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Sample records for knee replacement predicts

  1. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  2. Patients Unicondylar Knee Replacement vs. Total Knee Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Hedra Eskander

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to analyse the clinical effectiveness of total knee replacement (TKR) compared to unicondylar knee replacement (UKR) on patients. In terms of survival rates, revision rates and postoperative complications. The keywords used were: knee arthroplasty. Nearly three thousand articles were found on 25 August 2016. Of those, only twenty-five were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. Compared with those who have TKR, ...

  3. Interventions for the prediction and management of chronic postsurgical pain after total knee replacement: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Andrew D; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2015-05-12

    Total knee replacement can be a successful operation for pain relief. However, 10-34% of patients experience chronic postsurgical pain. Our aim was to synthesise evidence on the effectiveness of applying predictive models to guide preventive treatment, and for interventions in the management of chronic pain after total knee replacement. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials using appropriate search strategies in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to October 2014. No language restrictions were applied. Adult patients receiving total knee replacement. Predictive models to guide treatment for prevention of chronic pain. Interventions for management of chronic pain. Reporting of specific outcomes was not an eligibility criterion but we sought outcomes relating to pain severity. No studies evaluated the effectiveness of predictive models in guiding treatment and improving outcomes after total knee replacement. One study evaluated an intervention for the management of chronic pain. The trial evaluated the use of a botulinum toxin A injection with antinociceptive and anticholinergic activity in 49 patients with chronic postsurgical pain after knee replacement. A single injection provided meaningful pain relief for about 40 days and the authors acknowledged the need for a large trial with repeated injections. No trials of multidisciplinary interventions or individualised treatments were identified. Our systematic review highlights a lack of evidence about the effectiveness of prediction and management strategies for chronic postsurgical pain after total knee replacement. As a large number of people are affected by chronic pain after total knee replacement, development of an evidence base about care for these patients should be a research priority. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good range of motion in your knee. The ligaments in your knee are stable. However, most people with knee arthritis have a surgery called a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Knee replacement is most often done in people age 60 ...

  5. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  6. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. Medications prescribed by your doctor should help control pain. During the hospital stay, you'll be encouraged to move your ... exercise your new knee. After you leave the hospital, you'll continue physical ... mobility and a better quality of life. And most knee replacements can be ...

  7. TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH BELOW-KNEE AMPUTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Matthew D; Willey, Michael; Shurr, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is reserved for patients with severe and disabling arthritis that is non-responsive to conservative measures. Based on existing data, total knee replacement is a safe and cost-effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving physical function in patients who do not respond to conservative therapy. Despite the large variation in health status of patients and types of prosthesis implanted, total knee replacement has proven to be a relatively low risk and successful operation. Each year in the United States surgeons perform approximately 300,000 TKR.1 Likewise, lower extremity amputation is commonly performed in the United States with an annual incidence of 110,000 per year.2 Nearly 70% of all lower extremity amputations are performed as the result of chronic vascular disease, followed by trauma (22%), congenital etiology and tumor (4% each).3 Approximately 50% of all lower extremity amputations are performed secondary to complications from Diabetes Mellitus. Norvell et al. demonstrated that patients who have previously undergone transtibial amputation and ambulate with a prosthesis are more likely to develop degenerative joint disease in the con-tralateral extremity than the ipsilateral extremity.4 Further, radiographic changes consistent with osteoporosis have been demonstrated in up to 88% of limbs that have undergone transtibial amputation.8 To our knowledge, there have been only three reported cases of total knee replacement in patients with ipsilateral transtibial amputation.5,7 The purpose of the present study is to review the existing data on total knee replacement in patients who have undergone transtibial amputation. Further we present a patient with a transtibial amputation who underwent contralateral total knee replacement. PMID:21045987

  8. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a ... clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down ...

  9. Comparison of radiographic joint space width and magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of knee replacement: A longitudinal case-control study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, Felix; Wirth, Wolfgang; Cotofana, Sebastian [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg Austria and Chondrometrics GmbH, Institute of Anatomy, Ainring (Germany); Boudreau, Robert [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Zhijie; Hannon, Michael J. [University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh VAHS, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Duryea, Jeff [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), LLC, Boston, MA (United States); Roemer, Frank [Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), LLC, Boston, MA (United States); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nevitt, Michael [OAI Coordinating Ctr., UCSF, San Francisco, CA (United States); John, Markus R. [Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland); Ladel, Christoph [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany); Sharma, Leena [Northwestern University, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Hunter, David J. [University Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital and Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Kwoh, C.K. [University of Arizona, Division of Rheumatology and the University of Arizona Arthritis Center, Tucson, AZ (United States); Collaboration: OAI Investigators

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate whether change in fixed-location measures of radiographic joint space width (JSW) and cartilage thickness by MRI predict knee replacement. Knees replaced between 36 and 60 months' follow-up in the Osteoarthritis Initiative were each matched with one control by age, sex and radiographic status. Radiographic JSW was determined from fixed flexion radiographs and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness from 3 T MRI. Changes between the annual visit before replacement (T{sub 0}) and 2 years before T{sub 0} (T{sub -2}) were compared using conditional logistic regression. One hundred and nineteen knees from 102 participants (55.5 % women; age 64.2 ± 8.7 [mean ± SD] years) were studied. Fixed-location JSW change at 22.5 % from medial to lateral differed more between replaced and control knees (case-control [cc] OR = 1.57; 95 % CI: 1.23-2.01) than minimum medial JSW change (ccOR = 1.38; 95 % CI: 1.11-1.71). Medial femorotibial cartilage loss displayed discrimination similar to minimum JSW, and central tibial cartilage loss similar to fixed-location JSW. Location-independent thinning and thickening scores were elevated prior to knee replacement. Discrimination of structural progression between knee pre-placement cases versus controls was stronger for fixed-location than minimum radiographic JSW. MRI displayed similar discrimination to radiography and suggested greater simultaneous cartilage thickening and loss prior to knee replacement. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of radiographic joint space width and magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of knee replacement: A longitudinal case-control study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, Felix; Wirth, Wolfgang; Cotofana, Sebastian; Boudreau, Robert; Wang, Zhijie; Hannon, Michael J.; Duryea, Jeff; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael; John, Markus R.; Ladel, Christoph; Sharma, Leena; Hunter, David J.; Kwoh, C.K.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether change in fixed-location measures of radiographic joint space width (JSW) and cartilage thickness by MRI predict knee replacement. Knees replaced between 36 and 60 months' follow-up in the Osteoarthritis Initiative were each matched with one control by age, sex and radiographic status. Radiographic JSW was determined from fixed flexion radiographs and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness from 3 T MRI. Changes between the annual visit before replacement (T 0 ) and 2 years before T 0 (T -2 ) were compared using conditional logistic regression. One hundred and nineteen knees from 102 participants (55.5 % women; age 64.2 ± 8.7 [mean ± SD] years) were studied. Fixed-location JSW change at 22.5 % from medial to lateral differed more between replaced and control knees (case-control [cc] OR = 1.57; 95 % CI: 1.23-2.01) than minimum medial JSW change (ccOR = 1.38; 95 % CI: 1.11-1.71). Medial femorotibial cartilage loss displayed discrimination similar to minimum JSW, and central tibial cartilage loss similar to fixed-location JSW. Location-independent thinning and thickening scores were elevated prior to knee replacement. Discrimination of structural progression between knee pre-placement cases versus controls was stronger for fixed-location than minimum radiographic JSW. MRI displayed similar discrimination to radiography and suggested greater simultaneous cartilage thickening and loss prior to knee replacement. (orig.)

  11. Hip or knee replacement - in the hospital after

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip replacement surgery - after - self-care; Knee replacement surgery - after - self-care ... taking walks in the hallways with help. After knee replacement, some surgeons recommend using a continuous passive ...

  12. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make everyday tasks easier. Practice using a cane, walker , crutches , or a wheelchair correctly. On the ... ask your doctor Knee joint replacement - discharge Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Surgical ...

  13. Comparison of Radiographic Joint Space Width and Magnetic-Resonance-Imaging for Prediction of Knee Replacement – A Longitudinal Case-Control Study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Boudreau, Robert; Wang, Zhijie; Hannon, Michael J.; Duryea, Jeff; Wirth, Wolfgang; Cotofana, Sebastian; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael; John, Markus R.; Ladel, Christoph; Sharma, Leena; Hunter, David J.; Kwoh, C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether change in fixed location measures of radiographic joint space width (JSW) and in cartilage thickness by MRI predict knee replacement. Methods Knees replaced between 36-60 months follow-up (M) in the Osteoarthritis Initiative were each matched with one control by age, sex, and radiographic status. Radiographic JSW was determined from fixed flexion radiographs, and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness from 3 Tesla MRI. Changes between the annual visit before replacement (T0) and 2 years before T0 (T-2) were compared using conditional logistic regression. Results One hundred and nineteen knees from 102 participants (55.5% women; age 64.2±8.7 [mean±SD]) were studied. Fixed location JSW change at 22.5% from medial to lateral differed more between replaced and control knees (case-control [cc] OR=1.57; 95%CI: 1.23,2.01) than minimum medial JSW change (ccOR=1.38; 95%CI: 1.11,1.71). Medial femorotibial cartilage loss displayed discrimination similar to minimum JSW, and central tibial cartilage loss similar to fixed location JSW. Location-independent thinning and thickening scores were both elevated prior to knee replacement. Conclusions Discrimination of structural progression between knee pre-placement cases versus controls was stronger for fixed-location than for minimum radiographic JSW. MRI displayed similar discrimination to radiography and suggested greater simultaneous cartilage thickening and loss prior to knee replacement. PMID:26376884

  14. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The use of adaptive equipment following total knee replacement

    OpenAIRE

    McNaught, Jamie; Paul, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluates the need for adaptive equipment following total knee replacement. There are no recent studies to guide occupational therapists in the optimum time adaptive equipment is required following total knee replacement.\\ud \\ud Method: A non-experimental, concurrent mixed methods approach was used. The study population was patients attending for total knee replacement at a large general hospital. Outcome measures were the Oxford Knee Score, the United Kingdom Functio...

  16. Difference between right and left side in total knee and unicondylar knee replacement: An interesting observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Thirumal Selvan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an observation made about the differences between right and left side in case of total knee and unicondylar knee replacement. It was found that unicondylar knee replacement was performed more commonly on the left side (66%, as compared to only 34% on right side, where as total knee replacement was more common on the right side (64% as compared to 36% on left side. The exact clinical utility of this difference is yet to be known.

  17. Severe Heterotopic Ossification following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Dodds

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the incidence of minor heterotopic ossification is probably higher than what is usually expected, severe heterotopic ossification (HO is an extremely rare event following total knee replacement surgery. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman who initially had achieved an excellent range of motion following bilateral uncemented rotating platform total knee replacement, before presenting with pain and loss of range of motion at 2 months after surgery. Severe HO was diagnosed on X-rays. Treatment consisted of nonoperative measures only, including physiotherapy with hydrotherapy and anti-inflammatories. She eventually regained her range of motion when seen at 8 months after operation. This case illustrates that nonoperative treatment without the use of radiotherapy or surgery can be used to safely resolve stiffness caused by HO after total knee replacement.

  18. [SECOT consensus on painful knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, J; Macule, F; Bello, S; Chana, F; Forriol, F

    2013-01-01

    The opinions of 21 experts in knee surgery were evaluated in this study, using a DELPHI questionnaire method in two successive rounds, on 64 controversial scenarios that covered both the diagnosis and possible treatment of painful knee replacements. The level of consensus was significantly unanimous in 42 items and of the design in 5, with no agreement in 17 of the questions presented. light of the published scientific evidence, the surgeons who took part showed to have a notable level of information on the most effective diagnostic tests, although, it should be pointed out that there was a lack of confidence in the possibility of ruling out an infection when the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein were within normal values, which have been demonstrated in the literature to have a high negative predictive value As regards the treatments to employ in the different situations, the responses of the expert panel were mainly in agreement with the data in the literature. The conclusions of this consensus may help other surgeons when they are faced with a painful knee prosthesis. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of modular knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, P.; Mammeri, M.; Villers, P.

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-five modular total knee replacements, 54 of them unicompartmental, have been reviewed. The average follow-up was three years. The major indication for operation was pain. A precise preoperative radiographic evaluation and a technique for a positioning the components are described. This had led to a significant improvement in the clinical and radiographic results in 67 out of 95 knees which were operated on. The modifications concern the orientation of the tibial cut, the placing of the femoral components and the correction of axial deviation. The main causes of the 13% of failures in our series were either errors in positioning the components or a preoperative diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Unicompartmental replacement gave similar results in both valgus and varus knees, and the morbidity was lower than in the bicompartmental replacements. The best results were obtained in osteoarthristic knees in elderly patients and in posttraumatic osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  20. Prevalence of Total Hip and Knee Replacement in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Larson, Dirk R; Crowson, Cynthia S; Kremers, Walter K; Washington, Raynard E; Steiner, Claudia A; Jiranek, William A; Berry, Daniel J

    2015-09-02

    Descriptive epidemiology of total joint replacement procedures is limited to annual procedure volumes (incidence). The prevalence of the growing number of individuals living with a total hip or total knee replacement is currently unknown. Our objective was to estimate the prevalence of total hip and total knee replacement in the United States. Prevalence was estimated using the counting method by combining historical incidence data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases from 1969 to 2010 with general population census and mortality counts. We accounted for relative differences in mortality rates between those who have had total hip or knee replacement and the general population. The 2010 prevalence of total hip and total knee replacement in the total U.S. population was 0.83% and 1.52%, respectively. Prevalence was higher among women than among men and increased with age, reaching 5.26% for total hip replacement and 10.38% for total knee replacement at eighty years. These estimates corresponded to 2.5 million individuals (1.4 million women and 1.1 million men) with total hip replacement and 4.7 million individuals (3.0 million women and 1.7 million men) with total knee replacement in 2010. Secular trends indicated a substantial rise in prevalence over time and a shift to younger ages. Around 7 million Americans are living with a hip or knee replacement, and consequently, in most cases, are mobile, despite advanced arthritis. These numbers underscore the substantial public health impact of total hip and knee arthroplasties. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  1. Psychosocial determinants of outcomes in knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Landon, Glenn C; Siff, Sherwin J; Edelstein, David; Pak, Chong; Kallen, Michael A; Stanley, Melinda; Zhang, Hong; Robinson, Kausha C; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2011-10-01

    To identify potential psychosocial and educational barriers to clinical success following knee replacement. The authors evaluated 241 patients undergoing total knee replacement, preoperatively and 6 months after surgery. Outcomes included the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) scale and the Knee Society rating system (KSRS). Independent variables included: the medical outcome study-social support scale; depression, anxiety and stress scale; brief COPE inventory; health locus of control; arthritis self-efficacy scale and the life orientation test-revised. Multiple regression models evaluated associations of baseline demographic and psychosocial variables with outcomes at 6 months, controlling for body mass index, comorbidities and baseline outcome scores. Patients' mean age was 65 ± 9 years; 65% were women. Most patients improved outcomes after surgery. Several psychosocial variables were associated with outcomes. Regression analyses indicated lower education, less tangible support, depression, less problem-solving coping, more dysfunctional coping, lower internal locus of control were associated with worse WOMAC scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables for pain 0.07; for function, 0.14). Older age, lower education, depression and less problem-solving coping were associated with poorer total KSRS scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables to total KSRS model 0.09). Psychosocial variables as a set contributed from 25% to 74% of total explained variance across the models tested. Patients' level of education, tangible support, depression, problem-solving coping, dysfunctional coping and internal locus of control were associated with pain and functional outcomes after knee replacement. The findings suggest that, in addition to medical management, perioperative psychosocial evaluation and intervention are crucial in enhancing knee replacement outcomes.

  2. The cyclops lesion after bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Klaassen, Mark A.; Aikins, Jerry L.

    2017-01-01

    The cyclops lesion is a localized anterior arthrofibrosis most commonly seen following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The lesion forms at the anterior cruciate ligament insertion creating a painful extension block between femoral intercondylar notch and tibial plateau. We present 2 cases (3 knees) in which cyclops lesions appeared atypically following bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement. Two lesions occurred in a single patient following bilateral knee replacement. One les...

  3. Who should have knee joint replacement surgery for osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieppe, Paul; Lim, Keith; Lohmander, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Knee joint replacement is an effective and cost-effective intervention for severe symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, utilisation rates vary hugely, there are no indications, it is difficult to know when (in the course of arthritis) it is best to operate, and some 10-20% of peo......Knee joint replacement is an effective and cost-effective intervention for severe symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, utilisation rates vary hugely, there are no indications, it is difficult to know when (in the course of arthritis) it is best to operate, and some 10...

  4. The cyclops lesion after bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Klaassen, MD, FACS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cyclops lesion is a localized anterior arthrofibrosis most commonly seen following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The lesion forms at the anterior cruciate ligament insertion creating a painful extension block between femoral intercondylar notch and tibial plateau. We present 2 cases (3 knees in which cyclops lesions appeared atypically following bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement. Two lesions occurred in a single patient following bilateral knee replacement. One lesion occurred in an active sportswoman. All 3 resolved following arthroscopic debridement. We describe the presentation of this unusual complication and suggest keys to its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Keywords: Cyclops lesion, Bicruciate-retaining, Total knee arthroplasty, Extension deficit

  5. Embedded piezoelectrics for sensing and energy harvesting in total knee replacement units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brooke E.; Meneghini, Michael; Anton, Steven R.

    2015-04-01

    The knee replacement is the second most common orthopedic surgical intervention in the United States, but currently only 1 in 5 knee replacement patients are satisfied with their level of pain reduction one year after surgery. It is imperative to make the process of knee replacement surgery more objective by developing a data driven approach to ligamentous balance, which increases implant life. In this work, piezoelectric materials are considered for both sensing and energy harvesting applications in total knee replacement implants. This work aims to embed piezoelectric material in the polyethylene bearing of a knee replacement unit to act as self-powered sensors that will aid in the alignment and balance of the knee replacement by providing intraoperative feedback to the surgeon. Postoperatively, the piezoelectric sensors can monitor the structural health of the implant in order to perceive potential problems before they become bothersome to the patient. Specifically, this work will present on the use of finite element modeling coupled with uniaxial compression testing to prove that piezoelectric stacks can be utilized to harvest sufficient energy to power sensors needed for this application.

  6. Role of integrated approach of yoga therapy in a failed post-total knee replacement of bilateral knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ebnezar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OA Knee is the most common arthritis. Knee replacement Surgeries are being done increasingly in the present times. This has led to the violation of the standard indications and when knees are replaced ignoring other co - musculoskeletal conditions it results in the surgery failing early. This is about a patient who encountered a failed TKR due to improper selection as patient had bilateral OA Hip that was ignored in the initial stages. To overcome the problem she was advised bilateral hip replacement which would leave her with four replacements in the lower limb. She refused surgery and was told there are no alternative treatment options. This patient underwent a 3 week integrated course of IAYT at our center and she made a remarkable recovery. IAYT is a good non-surgical treatment that can be affective both before and after knee replacement and it should be considered as the first choice of treatment before surgery.

  7. Apixaban or enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Raskob, Gary E; Gallus, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    thromboprophylaxis with a low risk of bleeding and improved ease of use. METHODS: In a double-blind, double-dummy study, we randomly assigned patients undergoing total knee replacement to receive 2.5 mg of apixaban orally twice daily or 30 mg of enoxaparin subcutaneously every 12 hours. Both medications were started...... (P=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: As compared with enoxaparin for efficacy of thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement, apixaban did not meet the prespecified statistical criteria for noninferiority, but its use was associated with lower rates of clinically relevant bleeding and it had a similar adverse...

  8. Total Knee Replacement in A Resource Constrained Environment: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... care patronage, and the recent trends of religious/faith healings. • Beliefs ... Prevalence and Pattern of Knee Osteoarthritis in a North Eastern. Nigerian Rural ... epidemiology of total knee replacement in South Korea: national.

  9. Autologous blood transfusion in total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanović, Mirka Lukić; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Savić, Dragan; Ilić, Miroslav P; Jovanović, Gordana

    2013-03-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) surgery is one of the most frequent and the most extensive procedures in orthopedic surgery, accompanied with some serious complications. Perioperative blood loss is one of the most serious losses, so it is vital to recognize and treat such losses properly. Autologous blood transfusion is the only true alternative for the allogeneic blood. The aim of this study was to to examine if autologous blood transfusion reduces usage of allogenic blood in total knee replacement surgery, as well as to examine possible effect of autologous blood transfusion on postoperative complications, recovery and hospital stay of patients after total knee replacement surgery. During the controlled, prospective, randomised study we compared two groups of patients (n = 112) with total prosthesis implanted in their knee. The group I consisted of the patients who received the transfusion of other people's (allogeneic) blood (n = 57) and the group II of the patients whose blood was collected postoperatively and then given them [their own (autologous) blood] (n = 55). The transfusion trigger for both groups was hemoglobin level of 85 g/L. In the group of patients whose blood was collected perioperatively only 9 (0.9%) of the patients received transfusion of allogeneic blood, as opposed to the control group in which 98.24% of the patients received the transfusion of allogeneic blood (p blood was collected stayed in hospital for 6.18 days, while the patients of the control group stayed 7.67 days (p blood transfusion is a very effective method for reducing consumption of allogenic blood and thus, indirectly for reducing all complications related to allogenic blood transfusion. There is also a positive influence on postoperative recovery after total knee replacement surgery due to the reduction of hospital stay, and indirectly on the reduction of hospital costs.

  10. The use of synthetic ligaments in the design of an enhanced stability total knee joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Michael D; Greene, Brendan C; Pietrykowski, Luke W; Gambon, Taylor M; Bales, Caroline E; DesJardins, John D

    2018-03-01

    Current total knee replacement designs work to address clinically desired knee stability and range of motion through a balance of retained anatomy and added implant geometry. However, simplified implant geometries such as bearing surfaces, posts, and cams are often used to replace complex ligamentous constraints that are sacrificed during most total knee replacement procedures. This article evaluates a novel total knee replacement design that incorporates synthetic ligaments to enhance the stability of the total knee replacement system. It was hypothesized that by incorporating artificial cruciate ligaments into a total knee replacement design at specific locations and lengths, the stability of the total knee replacement could be significantly altered while maintaining active ranges of motion. The ligament attachment mechanisms used in the design were evaluated using a tensile test, and determined to have a safety factor of three with respect to expected ligamentous loading in vivo. Following initial computational modeling of possible ligament orientations, a physical prototype was constructed to verify the function of the design by performing anterior/posterior drawer tests under physiologic load. Synthetic ligament configurations were found to increase total knee replacement stability up to 94% compared to the no-ligament case, while maintaining total knee replacement flexion range of motion between 0° and 120°, indicating that a total knee replacement that incorporates synthetic ligaments with calibrated location and lengths should be able to significantly enhance and control the kinematic performance of a total knee replacement system.

  11. Total hip and knee joint replacement: perioperative clinical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira Almeida de Piano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the profile of patients undergoing hip and knee replacement during two years, and to compare the data obtained with the literature. Methods: A total of 323 medical records were reviewed to analyze the perioperative data of patients submitted to hip and knee replacement. Results: Osteoarthritis was the main indication for both procedures and male patients were heavier than females (p < 0.05. Hypertension was the prevalent disease among patients. Blood loss was more frequent in knee surgery than in the hip. Conclusions: The profile of patients undergoing total arthroplasty improved substantially over the past decade due to shorter hospital stay, lower risk of thromboembolic events and no infection as compared to previous reports.

  12. Primary Total Knee Replacement: Is Suction a Portal of Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnar, Vijaya M; Amirfeyz, Rouin; Ng, Michael; Bannister, Gordon C; Blom, Ashley W

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pulsed lavage during a total knee replacement usually leaves a pool of fluid on the surgical drapes. It is common practice to suck away this fluid using the same suction device used intra-operatively. This could be a cause of direct wound contamination. We hypothesised that bacteria contaminate fluid that collects around the foot in total knee replacement surgery and that suction equipment could be a portal of contamination. We also hypothesised that bacterial count in the fluid is lower if chlorhexidine, rather than saline, is used in the pulsed lavage. PATIENTS AND METHODS Forty patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were divided into two groups. The first group had pulsed lavage with normal saline and the second with 0.05% chlorhexidine. RESULTS At the end of the operation, 20 ml of fluid, pooled on the surgical drapes was aspirated and cultured for bacterial growth. None of the fluid samples showed bacterial growth. CONCLUSIONS Suction device used peri-operatively during knee replacement is unlikely to be a cause of wound contamination. Pulsed lavage with normal saline is as effective as lavage with chlorhexidine. PMID:19335972

  13. A 5 year prospective study of patient-relevant outcomes after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, A-K; Toksvig-Larsen, S; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    men, mean age 71 (51-86) assigned for TKR at the Department of Orthopaedics at Lund University Hospital were included in the study. The self-administered questionnaires Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and SF-36 were mailed preoperatively and 6 months, 12 months and at 5 years......OBJECTIVE: To prospectively describe self-reported outcomes up to 5 years after total knee replacement (TKR) in Osteoarthritis (OA) and to study which patient-relevant factors may predict outcomes for pain and physical function (PF). METHODS: 102 consecutive patients with knee OA, 63 women and 39...... postoperatively. RESULTS: Response rate at 5 years was 86%. At 6 months significant improvement was seen in all KOOS and SF-36 scores (P

  14. Contact Mechanics and Failure Modes of Compliant Polymeric Bearing Materials for Knee Cartilage Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohfafarosh, Mariya Shabbir

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of disability affecting millions of people worldwide. Total knee replacement is the current state-of-the-art treatment to alleviate pain and improve mobility among patients in the late stage of knee OA. The current gold standard materials for total knee arthroplasty are cobalt-chromium and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). However, wear debris and implant loosening-related revision persists; consequently, total knee replacements are not universally recommended for all patient subgroups with OA. This work explores the potential of using compliant polymeric materials in knee cartilage replacement devices, which are closer in lubrication and mechanical properties of articular cartilage, to prevent excessive removal of underlying bone and prolong the need for a total knee replacement. Two materials investigated in this thesis are polycarbonate urethane, Bionate 80A, and a novel hydrogel, Cyborgel, both of which have shown promising wear and lubrication properties under physiological loads. Polycarbonate urethane has been previously tested for the effects of gamma sterilization and has shown no significant changes in its mechanical strength or chemical bonds. Since an important aspect of medical device development is the sterilization process, this thesis first evaluated the effect of 30-35 kGy electron beam and gamma radiation on the polymer swell ratio, and the mechanical, chemical and tribological behavior of the novel hydrogel. Three different formulations were mechanically tested, and biphasic material properties were identified using finite element analysis. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate chemical changes, while the wear properties were tested for 2 million cycles in bovine serum. The results showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the swell ratio, mechanical and tribological properties of the electron beam and gamma sterilized hydrogel sample as compared to the

  15. Special features of total knee replacement in hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, Emerito Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Total knee replacement is an operation frequently needed by hemophilia patients, which greatly improves their quality of life. This operation, however, carries a higher risk of bleeding and infection for hemophiliacs than it does for osteoarthritis sufferers. It is advisable to implant prosthetic components using antibiotic-loaded cement. It is essential to maintain a level of 100% of the replacement clotting factor for 2 weeks. Hematological treatment must be established, depending on the patient's factor levels and other pharmacokinetic parameters such as recovery and half-life, optimal doses and treatment time. It is preferable to use general anesthesia due to the risk of spinal bleeding. The lifespan of total knee replacement in hemophilic patients is shorter than in patients with osteoarthritis because of the increased risk of infection.

  16. Analysis of in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong

    Despite the high incidence of osteoarthritis in human knee joint, its causes remain unknown. Total knee replacement (TKR) has been shown clinically to be effective in restoring the knee function. However, wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene has limited the longevity of TKRs. To address these important issues, it is necessary to investigate the in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models. A multibody dynamic model of an AMTI knee simulator was developed. Incorporating a wear prediction model into the contact model based on elastic foundation theory enables the contact surface to take into account creep and wear during the dynamic simulation. Comparisons of the predicted damage depth, area, and volume lost with worn retrievals from a physical machine were made to validate the model. In vivo tibial force distributions during dynamic and high flexion activities were investigated using the dynamic contact model. In vivo medial and lateral contact forces experienced by a well-aligned instrumented knee implant, as well as upper and lower bounds on contact pressures for a variety of activities were studied. For all activities, the predicted medial and lateral contact forces were insensitive to the selected material model. For this patient, the load split during the mid-stance phase of gait and during stair is more equal than anticipated. The external knee adduction torque has been proposed as a surrogate measure for medial compartment load during gait. However, a direct link between these two quantities has not been demonstrated using in vivo measurement of medial compartment load. In vivo data collected from a subject with an instrumented knee implant were analyzed to evaluate this link. The subject performed five different overground gait motions (normal, fast, slow, wide, and toe out) while instrumented implant, video motion, and ground reaction data were simultaneously collected. The high correlation coefficient

  17. Pain and senzitisation after total knee replacement or nonsurgical treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study is a secondary analysis of 12-month follow-ups from two parallel, randomised controlled trials (RCT) in painful knee osteoarthritis patients. RCT1: Total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment compared with non-surgical treatment. RCT2: Non...

  18. Total knee replacement and non-surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Roos, Ewa M; Laursen, Mogens B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare 2-year outcomes of total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment to that of non-surgical treatment alone and outcomes of the same non-surgical treatment to that of written advice. DESIGN: In two randomized trials, 200 (mean age 66) adults with moderate...... to severe knee osteoarthritis (OA), 100 eligible for TKR and 100 not eligible for TKR, were randomized to TKR followed by non-surgical treatment, non-surgical treatment alone, or written advice. Non-surgical treatment consisted of 12 weeks of supervised exercise, education, dietary advice, use of insoles......, and pain medication. The primary outcome was the mean score of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales, covering pain, symptoms, activities of daily living (ADL), and quality of life (QOL). RESULTS: Patients randomized to TKR had greater improvements than patients randomized...

  19. Opinions among Danish knee surgeons about indications to perform total knee replacement showed considerable variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Schrøder, Henrik; Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, the incidence of primary total knee replacement (TKA) surgery in Denmark has approximately doubled. This increase could be due to weakened indications to perform TKA surgery. We aimed to investigate variation in opinions about indications to perform TKA among Danish knee...

  20. Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS – validation and comparison to the WOMAC in total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Ewa M

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS is an extension of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthrtis Index (WOMAC, the most commonly used outcome instrument for assessment of patient-relevant treatment effects in osteoarthritis. KOOS was developed for younger and/or more active patients with knee injury and knee osteoarthritis and has in previous studies on these groups been the more responsive instrument compared to the WOMAC. Some patients eligible for total knee replacement have expectations of more demanding physical functions than required for daily living. This encouraged us to study the use of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS to assess the outcome of total knee replacement. Methods We studied the test-retest reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Swedish version LK 1.0 of the KOOS when used to prospectively evaluate the outcome of 105 patients (mean age 71.3, 66 women after total knee replacement. The follow-up rates at 6 and 12 months were 92% and 86%, respectively. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients were over 0.75 for all subscales indicating sufficient test-retest reliability. Bland-Altman plots confirmed this finding. Over 90% of the patients regarded improvement in the subscales Pain, Symptoms, Activities of Daily Living, and knee-related Quality of Life to be extremely or very important when deciding to have their knee operated on indicating good content validity. The correlations found in comparison to the SF-36 indicated the KOOS measured expected constructs. The most responsive subscale was knee-related Quality of Life. The effect sizes of the five KOOS subscales at 12 months ranged from 1.08 to 3.54 and for the WOMAC from 1.65 to 2.56. Conclusion The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS is a valid, reliable, and responsive outcome measure in total joint replacement. In comparison to the WOMAC, the KOOS improved validity

  1. Preoperative Education for Hip and Knee Replacement: Never Stop Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul K; Mears, Simon C; Lowry Barnes, C

    2017-09-01

    Participation in alternative payment models has focused efforts to improve outcomes and patient satisfaction while also lowering cost for elective hip and knee replacement. The purpose of this review is to determine if preoperative education classes for elective hip and knee replacement achieve these goals. Recent literature demonstrates that patients who attend education classes prior to surgery have decreased anxiety, better post-operative pain control, more realistic expectations of surgery, and a better understanding of their surgery. As a result, comprehensive clinical pathways incorporating a preoperative education program for elective hip and knee replacement lead to lower hospital length of stay, higher home discharge, lower readmission, and improved cost. In summary, we report convincing evidence that preoperative education classes are an essential element to successful participation in alternative payment models such as the Bundle Payment Care Initiative.

  2. Gait analysis of patients with an off-the-shelf total knee replacement versus customized bi-compartmental knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Foster, Jonathan; Franksen, Natasha; Estes, Jill; Rolston, Lindsey

    2018-04-01

    Newer TKR designs have been introduced to the market with the aim of overcoming common sizing problems with older TKR designs. Furthermore, since a sizable percentage of patients with OA present with disease limited to the medial/lateral knee compartment in addition to the patellofemoral joint, for whom, a customized bi-compartmental knee replacement (BKR) is available as a treatment option. To date, there is very little information regarding knee strength and mechanics during gait for patients implanted with these modern TKR and BKR designs. The purpose of the study was to evaluate knee strength and mechanics during walking for patients with either a modern off the shelf TKR or a customized BKR and compare these findings to a cohort of healthy controls. Twelve healthy controls, eight BKR, and nine TKR patients participated in the study. Maximal isometric knee strength was evaluated. 3D kinematic and kinetic analyses were conducted for level walking. The TKR knee exhibited less peak extensor torque when compared to, both the BKR and control limbs (p < 0.05). The TKR knee had less extensor moment at stance than both the BKR and control knees (p < 0.05). Both the BKR and control knees displayed larger internal rotation at stance than that of the TKR knee (p < 0.05). This study suggests that, for patients that exhibit isolated OA of the tibiofemoral joint, using a customized BKR implant is a viable treatment option and may contribute to superior mechanical advantages.

  3. Differences in the stress distribution in the distal femur between patellofemoral joint replacement and total knee replacement: a finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Jonbergen Hans-Peter W

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellofemoral joint replacement is a successful treatment option for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. However, results of later conversion to total knee replacement may be compromised by periprosthetic bone loss. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a decrease in distal femoral bone mineral density after patellofemoral joint replacement. It is unclear whether this is due to periprosthetic stress shielding. The main objective of the current study was to evaluate the stress shielding effect of prosthetic replacement with 2 different patellofemoral prosthetic designs and with a total knee prosthesis. Methods We developed a finite element model of an intact patellofemoral joint, and finite element models of patellofemoral joint replacement with a Journey PFJ prosthesis, a Richards II prosthesis, and a Genesis II total knee prosthesis. For each of these 4 finite element models, the average Von Mises stress in 2 clinically relevant regions of interest were evaluated during a simulated squatting movement until 120 degrees of flexion. Results During deep knee flexion, in the anterior region of interest, the average Von Mises stress with the Journey PFJ design was comparable to the physiological knee, while reduced by almost 25% for both the Richards II design and the Genesis II total knee joint replacement design. The average Von Mises stress in the supracondylar region of interest was similar for both patellofemoral prosthetic designs and the physiological model, with slightly lower stress for the Genesis II design. Conclusions Patellofemoral joint replacement results in periprosthetic stress-shielding, although to a smaller degree than in total knee replacement. Specific patellofemoral prosthetic design properties may result in differences in femoral stress shielding.

  4. Differences in the stress distribution in the distal femur between patellofemoral joint replacement and total knee replacement: a finite element study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral joint replacement is a successful treatment option for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. However, results of later conversion to total knee replacement may be compromised by periprosthetic bone loss. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a decrease in distal femoral bone mineral density after patellofemoral joint replacement. It is unclear whether this is due to periprosthetic stress shielding. The main objective of the current study was to evaluate the stress shielding effect of prosthetic replacement with 2 different patellofemoral prosthetic designs and with a total knee prosthesis. Methods We developed a finite element model of an intact patellofemoral joint, and finite element models of patellofemoral joint replacement with a Journey PFJ prosthesis, a Richards II prosthesis, and a Genesis II total knee prosthesis. For each of these 4 finite element models, the average Von Mises stress in 2 clinically relevant regions of interest were evaluated during a simulated squatting movement until 120 degrees of flexion. Results During deep knee flexion, in the anterior region of interest, the average Von Mises stress with the Journey PFJ design was comparable to the physiological knee, while reduced by almost 25% for both the Richards II design and the Genesis II total knee joint replacement design. The average Von Mises stress in the supracondylar region of interest was similar for both patellofemoral prosthetic designs and the physiological model, with slightly lower stress for the Genesis II design. Conclusions Patellofemoral joint replacement results in periprosthetic stress-shielding, although to a smaller degree than in total knee replacement. Specific patellofemoral prosthetic design properties may result in differences in femoral stress shielding. PMID:22704638

  5. Knee injury and obesity in patients undergoing total knee replacement: a retrospective study in 115 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Rofail, S

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and previous knee injury was assessed in a retrospective study of 115 patients under-going total knee replacement due to osteoarthritis. Obesity was considered a contributing factor in the development of osteoarthritis in 37% of the patients, and 33% of the patients had...... had an injury to the knee in question. Unilateral osteoarthritis was significantly more frequent than bilateral osteoarthritis among patients with a history of previous knee injury. The association of previous injury to the knee and unilateral osteoarthritis was stronger in men than women. Aggressive...... treatment of patients with knee injuries seems warranted....

  6. Radiological difficulty in identifying unicompartmental knee replacement dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr Oruaro Adebayo Onibere, MBBS, MRCS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Unicondylar knee replacement is a relatively common elective orthopedic procedure but is not often seen in the Emergency Department setting. Familiarity with normal clinical and radiological appearances is difficult to gain. Dislocation of the mobile bearing component “spacer” is a known complication of unicondylar knee replacements, and these patients will initially present to the accident and Emergency Department. In this setting, an accurate and prompt diagnosis is necessary to appropriately manage the patient's condition. There is normally a radiological challenge in identifying dislocated mobile bearings on plain radiographs. These patients may need to have further imaging, such as a computer tomographic scan to identify the dislocated mobile bearing.

  7. Effect of meniscus replacement fixation technique on restoration of knee contact mechanics and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lima, D D; Chen, P C; Kessler, O; Hoenecke, H R; Colwell, C W

    2011-06-01

    success of meniscal replacement. While contact conditions are mainly sensitive to meniscus horn fixation, the stability of the knee under anteroposterior shear loads appeared to be more sensitive to meniscal rim fixation. This model may also be useful in predicting the effect of biomaterial mechanical properties and meniscal replacement shape on knee contact conditions.

  8. Joint replacement in Zambia: A review of Hip & Knee Replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Data captured by the different variables entered into the Joint Register covering the pre-op, intra-op and post-op period of all total hip and knee replacement surgery done at the ZIOH from 1998 to 2010 was entered into a spreadsheet after verification with individual patient medical records. This was then imported ...

  9. The role of the posterior cruciate ligament in total knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, M. A.; Davis, K. E.; Meding, J. B.; Farris, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retention, PCL recession, and PCL excision during cruciate-retaining total knee replacement. Methods A total of 3018 anatomic graduated component total knee replacements were examined; 1846 of these retained the PCL, 455 PCLs were partially recessed, and in 717 the PCL was completely excised from the back of the tibia. Results Clinical scores between PCL groups favored excision for flexion (p knees, 98.2% for recessed knees, and 96.4% for excised knees (p = 0.0934, Wilcoxon; p = 0.0202, log-rank). Conclusions Despite some trade off in clinical performance, if the PCL is detached at the time of operation, conversion to a posterior-stabilised prosthesis may not be necessarily required as long as stability in the anteroposterior and coronal planes is achieved. PMID:23610673

  10. Catastrophizing and Depressive Symptoms as Prospective Predictors of Outcomes Following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert R Edwards

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several recent reports suggest that pain-related catastrophizing is a risk factor for poor acute pain outcomes following surgical interventions. However, it has been less clear whether levels of catastrophizing influence longer-term postoperative outcomes. Data were analyzed from a relatively small number (n=43 of patients who underwent total knee replacement and were followed for 12 months after their surgery. Previous research has suggested that high levels of both catastrophizing and depression are associated with elevated acute postoperative pain complaints among patients undergoing knee surgery. In this sample, catastrophizing and depression at each of the assessment points were studied as prospective predictors of pain (both global pain ratings and pain at night at the subsequent assessment point over the course of one year. The predictive patterns differed somewhat across measures of pain reporting; depressive symptoms were unique predictors of greater global pain complaints, while catastrophizing was a specific and unique predictor of elevated nighttime pain. While surgical outcomes following total knee replacement are, on average, quite good, a significant minority of patients continue to experience long-term pain. The present findings suggest that high levels of catastrophizing and depression may promote enhanced pain levels, indicating that interventions designed to reduce catastrophizing and depressive symptoms may have the potential to further improve joint replacement outcomes.

