift. We start by approximating the global covariance matrix as block-diagonal, where only pixels from the same spectrum are correlated. We then compute the eigenvectors of the derivative of the signal covariance with respect to cross-spectrum parameters, and project the inverse-covariance-weighted spectra onto them. This acts much like a radial Fourier transform over redshift windows. The resulting cross-spectrum inference is then converted into our final product, an approximation of the likelihood for the 3D power spectrum expressed as second order Taylor expansion around a fiducial model. We demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of the algorithm and comment on possible extensions. Our algorithm will allow efficient analysis of the upcoming Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument dataset.

  6. The relationship between I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}){sup 2} and crystalline volume fraction in microcrystalline silicon growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantana, Jakapan; Higuchi, Takuya; Nagai, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Shota; Sobajima, Yasushi; Toyama, Toshihiko; Sada, Chitose; Matsuda, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Optical-emission-intensity ratio of I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}) during film growth has been used as a simple indicator to predict crystallinity (crystal-volume fraction: X{sub C}) in the resulting microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) thin films. The relationship between I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}) and X{sub C} has been checked under a wide variety of film-preparation conditions including low-deposition-rate (<0.1 nm/s) and high-deposition-rate (>5 nm/s) cases. On the basis of theoretical consideration, we have proposed optical-emission-intensity ratio of I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}) {sup 2} as a new indicator of X{sub C} during film growth of {mu}c-Si:H. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Nicotinic {alpha}4{beta}2 receptor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichika, Rama [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Collins, Daphne [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Christian, Bradley T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH 45429 (United States); Shi, Bingzhi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH 45429 (United States); Narayanan, Tanjore K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH 45429 (United States); Potkin, Steven G. [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States); Mukherjee, Jogeshwar [Brain Imaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3960 (United States)]. E-mail: j.mukherjee@uci.edu

    2006-04-15

    The {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. Optimal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents are therefore highly desired for this receptor. We report here the development and initial evaluation of 2-fluoro-3-[2-((S)-3-pyrrolinyl)methoxy]pyridine (nifene). In vitro binding affinity of nifene in rat brain homogenate using {sup 3}H-cytisine exhibited a K {sub i}=0.50 nM for the {alpha}4{beta}2 sites. The radiosynthesis of 2-{sup 18}F-fluoro-3-[2-((S)-3-pyrrolinyl)methoxy]pyridine ({sup 18}F-nifene) was accomplished in 2.5 h with an overall radiochemical yield of 40-50%, decay corrected. The specific activity was estimated to be approx. 37-185 GBq/{mu}mol. In vitro autoradiography in rat brain slices indicated selective binding of {sup 18}F-nifene to anteroventral thalamic (AVT) nucleus, thalamus, subiculum, striata, cortex and other regions consistent with {alpha}4{beta}2 receptor distribution. Rat cerebellum showed some binding, whereas regions in the hippocampus had the lowest binding. The highest ratio of >13 between AVT and cerebellum was measured for {sup 18}F-nifene in rat brain slices. The specific binding was reduced (>95%) by 300 {mu}M nicotine in these brain regions. Positron emission tomography imaging study of {sup 18}F-nifene (130 MBq) in anesthetized rhesus monkey was carried out using an ECAT EXACT HR+ scanner. PET study showed selective maximal uptake in the regions of the anterior medial thalamus, ventro-lateral thalamus, lateral geniculate, cingulate gyrus, temporal cortex including the subiculum. The cerebellum in the monkeys showed lower binding than the other regions. Thalamus-to-cerebellum ratio peaked at 30-35 min postinjection to a value of 2.2 and subsequently reduced. The faster binding profile of {sup 18}F-nifene indicates promise as a PET imaging agent and thus needs further evaluation.

  8. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 0.3 FROM UV-TO-FIR MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oteo, I.; Bongiovanni, A.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Cepa, J.; Pintos-Castro, I. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ederoclite, A. [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon, Plaza San Juan 1, Planta 2, Teruel, 44001 (Spain); Sanchez-Portal, M.; Altieri, B. [Herschel Science Centre (ESAC), Villafranca del Castillo (Spain); Perez-Martinez, R. [XMM/Newton Science Operations Centre (ESAC), Villafranca del Castillo (Spain); Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Foerster Schreiber, N.; Genzel, R.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, 85741 Garching (Germany); Andreani, P. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzchild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Aussel, H.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc' h, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA-SAp) Saclay (France); Cimatti, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); and others

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of the physical properties of low-redshift Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) can provide clues in the study of their high-redshift analogs. At z {approx} 0.3, LAEs are bright enough to be detected over almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum and it is possible to carry out a more precise and complete study than at higher redshifts. In this work, we examine the UV and IR emission, dust attenuation, star formation rate (SFR), and morphology of a sample of 23 GALEX-discovered star-forming LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 with direct UV (GALEX), optical (ACS), and FIR (PACS and MIPS) data. Using the same UV and IR limiting luminosities, we find that LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 tend to be less dusty, have slightly higher total SFRs, have bluer UV continuum slopes, and are much smaller than other galaxies that do not exhibit Ly{alpha} emission in their spectrum (non-LAEs). These results suggest that at z {approx} 0.3, Ly{alpha} photons tend to escape from small galaxies with low dust attenuation. Regarding their morphology, LAEs belong to Irr/merger classes, unlike non-LAEs. Size and morphology represent the most noticeable difference between LAEs and non-LAEs at z {approx} 0.3. Furthermore, the comparison of our results with those obtained at higher redshifts indicates either that the Ly{alpha} technique picks up different kind of galaxies at different redshifts or that the physical properties of LAEs are evolving with redshift.

  9. The Contribution of Galactic Free-Free Emission to Anistropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background Found by the Saskatoon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, John H.; Dennison, Brian; Topasna, Gregory A.

    1996-02-01

    We made a sensitive, wide-field H alpha image of the north celestial polar region. Using this image, we constrain the contribution of irregularities in interstellar free-free emission to the degree-scale anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background detected in recent observations at Saskatoon by the Princeton group. The analysis of the H alpha image mimics the Saskatoon data analysis: the resulting signal is the strength of irregularities sampled with the Saskatoon beam (i.e., degree-scale) along the 85 deg declination circle. We found no such irregularities that could be attributed to H alpha emission. The implied upper bound on the rms variation in free-free brightness temperature is less than 4.6 mu K at 27.5 GHz. The observed cosmic microwave background anisotropies are much larger. Therefore, the contribution of irregularities in interstellar free-free emission to the observed anisotropies is negligible.

  10. Synthesis of tritiated 1-alpha-methadol and 1-alpha-acetylmethadol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, D.C.; Nam, N.H.; Pontikis, R. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital Fernand Widal, 75 - Paris (France)); Pichat, L. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service des Molecules Marquees)

    1982-04-01

    dl-Methadone was resolved by crystallization of its ammonium d- ..cap alpha.. -bromocamphor-..pi..-sulfonate salt to give d-methadone. The latter in ethyl acetate solution was reduced with tritium gas to 1-..cap alpha..-methadol /sup 3/H in presence of Adams platinum oxide at normal temperature and pressure. Acetylation of 1-..cap alpha..-carbinol hydrochloride by means of acetyl chloride afforded 1-..cap alpha..-acetylmethadol /sup 3/H, specific activity: 20 Ci/mMole. The positions and extent of tritium labelling were determined by /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Non-LTE hydrogen-line formation in moving prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, P.; Rompolt, B.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen-line brightness variations, depending on the prominence-velocity changes were investigated. By solving the NON-Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) problem for hydrogen researchers determine quantitatively the effect of Doppler brightening and/or Doppler dimming (DBE, DDE) in the lines of Lyman and Balmer series. It is demonstrated that in low-density prominence plasmas, DBE in H alpha and H beta lines can reach a factor of three for velocities around 160 km/sec, while the L alpha line exhibits typical DDE. L beta brightness variations follow from a combined DBE in the H alpha and DDE in L alpha and L beta itself, providing that all relevant multilevel interlocking processes are taken into account.

  12. Towards laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walz, J.; Pahl, A.; Eikema, K.S.E.; Hansch, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of the first continuous coherent source at 121.56 nm is described. Radiation at this wavelength of Lyman-alpha can be used for laser-cooling of antihydrogen on the strong 1S-2P transition. It also opens up a possibility for precision spectroscopy that requires just a few antihydrogen

  13. A Lyman Break Galaxy Candidate at z ~ 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Alaina L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Colbert, James W.; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I.; McCarthy, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We report the discovery of a z ~ 9 Lyman break galaxy candidate, selected from the NICMOS Parallel Imaging Survey as a J-dropout with J110 - H160 = 1.7. Spitzer/IRAC photometry reveals that the galaxy has a blue H160 - 3.6 μm color and a spectral break between 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We interpret this break as the Balmer break and derive a best-fit photometric redshift of z ~ 9. We use Monte Carlo simulations to test the significance of this photometric redshift, and we show that there is a 96% probability of z >= 7. We estimate that the lower limit to the comoving number density of such galaxies at z ~ 9 is phi > 3.8 × 10-6 Mpc-3. If the high redshift of this galaxy is confirmed, this will indicate that the luminous end of the rest-frame UV luminosity function has not evolved substantially from z ~ 9 to z ~ 3. Still, some small degeneracy remains between this z ~ 9 model and models at z ~ 2-3 deep optical imaging (reaching IAB ~ 29) can rule out the lower z models. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. This work is also based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with proposals 9484, 9865, 10226, and 10899.

  14. Pollen Dispersal by Catapult: Experiments of Lyman J. Briggs on the Flower of Mountain Laurel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.; Hermann, Paula M.; Kirkham, M. B.; Landa, Edward R.

    2014-09-01

    The flower of Kalmia latifolia L. employs a catapult mechanism that flings its pollen to considerable distances. Physicist Lyman J. Briggs investigated this phenomenon in the 1950s after retiring as longtime director of the National Bureau of Standards, attempting to explain how hydromechanical effects inside the flower's stamen could make it possible. Briggs's unfinished manuscript implies that liquid under negative pressure generates stress, which, superimposed on the stress generated from the flower's growth habit, results in force adequate to propel the pollen as observed. With new data and biophysical understanding to supplement Briggs's experimental results and research notes, we show that his postulated negative-pressure mechanism did not play the exclusive and crucial role that he credited to it, though his revisited investigation sheds light on various related processes. Important issues concerning the development and reproductive function of Kalmia flowers remain unresolved, highlighting the need for further biophysical advances.