  11. Reliability and concurrent validity of the Dutch hip and knee replacement expectations surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Reininga, Inge H. F.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Stevens, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Preoperative expectations of outcome of total hip and knee arthroplasty are important determinants of patients' satisfaction and functional outcome. Aims of the study were (1) to translate the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip Replacement Expectations Survey and Knee Replacement

  12. Dual-joint modeling for estimation of total knee replacement contact forces during locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hast, Michael W; Piazza, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    Model-based estimation of in vivo contact forces arising between components of a total knee replacement is challenging because such forces depend upon accurate modeling of muscles, tendons, ligaments, contact, and multibody dynamics. Here we describe an approach to solving this problem with results that are tested by comparison to knee loads measured in vivo for a single subject and made available through the Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in vivo Tibiofemoral Loads. The approach makes use of a "dual-joint" paradigm in which the knee joint is alternately represented by (1) a ball-joint knee for inverse dynamic computation of required muscle controls and (2) a 12 degree-of-freedom (DOF) knee with elastic foundation contact at the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral articulations for forward dynamic integration. Measured external forces and kinematics were applied as a feedback controller and static optimization attempted to track measured knee flexion angles and electromyographic (EMG) activity. The resulting simulations showed excellent tracking of knee flexion (average RMS error of 2.53 deg) and EMG (muscle activations within ±10% envelopes of normalized measured EMG signals). Simulated tibiofemoral contact forces agreed qualitatively with measured contact forces, but their RMS errors were approximately 25% of the peak measured values. These results demonstrate the potential of a dual-joint modeling approach to predict joint contact forces from kinesiological data measured in the motion laboratory. It is anticipated that errors in the estimation of contact force will be reduced as more accurate subject-specific models of muscles and other soft tissues are developed.

  13. Periprosthetic fracture-dislocation in a loosened total knee replacement treated by knee arthrodesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano Moreno, Francisco Jose

    2004-01-01

    We present a patient who was operated four years before performing a total knee replacement. She fell down resulting a periprosthetic femoral fracture and a prosthetic dislocation. After evaluating different treatments, we decided to do prosthetic removal and a knee arthrodesis using an intramedullar nail. The femoral fracture was fixed with wire cerclages. Knee arthrodesis is a procedure uses as a last option for the treatment of infected or loosed arthroplasties. In our case it was difficult to consider any other reconstructive procedure due to the association of fracture, dislocation and loosening. The evolution has been satisfactory with good functional result and without pain

  14. Predicting knee replacement damage in a simulator machine using a computational model with a consistent wear factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Sawyer, W Gregory; Banks, Scott A; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2008-02-01

    Wear of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene remains a primary factor limiting the longevity of total knee replacements (TKRs). However, wear testing on a simulator machine is time consuming and expensive, making it impractical for iterative design purposes. The objectives of this paper were first, to evaluate whether a computational model using a wear factor consistent with the TKR material pair can predict accurate TKR damage measured in a simulator machine, and second, to investigate how choice of surface evolution method (fixed or variable step) and material model (linear or nonlinear) affect the prediction. An iterative computational damage model was constructed for a commercial knee implant in an AMTI simulator machine. The damage model combined a dynamic contact model with a surface evolution model to predict how wear plus creep progressively alter tibial insert geometry over multiple simulations. The computational framework was validated by predicting wear in a cylinder-on-plate system for which an analytical solution was derived. The implant damage model was evaluated for 5 million cycles of simulated gait using damage measurements made on the same implant in an AMTI machine. Using a pin-on-plate wear factor for the same material pair as the implant, the model predicted tibial insert wear volume to within 2% error and damage depths and areas to within 18% and 10% error, respectively. Choice of material model had little influence, while inclusion of surface evolution affected damage depth and area but not wear volume predictions. Surface evolution method was important only during the initial cycles, where variable step was needed to capture rapid geometry changes due to the creep. Overall, our results indicate that accurate TKR damage predictions can be made with a computational model using a constant wear factor obtained from pin-on-plate tests for the same material pair, and furthermore, that surface evolution method matters only during the initial

  15. Multi-ligament instability after early dislocation of a primary total knee replacement - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisak, Krisztian; Lloyd, John; Fiddian, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve blocks have found increased popularity in providing prolonged post-operative analgesia following total knee replacement surgery. They generally provide effective analgesia with fewer complications than epidurals. This report describes an acute low-energy knee dislocation after a well balanced, fixed bearing, cruciate-retaining primary total knee replacement performed under a spinal anaesthetic with combined complimentary femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. The dislocation was not accompanied by neurovascular compromise. Due to the subsequent instability and injury to both collaterals, the posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner structures, the knee was treated with a rotating-hinge revision total knee replacement. The dislocation occurred whilst the peripheral nerve blocks (PNB) were still working. We review our incidence of PNB related complications and conclude that PNB remain a safe and effective analgesia for total knee replacements. However, we advocate that ward staff and patients should be sufficiently educated to ensure that unaided post-operative mobilisation is prevented until such a time that patients have regained complete voluntary muscle control. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Mini-subvastus approach for total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Andreas; Beier, Alexander; Neumann, Wolfram

    2009-03-01

    Total knee replacement in minimally invasive technique without any trauma to the extensor apparatus and with soft-tissue-referenced bone resections. Only the subvastus approach preserves the integrity of the extensor apparatus and has therefore been modified to become a minimally invasive technique with a shorter skin incision and lateralization instead of eversion of the patella. Soft-tissue balancing is done through this direct anterior approach. Mild to moderate varus osteoarthritis of the knee up to 15 degrees of malalignment, mild and passively correctable valgus osteoarthritis of the knee up to 10 degrees of malalignment. Severe, contract varus osteoarthritis of the knee, severe and moderate, contract valgus osteoarthritis of the knee, severe obesity, exceptionally muscular patients, decreased skin perfusion. Central skin incision from the superior pole of the patella to the tibial tubercle. Exposure of the medial retinaculum and mobilization of the vastus medialis muscle subcutaneously. Incision of the medial retinaculum and blunt separation of the vastus medialis muscle from the intermuscular septum. Lateralization of the patella and flexion of the knee joint. Resection of the tibia perpendicular to the diaphysis. Adjustment of the anteroposterior (AP) resection block at the level of the anterior femoral cortex and of rotation by applying equal tension to the collateral ligaments. Balancing of soft-tissue tension in flexion gap by release, if necessary. After AP resection fixation of distal resection block in planned valgus angle. Balancing of soft-tissue tension in extension gap by release, if necessary. After distal femur resection facet resection, adaptation of posterior femoral condyles, and implantation of prosthesis. Check on stability and range of motion. Wound closure. Full weight bearing from the 1st postoperative day, CPM (continuous passive motion) with up to 90 degrees flexion with peridural anesthesia as tolerated, stair climbing starting on

  17. Total knee replacement in patients with diffuse villonodular synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Flávio Biondi Pinheiro Júnior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper reports a case of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (DPVNS, associated with advanced gonarthrosis, submitted to total knee replacement. The patient had progressive pain and swelling. She had two previous surgeries, firstly arthroscopic , synovectomy and subsequently open synovectomy associated with radiotherapy, with recurrence of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse synovitis, advanced arthrosis, and bone cysts. The patient was submitted to a total knee replacement and synovectomy. There was a good postoperative clinical course, with improvement of pain, function, and joint edema on examination. The patient will be followed regarding the possibility of disease recurrence and implant survival.,

  18. Prediction of medial and lateral contact force of the knee joint during normal and turning gait after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    The computational modeling approach has commonly been used to predict knee joint contact forces, muscle forces, and ligament loads during activities of daily living. Knowledge of these forces has several potential applications, for example, within design of equipment to protect the knee joint from injury and to plan adequate rehabilitation protocols, although clinical applications of computational models are still evolving and one of the limiting factors is model validation. The objective of this study was to extend previous modeling technique and to improve the validity of the model prediction using publicly available data set of the fifth "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In Vivo Knee Loads." A two-stage modeling approach, which combines conventional inverse dynamic analysis (the first stage) with a multi-body subject-specific lower limb model (the second stage), was used to calculate medial and lateral compartment contact forces. The validation was performed by direct comparison of model predictions and experimental measurement of medial and lateral compartment contact forces during normal and turning gait. The model predictions of both medial and lateral contact forces showed strong correlations with experimental measurements in normal gait (r = 0.75 and 0.71) and in turning gait trials (r = 0.86 and 0.72), even though the current technique over-estimated medial compartment contact forces in swing phase. The correlation coefficient, Sprague and Geers metrics, and root mean squared error indicated that the lateral contact forces were predicted better than medial contact forces in comparison with the experimental measurements during both normal and turning gait trials. © IMechE 2016.

  19. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  20. Unilateral vs one stage bilateral total knee replacement in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran E

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A controversy exists regarding simultaneous or staged bilateral total knee replacement. Methods: Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous bilateral and 50 undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty were evaluated prospectively to compare the clinical, radiological results and complication rates. Eighty-four patients belonged to ASA category II or III preoperatively. The study included a high proportion of rheumatoid patients and osteoarthritis patients with severe deformities. Results: Bilateral group had greater blood loss and required more blood transfusion, but there was no difference in requirement of postoperative intensive care and the complication rates. Rheumatoid knees had lower pre and postoperative knee score and functional score as compared to osteoarthritic knees. Morbidity and mortality of one stage bilateral knee replacement was no greater than unilateral operation. Conclusion: Simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in younger patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis is safe and effective

  1. Reliability and concurrent validity of the Dutch hip and knee replacement expectations surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Raay, Jos J A M; Reininga, Inge H F; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Stevens, Martin

    2010-10-19

    Preoperative expectations of outcome of total hip and knee arthroplasty are important determinants of patients' satisfaction and functional outcome. Aims of the study were (1) to translate the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip Replacement Expectations Survey and Knee Replacement Expectations Survey into Dutch and (2) to study test-retest reliability and concurrent validity. Patients scheduled for total hip (N = 112) or knee replacement (N = 101) were sent the Dutch Expectations Surveys twice with a 2 week interval to determine test-retest reliability. To determine concurrent validity, the Expectation WOMAC was sent. The results for the Dutch Hip Replacement Expectations Survey revealed good test-retest reliability (ICC 0.87), no bias and good internal consistency (alpha 0.86) (N = 72). The correlation between the Hip Expectations Score and the Expectation WOMAC score was 0.59 (N = 86). The results for the Dutch Knee Replacement Expectations Survey revealed good test-retest reliability (ICC 0.79), no bias and good internal consistency (alpha 0.91) (N = 46). The correlation with the Expectation WOMAC score was 0.52 (N = 57). Both Dutch Expectations Surveys are reliable instruments to determine patients' expectations before total hip or knee arthroplasty. As for concurrent validity, the correlation between both surveys and the Expectation WOMAC was moderate confirming that the same construct was determined. However, patients scored systematically lower on the Expectation WOMAC compared to the Dutch Expectation Surveys. Research on patients' expectations before total hip and knee replacement has only been performed in a limited amount of countries. With the Dutch Expectations Surveys it is now possible to determine patients' expectations in another culture and healthcare setting.

  2. Continuous quality improvement program for hip and knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Christiansen, Tanya; Smith, Christopher; Squire Howden, Jane; Werle, Jason; Faris, Peter; Frank, Cy

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care and maximizing efficiency are priorities in hip and knee replacement, where surgical demand and costs increase as the population ages. The authors describe the integrated structure and processes from the Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program for Hip and Knee Replacement Surgical Care and summarize lessons learned from implementation. The Triple Aim framework and 6 dimensions of quality care are overarching constructs of the CQI program. A validated, evidence-based clinical pathway that measures quality across the continuum of care was adopted. Working collaboratively, multidisciplinary experts embedded the CQI program into everyday practices in clinics across Alberta. Currently, 83% of surgeons participate in the CQI program, representing 95% of the total volume of hip and knee surgeries. Biannual reports provide feedback to improve care processes, infrastructure planning, and patient outcomes. CQI programs evaluating health care services inform choices to optimize care and improve efficiencies through continuous knowledge translation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Comparing contemporary revision burden among hip and knee joint replacement registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. McGrory, MD, MS

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Revision burden has gradually decreased for hip replacements and has remained relatively constant for knee replacements both for the last 4 years and compared to historic controls. Knee revision burden was lower than hip revision burden for each period examined. Revision burden is one measure that may be helpful in following the effect of changes in surgical technique and implant design over time in registry populations and may be a helpful way to compare overall results between registries.

  4. Total knee replacement influences both knee and hip joint kinematics during stair climbing

    OpenAIRE

    Saari, Tuuli; Tranberg, Roy; Zügner, Roland; Uvehammer, Johan; Kärrholm, Johan

    2004-01-01

    A gait analysis system was used to evaluate the kinematics of the hip and knee during stair ascending and descending after operation with total knee replacement. Patients with 5° varus/valgus alignment or less were selected randomly to receive either a flat or a concave tibial component with retention of the posterior cruciate ligament. Patients who had more than 5° varus/valgus alignment and/or an extension defect of 10° or more were selected randomly to receive the concave or posterior-stab...

  5. Controlling costs without compromising quality: paying hospitals for total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Jones, Barbara L; Meimban, Roger J; Pine, Gregory J

    2010-10-01

    Unit costs of health services are substantially higher in the United States than in any other developed country in the world, without a correspondingly healthier population. An alternative payment structure, especially for high volume, high cost episodes of care (eg, total knee replacement), is needed to reward high quality care and reduce costs. The National Inpatient Sample of administrative claims data was used to measure risk-adjusted mortality, postoperative length-of-stay, costs of routine care, adverse outcome rates, and excess costs of adverse outcomes for total knee replacements performed between 2002 and 2005. Empirically identified inefficient and ineffective hospitals were then removed to create a reference group of high-performance hospitals. Predictive models for outcomes and costs were recalibrated to the reference hospitals and used to compute risk-adjusted outcomes and costs for all hospitals. Per case predicted costs were computed and compared with observed costs. Of the 688 hospitals with acceptable data, 62 failed to meet effectiveness criteria and 210 were identified as inefficient. The remaining 416 high-performance hospitals had 13.4% fewer risk-adjusted adverse outcomes (4.56%-3.95%; P costs ($12,773-$11,512; P costs. A payment system based on the demonstrated performance of effective, efficient hospitals can produce sizable cost savings without jeopardizing quality. In this study, 96% of total excess hospital costs resulted from higher routine costs at inefficient hospitals, whereas only 4% was associated with ineffective care.

  6. Sciatic nerve block causing heel ulcer after total knee replacement in 36 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todkar, Manoj

    2005-12-01

    Femoral and sciatic nerve blocks are often used for postoperative analgesia following total knee replacement surgery. In this report, we focus on cases of heel ulcers which occurred following the implementation of peripheral nerve block in concert with knee replacement surgery. In some instances, heel ulcers have resulted in delayed rehabilitation and prolonged hospital stays in this group of patients, which makes this phenomenon a potential burden on the healthcare system. Pressure points in the foot should be protected after the implementation of nerve blocks to prevent pressure sores. An awareness of this unusual complication related to knee replacement surgery is necessary to prevent its occurrence and avoid delays in patient rehabilitation and recovery.

  7. A comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgaied, A; Fisher, J; Jennings, L M

    2018-02-01

    A more robust pre-clinical wear simulation framework is required in order to simulate wider and higher ranges of activities, observed in different patient populations such as younger more active patients. Such a framework will help to understand and address the reported higher failure rates for younger and more active patients (National_Joint_Registry, 2016). The current study has developed and validated a comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements (TKR). The input mechanical (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) and wear parameters of the moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearing material were independently measured from experimental studies under realistic test conditions, similar to the loading conditions found in the total knee replacements. The wear predictions from the computational wear simulation were validated against the direct experimental wear measurements for size 3 Sigma curved total knee replacements (DePuy, UK) in an independent experimental wear simulation study under three different daily activities; walking, deep squat, and stairs ascending kinematic conditions. The measured compressive mechanical properties of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE material were more than 20% lower than that reported in the literature under tensile test conditions. The pin-on-plate wear coefficient of moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was significantly dependant of the contact stress and the degree of cross-shear at the articulating surfaces. The computational wear predictions for the TKR from the current framework were consistent and in a good agreement with the independent full TKR experimental wear simulation measurements, with 0.94 coefficient of determination of the framework. In addition, the comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework was able to explain the complex experimental wear trends from the three different daily

  8. [Custom-designed 3D tibial augmentation for knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirman, R; Vavrík, P; Horák, Z

    2009-02-01

    Reconstruction with the use of custom-made implants aims at optimal replacement of lost or damaged bone structures and restoration of their funkction. In this study the development and construction of a custom-made implant and the operative technique used for the treatment of an extensive tibial defect are described. The patient was a 65-year-old man treated for over 20 years for psoriatic arthritis and severe instability of the right knee, particularly in the frontal plane, with a worsening varus deformity. The radiogram showed an extensive destruction of the medial tibial condyle that also deeply involved the lateral condyle. The extent of defect made it impossible to use any commercial tibial augmentation. The geometry of the custom-designed implant for the medial tibial condyle was constructed on the basis of a 3D defect model and the shape of the medial tibial condyle of the collateral knee seen on CT scans. After its correct shape was verified on a plastic model, its coordinates were set in the software of a machine tool, and a titanium augmentation otherwise compatible with a standard knee replacement was produced.The use of such a custom implant to complete standard total knee arthroplasty has so far been demanding in terms of organisation and manufacture. Its production in the future could be facilitated by substituting titanium for plastic material such as poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Key words: custom-made implant, tibial augmentation, knee prosthesis.

  9. Position controlled Knee Rehabilitation Orthotic Device for Patients after Total Knee Replacement Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannaphan, Patsiri; Chanthasopeephan, Teeranoot

    2016-11-01

    Knee rehabilitation after total knee replacement arthroplasty is essential for patients during their post-surgery recovery period. This study is about designing one degree of freedom knee rehabilitation equipment to assist patients for their post-surgery exercise. The equipment is designed to be used in sitting position with flexion/extension of knee in sagittal plane. The range of knee joint motion is starting from 0 to 90 degrees angle for knee rehabilitation motion. The feature includes adjustable link for different human proportions and the torque feedback control at knee joint during rehabilitation and the control of flexion/extension speed. The motion of the rehabilitation equipment was set to move at low speed (18 degrees/sec) for knee rehabilitation. The rehabilitation link without additional load took one second to move from vertical hanging up to 90° while the corresponding torque increased from 0 Nm to 2 Nm at 90°. When extra load is added, the link took 1.5 seconds to move to 90° The torque is then increased from 0 Nm to 4 Nm. After a period of time, the speed of the motion can be varied. User can adjust the motion to 40 degrees/sec during recovery activity of the knee and users can increase the level of exercise or motion up to 60 degrees/sec to strengthen the muscles during throughout their rehabilitation program depends on each patient. Torque control is included to prevent injury. Patients can use the equipment for home exercise to help reduce the number of hospital visit while the patients can receive an appropriate therapy for their knee recovery program.

  10. Risk factors for perioperative hyperglycemia in primary hip and knee replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsen, Esa; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Eskelinen, Antti; Kalliovalkama, Jarkko; Moilanen, Teemu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Background and purpose — Perioperative hyperglycemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in several fields of surgery. In this observational study, we identified factors associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia following hip and knee replacement. Patients and methods Patients and methods — We prospectively monitored changes in glucose following primary hip and knee replacements in 191 patients with osteoarthritis. Possible associations of patient characteristics and operation-related factors with hyperglycemia (defined as glucose > 7.8 mmol/L in 2 consecutive measurements) and severe hyperglycemia (glucose > 10 mmol/L) were analyzed using binary logistic regression with adjustment for age, sex, operated joint, and anesthesiological risk score. Results Results — 76 patients (40%) developed hyperglycemia, and 48 of them (25% of the whole cohort) had severe hyperglycemia. Glycemic responses were similar following hip replacement and knee replacement. Previously diagnosed diabetes was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia and severe hyperglycemia, compared to patients with normal glucose metabolism, whereas newly diagnosed diabetes and milder glucose metabolism disorders had no effect. In patients without previously diagnosed diabetes, increased values of preoperative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting glucose on the day of operation were associated with hyperglycemia. Higher anesthesiological risk score—but none of the operation-related factors analyzed—was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia. Interpretation Interpretation — Perioperative hyperglycemia is common in primary hip and knee replacements. Previously diagnosed diabetes is the strongest risk factor for hyperglycemia. In patients with no history of diabetes, preoperative HbA1c and fasting glucose on the day of operation can be used to stratify the risk of hyperglycemia. PMID:25409255

  11. Midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramappa Manjunath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement (TKR is an evolving concept. Successful treatment of instability requires an understanding of the different types of instability. Methods: A literature review was performed to identify information pertinent to midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement, utilising PRISMA guidelines. Databases searched included Embase, Medline, All of the Cochrane Library, PubMed and cross references. Results: Three factors, i.e., elevated joint line, multiradii femoral component and medial collateral ligament (MCL laxity, were identified to influence midflexion instability. Literature suggested mediolateral instability at 30–60° of flexion as diagnostic of midflexion instability. Literature search also revealed paucity in clinical studies analysing midflexion instability. Most of the evidence was obtained from cadaveric studies for elevated joint line and MCL laxity. Clinical studies on multiradii femoral component were limited by their small study size and early followup period. Conclusion: Elevated joint line, multiradii femoral component and MCL laxity have been suggested to cause midflexion laxity in primary TKR. Due to limitations in available evidence, this review was unable to raise the strength of overall evidence. Future well-designed clinical studies are essential to make definitive conclusions. This review serves as a baseline for future researchers and creates awareness for routine assessment of midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement.

  12. Extramedullary versus intramedullary tibial cutting guides in megaprosthetic total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karade Vikas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a standard total knee replacement, tibial component alignment is a key factor for the long term success of the surgery. The purpose of this study is to compare the accuracy of extramedullary and intramedullary tibial cutting guides used in indigenous and imported implants respectively, in positioning of the tibial components in megaprosthetic knee replacements. Methods A comparative study of the accuracy of extramedullary and intramedullary tibial cutting guides was carried out in 92 megaprosthetic knee replacements for distal femoral tumors. For the proximal tibia cut for tibial component placement, an extramedullary guide was used in 65 patients and an intramedullary guide was used in 27 patients. Tibial component alignment angles were measured in postoperative X-rays with the help of CAD software. Results There was more varus placement in coronal plane with extramedullary cutting guide (−1.18 +/− 2.4 degrees than the intramedullary guide (−0.34 +/− 2.31 degrees but this did not reach statistical significance. The goal of 90 +/− 2 degrees alignment of tibial component was achieved in 54% of patients in the extramedullary group versus 67% in the intramedullary group. In terms of sagittal plane alignment, extramedullary guide showed less accurate results (2.09 +/− 2.4 degrees than intramedullary guide (0.50 +/− 3.80 degrees for tibial component alignment, though 78% of patients were aligned within the goal of 0–5 degrees of tibial slope angle in extramedullary group versus 63% in intramedullary group. The mean error in the measurements due to rotation of the knee during taking the X-rays was less than 0.1 degrees and distribution of the X-rays with the rotation of knee was similar in both the groups. Conclusions Overall, in megaprosthetic knee replacement intramedullary guides gave more accurate results in sagittal plane and exhibited similar variability as of extramedullary guides in coronal plane.

  13. Fast-track surgery for bilateral total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, H; Troelsen, A; Otte, K S

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral simultaneous total knee replacement (TKR) has been considered by some to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Our study analysed the outcome of 150 consecutive, but selected, bilateral simultaneous TKRs and compared them with that of 271 unilateral TKRs in a standardised...

  14. Posterior Slope of the Tibia Plateau in Malaysian Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Yoga

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The posterior slope of the tibial plateau is an important feature to preserve during knee replacement. The correct slope aids in the amount of flexion and determines if the knee will be loose on flexion. This is a study on the posterior tibial plateau slope based on preoperative and postoperative radiographs of 100 consecutive patients who had total knee replacements. The average posterior slope of the tibia plateau was 10.1 degrees. There is a tendency for patients with higher pre-operative posterior tibial plateau slope to have higher post-operative posterior tibial plate slope.

  15. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Delp, Scott L.; Banks, Scott A.; Pandy, Marcus G.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  16. Influence of conformity on the wear of total knee replacement: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockett, Claire L; Carbone, Silvia; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2018-02-01

    Wear of total knee replacement continues to be a significant factor influencing the clinical longevity of implants. Historically, failure due to delamination and fatigue directed design towards more conforming inserts to reduce contact stress. As new generations of more oxidatively stable polyethylene have been developed, more flexibility in bearing design has been introduced. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of insert conformity on the wear performance of a fixed bearing total knee replacement through experimental simulation. Two geometries of insert were studied under standard gait conditions. There was a significant reduction in wear with reducing implant conformity. This study has demonstrated that bearing conformity has a significant impact on the wear performance of a fixed bearing total knee replacement, providing opportunities to improve clinical performance through enhanced material and design selection.

  17. Changing trends in total knee replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Goudie, Ewan; Robinson, Cal; Walmsley, Phil; Brenkel, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction:  This study evaluates a possible change in the demographics and surgical practice observed in a large cohort of patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR). Patients and methods:  We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected data on two groups of consecutive patients undergoing primary TKR. Group one consisted of patients who underwent surgery between 1994 and 1998. Group two consisted of patients who had surgery between 2009 and 2012. Results:  The me...

  18. Predictive value of semi-quantitative MRI-based scoring systems for future knee replacement: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Eng, John; Demehri, Shadpour; Zikria, Bashir; Carrino, John A.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, in a confirmatory fashion, whether baseline and change from baseline to 24-month follow-up in cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscal damage are predictors of knee replacement (KR) in subjects with a high risk of osteoarthritis (OA), independent of the level of physical activity, symptom severity and radiographic abnormalities. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative's (OAI) baseline and 24-month follow-up knee MRIs of 115 patients (age range: 45-78 years; 48 % female; BMI: 20.9-48.7) were analyzed. Cartilage, bone marrow and menisci were semi-quantitatively scored according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) and Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) systems in all compartments. Baseline and 24-month interval changes in structural tissue damage assessed by BLOKS and WORMS were used as predictors of KR independent of clinical and radiographic parameters using Cox hazard analysis. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, BMI and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly: PASE), Western Ontario and McMaster Questionnaire (WOMAC) total score and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. BLOKS and WORMS baseline cartilage scores were predictors of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. One score increase in the average baseline BLOKS full-thickness cartilage defect score was associated with a [hazard ratio (95 % CI)] 13.55 (3.61-50.89) times greater risk of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. Net reclassification improvements (NRIs) of the additional evaluation of 24-month follow-up MRI scores and assessment of changes were not significant for prediction of KR (NRI range: - 7.23 - 24.8 %). The BLOKS cartilage score for full-thickness cartilage defects had the highest hazard for KR. Follow-up MRI changes in structural tissue damage, detected by BLOKS and WORMS cartilage, bone marrow or meniscus scores (up to 24 months) had no significant predictive value in addition

  19. Predictive value of semi-quantitative MRI-based scoring systems for future knee replacement: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Eng, John; Demehri, Shadpour [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zikria, Bashir [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate, in a confirmatory fashion, whether baseline and change from baseline to 24-month follow-up in cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscal damage are predictors of knee replacement (KR) in subjects with a high risk of osteoarthritis (OA), independent of the level of physical activity, symptom severity and radiographic abnormalities. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative's (OAI) baseline and 24-month follow-up knee MRIs of 115 patients (age range: 45-78 years; 48 % female; BMI: 20.9-48.7) were analyzed. Cartilage, bone marrow and menisci were semi-quantitatively scored according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) and Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) systems in all compartments. Baseline and 24-month interval changes in structural tissue damage assessed by BLOKS and WORMS were used as predictors of KR independent of clinical and radiographic parameters using Cox hazard analysis. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, BMI and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly: PASE), Western Ontario and McMaster Questionnaire (WOMAC) total score and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. BLOKS and WORMS baseline cartilage scores were predictors of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. One score increase in the average baseline BLOKS full-thickness cartilage defect score was associated with a [hazard ratio (95 % CI)] 13.55 (3.61-50.89) times greater risk of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. Net reclassification improvements (NRIs) of the additional evaluation of 24-month follow-up MRI scores and assessment of changes were not significant for prediction of KR (NRI range: - 7.23 - 24.8 %). The BLOKS cartilage score for full-thickness cartilage defects had the highest hazard for KR. Follow-up MRI changes in structural tissue damage, detected by BLOKS and WORMS cartilage, bone marrow or meniscus scores (up to 24 months) had no significant predictive value in addition

  20. Surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation for quadriceps strengthening pre and post total knee replacement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monaghan, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Total knee replacement has been demonstrated to be one of the most successful procedures in the treatment of osteoarthritis. However quadriceps weakness and reductions in function are commonly reported following surgery. Recently Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) has been used as an adjunct to traditional strengthening programmes. This review considers the effectiveness of NMES as a means of increasing quadriceps strength in patients before and after total knee replacement.

  1. Non-Traumatic Anterior Dislocation of a Total Knee Replacement Associated with Neurovascular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderinto, Joseph; Gross, Allan E; Rittenhouse, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic total knee replacements rarely dislocate. When dislocation does occur, it is usually in a posterior direction in association with a posterior stabilised, cruciate-sacrificing prosthesis. Neurovascular injury is unusual. In this report, we describe a case of anterior dislocation of a cruciate-retaining total knee replacement in a 67-year-old woman. The dislocation occurred in the absence of overt trauma and resulted in severe neurovascular injury. PMID:19686618

  2. The iDuo Bi-compartmental Knee Replacement: Our Early Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jemmett

    2016-12-01

    Our early results suggest that the iDuo knee is a good option for those with isolated bi-compartmental disease and outcome scores are comparable with those reported for the BKA. This bi-compartmental design may bridge the gap between the uni-compartmental and total knee replacement. The choice between monolithic or modular designs remains in debate. We will continue to use this prosthesis for a carefully selected group of patients.

  3. Apixaban or enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Raskob, Gary E; Gallus, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal strategy for thromboprophylaxis after major joint replacement has not been established. Low-molecular-weight heparins such as enoxaparin predominantly target factor Xa but to some extent also inhibit thrombin. Apixaban, a specific factor Xa inhibitor, may provide effective...... (P=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: As compared with enoxaparin for efficacy of thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement, apixaban did not meet the prespecified statistical criteria for noninferiority, but its use was associated with lower rates of clinically relevant bleeding and it had a similar adverse...

  4. Risk factors for urinary retention after hip or knee replacement: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Griesdale, Donald E. G.; Neufeld, Jeremy; Dhillon, Dale; Joo, Jennifer; Sandhu, Supna; Swinton, Frank; Choi, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In 2006, our provincial government initiated a program to reduce wait times for total hip or knee replacements by referring patients to a single tertiary-care centre. This program provided an opportunity to identify risk factors for perioperative complications as part of a continuing quality improvement project. We report the risk of postoperative urinary retention after hip and knee replacements and the risk factors associated with this complication. Methods After local Research...

  5. A randomised, controlled trial of circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement without patellar resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Jonbergen, H P W; Scholtes, V A B; van Kampen, A; Poolman, R W

    2011-08-01

    The efficacy of circumpatellar electrocautery in reducing the incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain is unknown. We conducted a single-centre, outcome-assessor and patient-blinded, parallel-group, randomised, controlled trial to compare circumpatellar electrocautery with no electrocautery in total knee replacement in the absence of patellar resurfacing. Patients requiring knee replacement for primary osteoarthritis were randomly assigned circumpatellar electrocautery (intervention group) or no electrocautery (control group). The primary outcome measure was the incidence of anterior knee pain. A secondary measure was the standardised clinical and patient-reported outcomes determined by the American Knee Society scores and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index. A total of 131 knees received circumpatellar electrocautery and 131 had no electrocautery. The overall incidence of anterior knee pain at follow-up at one year was 26% (20% to 31%), with 19% (12% to 26%) in the intervention group and 32% (24% to 40%) in the control group (p = 0.02). The relative risk reduction from electrocautery was 40% (9% to 61%) and the number needed to treat was 7.7 (4.3 to 41.4). The intervention group had a better mean total WOMAC score at follow-up at one year compared with the control group (16.3 (0 to 77.7) versus 21.6 (0 to 76.7), p = 0.04). The mean post-operative American Knee Society knee scores and function scores were similar in the intervention and control groups (knee score: 92.4 (55 to 100) versus 90.4 (51 to 100), respectively (p = 0.14); function score: 86.5 (15 to 100) versus 84.5 (30 to 100), respectively (p = 0.49)). Our study suggests that in the absence of patellar resurfacing electrocautery around the margin of the patella improves the outcome of total knee replacement.

  6. Increased conformity offers diminishing returns for reducing total knee replacement wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregly, Benjamin J; Marquez-Barrientos, Carlos; Banks, Scott A; DesJardins, John D

    2010-02-01

    Wear remains a significant problem limiting the lifespan of total knee replacements (TKRs). Though increased conformity between TKR components has the potential to decrease wear, the optimal amount and planes of conformity have not been investigated. Furthermore, differing conformities in the medial and lateral compartments may provide designers the opportunity to address both wear and kinematic design goals simultaneously. This study used a computational model of a Stanmore knee simulator machine and a previously validated wear model to investigate this issue for simulated gait. TKR geometries with different amounts and planes of conformity on the medial and lateral sides were created and tested in two phases. The first phase utilized a wide range of sagittal and coronal conformity combinations to blanket a physically realistic design space. The second phase performed a focused investigation of the conformity conditions from the first phase to which predicted wear volume was sensitive. For the first phase, sagittal but not coronal conformity was found to have a significant effect on predicted wear volume. For the second phase, increased sagittal conformity was found to decrease predicted wear volume in a nonlinear fashion, with reductions gradually diminishing as conformity increased. These results suggest that TKR geometric design efforts aimed at minimizing wear should focus on sagittal rather than coronal conformity and that at least moderate sagittal conformity is desirable in both compartments.

  7. The Influence of Component Alignment and Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Contact Forces in Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colin R; Vignos, Michael F; Lenhart, Rachel L; Kaiser, Jarred; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-02-01

    The study objective was to investigate the influence of coronal plane alignment and ligament properties on total knee replacement (TKR) contact loads during walking. We created a subject-specific knee model of an 83-year-old male who had an instrumented TKR. The knee model was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and included deformable contact, ligamentous structures, and six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. A novel numerical optimization technique was used to simultaneously predict muscle forces, secondary knee kinematics, ligament forces, and joint contact pressures from standard gait analysis data collected on the subject. The nominal knee model predictions of medial, lateral, and total contact forces during gait agreed well with TKR measures, with root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.23, 0.22, and 0.33 body weight (BW), respectively. Coronal plane component alignment did not affect total knee contact loads, but did alter the medial-lateral load distribution, with 4 deg varus and 4 deg valgus rotations in component alignment inducing +17% and -23% changes in the first peak medial tibiofemoral contact forces, respectively. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that uncertainties in ligament stiffness and reference strains induce ±0.2 BW uncertainty in tibiofemoral force estimates over the gait cycle. Ligament properties had substantial influence on the TKR load distributions, with the medial collateral ligament and iliotibial band (ITB) properties having the largest effects on medial and lateral compartment loading, respectively. The computational framework provides a viable approach for virtually designing TKR components, considering parametric uncertainty and predicting the effects of joint alignment and soft tissue balancing procedures on TKR function during movement.

  8. The Influence of Component Alignment and Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Contact Forces in Total Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colin R.; Vignos, Michael F.; Lenhart, Rachel L.; Kaiser, Jarred; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the influence of coronal plane alignment and ligament properties on total knee replacement (TKR) contact loads during walking. We created a subject-specific knee model of an 83-year-old male who had an instrumented TKR. The knee model was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and included deformable contact, ligamentous structures, and six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. A novel numerical optimization technique was used to simultaneously predict muscle forces, secondary knee kinematics, ligament forces, and joint contact pressures from standard gait analysis data collected on the subject. The nominal knee model predictions of medial, lateral, and total contact forces during gait agreed well with TKR measures, with root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.23, 0.22, and 0.33 body weight (BW), respectively. Coronal plane component alignment did not affect total knee contact loads, but did alter the medial–lateral load distribution, with 4 deg varus and 4 deg valgus rotations in component alignment inducing +17% and −23% changes in the first peak medial tibiofemoral contact forces, respectively. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that uncertainties in ligament stiffness and reference strains induce ±0.2 BW uncertainty in tibiofemoral force estimates over the gait cycle. Ligament properties had substantial influence on the TKR load distributions, with the medial collateral ligament and iliotibial band (ITB) properties having the largest effects on medial and lateral compartment loading, respectively. The computational framework provides a viable approach for virtually designing TKR components, considering parametric uncertainty and predicting the effects of joint alignment and soft tissue balancing procedures on TKR function during movement. PMID:26769446

  9. Knee Kinematic Improvement After Total Knee Replacement Using a Simplified Quantitative Gait Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sarailoo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to extract suitable spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters to determine how Total Knee Replacement (TKR alters patients’ knee kinematics during gait, using a rapid and simplified quantitative two-dimensional gait analysis procedure. Methods: Two-dimensional kinematic gait pattern of 10 participants were collected before and after the TKR surgery, using a 60 Hz camcorder in sagittal plane. Then, the kinematic parameters were extracted using the gait data. A student t-test was used to compare the group-average of spatiotemporal and peak kinematic characteristics in the sagittal plane. The knee condition was also evaluated using the Oxford Knee Score (OKS Questionnaire to ensure thateach subject was placed in the right group. Results: The results showed a significant improvement in knee flexion during stance and swing phases after TKR surgery. The walking speed was increased as a result of stride length and cadence improvement, but this increment was not statistically significant. Both post-TKR and control groups showed an increment in spatiotemporal and peak kinematic characteristics between comfortable and fast walking speeds. Discussion: The objective kinematic parameters extracted from 2D gait data were able to show significant improvements of the knee joint after TKR surgery. The patients with TKR surgery were also able to improve their knee kinematics during fast walking speed equal to the control group. These results provide a good insight into the capabilities of the presented method to evaluate knee functionality before and after TKR surgery and to define a more effective rehabilitation program.

  10. Do we need a gender-specific total knee replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M G; Husted, H; Bencke, J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a gender-specific high-flexion posterior-stabilised (PS) total knee replacement (TKR) would offer advantages over a high-flex PS TKR regarding range of movement (ROM), 'feel' of the knee, pain and satisfaction, as well as during activity. A total......, satisfaction and daily 'feel' of each knee. Patients underwent gait analysis pre-operatively and at one year, which yielded kinematic, kinetic and temporospatial parameters indicative of knee function during gait. At final follow-up we found no statistically significant differences in ROM (p = 0.......82). The median pain score was 0 (0 to 8) in both groups (p = 0.95). The median satisfaction score was 9 (4 to 10) in the high-flex group and 8 (0 to 10) in the gender-specific group (p = 0.98). The median 'feel' score was 9 (3 to 10) in the high-flex group and 8 (0 to 10) in the gender-specific group (p = 0...