  15. SOA Formation Potential of Emissions from Soil and Leaf Litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, C. L.; Vanderschelden, G. S.; Wen, M.; Cobos, D. R.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural sources exceed all anthropogenic sources combined. VOCs participate in oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere and impact the concentrations of ozone and particulate material. The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is particularly complex and is frequently underestimated using state-of-the-art modeling techniques. We present findings that suggest emissions of important SOA precursors from soil and leaf litter are higher than current inventories would suggest, particularly under conditions typical of Fall and Spring. Soil and leaf litter samples were collected at Big Meadow Creek from the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. The dominant tree species in this area of the forest are ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and western larch. Samples were transported to the laboratory and housed within a 0.9 cubic meter Teflon dynamic chamber where VOC emissions were continuously monitored with a GC-FID-MS and PTR-MS. Aerosol was generated from soil and leaf litter emissions by pumping the emissions into a 7 cubic meter Teflon aerosol growth chamber where they were oxidized with ozone in the absence of light. The evolution of particle microphysical and chemical characteristics was monitored over the following eight hours. Particle size distribution and chemical composition were measured with a SMPS and HR-ToF-AMS respectively. Monoterpenes dominated the emission profile with emission rates up to 283 micrograms carbon per meter squared per hour. The dominant monoterpenes emitted were beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, and delta-3-carene in descending order. The composition of the SOA produced was similar to biogenic SOA formed from oxidation of ponderosa pine emissions and alpha-pinene. Measured soil/litter monoterpene emission rates were compared with modeled canopy emissions. Results suggest that during fall and spring when tree emissions are lower, monoterpene emissions within forests may be

  16. The cathode-fall of low-pressure hydrogen discharges: Absolute spectral emission and model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelenkovic, B. M. [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States); Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Zenum Belgrade (Serbia); Phelps, A. V. [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Absolute excitation probabilities from very low to moderate-current hydrogen discharges in parallel-plane geometry are measured and used to test models. Relative emission data are obtained for the H{sub {alpha}} line, the H{sub 2} (a{sup 3}{Sigma}{yields}b{sup 3}{Pi}) near-UV continuum, and the H{sub 2} (G{sup 1}{Sigma}{yields}B{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u}{sup +}) band at pressures of 0.5 and 2 Torr, a 1.05 cm gap, and voltages from 300 to 900 V. Electron behavior is traced using the first negative (A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{yields} X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub u}, {nu}'' = 0 {yields}{nu}' = 0) band of N{sub 2}{sup +} by adding 2% N{sub 2}. Relative measurements of H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub 2} near-UV, and N{sub 2} 1st negative emission are placed on a absolute scale by normalization to published measurements and Boltzmann calculations of electron excitation. Emission probabilities calculated using a multi-beam kinetics model for the electrons, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, H{sup -}, H, and H{sub 2} are compared with the calibrated experiments. Fast H atoms are calculated to produce H{sub {alpha}} excitation that is comparable with that of electrons. The calculated emission intensities for H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub 2} near-UV continuum are within a factor of three of the absolute measurements for a range of 5000:1 in current and 4:1 in hydrogen pressure. Calculations at 2 Torr show that most of the space charge electric field responsible for the cathode fall is produced by H{sub 3}{sup +} ions.

  17. Instruments used to measure or check {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} activity and neutron emission in the course of processing ore or irradiated fuel; Appareils de mesure ou de controle {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, n, des circuits des usines de traitement du minerai ou du combustible irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, A; Brunet, M; Kermagoret, M; Labeyrie, J; Roux, G; Vasseur, J; Weil, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    One of the methods checking ores in the course of treatment is the rapid quantitative determination of thorium. This measurement is carried out by means of a scintillation instrument which shows the {beta} and {alpha} coincidences of ThC and ThC'. The treatment of irradiated fuel is accompanied by a large number of radioactive checks relative to the performance of the fixation and elution operations of uranium in the ion exchangers, to the concentration of radioactivity of effluent sent from the plant into watercourses. The operations of fixation and elution of the uranium are checked automatically by an instrument which takes a sample of 5 cm{sup 3} of solution, evaporates it and measures its activity every 10 or 20 minutes. Plutonium concentrations are measured: - in the presence of strong {beta} {gamma} activities, by means of rotating cylinder detectors; - in the presence of weak {beta} {gamma} activities, by means of {alpha} detectors scanning a constant level liquid surface; - by means of fission chambers relatively insensitive to {gamma}. Fission product concentrations are measured by chambers, counters or scintillators, according to the amount of {gamma} activity present. Finally, the activity of effluent to be emptied into watercourses is checked by means of a scintillation instrument, which measures the {alpha} activity on the one hand, and on the other hand the {beta} {gamma} activity of residue from a 100 cm{sup 3} sample taken and evaporated in 20 minutes. (author) [French] Parmi les controles relatifs au minerai en cours de traitement, figure le dosage rapide de thorium. Cette mesure est realisee au moyen d'un appareillage a scintillation qui met en evidence la coincidence des emissions {beta} et {alpha} du ThC et du ThC'. Le traitement des combustibles irradies s'accompagne d'un grand nombre de controles radioactifs portant sur le fonctionnement des operations de fixation et d'elution de l'uranium dans les echangeurs d'ions, sur la concentration du

  18. Ionization of cloud and intercloud hydrogen by O and B stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmergreen, B.G.

    1975-01-01

    Lyman continuum radiation from OB stars may be the primary source of ionization of interstellar hydrogen. Eighty percent of Lyman continuum photons produced by these stars comes from a very small number of 05 and 06 stars, however, and if this radiation is ionized to interstellar hydrogen with the high degree of uniformity indicated by pulsar dispersion measures or by the diffuse background of Hα emission, then each 05 or 06 star must be able to maintain an H II region over a distance of several hundred parsecs. The cloudy structure of interstellar space prevents such long range ionization, however, and a large fraction of the stellar Lyman continuum photons will be converted to Balmer photons in the high-density ionized surfaces of the exposed clouds. Two questions concerning this cloudy obscuration naturally arise: what will be the consequences of a cloud's exposure to Lyman continuum radiation, and to what extent can low-density, intercloud hydrogen be ionized in the obscured regions. These questions are considered

  19. The Discovery of a High-Redshift Quasar without Emission Lines from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan; Strauss; Gunn; Lupton; Carilli; Rupen; Schmidt; Moustakas; Davis; Annis; Bahcall; Brinkmann; Brunner; Csabai; Doi; Fukugita; Heckman; Hennessy; Hindsley; Ivezic; Knapp; Lamb; Munn; Pauls; Pier; Rockosi; Schneider; Szalay; Tucker; York

    1999-12-01

    We report observations of a luminous unresolved object at redshift z=4.62, with a featureless optical spectrum redward of the Lyalpha forest region, discovered from Sloan Digital Sky Survey commissioning data. The redshift is determined by the onset of the Lyalpha forest at lambda approximately 6800 Å and a Lyman limit system at lambda=5120 Å. A strong Lyalpha absorption system with weak metal absorption lines at z=4.58 is also identified in the spectrum. The object has a continuum absolute magnitude of -26.6 at 1450 Å in the rest frame (h0=0.5, q0=0.5) and therefore cannot be an ordinary galaxy. It shows no radio emission (the 3 sigma upper limit of its flux at 6 cm is 60 µJy), indicating a radio-to-optical flux ratio at least as small as that of the radio-weakest BL Lacertae objects known. It is also not linearly polarized to a 3 sigma upper limit of 4% in the observed I band. Therefore, it is either the most distant BL Lac object known to date, with very weak radio emission, or a new type of unbeamed quasar, whose broad emission line region is very weak or absent.

  20. Quartz luminescence response to a mixed alpha-beta field: Investigations on Romanian loess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Daniela; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew S.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Timar-Gabor, Alida

    2015-01-01

    Previous SAR-OSL dating studies using quartz extracted from Romanian and Serbian loess samples report SAR-OSL dose–response curves on fine grained (4–11 μm) quartz that grow to much higher doses compared to those of coarse-grained (63–90, 90–125, 125–180 μm) quartz. Furthermore, quartz SAR-OSL laboratory dose response curves do not reflect the growth of the OSL signal in nature. A main difference in coarse- and fine-grained quartz dating lies in the alpha irradiation history, but the effect of mixed alpha-beta fields has so far received little attention. In the present study we investigate whether the alpha dose experienced by fine grains over geological cycles of irradiation and bleaching may have an effect on the saturation characteristics of the laboratory dose response. By applying time resolved optically stimulated luminescence we confirm that the OSL signals induced in quartz by alpha and beta radiation follow the same recombination path. We also show that a mixed alpha-beta dose response reproduces the beta dose response only up to about 800 Gy. Assuming an a-value of 0.04 we have shown that laboratory alpha and beta dose response curves overlap up to effective alpha doses of ∼50 Gy. Based on these results, we conclude that exposure of fine grains to alpha radiation during burial and transport cycles prior to deposition, as well exposure to the mixed radiation field experienced during burial are not responsible for the age discrepancies previously reported on fine and coarse grained quartz extracted from Romanian and Serbian loess. - Highlights: • Prior alpha irradiation history does not influence the laboratory beta growth curves. • Alpha and beta induced photon emissions in quartz follow the same recombination path. • Laboratory alpha and beta growth curves overlap up to total alpha doses of ∼1250 Gy. • Mixed alpha-beta growth curves reproduce the beta dose response curves up to ∼800 Gy. • Mixed radiation field is not

  1. The average number of alpha-particle hits to the cell nucleus required to eradicate a tumour cell population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeske, John C; Stinchcomb, Thomas G

    2006-01-01

    Alpha-particle emitters are currently being considered for the treatment of micrometastatic disease. Based on in vitro studies, it has been speculated that only a few alpha-particle hits to the cell nucleus are considered lethal. However, such estimates do not consider the stochastic variations in the number of alpha-particle hits, energy deposited, or in the cell survival process itself. Using a tumour control probability (TCP) model for alpha-particle emitters, we derive an estimate of the average number of hits to the cell nucleus required to provide a high probability of eradicating a tumour cell population. In simulation studies, our results demonstrate that the average number of hits required to achieve a 90% TCP for 10 4 clonogenic cells ranges from 18 to 108. Those cells that have large cell nuclei, high radiosensitivities and alpha-particle emissions occurring primarily in the nuclei tended to require more hits. As the clinical implementation of alpha-particle emitters is considered, this type of analysis may be useful in interpreting clinical results and in designing treatment strategies to achieve a favourable therapeutic outcome. (note)

  2. Hippocampal 3alpha,5alpha-THP may alter depressive behavior of pregnant and lactating rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Cheryl A; Walf, Alicia A

    2004-07-01

    The 5alpha-reduced metabolite of progesterone (P), 5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP), may mediate progestins' effects to reduce depressive behavior of female rats in part through actions in the hippocampus. To investigate, forced swim test behavior and plasma and hippocampal progestin levels were assessed in groups of rats expected to differ in their 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels due to endogenous differences (pregnant and postpartum), administration of a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor (finasteride; 50 mg/kg sc), and/or gestational stress [prenatal stress (PNS)], an animal model of depression. Pregnant rats had higher plasma and hippocampal 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels and less depressive behavior (decreased immobility, increased struggling and swimming) in the forced swim test than did postpartum rats. Finasteride, compared to vehicle-administration, reduced plasma and hippocampal 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels and increased depressive behavior (increased immobility, decreased struggling and swimming). PNS was associated with lower hippocampal, but not plasma, 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels and increased swimming compared to that observed in control rats. Together, these data suggest that 3alpha,5alpha-THP in the hippocampus may mediate antidepressive behavior of female rats.