  11. Autograft reconstructions for bone defects in primary total knee replacement in severe varus knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatinder Kharbanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large posteromedial defects encountered in severe varus knees during primary total knee arthroplasty can be treated by cementoplasty, structural bone grafts or metallic wedges. The option is selected depending upon the size of the defect. We studied the outcome of autograft (structural and impaction bone grafting reconstruction of medial tibial bone defects encountered during primary total knee replacement in severe varus knees. Materials and Methods: Out of 675 primary varus knees operated, bone defects in proximal tibia were encountered in 54 knees. Posteromedial defects involving 25-40% of the tibial condyle cut surface and measuring more than 5 mm in depth were grafted using a structural graft obtained from cut distal femur or proximal tibia in 48 knees. For larger, peripheral uncontained vertical defects in six cases, measuring >25 mm in depth and involving >40% cut surface of proximal tibial condyle, impaction bone grafting with a mesh support was used. Results: Bone grafts incorporated in 54 knees in 6 months. There was no graft collapse or stress fractures, loosening or nonunion. The average followup period was 7.8 years (range 5-10 years. We observed an average postoperative increase in the Knee Society Score from 40 to 90 points. There was improvement in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scores in terms of pain, stiffness and physical function during activities of daily living. Conclusion: Bone grafting for defects in primary total knee is justified as it is biological, available then and is cost effective besides preserving bone stock for future revisions. Structural grafts should be used in defects >5 mm deep and involving 25-40% of the cut proximal tibial condyle surface. For larger peripheral vertical defects, impaction bone grafting contained in a mesh should be done.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of total hip and knee replacements for the Australian population with osteoarthritis: discrete-event simulation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Higashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively. However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of enhanced recovery in hip and knee replacement: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jacqueline; Pritchard, Mark G; Cheng, Lok Yin; Janarthanan, Roshni; Leal, José

    2018-03-14

    Hip and knee replacement represents a significant burden to the UK healthcare system. 'Enhanced recovery' pathways have been introduced in the National Health Service (NHS) for patients undergoing hip and knee replacement, with the aim of improving outcomes and timely recovery after surgery. To support policymaking, there is a need to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of enhanced recovery pathways across jurisdictions. Our aim is to systematically summarise the published cost-effectiveness evidence on enhanced recovery in hip and knee replacement, both as a whole and for each of the various components of enhanced recovery pathways. A systematic review will be conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Econlit and the National Health Service Economic Evaluations Database. Separate search strategies were developed for each database including terms relating to hip and knee replacement/arthroplasty, economic evaluations, decision modelling and quality of life measures.We will extract peer-reviewed studies published between 2000 and 2017 reporting economic evaluations of preoperative, perioperative or postoperative enhanced recovery interventions within hip or knee replacement. Economic evaluations alongside cohort studies or based on decision models will be included. Only studies with patients undergoing elective replacement surgery of the hip or knee will be included. Data will be extracted using a predefined pro forma following best practice guidelines for economic evaluation, decision modelling and model validation.Our primary outcome will be the cost-effectiveness of enhanced recovery (entire pathway and individual components) in terms of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year. A narrative synthesis of all studies will be presented, focussing on cost-effectiveness results, study design, quality and validation status. This systematic review is exempted from ethics approval because the work is carried out on published documents. The results of the review will be

  14. Cardiac stroke following total knee replacement in an ochronotic arthropathy: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaptonuria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective metabolism of homogentisic acid (HGA which on accumulation in the connective tissues causes arthritis, darkening of urine and connective tissue pigmentation. Knee is most commonly affected joint whereas pigment deposition is seen in entire body causing cardiovascular, genitourinary, ocular, cutaneous, and musculoskeletal complications. We here report such a case of bilateral ochronotic arthropathy, who was diagnosed to be alkaptonuric only during joint exploration. He sustained a cardiac catastrophic stroke on 3 rd post operative day of the left knee replacement which was done one week after the right knee replacement. With prompt treatment and good hospital care, the patient was revived successfully, without valvulotomy or valvular replacement. The spectrum of clinical manifestations are discussed in the report with emphasis on thorough history and clinical examination of the patient, before taking the patient to the total knee replacement to make accurate diagnosis before hand and be prepared for the complications or catastrophic by a multidisciplinary approach.

  15. The patient's experience of temporary paralysis from spinal anaesthesia, a part of total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Louise; Konradsen, Hanne; Dreyer, Pia Sander

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe the meaning of being temporary paralysed from spinal anaesthesia when undergoing total knee replacement. BACKGROUND: Total knee arthroplasty is a common procedure, and regional anaesthesia is used as a method for anaesthetising the patient...... of the experience of spinal anaesthesia, as a part of having a total knee replacement. METHODS: Twelve patients were interviewed in March 2014 after undergoing an elective total knee arthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia. The interviews were analysed with a Ricoeur-inspired interpretation method. RESULTS: Three...... TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results of this study contribute to insights and deeper knowledge that can enhance staff's ability to provide care for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty in spinal anaesthesia. The results provide perspectives that argue for care in accordance to individual needs....

  16. The Effect on Long-Term Survivorship of Surgeon Preference for Posterior-Stabilized or Minimally Stabilized Total Knee Replacement: An Analysis of 63,416 Prostheses from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertullo, Christopher J; Lewis, Peter L; Lorimer, Michelle; Graves, Stephen E

    2017-07-05

    Controversy still exists as to the optimum management of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in total knee arthroplasty. Surgeons can choose to kinematically substitute the PCL with a posterior-stabilized total knee replacement or alternatively to utilize a cruciate-retaining, also known as minimally stabilized, total knee replacement. Proponents of posterior-stabilized total knee replacement propose that the reported lower survivorship in registries when directly compared with minimally stabilized total knee replacement is due to confounders such as selection bias because of the preferential usage of posterior-stabilized total knee replacement in more complex or severe cases. In this study, we aimed to eliminate these possible confounders by performing an instrumental variable analysis based on surgeon preference to choose either posterior-stabilized or minimally stabilized total knee replacement, rather than the actual prosthesis received. Cumulative percent revision, hazard ratio (HR), and revision diagnosis data were obtained from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry from September 1, 1999, to December 31, 2014, for 2 cohorts of patients, those treated by high-volume surgeons who preferred minimally stabilized replacements and those treated by high-volume surgeons who preferred posterior-stabilized replacements. All patients had a diagnosis of osteoarthritis and underwent fixed-bearing total knee replacement with patellar resurfacing. At 13 years, the cumulative percent revision was 5.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.0% to 6.2%) for the surgeons who preferred the minimally stabilized replacements compared with 6.0% (95% CI, 4.2% to 8.5%) for the surgeons who preferred the posterior-stabilized replacements. The revision risk for the surgeons who preferred posterior-stabilized replacements was significantly higher for all causes (HR = 1.45 [95% CI, 1.30 to 1.63]; p total knee replacement compared with the patients of

  17. Physical health problems experienced in the early postoperative recovery period following total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szötz, Kirsten; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Hørdam, Britta

    2015-01-01

    of exercising in the early recovery period after discharge from hospital following total knee replacement. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a questionnaire. A total of 86 patients were included following first-time elective total knee replacement. Descriptive statistics were used. RESULTS......: The majority of the patients experienced leg oedema (90.7%). Secondary to this were pain (81.4%), sleeping disorders (47.7%) problems with appetite (38.4%) and bowel function (34.9%) were the most frequently identified physical health problems. In total, 69.8% of the patients indicated that they did...... not exercise or only partly exercise as recommended, but without associated experience of pain. CONCLUSION: Patients experienced a wide range of physical health problems following total knee replacement and deviation from recommended self-training was identified. These findings are valuable for health...

  18. Functional assessment of patients after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matla Joanna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the society of the 21st century, osteoarthritis is considered one of the primary causes of the occurrence of pain and disability. Arthroplasty is the treatment of choice for advanced degenerative changes. The aim of the study was to carry out a functional assessment of patients at early stages of rehabilitation after total knee replacement.

  19. [Clinical evaluation of the ceramic femoral component used for reconstruction of total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrík, P; Landor, I; Denk, F

    2008-12-01

    The study evaluates mid-term results of total knee replacement with a zirconia ceramic (ZrO2) femoral component. The evaluated group comprised 20 knees in 19 patients (4 men and 15 women). In one patient the replacement was performed bilaterally. Two patients had in the contralateral knee the same type of prosthesis with a femoral chrome-cobalt component.The mean age at the time of operation was 65.2 years (range, 38-81 years).The primary indication was 14 times osteoarthritis and 5 times rheumatoid arthritis. The average follow-up period was 6.5 years (range, 2.1-8.5 years). Patients included in the study regardless of age, body mass and the basic diagnosis, agreed with the use of the ceramic femoral component. The evaluation covered a range of motion, mechanical axis, joint stability, pain, swelling, ability to walk on level ground and on stairs, subjective satisfaction (EULAR Knee Chart). Radiograph were assessed at one year intervals in two projections to identify the incidence of radiolucency around the implant. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve was used and compared with the survival curve in identical chrome-cobalt implants. At he final follow-up, 14 knees were evaluated, because 3 patients died without any connection with the implant, in one case the tibial component migrated due to necrosis of the tibial condyle in a patient with RA and two implants had to be revised and replaced due to polyethylene wear. No infection or negative tissue reaction was recorded in the evaluated group. The average flexion range was 109 degrees. All knees were stable and without swelling, in two cases there occurred slight femoropatellar pain. Twelve patients were fully satisfied, 2 patients were satisfied with a certain reservation. The differences in the course of the survival curves of chrome-cobalt and ceramic implants were statistically insignificant. Although the use of zirconia ceramics in vitro reduces the amount of polyethylene wear, the clinical outcomes of total knee

  20. Expect the best, prepare for the worst: surgeon and patient expectation of the outcome of primary total hip and knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M.; Khan, A.; Sochart, D. H.; Andrew, G.

    2003-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 100 surgeons and 370 patients awaiting primary total hip or knee replacement was carried out. Oxford hip or knee score questionnaires were sent to the surgeons and patients. They were asked to predict the level of symptoms expected 6 months following surgery. The Oxford scores derive a value of 12-60, with a greater score indicating worsening symptoms. The mean pre-operative score was 45.12 for the hip patients and 42.96 for the knee patients, and the patients expected this to drop to 23.70 and 25.66, respectively, 6 months' postoperatively. This was a significant difference for both groups. The surgeons expected the patients to have a mean postoperative score of 20.91 for the hip group and 22.19 for the knee group. The surgeons' scores were significantly lower than those from the patients. There was a significant difference between the patients' and surgeons' expectations of the results of total knee and hip replacement surgery. The surgeons expected better results than the patients. We believe that this is the first study that directly compares surgeon and patient expectations of lower limb arthroplasty. PMID:12831497

  1. Apixaban versus enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement (ADVANCE-2): a randomised double-blind trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Raskob, Gary E; Gallus, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    efficacy and safety of these drugs after elective total knee replacement. METHODS: In ADVANCE-2, a multicentre, randomised, double-blind phase 3 study, patients undergoing elective unilateral or bilateral total knee replacement were randomly allocated through an interactive central telephone system......BACKGROUND: Low-molecular-weight heparins such as enoxaparin are preferred for prevention of venous thromboembolism after major joint replacement. Apixaban, an orally active factor Xa inhibitor, might be as effective, have lower bleeding risk, and be easier to use than is enoxaparin. We assessed...

  2. Preoperative hypoalgesia after cold pressor test and aerobic exercise is associated with pain relief six months after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Emmeluth, Claus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic pain after total knee replacement (TKR) is not uncommon. Preoperative impaired conditioning pain modulation (CPM) has been used to predict chronic postoperative pain. Interestingly, exercises reduce pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This pilot study...... investigated the association between exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and CPM on post-TKR pain relief. METHODS: Before and six months post-TKR, 14 patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis performed the cold pressor test on the non-affected leg and two exercise conditions (bicycling and isometric knee...... at the affected leg improved post-TKR compared with pre-TKR (PCPM and bicycling EIH assessed by the increase in cPTT correlated with reduction in NRS pain scores post-TKR (PCPM and EIH responses after TKR were significantly correlated with reduction in NRS pain scores...

  3. Analgesic effect of continuous femoral nerve block combined with infiltration anesthesia after total knee replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-Guo Tan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the analgesic effect of continuous femoral nerve block combined with infiltration anesthesia after total knee replacement. Methods: Patients who received unilateral total knee replacement in our hospital from May 2012 to August 2015 were included for study and randomly divided into experimental group who received continuous femoral nerve block combined with infiltration anesthesia and control group who received continuous femoral nerve block, and then the co...

  4. Biomechanical Considerations in the Design of High-Flexion Total Knee Replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kung Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typically, joint arthroplasty is performed to relieve pain and improve functionality in a diseased or damaged joint. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA involves replacing the entire knee joint, both femoral and tibial surfaces, with anatomically shaped artificial components in the hope of regaining normal joint function and permitting a full range of knee flexion. In spite of the design of the prosthesis itself, the degree of flexion attainable following TKA depends on a variety of factors, such as the joint’s preoperative condition/flexion, muscle strength, and surgical technique. High-flexion knee prostheses have been developed to accommodate movements that require greater flexion than typically achievable with conventional TKA; such high flexion is especially prevalent in Asian cultures. Recently, computational techniques have been widely used for evaluating the functionality of knee prostheses and for improving biomechanical performance. To offer a better understanding of the development and evaluation techniques currently available, this paper aims to review some of the latest trends in the simulation of high-flexion knee prostheses.

  5. Late rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament after total knee replacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, R. L.; Goodman, S. B.; Csongradi, J.

    1993-01-01

    To our knowledge there have been no reports of late rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) as a cause of instability in PCL-retaining total knee prostheses. In our experience of 150 total knee replacements using PCL-retaining prosthesis, three cases (2.0%) of late rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament have occurred, each leading to chronic instability, disabling pain, and revision arthroplasty. In each case rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament was confirmed at the time of...

  6. Application of bone scintigrams in total knee replacement (Okayama MK-II type)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, T.; Inoue, S.; Matsui, N.; Moriya, H. (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-02-01

    Eighteen patients with 21 total knee replacements (OKAYAMA MK-II type) were examined by radionuclide imaging in order to assess the prosthetic complaints such as loosening, infection, fracture and lasting pain. The following results and conclusions were obtained. 1) Bone imaging can reveal the condition of the attachment of bone and prosthesis. 2) Diffuse uptake gradually diminished until 18 months after surgery. 3) In front view on bone imaging, tibial uptake corresponded highly with the part of the weight area. 4) In cases of high uptake of posterior femoral component in lateral view, the range of knee flexion was mostly restricted. 5) Long-period persistent local uptake suggested loosening of the prosthesis or fracture of the tibial plateau. 6) Patello-femoral uptake showed no relation to the patellofemoral complaints. Radionuclide bone imaging is considered to represent one of the most valuable diagnostic procedures for assessing the clinical results after total knee replacement.

  7. Application of bone scintigrams in total knee replacement (Okayama MK-II type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Tohru; Inoue, Shunichi; Matsui, Nobuo; Moriya, Hideshige

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen patients with 21 total knee replacements (OKAYAMA MK-II type) were examined by radionuclide imaging in order to assess the prosthetic complaints such as loosening, infection, fracture and lasting pain. The following results and conclusions were obtained. 1) Bone imaging can reveal the condition of the attachment of bone and prosthesis. 2) Diffuse uptake gradually diminished until 18 months after surgery. 3) In front view on bone imaging, tibial uptake corresponded highly with the part of the weight area. 4) In cases of high uptake of posterior femoral component in lateral view, the range of knee flexion was mostly restricted. 5) Long-period persistent local uptake suggested loosening of the prosthesis or fracture of the tibial plateau. 6) Patello-femoral uptake showed no relation to the patellofemoral complaints. Radionuclide bone imaging is considered to represent one of the most valuable diagnostic procedures for assessing the clinical results after total knee replacement. (author)

  8. Total knee replacement in a resource constrained environment: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Total knee replacement surgery is relatively new in Nigeria and available in few centres only. It has been evolving at a slow pace because of the lack of facilities, structures and adequate surgical expertise alongside patient ignorance and poverty. Objective: The aim of this article is to review the cases done in a ...

  9. Apparent Skin Discoloration about the Knee Joint: A Rare Sequela of Metallosis after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narlaka Jayasekera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Metallosis is a phenomenon most commonly associated with hip replacement. However it can occur in any metallic implant subject to wear. Wear creates metal debris, which is deposited in the surrounding soft tissue. This leads to many local adverse reactions including, but not limited to, implant loosening/osteolysis, pain, and effusion. In the deeper joints, for example, the hip, metal deposits are mostly only seen intraoperatively. Case Study. A 74-year-old lady represented to orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Her principle complaint was skin discolouration, associated with pain and swelling over the left knee, on the background of a previous total knee replacement with a metal backed patella resurfacing six years. A plain radiograph revealed loosening of the patellar prosthesis. A diagnosis of metallosis was made; the patient underwent debridement of the stained soft tissue and primary revision of the prosthesis. She remained symptom-free five years after revision. Discussion. Metallosis results in metallic debris which causes tissue staining, often hidden within the soft tissue envelope of the hip, but more apparent in the knee. Metallosis may cause pain, effusion, and systemic symptoms because of raised levels of serum-metal ions. Surgical intervention with revision and debridement can have good functional results.

  10. Differences in the stress distribution in the distal femur between patellofemoral joint replacement and total knee replacement: a finite element study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jonbergen, H.P.; Innocenti, B.; Gervasi, G.L.; Labey, L.; Verdonschot, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral joint replacement is a successful treatment option for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. However, results of later conversion to total knee replacement may be compromised by periprosthetic bone loss. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a decrease in distal

  11. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (pknee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  12. Methods of X-ray examination of condylar knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrik, P.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the methodology of X-ray examination of patients with a condylar knee replacement. Preoperative examination includes standard anterio-posterior and lateral projections, axial projection of the patella in 30 deg flexion of the knee, examination of the mechanical axis of the extremity on a 90 x 30 format and the radioscopic assessment of the centre of the hip joint, essential for the correct centering of the knee implant. Immediately after surgery the position of the implant is checked in two standard projections. Another X-ray check is made after six weeks, before partial loading of the joint is permitted. A complete X-ray examination is made prior to the full loading of the knee joint. The methods are also discussed of the X-ray evaluation of complications such as aseptic loosening of the components, infection, instability, fractures. The general solution od these problems is described. The necessity is underlined of the deliberate and qualified indication of X-ray examinations. The basic prerequisites are listed for reducing the present considerable radiation burden of these patients in the course of the many X-ray examinations. (author). 7 figs., 3 tab., 6 refs

  13. The infection of Mycoplasma hominis after total knee replacement: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jiu Qiu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Mycoplasma hominis infection is a rare postoperative complication after joint replacement. Based on our knowledge, there were only two cases reported by Korea all over the world currently. A case of postoperative Mycoplasma hominis infection after total knee replacement in our hospital was reported in this article. It was confirmed through mass spectrometer and Mycoplasma cultivation and treated by the first stage debridement, polyethylene insert replacement, and then drainage and irrigation combined with sensitive antibiotics after the operation. We observed that the C reactive protein (CRP level correlates with the development of disease, while the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR remains at a high level, indicating the relevance between the Mycoplasma hominis infection caused by knee joint replacement and CRP. This study aims to report the case and review relevant literature.

  14. Waiting for total knee replacement surgery: factors associated with pain, stiffness, function and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionne Clermont E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidences show that education and rehabilitation while waiting for knee replacement have positive effects on the patients' health status. Identification of factors associated with worse pain, function and health-related quality of life (HRQoL while waiting for surgery could help develop pre-surgery rehabilitation interventions that target specifically these factors and prioritize patients that may benefit the most from them. The objectives of this study were to measure pain, stiffness, function and HRQoL in patients at enrolment on waiting lists for knee replacement and to identify demographic, clinical, socioeconomic and psychosocial characteristics associated with these outcomes. Methods This study is part of a broader study measuring the effects of pre-surgery wait in patients scheduled for knee replacement. From 02/2006 to 09/2007, 197 patients newly scheduled for total knee replacement were recruited from the waiting lists of three university hospitals in Quebec City, Canada. Pain, stiffness and function were measured with the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and HRQoL was measured with the SF-36 Health Survey. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to assess the strength of the associations between the independent variables and the WOMAC and SF-36 scores. Results The scores of all eight HRQoL physical and mental domains of the SF-36 were significantly lower than aged matched Canadian normative data (p Conclusion Patients waiting for knee replacement have poor function and HRQoL. Characteristics that were found to be associated with these outcomes could help develop pre-surgery rehabilitation program and prioritize patients that may benefit the most from them. Such programs could include interventions to reduce psychological distress, therapeutic exercises targeting both knees and weight loss management.

  15. Do intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections delay total knee replacement in patients with osteoarthritis - A Cox model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbarre, Angélique; Amor, Bernard; Bardoulat, Isabelle; Tetafort, Aymeric; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to describe patients treated for knee osteoarthritis between 2006 and 2013 in France and to compare the delay from diagnosis to total knee replacement between patients who received intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections and those who did not receive the injections. A second objective was to compare direct medical costs for ambulatory care between treatment groups. Patients were selected from a representative sample of the real world administrative claims database using an algorithm developed by experts from the scientific committee of the study. Data were matched with the medico-administrative database for hospital care. A Cox proportional hazards model was stratified for the treatment group and adjusted for available socio-demographic and medical covariates to compare restricted mean survival times at different time points (1, 3, 5 and 7.5 years) between groups. Costs were expressed in 2013 euros. A total of 14,782 patients were treated for knee osteoarthritis (67% women; mean age = 68 years). Among this population, 1,662 patients had total knee replacement (11.2%). At each time point, restricted mean survival time without total knee replacement was significantly higher (p-valueshyaluronic acid group, from +51 to +217 days at 1 and 7.5 years, respectively. For the year preceding total knee replacement, the means for total direct medical costs were similar between groups, €744 vs €805 for treatment and control groups, respectively, (p-value = 0.104). Intra-articular injections accounted for less than 10% of the total costs. This is the first retrospective longitudinal study involving knee osteoarthritis patients using medico-administrative databases in France. The results support the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid injections in delaying total knee replacement and show that patients treated with hyaluronic acid have similar direct medical costs for ambulatory care compared to patients treated with corticosteroids only.

  16. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rasnick

    Full Text Available Total knee replacement (TKR is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05. No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  17. Circumferential electrocautery of the patella in primary total knee replacement without patellar replacement: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lihong; Ge, Zhaogang; Zhang, Chen; Li, Jia; Yu, Zefeng; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to identify and assess whether circumferential electrocautery is useful for improving outcomes after primary total knee replacement(TKR). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, SpringerLink, Web of Knowledge, OVID CINAHL, OVID EBM and Google Scholar and included articles published through January 2014. A total of 6 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 776 cases included in the analysis, 388 cases involved patellar denervation, and 388 cases were designated as the control group. The meta-analysis revealed no significant difference in the incidence of anterior knee pain (AKP, p = 0.18) or in the visual analogue scale score (VAS, p = 0.23) between the two groups. In addition, AKSS Function Score indicated no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.28). However, the OKS (p = 0.02), patellar score (p = 0.01), AKSS-Knee Score (p = 0.004), range of motion (ROM, p electrocautery. The results indicate that circumferential electrocautery of the patella does not significantly improve AKP compared with non-electrocautery techniques but that circumferential electrocautery significantly improves patients' knee function after surgery. Therefore, we believe that circumferential electrocautery is beneficial to the outcome of primary TKR surgery without patellar replacement.

  18. The Cost of Joint Replacement: Comparing Two Approaches to Evaluating Costs of Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsis, John A; Brehmer, Thomas S; Pellegrini, Vincent D; Drew, Jacob M; Sachs, Barton L

    2018-02-21

    In an era of mandatory bundled payments for total joint replacement, accurate analysis of the cost of procedures is essential for orthopaedic surgeons and their institutions to maintain viable practices. The purpose of this study was to compare traditional accounting and time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) methods for estimating the total costs of total hip and knee arthroplasty care cycles. We calculated the overall costs of elective primary total hip and total knee replacement care cycles at our academic medical center using traditional and TDABC accounting methods. We compared the methods with respect to the overall costs of hip and knee replacement and the costs for each major cost category. The traditional accounting method resulted in higher cost estimates. The total cost per hip replacement was $22,076 (2014 USD) using traditional accounting and was $12,957 using TDABC. The total cost per knee replacement was $29,488 using traditional accounting and was $16,981 using TDABC. With respect to cost categories, estimates using traditional accounting were greater for hip and knee replacement, respectively, by $3,432 and $5,486 for personnel, by $3,398 and $3,664 for space and equipment, and by $2,289 and $3,357 for indirect costs. Implants and consumables were derived from the actual hospital purchase price; accordingly, both methods produced equivalent results. Substantial cost differences exist between accounting methods. The focus of TDABC only on resources used directly by the patient contrasts with the allocation of all operating costs, including all indirect costs and unused capacity, with traditional accounting. We expect that the true costs of hip and knee replacement care cycles are likely somewhere between estimates derived from traditional accounting methods and TDABC. TDABC offers patient-level granular cost information that better serves in the redesign of care pathways and may lead to more strategic resource-allocation decisions to optimize

  19. Radionuclide scanning after total knee replacement: correlation with pain and radiolucent lines. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, B R; Boeckstyns, M; Kjaer, L

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined the relationships among Tc-99m radionuclide bone scan findings, pain, and radiolucent lines in 35 postsurgical knees. Our prospective study included bone scans, as well as radiographic and clinical examination three, seven, and 12 months after knee replacement surgery in 35...... and nonpainful knees, and the degree of isotope uptake did not correlate with the development of radiolucent lines around the prosthetic components....

  20. Quantification of in vivo implant wear in total knee replacement from dynamic single plane radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Matthew G.; Seslija, Petar; Milner, Jaques S.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Yuan, Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2013-05-01

    An in vivo method to measure wear in total knee replacements was developed using dynamic single-plane fluoroscopy. A dynamic, anthropomorphic total knee replacement phantom with interchangeable, custom-fabricated components of known wear volume was created, and dynamic imaging was performed. For each frame of the fluoroscopy data, the relative location of the femoral and tibial components were determined, and the apparent intersection of the femoral component with the tibial insert was used to calculate wear volume, wear depth, and frequency of intersection. No difference was found between the measured and true wear volumes. The precision of the measurements was ±39.7 mm3 for volume and ±0.126 mm for wear depth. The results suggest the system is capable of tracking wear volume changes across multiple time points in patients. As a dynamic technique, this method can provide both kinematic and wear measurements that may be useful for evaluating new implant designs for total knee replacements.

  1. Quantification of in vivo implant wear in total knee replacement from dynamic single plane radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeter, Matthew G; Naudie, Douglas D R; Holdsworth, David W; Seslija, Petar; Milner, Jaques S; Nikolov, Hristo N; Yuan Xunhua

    2013-01-01

    An in vivo method to measure wear in total knee replacements was developed using dynamic single-plane fluoroscopy. A dynamic, anthropomorphic total knee replacement phantom with interchangeable, custom-fabricated components of known wear volume was created, and dynamic imaging was performed. For each frame of the fluoroscopy data, the relative location of the femoral and tibial components were determined, and the apparent intersection of the femoral component with the tibial insert was used to calculate wear volume, wear depth, and frequency of intersection. No difference was found between the measured and true wear volumes. The precision of the measurements was ±39.7 mm 3 for volume and ±0.126 mm for wear depth. The results suggest the system is capable of tracking wear volume changes across multiple time points in patients. As a dynamic technique, this method can provide both kinematic and wear measurements that may be useful for evaluating new implant designs for total knee replacements. (paper)

  2. Patient outcomes using Wii-enhanced rehabilitation after total knee replacement - the TKR-POWER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, J J; Cawthorne, D P; Chen, J S; Scholes, C J; Parker, D A; March, L M

    2015-01-01

    Home-based rehabilitation following total knee replacement surgery can be as effective as clinic-based or in-patient rehabilitation. The use of the Nintendo Wii has been postulated as a novel rehabilitation tool that adds an additional focus on balance and proprioception into the recovery protocol. The aim of the proposed clinical trial is to investigate the effectiveness of this novel rehabilitation tool, used at home for three months after total knee replacement surgery and to assess any lasting improvements in functional outcome at one year. This will be a randomised controlled trial of 128 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement. The participants will be recruited preoperatively from three surgeons at a single centre. There will be no change to the usual care provided until 6 weeks after the operation. Then participants will be randomised to either the Wii-Fit group or usual rehabilitative care group. Outcomes will be assessed preoperatively, a 6-week post surgery baseline and then at 18 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. The primary outcome is the change in self-reported WOMAC total score from week 6 to 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes include objective measures of strength, function and satisfaction scores. The results of this clinical trial will be directly relevant for implementation into clinical practice. If beneficial, this affordable technology could be used by many patients to rehabilitate at home. Not only could it optimize the outcomes from their total knee replacement surgery but decrease the need for clinic-based or outpatient therapy for the majority. (ACTRN12611000291987). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxford Partial Knee Replacement as a Gateway to Outpatient Arthroplasty “Lessons Learned along the Journey”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Berend

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Partial Knee Replacement was approved for implantation in the US in 2004 after the surgeon completed an educational training requirement.  Since then my knee practiced has expanded to over 50% partial knee.  This experience coupled with refinement of surgical techniques, anesthesia protocols, and patient selection has facilitated the transformation to same day discharge for partial knee cases and has quickly transitioned to total hip, total knee, and selected revision surgeries.  Patient selection has also expanded for outpatient joints and is now based on medical screening criteria and insurance access.  Over a two-year period we have performed over 1,000 outpatient arthroplasty procedures with no readmissions for pain control.   Overall readmission rate for all reasons was 2%.  Patient satisfaction scores were 98% Great-Good for 2014-15.  The combination of a partial knee replacement practice and an outpatient joint program brings the best VALUE to the patients, surgeons, and the arthroplasty system and represents the future of arthroplasty care.

  4. Muscle strength, physical performance and physical activity as predictors of future knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Wise, Barton L; Lewis, Cora E

    2016-01-01

    Activity Scale for the Elderly score with incident KR between baseline and the 84-month follow-up. RESULTS: 1,252 (99.6%) participants (1,682 knees) completed the follow-up visits. 331 participants (394 knees) underwent a KR during the 84 months (229 women and 102 men). The crude analysis demonstrated......OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between lower levels of muscle strength, physical performance and physical activity and the risk of knee replacement (KR) in older adults with frequent knee pain. METHOD: Participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) with knee pain on most......% CI) 0.99 (0.99 to 1.00)), but not when adjusting for Kellgren-Lawrence grade (p = 0.97). CONCLUSION: Lower levels of chair stand performance and self-reported physical activity are not associated with an increased risk of KR within 7 years, while the independent effect of knee extensor strength...

  5. Variation in age and physical status prior to total knee and hip replacement surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Dieppe, Paul A; March, Lyn M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether variation exists in the preoperative age, pain, stiffness, and physical function of people undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) at several centers in Australia and Europe. METHODS: Individual Western Ontario and McMaster Univers...

  6. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: Midterm clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shaoqi; Liu, Jiangjun; Yuan, Wanqing; Wang, Yuanhe; Ha, Chengzhi; Liu, Lun; Li, Qicai; Yang, Xu; Sun, Kang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the midterm clinical outcomes of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) for medial knee arthropathy through a minimally invasive approach (MIA). From January 2006 to June 2010, 442 consecutive patients (485 knees) were included in the study. All patients underwent MIA-UKR with the mobile bearing Oxford phrase III prosthesis. The incision was made starting 1 cm medial to the medial pole of the patella and extending distally to the tibial tubercle. Radiographic evaluations include femorotibial angle (FTA) from coronal x-rays and rectified varus deformity angle, while clinical evaluations included Knee Society Score (KSS, clinical score and function score), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Patients followed-up at 1, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery and each year thereafter. Four hundreds and two patients completed the entire follow-up, 40 patients (45 knees) were lost to follow-up. The average follow-up time was 73.0 ± 1.9 months. The mean length of the incisions was 5.0 ± 0.2 cm. The average FTA decreased from 183.6° ± 5.1° preoperatively to 174.3° ± 4.2° postoperatively, and the mean rectified varus deformity angle was 9.3° ± 1.2°. The KSS clinical score improved from 42.4 ± 2.9 to 92.9 ± 3.8, and the function score improved from 53.5 ± 3.8 to 93.5 ± 4.0. The WOMAC score improved from 47.5 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 12.3 ± 1.5 at the last evaluation. The VAS dropped from 7.8 ± 1.9 preoperatively to 1.6 ± 0.2 postoperatively. All clinical evaluations (KSS, WOMAC, VAS) were significantly different (p clinical outcomes of MIA-UKR are satisfactory in a Chinese patient population, which is a good surgical option for patients with medial arthropathy of the knee. However, longer-term follow-up studies should be performed in these patients.

  7. Patient-controlled oral analgesia for postoperative pain management following total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanias, Patti; Gowans, Sue; Tumber, Paul S; Snaith, Kianda; Robinson, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA) used by individuals receiving a total knee replacement could reduce pain, increase patient satisfaction, reduce opioid use and/or reduce opioid side effects when compared with traditional nurse (RN)-administered oral analgesia. Patients who underwent an elective total knee replacement at a quaternary care centre (Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario) were randomly assigned to either PCOA or RN-administered short-acting oral opioids on postoperative day 2. Subjects in the RN group called the RN to receive their prescribed short-acting opioid. Subjects in the PCOA group kept a single dose of their prescribed oral opioid at their bedside and took this dose when they felt they needed it, to a maximum of one dose every 2 h. Study outcomes, collected on postoperative day 2, included pain (measured by the Brief Pain Inventory - Short Form), patient satisfaction (measured by the Pain Outcome Questionnaire Satisfaction subscale - component II), opioid use (oral morphine equivalents), opioid side effects (nausea, pruritus and/or constipation) and knee measures (maximum passive knee flexion and pain at maximum passive knee flexion, performed on the operative knee). Study outcomes were analyzed twice. First, for a subset of 73 subjects who remained in their randomly assigned group (PCOA group, n=36; RN group, n=37), randomized analyses were performed. Second, for the larger sample of 88 subjects who were categorized by their actual method of receiving oral opioids (PCOA group, n=41; RN group, n=47), as-treated analyses were performed. There were no differences in study outcomes between the PCOA and RN groups in either analysis. PCOA was not superior to RN administration on study outcomes. However, PCOA did not increase opioid use or pain. PCOA remains an important element in the patient-centred care facility.

  8. Total knee replacement for tricompartmental arthritis in a patient with a below-knee amputation after a previous closing wedge high tibial osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Fleming, MBBCH, FC orth(SA, MMED

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a 64-year-old man who had undergone a high tibial osteotomy (HTO 17 years ago of his right knee for medial compartment osteoarthritis; 5 days later, he received a below-knee amputation owing to a missed popliteal artery injury at the time of the HTO. We elected to perform a total knee replacement (TKR for progressive arthritis of the ipsilateral knee 17 years after the transtibial amputation. Although there is a plethora of literature regarding TKR in the contralateral knee of amputees, there is a paucity of data of TKR in the ipsilateral knee. Using medical search engines including Google Scholar and PubMed, we were only able to identify 4 case reports of TKR in the ipsilateral knee of below-knee amputees. This is the first description in the English literature that has the following rare pathology list: tricompartmental arthritis with a previous closing wedge HTO with a resultant truncated valgus tibia and short transtibial amputation.

  9. Knee replacement and Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs): patient classification and hospital reimbursement in 11 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siok Swan; Chiarello, Pietro; Quentin, Wilm

    2013-11-01

    Researchers from 11 countries (Austria, England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden) compared how their Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) systems deal with knee replacement cases. The study aims to assist knee surgeons and national authorities to optimize the grouping algorithm of their DRG systems. National or regional databases were used to identify hospital cases treated with a procedure of knee replacement. DRG classification algorithms and indicators of resource consumption were compared for those DRGs that together comprised at least 97 % of cases. Five standardized case scenarios were defined and quasi-prices according to national DRG-based hospital payment systems ascertained. Grouping algorithms for knee replacement vary widely across countries: they classify cases according to different variables (between one and five classification variables) into diverging numbers of DRGs (between one and five DRGs). Even the most expensive DRGs generally have a cost index below 2.00, implying that grouping algorithms do not adequately account for cases that are more than twice as costly as the index DRG. Quasi-prices for the most complex case vary between euro 4,920 in Estonia and euro 14,081 in Spain. Most European DRG systems were observed to insufficiently consider the most important determinants of resource consumption. Several countries' DRG system might be improved through the introduction of classification variables for revision of knee replacement or for the presence of complications or comorbidities. Ultimately, this would contribute to assuring adequate performance comparisons and fair hospital reimbursement on the basis of DRGs.

  10. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Wimmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM and (b that there is a significant difference between the subject’s flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857 walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319 stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences.

  11. Use of Tranexamic acid is a cost effective method in preventing blood loss during and after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Chaudhry Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Purpose Allogenic blood transfusion in elective orthopaedic surgery is best avoided owing to its associated risks. Total knee replacement often requires blood transfusion, more so when bilateral surgery is performed. Many strategies are currently being employed to reduce the amount of peri-operative allogenic transfusions. Anti-fibrinolytic compounds such as aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid have been used systemically in perioperative settings with promising results. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of tranexamic acid in reducing allogenic blood transfusion in total knee replacement surgery. Methodology This was a retrospective cohort study conducted on patients undergoing total knee replacement during the time period November 2005 to November 2008. Study population was 99 patients, of which 70 underwent unilateral and 29 bilateral knee replacement. Forty-seven patients with 62 (49.5% knees (group-I had received tranexamic acid (by surgeon preference while the remaining fifty-two patients with 66 (51.5% knees (group-II had did not received any tranexamic acid either pre- or post-operatively. Results The mean drop in the post-operative haemoglobin concentration in Group-II for unilateral and bilateral cases was 1.79 gm/dl and 2.21 gm/dl, with a mean post-operative drainage of 1828 ml (unilateral and 2695 ml (bilateral. In comparison, the mean drop in the post-op haemoglobin in Group-I was 1.49 gm/dl (unilateral and 1.94 gm/dl (bilateral, with a mean drainage of 826 ml (unilateral and 1288 ml (bilateral (p-value Interpretation Tranexamic acid is effective in reducing post-operative drainage and requirement of blood transfusion after knee replacement.

  12. The dramatic increase in total knee replacement utilization rates in the United States cannot be fully explained by growth in population size and the obesity epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losina, Elena; Thornhill, Thomas S; Rome, Benjamin N; Wright, John; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2012-02-01

    Total knee replacement utilization in the United States more than doubled from 1999 to 2008. Although the reasons for this increase have not been examined rigorously, some have attributed the increase to population growth and the obesity epidemic. Our goal was to investigate whether the rapid increase in total knee replacement use over the past decade can be sufficiently attributed to changes in these two factors. We used data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to estimate changes in total knee replacement utilization rates from 1999 to 2008, stratified by age (eighteen to forty-four years, forty-five to sixty-four years, and sixty-five years or older). We obtained data on obesity prevalence and U.S. population growth from federal sources. We compared the rate of change in total knee replacement utilization with the rates of population growth and change in obesity prevalence from 1999 to 2008. In 2008, 615,050 total knee replacements were performed in the United States adult population, 134% more than in 1999. During the same time period, the overall population size increased by 11%. While the population of forty-five to sixty-four-year-olds grew by 29%, the number of total knee replacements in this age group more than tripled. The number of obese and non-obese individuals in the United States increased by 23% and 4%, respectively. Assuming unchanged indications for total knee replacement among obese and non-obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis over the last decade, these changes fail to account for the 134% growth in total knee replacement use. Population growth and obesity cannot fully explain the rapid expansion of total knee replacements in the last decade, suggesting that other factors must also be involved. The disproportionate increase in total knee replacements among younger patients may be a result of a growing number of knee injuries and expanding indications for the procedure.

  13. OPTIMAL IMPROVEMENT IN FUNCTION AFTER TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT: HOW DEEP DO YOU KNOW YOUR PATIENT’S MIND?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, M F; Vicenti, G; Abate, A; Picca, G; Leoncini, V; Lomuscio, M; Casalino, A; Solarino, G; Moretti, B

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee causes pain and loss of joint mobility, leading to limitations in physical function. When conservative treatment fails total hip and knee replacement is a cost-effective surgical option. Patients have high expectations regarding functional outcome after these procedures. If such expectations are not met, they may still be dissatisfied with the outcome of a technically successful procedure. Recently, numerous studies reported that psychological factors can influence the outcome of total knee replacement (tkr) and total hip artrhoplasty with total hip replacement (thr). We conducted a prospective study on a consecutive sample of 280 patients affected by hip or knee OA who underwent total joint replacement. At patients’ admission, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Knee Society Score (KSS) were used to assess pain and function. Furthermore, SF-36, Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (BRIEF-COPE) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) were administered. Patients had clinical and radio graphical follow up at 1, 3 and 6 months post-operatively. The HHS and KSS values before surgery showed a linear correlation with both SCL-90-R and MMSE. None of the investigated variables influenced post-operative HHS and KSS scores; however, the improvement of functional scores resulted conditioned by SCL-90-R values, VAS score, schooling and MMSE. Psychological factors and mental status in primary total hip and knee replacement can affect outcome and patient satisfaction. Strategies focused on identification and facing of these conditions must be considered to improve outcome of total replacement.