  3. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency ω cα . This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies ω ∼ mω cα

  4. A Lyman Break Galaxy in the Epoch of Reionization from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Grism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel K.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Dickinson, Mark; Pirzkal, Norbert; Spinrad, Hyron; Reddy, Naveen; Dey, Arjun; Hathi, Nimish; hide

    2013-01-01

    Slitless grism spectroscopy from space offers dramatic advantages for studying high redshift galaxies: high spatial resolution to match the compact sizes of the targets, a dark and uniform sky background, and simultaneous observation over fields ranging from five square arcminutes (HST) to over 1000 square arcminutes (Euclid). Here we present observations of a galaxy at z = 6.57 the end of the reioinization epoch identified using slitless HST grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) and reconfirmed with Keck + DEIMOS. This high redshift identification is enabled by the depth of the PEARS survey. Substantially higher redshifts are precluded for PEARS data by the declining sensitivity of the ACS grism at greater than lambda 0.95 micrometers. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms.

  5. Double differential cross-sections of (n,{alpha}) reactions in aluminium and nickel at 14.77 MeV neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalremruata, B.; Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune-411007 (India); Ganesan, S. [Reactor Physics Design Division, BARC, Mumbai-400085 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune-411007 (India)], E-mail: vnb@physics.unipune.ernet.in

    2009-04-15

    The double differential cross-sections (DDX) for the emission of alpha particles from {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na and Ni(n,{alpha}) reactions induced by 14.77 MeV neutrons were estimated from the alpha particle spectra recorded at 30 deg., 50 deg., 90 deg., 110 deg. angles for aluminium, and at 20 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 110 deg. for natural nickel. The results indicate that the alpha particles below and around the most probable energies ({approx}6.3 MeV from aluminium and {approx}8 MeV from natural nickel) are emitted predominantly through the compound nucleus formation process, and the higher energy alpha particles are emitted through the pre-equilibrium or the direct reaction. In general, the measured double-differential cross-sections are in agreement with the theoretical cross-sections estimated using Talys-1.0 and Preco2007 computer programs. The present value of the level density parameter for {sup 24}Na is close to the literature value and, therefore, these results reveal consistency in the alpha particle spectra recorded with a single silicon surface barrier detector at different scattering angles.

  6. Search for alpha particles emitted at rest in the break-up of the 12C-α-12C molecule-like configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurer, J.N.; Bertault, D.; Caussanel, M.; Quebert, J.L.; Fouan, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A yield of alpha particles emitted at rest is clearly observed in 16 O+ 12 C at several incident energies. These alpha particles are detected by two methods: i) the alpha particle is considered as a missing mass in the detection of two 12 C nuclei in coincidence; ii) the alpha particle is detected at zero degree with a velocity due to centre of mass motion. Such a yield is assigned to a linear chain formation of the type 12 C-α- 12 C and an excitation function between 40 and 65 MeV is given. The emission due to Coulomb effects is emphasized in the discussion to give the chief explanation of the coincidence results

  7. Lyman Break Galaxies At z 2 In The GOODS Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Lutz; Williger, G.; Lehnert, M.; Nesvadba, N.

    2009-12-01

    Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) have been the benchmarks against which other samples of high redshift galaxies have been compared for the last 2 decades. They are unique in that no other selection mechanism allows us to study galaxies selected in a consistent manner over the span of redshifts from z=0 to 7. An important remaining gap is the redshift range z ˜ 1.5-2.5, which includes near UV (NUV)-band drop-outs. We present first results of a search for LBGs at these redshifts using very sensitive multi-frequency data from the far UV to mid-IR of the GOODS CDF-S and HDF-N. We modelled colors of star-forming galaxies, and found only a small overlap with the BM/BX selection method (Adelberger et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 226). We developed new color selection criteria using GALEX NUV and optical photometry to identify high star formation galaxies, including NUV-dropouts for 2.0methods, we identified a sample of ? z˜ 2 LBG candidates in both the GOODS CDF-S and the HDF-N. A first analysis of the mean SED of our LBG candidate sample shows results consistent with red LBGs at z ˜ 1, indicating massive galaxies with high star formation rates. Nearly 10% of our selected LBG candidates have mid-IR (IRAC+MIPS) colors comparable both to z ˜ 3 IR-luminous LBGs, which are believed to be dusty, vigorously star-forming massive progenitors of modern ellipticals.

  8. Decreased cerebral {alpha}4{beta}2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease assessed with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendziorra, Kai; Meyer, Philipp Mael; Barthel, Henryk; Hesse, Swen; Becker, Georg Alexander; Luthardt, Julia; Schildan, Andreas; Patt, Marianne; Sorger, Dietlind; Seese, Anita; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Old Age Psychiatry and Psychiatry Research, Psychiatric University Hospital (PUK) Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Gertz, Herman-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Postmortem studies indicate a loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to establish whether these changes in the cholinergic system occur at an early stage of AD, we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with a specific radioligand for the {alpha}4{beta}2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}4{beta}2* nAChR) in patients with mild to moderate AD and in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), who have a high risk to progress to AD. Nine patients with moderate AD, eight patients with MCI and seven age-matched healthy controls underwent 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380) PET. After coregistration with individual magnetic resonance imaging the binding potential (BP{sub ND}) of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 was calculated using either the corpus callosum or the cerebellum as reference regions. PET data were analysed by region of interest analysis and by voxel-based analysis. Both patients with AD and MCI showed a significant reduction in 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 BP{sub ND} in typical AD-affected brain regions. Thereby, the corpus callosum was identified as the most suitable reference region. The 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 BP{sub ND} correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment. Only MCI patients that converted to AD in the later course (n = 5) had a reduction in 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 BP{sub ND}. 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 PET appears to be a sensitive and feasible tool for the detection of a reduction in {alpha}4{beta}2* nAChRs which seems to be an early event in AD. In addition, 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 PET might give prognostic information about a conversion from MCI to AD. (orig.)

  9. The heavy quarkonium spectrum at order $m\\alpha_{s}^{5}\\ln\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Brambilla, Nora; Soto, Joan; Vairo, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We compute the complete leading-log terms of the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order corrections to potential NRQCD. As a by-product we obtain the leading logs at $O(m\\alpha_s^5)$ in the heavy quarkonium spectrum. These leading logs, when $\\Lambda_{QCD} \\ll m\\alpha_s^2$, give the complete $O(m\\alpha_s^5 \\ln \\alpha_s)$ corrections to the heavy quarkonium spectrum.

  10. New concept for a wall detector for alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Kislev, H.; Micklich, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    A new concept for a wall-mounted detector is described here that would measure D-T alpha flux and corresponding pitch angle distribution in tokamaks (or related toroidal devices). The sensing element is a conical Micro Channel Ring (MCR) coated with 1 to 2μ of ZnS scintillator (or possibly ZnO). The collimation of the α particles is provided by two circumferential slots at the wall surface. The alpha scintillation events on the MCR are transferred through the ring channels and coupled fiber optics bundle to an external processor. From the magnetic field vector at a given point on the device wall, a certain relation can be set up between the α-induced scintillation position on the MCR and its original pitch angle (i.e., the angle between the α emission from the fusion reaction and the magnetic field vector) which is equal to the local pitch angle since the wall α flux is dominated by prompt losses

  11. ALFITeX. A new code for the deconvolution of complex alpha-particle spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro Marroyo, B.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2013-01-01

    A new code for the deconvolution of complex alpha-particle spectra has been developed. The ALFITeX code is written in Visual Basic for Microsoft Office Excel 2010 spreadsheets, incorporating several features aimed at making it a fast, robust and useful tool with a user-friendly interface. The deconvolution procedure is based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, with the curve fitting the experimental data being the mathematical function formed by the convolution of a Gaussian with two left-handed exponentials in the low-energy-tail region. The code also includes the capability of fitting a possible constant background contribution. The application of the singular value decomposition method for matrix inversion permits the fit of any kind of alpha-particle spectra, even those presenting singularities or an ill-conditioned curvature matrix. ALFITeX has been checked with its application to the deconvolution and the calculation of the alpha-particle emission probabilities of 239 Pu, 241 Am and 235 U. (author)

  12. Measurement of 233U/234U ratios in contaminated groundwater using alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Jennifer J.; Payne, Timothy E.; Wilsher, Kerry L.; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Child, David P.; Johansen, Mathew P.; Hotchkis, Michael A.C.

    2016-01-01

    The uranium isotope 233 U is not usually observed in alpha spectra from environmental samples due to its low natural and fallout abundance. It may be present in samples from sites in the vicinity of nuclear operations such as reactors or fuel reprocessing facilities, radioactive waste disposal sites or sites affected by clandestine nuclear operations. On an alpha spectrum, the two most abundant alpha emissions of 233 U (4.784 MeV, 13.2%; and 4.824 MeV, 84.3%) will overlap with the 234 U doublet peak (4.722 MeV, 28.4%; and 4.775 MeV, 71.4%), if present, resulting in a combined 233+234 U multiplet. A technique for quantifying both 233 U and 234 U from alpha spectra was investigated. A series of groundwater samples were measured both by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to determine 233 U/ 234 U atom and activity ratios and by alpha spectrometry in order to establish a reliable 233 U estimation technique using alpha spectra. The Genie™ 2000 Alpha Analysis and Interactive Peak Fitting (IPF) software packages were used and it was found that IPF with identification of three peaks ( 234 U minor, combined 234 U major and 233 U minor, and 233 U major) followed by interference correction on the combined peak and a weighted average activity calculation gave satisfactory agreement with the AMS data across the 233 U/ 234 U activity ratio range (0.1–20) and 233 U activity range (2–300 mBq) investigated. Correlation between the AMS 233 U and alpha spectrometry 233 U was r 2  = 0.996 (n = 10). - Highlights: • Describes a technique for deconvoluting the combined 233 U and 234 U multiplet in alpha spectra. • Enables 233 U and 234 U activities and 233 U/ 234 U ratios to be quantified without requiring additional analysis and measurement. • Applicable to an environmental matrix (groundwater) using standard alpha spectrometry counting equipment, operation and set-up.

  13. Can sterile neutrinos be ruled out as warm dark matter candidates?

    CERN Document Server

    Viel, M; Hähnelt, M G; Matarrese, S; Riotto, Antonio; Viel, Matteo; Lesgourgues, Julien; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Matarrese, Sabino; Riotto, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    We present constraints on the mass of Warm Dark Matter (WDM) particles from a combined analysis of the matter power spectrum inferred from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Lyman-alpha flux power spectrum at 2.2 10 keV (2 sigma) if the WDM consists of sterile neutrinos and m_wdm > 2 keV (2 sigma) for early decoupled thermal relics. These results significantly improve our previous estimates based on high-resolution Lyman-alpha forest data at lower redshift. Our new limits are consistent with those of Seljak et al. (2006), albeit ~ 30 % smaller. If we combine this bound with the constraint derived from X-ray flux observations in the Coma cluster periphery (Boyarsky et al.), we find that the only allowed sterile neutrino mass is ~ 10 keV (in the standard production scenario with non-resonant neutrino oscillations). Adding constraints based on X-ray fluxes from the Andromeda galaxy or the Milky Way, we find that dark matter particles cannot be sterile neutrinos, unless the latter are produced by resonant oscill...

  14. Bright emission lines in new Seyfert galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasev, V.L.; Denisiuk, E.K.; Lipovetskii, V.A.; Shapovalova, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Observational data are given on bright emission lines (H-alpha, H-beta, and forbidden N II, S II, and O III) for 14 recently discovered Seyfert galaxies. The investigated objects can be divided into three groups, which correspond approximately to the first (5 objects), the intermediate (4 objects), and the second (4 objects) Seyfert types. Attention is drawn to the properties of the galaxy Markaryan 1018, which has features of both the first and the second type and is distinguished by the weakness of its emission lines, which is probably due to a gas deficit. 7 references

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Vatican Emission-line stars (Coyne+ 1974-1983)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, G. V.; Lee, T. A.; de Graeve, E.; Wisniewski, W.; Corbally, C.; Otten, L. B.; MacConnell, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    The survey represents a search for Hα emission-line stars, and was conducted with a 12{deg} objective prism on the Vatican Schmidt telescope. The Vatican Emission Stars (VES) survey covers the galactic plane (|b|II/246), IRAS point source catalog (II/125), MSX6C (V/114), CMC14 (I/304), GSC-2.3 (I/305), UCAC2 (I/289). Cross-identifications are also supplied with HD/BD/GCVS names, and with Dearborn catalog of red stars (II/68). Many of the stars in the first four papers are not early-type emission-line stars, but instead M giants, where the sharp TiO bandhead at 6544{AA} was mistaken for H-{alpha} emission on the objective-prism plates. Based on the revision of paper V and a later list prepared by Jack MacConnell, a column identifies the "non H-alpha" stars explicitly. The links with the Dearborn, IRAS, and MSX catalogues help identify the red stars. These and other identifications and comments are given in the remarks at the end of each line, or in longer notes in a separate file, indicated by an asterisk (*) next to the star number. (3 data files).

  16. Crystalline anhydrous {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (polymorph {beta}) and crystalline dihydrate {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose: A calorimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Susana S. [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: susanapinto@ist.utl.pt; Diogo, Herminio P. [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: hdiogo@ist.utl.pt; Moura-Ramos, Joaquim J. [Centro de Quimica-Fisica Molecular, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mouraramos@ist.utl.pt

    2006-09-15

    The mean values of the standard massic energy of combustion of crystalline anhydrous {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11}, polymorph {beta}) and crystalline dihydrate {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (C{sub 12}H{sub 26}O{sub 13}) measured by static-bomb combustion calorimetry in oxygen, at the temperature T=298.15K, are {delta}{sub c}u{sup o}=-(16434.05+/-4.50)J.g{sup -1} and {delta}{sub c}u{sup o}=-(14816.05+/-3.52)J.g{sup -1}, respectively. The standard (p{sup o}=0.1MPa) molar enthalpy of formation of these compounds were derived from the corresponding standard molar enthalpies of combustion, respectively, {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o} (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11},cr)=-(2240.9+/-3.9)kJ.mol{sup -1}, and {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o} (C{sub 12}H{sub 26}O{sub 13},cr)=-(2832.6+/-3.6)kJ.mol{sup -1}. The values of the standard enthalpies of formation obtained in this work, together with data on enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution ({delta}{sub sol}H{sup {approx}}) for crystalline dihydrate and amorphous anhydrous trehalose, allow a better insight on the thermodynamic description of the trehalose system which can provide, together with the future research on the subject, a contribution for understanding the metabolism in several organisms, as well as the phase transition between the different polymorphs.

  17. Energy dependence of event shapes and of $\\alpha_s$ at LEP 2

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Infrared and collinear safe event shape distributions and their mean values are determined using the data taken at ve di erent centre of mass energies above $M_Z$ with the DELPHI detector at LEP. From the event shapes, the strong coupling $\\alpha_s$ is extracted in $O(\\alpha^2_s)$, NLLA and a combined scheme using hadronisation corrections evaluated with fragmentation model generators as well as using an analytical power ansatz. Comparing these measurements to those obtained at MZ, the energy dependence (running) of $\\alpha_s$ is accessible. The logarithmic energy slope of the inverse strong coupling is measured to be $d\\alpha_{s}^{-1}/d log(E_{cm}) = 1.39 \\pm 0.34(stat) \\pm 0.17(syst)$, in good agreement with the QCD expectation of 1.27.

  18. Alpha Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quickly, but their effects last only a few hours. Long-acting medications take longer to work, but their effects last longer. Which alpha blocker is best for you depends on your health and the condition being treated. Alpha blockers are ...

  19. Tumor immunolocalization using 124I-iodine-labeled JAA-F11 antibody to Thomsen-Friedenreich alpha-linked antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Heimburg, Jamie; Yan, Jun; Koury, Stephen; Sajjad, Munawwar; Abdel-Nabi, Hani H.; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Clinical immunolocalization has been attempted by others with an anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag) mAb that bound both alpha- and beta-linked TF-Ag. In this report, 124 I-labeled mAb JAA-F11 specific for alpha-linked TF-Ag showed higher tumor specificity in in vivo micro-positron emission tomography (micro-PET) of the mouse mammary adenocarcinoma line, 4T1, showing no preferential uptake by the kidney. Labeled product remained localized in the tumor for at least 20 days. Glycan array analysis showed structural specificity of the antibody

  20. Szilard-Chalmers effect in natural. cap alpha. disintegrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haissinsky, M; Cottin, M

    1948-11-01

    The Szilard-Chalmers effect resulting from the reaction UI(/sup 238/U) ..-->.. UX1(/sup 234/Th) was investigated. The authors developed a chemical method adapted from a technique of Starke (Naturwissenschaften 30, 577(1942)) to separate UX1 which was formed by ..cap alpha.. emission. The experimental accuracy is insufficient to indicate the influence of the degree of dilution of the chemical solutions used on the efficiency of separation, but it is shown that there is a marked decrease in efficiency when solid compounds are used, which is consistent with a hypothesis of Franck and Rabinowitsch (Trans. Faraday Soc. 30, 120(1934)).

  1. Uranium analysis in Cypriot groundwaters by total alpha-radiometry and alpha-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, Maria; Kiliari, Tasoula; Pashalidis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Two different alpha-radiometric methods (e.g. alpha-spectroscopy and alpha-particle counting) have been applied to the determination of uranium in Cypriot groundwater samples after separation of the radionuclides by cation exchange using Chelex-100 and its electrodeposition on stainless steel planchettes. The data obtained were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages of the two radiometric methods, determine the alpha-radioactivity concentration and the radiation dose associated with the use of the studied groundwaters. Calibration of the methods was performed by means of uranium standard solutions and the corresponding data were used to evaluate linear range, detector efficiency, detection limits, value of the information obtained, and time of analysis of the methods. Comparison of the data obtained from calibration and natural sample measurements has shown that alpha-particle counting with a simple alpha-radiometer (equipped with a semiconductor detector) may offer only an activity value and not detailed information about the isotopic composition but it is the fastest method and the method of choice if only a screening method for the alpha-radioactivity measurement is required. Based on the alpha-radioactivity data, the corresponding radiation dose was estimated for situations where the groundwaters are used for drinking water purposes.

  2. Microscopic study of proton emission from heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, B.B.; Patra, S.K.; Agarwalla, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years many theoretical calculations have been employed to explain the observed lifetimes of proton radioactivity and alpha decay processes in the region of proton rich nuclei. These data are very promising for the analysis of possible irregularities in the structure of these proton-rich nuclei. They are also of great interest in rapid proton capture processes. Some new results for proton radioactivity in this region of proton-rich nuclei have indicated that the proton emission mode is rather competitive with the alpha decay one. In the energy domain of radioactivity, proton can be considered as a point charge having highest probability of being present in the parent nucleus

  3. Description of light charged particle emission in ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kuklin, S. N.; Scheid, W.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the motion of three fragments starting from the scission point of ternary system. In the alpha-accompanied ternary fission the initial conditions are not the free parameters and determined by minimization of potential energy at scission point. In the trajectory calculations the angular distribution and mean value of the kinetic energy of the alpha-particles are well described in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252 Cf. In the Be- and C-accompanied ternary fission we found that the emission of the third particle occurs from one of the heavy fragments after their separation. (authors)

  4. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-dimensional transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability

  5. Detection of baryon acoustic oscillations in the Lyman-α forests of BOSS quasar spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delubac, Timothee

    2013-01-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) form a standard ruler that can be used to constrain different cosmological models. This thesis reports the first measurement of the BAO feature in the correlation function of the transmitted flux fraction in the Lyman-α forests of high redshift quasars. This detection uses 89322 quasar spectra measured by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III). Redshift of used quasars belong to the range 2.1≤z≤3.5. A peak in the correlation function is seen at 1.043"+"0"."0"2"1_-_0_._0_2_0 times the expected BAO peak position for a concordance ΛCDM model. In addition this thesis presents a new method of quasar selection through their variability. This method is applied to the Stripe 82 region where an important number of multi-epoch photometric data is available. On this region it achieves a quasar density of 30 deg"-"2 to be compared with the 18 deg"-"2 of usual color selections. (author) [fr

  6. Preliminary Results of Nuclear Fluorescence Imaging of Alpha and Beta Emitting Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feener, Jessica S.; Charlton, William S.