  14. Do intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections delay total knee replacement in patients with osteoarthritis – A Cox model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Bernard; Bardoulat, Isabelle; Tetafort, Aymeric; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Due to the growing worldwide prevalence of knee osteoarthritis, the optimal management of this issue is critical for reducing its burden. Objectives This study aimed to describe patients treated for knee osteoarthritis between 2006 and 2013 in France and to compare the delay from diagnosis to total knee replacement between patients who received intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections and those who did not receive the injections. A second objective was to compare direct medical costs for ambulatory care between treatment groups. Materials and methods Patients were selected from a representative sample of the real world administrative claims database using an algorithm developed by experts from the scientific committee of the study. Data were matched with the medico-administrative database for hospital care. A Cox proportional hazards model was stratified for the treatment group and adjusted for available socio-demographic and medical covariates to compare restricted mean survival times at different time points (1, 3, 5 and 7.5 years) between groups. Costs were expressed in 2013 euros. Results A total of 14,782 patients were treated for knee osteoarthritis (67% women; mean age = 68 years). Among this population, 1,662 patients had total knee replacement (11.2%). At each time point, restricted mean survival time without total knee replacement was significantly higher (p-valueshyaluronic acid group, from +51 to +217 days at 1 and 7.5 years, respectively. For the year preceding total knee replacement, the means for total direct medical costs were similar between groups, €744 vs €805 for treatment and control groups, respectively, (p-value = 0.104). Intra-articular injections accounted for less than 10% of the total costs. Conclusion This is the first retrospective longitudinal study involving knee osteoarthritis patients using medico-administrative databases in France. The results support the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid injections in delaying total knee

  15. Cognitive dysfunction after fast-track hip and knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenk, Lene; Kehlet, Henrik; Bæk Hansen, Torben; Solgaard, Søren; Soballe, Kjeld; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-05-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is reported to occur after major surgery in as many as 20% of patients, elderly patients may especially experience problems in the weeks and months after surgery. Recent studies vary greatly in methods of evaluation and diagnosis of POCD, and the pathogenic mechanisms are still unclear. We evaluated a large uniform cohort of elderly patients in a standardized approach, after major joint replacement surgery (total hip and knee replacement). Patients were in an optimized perioperative approach (fast track) with multimodal opioid-sparing analgesia, early mobilization, and short length of stay (LOS ≤3 days) and discharged to home. In a prospective multicenter study, we included 225 patients aged ≥60 years undergoing well-defined fast-track total hip or total knee replacement. Patients had neuropsychological testing preoperatively and 1 to 2 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. LOS, pain, opioid use, inflammatory response, and sleep quality were recorded. The practice effect of repeated cognitive testing was gauged using data from a healthy community-dwelling control group (n = 161). Median LOS was 2 days (interquartile range 2-3). The incidence of POCD at 1 to 2 weeks was 9.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4%-13.1%) and 8.0% (95% CI, 4.5%-12.0%) at 3 months. There was no statistically significant difference between patients with and without early POCD, regarding pain, opioid use, sleep quality, or C-reactive protein response, although the CIs were wide. Patients with early POCD had a higher Mini Mental State Examination score preoperatively (difference in medians 0.5 [95% CI, -1.0% to 0.0%]; P = 0.034). If there was an association between early POCD and late POCD, the sample size was unfortunately too small to verify this (23.6% of patients with early POCD had late onset vs 6.7% in non-POCD group; risk difference 16.9 (95% CI, -2.1% to 41.1%; P = 0.089). The incidence of POCD early after total hip and knee replacement

  16. Brief Report: Loss of Muscle Strength Prior to Knee Replacement: A Question of Anatomic Cross-Sectional Area or Specific Strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culvenor, Adam G; Hamler, Felix C; Kemnitz, Jana; Wirth, Wolfgang; Eckstein, Felix

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether loss in thigh muscle strength prior to knee replacement is caused by reductions of muscle strength in the anatomic cross-sectional area or by reductions of specific strength. All 100 of the participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative who underwent knee replacement and whose medical records included data on thigh isometric muscle strength and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (58 women, and 42 men, mean ± SD age 65 ± 8 years, mean ± SD body mass index [BMI] 29 ± 5 kg/m 2 ) were matched with a control (no knee replacement) for age, sex, height, BMI, and radiographic severity. Thigh muscle anatomic cross-sectional area was determined by MRI at the research visit before knee replacement (time 0) and 2 years before time 0 (time -2). Specific strength (strength/anatomic cross-sectional area) was calculated, and the measures were compared by conditional logistic regression (i.e., odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation). ORs adjusted for pain (OR adj ) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were also calculated. Knee replacement cases had significantly smaller extensor (but not flexor) anatomic cross-sectional areas than controls at time 0 (women, OR adj 1.89 [95% CI 1.05-3.90]; men, OR adj 2.22 [95% CI 1.04-4.76]), whereas no significant differences were found at time -2. Women who had knee replacement showed lower levels of extensor specific strength than controls at time 0 (OR 1.59 [95% CI 1.02-2.50]), although this difference was not observed in men and did not maintain significance after adjustment for pain (OR adj 1.22 [95% CI 0.71-2.08]). Female cases lost significantly more extensor specific strength between time -2 and time 0 than controls (OR adj 3.76 [95% CI 1.04-13.60]), whereas no significant differences were noted at time -2, or in men. Prior to knee replacement, a significant reduction in knee extensor strength appears to occur in women through 2 mechanisms: one driven by pain (loss of specific strength) and one independent of pain

  17. Increase in vastus medialis cross-sectional area is associated with reduced pain, cartilage loss, and joint replacement risk in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wluka, Anita E; Berry, Patricia A; Siew, Terence; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Urquhart, Donna M; Lloyd, David G; Jones, Graeme; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2012-12-01

    Although there is evidence for a beneficial effect of increased quadriceps strength on knee symptoms, the effect on knee structure is unclear. We undertook this study to examine the relationship between change in vastus medialis cross-sectional area (CSA) and knee pain, tibial cartilage volume, and risk of knee replacement in subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred seventeen subjects with symptomatic knee OA underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the knee at baseline and at 2 and 4.5 years. Vastus medialis CSA was measured at baseline and at 2 years. Tibial cartilage volume was measured at baseline and at 2 and 4.5 years. Knee pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index at baseline and at 2 years. The frequency of knee joint replacement over 4 years was determined. Regression coefficients (B) and odds ratios were determined along with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). After adjusting for confounders, baseline vastus medialis CSA was inversely associated with current knee pain (r = -0.16, P = 0.04) and with medial tibial cartilage volume loss from baseline to 2 years (B coefficient -10.9 [95% CI -19.5, -2.3]), but not with baseline tibial cartilage volume. In addition, an increase in vastus medialis CSA from baseline to 2 years was associated with reduced knee pain over the same time period (r = 0.24, P = 0.007), reduced medial tibial cartilage loss from 2 to 4.5 years (B coefficient -16.8 [95% CI -28.9, -4.6]), and reduced risk of knee replacement over 4 years (odds ratio 0.61 [95% CI 0.40, 0.94]). In a population of patients with symptomatic knee OA, increased vastus medialis size was associated with reduced knee pain and beneficial structural changes at the knee, suggesting that management of knee pain and optimizing vastus medialis size are important in reducing OA progression and subsequent knee replacement. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. A systematic review of endoprosthetic replacement for non-tumour indications around the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korim, Muhammad T; Esler, Colin N A; Reddy, Venuthurla R M; Ashford, Robert U

    2013-12-01

    Endoprosthetic replacement (EPR) for limb salvage is an established treatment modality for orthopaedic malignancies around the knee. Increasingly, they are being used for non-tumour indications such as fractures, bone loss associated with aseptic loosening, septic loosening and ligament insufficiencies. We reviewed the evolution and biomechanics of knee EPRs. MEDLINE was searched using the PubMed interface to identify relevant studies pertaining to the use of knee EPRs in non-tumour conditions. Failures, mortality and knee scores were the main outcome measures. Subgroup analysis in the non-tumour conditions was also performed. There were nine studies with an average follow-up of 3.3years (Range 1-5years) describing 241 EPRs used in non-tumour conditions. Re-operation for any reason occurred in 17% (41/241) of cases. The most common complication was infection (15%) followed by aseptic loosening (5%) and periprosthetic fractures (5%). The mortality rate averaged 22%. Infected knee arthroplasties were less likely to have a successful outcome when salvaged with an EPR with failure rates up to 33%. Endoprosthetic replacement is a limb salvage option when other surgical options are unfeasible, especially in low demand elderly patients with limited life expectancy. They have low rates of failure in the medium term. Level 1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of pre-operative neuromuscular training on functional outcome after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Erika O; de Bie, Rob A; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Total Knee Replacement (TKR) is the standard treatment for patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). Significant improvement in pain and function are seen after TKR and approximately 80% of patients are very satisfied with the outcome. Functional status prior to TKR is a major predictor...... of outcome after the intervention. Thus, improving functional status prior to surgery through exercise may improve after surgery outcome. However, results from several previous trials testing the concept have been inconclusive after surgery....

  20. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: Midterm clinical outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoqi Tian

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the midterm clinical outcomes of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR for medial knee arthropathy through a minimally invasive approach (MIA.From January 2006 to June 2010, 442 consecutive patients (485 knees were included in the study. All patients underwent MIA-UKR with the mobile bearing Oxford phrase III prosthesis. The incision was made starting 1 cm medial to the medial pole of the patella and extending distally to the tibial tubercle. Radiographic evaluations include femorotibial angle (FTA from coronal x-rays and rectified varus deformity angle, while clinical evaluations included Knee Society Score (KSS, clinical score and function score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC osteoarthritis index and visual analog scale (VAS for pain. Patients followed-up at 1, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery and each year thereafter.Four hundreds and two patients completed the entire follow-up, 40 patients (45 knees were lost to follow-up. The average follow-up time was 73.0 ± 1.9 months. The mean length of the incisions was 5.0 ± 0.2 cm. The average FTA decreased from 183.6° ± 5.1° preoperatively to 174.3° ± 4.2° postoperatively, and the mean rectified varus deformity angle was 9.3° ± 1.2°. The KSS clinical score improved from 42.4 ± 2.9 to 92.9 ± 3.8, and the function score improved from 53.5 ± 3.8 to 93.5 ± 4.0. The WOMAC score improved from 47.5 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 12.3 ± 1.5 at the last evaluation. The VAS dropped from 7.8 ± 1.9 preoperatively to 1.6 ± 0.2 postoperatively. All clinical evaluations (KSS, WOMAC, VAS were significantly different (p < 0.05 from pre and post-operative evaluations. The survival rate was 99.1% at 73 months, and the revision rate was 0.9%.The midterm clinical outcomes of MIA-UKR are satisfactory in a Chinese patient population, which is a good surgical option for patients with medial arthropathy of the knee. However, longer

  1. Effects of aquatic resistance training on mobility limitation and lower-limb impairments after knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Anu; Pöyhönen, Tapani; Sipilä, Sarianna; Heinonen, Ari

    2010-06-01

    To study the effects of aquatic resistance training on mobility, muscle power, and cross-sectional area. Randomized controlled trial. Research laboratory and hospital rehabilitation pool. Population-based sample (N=50) of eligible women and men 55 to 75 years old 4 to 18 months after unilateral knee replacement with no contraindications who were willing to participate in the trial. Twelve-week progressive aquatic resistance training (n=26) or no intervention (n=24). Mobility limitation assessed by walking speed and stair ascending time, and self-reported physical functional difficulty, pain, and stiffness assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Knee extensor power and knee flexor power assessed isokinetically, and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by computed tomography. Compared with the change in the control group, habitual walking speed increased by 9% (P=.005) and stair ascending time decreased by 15% (P=.006) in the aquatic training group. There was no significant difference between the groups in the WOMAC scores. The training increased knee extensor power by 32% (Plower limb muscle power and muscle CSA. Resistance training in water is a feasible mode of rehabilitation that has wide-ranging positive effects on patients after knee replacement surgery. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rates of hip and knee joint replacement amongst different ethnic groups in England: an analysis of National Joint Registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M C; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Dieppe, P; Beswick, A D; Adebajo, A O; Wilkinson, J M; Blom, A W

    2017-04-01

    Despite a health care system that is free at the point of delivery, ethnic minorities may not always get care equitable to that of White patients in England. We examined whether ethnic differences exist in joint replacement rates and surgical practice in England. 373,613 hip and 428,936 knee National Joint Registry (NJR) primary replacement patients had coded ethnicity in Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). Age and gender adjusted observed/expected ratios of hip and knee replacements amongst ethnic groups were compared using indirect standardisation. Associations between ethnic group and type of procedure were explored and effects of demographic, clinical and hospital-related factors examined using multivariable logistic regression. Adjusted standardised observed/expected ratios were substantially lower in Blacks and Asians than Whites for hip replacement (Blacks 0.33 [95% CI, 0.31-0.35], Asians 0.20 [CI, 0.19-0.21]) and knee replacement (Blacks 0.64 [CI, 0.61-0.67], Asians 0.86 % [CI, 0.84-0.88]). Blacks were more likely to receive uncemented hip replacements (Blacks 52%, Whites 37%, Asians 44%; P replacements than Whites (men 10% vs 15%, P = 0.001; women 6% vs 14%, P replacement (OR 1.43 [CI, 1.11-1.84]). In England, hip and knee replacement rates and prosthesis type given differ amongst ethnic groups. Whether these reflect differences in clinical need or differential access to treatment requires urgent investigation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Radiography, radionuclide imaging, and asthrography in the evaluation of total hip and knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelman, M.I.; Coleman, R.E.; Stevens, P.M.; Davey, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with 21 total joint replacements including 17 hips and 4 knees were studied by plain film radiography, radionuclide imaging, and subtraction arthrography to evaluate these procedures for assessing prosthetic complications. Surgery was performed in 14 patients and confirmed loosening of 8 femoral and 7 acetabular hip prosthesis components and 1 femoral and 4 tibial knee prosthesis components. Plain films suggested loosening of only 9 hip components and no knee components. In contrast, radionuclide imaging and subtraction arthrography were considerably more effective in demonstrating loosening as well as other causes of the painful total joint prosthesis

  4. Patient-Controlled Oral Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management Following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Kastanias

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate whether patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA used by individuals receiving a total knee replacement could reduce pain, increase patient satisfaction, reduce opioid use and/or reduce opioid side effects when compared with traditional nurse (RN-administered oral analgesia.

  5. The Influence of Component Alignment and Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Contact Forces in Total Knee Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Colin R.; Vignos, Michael F.; Lenhart, Rachel L.; Kaiser, Jarred; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the influence of coronal plane alignment and ligament properties on total knee replacement (TKR) contact loads during walking. We created a subject-specific knee model of an 83-year-old male who had an instrumented TKR. The knee model was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and included deformable contact, ligamentous structures, and six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. A novel numerical optimization ...

  6. Monitoring of glycolytic activity secondary to ischaemia in knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Muñoz, V J; Lisón-Almagro, A J; Hernández-García, C H; López-López, M

    2018-04-17

    To non-invasively assess tissue lesion secondary to ischaemia applied during knee replacement surgery. Secondary objectives: to assess whether this lesion correlates with the duration of ischaemia and whether instrumental and gender variables influence it. Prospective cohort study. Pre and postoperative serum lactate levels have been determined as an indicator of glycolytic activity secondary to ischaemia in 88 patients. Serum lactate determination was performed by reactive strips of enzymatic-amperometric detection on capillary blood. Preoperative serum lactate levels (mean and SD): 2.467±1.036 mmol/L. Postoperative serum lactate levels: 3.938±2.018 mmol/L. Ischaemia time 102.98±18.25minutes. Postoperative serum lactate levels were significantly higher than preoperative lactate levels. There are no statistical differences according to the time that the ischaemia was prolonged, gender or type of instrumentation used. In our study, postoperative serum lactate values were significantly higher than preoperative lactate values, with no correlation to the duration of ischaemia during knee replacement surgery. Copyright © 2018 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Incidence, risk factors and the healthcare cost of falls postdischarge after elective total hip and total knee replacement surgery: protocol for a prospective observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Ross-Adjie, Gail; McPhail, Steven M; Monterosso, Leanne; Bulsara, Max; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Powell, Sarah-Jayne; Hardisty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of major joint replacement procedures continues to increase in Australia. The primary aim of this study is to determine the incidence of falls in the first 12 months after discharge from hospital in a cohort of older patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee replacement. Methods and analyses A prospective longitudinal observational cohort study starting in July 2015, enrolling patients aged ≥60 years who are admitted for elective major joint replacement (n=267 total hip replacement, n=267 total knee replacement) and are to be discharged to the community. Participants are followed up for 12 months after hospital discharge. The primary outcome measure is the rate of falls per thousand patient-days. Falls data will be collected by 2 methods: issuing a falls diary to each participant and telephoning participants monthly after discharge. Secondary outcomes include the rate of injurious falls and health-related quality of life. Patient-rated outcomes will be measured using the Oxford Hip or Oxford Knee score. Generalised linear mixed modelling will be used to examine the falls outcomes in the 12 months after discharge and to examine patient and clinical characteristics predictive of falls. An economic evaluation will be conducted to describe the nature of healthcare costs in the first 12 months after elective joint replacement and estimate costs directly attributable to fall events. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through local site networks and will inform future services to support older people undergoing hip or knee joint replacement and also through peer-reviewed publications and medical conferences. This study has been approved by The University of Notre Dame Australia and local hospital human research ethics committees. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000653561; Pre-results. PMID:27412102

  8. A longitudinal study of quality of life and functional status in total hip and total knee replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuk, Lynda L; McMillan, Diana E; Bohm, Eric R

    2015-05-01

    Primary total hip and primary total knee surgeries are commonly performed to improve patients' quality of life and functional status. This longitudinal retrospective study (N = 851) examined self-reported quality of life and functional status over the preoperative and postoperative periods: 12 months prior to surgery, one month prior to surgery and 12 months following surgery. A linear mixed effects model was used to analyze the changes in quality of life and functional status over the sampling period. Patients in the convenience sample reported improvements in quality of life and functional status utilizing the SF-12 and Oxford Hip and Oxford Knee, although differences were noted by procedure and gender. Total hip patients tended to demonstrate greater improvement than total knee patients and males reported higher levels of physical and mental quality of life as well as functional status when compared to females. Of particular note was that mental health scores were consistently lower in both total hip and total knee replacement patients across the perioperative period and up to one year postoperative. This study identifies an opportunity for health care providers to proactively address the mental health of total hip and total knee replacement patients throughout their joint replacement trajectory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rehabilitation after total joint replacement: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Snell, Deborah; Hipango, Julia; Sinnott, K Anne; Dunn, Jennifer A; Rothwell, Alastair; Hsieh, C Jean; DeJong, Gerben; Hooper, Gary

    2018-07-01

    The evidence supporting rehabilitation after joint replacement, while vast, is of variable quality making it difficult for clinicians to apply the best evidence to their practice. We aimed to map key issues for rehabilitation following joint replacement, highlighting potential avenues for new research. We conducted a scoping study including research published between January 2013 and December 2016, evaluating effectiveness of rehabilitation following hip and knee total joint replacement. We reviewed this work in the context of outcomes described from previously published research. Thirty individual studies and seven systematic reviews were included, with most research examining the effectiveness of physiotherapy-based exercise rehabilitation after total knee replacement using randomized control trial methods. Rehabilitation after hip and knee replacement whether carried out at the clinic or monitored at home, appears beneficial but type, intensity and duration of interventions were not consistently associated with outcomes. The burden of comorbidities rather than specific rehabilitation approach may better predict rehabilitation outcome. Monitoring of recovery and therapeutic attention appear important but little is known about optimal levels and methods required to maximize outcomes. More work exploring the role of comorbidities and key components of therapeutic attention and the therapy relationship, using a wider range of study methods may help to advance the field. Implications for Rehabilitation Physiotherapy-based exercise rehabilitation after total hip replacement and total knee replacement, whether carried out at the clinic or monitored at home, appears beneficial. Type, intensity, and duration of interventions do not appear consistently associated with outcomes. Monitoring a patient's recovery appears to be an important component. The available research provides limited guidance regarding optimal levels of monitoring needed to achieve gains following hip

  10. Lactobacillus as a rare cause of an infected total knee replacement: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We report a rare case of an infected revision total knee replacement as a result of a Lactobacillus species infection. Lactobacillus infections have been associated with prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic use. This can have implications in revision surgery, especially when patients have been on previous long-term suppressive antibiotic therapy. Case presentation An 81-year-old British man with a previous history of complex revision knee arthroplasty for infection presented with a hot, swollen knee joint. He had previously been on long-term suppressive antibiotic therapy. Aspiration of the knee joint yielded a culture of Lactobacillus species. Conclusion In patients undergoing revision joint arthroplasty, especially for previous infection, the presence of common and uncommon bacterial species must be excluded and eradicated before further surgical intervention. PMID:19830207

  11. Flowtron foot-pumps for prevention of venous thromboembolism in total hip and knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitto, Rocco P; Koh, Chuan K

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical prophylaxis with foot-pumps provides an interesting alternative to chemical agents in the prevention of venous thomboembolism following major orthopaedic surgery procedures. The aim of this prospective study was to assess efficacy and safety of the Flowtron(®) foot-pumps system following total hip and knee replacement. The foot pumps were used as main tool for prevention of thromboembolic events, in most cases in association with a variety of chemicals. The primary endpoint of the study was to assess the incidence of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after total hip and knee replacement. The secondary endpoints included postoperative bleeding, swelling, bruising and wound ooze. 424 consecutive patients were included in the study. Symptomatic deep vein thrombosis was detected in 7 patients (1.6%). All symptomatic deep vein thromboses were detected after discharge before the six week follow-up clinic. Five non-fatal pulmonary embolisms occurred (1.2%). Only one patient presented a major wound bleeding (0.2%). The mean difference of swelling of thigh pre-versus postoperatively was only 22.8 mm. In conclusion, thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip and knee replacement using Flowtron(®) foot-pumps as main prevention tool of an individualised protocol appears effective and safe. This is the first clinical report related to this popular brand of foot pumps.

  12. Meniscal tears, repairs and replacement: their relevance to osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ian

    2011-04-01

    The menisci of the knee are important load sharers and shock absorbers in the joint. Meniscal tears are common, and whenever possible meniscal tears should be surgically repaired. Meniscectomy leads to a significant increased risk of osteoarthritis, and various options now exist for replacing missing menisci, including the use of meniscal scaffolds or the replacement of the entire meniscus by meniscal allograft transplantation. The field of meniscal surgery continues to develop apace, and the future may lie in growing new menisci by tissue engineering techniques.

  13. Description of the rates, trends and surgical burden associated with revision for prosthetic joint infection following primary and revision knee replacements in England and Wales: an analysis of the National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenguerrand, Erik; Whitehouse, Michael R; Beswick, Andrew D; Toms, Andrew D; Porter, Martyn L; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-07-10

    To describe the prevalence rates of revision surgery for the treatment of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) for patients undergoing knee replacement, their time trends, the cumulative incidence function of revision for PJI and estimate the burden of PJI at health service level. We analysed revision knee replacements performed due to a diagnosis of PJI and the linked index procedures recorded in the National Joint Registry from 2003 to 2014 for England and Wales. The cohort analysed consisted of 679 010 index primary knee replacements, 33 920 index revision knee replacements and 8247 revision total knee replacements performed due to a diagnosis of PJI. The prevalence rates, their time trends investigated by time from index surgery to revision for PJI, cumulative incidence functions and the burden of PJI (total procedures) were calculated. Overall linear trends were investigated with log-linear regression. The incidence of revision total knee replacement due to PJI at 2 years was 3.2/1000 following primary and 14.4/1000 following revision knee replacement, respectively. The prevalence of revision due to PJI in the 3 months following primary knee replacement has risen by 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.2 to 5.3) from 2005 to 2013 and 7.5-fold (95% CI 1.0 to 56.1) following revision knee replacement. Over 1000 procedures per year are performed as a consequence of knee PJI, an increase of 2.8 from 2005 to 2013. Overall, 75% of revisions were two-stage with an increase in use of single-stage from 7.9% in 2005 to 18.8% in 2014. Although the risk of revision due to PJI following knee replacement is low, it is rising, and coupled with the established and further predicted increased incidence of both primary and revision knee replacements, this represents an increasing and substantial treatment burden for orthopaedic service delivery in England and Wales. This has implications for future service design and the funding of individual and specialist centres. © Article author

  14. Long-Acting Morphine Following Hip or Knee Replacement: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley L Musclow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement surgery experience unmanaged pain during postoperative physiotherapy sessions. It was theorized that a baseline opioid would improve pain management.

  15. Use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee replacement: effects on perioperative blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volquind, Daniel; Zardo, Remi Antônio; Winkler, Bruno Costamilan; Londero, Bruno Bertagnolli; Zanelatto, Natália; Leichtweis, Gisele Perondi

    2016-01-01

    The use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee replacement surgeries has been the subject of constant study. The strategies to reduce bleeding are aimed at reducing the need for blood transfusion due to the risks involved. In this study we evaluated the use of tranexamic acid in reducing bleeding, need for blood transfusion, and prevalence of postoperative deep vein thrombosis in primary total knee replacement. 62 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were enrolled in the study, from June 2012 to May 2013, and randomized to receive a single dose of 2.5g of intravenous tranexamic acid (Group TA) or saline (Group GP), 5min before opening the pneumatic tourniquet, respectively. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and blood loss were recorded 24h after surgery. Deep vein thrombosis was investigated during patient's hospitalization and 15 and 30 days after surgery in review visits. There was no demographic difference between groups. Group TA had 13.89% decreased hematocrit (p=0.925) compared to placebo. Group TA had a decrease of 12.28% (p=0.898) in hemoglobin compared to Group GP. Group TA had a mean decrease of 187.35mL in blood loss (25.32%) compared to group GP (p=0.027). The number of blood transfusions was higher in Group GP (p=0.078). Thromboembolic events were not seen in this study. Tranexamic acid reduced postoperative bleeding without promoting thromboembolic events. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting dynamic knee joint load with clinical measures in people with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-08-01

    Knee joint loading, as measured by the knee adduction moment (KAM), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Given that the KAM can only currently be accurately measured in the laboratory setting with sophisticated and expensive equipment, its utility in the clinical setting is limited. This study aimed to determine the ability of a combination of four clinical measures to predict KAM values. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to calculate the peak KAM at a self-selected walking speed in 47 consecutive individuals with medial compartment knee OA and varus malalignment. Clinical predictors included: body mass; tibial angle measured using an inclinometer; walking speed; and visually observed trunk lean toward the affected limb during the stance phase of walking. Multiple linear regression was performed to predict KAM magnitudes using the four clinical measures. A regression model including body mass (41% explained variance), tibial angle (17% explained variance), and walking speed (9% explained variance) explained a total of 67% of variance in the peak KAM. Our study demonstrates that a set of measures easily obtained in the clinical setting (body mass, tibial alignment, and walking speed) can help predict the KAM in people with medial knee OA. Identifying those patients who are more likely to experience high medial knee loads could assist clinicians in deciding whether load-modifying interventions may be appropriate for patients, whilst repeated assessment of joint load could provide a mechanism to monitor disease progression or success of treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Knee effusion after total knee replacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, H. U.

    1993-01-01

    The various causes of effusions in artificial knees can be divided into four groups: implant related, technique related, interface problems, and infection. Diagnosis can be made from the patient's history and a clinical examination. Treatment is usually surgical revision.

  18. Analgesic effect of continuous femoral nerve block combined with infiltration anesthesia after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Guo Tan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the analgesic effect of continuous femoral nerve block combined with infiltration anesthesia after total knee replacement. Methods: Patients who received unilateral total knee replacement in our hospital from May 2012 to August 2015 were included for study and randomly divided into experimental group who received continuous femoral nerve block combined with infiltration anesthesia and control group who received continuous femoral nerve block, and then the contents of postoperative serum pain-promoting-related mediators, painsuppressing-related mediators and pain-related signal molecules were detected. Results: Serum CGRP, PS, Hist, 5-HT, AM and BK contents of experimental group were significantly lower than those of control group, AEA, β-EP, RvE1, LXA4 and LXB4 contents were significantly higher than those of control group, and P2X2, P2X7, P2X3, P2X4, P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y 13, P2Y14, p38MAPK and PI3K contents were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusions: Continuous femoral nerve block combined with infiltration anesthesia after total knee replacement can increase the generation of pain-suppressing mediators, decrease the generation of pain-promoting mediators and achieve more exact analgesic effect.

  19. Assessment and validation of CT scanogram to compare per-operative and post-operative mechanical axis after navigated total knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to assess and validate low-dose computed tomography (CT) scanogram as a post-operative imaging modality to measure the mechanical axis after navigated total knee replacement. A prospective study was performed to compare intra-operative and post-operative mechanical axis after navigated total knee replacements. All consecutive patients who underwent navigated total knee replacement between May and December 2006 were included. The intra-operative final axis was recorded, and post-operatively a CT scanogram of lower limbs was performed. The mechanical axis was measured and compared against the intra-operative measurement. There were 15 patients ranging in age from 57 to 80 (average 70) years. The average final intra-operative axis was 0.56° varus (4° varus to 1.5° valgus) and post-operative CT scanogram axis was 0.52° varus (3.1° varus to 1.8° valgus). The average deviation from final axes to CT scanogram axes was 0.12° valgus with a correlation coefficient of 0.9. Our study suggests that CT scanogram is an imaging modality with reasonable accuracy for measuring mechanical axis despite significantly low radiation. It also confirms a high level of correlation between intra-operative and post-operative mechanical axis after navigated total knee replacement. PMID:18696064

  20. Predictors of length of stay and patient satisfaction after hip and knee replacement surgery: fast-track experience in 712 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Holm, Gitte; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Very few studies have focused on patient characteristics that influence length of stay (LOS) in fast-track total hip (THR) and knee arthroplasty (TKR). The aim of this prospective study was to identify patient characteristics associated with LOS and patient satisfaction...... after total hip and knee replacement surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between September 2003 and December 2005, 712 consecutive, unselected patients (440 women) with a mean age of 69 (31-91) years were admitted for hip and knee replacement surgery at our specialized fast-track joint replacement unit....... Epidemiological, physical, and perioperative parameters were registered and correlated to LOS and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: 92% of the patients were discharged directly to their homes within 5 days, and 41% were discharged within 3 days. Age, sex, marital status, co-morbidity, preoperative use of walking...

  1. Cognitive dysfunction after fast-track hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Lene; Kehlet, Henrik; Bæk Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    to 2 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. LOS, pain, opioid use, inflammatory response, and sleep quality were recorded. The practice effect of repeated cognitive testing was gauged using data from a healthy community-dwelling control group (n = 161). RESULTS: Median LOS was 2 days (interquartile range...... this (23.6% of patients with early POCD had late onset vs 6.7% in non-POCD group; risk difference 16.9 (95% CI, -2.1% to 41.1%; P = 0.089). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of POCD early after total hip and knee replacement seems to be lower after a fast-track approach than rates previously reported...

  2. The efficacy of 12 weeks non-surgical treatment for patients not eligible for total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of a 12-week non-surgical treatment program with usual care in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) not eligible for total knee replacement (TKR). METHOD: This two-arm parallel group assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) included 100 adults from...... secondary care with knee OA, confirmed by radiography (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥1), but not eligible for a TKR. The 12-week non-surgical treatment program consisted of individualized progressed neuromuscular exercise, patient education, insoles, dietary advice and prescription of pain medication...... if indicated, while usual care comprised two leaflets with information and advice on knee OA and recommended treatments. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to 12 months in the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)4 defined as the average score for the KOOS subscales of pain...

  3. Blood loss associated with Ring uncemented total knee replacement: comparison between continuous and intermittent suction drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, F W; Ring, P A

    1984-01-01

    In a retrospective comparison of blood loss following uncemented total knee replacement, in which either continuous or intermittent suction drainage was used, measured blood loss was significantly greater with continuous drainage. However, a method of calculating actual blood loss demonstrated no significant difference. With intermittent drainage, more blood remains undetected around the knee joint; this technique should therefore be abandoned in favour of continuous suction drainage. PMID:6747978

  4. Development of explicit criteria for prioritization of hip and knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Antonio; Quintana, José M; Bilbao, Amaia; Ibañez, Berta; Arenaza, Juan C; Gutiérrez, Luis; Azkárate, Jesús; Güenaga, Jose I; Vidaurreta, Ignacio

    2007-06-01

    Among the problems to the publicly funded national health services are the waiting lists. Patients who need elective surgery generally have long waiting times before treatment. We aimed to develop a new prioritization tool for primary hip and knee replacement. Criteria were developed using a modified Delphi panel process. We convened a panel of nine members who scored the scenarios created by the research team and by patient focus groups. We studied the level of agreement among the panelists and the contribution of the variables to the ratings of the panel using linear and logistic regression models. The priority scores of the variables and their levels were synthesized using the optimal scaling and standard linear regression methods. Seven variables, pain on motion, walking functional limitations, abnormal findings on physical examination, pain at rest, other functional limitations, social role, and other pathologies that could improve with joint replacement, were considered to create the different scenarios. The panel scored 192 scenarios. The disagreement among the panelists was very low (1%) with an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.72. Of the 192 scenarios, 45.8% were scored as urgent, 35.4% as preferred and 18.8% as ordinary. The variables that contributed most to the scores were pain on motion and walking functional limitations. When optimal scaling and regression techniques were applied, similar results were obtained. This tool can evaluate and prioritize patients on a waiting list for hip or knee replacement. We also provide a simple and easy way to use an algorithm to estimate the treatment priority for individual patients.

  5. In Vivo Wear Performance of Cobalt-Chromium Versus Oxidized Zirconium Femoral Total Knee Replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Teeter, Matthew G; Guenther, Leah E; Burnell, Colin D; Bohm, Eric R; Naudie, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the damage and wear on the polyethylene (PE) inserts from 52 retrieved Genesis II total knee replacements to identify differences in tribological performance between matched pairs of cobalt-chromium (CoCr) and oxidized zirconium (OxZr) femoral components. Observer damage scoring and microcomputed tomography were used to quantify PE damage and wear, respectively. No significant differences were found between CoCr and OxZr groups in terms of PE insert damage, surface penetration, or wear. No severe damage such as cracking or delamination was noted on any of the 52 PE inserts. Observer damage scoring did not correlate with penetrative or volumetric PE wear. The more costly OxZr femoral component does not demonstrate clear tribological benefit over the standard CoCr component in the short term with this total knee replacement design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced education and physiotherapy before knee replacement; is it worth it? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, R W; Smith, N A; Chahal, G S; Casson, C; Reed, M R; Sprowson, A P

    2014-12-01

    Around 20% of knee replacement have an unsatisfactory outcome. Pre-operative physiotherapy and education have been proposed to improve post-operative outcomes. This systematic review evaluated whether these factors improved length of stay and patient reported outcomes after knee replacement surgery. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO and PEDro were searched on the 1st January 2013. Randomised or quasi-randomised studies assessing either pre-operative education or physiotherapy on patients undergoing a planned total or partial knee replacement were included in the review. Only studies with a control group receiving a defined standard of pre-operative care were included. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria set. Two studies analysed the effect of pre-operative education, seven pre-operative treatment by a physiotherapist and two studies used both factors. No study found significant differences in validated joint specific patient reported outcome measures. The education studies found a decrease in pre-operative expectation and an improvement in knowledge, flexion and regularity of exercise. Two studies found an improvement in muscle strength in the group treated by a physiotherapist at three months. The combination of education and physiotherapy was shown to reduce patient length of stay and cost in one study. The evidence reviewed is insufficient to support the implementation of either pre-operative education or physiotherapy programmes. The combination of pre-operative education and treatment by a physiotherapist may reduce the medical costs associated with surgery. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of balance and proprioceptive training on total hip and knee replacement rehabilitation: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Navarro, Fernando; Igual-Camacho, Celedonia; Silvestre-Muñoz, Antonio; Roig-Casasús, Sergio; Blasco, José María

    2018-05-01

    Balance and proprioceptive deficits are frequently persistent after total joint replacement, limiting functionality and involving altered movement patterns and difficulties in walking and maintaining postural control among patients. The goal of this systematic review was to evaluate the short- and mid-term effects of proprioceptive and balance training for patients undergoing total knee and hip replacement. This is a systematic review of literature. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, PEDro, and Scopus were the databases searched. The review included randomized clinical trials in which the experimental groups underwent a training aimed at improving balance and proprioception, in addition to conventional care. The studies had to assess at least one of the following outcomes: self-reported functionality or balance (primary outcomes), knee function, pain, falls, or quality of life. Eight trials were included, involving 567 participants. The quantitative synthesis found a moderate to high significant effect of balance and proprioceptive trainings on self-reported functionality and balance after total knee replacement. The effects were maintained at mid-term in terms of balance alone. Conversely, preoperative training did not enhance outcomes after total hip arthroplasty. The synthesis showed that, in clinical terms, balance trainings are a convenient complement to conventional physiotherapy care to produce an impact on balance and functionality after knee replacement. If outcomes such as improvement in pain, knee range of movement, or patient quality of life are to be promoted, it would be advisable to explore alternative proposals specifically targeting these goals. Further research is needed to confirm or discard the current evidence ultimately, predominantly in terms of the effects on the hips and those yielded by preoperative interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Individualised distal femoral cut improves femoral component placement and limb alignment during total knee replacement in knees with moderate and severe varus deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisami, Dhanasekararaja; Iyyampillai, Geethan; Shanmugam, Sivaraj; Natesan, Rajkumar; S, Rajasekaran

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to determine the variation in valgus correction angle and the influence of individualised distal femoral cut on femoral component placement and limb alignment during total knee replacement (TKR) in knees with varus deformity. The study was done prospectively in two stages. In the first stage, the valgus correction angle (VCA) was calculated in long-limb radiographs of 227 patients and correlated with pre-operative parameters of femoral bowing, neck-shaft angle and hip-knee-ankle angle. In the second part comprising of 240 knees with varus deformity, 140 (group 1) had the distal femoral cut individualised according to the calculated VCA, while the remaining 100 knees (group 1) were operated with a fixed distal femoral cut of 5°. The outcome of surgery was studied by grouping the knees as varus 15°. Of the 227 limbs analysed in stage I, 70 knees (31 %) had a VCA angle outside 5-7°. Coronal bowing (p shaft angle (p alignment when VCA was individualised in the groups of knees with varus 10-15° (p 0.002) and varus >15° (p 0.002). Valgus correction angle is highly variable and is influenced by femoral bowing, neck-shaft angle and pre-operative deformity. Individualisation of VCA is preferable in patients with moderate and severe varus deformity. Level 2.

  9. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  10. Acute normovolaemic haemodilution decreases postoperative allogeneic blood transfusion after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsfanger, D; Fredman, B; Goldstein, B; Shapiro, A; Jedeikin, R

    1997-09-01

    We hypothesized that the success of postoperative blood conservation after acute normovolaemic haemodilution (NVHD) is influenced by the extent of intraoperative bleeding and surgical trauma, and the timing of autologous blood transfusion. As total knee replacement is associated with minimal intraoperative but extensive postoperative blood loss, this procedure is ideally suited to acute NVHD. Therefore, to test our hypothesis, 30 patients undergoing elective total knee replacement were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, controlled study. In groups NVHD-2 and NVHD-6, before induction of anaesthesia patients were bled to a target packed cell volume (PCV) of 28-30%, and in the post-anaesthesia care unit autologous blood was transfused over a 2-h period terminating after operation at 2 and 6 h, respectively. In the control group, NVHD was not performed. After operation, platelets, fibrinogen, prothrombin and partial thromboplastin time, and liver function, urea and electrolytes were measured and compared with preoperative baseline values. Significantly (P conservation strategy. However, there was no difference in allogeneic blood administration between the two NVHD groups. Coagulation and liver function, and urea and electrolyte concentrations were unaffected by treatment.

  11. Body mass index and risk of perioperative cardiovascular adverse events and mortality in 34,744 Danish patients undergoing hip or knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornqvist, Catharina; Gislason, Gunnar H; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    underwent elective primary hip or knee replacement surgery between 2005 and 2011. We used multivariable Cox regression models to calculate the 30-day risks of MACE and mortality associated with 5 BMI groups (underweight (BMI ...BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Obesity is a risk factor for osteoarthritis in the lower limb, yet the cardiovascular risks associated with obesity in hip or knee replacement surgery are unknown. We examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of a major adverse cardiovascular event...... (MACE: ischemic stroke, acute myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death) or the risk of all-cause mortality in a nationwide Danish cohort of patients who underwent primary hip or knee replacement surgery. METHODS: Using Danish nationwide registries, we identified 34,744 patients aged ≥ 20 years who...

  12. Total knee replacement with retention of both cruciate ligaments: a 22-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouret, P; Lavoie, F; Cloutier, J-M

    2013-07-01

    We report on the long-term results of 163 bicruciate-retaining Hermes 2C total knee replacements in 130 patients at a mean follow-up of 22.4 years (20.3 to 23.5). Even when the anterior cruciate ligament had a partially degenerative appearance it was preserved as long as the knee had a normal anterior drawer and Lachman's test pre-operatively. The description and surgical technique of this minimally constrained prosthesis were published in 1983 and the ten-year clinical results in 1999. A total of 12% of the knees (20 of 163) in this study were revised because of wear of the polyethylene tibial insert. Excellent stability was achieved and the incidence of aseptic component loosening was 4.3% (seven of 163). The survival rate using revision for any reason as the endpoint was 82% (95% confidence interval 76.2 to 88.0). Although this series included a relatively small number of replacements, it demonstrated that the anterior cruciate ligament, even when partially degenerated at the time of TKR, remained functional and provided adequate stability at a long-term follow-up.

  13. International comparative evaluation of fixed-bearing non-posterior-stabilized and posterior-stabilized total knee replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Thomas; Baste, Valborg; Froufe, Miquel Angel; Namba, Robert; Bordini, Barbara; Robertsson, Otto; Cafri, Guy; Paxton, Elizabeth; Sedrakyan, Art; Graves, Stephen

    2014-12-17

    Differences in survivorship of non-posterior-stabilized compared with posterior-stabilized knee designs carry substantial economic consequences, especially with limited health-care resources. However, these comparisons have often been made between relatively small groups of patients, often with short-term follow-up, with only small differences demonstrated between the groups. The goal of this study is to compare the outcomes of non-posterior-stabilized and posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasties with use of a unique collaboration of multiple established knee arthroplasty registries. A distributed health data network was developed by the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries and was used in this study to reduce barriers to participation (such as security, propriety, legal, and privacy issues) compared with a centralized data warehouse approach. The study included only replacements in osteoarthritis patients who underwent total knee procedures involving fixed-bearing devices from 2001 to 2010. The outcome of interest was time to first revision. On average, not resurfacing showed a more harmful effect than resurfacing did when posterior-stabilized and non-posterior-stabilized knee replacements were compared, while the risk of revision for posterior-stabilized compared with non-posterior-stabilized knees was highest in year zero to one, followed by year one to two, years eight through ten, and years two through eight. Posterior-stabilized knees did significantly worse than non-posterior-stabilized knees did when the patella was not resurfaced. This difference was most pronounced in the first two years (year zero to one: hazard ratio [HR] = 2.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56 to 2.95, p < 0.001; year one to two: HR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.48 to 1.75, p < 0.001). When the patella was resurfaced, posterior-stabilized knees did significantly worse than non-posterior-stabilized knees did. This was again most pronounced in the first two years (year zero

  14. Cerebral fat embolism after bilateral total knee replacement arthroplasty -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ri-Na; Kim, Jong-Hak; Lee, Heeseung; Baik, Hee-Jung; Chung, Rack Kyung; Kim, Chi Hyo; Hwang, Tae-Hu

    2010-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is a rare and potentially lethal complication most commonly seen in long bone fractures and intramedullary manipulation. The clinical triad of fat embolism syndrome consists of mental confusion, respiratory distress, and petechiae. This study reports a case of cerebral fat embolism syndrome following elective bilateral total knee replacement. After an uneventful anesthesia and initial recovery, the patient developed neurologic symptoms nine hours postoperatively.

  15. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: retrospective clinical and radiographic evaluation of 83 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Danilo; Iacono, Francesco; Russo, Alessandro; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Bignozzi, Simone; Bragonzoni, Laura; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-06-01

    We performed a retrospective clinical and radiographic evaluation of 83 nonconsecutive patients operated in our institute between February 1996 and March 2003 with a mean follow-up of 60 months to assess the efficiency of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) performed with a minimally invasive technique. The aim of this study was to correlate the clinical outcome with the pre- and post-operative alignment and with implant positioning on coronal and sagittal plane. Eighty-three nonconsecutive patients (60 males, 23 females) underwent cemented UKR (De Puy Preservation Uni with all-poly tibial component), for both medial OA (80 patients) and AVN of the medial femoral condyle (3 patients). All patients were available at final follow-up evaluation, and they all presented an evident varus alignment at pre-operative clinical and radiographic evaluation. At radiographic measurement, we considered a knee with femoro-tibial angle (FTA) > 175 degrees as varus knee, 170 degrees FTA FTA 90 degrees for valgus knee and a TPA clinical result presented a mean varus deformity of 7.2 degrees (3.6 degrees-10.8 degrees) pre-operatively. According to literature, we demonstrated that a small amount of undercorrection with a small amount of residual varus deformity of 3 degrees-5 degrees is the goal to be reached in order to avoid both rapid degeneration of the nonreplaced compartment and the premature loosening of the replaced compartment. We performed a mean axial correction of 5 degrees (SD 3.9 degrees), leaving a mean axial varus deformity of 2.2 degrees in the excellent group. In our series, the group with excellent results also showed a post-operative PTS of 7 degrees (2.4 degrees-11.6 degrees), while mean pre-operative PTS was 6.5 degrees (2.7 degrees-10.3 degrees). In this study, results have shown that minimally invasive UKR producing a small amount of varus undercorrection in selected patients with medial tibio-femoral osteoarthritis or moderate avascular necrosis of the

  16. Effect of preoperative neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) on functional outcome after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Erika O; Roos, Ewa M.; Meichtry, André

    2015-01-01

    baseline to 3 months after Total Knee Replacement (TKR) following a neuromuscular exercise programme (NEMEX-TJR) plus a knee school educational package (KS) or KS alone. METHODS: 45 patients (55-83 years, 53% male, waiting for TKR) were randomized to receive a minimum of 8 sessions of NEMEXTJR plus 3...... and after the intervention, and at 6 weeks, 3 months and 12 months after surgery by a physiotherapist, blinded to group allocation. RESULTS: After intervention before surgery we observed a small improvement for primary and secondary endpoints in both groups, which did not differ significantly between groups...

  17. The use of MRI in the investigation of lateral meniscal tear post medial unicompartmental knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil H. Ajwani, MBChB, BSc (Hons, MRCS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of lateral knee pain in patients with a medial unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR is complex. The native lateral compartment structures are prone to the same injuries as patients with normal knees. Historical reports of lateral meniscal injury post medial UKR have argued MRI evaluation is obsolete due to artefact caused by the prosthesis. We report a case of lateral meniscal injury in a patient two years after successful medial UKR. We identified the offending pathology via utilization of MRI scanners adopting metal artefact reduction sequences (MARS. The MARS MRI protocol helps clinicians accurately and non-invasively evaluate soft tissue structures in knees with metal prostheses. It also allows surgeons to accurately counsel patients and provides a higher degree of certainty in treating the pathology.

  18. Porous polymers for repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompmaker, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The studies presented here were initiated to answer a variety of questions concerning firstly the repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and, secondly, the repair of full-thickness defects of articular cartilage. AIMS OF THE STUDIES I To assess the effect of implantation of a porous

  19. Better Survival of Total Knee Replacement in Patients Older Than 70 Years: A Prospective Study with 8 To 12 Years Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Fernandez-Fernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Modern knee designs have popularized its use in younger patients due to its better performance. There remains uncertainty whether higher demands of these patients can affect implant survivorship.    Purpose: To assess whether modern knee designs have provided similar results in patients younger than 70 years versus older patients. Methods: We included 203 consecutive patients (236 knees who underwent knee replacement for osteoarthritis with a mean follow-up of 11.4 years (range: 8.8 to 12. The mean age was 70 years (range: 31 to 85. Knee replacements were stratified into two groups: 109 were younger than 70 years and 127 were older than 70 years (70 years of age is the mandatory retirement age. Results: There were no significant pre-operative differences between groups with regards to knee alignment, alpha or beta angles, knee score or function score. Fourteen implants were radiographically loose at last follow up visit. Groups were matched in terms of demographic data. We found that patients older than 70 years had significantly better mean survivorship at 12 years. (97% vs. 88%; P=0.010. Patients under 70 years presented with a higher rate of polyethylene wear which was further associated with radiolucent lines in the femur and tibia as well as the presence of osteolysis. There was also an association between migration and presence of osteolysis. Conclusions: Patients over 70 years old undergoing cemented total knee replacement for osteoarthritis showed better implant survivorship versus patients under 70 years old.

  20. Taking care of your new knee joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few ...

  1. Effect of Body Mass Index and Psychosocial Traits on Total Knee Replacement Costs in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waimann, Christian A; Fernandez-Mazarambroz, Rodrigo J; Cantor, Scott B; Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Barbo, Andrea G; Landon, Glenn C; Siff, Sherwin J; Lin, Heather; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2016-08-01

    Clinical and psychosocial attributes are associated with clinical outcomes after total knee replacement (TKR) surgery in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), but their relationship with TKR-related costs is less clear. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of clinical and psychosocial attributes on TKR costs. We conducted a 6-month prospective cohort study of patients with knee OA who underwent TKR. We examined baseline demographic, clinical [body mass index (BMI) and comorbidities], and psychosocial attributes (social support, locus of control, coping, depression, anxiety, stress, and self-efficacy); baseline and 6-month OA clinical outcomes [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function]; and 6-month direct and indirect TKR-related costs. Multiple regression was performed to identify determinants of TKR-related costs. We included 212 patients; 66% were women, 71% were white, and the mean age was 65.2 years. The mean baseline WOMAC pain score was 55 (SD 19) and WOMAC function score was 54 (SD 20). Mean total TKR-related costs were US$30,831 (SD $9893). Multivariate regression analyses showed that increasing BMI and anxiety levels and decreasing levels of positive social interactions were associated with increased costs. A lower cost scenario with a lower range of normal BMI (19.5), highest positive social interaction, and no anxiety predicted TKR costs to be $22,247. Predicted costs in obese patients (BMI 36) with lowest positive social interaction and highest anxiety were $58,447. Increased baseline BMI, anxiety, and poor social support lead to higher TKR-related costs in patients with knee OA. Preoperative interventions targeting these factors may reduce TKR-related costs, and therefore be cost-effective.

  2. 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in the diagnosis of infection after total knee replacement arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Rib; Kim, Jae Seung; Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Bin, Seong Il; Cho, Woo Shin; Lee, Hee Kyung

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of 99m Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy for diagnosing prosthetic infection after total knee replacement arthroplasty without the aid of following bone marrow scintigraphy. The study subjects were 25 prostheses of 17 patients (one man and 16 women, mean age: 65 years) who had total knee replacement arthroplasty. After injection of 99m Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte, the whole body planar and knee SPECT images were obtained in all patients. The subjects were classified into three groups according to clinical suspicion of prosthetic infection: Group A (n=11) with high suspicion of infection; Group B (n=6) with equivocal suspicion of infection, and Group C (n=8) with asymptomatic contralateral prostheses. Final diagnosis of infection was based on surgical, histological and bacteriological data and clinical follow-up. Infection was confirmed in 13 prostheses (11 in Group A and 2 in Group B). All prostheses in Group A were true positive. There were two true positive, one false positive and three true negative in Group B, and six true negatives and two false positive in Group C. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosis of the infected knee prosthesis were 100%, 75% and 88%, respectively. 99m Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy is a sensitive method for the diagnosis of infected knee prosthesis. However, false positive uptakes even in asymptomatic prosthesis suggest that bone marrow scintigraphy may be needed to achieve improved specificity

  3. Infection after total knee replacement: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Honorio de Carvalho Junior

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection after total knee replacement (IATJ is a rare complication. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality increasing the final costs. Gram positive coccus and Staphylococcus coagulase-negative and Staphylococcus aureus are the most common isolated germs (>50% of the cases. Conditions related to the patient, to the surgical procedure and even to the post op have been identified as risk factors to IATJ. Many complementary methods together with clinical symptoms are useful to a proper diagnosis. Treatment for IATJ must be individualized but generally is a combination of systemic antibiotic therapy and surgical treatment. Prosthesis exchange in one or two stages is the first choice procedure. Debridement with prosthesis retention is an option in acute cases with stable implants and antibiotic sensible germs.

  4. Improving performances of the knee replacement surgery process by applying DMAIC principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Giovanni; Balato, Giovanni; Romano, Maria; Ponsiglione, Alfonso Maria; Raiola, Eliana; Russo, Mario Alessandro; Cuccaro, Patrizia; Santillo, Liberatina Carmela; Cesarelli, Mario

    2017-12-01

    The work is a part of a project about the application of the Lean Six Sigma to improve health care processes. A previously published work regarding the hip replacement surgery has shown promising results. Here, we propose an application of the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, and Control) cycle to improve quality and reduce costs related to the prosthetic knee replacement surgery by decreasing patients' length of hospital stay (LOS) METHODS: The DMAIC cycle has been adopted to decrease the patients' LOS. The University Hospital "Federico II" of Naples, one of the most important university hospitals in Southern Italy, participated in this study. Data on 148 patients who underwent prosthetic knee replacement between 2010 and 2013 were used. Process mapping, statistical measures, brainstorming activities, and comparative analysis were performed to identify factors influencing LOS and improvement strategies. The study allowed the identification of variables influencing the prolongation of the LOS and the implementation of corrective actions to improve the process of care. The adopted actions reduced the LOS by 42%, from a mean value of 14.2 to 8.3 days (standard deviation also decreased from 5.2 to 2.3 days). The DMAIC approach has proven to be a helpful strategy ensuring a significant decreasing of the LOS. Furthermore, through its implementation, a significant reduction of the average costs of hospital stay can be achieved. Such a versatile approach could be applied to improve a wide range of health care processes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Numerical Modelling of the Weight-Bearing Total Knee Joint Replacement and Usage in Practice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daněk, Josef; Nedoma, Jiří; Hlaváček, Ivan; Vavřík, P.; Denk, F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 1-3 (2007), s. 49-56 ISSN 0378-4754 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA/087 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : total knee joint replacement * contact problem * non-overlapping domain decomposition method Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.738, year: 2007

  6. Tibialis Anterior Tendon: A Reliable Anatomical Landmark Indicating the Ankle Centre. Potential Utility in Extra-Medullary Alignment During Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avadhoot P. Kantak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Extramedullary alignment is a well established surgical technique during total knee replacement. There are different methods to achieve accuracy but variability is quite extensive. To attain uniformity in the surgical technique we have been using the tibialis tendon to align our resection guide. This may prove to be a useful aid for surgeons during knee replacement surgery. Objectives The purpose of our study was to establish if tibialis anterior tendon represents the centre of ankle joint and if it could be used as an anatomical reference for alignment during knee replacement. Methods We designed a retrospective radiological cohort study. We studied sixty MRI scans of normal ankles. The centre of ankle joint was marked as a bisection point of the intermalleolar line at the level of superior surface of the talus. A line was drawn connecting the centre of Achilles tendon to the ankle centre and this was extended anteriorly. This line was found to have a constant relation to the ankle centre and it would simulate the positioning of the standard alignment device used. Results The tibialis anterior tendon lies less than 3mm medial to the ankle centre in the frontal plane. Conclusions We conclude that the tibialis anterior tendon can be used during knee replacement surgery as an accurate alignment guide.

  7. The comparison of clinical features and quality of life after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Kim, Jung-Hee; Jung, Eun-Jung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to provide fundamental information for efficient management of patients after a total knee replacement (TKR) through the evaluation of changes of range of motion, pain, functional level, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] For a total of 63 knee osteoarthritis patients, VAS, KSKS, KSFS, HSS, WOMAC scores and quality of life were evaluated for functional levels at pre-operation, post-operation, six months after operation, and 12 months after operation. [Results] After the TKR operations, participants showed significant improvement in KSKS, KSFS, WOMAC, and SF-36 scores when compared to pre-operation. [Conclusion] After a TKR operation, ROM, and pain management, along with a therapeutic program for improvement of function, should be conducted 6 months after the operation.

  8. The effects of dimensional parameters on sensing and energy harvesting of an embedded PZT in a total knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Mohsen; Anton, Steven R.

    2016-04-01

    Total Knee Replacement (TKR), one of the most common surgeries in the United States, is performed when the patient is experiencing significant amounts of pain or when knee functionality has become substantially degraded. Despite impressive recent developments, only about 85% of patients are satisfied with the pain reduction after one year. Therefore, structural health and performance monitoring are integral for intraoperative and postoperative feedback. In extension of the author's previous work, a new configuration for implementation of piezoelectric transducers in total knee replacement bearings is proposed and FEA modeling is performed to attain appropriate sensing and energy harvesting ability. The predicted force transmission ratio to the PZT (ratio of force applied to the bearing to force transferred to the embedded piezoelectric transducer) is about 6.2% compared to about 5% found for the previous encapsulated design. Dimensional parameters of the polyethylene bearing including the diameter and depth of the PZT pocket as well as the placement geometry of the PZT transducer within the bearing are hypothesized as the most influential parameters on the performance of the designed system. The results show a small change of 1% and 2.3% in the output of the system as a result of variation in the PZT location and pocket diameter, respectively. Whereas, the output of the system is significantly sensitive to the pocket depth; a pocket 0.01 mm deeper than the PZT transducer leads to no force transmission, and a pocket 0.15 mm shallower leads to full load transmission to the PZT. In order to develop a self-powered sensor, the amount of energy harvested from tibial forces for the proposed geometry is investigated.

  9. Satisfactory outcomes following combined unicompartmental knee replacement and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpin, Andrea; Kini, S G; Meuffels, D E

    2017-03-31

    There exist limited options for treatment of patients with combined medial compartment arthritis and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. Ideal treatment is one that offers lasting relief of symptoms not compromising any future surgery. Unicompartmental knee replacement has shown consistently good results in the relatively young and active population, but there is a high reported incidence of failure up to 20%, if performed in ACL-deficient knees. One of the recognized treatment modality is combined ACL reconstruction and unicompartmental arthroplasty. A systematic review was conducted looking at the demographics, techniques, complications and outcome of combined ACL reconstruction with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. A systematic literature search within the online Medline, PubMed Database, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar was carried out until October 2016 to identify relevant articles. A study was defined eligible if it met the following inclusion criteria: the surgical procedure combined unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; patient's clinical and/or functional outcomes were reported; any complications intra-operatively and post-operatively were reported; and the full-text articles, written in English, German, Italian, Dutch or Spanish, were available. Quality and risk of bias assessments were done using standardized criteria set. A total of 8 studies met the inclusion criteria encompassing 186 patients who were treated with simultaneous ACL reconstruction and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. The mean age was 50.5 years (range from 44 to 56) with a mean follow-up of 37.6 months (range from 24 to 60). There was an improvement in mean Oxford Score from 27.5 to 36.8. Complications reported included tibial inlay dislocation (n = 3), conversion to a total knee arthroplasty (n = 1), infection requiring two-stage revision (n = 2), deep-vein thrombosis (n = 1), stiffness requiring

  10. Intermediate and long-term quality of life after total knee replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Leonard; Shan, Bernard; Suzuki, Arnold; Nouh, Fred; Saxena, Akshat

    2015-01-21

    Total knee replacement is a highly successful and frequently performed operation. Technical outcomes of surgery are excellent, with favorable early postoperative health-related quality of life. This study reviews intermediate and long-term quality of life after surgery. A systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies published from January 2000 onward was performed to evaluate health-related quality of life after primary total knee replacement for osteoarthritis in patients with at least three years of follow-up. Key outcomes were postoperative quality of life, function, and satisfaction compared with the preoperative status. Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Quality appraisal and data tabulation were performed with use of predefined criteria. Data were synthesized by narrative review and random-effects meta-analysis utilizing standardized mean differences. Heterogeneity was assessed with the tau(2) and I(2) statistics. Nineteen studies were included in the review. Intermediate and long-term postoperative quality of life was superior to the preoperative level in qualitative and quantitative analyses. The pooled effect in combined WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) and KSS (Knee Society Score) outcomes was a marked improvement from baseline with respect to the total score (2.17; 95% CI [confidence interval], 1.13 to 3.22; p Total knee replacement confers significant intermediate and long-term benefits with respect to both disease-specific and generic health-related quality of life, especially pain and function, leading to positive patient satisfaction. Recommendations for necessary future studies are provided. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  11. Spontaneous Relocation of a Posterior Dislocation of Mobile Bearing in a Medial Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureddine, Hussein; Aird, Jaimes; Latimer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous relocation of a posterior dislocation of the mobile bearing in a medial unicompartmental knee replacement, prior to surgical intervention. We are unaware of any similar cases in the published literature. This paper highlights some clinical issues around this type of dislocation. PMID:23259116

  12. Late Streptococcus bovis infection of total knee replacement complicated by infective endocarditis and associated with colonic ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Hla, Sann Minn; Keys, Graham Watson

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis is rare cause of late infections after total knee replacement (TKR). This report presents a case of confirmed late septic arthritis following TKR caused by S bovis that was further complicated with infective endocarditis resulting in aortic valve insufficiency in an immunecompetent patient. As an association between S bovis and gastrointestinal malignancies is suggested, a workup for such malignancies was performed that revealed non-malignant ulcers in patient's ascending colon. The patient is currently recovering from his aortic valve replacement surgery and is scheduled to have annual colonoscopies. His knee joint has improved; however, he developed constant pain because of underlying chronic infection in the affected joint and has difficulties mobilising. Therefore, a revision TKR is considered but postponed until he fully recovers from his heart valve surgery. PMID:23744853

  13. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-hua Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR. Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35 while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (<0.05, controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (<0.05, controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR.

  14. Early self-managed focal sensorimotor rehabilitative training enhances functional mobility and sensorimotor function in patients following total knee replacement: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutzouri, Maria; Gleeson, Nigel; Coutts, Fiona; Tsepis, Elias; John, Gliatis

    2018-02-01

    To assess the effects of early self-managed focal sensorimotor training compared to functional exercise training after total knee replacement on functional mobility and sensorimotor function. A single-blind controlled clinical trial. University Hospital of Rion, Greece. A total of 52 participants following total knee replacement. The primary outcome was the Timed Up and Go Test and the secondary outcomes were balance, joint position error, the Knee Outcome Survey Activities of Daily Living Scale, and pain. Patients were assessed on three separate occasions (presurgery, 8 weeks post surgery, and 14 weeks post surgery). Participants were randomized to either focal sensorimotor exercise training (experimental group) or functional exercise training (control group). Both groups received a 12-week home-based programme prescribed for 3-5 sessions/week (35-45 minutes). Consistently greater improvements ( F 2,98  = 4.3 to 24.8; P effect size range of 1.3-6.5. Overall, the magnitude of improvements in functional mobility and sensorimotor function endorses using focal sensorimotor training as an effective mode of rehabilitation following knee replacement.

  15. Quality assessment before and after knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Węgorowski

    2017-07-01

    On the basis of the research, it was concluded that the main cause of the implantation of the prosthesis was a knee injury (54%. The disease affected the deterioration of physical fitness prior to implantation of knee arthroplasty in 28% of respondents; 34% said they were very good. The quality of life after implantation of knee arthroplasty significantly improved in 57% of respondents. Self-service after surgery has improved considerably in 23% of respondents.

  16. Spontaneous Relocation of a Posterior Dislocation of Mobile Bearing in a Medial Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Noureddine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of spontaneous relocation of a posterior dislocation of the mobile bearing in a medial unicompartmental knee replacement, prior to surgical intervention. We are unaware of any similar cases in the published literature. This paper highlights some clinical issues around this type of dislocation.

  17. The safety of peri-articular local anaesthetic injection for patients undergoing total knee replacement with autologous blood transfusion: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D F; Emmett, S R; Kang, K K; Chahal, G S; Hiskens, R; Balasubramanian, S; McGuinness, K; Parsons, H; Achten, J; Costa, M L

    2012-12-01

    Intra-operative, peri-articular injection of local anaesthesia is an increasingly popular way of controlling pain following total knee replacement. At the same time, the problems associated with allogenic blood transfusion have led to interest in alternative methods for managing blood loss after total knee replacement, including the use of auto-transfusion of fluid from the patient's surgical drain. It is safe to combine peri-articular infiltration with auto-transfusion from the drain. We performed a randomised clinical trial to compare the concentration of local anaesthetic in the blood and in the fluid collected in the knee drain in patients having either a peri-articular injection or a femoral nerve block. Clinically relevant concentrations of local anaesthetic were found in the fluid from the drains of patients having peri-articular injections (4.92 μg/ml (sd 3.151)). However, none of the patients having femoral nerve blockade had detectable levels. None of the patients in either group had clinically relevant concentrations of local anaesthetic in their blood after re-transfusion. The evidence from this study suggests that it is safe to use peri-articular injection in combination with auto-transfusion of blood from peri-articular drains during knee replacement surgery.

  18. {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in the diagnosis of infection after total knee replacement arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Rib [College of Medicine, Kunkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung; Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Bin, Seong Il; Cho, Woo Shin; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy for diagnosing prosthetic infection after total knee replacement arthroplasty without the aid of following bone marrow scintigraphy. The study subjects were 25 prostheses of 17 patients (one man and 16 women, mean age: 65 years) who had total knee replacement arthroplasty. After injection of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte, the whole body planar and knee SPECT images were obtained in all patients. The subjects were classified into three groups according to clinical suspicion of prosthetic infection: Group A (n=11) with high suspicion of infection; Group B (n=6) with equivocal suspicion of infection, and Group C (n=8) with asymptomatic contralateral prostheses. Final diagnosis of infection was based on surgical, histological and bacteriological data and clinical follow-up. Infection was confirmed in 13 prostheses (11 in Group A and 2 in Group B). All prostheses in Group A were true positive. There were two true positive, one false positive and three true negative in Group B, and six true negatives and two false positive in Group C. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosis of the infected knee prosthesis were 100%, 75% and 88%, respectively. {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy is a sensitive method for the diagnosis of infected knee prosthesis. However, false positive uptakes even in asymptomatic prosthesis suggest that bone marrow scintigraphy may be needed to achieve improved specificity.

  19. Effect of preoperative education of patients before hip or knee replacement surgery: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Klit, Jakob; Husted, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) are standard procedures for treatment of end stage osteoarthritis, and much is done to optimize results. It is usually hypothesized that education of patients before surgery reduces anxiety, secures more realistic patient expectations...... and enhances postoperative outcomes. Objectives To determine whether results reported in the literature proves an effect of preoperative education on postoperative outcomes in replacement surgery patients regarding anxiety, pain, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, postoperative complications...... visual) given by health professionals to patients were included. Results Seven studies involving 677 participants met the inclusion criteria. Two studies involved patients undergoing THA replacement, while five studies involved patients undergoing both THA and TKA replacement surgery. Mean number...

  20. Does circumpatellar electrocautery improve the outcome after total knee replacement?: a prospective, randomised, blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, S; McNair, C J; Barnett, K J; MacLeod, J; Humphry, R W; Finlayson, D

    2012-09-01

    The incidence of anterior knee pain following total knee replacement (TKR) is reported to be as high as 49%. The source of the pain is poorly understood but the soft tissues around the patella have been implicated. In theory circumferential electrocautery denervates the patella thereby reducing efferent pain signals. However, there is mixed evidence that this practice translates into improved outcomes. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of intra-operative circumpatellar electrocautery in patients undergoing TKR using the LCS mobile bearing or Kinemax fixed bearing TKR. A total of 200 patients were randomised to receive either circumpatellar electrocautery (diathermy) or not (control). Patients were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) for anterior knee pain and Oxford knee score (OKS) pre-operatively and three months, six months and one year post-operatively. Patients and assessors were blinded. There were 91 patients in the diathermy group and 94 in the control. The mean VAS improvement at one year was 3.9 in both groups (control; -10 to 6, diathermy; -9 to 8, p electrocautery on either VAS anterior knee pain or OKS for patients undergoing LCS and Kinemax TKR.

  1. Radiography, radionuclide imaging, and asthrography in the evaluation of total hip and knee replacement. [/sup 99m/Tc-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelman, M.I.; Coleman, R.E.; Stevens, P.M.; Davey, B.W.

    1978-09-01

    Twenty patients with 21 total joint replacements including 17 hips and 4 knees were studied by plain film radiography, radionuclide imaging, and subtraction arthrography to evaluate these procedures for assessing prosthetic complications. Surgery was performed in 14 patients and confirmed loosening of 8 femoral and 7 acetabular hip prosthesis components and 1 femoral and 4 tibial knee prosthesis components. Plain films suggested loosening of only 9 hip components and no knee components. In contrast, radionuclide imaging and subtraction arthrography were considerably more effective in demonstrating loosening as well as other causes of the painful total joint prosthesis.

  2. The anteroposterior axis of the tibia in Korean patients undergoing total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C W; Seo, S S; Kim, J H; Roh, S M; Lee, C R

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to find anatomical landmarks for rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee replacement (TKR) in a CT-based study. Pre-operative CT scanning was performed on 94 South Korean patients (nine men, 85 women, 188 knees) with osteoarthritis of the knee joint prior to TKR. The tibial anteroposterior (AP) axis was defined as a line perpendicular to the femoral surgical transepicondylar axis and passing through the centre of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). The angles between the defined tibial AP axis and anatomical landmarks at various levels of the tibia were measured. The mean values of the angles between the defined tibial AP axis and the line connecting the anterior border of the proximal third of the tibia to the centre of the PCL was -0.2° (-17 to 14.1, sd 4.1). This was very close to the defined tibial axis, and remained so regardless of lower limb alignment and the degree of tibial bowing. Therefore, AP axis defined as described, is a reliable anatomical landmark for rotational alignment of tibial components. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy.

  4. Risk prediction model for knee pain in the Nottingham community: a Bayesian modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, G S; Bhattacharya, A; McWilliams, D F; Ingham, S L; Doherty, M; Zhang, W

    2017-03-20

    Twenty-five percent of the British population over the age of 50 years experiences knee pain. Knee pain can limit physical ability and cause distress and bears significant socioeconomic costs. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate the first risk prediction model for incident knee pain in the Nottingham community and validate this internally within the Nottingham cohort and externally within the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) cohort. A total of 1822 participants from the Nottingham community who were at risk for knee pain were followed for 12 years. Of this cohort, two-thirds (n = 1203) were used to develop the risk prediction model, and one-third (n = 619) were used to validate the model. Incident knee pain was defined as pain on most days for at least 1 month in the past 12 months. Predictors were age, sex, body mass index, pain elsewhere, prior knee injury and knee alignment. A Bayesian logistic regression model was used to determine the probability of an OR >1. The Hosmer-Lemeshow χ 2 statistic (HLS) was used for calibration, and ROC curve analysis was used for discrimination. The OAI cohort from the United States was also used to examine the performance of the model. A risk prediction model for knee pain incidence was developed using a Bayesian approach. The model had good calibration, with an HLS of 7.17 (p = 0.52) and moderate discriminative ability (ROC 0.70) in the community. Individual scenarios are given using the model. However, the model had poor calibration (HLS 5866.28, p prediction model for knee pain, regardless of underlying structural changes of knee osteoarthritis, in the community using a Bayesian modelling approach. The model appears to work well in a community-based population but not in individuals with a higher risk for knee osteoarthritis, and it may provide a convenient tool for use in primary care to predict the risk of knee pain in the general population.

  5. Intravenous dex medetomidine or propofol adjuvant to spinal anesthesia in total knee replacement surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlOweidi, A.S.; Al-Mustafa, M.M.; Alghanem, S.M.; Qudaisat, Y.; Halaweh, S.A.; Massad, I.M.; Al Ajlouni, J.M; Mas'ad, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effect of intravenous dex medetomidine with the intravenous propofol adjuvant to spinal intrathecal anesthesia on the duration of spinal anesthesia and hemodynamic parameters during total knee replacement surgery. Supplementation of spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexemedetomidine or propofol produces good sedation levels without significant clinical hemodynamic changes. Adding dex medetomidine produces significantly longer sensory and motor block than propofol . (authors).

  6. Negative emotions affect postoperative scores for evaluating functional knee recovery and quality of life after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine whether psychological factors affect health-related quality of life (HRQL and recovery of knee function in total knee replacement (TKR patients. A total of 119 TKR patients (male: 38; female: 81 completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-revised (EPQR-S, Knee Society Score (KSS, and HRQL (SF-36. At 1 and 6 months after surgery, anxiety, depression, and KSS scores in TKR patients were significantly better compared with those preoperatively (P<0.05. SF-36 scores at the sixth month after surgery were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.001. Preoperative Physical Component Summary Scale (PCS and Mental Component Summary Scale (MCS scores were negatively associated with extraversion (E score (B=-0.986 and -0.967, respectively, both P<0.05. Postoperative PCS and State Anxiety Inventory (SAI scores were negatively associated with neuroticism (N score; B=-0.137 and -0.991, respectively, both P<0.05. Postoperative MCS, SAI, Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI, and BAI scores were also negatively associated with the N score (B=-0.367, -0.107, -0.281, and -0.851, respectively, all P<0.05. The KSS function score at the sixth month after surgery was negatively associated with TAI and N scores (B=-0.315 and -0.532, respectively, both P<0.05, but positively associated with the E score (B=0.215, P<0.05. The postoperative KSS joint score was positively associated with postoperative PCS (B=0.356, P<0.05. In conclusion, for TKR patients, the scores used for evaluating recovery of knee function and HRQL after 6 months are inversely associated with the presence of negative emotions.

  7. Women with knee osteoarthritis have more pain and poorer function than men, but similar physical activity prior to total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonelli Shalome M

    2011-11-01

    duration, pain catastrophizing, body mass index (BMI, and heat pain threshold; and (3 physical activity (average metabolic equivalent tasks (METS/day were BMI, age, Short-Form 36 (SF-36 Physical Function, Kellgren-Lawrence osteoarthritis grade, depression, and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS pain subscale. Conclusions Women continue to be as physically active as men prior to total knee replacement even though they have significantly more pain, greater pain sensitivity, poorer perceived function, and more impairment on specific functional tasks.

  8. Hip Abductor Strengthening Improves Physical Function Following Total Knee Replacement: One-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Harikesavan, Karvannan; Chakravarty, Raj D.; Maiya, Arun G; Hegde, Sanjay P.; Y. Shivanna, Shivakumar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Total knee replacement (TKR) is the commonest surgical procedure for patients with severe pain and impaired physical function following end stage knee osteoarthritis. The hip abductors are well renowned in stabilization of the trunk and hip during walking, maintaining the lower limb position, and transferring the forces from the lower limbs to the pelvis. Objective: To assess the efficacy of hip abductor strengthening exercise on functional outcome using performance based outcome ...

  9. Disparities in total knee replacement: Population losses in quality-adjusted life years due to differential offer, acceptance, and complication rates for Black Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, Hannah M; Smith, Savannah R; Smith, Karen C; Collins, Jamie E; Suter, Lisa G; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena

    2018-01-24

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is an effective treatment for end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). American racial minorities undergo fewer TKRs than Whites. We estimated quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost for Black knee OA patients due to differences in TKR offer, acceptance, and complication rates. We used the Osteoarthritis Policy Model, a computer simulation of knee OA, to predict QALY outcomes for Black and White knee OA patients with and without TKR. We estimated per-person QALYs gained from TKR as the difference between QALYs with current TKR use and QALYs when no TKR was performed. We estimated average, per-person QALY losses in Blacks as the difference between QALYs gained with White rates of TKR and QALYs gained with Black rates of TKR. We calculated population-level QALY losses by multiplying per-person QALY losses by the number of persons with advanced knee OA. Finally, we estimated QALYs lost specifically due to lower TKR offer and acceptance and higher complications among Black knee OA patients. Black men and women gain 64,100 QALYs from current TKR use. With white offer and complications rates, they would gain an additional 72,000 QALYs. Because these additional gains are unrealized, we call this a loss of 72,000 QALYs. Black Americans lose 67,500 QALYs because of lower offer, 15,800 QALYs because of lower acceptance, and 2,600 QALYs because of higher complications. Black Americans lose 72,000 QALYs due to disparities in TKR offer and complication rates. Programs to decrease disparities in TKR use are urgently needed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Embolization of Spontaneous Hemarthrosis Post Total Knee Replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given, M. F.; Smith, P.; Lyon, S. M.; Robertson, D.; Thomson, K. R.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous nonhemophiliac hemarthrosis is an unusual entity, which has been little described. We present three cases of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis post total knee replacement (TKR) and successful management with embolization. Three male patients were referred to our service for angiography and treatment of recurrent hemarthrosis post TKR. In all three patients antegrade ipsilateral common femoral artery punctures and selective angiography of the geniculate branches were performed with a microcatheter. Abnormal vasculature was noted in all cases. Subsequent embolization was performed with Contour (Boston Scientific, Target Vascular, Cork, Ireland) embolization particles (150-250 and 250-355 μm) in two patients and microcoils in the third (TornadoR; Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA). Technical success was 100%. One patient had a recurrence of symptoms requiring a repeat procedure 6 months later. No complications were encountered. Selective angiography and particle embolization is an effective technique for management of this unusual but problematic postoperative sequelae.

  11. Canine total knee replacement performed due to osteoarthritis subsequent to distal femur fracture osteosynthesis: two-year objective outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, E V; Liska, W D; Hyytiäinen, H K; Hielm-Björkman, A

    2012-01-01

    A 27-kg German Shorthaired Pointer was referred for evaluation due to the complaint of left pelvic limb lameness and signs of pain in the left stifle joint. Radiographs revealed signs of a healed supracondylar femoral fracture that had been previously repaired at another hospital with an intramedullary pin and two cross pins. In addition, there were signs of severe osteoarthritis (OA). The OA had been managed medically with administration of carprofen and nutraceuticals for nine months without any improvement. Left total knee replacement (TKR) surgery was performed to alleviate signs of pain. The patient was assessed preoperatively and at six months, one year, and two years after surgery using radiology, force platform analysis of gait, thigh circumference measures, goniometry, and lameness evaluation. Following surgery, the dog resumed normal activity without any signs of pain and a good quality of life at 3.5 months. Force plate analysis found that peak vertical force on the TKR limb was 85.7% of the normal contralateral limb after two years. Total knee replacement was a successful treatment to manage knee OA associated with a healed distal femoral fracture and internal fixation in this dog.

  12. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of three-dimensional (3D geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR and knee prosthesis design.

  13. Total Knee Replacement: 12 Years Retrospective Review and Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hafiz Z

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA performed from January 1986 to December 1997 at this institution. Case review included Knee Society scores and functional knee score. The records of 94 patients (128 knees were available for analysis with the sample comprised of 76 females (80.9% and 18 males (19.1% and a mean age was 61.4 years. TKA was performed for osteoarthritis (OA in 96 knees (75% and rheumatoid arthritis (RA in 32 knees (25%. Cemented TKAs were performed in all patients. The mean knee score improved from 38.8 preoperatively to 90.9 postoperatively. The mean functional score improved from 19.1 preoperatively to 62.5 postoperatively. Both scores showed significant improvement when comparing preoperative to post operative results (p< 0.005. Arthroplasty was designated failures if the prostheses used had been removed. Survivorship at 12 years was 89.5%.

  14. [Partial replacement of the knee joint with patient-specific instruments and implants (ConforMIS iUni, iDuo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, J; Steinert, A; Zilkens, C; Zeh, A; Schnurr, C; Schmitt-Sody, M; Gebauer, M

    2016-04-01

    Knee arthroplasty is a successful standard procedure in orthopedic surgery; however, approximately 20 % of patients are dissatisfied with the clinical results as they suffer pain and can no longer achieve the presurgery level of activity. According to the literature the reasons are inexact fitting of the prosthesis or too few anatomically formed implants resulting in less physiological kinematics of the knee joint. Reducing the number of dissatisfied patients and the corresponding number of revisions is an important goal considering the increasing need for artificial joints. In this context, patient-specific knee implants are an obvious alternative to conventional implants. For the first time implants are now matched to the individual bone and not vice versa to achieve the best possible individual situation and geometry and more structures (e.g. ligaments and bone) are preserved or only those structures are replaced which were actually destroyed by arthrosis. According to the authors view, this represents an optimal and pioneering addition to conventional implants. Patient-specific implants and the instruments needed for correct alignment and fitting can be manufactured by virtual 3D reconstruction and 3D printing based on computed tomography (CT) scans. The portfolio covers medial as well as lateral unicondylar implants, medial as well as lateral bicompartmental implants (femorotibial and patellofemoral compartments) and cruciate ligament-preserving as well as cruciate ligament-substituting total knee replacements; however, it must be explicitly emphasized that the literature is sparse and no long-term data are available.

  15. Bicruciate-retaining Total Knee Replacement Provides Satisfactory Function and Implant Survivorship at 23 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2015-07-01

    One of the goals of a TKA is to approximate the function of a normal knee. Preserving the natural ligaments might provide a method of restoring close to normal function. Sacrifice of the ACL is common and practical during a TKA. However, this ligament is functional in more than 60% of patients undergoing a TKA and kinematic studies support the concept of bicruciate-retaining (that is, ACL-preserving) TKA; however, relatively few studies have evaluated patients treated with bicruciate-retaining TKA implants. I asked: (1) what is the long-term (minimum 20-year) survivorship, (2) what are the functional results, and (3) what are the reasons for revision of bicruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty prostheses? From January 1989 to September 1992, I performed 639 total knee replacements in 537 patients. Of these, 489 were performed in 390 patients using a bicruciate-retaining, minimally constrained device. During the period in question, this knee prosthesis was used for all patients observed intraoperatively to have an intact, functional ACL with between 15° varus and 15° valgus joint deformity. There were 234 women and 156 men with a mean age at surgery of 65 years (range, 42-84 years) and a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis in 89%. The patella was resurfaced in all knees. The mean followup was 23 years (range, 20-24 years). At the time of this review, 199 (51%) patients had died and 31 (8%) patients were lost to followup, leaving 160 (41%) patients (214 knees) available for review. Component survivorship was determined by competing-risks analysis and Kaplan Meier survivorship analysis with revision for any reason as the primary endpoint. Patients were evaluated every 2 years to assess ROM, joint laxity, knee stability, and to determine American Knee Society scores. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 89% (95% CI, 82%-93%) at 23 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint. Competing-risks survivorship was 94% (95% CI, 91%%-96 %) at 23 years. At followup, the mean

  16. Medium-term evaluation of total knee arthroplasty without patellar replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wanderley Vasconcelos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To mid-term evaluate patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. METHODS: It was realized a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. In all patients clinical examination was done based on the protocol of the Knee Society Scoring System, which assessed pain, range of motion, stability, contraction, knee alignment and function, and radiological evaluation. RESULTS: A total of 36 patients were evaluated. Of these, 07 were operated only on left knee, 12 only on right knee and 17 were operated bilaterally, totaling 53 knees. Ages ranged from 26 to 84 years. Of the 53 knees evaluated, 33 (62.26% had no pain. The maximum flexion range of motion averaged 104.7°. No knee had difficulty in active extension. As to the alignment for anatomical axis twelve knees (22.64% showed deviation between 0° and 4° varus. Thirty-nine (75.49% knees showed pace without restriction and the femorotibial angle ranged between 3° varus and 13° valgus with an average of 5° valgus. The patellar index ranged from 0.2 to 1.1. CONCLUSION: Total knee arthroplasty whitout patellar resurfacing provides good results in mid-term evaluation.