    2013-06-01

    The preliminary results from a series of nuclear fluorescence imaging experiments using a variety of radioactive sources and shielding are given. These experiments were done as part of a proof of concept to determine if nuclear fluorescence imaging could be used as a safeguards measurements tool or for nuclear warhead verification for nuclear arms control treaties such as the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty and the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty. An off-the-shelf Princeton Instruments charged coupled device camera system was used to image the emission of fluorescence photons from the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules in air that have been excited by ionizing radiation. The fluorescence emissions are primarily in the near ultraviolet range; between the wavelengths of 300 and 400 nm. Fluorescent imaging techniques are currently being investigated in a number of applications. A French research team has successfully demonstrated this concept for remote imaging of alpha contamination. It has also been shown that the phenomenon can be seen through translucent materials and that alpha radiation can be seen in the presence of large gamma backgrounds. Additionally, fluorescence telescopes and satellites utilize the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules to observe cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere. In cosmic ray shower detection, electrons are the main contributor to the excitation of the of nitrogen molecules in air. The experiments presented in this paper were designed to determine if the imaging system could observe beta emitting sources, differentiate between beta emitters and alpha emitting materials such as uranium oxide and uranium metal, and to further investigate the phenomenon through translucent and non-translucent materials. The initial results show that differentiation can be made between beta and alpha emitting sources and that the device can observe the phenomenon through very thin non-transparent material. Additionally, information is given on the

  7. [Age-related change in the alpha-tocopherolquinone/alpha-tocopherol ratio in the rat erythrocyte membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, K; Takeda, H; Matsumiya, T; Takasaki, M

    1999-05-01

    alpha-Tocopherol (alpha-Toc), a lipophilic phenolic antioxidant that is localized mainly in the biomembrane, protects cells against oxidation-associated cytotoxicity by prevention of membrane lipid peroxidation, maintenance of the redox balance intracellular thiols and stabilization of the membrane structure. We investigated the age-related changes in redox dynamics of alpha-Toc in plasma and erythrocyte membrane of an elderly (66 weeks old) and young group (10 weeks old). Total, alpha-, beta + gamma-, delta-Toc and alpha-tocopherolquinone (alpha-TocQ) in plasma and erythrocyte membrane were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a series of multiple coulometric working electrodes (CWE). Rat venous blood sample was divided into plasma and erythrocyte layers by centrifugation, and then erythrocyte membrane sample was prepared according to the method of Dodge et al. under a stream of nitrogen. In plasma, total and alpha-Toc concentrations were increased, and beta + gamma-, delta-Toc and alpha-TocQ concentrations were decreased age-dependently. In the erythrocyte membrane, total, alpha-TocQ concentrations and three fractions of tocopherols decreased age-dependently. Also, a decrease in the alpha-TocQ/alpha-Toc ratio in erythrocyte membrane was observed in the elderly group. These findings suggest that the alpha-Toc uptake in erythrocyte membrane and utilization rate of alpha-Toc in erythrocyte membrane decline age-dependently. This decline may promote membrane lipid peroxidation. alpha-Toc redox dynamics in erythrocyte membrane were useful to investigate the pathophysiology of aging mechanisms related to oxidative stress.

  8. Identification of a novel bile acid in swans, tree ducks, and geese: 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiyama, Genta; Iida, Takashi; Goto, Takaaki; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi; Nambara, Toshio; Hagey, Lee R; Schteingart, Claudio D; Hofmann, Alan F

    2006-07-01

    By HPLC, a taurine-conjugated bile acid with a retention time different from that of taurocholate was found to be present in the bile of the black-necked swan, Cygnus melanocoryphus. The bile acid was isolated and its structure, established by (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectrometry, was that of the taurine N-acyl amidate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid. The compound was shown to have chromatographic and spectroscopic properties that were identical to those of the taurine conjugate of authentic 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid, previously synthesized by us from ursodeoxycholic acid. By HPLC, the taurine conjugate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid was found to be present in 6 of 6 species in the subfamily Dendrocygninae (tree ducks) and in 10 of 13 species in the subfamily Anserinae (swans and geese) but not in other subfamilies in the Anatidae family. It was also not present in species from the other two families of the order Anseriformes. 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-Trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid is a new primary bile acid that is present in the biliary bile acids of swans, tree ducks, and geese and may be termed 15alpha-hydroxy-chenodeoxycholic acid.

  9. VUV Study of Electron-Pyrimidine Dissociative Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jeff; Al-Khazraji, Hajar; Tiessen, Collin; Lukic, Dragan; Trocchi, Joshuah; McConkey, William

    2013-05-01

    A crossed electron-gas beam system coupled to a VUV spectrometer has been used to investigate the dissociation of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) into excited atomic fragments in the electron-impact energy range from threshold to 375 eV. Data have been made absolute using Lyman- α from H2 as a secondary standard. The main features in the spectrum are the H Lyman series lines. The emission cross section of Lyman- α is measured to be (2.44 +/- 0.25) 10-18 cm2 at 100 eV impact energy. The probability of extracting C or N atoms from the ring is shown to be very small. Possible dissociation channels and excitation mechanisms in the parent molecule will be discussed. The authors thank NSERC (Canada) for financial support.

  10. Shock-related radio emission during coronal mass ejection lift-off?

    OpenAIRE

    Pohjolainen, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We identify the source of fast-drifting decimetric-metric radio emission that is sometimes observed prior to the so-called flare continuum emission. Fast-drift structures and continuum bursts are also observed in association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), not only flares. Methods: We analyse radio spectral features and images acquired at radio, H-alpha, EUV, and soft X-ray wavelengths, during an event close to the solar limb on 2 June 2003. Results: The fast-drifting decimetric-met...

  11. Buffett's Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Kabiller, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    Berkshire Hathaway has realized a Sharpe ratio of 0.76, higher than any other stock or mutual fund with a history of more than 30 years, and Berkshire has a significant alpha to traditional risk factors. However, we find that the alpha becomes insignificant when controlling for exposures to Betting...

  12. Sterol synthesis. A novel reductive rearrangement of an alpha,beta-unsaturated steroidal epoxide; a new chemical synthesis of 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta, 15alpha-diol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, E J; Schroepfer, G J

    1977-04-01

    Reduction of 3beta-benzoyloxy-14alpha,15alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholest-7-ene with either lithium triethylboro-hydride or lithium aluminum hydride (4 molar excess) gave 5-alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol in high yield. Reduction of the epoxy ester with lithium triethylborodeuteride or lithium aluminum deuteride (4 molar excess) gave [7alpha-2-H]-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol. Reduction of 2beta-benzoyloxy-14alpha,15alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholest-7-ene with a large excess (24 molar excess) of lithium aluminum hydride gave, in addition to the expected 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol, a significant yield (33%) of 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-o1. Reduction of the epoxy ester with a large excess (24 molar excess) of lithium aluminum deuteride gave [7alpha-2H]-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol and 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-o1 which contained two atoms of stably bound deuterium.

  13. Immunostimulatory effects of natural human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) on carps Cyprinus carpio L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Hironobu; Chakraborty, Gunimala; Korenaga, Hiroki; Kono, Tomoya; Shivappa, R B; Sakai, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    Human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) is an important immunomodulatory substance used in the treatment and prevention of numerous infectious and immune-related diseases in animals. However, the immunostimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha in fish remain to be investigated. In the current study, the immune responses of the carp species Cyprinus carpio L. to treatment with huIFN-alpha were analyzed via measurement of superoxide anion production, phagocytic activity and the expression of cytokine genes including interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 10. Low doses of huIFN-alpha were administered orally once a day for 3 days, and sampling was carried out at 1, 3 and 5 days post-treatment. Our results indicate that a low dose of huIFN-alpha significantly increased phagocytic activity and superoxide anion production in the carp kidney. The huIFN-alpha-treated fish also displayed a significant upregulation in cytokine gene expression. The current study demonstrates the stimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha on the carp immune system and highlights the immunomodulatory role of huIFN-alpha in fish.

  14. Drugs interacting with alpha adrenoceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Alpha adrenoceptors should be divided into various subtypes, comprising pre/postsynaptic and alpha 1/alpha 2-subpopulations, respectively. This classification implicates important functional differences between the various alpha-receptor subtypes, including certain differences in signal transduction

  15. Absolute generalized oscillator strength for the Lyman--Birge--Hopfield band of N2 as determined by high energy electron impact spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.C.; Lee, J.S.; Wellenstein, H.F.; Bonham, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute generalized oscillator strength for the dipole forbidden quadrupole allowed Lyman--Birge--Hopfield band a 1 Pi/subg/ reverse arrow X 1 Σ + /subg/ in molecular nitrogen at an energy loss of 9.35 eV is observed by electron impact spectroscopy using 25 keV electrons over the momentum transfer range 0.04less than or equal toK 2 less than or equal to10 a.u. The results agree in the zero angle (zero momentum transfer) limit with the previous observations of Skerbele and Lassettre, but are in disagreement with previous theoretical and experimental results for K 2 >0.5. (auth)

  16. Supernova rates, galaxy emission, and Hubble type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Bergh, S.

    1991-01-01

    Supernova discovery frequency is found to correlate with emission-line (H-alpha + forbidden N II line) equivalent width, except for the most active galaxies in which some supernovae might be hidden by dust. SNII occur preferentially in active galaxies with emission-line EW not less than 20 A, whereas SNIa favor less active galaxies with EW less than 20 A. The intrinsic frequency of supernovae is found to be an order of magnitude higher in Sc galaxies than it is in early type spirals. The relatively high frequency of SNIa in late-type galaxies suggests that not all such objects have old progenitors. 13 refs

  17. The influence of nonuniform micro-distribution of alpha emitter on microdosimetry in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yuan; Zhang Liang'an; Dai Guangfu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of nonuniform micro-distribution of alpha emitter on cellular S values(in the radioimmunotherapy). Methods: Emission of alpha particles is randomly simulated by Monte Carlo method; the incident energy and exit energy are calculated with interpolation technique based on the relationship between range and energy of alpha particle and the analytical Continuous Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA) model. So energy deposited in the target area can be obtained. To take 213 Po as an example, cellular S values with various cell dimensions and possible micro-distributions of radioactivity are calculated, such as linear increase, linear decrease, exponential increase and exponential decrease. Results: S values from cell to cell of uniform distribution showed no difference with the Hamacher's results. S values of different micro-distributions are distinguishing with each other. It is indicated that different micro-distributions of radioactivity will result in significant change of average chord length of alpha particles traveling in the target area, as well as the change of average stopping power over the chord, which is primary reason for differences of S values. Conclusions: The nonuniform micro-distributions show remarkable influence on cellular S values and hence should be taken consideration in cellular absorbed dose estimation, especially in microdosimetry. (authors)

  18. Intensities of the Martian N2 electron-impact excited dayglow emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jane L.; Hać, Nicholas E. F.