  17. Analysing uncertainty around costs of innovative medical technologies: the case of fibrin sealant (QUIXIL) for total knee replacement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Bastide, Philippe; Buxton, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a relatively simple cost model comparing the costs of using a commercial fibrin sealant (QUIXIL®) in addition to conventional haemostatic treatment vs. conventional treatment alone in total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, and demonstrates and discusses how one- and two-way

  18. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prefontaine Paul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered outcomes using a team approach including the patient, patient's family, and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The JRP consisted of a pre-operative class, standard pathways for medical care, comprehensive peri-operative pain management, aggressive physical therapy (PT, and proactive discharge planning. Measures included functional tests, knee range of motion (ROM, and medical record abstraction of patient demographics, length of stay, discharge disposition, and complications over a 6-month follow-up period. Results All patients achieved medical criteria for hospital discharge. The patients achieved the knee flexion ROM goal of 90° (91.7 ± 5.4°, but did not achieve the knee extension ROM goal of 0° (2.4 ± 2.6°. The length of hospital stay was two days for 53% of the patients, with 39% and 7% discharged in three and four days, respectively. All but three patients were discharged home with functional independence. 68% of these received outpatient physical therapy compared with 32% who received home physical therapy immediately after discharge. Two patients ( Conclusion The comprehensive JRP for TKA was associated with satisfactory clinical outcomes, short lengths of stay, a high percentage of patients discharged home with outpatient PT, and minimal complications. This JRP may represent an efficient, effective and safe protocol for providing care after a TKA.

  19. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy after knee replacement for osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Artz, Neil; Marques, Elsa; Lenguerrand, Erik; Dixon, Samantha; Beswick, Andrew D; Burston, Amanda; Murray, James; Parwez, Tarique; Blom, Ashley W; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2016-06-13

    Primary total knee replacement is a common operation that is performed to provide pain relief and restore functional ability. Inpatient physiotherapy is routinely provided after surgery to enhance recovery prior to hospital discharge. However, international variation exists in the provision of outpatient physiotherapy after hospital discharge. While evidence indicates that outpatient physiotherapy can improve short-term function, the longer term benefits are unknown. The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the long-term clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a 6-week group-based outpatient physiotherapy intervention following knee replacement. Two hundred and fifty-six patients waiting for knee replacement because of osteoarthritis will be recruited from two orthopaedic centres. Participants randomised to the usual-care group (n = 128) will be given a booklet about exercise and referred for physiotherapy if deemed appropriate by the clinical care team. The intervention group (n = 128) will receive the same usual care and additionally be invited to attend a group-based outpatient physiotherapy class starting 6 weeks after surgery. The 1-hour class will be run on a weekly basis over 6 weeks and will involve task-orientated and individualised exercises. The primary outcome will be the Lower Extremity Functional Scale at 12 months post-operative. Secondary outcomes include: quality of life, knee pain and function, depression, anxiety and satisfaction. Data collection will be by questionnaire prior to surgery and 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery and will include a resource-use questionnaire to enable a trial-based economic evaluation. Trial participation and satisfaction with the classes will be evaluated through structured telephone interviews. The primary statistical and economic analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis with and without imputation of missing data. The primary economic result will estimate the

  20. Parametric analysis of electromechanical and fatigue performance of total knee replacement bearing with embedded piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Mohsen; Meneghini, R. Michael; Anton, Steven R.

    2017-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a common procedure in the United States; it has been estimated that about 4 million people are currently living with primary knee replacement in this country. Despite huge improvements in material properties, implant design, and surgical techniques, some implants fail a few years after surgery. A lack of information about in vivo kinetics of the knee prevents the establishment of a correlated intra- and postoperative loading pattern in knee implants. In this study, a conceptual design of an ultra high molecular weight (UHMW) knee bearing with embedded piezoelectric transducers is proposed, which is able to measure the reaction forces from knee motion as well as harvest energy to power embedded electronics. A simplified geometry consisting of a disk of UHMW with a single embedded piezoelectric ceramic is used in this work to study the general parametric trends of an instrumented knee bearing. A combined finite element and electromechanical modeling framework is employed to investigate the fatigue behavior of the instrumented bearing and the electromechanical performance of the embedded piezoelectric. The model is validated through experimental testing and utilized for further parametric studies. Parametric studies consist of the investigation of the effects of several dimensional and piezoelectric material parameters on the durability of the bearing and electrical output of the transducers. Among all the parameters, it is shown that adding large fillet radii results in noticeable improvement in the fatigue life of the bearing. Additionally, the design is highly sensitive to the depth of piezoelectric pocket. Finally, using PZT-5H piezoceramics, higher voltage and slightly enhanced fatigue life is achieved.

  1. Total knee replacement with tibial tubercle osteotomy in rheumatoid patients with stiff knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ahmed Salem; Nassar, Wael Ahmed Mohamed; Fayyad, Tamer Abdelmeguid Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a well-proven modality that can provide pain relief and restore mobility for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with advanced joint destruction. Patellar ligament avulsion, especially in presence of poor bone quality and knee stiffness, is one of the special considerations that must be addressed in this unique population of patients. This study aimed to determine the functional results in a series of rheumatoid patients with stiff knee and end-stage joint destruction who underwent tibial tubercle osteotomy during TKA. Twenty-three knees in 20 patients (16 women; four men) at a mean age of 54 years with end-stage arthritis and knee stiffness due to RA were operated upon for TKA using tibial tubercle osteotomy as a step during the operation. Patients were reviewed clinically and radiographically with a minimum follow-up of two years. Complications were noted. Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score was recorded pre-operatively and at six and 12 months postoperatively. Union occurred at the osteotomy site in 21 of 23 cases. One case had deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There was no infection or periprosthetic fracture, and at last follow-up, no patient required revision. HSS score improved from 46 (15-60) pre-operatively to 85 (71-96) post-operatively. Tibial tubercle osteotomy during TKA in patients with RA and stiff knee is technically demanding yet proved to be effective in improving post-operative range of movement and minimising the complication of patellar ligament avulsion.

  2. International survey of primary and revision total knee replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Ong, Kevin L.; Lau, Edmund; Widmer, Marcel; Maravic, Milka; Gomez-Barrena, Enrique; de Pina, Maria de Fatima; Manno, Valerio; Torre, Marina; Walter, William L.; de Steiger, Richard; Geesink, Rudolph G. T.; Peltola, Mikko; Roeder, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is currently the international standard of care for treating degenerative and rheumatologic knee joint disease, as well as certain knee joint fractures. We sought to answer the following three research questions: (1) What is the international variance in primary and

  3. Predictors of clinical outcome in total hip and knee replacement : a methodological appraisal of implants and patient factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, Johan Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied both implants and patient and surgeon factors as predictors of clinical outcome after total hip and knee replacement. Additionally, we studied a number of methodological aspects of orthopaedic research, such as competing risks in estimating the probability of revision

  4. After total knee replacement younger patients demonstrate superior balance control compared to older patients when recovering from a forward fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Brian D; Gage, William

    2017-05-01

    National joint replacement registries have reported a substantial growth in younger knee osteoarthritic patients (controlled perturbation have shown age-related differences between younger and older healthy adults, whether similar age-related differences exist among total knee replacement patients is unknown. A total of 59 participants, including 29 unilateral total knee replacement patients (six-months post-surgery) made up the four experimental groups: 1) younger patient (54.3 (SD 7.9) years), 2) younger control (55.2 (SD 4.0) years), 3) older patient (76.9 (SD 4.7) years), and 4) older control (77.7 (SD 4.1) years). Using a tether-release method to perturb balance and simulate a forward fall, center of mass and stepping characteristics were analyzed. Younger patients recovered following the perturbation with a significantly smaller center of mass displacement compared to the older patients (14.85 (SD 0.01) v. 18.13 (SD 0.02) %ht, p=0.02); utilizing a longer (0.43 (SD 0.02) v. 0.39 (SD 0.03) m, pcontrols in center of mass displacement or recovery step characteristics (p>0.05). The younger patients demonstrated superior center of mass control in response to a forward perturbation, suggesting that younger patients would be at a reduced risk of falling when recovering from a forward-directed postural perturbation compared to older patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prospective study of ascending venogram following total hip replacement or total knee replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youm, Chang Seon; Suh, Jin Seok; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Chang Yun; Kim, Young Hoo [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    The ascending leg venogram was performed in one hundred forty six lower extremities on the 7th day following total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR). The results were as follows; 1.Overall incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in 146 limbs who underwent THR or TKR was 10%: DVT was detected in 8 limbs among 110 limbs following THR (7%) and 6 limbs among 36 limbs following TKR (17%). 2.The anatomic distribution of DVT was as follows: In THR, 12.5% in FV, 25% in FV and PV, 25% in FV and PV and CV, 12.5% in FV and CV, and 25% in CV. In TKR, 100% in CV. 3.There were many anatomic variations in deep veins of lower extremities: Accessory SFV (41 limbs), double PV(24), accessory SFV and double PV(7), duplication of SFV and PV(3), accessory SFV and multiple PV(2), and accessory SFV and double PV(1). 4.There were multiple SFV in 37%, and 19% of these limbs had DVT. It represented statistically higher than 4% in limbs with a single SFV (P-value < 0.05). 5.The incidence of DVT was 8% in cases of multiple PV, and there was no statistically significant difference between these groups and single PV groups. 6.We could assess number of values from popliteal vein to common femoral vein in 72 limbs. Mean number of value was 5.45 and there was no statistically significant difference between groups having valve over 5 and under 5.

  6. Evaluation of the relationship between anteroposterior translation of a posterior cruciate ligament-retaining total knee replacement and functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, R B; Pang, H N; Lo, N N; Chong, H C; Chin, P L; Chia, S L; Yeo, S J

    2012-10-01

    The success of total knee replacement (TKR) depends on optimal soft-tissue balancing, among many other factors. The objective of this study is to correlate post-operative anteroposterior (AP) translation of a posterior cruciate ligament-retaining TKR with clinical outcome at two years. In total 100 patients were divided into three groups based on their AP translation as measured by the KT-1000 arthrometer. Group 1 patients had AP translation  10 mm. Outcome assessment included range of movement of the knee, the presence of flexion contractures, hyperextension, knee mechanical axes and functional outcome using the Knee Society score, Oxford knee score and the Short-Form 36 questionnaire. At two years, patients in Group 2 reported significantly better Oxford knee scores than the other groups (p = 0.045). A positive correlation between range of movement and AP translation was noted, with patients in group 3 having the greatest range of movement (mean flexion: 117.9° (106° to 130°)) (p 10° (p = 0.01). In this study, the best outcome for cruciate-ligament retaining TKR was achieved in patients with an AP translation of 5 mm to 10 mm.

  7. Augmented Reality for Assistance of Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the development of a surgical assistance system based on augmented reality to support joint replacement procedures and implantation of prosthetic knee. Images of the scene were captured in order to detect the visual markers located on the lateral surface of the patient’s leg for overlapping the 3D models of the prosthesis and the joint, as well as the tool used by the medical specialist. With the marker identification, it was possible to compute its position and orientation for locating the virtual models, obtaining a monitoring system for giving accurate information about the procedure. Also it can be used as training platform for surgeons, without having volunteers or patients for performing real surgeries; instead they can train in a virtual environment. The results have shown an efficient system in terms of cost-benefit relation, taking into account the materials used for developing the system; nevertheless, the accuracy of the algorithm decreases according to the distance between the markers.

  8. Effects of Reiki on Pain, Anxiety, and Blood Pressure in Patients Undergoing Knee Replacement: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Vitale, Anne; Brownell, Elise; Kryak, Elizabeth; Rand, William

    This blinded, controlled pilot study investigated the effects of Reiki on 46 patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Of the 3 groups, Reiki, Sham Reiki, and Standard of Care, only the Reiki group showed significant reductions in pain, blood pressure, respiration rate, and state anxiety, which provides evidence for a full-scale clinical study.

  9. Using Patient Demographics and Statistical Modeling to Predict Knee Tibia Component Sizing in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Anna N; Neher, Robert E; Bell, Tyler; Grimm, James

    2018-06-01

    Preoperative planning is important to achieve successful implantation in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, traditional TKA templating techniques are not accurate enough to predict the component size to a very close range. With the goal of developing a general predictive statistical model using patient demographic information, ordinal logistic regression was applied to build a proportional odds model to predict the tibia component size. The study retrospectively collected the data of 1992 primary Persona Knee System TKA procedures. Of them, 199 procedures were randomly selected as testing data and the rest of the data were randomly partitioned between model training data and model evaluation data with a ratio of 7:3. Different models were trained and evaluated on the training and validation data sets after data exploration. The final model had patient gender, age, weight, and height as independent variables and predicted the tibia size within 1 size difference 96% of the time on the validation data, 94% of the time on the testing data, and 92% on a prospective cadaver data set. The study results indicated the statistical model built by ordinal logistic regression can increase the accuracy of tibia sizing information for Persona Knee preoperative templating. This research shows statistical modeling may be used with radiographs to dramatically enhance the templating accuracy, efficiency, and quality. In general, this methodology can be applied to other TKA products when the data are applicable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Use of Tomosynthesis in the Global Study of Knee Subchondral Insufficiency Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Fred; Bokhari, Omaima; Oravec, Daniel; Kim, Woong; Flynn, Michael; Lumley, Catherine; McPhilamy, Austin; Yeni, Yener N

    2017-02-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF), previously termed spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, are marked by a sudden onset of severe pain. Other than the size of the lesion, prediction for progression to joint replacement is difficult. The objective was to determine if quantitative analysis of bone texture using digital tomosynthesis imaging would be useful in predicting more rapid progression to joint replacement. Tomosynthesis studies of 30 knees with documented SIF were quantified by fractal, mean intercept length (MIL), and line fraction deviation analyses. Fractal dimension, lacunarity, MIL, and line fraction deviation variables measured from these analyses were then correlated to short interval progression to joint replacement surgery. Higher odds for joint replacement were related to higher values of the standard deviation of slope lacunarity and to morphometric measures (eg, MIL). Using digital tomosynthesis images for bone texture assessment may help distinguish condylar bone response in SIF, potentially acting as a clinically relevant predictive tool. In the future, contrasting SIF to the more gradual long-term process of osteoarthritis, there may be a better understanding of the different mechanisms for the two conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of hinges in primary total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, T; Kendoff, D; Haasper, C

    2014-11-01

    The use of hinged implants in primary total knee replacement (TKR) should be restricted to selected indications and mainly for elderly patients. Potential indications for a rotating hinge or pure hinge implant in primary TKR include: collateral ligament insufficiency, severe varus or valgus deformity (>20°) with necessary relevant soft-tissue release, relevant bone loss including insertions of collateral ligaments, gross flexion-extension gap imbalance, ankylosis, or hyperlaxity. Although data reported in the literature are inconsistent, clinical results depend on implant design, proper technical use, and adequate indications. We present our experience with a specific implant type that we have used for over 30 years and which has given our elderly patients good mid-term results. Because revision of implants with long cemented stems can be very challenging, an effort should be made in the future to use shorter stems in modular versions of hinged implants. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. A Modified Method for Reconstruction of Chronic Rupture of the Quadriceps Tendon after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Singh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe herein a modified technique for reconstruction of chronic rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with bilateral total knee replacement and distal realignment of the patella. The surgery involved the application of a Dacron graft and the ‘double eights’ technique. The patient achieved satisfactory results after surgery and we believe that this technique of reconstruction offers advantages over other methods.

  13. Complications in total and partial hip and knee replacement in the San Jose Universitary Hospital Popayan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Sandoval-Daza

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Total hip and knee replacements are surgical procedures commonly used in cases of degenerative articular problems, intrarticular fractures and less common in tumor conditions. Despite its great success complications can arise. Objective: Describe complications in total knee and hip replacements. Methods: A descriptive study, cases serie was done in Hospital Universitario San José in Popayán Colombia, analyzing the period between January 2004 and January 2009, Seventy six patients were included: 53 total hips replacements, 12 cases of partial hip replacements and 11 total knee replacements. Patient's age was in the range between 27 and 97. Results: The main complications founded were: respiratory insufficiency, inability to place the prosthesis, prosthesis dislocation, anemic syndrome, acetabular protrusion, infection, iatrogenic Gushing's syndrome, discrepancy of length limb, residual pain, inability to walk, nosocomial pneumonia, renal failure and periprosthetic fracture. An average of 4, 6% mortality index, 10, 8% hip prosthesis dislocation, 9, 2% infections, all these indices over the different literature reports.

  14. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in the detection of significant complications after total knee joint replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.L.; Wastie, M.L.; Forster, I.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Post-arthroplasty knee pain is common and clinically it can be difficult to identify those patients with complications requiring active treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of 99 Tc m -MDP bone scintigraphy. METHOD: A retrospective study of all patients having a 99 Tc m -MDP bone scintigram for a painful knee arthroplasty between 1993 and 1999 was performed. Bone scintigrams were classified as normal or abnormal by a single observer. The results of these investigations were correlated with clinical outcome. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients with painful knee arthroplasties were referred for investigation. A total of 80 bone scintigrams were performed. The average patient age was 66.2 years (42 female and 33 male). The mean time period between surgery and onset of knee pain was 3 years. A final clinical diagnosis based on arthroscopy, open surgery, and extended clinical follow-up was available for all patients. Forty-three (53.8%) of the scintigrams were normal and 37 (46.3%) abnormal. Two patients with a normal bone scintigram has loose prostheses. Thirteen patients with an abnormal study had normal prostheses on follow-up and these tended to be patients scanned less than a year after surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of an unequivocally normal or abnormal bone scintigram was 92.3, 75.9, 64.9 and 95.0%, respectively. The pattern of isotope uptake in the abnormal studies was not specific enough to reliably differentiate aseptic from septic loosening. CONCLUSION: Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is useful in the assessment of the painful knee arthroplasty. A negative bone scintigram is reassuring and makes loosening or infection unlikely. Smith, S.L. et al. (2001)

  15. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in the detection of significant complications after total knee joint replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.L.; Wastie, M.L.; Forster, I

    2001-03-01

    AIM: Post-arthroplasty knee pain is common and clinically it can be difficult to identify those patients with complications requiring active treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of{sup 99}Tc{sup m}-MDP bone scintigraphy. METHOD: A retrospective study of all patients having a{sup 99}Tc{sup m}-MDP bone scintigram for a painful knee arthroplasty between 1993 and 1999 was performed. Bone scintigrams were classified as normal or abnormal by a single observer. The results of these investigations were correlated with clinical outcome. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients with painful knee arthroplasties were referred for investigation. A total of 80 bone scintigrams were performed. The average patient age was 66.2 years (42 female and 33 male). The mean time period between surgery and onset of knee pain was 3 years. A final clinical diagnosis based on arthroscopy, open surgery, and extended clinical follow-up was available for all patients. Forty-three (53.8%) of the scintigrams were normal and 37 (46.3%) abnormal. Two patients with a normal bone scintigram has loose prostheses. Thirteen patients with an abnormal study had normal prostheses on follow-up and these tended to be patients scanned less than a year after surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of an unequivocally normal or abnormal bone scintigram was 92.3, 75.9, 64.9 and 95.0%, respectively. The pattern of isotope uptake in the abnormal studies was not specific enough to reliably differentiate aseptic from septic loosening. CONCLUSION: Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is useful in the assessment of the painful knee arthroplasty. A negative bone scintigram is reassuring and makes loosening or infection unlikely. Smith, S.L. et al. (2001)

  16. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after total knee or hip replacement: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patientsTo determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patientsTo determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person's functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. THE THERAPY: The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may receive inpatient or outpatient

  17. The effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Inkyung; Kim, Dong Yeon; Kim, Youn Jin

    2012-11-01

    Inflation and deflation of a pneumatic tourniquet used in total knee replacement surgery induces various changes in patient's hemodynamic and metabolic status, which may result in serious complications, especially in aged patients. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a monitoring device designed to estimate the regional cerebral oxygen saturation. We evaluated the effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery, using NIRS. Twenty-eight American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II patients, over the age of sixty-five years undergoing total knee replacement surgery, were included. Under general anesthesia, the mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) were recorded before induction of anesthesia and every 2 min after tourniquet deflation for 20 min. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed 5 min before, in addition to 0, and 10 min after tourniquet deflation. The decrease of rSO(2) was not significant during 20-min deflation period. MAP, CO and SV showed significant decrease during 2 to 12, 4 to 6 and 2 to 6-min period after tourniquet deflation, respectively (P deflation caused significant changes in hemodynamic and metabolic status, but not in regional cerebral oxygen saturation. It is recommended to monitor neurologic status, as well as hemodynamic and metabolic status to avoid serious complications, especially in aged patients.

  18. Prediction of progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis using tibial trabecular bone texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woloszynski, T; Podsiadlo, P; Stachowiak, G W

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE.: To develop a system for prediction of progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) using tibial trabecular bone (TB) texture. METHODS.: We studied 203 knees with (n=68) or without (n=135) radiographic tibiofemoral OA in 105 subjects (90 men, 15 women, mean age 54 years) who ha...

  19. Wear Behavior of an Unstable Knee: Stabilization via Implant Design?

    OpenAIRE

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background. Wear-related failures and instabilities are frequent failure mechanisms of total knee replacements. High-conforming designs may provide additional stability for the joint. This study analyzes the effects of a ligamentous insufficiency on the stability and the wear behavior of a high-conforming knee design. Methods. Two simulator wear tests were performed on a high-conforming total knee replacement design. In the first, a ligamentous-stable knee replacement with a sacrificed anteri...

  20. OUTCOMES REVIEW OF TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT WITH GENESIS II TOTAL KNEE SYSTEM: AUSTRALIAN ORTHOPAEDIC ASSOCIATION NATIONAL JOINT REPLACEMENT REGISTRY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Logvinov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The goal of the article was to review Genesis II Total Knee System use according to AoA NJRR report. Genesis II has been widely used in Russian Federation since 1996. The AoA NJRR report was studied in order to learn connection between number of revision procedures and surgeon’s skills or type of the System, adequate choice among cemented, cementless and hybrid fixation, number of surgeries using Genesis II Total Knee System annually, average revision rate for Genesis II and early cumulative revision rate.CONCLUSION. The systematic study of AoA NJRR allows us to make a conclusion that cemented fixation of Genesis II Total Knee System is mostly effective, and this fact is confirmed by domestic experience. 

  1. Return to work and workplace activity limitations following total hip or knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, A; Davis, A M; Palaganas, M P; Beaton, D E; Badley, E M; Gignac, M A

    2013-10-01

    Total hip (THR) and knee (TKR) replacements increasingly are performed on younger people making return to work a salient outcome. This research evaluates characteristics of individuals with early and later return to work following THR and TKR. Additionally, at work limitations pre-surgery and upon returning to work, and factors associated with work limitations were evaluated. 190 THR and 170 TKR of a total 931 cohort participants were eligible (i.e., working or on short-term disability pre-surgery). They completed questionnaires pre-surgery and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months post-surgery that included demographics, type of occupation, and the Workplace Activity Limitations Scale (WALS). 166 (87%) and 144 (85%) returned to work by 12 months following THR and TKR, respectively. Early (1 month) return to work was associated with, male gender, university education, working in business, finance or administration, and low physical demand work. People with THR returned to work earlier than those with TKR. For both groups, less pain and every day functional limitations were associated with less workplace activity limitations at the time return to work. The majority of individuals working prior to surgery return to work following hip or knee replacement for osteoarthritis (OA) and experience fewer limitations at work than pre-surgery. The changing workforce dynamics and trends toward surgery at younger ages mean that these are important outcomes for clinicians to assess. Additionally, this is important information for employers in understanding continued participation in employment for people with OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prosthetic replacement of the medial meniscus in cadaveric knees - Does the prosthesis mimic the functional behavior of the native meniscus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, TG; Verdonschot, N; Heijkants, RGJC; Buma, R; Scholten, JGF; van Kampen, A; Veth, RPH

    2004-01-01

    Meniscus replacement by a polymer meniscus prosthesis in dogs resulted in generation of new meniscal tissue. Hypothesis: Optimal functioning of the prosthesis would involve realistic deformation and motion patterns of the prosthesis during knee joint motion. Study Design: Controlled laboratory

  3. ACL-RSI and KOOS Measures Predict Normal Knee Function after ACL-SPORTS Training

    OpenAIRE

    White, Kathleen; Zeni, Joseph; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) athletes commonly report increased fear of re-injury and below normal knee function. Implementing a post-operative training protocol (ACL-SPORTS Training) to improve patient perceived knee function, may improve short term outcomes after surgery. Identifying pre-training measures that predict normal knee function after training may allow us to determine who may respond to the treatment intervention. The purpose of this study wa...

  4. Concerns of patients actively contemplating total knee replacement: differences by race and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huan J; Mehta, Priya S; Rosenberg, Aaron; Scrimshaw, Susan C

    2004-02-15

    To examine differences by race/ethnicity and gender in patients' concerns regarding total knee replacement (TKR). Focus groups of patients actively considering TKR were conducted. Discussion included patients' questions and concerns regarding TKR. The software ATLAS.ti was used to tabulate themes by race/ethnicity and gender. Concerns raised by focus group participants were compared with thematic content from patient joint replacement information materials. This comparison used patient literature from 3 high-volume academic TKR centers, the Arthritis Foundation, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. All groups shared similar concerns. However, some issues were more prevalent among certain gender and racial groups. For instance, concerns regarding anesthesia were more important to white Americans and concerns regarding recovery were more important to women. Some of these concerns were not addressed in the available patient literature. Different gender and racial subgroups focus on different concerns when considering TKR. These differences may contribute to gender and race/ethnicity disparity seen in TKR use.

  5. Timing of Re-Transfusion Drain Removal Following Total Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, MF; Costa, ML; Costello, E; Edwards, D

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The use of postoperative drains following total knee replacement (TKR) has recently been modified by the use of re-transfusion drains. The aim of our study was to investigate the optimal time for removal of re-transfusion drains following TKR. PATIENTS AND METHODS The medical records of 66 patients who had a TKR performed between October 2003 and October 2004 were reviewed; blood drained before 6 h and the total volume of blood drained was recorded. RESULTS A total of 56 patients had complete records of postoperative drainage. The mean volume of blood collected in the drain in the first 6 h was 442 ml. The mean total volume of blood in the drain was 595 ml. Therefore, of the blood drained, 78% was available for transfusion. CONCLUSION Re-transfusion drains should be removed after 6 h, when no further re-transfusion is permissible. PMID:16551400

  6. Validation of a prediction model that allows direct comparison of the Oxford Knee Score and American Knee Society clinical rating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maempel, J F; Clement, N D; Brenkel, I J; Walmsley, P J

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates a significant correlation between the American Knee Society (AKS) Clinical Rating System and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and provides a validated prediction tool to estimate score conversion. A total of 1022 patients were prospectively clinically assessed five years after TKR and completed AKS assessments and an OKS questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations between OKS and the AKS knee and function scores but a stronger correlation (r = 0.68, p Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Can multivariate models based on MOAKS predict OA knee pain? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Gómez, Carlos D.; Zanella-Calzada, Laura A.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Galván-Tejada, Carlos E.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in the world. Knee pain is the most disabling symptom in the disease, the prediction of pain is one of the targets in preventive medicine, this can be applied to new therapies or treatments. Using the magnetic resonance imaging and the grading scales, a multivariate model based on genetic algorithms is presented. Using a predictive model can be useful to associate minor structure changes in the joint with the future knee pain. Results suggest that multivariate models can be predictive with future knee chronic pain. All models; T0, T1 and T2, were statistically significant, all p values were 0.60.

  8. Total knee replacement induces peripheral blood lymphocytes apoptosis and it is not prevented by regional anesthesia - a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosel, Juliusz; Rusak, Małgorzata; Gołembiewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowska, Milena; Siemiątkowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Among the many changes caused by a surgical insult one of the least studied is postoperative immunosuppression. This phenomenon is an important cause of infectious complications of surgery such as surgical site infection or hospital acquired pneumonia. One of the mechanisms leading to postoperative immunosuppression is the apoptosis of immunological cells. Anesthesia during surgery is intended to minimize harmful changes and maintain perioperative homeostasis. The aim of the study was evaluation of the effect of the anesthetic technique used for total knee replacement on postoperative peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis. 34 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were randomly assigned to two regional anesthetic protocols: spinal anesthesia and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 11 patients undergoing total knee replacement under general anesthesia served as control group. Before surgery, immediately after surgery, during first postoperative day and seven days after the surgery venous blood samples were taken and the immunological status of the patient was assessed with the use of flow cytometry, along with lymphocyte apoptosis using fluorescent microscopy. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis was seen immediately in the postoperative period and was accompanied by a decrease of the number of T cells and B cells. There were no significant differences in the number of apoptotic lymphocytes according to the anesthetic protocol. Changes in the number of T CD3/8 cells and the number of apoptotic lymphocytes were seen on the seventh day after surgery. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis is an early event in the postoperative period that lasts up to seven days and is not affected by the choice of the anesthetic technique. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Total knee replacement induces peripheral blood lymphocytes apoptosis and it is not prevented by regional anesthesia - a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliusz Kosel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Among the many changes caused by a surgical insult one of the least studied is postoperative immunosuppression. This phenomenon is an important cause of infectious complications of surgery such as surgical site infection or hospital acquired pneumonia. One of the mechanisms leading to postoperative immunosuppression is the apoptosis of immunological cells. Anesthesia during surgery is intended to minimize harmful changes and maintain perioperative homeostasis. The aim of the study was evaluation of the effect of the anesthetic technique used for total knee replacement on postoperative peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis. METHODS: 34 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were randomly assigned to two regional anesthetic protocols: spinal anesthesia and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 11 patients undergoing total knee replacement under general anesthesia served as control group. Before surgery, immediately after surgery, during first postoperative day and seven days after the surgery venous blood samples were taken and the immunological status of the patient was assessed with the use of flow cytometry, along with lymphocyte apoptosis using fluorescent microscopy. RESULTS: Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis was seen immediately in the postoperative period and was accompanied by a decrease of the number of T cells and B cells. There were no significant differences in the number of apoptotic lymphocytes according to the anesthetic protocol. Changes in the number of T CD3/8 cells and the number of apoptotic lymphocytes were seen on the seventh day after surgery. CONCLUSION: Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis is an early event in the postoperative period that lasts up to seven days and is not affected by the choice of the anesthetic technique.

  10. Simple Scoring System and Artificial Neural Network for Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Prediction: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Soo Beom; Oh, Ein; Park, Jee Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease of adults worldwide. Since the treatments for advanced radiographic knee OA are limited, clinicians face a significant challenge of identifying patients who are at high risk of OA in a timely and appropriate way. Therefore, we developed a simple self-assessment scoring system and an improved artificial neural network (ANN) model for knee OA. Methods The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V-1) data were used to develop a scoring system and ANN for radiographic knee OA. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of the scoring system. The ANN was constructed using 1777 participants and validated internally on 888 participants in the KNHANES V-1. The predictors of the scoring system were selected as the inputs of the ANN. External validation was performed using 4731 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic was calculated to compare the prediction models. Results The scoring system and ANN were built using the independent predictors including sex, age, body mass index, educational status, hypertension, moderate physical activity, and knee pain. In the internal validation, both scoring system and ANN predicted radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.73 versus 0.81, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.88 versus 0.94, p<0.001) with good discriminative ability. In the external validation, both scoring system and ANN showed lower discriminative ability in predicting radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.62 versus 0.67, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.70 versus 0.76, p<0.001). Conclusions The self-assessment scoring system may be useful for identifying the adults at high risk for knee OA. The performance of the scoring system is improved significantly by the ANN. We provided an ANN calculator to simply predict the knee OA risk. PMID:26859664

  11. Factors associated with health related quality of life after a hip or knee total replacement, according to a gender approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio R. López Alonso

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the factors associated with Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL, and Symptoms and Physical Functional Disability (S&PFD after a Hip or Knee Total Replacement, according to a gender approach. A longitudinal cohort study design is performed at “La Merced” (Osuna. Sevilla and “Torrecárdenas” (Almería Hospitals, via telephone interview since October 2004 to November 2006. The study included all people who underwent a hip or knee total replacement. The dependent variables were HRQL and S&PFD, both measured via short versions of the COOP/WONCA and WOMAC questionnaires.Results: 311 people were included, who were mostly women (82,63% and 70 years old (average. The hip and knee replacement obtained an statistically significant improvement on HRQL (20,5% and S&PFD (28,2%, with no gender difference. Five variables were associated to HRQL for Women: HRQL previous to surgery, hospital, local infection as a complication, autonomy for daily living, and marital status. All of them were associated to men, except the last two ones. About S&PFD, six variables were associated for women: HRQL and S&PFD previous to surgery, hospital, local infection as a complication, body mass index and marital status. All of them were associated to men, except the last two ones.Factors associated to improve on HRQL and S&PFD in male population are few, though they find a great explanation of the improvement. Different situation arise on female population because more factors obtained a substantially inferior explanation.

  12. The Influence of Obesity on Patient Reported Outcomes following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Ayyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study retrospectively analysed the effects of obesity as described by Body Mass Index (BMI on patient reported outcomes following total knee replacement. Participants (105 females and 66 males who had undergone surgery under the care of a single surgeon were included in the review and were grouped according to their preoperative BMI into nonobese ( kg/m2, ( obese ( kg/m2 (. Oxford Knee Score (OKS and Short Form 12 scores (SF12 were taken preoperatively and 6 and 12 months after surgery to analyse differences between groups in the absolute scores as well as changes from before to after surgery. Preoperatively, the obese group had a significantly poorer OKS compared to non obese (44.7 versus 41.2, . There were no statistically significant group effects on follow-up or change scores of the OKS and SF12. Correlations coefficients between BMI and follow-up and change scores were low (. There were no significant differences in the number of complications and revisions (local wound infection, 6.7% non obese, 11% obese, postoperative systemic complication, 8% non obese, 12% obese, revision, 4% nonobese, 3% obese. In conclusion, our findings indicate similar degrees of benefits from the surgery irrespective of patient BMI.

  13. Peripheral nerve blocks versus general anesthesia for total knee replacement in elderly patients on the postoperative quality of recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu JL

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available JunLe Liu,1,* WeiXiu Yuan,1,* XiaoLin Wang,1,* Colin F Royse,2,3 MaoWei Gong,1 Ying Zhao,1 Hong Zhang1 1Anesthesia and Operation Center, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital and Medical School of Chinese People's Liberation Army, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Anesthesia and Pain Management Unit, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 3Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Both peripheral nerve blocks with sedation or general anesthesia can be used for total knee replacement surgery. Objectives: We compared these anesthetic techniques on the postoperative quality of recovery early in elderly patients. Materials and methods: In our study, 213 patients who were ≥65 years old and undergoing total knee replacement were randomized to peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs – lumbar plexus and sciatic – with propofol sedation, or general anesthesia with combined propofol and remifentanil. Blocks were performed using nerve stimulation and 0.35% ropivacaine. All patients received postoperative multimodal analgesia. Postoperative recovery was assessed at 15 minutes, 40 minutes, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days after surgery, with the Postoperative Quality of Recovery Scale, in physiological, nociceptive, emotive, modified activities of daily living, modified cognitive, and overall patient perspective domains. Results: Intraoperative blood pressure and heart rate were more stable with PNBs (P<0.001. The recovery was better with PNBs in physiological (P<0.001, emotive (depression and anxiety (P<0.001, nociceptive (pain and nausea (P<0.001, modified cognitive (P<0.001, and all domains recovery (P<0.001, but not in activities of daily living (P=0.181. Intraoperative drugs and the postoperative sulfentanil requirement of the PNBs group were lower (all P<0.001. Differences were

  14. Influence of body mass index (BMI on functional improvements at 3 years following total knee replacement: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Baker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of patients presenting for total knee replacement who are classified as obese is increasing. The functional benefits of performing TKR in these patients are unclear. AIM: To assess the influence pre-operative body mass index has upon knee specific function, general health status and patient satisfaction at 3 years following total knee replacement. DESIGN: Retrospective comparative cohort study using prospectively collected data from an institutional arthroplasty register. METHODS: 1367 patients were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and Medical Outcomes Trust Short Form-36 (SF-36 scores supplemented by a validated measure of satisfaction pre-operatively and subsequently at 1,2 and 3 year post-operatively. Comparisons were made by dividing the cohort into 4 groups based on body mass index (BMI 18.5-25.0 kg/m(2 (n = 253;>25.0-30.0 kg/m(2 (n = 559;>30.0-35.0 kg/m(2 (n = 373;>35.0 kg/m(2 (n = 182. RESULTS: Despite lower pre-operative, 1 and 3 year WOMAC and SF-36 scores patients with the highest BMIs >35.0 kg/m(2 experienced similar improvements to patients with a 'normal' BMI (18.5-25.0 kg/m(2 at 1 year (Difference in WOMAC improvement = 0.0 (95%CI -5.2 to 5.2, p = 1.00 and this improvement was sustained at up to 3 years (Difference in 1 year to 3 year improvement = 2.2 (95%CI: -2.1 to 6.5, p = 1.00. This effect was also observed for the SF-36 mental and physical component scores. Despite equivalent functional improvements levels of satisfaction in the >35.0 kg/m(2 group were lower than for any other BMI group (>35.0 kg/m(2 = 84.6% satisfied versus 18.5-5.0 kg/m(2 = 93.3% satisfied,p = 0.01 as was the proportion of patients who stated they would have the operation again (>35.0 kg/m(2 = 69.6% versus 18.5-25.0 kg/m(2 = 82.2%,p = 0.01. CONCLUSION: Obese and morbidly obese patients gain as much functional benefit from

  15. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475. When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P<0.01 of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  16. Pre- and postoperative ventilation-perfusion scan findings in patients undergoing total hip replacement or knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Venous thrombolembolism is one of the major postoperative complications in patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) or knee anthroplasty (TKA). The reported incidence of pulmonary embolism in this group is as high as 20%. The purpose of this report was to evaluate the value of preoperative and 7th-day postpoperative ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) lung scans in the management of patients undergoing elective reconstructive surgery of the hips or knees. Routine preoperative and 7th-day postoperative V/Q lung scans were obtained in 34 patients who underwent THR (17 patients) or TKA (17 patients). There were 15 male and 19 female patients, with an age distribution ranging from 56 to 80 years. Chest radiographs were obtained within 1 day of the pre- or postoperative lungs scan. Lung scans were interpreted by two experienced nuclear physicians

  17. Development of Total Knee Replacement Digital Templating Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Siti Fairuz; Sulaiman, Riza; Thian Seng, Lee; Mohd. Kassim, Abdul Yazid; Abdullah, Suhail; Yusof, Shahril; Omar, Masbah; Abdul Hamid, Hamzaini

    In this study, by taking full advantage of digital X-ray and computer technology, we have developed a semi-automated procedure to template knee implants, by making use of digital templating method. Using this approach, a software system called OrthoKneeTMhas been designed and developed. The system is to be utilities as a study in the Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology in medical faculty, UKM (FPUKM). OrthoKneeTMtemplating process employs uses a technique similar to those used by many surgeons, using acetate templates over X-ray films. Using template technique makes it easy to template various implant from every Implant manufacturers who have with a comprehensive database of templates. The templating functionality includes, template (knee) and manufactures templates (Smith & Nephew; and Zimmer). From an image of patient x-ray OrthoKneeTMtemplates help in quickly and easily reads to the approximate template size needed. The visual templating features then allow us quickly review multiple template sizes against the X-ray and thus obtain the nearly precise view of the implant size required. The system can assist by templating on one patient image and will generate reports that can accompany patient notes. The software system was implemented in Visual basic 6.0 Pro using the object-oriented techniques to manage the graphics and objects. The approaches for image scaling will be discussed. Several of measurement in orthopedic diagnosis process have been studied and added in this software as measurement tools features using mathematic theorem and equations. The study compared the results of the semi-automated (using digital templating) method to the conventional method to demonstrate the accuracy of the system.

  18. Knee and Ankle Arthroplasty in Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Piero Solimeno

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Today, major surgical procedures can be safely performed in hemophilic patients with chronic arthropathy, using available factor concentrates. In this setting, total knee replacement is considered the “gold standard”, while the use of total ankle replacement is still debated. Indeed, the unsatisfactory results obtained with the previous available design of implants did not raise enthusiasm as knee or hip replacement. Recently, the introduction of new implant designs and better reported outcomes have renewed the interest in total ankle replacement in people with hemophilia. In this review, the role of replacement surgery in the treatment of chronic hemophilic arthropathy will be described.

  19. A nationwide analysis of socioeconomic outcomes after hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Jakob; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Total hip and knee replacement (THA and TKA) are successful operations based on patient-reported outcomes and short-term socioeconomic evaluations. However, other data have shown problems regarding persistent pain and function. No detailed large-scale, long-term socioeconomic data...... exist on income and total health expenses before and after THA and TKA compared with a matched reference population (RP). METHODS: From the unique nationwide Danish registers, a total of 128,109 patients undergoing primary THA and TKA were followed from up to 12 years before to up to 12 years after...... surgery. The economic analysis of the total costs before and after surgery were divided into annual healthcare costs (outpatient services, inpatient admissions, prescription drugs and physician office visits), home care and loss of income and compared with a matched RP. RESULTS: Healthcare costs increased...

  20. Preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 and 5 years after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Trela-Larsen, Lea; Whitehouse, Michael R; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - Psychosocial factors are important risk factors for poor outcomes in the first year after total knee replacement (TKR), however their impact on long-term outcomes is unclear. We aimed to identify preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 year and 5 years after TKR. Patients and methods - 266 patients were recruited prior to TKR surgery. Knee pain and function were assessed preoperatively and at 1 and 5 years postoperative using the WOMAC Pain score, WOMAC Function score and American Knee Society Score (AKSS) Knee score. Preoperative depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, pain self-efficacy and social support were assessed. Statistical analyses involved multiple linear regression and mixed effect linear regression. Results - Higher anxiety was a risk factor for worse pain at 1 year postoperative. No psychosocial factors were associated with any outcomes at 5 years postoperative. Analysis of change over time found that patients with higher pain self-efficacy had lower preoperative pain and experienced less improvement in pain up to 1 year postoperative. Higher pain self-efficacy was associated with less improvement in the AKSS up to 1 year postoperative but more improvement between 1 and 5 years postoperative. Interpretation - Preoperative anxiety was found to influence pain at 1 year after TKR. However, none of the psychosocial variables were risk factors for a poor outcome at 5 years post-operative, suggesting that the negative effects of anxiety on outcome do not persist in the longer-term.

  1. Outcome of total knee replacement following explantation and cemented spacer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Zajonz, Dirk; Bollmann, Juliane; Geissler, Vanessa; Prietzel, Torsten; Moche, Michael; Roth, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph-E; Josten, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Infection after total knee replacement (TKR) is one of the serious complications which must be pursued with a very effective therapeutic concept. In most cases this means revision arthroplasty, in which one-setting and two-setting procedures are distinguished. Healing of infection is the conditio sine qua non for re-implantation. This retrospective work presents an assessment of the success rate after a two-setting revision arthroplasty of the knee following periprosthetic infection. It further considers drawing conclusions concerning the optimal timing of re-implantation. A total of 34 patients have been enclosed in this study from September 2005 to December 2013. 35 re-implantations were carried out following explantation of total knee and implantation of cemented spacer. The patient's group comprised of 53% (18) males and 47% (16) females. The average age at re-implantation time was 72.2 years (ranging from 54 to 85 years). We particularly evaluated the microbial spectrum, the interval between explantation and re-implantation, the number of surgeries that were necessary prior to re-implantation as well as the postoperative course. We reported 31.4% (11) reinfections following re-implantation surgeries. The number of the reinfections declined with increasing time interval between explantation and re-implantation. Patients who developed reinfections were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 4.47 months. Those patients with uncomplicated course were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 6.79 months. Nevertheless, we noticed no essential differences in outcome with regard to the number of surgeries carried out prior to re-implantation. Mobile spacers proved better outcome than temporary arthrodesis with intramedullary fixation. No uniform strategy of treatment exists after peri-prosthetic infections. In particular, no optimal timing can be stated concerning re-implantation. Our data point out to the fact that a longer time interval between

  2. Outcome of total knee replacement following explantation and cemented spacer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection after total knee replacement (TKR is one of the serious complications which must be pursued with a very effective therapeutic concept. In most cases this means revision arthroplasty, in which one-setting and two-setting procedures are distinguished. Healing of infection is the conditio sine qua non for re-implantation. This retrospective work presents an assessment of the success rate after a two-setting revision arthroplasty of the knee following periprosthetic infection. It further considers drawing conclusions concerning the optimal timing of re-implantation.Patients and methods: A total of 34 patients have been enclosed in this study from September 2005 to December 2013. 35 re-implantations were carried out following explantation of total knee and implantation of cemented spacer. The patient’s group comprised of 53% (18 males and 47% (16 females. The average age at re-implantation time was 72.2 years (ranging from 54 to 85 years. We particularly evaluated the microbial spectrum, the interval between explantation and re-implantation, the number of surgeries that were necessary prior to re-implantation as well as the postoperative course. Results: We reported 31.4% (11 reinfections following re-implantation surgeries. The number of the reinfections declined with increasing time interval between explantation and re-implantation. Patients who developed reinfections were operated on (re-implantation after an average of 4.47 months. Those patients with uncomplicated course were operated on (re-implantation after an average of 6.79 months. Nevertheless, we noticed no essential differences in outcome with regard to the number of surgeries carried out prior to re-implantation. Mobile spacers proved better outcome than temporary arthrodesis with intramedullary fixation.Conclusion: No uniform strategy of treatment exists after peri-prosthetic infections. In particular, no optimal timing can be stated concerning re

  3. Total Knee Replacement: a Preliminary Report Thirteen (13) Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is a major technical procedure. Since its introduction it has become a successful procedure for treating various forms of pathologies in the knee associated with severe pain and disabling deformities such as severe osteoarthritis. Although various systems exist, they are broadly ...

  4. Traumatic Dislodgement of Tibial Polyethylene Insert after a High-Flex Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felix Astoul Bonorino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many pathologic entities can produce a painful total knee replacement (TKR that may lead to potential prosthetic failure. Polyethylene insert dissociation from the tibial baseplate has been described most frequently after mobile-bearing and cruciate-retaining TKRs. However, only 3 tibial insert dislocations in primary fixed-bearing High-Flex posterior-stabilized TKRs have been reported. We present a new case of tibial insert dislocation in a High-Flex model that shares similarities and differences with the cases reported, facilitating the analysis of the potential causes, which still remain undefined.

  5. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  6. Outcome of total knee arthroplasty with insall burstein-11 prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, M.Z.; Qayum, H.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with severe degenerative knee joint disease often require knee arthroplasty to reduce pain, improve stability and restore function. Insall Burstein II prosthesis is posteriorly stabilized condylar prosthesis, which provide posterior cruciate ligament substitution. It was designed to improve range of motion, stair climbing ability and to prevent posterior subluxation. Evaluate the functional outcome of total knee arthroplasty with IB II prosthesis and Evaluate the alignment of prosthetic components by radiological parameters and its correlation with functional outcome. Sixty knees of sixty patients were replaced by using Insall Burstein II prosthesis. Postoperative radiographs were evaluated for alignment of knee and prosthetic components by criteria selected from knee society roentogenographic evaluation system. Functional outcome was evaluated by rationale of knee society knee rating system. Prosthetic component was aligned in 93% and mal-alignment in 7% of the cases. There was significant improvement in functions core from mean score 33.83 +-15.5 to 59.5+-17.7 and knee score from 37 +- 12.5 to 76.4 +-2.2. Postoperative functional score was found correlated with alignment significantly. Conclusion: Total knee arthroplasty with I-B-II prosthesis is a safe durable and predictable procedure with proper surgical technique and expertise good alignment and satisfactory functional out come can be achieved. (author)

  7. A Systematic Review of Clinical Functional Outcomes After Medial Stabilized Versus Non-Medial Stabilized Total Knee Joint Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Young

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Medial stabilized total knee joint replacement (TKJR construct is designed to closely replicate the kinematics of the knee. Little is known regarding comparison of clinical functional outcomes of patients utilising validated patient reported outcome measures (PROM after medial stabilized TKJR and other construct designs.PurposeTo perform a systematic review of the available literature related to the assessment of clinical functional outcomes following a TKJR employing a medial stabilized construct design.MethodsThe review was performed with a Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA algorithm. The literature search was performed using variouscombinations of keywords. The statistical analysis was completed using Review Manager (RevMan, Version 5.3.ResultsIn the nineteen unique studies identified, there were 2,448 medial stabilized TKJRs implanted in 2,195 participants, there were 1,777 TKJRs with non-medial stabilized design constructs implanted in 1,734 subjects. The final mean Knee Society Score (KSS value in the medial stabilized group was 89.92 compared to 90.76 in the non-medial stabilized group, with the final KSS mean value difference between the two groups was statistically significant and favored the non-medial stabilized group (SMD 0.21; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.41; p = 004. The mean difference in the final WOMAC values between the two groups was also statistically significant and favored the medial stabilized group (SMD: −0.27; 95% CI: −0.47 to −0.07; p = 0.009. Moderate to high values (I2 of heterogeneity were observed during the statistical comparison of these functional outcomes.ConclusionBased on the small number of studies with appropriate statistical analysis, we are unable to reach a clear conclusion in the clinical performance of medial stabilized knee replacement construct.Level of EvidenceLevel II

  8. Continuous Femoral Nerve Block versus Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia for Knee Mobility and Long-Term Pain in Patients Receiving Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the comparative analgesia effectiveness and safety of postoperative continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB with patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA and their impact on knee function and chronic postoperative pain. Methods. Participants were randomly allocated to receive postoperative continuous femoral nerve block (group CFNB or intravenous patient controlled analgesia (group PCIA. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scores for knee and incidence of chronic postoperative pain at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively were compared. postoperative pain and salvage medication at rest or during mobilization 24 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days postoperatively were also recorded. Results. After discharge from the hospital and rehabilitation of joint function, patients in group CFNB reported significantly improved knee flexion and less incidence of chronic postoperative pain at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively (P<0.05. Analgesic rescue medications were significantly reduced in patients receiving CFNB (P<0.001 and P=0.031, resp.. Conclusion. With standardized rehabilitation therapy, continuous femoral nerve block analgesia reduced the incidence of chronic postoperative pain, improved motility of replaced joints, and reduced the dosages of rescue analgesic medications, suggesting a recovery-enhancing effect of peripheral nerve block analgesia.

  9. Influence of a meal-replacement diet on quality of life in women with obesity and knee osteoarthritis before orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gómez, Juan José; Izaola-Jáuregui, Olatz; Torres-Torres, Beatriz; Gómez-Hoyos, Emilia; Castro Lozano, María Ángeles; Ortolá-Buigues, Ana; Martín Ferrero, Miguel Ángel; De Luis-Román, Daniel Antonio

    2018-01-16

    Knee osteoarthritis is a disease with a high prevalence in our environment, especially in women. Weight loss can improve the quality of life of these patients before surgery. To evaluate the effect of a meal-replacement diet on weight loss, body composition, and the improvement of the quality of life in obese women with knee osteoarthritis pending surgery. One branch intervention study was performed over three months on 81 women with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m2 with knee osteoarthritis before surgery. Patients received a hyperproteic meal-replacement diet with two bottles of an oral nutrition supplement in lunch and dinner (1,035 kcal). Anthropometric parameters, and body composition were measured. The quality of life was assessed by WOMAC and SF-36 test. The mean age of the patients was 62.23 (8.50) years. The percentage of weight loss was 8.23% (4.04). An improvement in the SF-36 total score was observed (basal: 49.35 [20.41], three months: 58.71 [17.07], p diet, there is a significant decrease in weight and fat mass with a relative increase of the latter. There is an improvement in the quality of life according to SF-36 and WOMAC. There is an independent relationship between weight loss and SF-36 improvement.

  10. An empirical study using range of motion and pain score as determinants for continuous passive motion: outcomes following total knee replacement surgery in an adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    The continuous passive motion (CPM) machine is one means by which to rehabilitate the knee after total knee replacement surgery. This study sought to determine which total knee replacement patients, if any, benefit from the use of the CPM machine. For the study period, most patients received active physical therapy. Patients were placed in the CPM machine if, on postoperative day 1, they had a range of motion less than or equal to 45° and/or pain score of 8 or greater on a numeric rating scale of 0-10, 0 being no pain and 10 being the worst pain. Both groups of patients healed at similar rates. The incidence of adverse events, length of stay, and functional outcomes was comparable between groups. Given the demonstrated lack of relative benefit to the patient and the cost of the CPM, this study supported discontinuing the routine use of the CPM.

  11. [Comparison of in vivo characteristics of polyethylene wear particles produced by a metal and a ceramic femoral component in total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veigl, D; Vavřík, P; Pokorný, D; Slouf, M; Pavlova, E; Landor, I

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate in vivo and compare, in terms of the quality and number of ultra high-molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles, total knee replacements of identical construction differing only in the material used for femoral component production, i.e., CoCrMo alloy or ZrO2 ceramics. Samples of peri-prosthetic granuloma tissue were collected in two patients with total knee replacement suffering from implant migration, who were matched in relevant characteristics. The primary knee replacement in Patient 1 with a CoCrMo femoral component was done 7.2 years and in Patient 2 with a ZrO2 implant 6.8 years before this assessment. The polyethylene wear-induced granuloma was analysed by the MORF method enabling us to assess the shape and size of wear debris and the IRc method for assessment of particle concentration. In the granuloma tissue samples of Patient 1, on the average, particles were 0.30 mm in size and their relative volume was 0.19. In the Patient 2 tissue samples, the average size of particles was 0.33 mm and their relative volume was 0.26. There was no significant difference in either particle morphology or their concentration in the granuloma tissue between the two patients. One of the options of how to reduce the production of polyethylene wear particles is to improve the tribological properties of contacting surfaces in total knee replacement by substituting a cobalt-chrome femoral component with a zirconia ceramic femoral component. The previous in vitro testing carried out with a mechanical simulator under conditions approaching real weight-bearing in the human body did show a nearly three-fold decrease in the number of UHMWPE wear particles in zirconia components. The evaluation of granuloma tissue induced by the activity of a real prosthetic joint for nearly seven years, however, did not reveal any great difference in either quality or quantity of polyethylene debris between the two replacements. The difference of surface

  12. Repair of Medial Patellofemoral, Ligament Improves Patellar, Tracking in Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, R Michael; Ziemba-Davis, Mary; Smits, Shelly; Bicos, James

    2015-11-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is essential to maintain patella stability; however, its role in total knee replacement (TKR) has not been studied. Forty-six consecutive TKRs in 40 patients were reviewed. Standard closure was performed in 29 TKRs. The MPFL was isolated and anatomically re-approximated in 17 subsequent TKRs. Blinded radiographic evaluation of patellar tilt and subluxation was performed preoperatively and 4 months postoperatively. Despite greater preoperative lateral tilt, the MPFL repair group demonstrated greater correction in patellar tilt compared with the standard closure group (p = 0.02). Patellar tracking also was optimized in the MPFL group, despite equivalent preoperative lateral patellar subluxation in the two groups. Simple repair of the MPFL at arthrotomy closure appears to optimize patellar stability radiographically and may improve long-term results by minimizing patellar complications and wear.

  13. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Theodore T.

    2005-01-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty

  14. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021 (United States)]. E-mail: TMiller@NSHS.edu

    2005-05-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty.

  15. Resource use and costs associated with opioid-induced constipation following total hip or total knee replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittbrodt ET

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Eric T Wittbrodt,1 Tong J Gan,2 Catherine Datto,1 Charles McLeskey,1 Meenal Sinha3 1US Medical Affairs, AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA; 3Premier Applied Sciences, Premier, Inc., Charlotte, NC, USA Purpose: Constipation is a well-known complication of surgery that can be exacerbated by opioid analgesics. This study evaluated resource utilization and costs associated with opioid-induced constipation (OIC. Patients and methods: This retrospective, observational, and propensity-matched cohort study utilized the Premier Healthcare Database. The study included adults ≥18 years of age undergoing total hip or total knee replacement as inpatients who received an opioid analgesic and were discharged between January 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015. Diagnosis codes identified patients with OIC who were then matched 1:1 to patients without OIC. Generalized linear and logistic regression models were used to compare inpatient resource utilization, total hospital costs, inpatient mortality, and 30-day all-cause readmissions and emergency department visits. Results: Of 788,448 eligible patients, 40,891 (5.2% had OIC. Covariates were well balanced between matched patients with and without OIC (n=40,890 each. In adjusted analyses, patients with OIC had longer hospital lengths of stay (3.6 versus 3.3 days; p<0.001, higher total hospital costs (US$17,479 versus US$16,265; p<0.001, greater risk of intensive care unit admission (odds ratio [OR]=1.12, 95% CI: 1.01–1.24, and increased likelihood of 30-day hospital readmissions (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.11–1.22 and emergency department visits (OR=1.38, 95% CI: 1.07–1.79 than patients without OIC. No statistically significant difference was found with inpatient mortality (OR=0.89, 95% CI: 0.59–1.35. Conclusion: OIC was associated with greater resource utilization and hospital costs for patients undergoing primarily elective total hip or total knee

  16. [Effect of Transcutaneous Acupoint Electrical Stimulation on Hemodynamic Fluctuation Caused by Loosing Tourniquet in Elderly Patients Undergoing Knee Joint Replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Han-Sheng; Feng, Yi

    2017-12-25

    To observe the effect of transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation (TAES) on hemodynamic fluctuation caused by loosing tourniquet in the elderly patients undergoing knee joint replacement. A total of 60 ASA (America Society Anesthesiologist) I or II elderly patients for elective knee joint replacement surgery were randomly divided into control group (30 cases) and TAES group (30 cases). Patients of both groups were treated by intravenous anesthesia, and monitored with bispectral index (BIS, between 45-60) for anesthesia depth, stroke volume variation (SVV) for fluid management, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac index (CI) for hemodynamic fluctuation evaluation, and with analgesia nociception index (ANI, between 50-70) for remifentanil dosage adjustment. TAES (2 Hz/100 Hz, 8-20 mA) was applied to bilateral Xinshu (BL 15), Feishu (BL 13), Neiguan (PC 6) and Hegu (LI 4) acupoints for 30 min first (followed by anesthesia induction and operation), and given continuously until 15 min after tourniquet loosing. Patients of the control group were only given with electrodes attachment without electrical stimulation. The levels of MAP, CI, and arterial blood pH, PaCO 2 , PaO 2 , base excess (BE) and lactic acid (Lac) 1 min before, and 5 and 15 min after tourniquet loosing, and the dosages of remifentanil and ephedrine after tourniquet loosing were recorded. The changed levels of MAP, CI and blood Lac at 5 min after tourniquet loosing (relevant to the baseline levels), and blood Lac content at 15 min after tourniquet loosing (relevant to 5 min after tourniquet loosing) were significantly lower in the TAES group than in the control group ( P 0.05). TAES has a positive effect on hemodynamics fluctuation caused by loosing tourniquet in the aged patients undergoing knee joint replacement.

  17. Prosthetic alignment after total knee replacement is not associated with dissatisfaction or change in Oxford Knee Score: A multivariable regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbregts, Henricus J T A M; Khan, Riaz J K; Fick, Daniel P; Jarrett, Olivia M; Haebich, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 18% of the patients are dissatisfied with the result of total knee replacement. However, the relation between dissatisfaction and prosthetic alignment has not been investigated before. We retrospectively analysed prospectively gathered data of all patients who had a primary TKR, preoperative and one-year postoperative Oxford Knee Scores (OKS) and postoperative computed tomography (CT). The CT protocol measures hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle, and coronal, sagittal and axial component alignment. Satisfaction was defined using a five-item Likert scale. We dichotomised dissatisfaction by combining '(very) dissatisfied' and 'neutral/not sure'. Associations with dissatisfaction and change in OKS were calculated using multivariable logistic and linear regression models. 230 TKRs were implanted in 105 men and 106 women. At one year, 12% were (very) dissatisfied and 10% neutral. Coronal alignment of the femoral component was 0.5 degrees more accurate in patients who were satisfied at one year. The other alignment measurements were not different between satisfied and dissatisfied patients. All radiographic measurements had a P-value>0.10 on univariate analyses. At one year, dissatisfaction was associated with the three-months OKS. Change in OKS was associated with three-months OKS, preoperative physical SF-12, preoperative pain and cruciate retaining design. Neither mechanical axis, nor component alignment, is associated with dissatisfaction at one year following TKR. Patients get the best outcome when pain reduction and function improvement are optimal during the first three months and when the indication to embark on surgery is based on physical limitations rather than on a high pain score. 2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiological imaging of osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, M.C.; Jaschke, W.; Klauser, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative age-related joint disease leading to typical degradation of articular cartilage with severe pain and limitation of joint motion. Although knee radiographs are widely considered as the gold standard for the assessment of knee osteoarthritis in clinical and scientific settings they increasingly have significant limitations in situations when resolution and assessment of cartilage is required. Analysis of osteoarthritis of the knee with conventional x-ray is associated with many technical limitations and is increasingly being replaced by high-quality assessment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or sonography both in the clinical routine and scientific studies. Novel imaging modalities such as MRI or ultrasound enable in vivo visualization of the quality of the cartilaginous structure and bone as well as all articular and periarticular tissue. Therefore, the limitations of radiographs in assessment of knee osteoarthritis could be overcome by these techniques. This review article aims to provide insights into the most important radiological features of knee osteoarthritis and systematic visualization with different imaging approaches. The demographic development in western industrialized countries predicts an increase of ageing-related osteoarthritis of the knee for the next decades. A systematic radiological evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis includes the assessment of the periarticular soft tissue, cartilaginous thickness, cartilage volume, possible cartilage defects, the macromodular network of hyaline cartilage, bone marrow edema, menisci and articular ligaments. Modern imaging modalities, such as MRI and sonography allow the limitations of conventional radiography to be overcome and to visualize the knee structures in great detail to quantitatively assess the severity of knee osteoarthritis. (orig.) [de

  19. Granuloma debridement and the use of an injectable calcium phosphate bone cement in the treatment of osteolysis in an uncemented total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranawat Vijai S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyethylene particulate debris-induced periprosthetic osteolysis is a known complication of knee arthroplasty surgery, and may result in the need for revision surgery. The management of these bony defects can be surgically challenging, and full revisions of well-fixed total knee components can lead to substantial bone loss. We present the case of a 71 year old man who developed knee pain and osteolysis around an uncemented total knee replacement. Due to significant medical comorbidies he was treated by percutaneous cyst granuloma debridement and grafting using an injectable calcium phosphate bone substitute. There were no wound complications, and the patient was allowed to fully weight-bear post-operatively. Histopathology and microbiology of the cyst material confirmed polyethylene granulomata without any evidence of infection. At 6 weeks post-operatively the patient's previous knee pain had resolved, he was able to comfortably fully weight-bear. Preoperative scores (Knee Society Score (KSS 41, WOMAC score 46.2, and Oxford Knee Score 39 had all improved at the 12-month post-operative review KSS 76, WOMAC 81.7 and Oxford Knee score 21. This is a safe and effective technique with minimal morbidity and may be an appropriate treatment modality when more extensive revision surgery is not possible. The case is discussed with reference to the literature.

  20. Predicting knee cartilage loss using adaptive partitioning of cartilage thickness maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter; Dam, Erik Bjørnager; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether measures of knee cartilage thickness can predict future loss of knee cartilage. A slow and a rapid progressor group was determined using longitudinal data, and anatomically aligned cartilage thickness maps were extracted from MRI at baseline. A novel machine learning...... framework was then trained using these maps. Compared to measures of mean cartilage plate thickness, group separation was increased by focusing on local cartilage differences. This result is central for clinical trials where inclusion of rapid progressors may help reduce the period needed to study effects...

  1. Poor expectations of knee replacement benefit are associated with modifiable psychological factors and influence the decision to have surgery: A cross-sectional and longitudinal study of a community-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Daniel L; Golladay, Gregory J; Hayes, Amanda; Ghomrawi, Hassan M K

    2017-03-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a highly effective surgery, but is underutilized by some patient groups. This study determined factors associated with a person's expectations with respect to pain and walking function following a TKA procedure, should they elect to undergo a TKA. A total of 3542 people were studied with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis and enrolled in the community-based Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Multivariable logistic regression analyses identified demographic, socioeconomic, osteoarthritis-related, joint replacement awareness, and psychological correlates as poor outcome expectations. Logistic regression determined if outcome expectation was associated with future knee arthroplasty utilization. Approximately 25% of the sample expected a poor outcome. Several factors were associated with poor pain outcome expectation, with the most powerful being African American race (Odds Ratio (OR)=2.11, 95% CI=1.69, 2.64) and an interaction between clinical depression symptoms and pain catastrophizing (OR=3.17, 95% CI=2.26, 4.44 when both were coded 'yes'). Whether a person had knee OA did not affect expectations. Pain outcome expectations were strongly associated with future TKA utilization (OR=4.9, 95% CI=2.2, 11.1). A variety of modifiable psychological factors impact people's expectations of the extent of pain and walking difficulty following a potential future TKA. Expectations strongly predict future TKA utilization. Given the high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis, mass media educational interventions for the population may assist in better aligning expectations with evidence-based knee arthroplasty outcomes and lead to more appropriate utilization of an effective procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel flexible capacitive load sensor for use in a mobile unicompartmental knee replacement bearing: An in vitro proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink, M J A; Van Duren, B H; Murray, D W; Gill, H S

    2017-08-01

    Instrumented knee replacements can provide in vivo data quantifying physiological loads acting on the knee. To date instrumented mobile unicompartmental knee replacements (UKR) have not been realised. Ideally instrumentation would be embedded within the polyethylene bearing. This study investigated the feasibility of an embedded flexible capacitive load sensor. A novel flexible capacitive load sensor was developed which could be incorporated into standard manufacturing of compression moulded polyethylene bearings. Dynamic experiments were performed to determine the characteristics of the sensor on a uniaxial servo-hydraulic material testing machine. The instrumented bearing was measured at sinusoidal frequencies between 0.1 and 10Hz, allowing for measurement of typical gait load magnitudes and frequencies. These correspond to frequencies of interest in physiological loading. The loads that were applied were a static load of 390N, corresponding to an equivalent body weight load for UKR, and a dynamic load of ±293N. The frequency transfer response of the sensor suggests a low pass filter response with a -3dB frequency of 10Hz. The proposed embedded capacitive load sensor was shown to be applicable for measuring in vivo loads within a polyethylene mobile UKR bearing. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of music on psychophysiological responses and opioid dosage in patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Ji; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Hsieh, Yuan-Mei; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2015-10-01

    The present authors examined the effects of listening to music on psychophysiological parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate) during preoperative and postoperative days and determined whether listening to music could lower pain intensity and opioid dosage during postoperative days in patients who underwent total knee replacements. This was a two group repeated measures design for 30 subjects aged 53-85 years who were scheduled for total knee replacement. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a music group or a control group. Psychophysiological parameters were obtained from patients' monitors. A visual analog scale was used to assess postoperative pain. Opioid dosage was recorded and converted to standardized units. Mann-Whitney U-test and generalized estimating equation analysis were used to compare groups. Respiratory rates while in the surgical waiting area were lower for the music group than for the control group (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference between these groups for blood pressure, heart rate, pain intensity, or opioid dosage. However, a within-group comparison showed that systolic blood pressure in the music group was significantly and consistently decreased during postoperative recovery (Wald = 9.21, P = 0.007). These results suggest that listening to music stabilized systolic blood pressure in patients during postoperative recovery. However, the effects of music on psychophysiological parameters, pain intensity, and opioid dosage in a surgical setting require further research. © 2015 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  4. Custom total knee replacement in a dog with femoral condylar bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, William D; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Eskelinen, Esa V; Sidebotham, Christopher G; Harrysson, Ola L A; Hielm-Björkman, Anna K

    2007-06-01

    To report surgical planning, technique, and outcome of custom total knee replacement (TKR) performed to manage a medial femoral condylar nonunion in a dog. Clinical case report. A 3-year-old, 20 kg Karelian Bear Hound. Computed tomographic scan of the left pelvic limb was used to build a stereolithography model of the distal portion of the femur. The model was used to create a custom augment to replace the missing medial femoral condyle and a custom stem for intramedullary condylar cemented fixation. The augment and stem were adapted to femoral and tibial components already available. The model was used to rehearse the surgery and then the custom prosthesis was implanted. Weight bearing returned 8 hours after surgery and improved thereafter. Joint alignment was normal and prosthetic joint motion was 60-165 degrees postoperatively. The dog resumed moose hunting 3 months after surgery. Peak vertical force and impulse of the operated limb measured 17 months after surgery were 65% and 47% of the normal, contralateral limb. Based on short-term follow-up, cemented canine TKR was successfully achieved for management of a severely abnormal stifle joint. With further refinement and development of commercially available prostheses, TKR should be possible for canine patients.

  5. Single shot “3-in-1” femoral nerve blockade with 0.25% or 0.375% levobupivacaine provides similar postoperative analgesia for total knee replacement

    OpenAIRE

    APAN, Alpaslan; SARI, Filiz; EKMEKÇİ, Alp Burak

    2010-01-01

    To compare postoperative analgesia provided by single shot "3-in-1" femoral nerve blockade using 0.25% or 0.375% levobupivacaine in preceding with spinal anesthesia for unilateral total knee replacement surgery. Materials and methods: Forty consenting patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty were included in this prospective randomized study. Spinal anesthesia was achieved with 15 mg plain bupivacaine at the L3-4 or L4-5 interspace. After resolution of the sp...

  6. Comparison of the Effects of Intrathecal Fentanyl and Intrathecal Morphine on Pain in Elective Total Knee Replacement Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refika Kılıçkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Total knee replacement is one of the most painful orthopedic surgical procedures. In this study, our goal was to compare the intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamic effects, the side effects, the effect on the duration of pain start, the 24-hour VAS, and the amount of additional analgesia used, of the fentanyl and morphine we added to the local anesthetic in the spinal anesthesia we administered in cases of elective knee replacement. Materials and Methods. After obtaining the approval of the Erciyes University Medical Faculty Clinical Drug Trials Ethics Committee, as well as the verbal and written consent of the patients, we included 50 patients in our prospective, randomized study. Results. In our study, the morphine group (Group M had lower pain scores in the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 24th hours compared to the fentanyl group (Group F. When additional analgesic requirements were compared, it was found that in the 2nd, 6th, and 24th hours fewer Group M patients needed more analgesics than did Group F patients. Conclusion. The fentanyl group also had lower first analgesic requirement times than did the morphine group. In terms of nausea and vomiting, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups.

  7. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig J. Della Vale

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A user- friendly reference for decision making in complicated cases of knee arthroplasty desingned in a question and answers format composed of articles containing current concepts and preferences of experts in total knee replacement surgery, enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a casual advice by Craig J. Della Vale, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of knee arthroplasty, the editor and the contributors have aimed providing straightforward and brief answers, evidence-based advices, their preference and opinions containing current concepts for unanswered questions about complicated cases in total knee replacement surgery which are often controversial and not addressed clearly in traditional knee arthroplasty references. FEATURES There are 49 subjects each written by a different expert designed in 4 sections in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected including indications, unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee, patient with vascular problems, donating blood, bilateral arthroplasty, patellar resurfacing, range of motion, bearing surface, contraindications, teaching class for patients prior surgery. The second section is about intraoperative questions including skin incision, patella femoral maltracking, femoral component rotation, tibial component rotation, lateral release, femoral component sizing, flexion instability, varus deformity, and valgus deformity, tightness in extension, iatrogenic MCL injury, antibiotic-loaded cement, and perioperative pain. The third section subjects postoperative questions including wound drainage, preventing tromboembolic events, vascular complications, foot drop, manipulation under anesthesia, patella fractures, supracondylar femur fractures, acute extensor mechanism disruptions. In the fourth

  8. Keblish's lateral surgical approach enhances patellar tilt in valgus knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Tonelli Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of conventional medial and lateral approaches for total knee replacement in the valgus osteoarthritic knee. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 21 patients with valgus knee osteoarthritis were randomized to total knee replacement through medial or lateral approach. The primary outcome was radiographic patellar tilt. Secondary outcomes were visual analog scale of pain, postoperative levels of hemoglobin, and clinical aspect of the operative wound. RESULTS: There were no differences between the groups regarding other clinical variables. Mean lateral tilt of the patella was 3.1 degrees (SD ± 5.3 in the lateral approach group and 18 degrees (SD ± 10.2 in the medial approach group (p = 0.02. There were no differences regarding the secondary outcomes. CONCLUSION: Lateral approach provided better patellar tilt following total knee replacement in valgus osteoarthritic knee.

  9. A systematic review and meta-regression of mobile-bearing versus fixed-bearing total knee replacement in 41 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, P; Pijls, B G; Nouta, K A; Valstar, E R; Jacobs, W C H; Nelissen, R G H H

    2013-09-01

    Mobile-bearing (MB) total knee replacement (TKR) was introduced to reduce the risk of aseptic loosening and wear of polyethylene inserts. However, no consistent clinical advantages of mobile- over fixed-bearing (FB) TKR have been found. In this study we evaluated whether mobile bearings have an advantage over fixed bearings with regard to revision rates and clinical outcome scores. Furthermore, we determined which modifying variables affected the outcome. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to collect clinical trials comparing MB and FB in primary TKR. The primary outcomes were revision rates for any reason, aseptic loosening and wear. Secondary outcomes included range of movement, Knee Society score (KSS), Oxford knee score (OKS), Short-Form 12 (SF-12) score and radiological parameters. Meta-regression techniques were used to explore factors modifying the observed effect. Our search yielded 1827 publications, of which 41 studies met our inclusion criteria, comprising over 6000 TKRs. Meta-analyses showed no clinically relevant differences in terms of revision rates, clinical outcome scores or patient-reported outcome measures between MB and FB TKRs. It appears that theoretical assumptions of superiority of MB over FB TKR are not borne out in clinical practice.

  10. Reproducibility and validity of the DynaPort KneeTest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokkink, L.B.; Terwee, C.B.; Slikke, van der R.M.; Lummel, van R.C.; Benink, R.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, de H.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the reproducibility and validity of the DynaPort KneeTest, a performance-based test that measures quality of movement of patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR). METHODS: A total of 92 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee performed the KneeTest twice on the

  11. The decision-making threshold and the factors that affect it: A qualitative study of patients' decision-making in knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, T; Scott, P; Thomson, L; Griffin, D; Realpe, A

    2018-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a significant cause of burden to the ageing population and knee replacement is a common operation for treatment of end-stage disease. We aimed to explore these factors to help understand patients' decision-making, which is critical in informing patient-centred care. These can be used to enhance decision-making and dialogue between clinicians and patients, allowing a more informed choice. The study consisted of two focus groups, in a patient cohort after total knee replacement followed by more in-depth interviews to further test and explore themes from the focus groups, in patients in either the deliberation stage or the decision-making stage. Using qualitative research methods (iterative thematic analysis) reviewing decision-making and deliberation phases of making informed choices we found nine key themes that emerged from the study groups. An awareness of the deliberation phase, the factors that influence it, the stress associated with it, preferred models of care, and the influence of the decision-making threshold will aid useful communication between doctors and patients. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. STUDY OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED CONTINUOUS FEMORAL NERVE BLOCKADE WITH EPIDURAL ANALGESIA FOR PAIN RELIEF AFTER TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rapolu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Total knee replacement causes moderate-to-severe pain requiring effective analgesia. With use of ultrasound guidance, we may prove a more suitable approach compared with the epidural technique. Aim of this study is the comparison between Continuous Epidural Analgesia (CEA and Continuous Femoral Block (CFB techniques in Total Knee Replacement surgeries. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted on 60 adult male and female patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery for a period of 2 years. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group - 1: Continuous epidural analgesia patients, Group - 2: Continuous femoral blockage patients. All patients were assessed clinically preoperatively and investigated to rule out any systemic disease. RESULTS The mean age of patient in Group - 1 was 66.54 ± 4.98 and in Group - 2 was 66.98 ± 5.02 years. P value was > 0.05, which was not significant. No significant differences in gender is observed between the groups. VAS scores were significantly high (P < 0.05 in the femoral group at 6 h, after which there was a declining trend and scores were essentially similar from 24 h. The use of rescue analgesic was also higher in the femoral group. Analysis of side-effects showed that all the five common sideeffects were twice as common in the epidural group than in the femoral study group. Only one patient in the femoral group had urinary retention when compared with four in the epidural group. The differences were not statistically significant. Muscle power at 48 h, time getting out of the bed and time stay in hospital (days are significant in comparison in 2 groups, range of movement is insignificant in groups. Patient satisfaction score was measured on a scale of 1 - 10. Patients in the Femoral group were slightly more satisfied with a mean ± SD score of 8.1 ± 1.2 when compared with the epidural group 7.3 ± 1.01. CONCLUSION Continuous femoral blockade using US guidance provides equivalent analgesia

  13. No Effect of Acupuncture as Adjunctive Therapy for Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tom; Hautopp, Holger; Duus, Benn

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Acupuncture is a low risk option in pain management following total knee replacement as an alternative to opioid analgesics. Therefore, the benefit of acupuncture as adjunct to an exercise program was investigated. Furthermore, the modifying effect of previous benefit from acupuncture...... was explored. Design: Three weeks postoperatively, eligible patients were randomized to acupuncture and exercises or exercises alone. Setting: An outpatient rehabilitation centre in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark. Subjects: A total of 172 patients were included. Methods: Main outcome was proportion...... of the course of treatment were assessed. Results: No additional benefit of acupuncture was found on any of the main outcomes. Between-group differences were non-significant in proportions of patients with a clinically important reduction of night pain (Relative Risk: 0.98; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0...

  14. [Application and effect of auricular acupoint pressing for analgesia in perioperative period of total knee joint replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Pei-Jian; Wang, Hai-Dong; Ma, Zhen-Chuan

    2010-09-01

    To observe the effect of auricular acupoint pressing (AAP) for analgesia during perioperative period of total knee joint replacement. Sixty patients with osteoarthritis of ASA grade I - III scheduled to receive unilateral total knee joint replacement were equally randomized into the AAP group and the control group, 30 in each group. The general anesthesia on all patients was implemented by physicians of an identical group through endotracheal intubation. To the patients in the AAP group, AAP with Vaccaria seed was applied before operation, and the local analgesia on affected limb with acupoint pasting was used after operation. Besides, administering of celecoxib 400 mg on the day before operation, and celecoxib 200 mg twice daily post-operation was given to all patients. When the visual analogue scales (VAS) reached more than 7 points, 0.1 g of bucinnazine hydrochloride was given for supplement. Meantime, same post-operative training methods were adopted in both groups. The resting VAS pain scores, contentment of sedation, incidence of adverse event, postoperative range of motion (ROM) of knee joint and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score were recorded. The resting VAS pain scores at 6 h and 24 h after operation was 5.99 +/- 0.67 scores and 4.26 +/- 0.59 scores in the AAP group respectively, which was significantly lower than that in the control group at the corresponding time (7.02 +/- 0.85 scores and 4.92 +/- 0.43 scores, P 0.05); sedation contentment in the two groups was similar; incidence of adverse event in the AAP groups seemed lower (4 cases vs. 11 cases), but the intergroup difference was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). ROM before surgery were 75.63 degrees +/- 5.74 degrees and 75.43 degrees +/- 5.63 degrees in the two groups respectively, showing no significant difference (P > 0.05), two weeks after operation, the initiative ROM raised to 96.50 degrees +/- 3.79 degrees and 93.50 degrees +/- 3.50 degrees, and the passive ROM reached 107

  15. On Patellofemoral joint replacement - Clinical, radiological, and numerical studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonbergen, J.P.W. van

    2011-01-01

    Patellofemoral, osteoarthritis, joint replacement, arthroplasty, anterior knee pain Isolated patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disorder of the knee estimated to occur in approximately 4% to 24% of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Mild isolated patellofemoral

  16. Influence of the ischaemic tourniquet in antibiotic prophylaxis in total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, Laura; Valls, Joan; Ros, Joaquim; Jover, Alfredo; Pérez-Villar, Ferran; Fernández-Martínez, José Juan

    2015-01-01

    There is level iv evidence that the preoperative administration of antibiotics helps in the prevention of prosthetic infection. There is controversy on whether the ischemia applied during surgery may affect the minimum inhibitory concentration of the antibiotic in the peri-prosthetic tissues. The aim of this study is to review this phenomenon through the determination of antibiotic concentration in the synovial tissue. A prospective observational clinical study was conducted on 32 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Cefonicid 2g was administered as prophylaxis, with a tourniquet used for all patients. The antibiotic concentration was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography in samples of synovial tissue collected at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. The mean concentration of antibiotic was 23.16 μg/g (95% CI 19.19 to 27.13) in the samples at the beginning of the intervention and 15.45 μg/g (95% CI 13.20 to 17.69) in the final samples, being higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration of cefonicid, set at 8 μg/g. These results were statistically significant for both concentrations (P<.00001). The antibiotic concentration throughout the standard total knee prosthesis surgery performed with tourniquet gradually decreases throughout the intervention. The concentration determined at the end of the intervention was higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration required for the antibiotic studied. In conclusion, the use of a tourniquet does not increase the risk of infection. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Relation between preoperative autonomic function and blood pressure change after tourniquet deflation during total knee replacement arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, In Young; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Shin, Soo Jin; Cho, Young Woo; Park, Soon Eun

    2012-02-01

    Tourniquets are used to provide a bloodless surgical field for extremities. Hypotension due to vasodilation and bleeding after tourniquet deflation is a common event. Hemodynamic stability is modulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Heart rate variability (HRV) is a sensitive method for detecting individuals who may be at risk of hemodynamic instability during general anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate ANS function to predict hypotension after tourniquet deflation. Eighty-six patients who underwent total knee replacement arthroplasty (TKRA) were studied. HRV, systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were analyzed. We assigned two groups depending on the lowest systolic blood pressure (SBP) or mean BP (MBP) after tourniquet release (Group H; SBP 80 mmHg and MBP > 60 mmHg). Fifteen patients developed severe hypotension and ten patients were treated with ephedrine. Of the parameters of HRV, SBPV, and BRS, only BRS(SEQ) was significant being low in Group H. BRS and high-frequency SBPV were correlated with the degree of MBP change after tourniquet deflation. Preoperative low BRS is associated with hypotension after tourniquet deflation, suggesting the importance of baroreflex regulation for intraoperative hemodynamic stability.