    2013-06-01

    The first N2 emissions in the Martian dayglow were detected by the SPICAM UV spectrograph on board the Mars Express spacecraft. Intensities of the (0,5) and (0,6) Vegard-Kaplan bands were found to be about one third of those predicted more than 35 years ago. The Vegard-Kaplan band system arises from the transition from the lowest N2 triplet state (A3Σu+;v') to the electronic ground state (X1Σg+;v″). It is excited in the Martian dayglow by direct electron-impact excitation of the ground N2(X) state to the A state and by excitation to higher triplet states that populate the A state by cascading. Using revised data, we compute here updated intensities of several of the bands in the N2 triplet systems and those involving the a1Πg state, the upper state of the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands. We find that the predicted limb intensities for the (0,5) and (0,6) Vegard-Kaplan bands are consistent with the measured values.

  19. Alpha-in-air monitor for continuous monitoring based on alpha to beta ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somayaji, K.S.; Venkataramani, R.; Swaminathan, N.; Pushparaja

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of long-lived alpha activity collected on a filter paper in continuous air monitoring of ambient working environment is difficult due to interference from much larger concentrations of short-lived alpha emitting daughter products of 222 Rn and 220 Rn. However, the ratio between the natural alpha and beta activity is approximately constant and this constancy of the ratio is used to discriminate against short-lived natural radioactivity in continuous air monitoring. Detection system was specially designed for the purpose of simultaneous counting of alpha and beta activity deposited on the filter paper during continuous monitoring. The activity ratios were calculated and plotted against the monitoring duration up to about six hours. Monitoring was carried out in three facilities with different ventilation conditions. Presence of any long-lived alpha contamination on the filter paper results in increase in the alpha to beta ratio. Long-lived 239 Pu contamination of about 16 DAC.h could be detected after about 45 minutes of commencement of the sampling. The experimental results using prototype units have shown that the approach of using alpha to beta activity ratio method to detect long-lived alpha activity in the presence of short-lived natural activity is satisfactory. (author)

  20. Screening alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors from natural compounds by molecular docking in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Chien-Hung; Riyaphan, Jirawat; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor is a common oral anti-diabetic drug used for controlling carbohydrates normally converted into simple sugars and absorbed by the intestines. However, some adverse clinical effects have been observed. The present study seeks an alternative drug that can regulate the hyperglycemia by down-regulating alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activity by molecular docking approach to screen the hyperglycemia antagonist against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activities from the 47 natural compounds. The docking data showed that Curcumin, 16-hydroxy-cleroda-3,13-dine-16,15-olide (16-H), Docosanol, Tetracosanol, Antroquinonol, Berberine, Catechin, Quercetin, Actinodaphnine, and Rutin from 47 natural compounds had binding ability towards alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase as well. Curcumin had a better biding ability of alpha-amylase than the other natural compounds. Analyzed alpha-glucosidase activity reveals natural compound inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) are Curcumin, Actinodaphnine, 16-H, Quercetin, Berberine, and Catechin when compared to the commercial drug Acarbose (3 mM). A natural compound with alpha-amylase inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) includes Curcumin, Berberine, Docosanol, 16-H, Actinodaphnine/Tetracosanol, Catechin, and Quercetin when compared to Acarbose (1 mM). When taken together, the implication is that molecular docking is a fast and effective way to screen alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors as lead compounds of natural sources isolated from medicinal plants. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Neutral Hydrogen and Its Emission Lines in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-12-01

    Since the Lyman-α rocket observations of Gabriel ( Solar Phys. 21, 392, 1971), it has been realized that the hydrogen (H) lines could be observed in the corona and that they offer an interesting diagnostic for the temperature, density, and radial velocity of the coronal plasma. Moreover, various space missions have been proposed to measure the coronal magnetic and velocity fields through polarimetry in H lines. A necessary condition for such measurements is to benefit from a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The aim of this article is to evaluate the emission in three representative lines of H for three different coronal structures. The computations have been performed with a full non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) code and its simplified version without radiative transfer. Since all collisional and radiative quantities (including incident ionizing and exciting radiation) are taken into account, the ionization is treated exactly. Profiles are presented at two heights (1.05 and 1.9 solar radii, from Sun center) in the corona, and the integrated intensities are computed at heights up to five solar radii. We compare our results with previous computations and observations ( e.g. Lα from Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer) and find a rough (model-dependent) agreement. Since the Hα line is a possible candidate for ground-based polarimetry, we show that in order to detect its emission in various coronal structures, it is necessary to use a very narrow (less than 2 Å wide) bandpass filter.

  2. Solubilization and precipitation of {omega} and {alpha} phases in Ti-30 Nb and Ti-35 Nb alloys; Solubilizacao e precipitacao de fases {omega} e {alpha} nas ligas Ti-30Nb e Ti-35Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayama, A.O.F.; Lopes, J.F.S.C.; Caram, R., E-mail: alexandrah@fem.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DEMa/FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This work presents the main results of the characterization of Ti-30Nb and Ti-35Nb alloys (wt%) submitted to the solutioning heat treatment following by aging. Samples were obtained by electric arc melting, followed by solution heat treatment at 1000 deg C during 8 hours and cooling in water, the microstructure obtained is formed by {beta} and {alpha} phases. Samples were aged at 260 and 400 deg C during periods of time varying from 1 to 240 min. Characterization was performed using light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Young's modulus measurements by acoustic emission and Vickers hardness. The results show the presence of {beta} and {alpha}{sup '}' phases in samples of the Ti-30Nb alloy aged at 260 deg C. In samples aged at 400 deg C, precipitation of {omega} and {alpha}{sup '}' phases took place, and due to this fact, an increase in Young's modulus and in hardness occurred. (author)

  3. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  4. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4π-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmoille-Roblot, M.

    1999-01-01

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4π-α spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4π -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  5. Response of noctilucent cloud brightness to daily solar variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, P.; Pertsev, N.; Perminov, V.; Dubietis, A.; Zadorozhny, A.; Zalcik, M.; McEachran, I.; McEwan, T.; Černis, K.; Grønne, J.; Taustrup, T.; Hansen, O.; Andersen, H.; Melnikov, D.; Manevich, A.; Romejko, V.; Lifatova, D.

    2018-04-01

    For the first time, long-term data sets of ground-based observations of noctilucent clouds (NLC) around the globe have been analyzed in order to investigate a response of NLC to solar UV irradiance variability on a day-to-day scale. NLC brightness has been considered versus variations of solar Lyman-alpha flux. We have found that day-to-day solar variability, whose effect is generally masked in the natural NLC variability, has a statistically significant effect when considering large statistics for more than ten years. Average increase in day-to-day solar Lyman-α flux results in average decrease in day-to-day NLC brightness that can be explained by robust physical mechanisms taking place in the summer mesosphere. Average time lags between variations of Lyman-α flux and NLC brightness are short (0-3 days), suggesting a dominant role of direct solar heating and of the dynamical mechanism compared to photodissociation of water vapor by solar Lyman-α flux. All found regularities are consistent between various ground-based NLC data sets collected at different locations around the globe and for various time intervals. Signatures of a 27-day periodicity seem to be present in the NLC brightness for individual summertime intervals; however, this oscillation cannot be unambiguously retrieved due to inevitable periods of tropospheric cloudiness.

  6. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  7. ALPHA-2: the sequel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.   The ALPHA team lower the new superconducting solenoid magnet into place. The ALPHA collaboration is working at full speed to complete the ALPHA-2 set-up for mid-November – this will give them a few weeks of running before the AD shutdown on 17 December. “We really want to get some experience with this device this year so that, if we need to make any changes, we will have time during the long shutdown in which to make them,” says Jeffrey Hangst, ALPHA spokesperson. “Rather than starting the 2014 run in the commissioning stage, we will be up and running from the get go.&...

  8. Technical Basis for the Use of Alpha Absorption Corrections on RCF Gross Alpha Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceffalo, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the supporting data and rationale for making absorption corrections to gross alpha data to correct alpha data for loss due to absorption in the sample matrix. For some time there has been concern that the gross alpha data produced by the Environmental Restoration Contractor Radiological Counting Facility, particularly gross alpha analysis on soils, has been biased toward low results, as no correction for self-absorption was applied to the counting data. The process was investigated, and a new methodology for alpha self-absorption has been developed

  9. The onset of chromospheric activity among the A- and F- type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Theodore; Landsman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    IUE observations of C II lambda1335 and C IV lambda1549 and ground-based observations of He I lambda5876 have previously discovered intense levels of chromospheric activity among early F type stars. Virtually all F dwarfs show stronger chromospheric and transition region emission than do the cooler and more deeply convective dwarf stars like the Sun. The IUE spectra and those of He lambda5876 place the onset of stellar activity along the main sequence near a color B - V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type FO and an effective temperature of 7300 K. However, existing X-ray observations of A and F stars suggest that coronal activity may reach a peak blueward of this high temperature boundary at B - V = 0.28 before vanishing among the early and mid A-type stars. Discussed are preliminary results of a new effort to refine the location of the high temperature boundary to chromospheric activity among A- and F- type stars, making use of low dispersion short-wavelength spectra from the IUE archives from which the strengths of C IV, C II, and Lyman alpha emission have been measured.

  10. Biogenic VOC Emissions from Tropical Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, A.; Greenberg, J.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Vanni Gatti, L.; Baker, B.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic VOC have an important role in determining the chemical composition of atmosphere. As a result, these compounds are important for visibility, biogeochemical cycling, climate and radiative forcing, and the health of the biosphere. Tropical landscapes are estimated to release about 80% of total global biogenic VOC emissions but have been investigated to lesser extent than temperate regions. Tropical VOC emissions are particularly important due to the strong vertical transport and the rapid landuse change that is occurring there. This presentation will provide an overview of field measurements of biogenic VOC emissions from tropical landscapes in Amazonia (Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia, LBA) Central (EXPRESSO) and Southern (SAFARI 2000) Africa, Asia and Central America. Flux measurement methods include leaf-scale (enclosure measurements), canopy-scale (above canopy tower measurements), landscape-scale (tethered balloon), and regional-scale (aircraft measurements) observations. Typical midday isoprene emission rates for different landscapes vary by more than a factor of 20 with the lowest emissions observed from degraded forests. Emissions of alpha-pinene vary by a similar amount with the highest emissions associated with landscapes dominated by light dependent monoterpene emitting plants. Isoprene emissions tend to be higher for neotropical forests (Amazon and Costa Rica) in comparison to Africa and Asian tropical forests but considerable differences are observed within regions. Strong seasonal variations were observed in both the Congo and the Amazon rainforests with peak emissions during the dry seasons. Substantial emissions of light dependent monoterpenes, methanol and acetone are characteristic of at least some tropical landscapes.

  11. Cloning, expression, and mapping of allergenic determinants of alphaS1-casein, a major cow's milk allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmeister, Ulrike; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Swoboda, Ines; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Geller, Beate; Nystrand, Mats; Härlin, Annika; Thalhamer, Josef; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Keller, Walter; Niggemann, Bodo; Quirce, Santiago; Ebner, Christoph; Mari, Adriano; Pauli, Gabrielle; Herz, Udo; Valenta, Rudolf; Spitzauer, Susanne

    2009-06-01

    Milk is one of the first components introduced into human diet. It also represents one of the first allergen sources, which induces IgE-mediated allergies in childhood ranging from gastrointestinal, skin, and respiratory manifestations to severe life-threatening manifestations, such as anaphylaxis. Here we isolated a cDNA coding for a major cow's milk allergen, alphaS1-casein, from a bovine mammary gland cDNA library with allergic patients' IgE Abs. Recombinant alphaS1-casein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized by circular dichroism as a folded protein. IgE epitopes of alphaS1-casein were determined with recombinant fragments and synthetic peptides spanning the alphaS1-casein sequence using microarrayed components and sera from 66 cow's milk-sensitized patients. The allergenic activity of ralphaS1-casein and the alphaS1-casein-derived peptides was determined using rat basophil leukemia cells transfected with human FcepsilonRI, which had been loaded with the patients' serum IgE. Our results demonstrate that ralphaS1-casein as well as alphaS1-casein-derived peptides exhibit IgE reactivity, but mainly the intact ralphaS1-casein induced strong basophil degranulation. These results suggest that primarily intact alphaS1-casein or larger IgE-reactive portions thereof are responsible for IgE-mediated symptoms of food allergy. Recombinant alphaS1-casein as well as alphaS1-casein-derived peptides may be used in clinical studies to further explore pathomechanisms of food allergy as well as for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for milk allergy.

  12. Orgasm is preserved regardless of ejaculatory dysfunction with selective alpha1A-blocker administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K; Masumori, N; Kato, R; Hisasue, S; Furuya, R; Tsukamoto, T

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated whether ejaculatory dysfunction induced with a selective alpha1A-blocker influenced orgasm. Fifteen healthy male volunteers took silodosin or a placebo in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. We investigated the ejaculatory volume before and after administration of the agents. After each ejaculation, participants self-reported the answers to an original questionnaire, which was about discomfort on ejaculation, orgasm and satisfaction with the discomforting ejaculation. All participants on silodosin had a complete lack of seminal emission and expulsion. All participants felt orgasm in spite of a complete lack of seminal emission. Of the 15, 12 (80%) who had a somewhat uncomfortable feeling during orgasm were dissatisfied with this feeling, although 9 of the 12 reported that its degree was mild. Orgasm is preserved regardless of the loss of seminal emission with silodosin administration. Although most participants reported mild discomfort during orgasm, they were greatly dissatisfied with the loss of seminal emission.

  13. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  14. Alpha Momentum and Price Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Lea Hühn

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyze a novel alpha momentum strategy that invests in stocks based on three-factor alphas which we estimate using daily returns. The empirical analysis for the U.S. and for Europe shows that (i past alpha has power in predicting the cross-section of stock returns; (ii alpha momentum exhibits less dynamic factor exposures than price momentum and (iii alpha momentum dominates price momentum only in the U.S. Connecting both strategies to behavioral explanations, alpha momentum is more related to an underreaction to firm-specific news while price momentum is primarily driven by price overshooting due to momentum trading.

  15. /sup 58,60,62/Ni (. cap alpha. ,p) three--nucleon transfer reactions and. cap alpha. optical potential ambiguities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuanda, Wang; Xiuming, Bao; Zhiqiang, Mao; Rongfang, Yuan; Keling, Wen; Binyin, Huang; Zhifu, Wang; Shuming, Li; Jianan, Wang; Zuxun, Sun; others, and

    1985-11-01

    The differential cross sections are measured using 26.0 MeV ..cap alpha.. particle for /sup 58,62/Ni(..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..) /sup 58,62/Ni and /sup 58,62/Ni(..cap alpha..,p) /sup 61,65/Cu reactions as well as 25.4 MeV ..cap alpha.. particle for /sup 60/Ni(..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..)/sup 69/Ni and /sup 60/Ni(..cap alpha.., p)/sup 63/Cu reactions. Consistent calculations with optical model and ZR DWBA are made for (..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..) and (..cap alpha.., p) reactions by using of single, two, three and four nucleon optical potential parameters. For elastic scattering due to the ..cap alpha.. optical potential ambiguities, all the above optical potential can reproduce the experimental angular distributions. However, the single, two and three nucleon potential, including the Baird's mass systematics and the Chang's energy systematics of ..cap alpha.. potentials, obviously can not provide a reasonable fitting with the (..cap alpha..,p) reaction experimental data. Only the results from the four nucleon potential is in good agreement with the (..cap alpha..,p) reaction experimental data. This reveals that in the ..cap alpha..-particle induced transfer reactions, the real depth of the ..cap alpha..-nucleus optical potential should be rather deep.

  16. New evaluation of alpha decay half-life of 190Pt isotope for the Pt-Os dating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Medeiros, E.L.; Terranova, M.L.

    2005-08-01

    A semiempirical model based on the quantum mechanical tunnelling mechanism of alpha emission from nuclei has been used to evaluate the half-life of the Pt isotopes. For the important naturally occurring 190 Pt isotope, the radiogenic parent in the 190 Pt → 186 Os dating system, the model yielded a half-life value of (3.7± 0.3) versus 10 11 y. This is comparable to (3.2±0.1) versus 10 11 y which was obtained in the last direct counting experiment to measure the alpha activity of 190 Pt (Tavares and Terranova, Rad. Measurem. 27 (1997) 19). A literature survey of available alpha decay half-life values for 190 Pt isotope is also reported. The significant discrepancies found between data obtained by direct counting, indirect geological methods and different calculation models are analysed and discussed. (author)

  17. K-shell X-ray production cross sections of Ni induced by protons, alpha-particles, and He{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Hinrichs, R. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z., E-mail: marcos@if.ufrgs.br [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    The proton, alpha-particle, and He{sup +} induced X-ray emissions of Ni were measured on mono-elemental thin films in order to obtain the K-shell X-ray production cross section in the energy range of 0.7–2.0 MeV for protons, 4.0–6.5 MeV for alpha-particles, and 3.0–4.0 MeV for He{sup +}. The proton-induced X-ray production cross section for Ni agreed well with the theoretical values, endorsing the quality of the measurements. The X-ray production cross section induced with alpha-particles is in good agreement with ECPSSR theory in the complete range of energies, while for He{sup +} that quantity is systematically below. K{sub β}/K{sub α} ratios were evaluated and compared with experimental and theoretical values.

  18. Investigating the physics and environment of Lyman limit systems in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkal, Denis

    2015-07-01

    In this work, I investigate the properties of Lyman limit systems (LLSs) using state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological galaxy formation simulations with on the fly radiative transfer, which includes both the cosmic UV background (UVB) and local stellar sources. I compare the simulation results to observations of the incidence frequency of LLSs and the H I column density distribution function over the redshift range z = 2-5 and find good agreement. I explore the connection between LLSs and their host haloes and find that LLSs reside in haloes with a wide range of halo masses with a nearly constant covering fraction within a virial radius. Over the range z = 2-5, I find that more than half of the LLSs reside in haloes with M test a simple model which encapsulates many of their properties. I confirm that LLSs have a characteristic absorption length given by the Jeans length and that they are in photoionization equilibrium at low column densities. Finally, I investigate the self-shielding of LLSs to the UVB and explore how the non-sphericity of LLSs affects the photoionization rate at a given N_{H I}. I find that at z ≈ 3, LLSs have an optical depth of unity at a column density of ˜1018 cm-2 and that this is the column density which characterizes the onset of self-shielding.

  19. Low-redshift Lyman limit systems as diagnostics of cosmological inflows and outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, Zachary; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Anglés-Alcázar, Daniel; Kereš, Dušan; Feldmann, Robert; Chan, T. K.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-08-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with stellar feedback from the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project to study the physical nature of Lyman limit systems (LLSs) at z ≤ 1. At these low redshifts, LLSs are closely associated with dense gas structures surrounding galaxies, such as galactic winds, dwarf satellites and cool inflows from the intergalactic medium. Our analysis is based on 14 zoom-in simulations covering the halo mass range Mh ≈ 109-1013 M⊙ at z = 0, which we convolve with the dark matter halo mass function to produce cosmological statistics. We find that the majority of cosmologically selected LLSs are associated with haloes in the mass range 1010 ≲ Mh ≲ 1012 M⊙. The incidence and H I column density distribution of simulated absorbers with columns in the range 10^{16.2} ≤ N_{H I} ≤ 2× 10^{20} cm-2 are consistent with observations. High-velocity outflows (with radial velocity exceeding the halo circular velocity by a factor of ≳ 2) tend to have higher metallicities ([X/H] ˜ -0.5) while very low metallicity ([X/H] standard deviation) [X/H] = -0.9 (0.4) and does not show significant evidence for bimodality, in contrast to recent observational studies, but consistent with LLSs arising from haloes with a broad range of masses and metallicities.

  20. Targeted Alpha Therapy: From Alpha to Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J; Clarke, Raymond; Huang Chenyu

    2013-01-01

    This review covers the broad spectrum of Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT) research in Australia; from in vitro and in vivo studies to clinical trials. The principle of tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT) is discussed in terms of its validation by Monte Carlo calculations of vascular models and the potential role of biological dosimetry is examined. Summmary of this review is as follows: 1. The essence of TAT 2. Therapeutic objectives 3. TAVAT and Monte Carlo microdosimetry 4. Biological dosimetry 5. Preclinical studies 6. Clinical trials 7. What next? 8. Obstacles. (author)

  1. 5alphaDH-DOC (5alpha-dihydro-deoxycorticosterone) activates androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Motohide; Honma, Seijiro; Chung, Suyoun; Takata, Ryo; Furihata, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Kazuo; Nonomura, Norio; Nasu, Yasutomo; Miki, Tsuneharu; Shuin, Taro; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Okuyama, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2010-08-01

    Prostate cancer often relapses during androgen-depletion therapy, even under the castration condition in which circulating androgens are drastically reduced. High expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and genes involved in androgen metabolism indicate a continued role for AR in castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs). There is increasing evidence that some amounts of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and other androgens are present sufficiently to activate AR within CRPC tissues, and enzymes involved in the androgen and steroid metabolism, such as 5alpha-steroid reductases, are activated in CRPCs. In this report, we screened eight natural 5alphaDH-steroids to search for novel products of 5alpha-steroid reductases, and identified 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) as a novel substrate for 5alpha-steroid reductases in CRPCs. 11-Deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and 5alpha-dihydro-deoxycorticosterone (5alphaDH-DOC) could promote prostate cancer cell proliferation through AR activation, and type 1 5alpha-steroid reductase (SRD5A1) could convert from DOC to 5alphaDH-DOC. Sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis detected 5alphaDH-DOC in some clinical CRPC tissues. These findings implicated that under an extremely low level of DHT, 5alphaDH-DOC and other products of 5alpha-steroid reductases within CRPC tissues might activate the AR pathway for prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival under castration.

  2. The alpha channeling effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  3. Compensatory increase in alpha 1-globin gene expression in individuals heterozygous for the alpha-thalassemia-2 deletion.

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhaber, S A; Cash, F E; Main, D M

    1985-01-01

    alpha-Globin is encoded by the two adjacent genes, alpha 1 and alpha 2. Although it is clearly established that both alpha-globin genes are expressed, their relative contributions to alpha-globin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein synthesis are not fully defined. Furthermore, changes that may occur in alpha-globin gene activity secondarily to the loss of function of one or more of these genes (alpha-thalassemia [Thal]) have not been directly investigated. This study further defines the expressi...

  4. Generation of a Circumstellar Gas Disk by Hot Jupiter WASP-12b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrecht, Alex; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Frank, Adam; Fossati, Luca; Blackman, Eric G.; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2018-05-01

    Observations of transiting extra-solar planets provide rich sources of data for probing the in-system environment. In the WASP-12 system, a broad depression in the usually-bright MgII h&k lines has been observed, in addition to atmospheric escape from the extremely hot Jupiter WASP-12b. It has been hypothesized that a translucent circumstellar cloud is formed by the outflow from the planet, causing the observed signatures. We perform 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the full system environment of WASP-12, injecting a planetary wind and stellar wind from their respective surfaces. We find that a torus of density high enough to account for the lack of MgII h&k line core emission in WASP-12 can be formed in approximately 13 years. We also perform synthetic observations of the Lyman-alpha spectrum at different points in the planet's orbit, which demonstrate that significant absorption occurs at all points in the orbit, not just during transits, as suggested by the observations.

  5. An optical spectrum of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst at a redshift of z = 6.295.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, N; Kosugi, G; Aoki, K; Yamada, T; Totani, T; Ohta, K; Iye, M; Hattori, T; Aoki, W; Furusawa, H; Hurley, K; Kawabata, K S; Kobayashi, N; Komiyama, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Nomoto, K; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Sato, R; Sekiguchi, K; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, T; Tamagawa, T; Terada, H; Watanabe, J; Yatsu, Y; Yoshida, A

    2006-03-09

    The prompt gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) should be detectable out to distances of z > 10 (ref. 1), and should therefore provide an excellent probe of the evolution of cosmic star formation, reionization of the intergalactic medium, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. Hitherto, the highest measured redshift for a GRB has been z = 4.50 (ref. 5). Here we report the optical spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 050904 obtained 3.4 days after the burst; the spectrum shows a clear continuum at the long-wavelength end of the spectrum with a sharp cut-off at around 9,000 A due to Lyman alpha absorption at z approximately 6.3 (with a damping wing). A system of absorption lines of heavy elements at z = 6.295 +/- 0.002 was also detected, yielding the precise measurement of the redshift. The Si ii fine-structure lines suggest a dense, metal-enriched environment around the progenitor of the GRB.

  6. Detailed non-LTE calculations of the iron emission from NGC 1068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; Klein, Richard I.; Castor, John I.; Nash, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray iron line emission from NGC 1068 observed by the Ginga satellite is modeled using the new multiline, multilevel, non-LTE radiative transport code ALTAIR and a detailed atomic model for Ne-like through stripped iron. The parameter space of the obscured type 1 Seyfert nucleus model for this object is studied. The equivalent width is greater than previously predicted. It is found that detailed radiative transfer can have a significant effect on the observed line flux both for the K alpha line and for the L-shell emission. The ionization of the iron increases with temperature. Therefore the K alpha equivalent width and energy is a function not only of the ionization parameter, but also of the column depth and temperature. For a likely model of NGC 1068 it is found that the iron abundance is about twice solar, but that modifications of this model may permit a smaller abundance.

  7. Hydrogenic fast-ion diagnostic using Balmer-alpha light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W W; Burrell, K H; Luo, Y; Pablant, N A; Ruskov, E

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogenic fast-ion populations are common in toroidal magnetic fusion devices, especially in devices with neutral beam injection. As the fast ions orbit around the device and pass through a neutral beam, some fast ions neutralize and emit Balmer-alpha light. The intensity of this emission is weak compared with the signals from the injected neutrals, the warm (halo) neutrals and the cold edge neutrals, but, for a favourable viewing geometry, the emission is Doppler shifted away from these bright interfering signals. Signals from fast ions are detected in the DIII-D tokamak. When the electron density exceeds ∼7 x 10 19 m -3 , visible bremsstrahlung obscures the fast-ion signal. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the diagnostic is ∼5 cm for 40 keV amu -1 fast ions. The technique is well suited for diagnosis of fast-ion populations in devices with fast-ion energies (∼30 keV amu -1 ), minor radii (∼0.6 m) and plasma densities (∼ 20 m -3 ) that are similar to those of DIII-D

  8. Resting-State Alpha in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alpha Associations with Thalamic Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. Christopher; Heiken, Kory; Chen, Yu-Han; Herrington, John D.; Chow, Vivian; Liu, Song; Bloy, Luke; Huang, Mingxiong; Pandey, Juhi; Cannon, Katelyn M.; Qasmieh, Saba; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha circuits (8-12 Hz), necessary for basic and complex brain processes, are abnormal in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study obtained estimates of resting-state (RS) alpha activity in children with ASD and examined associations between alpha activity, age, and clinical symptoms. Given that the thalamus modulates cortical RS alpha…

  9. Pre-equilibrium emission and nuclear level densities in neutron induced reactions on Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Ivascu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimentally well known (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron, proton and alpha-particle emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes are calculated in the frame of a generalized Geometry-Dependent-Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation and alpha-particle emission, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incident orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of this process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations. Finally, the unitary account of the (n, p) and (n, 2n) reaction excitation functions for Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes has allowed the proper establishment of the limits of the transition excitation range between the two different nuclear level density models used at medium and higher excitation energies, respectively. (author). 83 refs, 15 figs

  10. Constraints on dark radiation from cosmological probes

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Graziano; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We present joint constraints on the number of effective neutrino species N_eff and the sum of neutrino masses M_nu, based on a technique which exploits the full information contained in the one-dimensional Lyman-Alpha forest flux power spectrum, complemented by additional cosmological probes. In particular, we obtain N_eff=2.91(+0.21)(-0.22) (95% CL) and M_nu<0.15 eV (95% CL) when we combine BOSS Lyman-Alpha forest data with CMB (Planck+ACT+SPT+WMAP polarization) measurements, and N_eff=2.88(+0.20)(-0.20) (95% CL) and M_nu<0.14 eV (95% CL) when we further add baryon acoustic oscillations. Our results provide evidence for the Cosmic Neutrino Background from N_eff~3 (N_eff=0 is rejected at more than 14 sigma), and rule out the possibility of a sterile neutrino thermalized with active neutrinos (i.e., N_eff=4) - or more generally any decoupled relativistic relic with Delta N_eff ~ 1 - at a significance of over 5 sigma, the strongest bound to date, implying that there is no need for exotic neutrino physics ...

  11. Cytokine vaccination: neutralising IL-1alpha autoantibodies induced by immunisation with homologous IL-1alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, M; Hansen, M B; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2000-01-01

    with IL-1alpha coupled to purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD). Both unprimed and primed animals developed IgG aAb to IL-1alpha. These aAb persisted at high levels more than 100 days after vaccination and did not cross-react with murine IL-1beta. The induced anti-IL-1alpha aAb inhibited binding...... in mice by vaccination with recombinant murine IL-1alpha conjugated to PPD. Studies of the effects of IL-1alpha aAb in such animals may help clarify the importance of naturally occurring IL-1alpha aAb in humans and permit the evaluation of future therapies with cytokine aAb in patients...

  12. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Enterria, David [CERN; Skands, Peter Z. [Monash U.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  13. Pre-equilibrium complex particle emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bĕták, E.

    2002-01-01

    Semi-classical (phenomenological) pre-equilibrium emission of clusters of nucleons (complex particles) such as deuterons, tritons, helions and α particles from reactions induced by light projectiles (nucleons to α’s) is addressed. The main attention is given to the hard components in the emission energetic spectra, which play an increasing role at incident energies above 20 MeV, and are currently attributed to a presence of some kind of pre-equilibrium processes. In addition, the mechanisms of cluster reactions show special features such as the competition between pickup and knockout processes and the contributions of several successive steps in the reaction. The main frame used here to illustrate the processes and interplays of the competing mechanisms of pre-equilibrium cluster formation and emission, namely the coalescence, pick-up and knock-out, is the pre-equilibrium exciton model. It obviously contains the process of clusterization itself as its organic part. The most important case of complex particles with the largest amount of experimental data is that of alpha emission, which therefore naturally attracts most of the attention and where the widest range of possible mechanisms is available on the market. The loosely bound ejectiles, on the other side, are usually not able to demonstrate all features of the whole spectrum of contributing mechanisms, but they are nevertheless an important link between the nucleon emission and the cluster one.

  14. Strategy