  18. Does post-operative knee awareness differ between knees in bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty? Predictors of high or low knee awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine Abildgaard; Thomsen, Morten Grove; Latifi, Roshan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the difference in post-operative knee awareness between knees in patients undergoing bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to assess factors predicting high or low knee awareness. METHODS: This study was conducted on 99 bilateral simultaneous TKAs performed...... at our institution from 2008 to 2012. All patients received one set of questionnaires [Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS)] for each knee. Based on the FJS, the patients' knees were divided into two groups: "best" and "worst" knees. The median of the absolute difference in FJS and OKS...... within each patient was calculated. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify factors affecting FJS. RESULTS: The difference between knees was 1 point (CI 0-5) for the FJS and 1 point (CI 0-2) for the OKS. The FJS for females increased (decreasing awareness) with increasing age. Males had...

  19. Knee strength retention and analgesia with continuous perineural fentanyl infusion after total knee replacement: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangar, Devanand; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Sprenker, Collin J; Downes, Katheryne L; Taffe, Narrene; Wainwright, Robert; Gustke, Kenneth; Bernasek, Thomas L; Camporesi, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Despite providing adequate pain relief, a femoral nerve block can induce postoperative muscle weakness after total knee arthoplasty (TKA). Fentanyl has been shown to have peripheral effects but has not been used as a perineural infusate alone after TKA. Sixty patients scheduled for TKA were randomized to one of three blinded groups: a continuous 24 h infusion of either fentanyl 3 μg/ml, ropivacaine 0.1%, or 0.9% normal saline through a femoral nerve sheath catheter at 10 ml/h. The main outcome was maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) in the quadriceps femoris (knee extension), measured by a handheld dynamometer (Nm/kg). Other variables assessed were preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores, hamstrings MVIC (knee flexion), active range of motion of the operative knee, distance ambulated, incidence of knee buckling, supplemental morphine usage, postoperative side effects, and serum fentanyl levels. Quadriceps MVIC values were significantly greater in the fentanyl group compared to the group that received ropivacaine (median values, 0.08 vs. 0.03 Nm/kg; p = 0.028). The incidence of postoperative knee buckling upon ambulation was higher in the ropivacaine group compared to the fentanyl group, although not statistically significant (40% vs. 15 %, respectively; p = 0.077). VAS scores while ambulating were not significantly different between the fentanyl group and the ropivacaine group (p = 0.270). Postoperative morphine consumption, nausea and vomiting, and resting VAS scores were similar among the three groups. A continuous perineural infusion of fentanyl produced greater strength retention than ropivacaine post-TKA.

  20. Total knee arthroplasty in ochronosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav G. Patel, MBBS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alkaptonuria is disorder of tyrosine metabolism due to deficiency of homogentisic oxidase characterized by excretion of homogentisic acid in urine, deposition of oxidized homogensitate pigments in connective tissues and articular cartilages (ochronosis. The result is dark pigmentation and weakening of the tissues resulting in chronic inflammation and osteoarthritis. Management of alkaptonuric ochronic osteoarthritis is usually symptomatic and replacements have comparable outcomes to osteoarthritis in patients without ochronosis. I report a case of a patient with ochronosis of knee treated with total knee replacement and report operative pearls for surgery in this rare disorder.

  1. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance ima...

  2. Association Between Pain at Sites Outside the Knee and Knee Cartilage Volume Loss in Elderly People Without Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Laslett, Laura; Tian, Jing; Cicuttini, Flavia; Winzenberg, Tania; Ding, Changhai; Jones, Graeme

    2017-05-01

    Pain is common in the elderly. Knee pain may predict knee cartilage loss, but whether generalized pain is associated with knee cartilage loss is unclear. This study, therefore, aimed to determine whether pain at multiple sites predicts knee cartilage volume loss among community-dwelling older adults, and, if so, to explore potential mechanisms. Data from the prospective Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort study was utilized (n = 394, mean age 63 years, range 52-79 years). Experience of pain at multiple sites was assessed using a questionnaire at baseline. T1-weighted fat-saturated magnetic resonance imaging of the right knee was performed to assess the cartilage volume at baseline and after 2.6 years. Linear regression modeling was used with adjustment for potential confounders. The median number of painful sites was 3 (range 0-7). There was a dose-response relationship between the number of painful sites and knee cartilage volume loss in the lateral and total tibiofemoral compartments (lateral β = -0.28% per annum; total β = -0.25% per annum, both P for trend knee osteoarthritis (OA) (P pain medication, and knee structural abnormalities. The number of painful sites independently predicts knee cartilage volume loss, especially in people without knee OA, suggesting that widespread pain may be an early marker of more rapid knee cartilage loss in those without radiographic knee OA. The underlying mechanism is unclear, but it is independent of anthropometrics, physical activity, and knee structural abnormalities. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Hyaluronic Acid Injections Are Associated with Delay of Total Knee Replacement Surgery in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Evidence from a Large U.S. Health Claims Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Altman

    Full Text Available The growing prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA and the medical costs associated with total knee replacement (TKR surgery for end-stage OA motivate a search for agents that can delay OA progression. We test a hypothesis that hyaluronic acid (HA injection is associated with delay of TKR in a dose-dependent manner.We retrospectively evaluated records in an administrative claims database of ~79 million patients, to identify all patients with knee OA who received TKR during a 6-year period. Only patients with continuous plan enrollment from diagnosis until TKR were included, so that complete medical records were available. OA diagnosis was the index event and we evaluated time-to-TKR as a function of the number of HA injections. The database included 182,022 patients with knee OA who had TKR; 50,349 (27.7% of these patients were classified as HA Users, receiving ≥1 courses of HA prior to TKR, while 131,673 patients (72.3% were HA Non-users prior to TKR, receiving no HA. Cox proportional hazards modelling shows that TKR risk decreases as a function of the number of HA injection courses, if patient age, gender, and disease comorbidity are used as background covariates. Multiple HA injections are therefore associated with delay of TKR (all, P < 0.0001. Half of HA Non-users had a TKR by 114 days post-diagnosis of knee OA, whereas half of HA Users had a TKR by 484 days post-diagnosis (χ2 = 19,769; p < 0.0001. Patients who received no HA had a mean time-to-TKR of 0.7 years; with one course of HA, the mean time to TKR was 1.4 years (χ2 = 13,725; p < 0.0001; patients who received ≥5 courses delayed TKR by 3.6 years (χ2 = 19,935; p < 0.0001.HA injection in patients with knee OA is associated with a dose-dependent increase in time-to-TKR.

  4. The economics of using prophylactic antibiotic-loaded bone cement in total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, C J; Zmistowski, B M; Clyde, C T; Parvizi, J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of peri-prosthetic infection following total joint replacement continues to rise, and attempts to curb this trend have included the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cement at the time of primary surgery. We have investigated the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the use of antibiotic-loaded cement for primary total knee replacement (TKR) by comparing the rate of infection in 3048 TKRs performed without loaded cement over a three-year period versus the incidence of infection after 4830 TKRs performed with tobramycin-loaded cement over a later period of time of a similar duration. In order to adjust for confounding factors, the rate of infection in 3347 and 4702 uncemented total hip replacements (THR) performed during the same time periods, respectively, was also examined. There were no significant differences in the characteristics of the patients in the different cohorts. The absolute rate of infection increased when antibiotic-loaded cement was used in TKR. However, this rate of increase was less than the rate of increase in infection following uncemented THR during the same period. If the rise in the rate of infection observed in THR were extrapolated to the TKR cohort, 18 additional cases of infection would have been expected to occur in the cohort receiving antibiotic-loaded cement, compared with the number observed. Depending on the type of antibiotic-loaded cement that is used, its cost in all primary TKRs ranges between USD $2112.72 and USD $112 606.67 per case of infection that is prevented.

  5. Advances in Rosetta structure prediction for difficult molecular-replacement problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMaio, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modeling advances using Rosetta structure prediction to aid in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems are discussed. Recent work has shown the effectiveness of structure-prediction methods in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems. The Rosetta protein structure modeling suite can aid in the solution of difficult molecular-replacement problems using templates from 15 to 25% sequence identity; Rosetta refinement guided by noisy density has consistently led to solved structures where other methods fail. In this paper, an overview of the use of Rosetta for these difficult molecular-replacement problems is provided and new modeling developments that further improve model quality are described. Several variations to the method are introduced that significantly reduce the time needed to generate a model and the sampling required to improve the starting template. The improvements are benchmarked on a set of nine difficult cases and it is shown that this improved method obtains consistently better models in less running time. Finally, strategies for best using Rosetta to solve difficult molecular-replacement problems are presented and future directions for the role of structure-prediction methods in crystallography are discussed

  6. Wear Behavior of an Unstable Knee: Stabilization via Implant Design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Reinders

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear-related failures and instabilities are frequent failure mechanisms of total knee replacements. High-conforming designs may provide additional stability for the joint. This study analyzes the effects of a ligamentous insufficiency on the stability and the wear behavior of a high-conforming knee design. Methods. Two simulator wear tests were performed on a high-conforming total knee replacement design. In the first, a ligamentous-stable knee replacement with a sacrificed anterior cruciate ligament was simulated. In the second, a ligamentous-unstable knee with additionally insufficient posterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament was simulated. Wear was determined gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. Implant kinematics was recorded during simulation. Results. Significantly higher wear rates (P≤0.001 were observed for the unstable knee (14.58±0.56 mg/106 cycles compared to the stable knee (7.97 ± 0.87 mg/106 cycles. A higher number of wear particles with only small differences in wear particle characteristics were observed. Under unstable knee conditions, kinematics increased significantly for translations and rotations (P≤0.01. This increase was mainly attributed to higher tibial posterior translation and internal rotations. Conclusion. Higher kinematics under unstable test conditions is a result of insufficient stabilization via implant design. Due to the higher kinematics, increased wear was observed in this study.

  7. The effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Inkyung; Kim, Dong Yeon; Kim, Youn Jin

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflation and deflation of a pneumatic tourniquet used in total knee replacement surgery induces various changes in patient's hemodynamic and metabolic status, which may result in serious complications, especially in aged patients. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a monitoring device designed to estimate the regional cerebral oxygen saturation. We evaluated the effect of tourniquet deflation on hemodynamics and regional cerebral oxygen saturation in aged patients undergoing tot...

  8. PEEK-OPTIMA? as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    PEEK-OPTIMA™ (Invibio Ltd, UK) has been considered as an alternative joint arthroplasty bearing material due to its favourable mechanical properties and the biocompatibility of its wear debris. In this study, the potential to use injection moulded PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of a total knee replacement was investigated in terms of its wear performance. Experimental wear simulation of three cobalt chrome and three PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components art...

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the French version of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in knee osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornetti, P; Parratte, S; Gossec, L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To adapt the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) into French and to evaluate the psychometric properties of this new version. METHODS: The French version of the KOOS was developed according to cross-cultural guidelines by using the "translation-back translation" method...... to ensure content validity. KOOS data were then obtained in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). The translated questionnaire was evaluated in two knee OA population groups, one with no indication for joint replacement (medicine), and the other waiting for joint replacement (surgery......). The psychometric properties evaluated were feasibility: percentage of responses, floor and ceiling effects; construct validity: internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, correlations with osteoarthritis knee and hip quality of life domains using Spearman's rank test, and known group comparison between medicine...

  10. Time-driven activity based costing of total knee replacement surgery at a London teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Akhtar, Kashif; Makaram, Navnit; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a time-driven activity based costing (TDABC) analysis of the clinical pathway for total knee replacement (TKR) and to determine where the major cost drivers lay. The in-patient pathway was prospectively mapped utilising a TDABC model, following 20 TKRs. The mean age for these patients was 73.4 years. All patients were ASA grade I or II and their mean BMI was 30.4. The 14 varus knees had a mean deformity of 5.32° and the six valgus knee had a mean deformity of 10.83°. Timings were prospectively collected as each patient was followed through the TKR pathway. Pre-operative costs including pre-assessment and joint school were £ 163. Total staff costs for admission and the operating theatre were £ 658. Consumables cost for the operating theatre were £ 1862. The average length of stay was 5.25 days at a total cost of £ 910. Trust overheads contributed £ 1651. The overall institutional cost of a 'noncomplex' TKR in patients without substantial medical co-morbidities was estimated to be £ 5422, representing a profit of £ 1065 based on a best practice tariff of £ 6487. The major cost drivers in the TKR pathway were determined to be theatre consumables, corporate overheads, overall ward cost and operating theatre staffing costs. Appropriate discounting of implant costs, reduction in length of stay by adopting an enhanced recovery programme and control of corporate overheads through the use of elective orthopaedic treatment centres are proposed approaches for reducing the overall cost of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of perceptions of care, medical advice, and hospital quality on patient satisfaction after primary total knee replacement: A cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Schaal

    Full Text Available The increase in the number of patients presenting with osteoarthritis in the past decade has led to a 32% increase in knee replacement surgeries designed to reduce restrictions on patient movement and improve their quality of life. Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasingly important indicator of quality of care. This study was designed to identify predictors of various service components in the treatment process and hospital key performance indicators significantly associated with patient satisfaction.A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted with 856 patients having their primary total knee replacements at 41 hospitals. Patient satisfaction was queried via a validated, multidimensional questionnaire mainly using a six-point scale. In addition to bivariate calculations, patient satisfaction was the dependent variable in a binary logistic regression model.The bivariate analysis showed a strong association between satisfaction and sex (male or female, the patients' health before admission, and the length of stay. The number of cases treated at each hospital did not reveal any impact on satisfaction. The multivariate analysis identified three predictors associated with overall satisfaction. The strongest factor was the treatment outcome and the weakest was the quality of food. It became apparent that the statutory procedure minimums were not being met.The relevant factors influencing patient satisfaction were partially the same as previous study results and allowed more detailed conclusions. The results provide suggestions across hospitals that could help health care providers better meet needs of patients after knee arthroplasties.

  12. Effects of perceptions of care, medical advice, and hospital quality on patient satisfaction after primary total knee replacement: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Tom; Schoenfelder, Tonio; Klewer, Joerg; Kugler, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The increase in the number of patients presenting with osteoarthritis in the past decade has led to a 32% increase in knee replacement surgeries designed to reduce restrictions on patient movement and improve their quality of life. Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasingly important indicator of quality of care. This study was designed to identify predictors of various service components in the treatment process and hospital key performance indicators significantly associated with patient satisfaction. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted with 856 patients having their primary total knee replacements at 41 hospitals. Patient satisfaction was queried via a validated, multidimensional questionnaire mainly using a six-point scale. In addition to bivariate calculations, patient satisfaction was the dependent variable in a binary logistic regression model. The bivariate analysis showed a strong association between satisfaction and sex (male or female), the patients' health before admission, and the length of stay. The number of cases treated at each hospital did not reveal any impact on satisfaction. The multivariate analysis identified three predictors associated with overall satisfaction. The strongest factor was the treatment outcome and the weakest was the quality of food. It became apparent that the statutory procedure minimums were not being met. The relevant factors influencing patient satisfaction were partially the same as previous study results and allowed more detailed conclusions. The results provide suggestions across hospitals that could help health care providers better meet needs of patients after knee arthroplasties.

  13. Comparison of group-based outpatient physiotherapy with usual care after total knee replacement: a feasibility study for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Neil; Dixon, Samantha; Wylde, Vikki; Marques, Elsa; Beswick, Andrew D; Lenguerrand, Erik; Blom, Ashley W; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial comparing group-based outpatient physiotherapy with usual care in patients following total knee replacement. A feasibility study for a randomized controlled trial. One secondary-care hospital orthopaedic centre, Bristol, UK. A total of 46 participants undergoing primary total knee replacement. The intervention group were offered six group-based exercise sessions after surgery. The usual care group received standard postoperative care. Participants were not blinded to group allocation. Feasibility was assessed by recruitment, reasons for non-participation, attendance, and completion rates of study questionnaires that included the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Recruitment rate was 37%. Five patients withdrew or were no longer eligible to participate. Intervention attendance was high (73%) and 84% of group participants reported they were 'very satisfied' with the exercises. Return of study questionnaires at six months was lower in the usual care (75%) than in the intervention group (100%). Mean (standard deviation) Lower Extremity Functional Scale scores at six months were 45.0 (20.8) in the usual care and 57.8 (15.2) in the intervention groups. Recruitment and retention of participants in this feasibility study was good. Group-based physiotherapy was acceptable to participants. Questionnaire return rates were lower in the usual care group, but might be enhanced by telephone follow-up. The Lower Extremity Functional Scale had high responsiveness and completion rates. Using this outcome measure, 256 participants would be required in a full-scale randomized controlled trial.

  14. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (female football. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Experimental and computational analysis of micromotions of an uncemented femoral knee implant using elastic and plastic bone material models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berahmani, Sanaz; Janssen, Dennis; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-01-01

    It is essential to calculate micromotions at the bone-implant interface of an uncemented femoral total knee replacement (TKR) using a reliable computational model. In the current study, experimental measurements of micromotions were compared with predicted micromotions by Finite Element Analysis

  16. Novel computational approaches characterizing knee physiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangdo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A knee joint’s longevity depends on the proper integration of structural components in an axial alignment. If just one of the components is abnormally off-axis, the biomechanical system fails, resulting in arthritis. The complexity of various failures in the knee joint has led orthopedic surgeons to select total knee replacement as a primary treatment. In many cases, this means sacrificing much of an otherwise normal joint. Here, we review novel computational approaches to describe knee physiotherapy by introducing a new dimension of foot loading to the knee axis alignment producing an improved functional status of the patient. New physiotherapeutic applications are then possible by aligning foot loading with the functional axis of the knee joint during the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis.

  17. Total replace in the knee with deformity in the valgus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara Cortassio, Gilberto; Pineros Ramirez, Daniel Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The total knee arthroplasty with valgus deformity is a technically demanding surgery. The bone deformities and the soft tissues make difficult to balance the soft tissues, the mechanic axis restoration and the prostheses placement. We present the results of a retrospective study, observational, descriptive type series of cases of 40 patients (42 prostheses), operated on with valgus deformity of more than 10 grades, using the I. White side technique to balance the soft tissue, with and average following up of 4.5 years. Based on the knee society scale (KSS) we found satisfactory results in more than 92% of the cases (39 prostheses). The complications were: total lost of the knee extension in 2 patients and i femoropatellar misalignment. We recommend practicing a sequential liberation of the lateral soft tissue to obtain a good clinical result and prostheses longevity

  18. Potentiality Prediction of Electric Power Replacement Based on Power Market Development Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Bo; Yang, Shuo; Liu, Qiang; Lin, Jingyi; Zhao, Le; Liu, Chang; Li, Bin

    2017-05-01

    The application of electric power replacement plays an important role in promoting the development of energy conservation and emission reduction in our country. To exploit the potentiality of regional electric power replacement, the regional GDP (gross domestic product) and energy consumption are taken as potentiality evaluation indicators. The principal component factors are extracted with PCA (principal component analysis), and the integral potentiality analysis is made to the potentiality of electric power replacement in the national various regions; a region is taken as a research object, and the potentiality of electric power replacement is defined and quantified. The analytical model for the potentiality of multi-scenario electric power replacement is developed, and prediction is made to the energy consumption with the grey prediction model. The relevant theoretical research is utilized to realize prediction analysis on the potentiality amount of multi-scenario electric power replacement.

  19. Association between NICE guidance on biologic therapies with rates of hip and knee replacement among rheumatoid arthritis patients in England and Wales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawley, Samuel; Cordtz, René; Dreyer, Lene

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the impact of NICE approval of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapies on the incidence of total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in England and Wales. METHODS: Primary care data [Clinical Practice.......92 PYs, respectively. NICE guidance was associated with a significant average decrease in TKR incidence of -4.41/1000 PYs (95% C.I. -6.88 to -1.94), equating to a relative 34% reduction. Overall, no effect was seen on THR rates. CONCLUSIONS: Among incident RA patients in England and Wales, NICE guidance...

  20. THE METHOD OF KNEE JOINT ARTHRODESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Fedorov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of bone plastics by cylindrical autotransplant in cases of posttraumatic changes of knee joint is described. Knee joint arthrodesis is supposed to be used as alternate in term of replacement impossibility (for example, high-grade deformity, the age (osteoporosis, concomitant diseases that can lead to complicate operation.

  1. [Clinical factors and findings in knee arthroscopy of patients with knee arthrosis candidates for conversion to total replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, D; Calvo, R; Villalón, I; Tuca, M J; Vaisman, A; Valdés, M

    2013-01-01

    To identify those clinical characteristic and arthroscopic findings in patients with knee arthrosis that are associated with worsening of the disease and subsequent total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted on 78 consecutive patients (88 knees) who underwent knee arthroscopy for arthrosis. The study included 44 women and 34 men, with a mean age of 58.9 years (range: 37-78 years). After a mean follow-up of 50.4 months (range: 12-96 months), those patients who progressed towards TKA were identified. A logistic regression model was applied to recognise the factors associated with deterioration of the arthrosis, with consequent progression towards a TKA. Twenty-four out of the 88 knees progressed towards a TKA (27.3%) within a mean time of 13.5 months after arthroscopy (range: 13-29 months). The clinical characteristics that showed a significant association with poor progression of the arthrosis were: female gender (0.02) and Ahlbäck 2 (P=.04). Arthroscopic finding that proved significant correlation with worsening of the arthrosis towards TKA were: meniscal tears of the posterior horn (P=.02), meniscectomies above 60% (P=.03), and 2nd degree chondral lesions in loading areas of the medial femoral condyle (P=.02). The variables associated with a greater chance of progressing towards a TKA after a knee arthroscopy due to arthrosis in this study were, female gender, grade 2 radiographic arthrosis, posterior horn meniscal lesions, meniscectomies over 60%, and chondral lesions in loading area of the medial femoral condyle. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip or knee surgery - getting your home ready; Osteoarthritis - knee ... Cabrera JA, Cabrera AL. Total hip replacement. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  3. Development of an above-knee prosthesis equipped with a microcomputer-controlled knee joint: first test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeyels, B; Peeraer, L; Vander Sloten, J; Van der Perre, G

    1992-05-01

    The shortcomings of conventional above-knee prostheses are due to their lack of adaptive control. Implementation of a microcomputer controlling the knee joint in a passive way has been suggested to enhance the patient's gait comfort, safety and cosmesis. This approach was used in the design of a new prosthetic system for the above-knee amputee, and tested on one patient. The knee joint of a conventional, modular prosthesis was replaced by a knee joint mechanism, equipped with a controllable brake on the knee joint axis. Sensors and a microcomputer were added, keeping the system self-contained. The modularity of the design permits the use of an alternative, external, PC-based control unit, emulating the self-contained one, and offering extended data monitoring and storage facilities. For both units an operating environment was written, including sensor/actuator interfacing and the implementation of a real-time interrupt, executing the control algorithm. A double finite state approach was used in the design of the control algorithm. On a higher level, the mode identification algorithm reveals the patient's intent. Within a specific mode (lower level), the relevant mode control algorithm looks for the current phase within the gait cycle. Within a particular phase, a specific simple control action with the brake replaces normal knee muscle activity. Tests were carried out with one prosthetic patient using a basic control algorithm for level walking, allowing controlled knee flexion during stance phase. The technical feasibility of such a concept is illustrated by the test results, even though only flexion during early stance phase was controlled during the trials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Polyethylene wear in Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement: a retrieval study of 47 bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, B J L; Longino, D; Pandit, H; Svard, U; Gill, H S; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W; Price, A J

    2010-03-01

    The Oxford Unicompartmental Knee replacement (UKR) was introduced as a design to reduce polyethylene wear. There has been one previous retrieval study involving this implant, which reported very low rates of wear in some specimens but abnormal patterns of wear in others. There has been no further investigation of these abnormal patterns. The bearings were retrieved from 47 patients who had received a medial Oxford UKR for anteromedial osteoarthritis of the knee. None had been studied previously. The mean time to revision was 8.4 years (sd 4.1), with 20 having been implanted for over ten years. The macroscopic pattern of polyethylene wear and the linear penetration were recorded for each bearing. The mean rate of linear penetration was 0.07 mm/year. The patterns of wear fell into three categories, each with a different rate of linear penetration; 1) no abnormal macroscopic wear and a normal articular surface, n = 16 (linear penetration rate = 0.01 mm/year); 2) abnormal macroscopic wear and normal articular surfaces with extra-articular impingement, n = 16 (linear penetration rate = 0.05 mm/year); 3) abnormal macroscopic wear and abnormal articular surfaces with intra-articular impingement +/- signs of non-congruous articulation, n = 15 (linear penetration rate = 0.12 mm/year). The differences in linear penetration rate were statistically significant (p < 0.001). These results show that very low rates of polyethylene wear are possible if the device functions normally. However, if the bearing displays suboptimal function (extra-articular, intra-articular impingement or incongruous articulation) the rates of wear increase significantly.

  5. Knee extensor strength and risk of structural, symptomatic and functional decline in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Culvenor, Adam G; Ruhdorfer, Anja; Juhl, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor strength and the risk of structural, symptomatic, or functional deterioration in individuals with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). METHODS: We systematically identified and methodologically...... appraised all longitudinal studies (≥1-year follow-up) reporting an association between knee extensor strength and structural (tibiofemoral, patellofemoral), symptomatic (self-reported, knee replacement), or functional (subjective, objective) decline in individuals with or at risk of radiographic......-analysis revealed that lower knee extensor strength was associated with an increased risk of symptomatic (WOMAC-Pain: odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.67) and functional decline (WOMAC-Function: OR 1.38, 95%CI 1.00, 1.89; chair-stand task: OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.03, 1.04), but not increased risk...

  6. The Effect of Music Listening on Pain, Heart Rate Variability, and Range of Motion in Older Adults After Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chung; Chen, Su-Ru; Lee, Pi-Hsia; Lin, Pi-Chu

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects that listening and not listening to music had on pain relief, heart rate variability (HRV), and knee range of motion in total knee replacement (TKR) patients who underwent continuous passive motion (CPM) rehabilitation. We adopted a single-group quasi-experimental design. A sample of 49 TKR patients listened to music for 25 min during one session of CPM and no music during another session of CPM the same day for a total of 2 days. Results indicated that during CPM, patients exhibited a significant decrease in the pain level ( p listening to music compared with no music. This study demonstrated that listening to music can effectively decrease pain during CPM rehabilitation and improve the joint range of motion in patients who underwent TKR surgery.

  7. LOCAL APPLICATION OF TRANEXAMIC ACID IN KNEE REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Pshenitsyna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study – assessment of the efficacy of local application of tranexamic acid in TKA and the choice of the optimal dosage. Materials and methods. 48 patients were included in open-prospective study and were randomized to one of four groups. In the first group tranexamic acid was used as intravenous bolus at the beginning of the operation at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Additionally, after the installation of the prosthetic components, the surgeon performed periarticular infiltration of soft tissue by tranexamic acid solution at a dose of 15 mg/kg. In the second group of patients tranexamic acid was used as 500 mg intravenous bolus before surgery, and 500 mg locally after installation of the prosthesis components. In the third group of patients received tranexamic acid once at the beginning of the operation at a dose of 15 mg/kg iv bolus. In the fourth group tranexam was used after surgery once at a dose of 10 mg/kg. Results. In the first group of patients were achieved statistically significant, 5-6 times, reduction of blood loss on drainage in comparison with other groups, where the volume of postoperative blood loss was not significantly different between groups. Also in the first group recorded the smallest decrease in hemoglobin at the 5th postoperative day compared to the third and fourth groups. Complications associated with the use of tranexamic acid were not revealed. Conclusion. The method of periarticular infiltration by tranexamic acid in combination with its intravenous use in knee joint replacement is an effective and safe method for reduction of post-operative blood loss.

  8. Quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis--data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, K; Quinn, E; Niu, J; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F; Wirth, W; Eckstein, F; Felson, D

    2016-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA), prior to the advent of radiographic disease. 206 knees with incident radiographic KOA (Kellgren Lawrence Grade (KLG) 0 or 1 at baseline, developing KLG 2 or greater with a definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) grade ≥1 by year 4) were matched to 232 control knees not developing incident KOA. Manual segmentation of the central five slices of the medial and lateral meniscus was performed on coronal 3T DESS MRI and quantitative meniscus position was determined. Cases and controls were compared using conditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, BMI, race and clinical site. Sensitivity analyses of early (year [Y] 1/2) and late (Y3/4) incidence was performed. Mean medial extrusion distance was significantly greater for incident compared to non-incident knees (1.56 mean ± 1.12 mm SD vs 1.29 ± 0.99 mm; +21%, P meniscus (25.8 ± 15.8% vs 22.0 ± 13.5%; +17%, P meniscus in incident medial KOA, or for the tibial plateau coverage between incident and non-incident knees. Restricting the analysis to medial incident KOA at Y1/2 differences were attenuated, but reached significance for extrusion distance, whereas no significant differences were observed at incident KOA in Y3/4. Greater medial meniscus extrusion predicts incident radiographic KOA. Early onset KOA showed greater differences for meniscus position between incident and non-incident knees than late onset KOA. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Does the Risk Assessment and Prediction Tool Predict Discharge Disposition After Joint Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Viktor J.; Gromov, Kirill; Lebrun, Lauren M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Payers of health services and policymakers place a major focus on cost containment in health care. Studies have shown that early planning of discharge is essential in reducing length of stay and achieving financial benefit; tools that can help predict discharge disposition would...... populations is unknown. A low RAPT score is reported to indicate a high risk of needing any form of inpatient rehabilitation after TJA, including short-term nursing facilities. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: This study attempts (1) to assess predictive accuracy of the RAPT on US patients undergoing total hip and knee....... Based on our findings, the risk categories in our populations should be high risk intermediate risk 7 to 10, and low risk > 10. CONCLUSIONS: The RAPT accurately predicted discharge disposition for high- and low-risk patients in our cohort. Based on our data, intermediate-risk patients should...

  10. Factors affecting wound ooze in total knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, U; Ahmad, R; Aspros, D; Bannister, GC

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Wound ooze is common following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and persistent wound infection is a risk factor for infection, and increased length and cost of hospitalisation. PATIENTS AND METHODS We undertook a prospective study to assess the effect of tourniquet time, peri-articular local anaesthesia and surgical approach on wound oozing after TKA. RESULTS The medial parapatellar approach was used in 59 patients (77%) and subvastus in 18 patients (23%). Peri-articular local anaesthesia (0.25% Bupivacaine with 1:1,000,000 adrenalin) was used in 34 patients (44%). The mean tourniquet time was 83 min (range, 38–125 min). We found a significant association between cessation of oozing and peri-articular local anaesthesia (P = 0.003), length of the tourniquet time (P = 0.03) and the subvastus approach (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Peri-articular local anaesthesia, the subvastus approach and shorter tourniquet time were all associated with less wound oozing after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:20836920

  11. High patient satisfaction in 445 patients who underwent fast-track hip or knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Kirsten; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, Per; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patient satisfaction is important in fast-track total hip and knee replacement (THR, TKR). We assessed: (1) how satisfied patients were with the treatment; (2) factors related to overall satisfaction; and (3) whether there was a difference between THR and TKR regarding...... length of stay (LOS) and patient satisfaction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this follow-up study, a consecutive series of 445 patients undergoing THR and TKR completed a questionnaire 2 weeks after discharge. LOS and short-term patient satisfaction with the fast-track management were measured. Patient...... satisfaction was measured using a numerical rating scale (NRS; 0-10). RESULTS: For THR, the median satisfaction score was 9-10 and for TKR it was 8.5-10 in all parameters. Older THR patients had higher overall satisfaction. No association was found between overall satisfaction following THR or TKR and sex...

  12. The importance of patient expectations as a determinant of satisfaction with waiting times for hip and knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner-Spady, Barbara L; Sanmartin, Claudia; Johnston, Geoffrey H; McGurran, John J; Kehler, Melissa; Noseworthy, Tom W

    2011-08-01

    The disconfirmation model hypothesizes that satisfaction is a function of a perceived discrepancy from an initial expectation. Our objectives were: (1) to test the disconfirmation model as it applies to patient satisfaction with waiting time (WT) and (2) to build an explanatory model of the determinants of satisfaction with WT for hip and knee replacement. We mailed 1000 questionnaires to 2 random samples: patients waiting or those who had received a joint replacement within the preceding 3-12 months. We used ordinal logistic regression analysis to build an explanatory model of the determinants of satisfaction. Of the 1330 returned surveys, 1240 contained patient satisfaction data. The sample was 57% female; mean age was 70 years (SD 11). Consistent with the disconfirmation model, when their WTs were longer than expected, both waiting (OR 5.77, 95% CI 3.57-9.32) and post-surgery patients (OR 6.57, 95% CI 4.21-10.26) had greater odds of dissatisfaction, adjusting for the other variables in the model. Compared to those who waited 3 months or less, post-surgery patients who waited 6 to 12 months (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.27-5.27) and over 12 months (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.65-6.58) had greater odds of being dissatisfied with their waiting time. Patients who felt they were treated unfairly had greater odds of being dissatisfied (OR 4.74, 95% CI 2.60-8.62). In patients on waiting lists and post-surgery for hip and knee replacement, satisfaction with waiting times is related to fulfillment of expectations about waiting, as well as a perception of fairness. Measures to modify expectations and increase perceived fairness, such as informing patients of a realistic WT and communication during the waiting period, may increase satisfaction with WTs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Knee disarticulation and through-knee amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    A knee disarticulation or a through-knee stump is superior compared to a transfemoral stump. The thigh muscles are all preserved, and the muscle balance remains undisturbed. The range of motion of the hip joint is not limited. The bulbous shape of the stump allows full weight bearing at the stump end and can easily be fitted with a prosthesis. An amputee with a bilateral knee disarticulation is able to walk "barefoot". A more distal amputation level, e.g., an ultra-short transtibial amputation, is not possible. Important alternative to transfemoral amputations. Possible for any etiology except for Buerger-Winiwarter's disease. New indications are infected and loosened total knee replacements. Preservation of the knee joint is possible. Knee disarticulation is a very atraumatic procedure, compared to transfemoral amputations. Neither bones nor muscles have to be severed, just skin, ligaments, vessels, and nerves. Even the meniscal cartilages may be left in place to act as axial shock absorbers. The cartilage of the femur is not resected, but only bevelled in case of osteoarthritis. There are no tendon attachments or myoplastic procedures necessary. The patella remains in place and is held in position only by the retinacula. Skin closure must be performed without the slightest tension, and if possible not in the weight-bearing area. Transcondylar amputations across the femoral condyles only are indicated when there are not sufficient soft tissues for wound closure of a knee disarticulation. Alternatives as the techniques of Gritti, Klaes, and Eigler, the shortening of the femur and the Sauerbruch's rotation plasty [14] are presented and discussed. The risk of decubital ulcers is rather high. Correct bandaging of the stump is, therefore, particularly important. Prosthetic fitting is possible 3-6 weeks after surgery. The type of prosthesis depends on the amputee's activity level. The superior performance of amputees with knee disarticulations in sports prove the

  14. Weaker lower extremity muscle strength predicts traumatic knee injury in youth female but not male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryman Augustsson, Sofia; Ageberg, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The role of lower extremity (LE) muscle strength for predicting traumatic knee injury in youth athletes is largely unknown. The aim was to investigate the influence of LE muscle strength on traumatic knee injury in youth female and male athletes. 225 athletes (40% females) from sport senior high schools in Sweden were included in this case-control study. The athletes recorded any traumatic knee injury that had occurred during their high-school period in a web-based injury form. A one repetition maximum (1RM) barbell squat test was used to measure LE muscle strength. The 1RM was dichotomised to analyse 'weak' versus 'strong' athletes according to the median (weak median vs strong median ). 63 traumatic knee injuries, including 18 ACL injuries, were registered. The majority of injured female athletes were in the weak group compared with the strong group (p=0.0001). The odds of sustaining a traumatic knee injury and an ACL injury was 9.5 times higher and 7 times higher, respectively, in the weak median group compared with the strong median group in females (p ≤0.011). A relative 1RM squat ≤1.05 kg (105% of bodyweight) was established as the best cut-off value to distinguish high versus low risk of injury in female athletes. No strength-injury relationships were observed for the male athletes (p ≥0.348). Weaker LE muscle strength predicted traumatic knee injury in youth female athletes, but not in males. This suggests that LE muscle strength should be included in injury screening in youth female athletes.

  15. Quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, K.; Quinn, E.; Niu, J.; Guermazi, A.; Roemer, F.; Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F.; Felson, D.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA), prior to the advent of radiographic disease. Methods 206 knees with incident radiographic KOA (Kellgren Lawrence Grade (KLG) 0 or 1 at baseline, developing KLG 2 or greater with a definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) grade ≥1 by year 4) were matched to 232 control knees not developing incident KOA. Manual segmentation of the central five slices of the medial and lateral meniscus was performed on coronal 3T DESS MRI and quantitative meniscus position was determined. Cases and controls were compared using conditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, BMI, race and clinical site. Sensitivity analyses of early (year [Y] 1/2) and late (Y3/4) incidence was performed. Results Mean medial extrusion distance was significantly greater for incident compared to non-incident knees (1.56 mean ± 1.12 mm SD vs 1.29 ± 0.99 mm; +21%, P meniscus (25.8 ± 15.8% vs 22.0 ± 13.5%; +17%, P meniscus in incident medial KOA, or for the tibial plateau coverage between incident and non-incident knees. Restricting the analysis to medial incident KOA at Y1/2 differences were attenuated, but reached significance for extrusion distance, whereas no significant differences were observed at incident KOA in Y3/4. Conclusion Greater medial meniscus extrusion predicts incident radiographic KOA. Early onset KOA showed greater differences for meniscus position between incident and non-incident knees than late onset KOA. PMID:26318658

  16. Can combined use of low-level lasers and hyaluronic acid injections prolong the longevity of degenerative knee joints?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, David; Fu, Nga Yue

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated whether half-yearly hyaluronic acid injection together with low-level laser therapy in addition to standard conventional physical therapy can successfully postpone the need for joint replacement surgery in elderly patients with bilateral symptomatic tricompartmental knee arthritis. In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 70 consecutive unselected elderly patients with bilateral tricompartmental knee arthritis were assigned at random to either one of two conservative treatment protocols to either one of the painful knees. Protocol A consisted of conventional physical therapy plus a sham light source plus saline injection, and protocol B consisted of protocol A with addition of half-yearly hyaluronic acid injection as well as low-level laser treatment instead of using saline and a sham light source. Treatment failure was defined as breakthrough pain necessitating joint replacement. Among the 140 painful knees treated with either protocol A or protocol B, only one of the 70 painful knees treated by protocol B required joint replacement, whereas 15 of the 70 painful knees treated by protocol A needed joint replacement surgery (Phyaluronic acid injections together with low-level laser therapy should be incorporated into the standard conservative treatment protocol for symptomatic knee arthritis, because it may prolong the longevity of the knee joint without the need for joint replacement.

  17. Perioperative plasmatic presepsin levels in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenti, G; Pesce, V; Bizzoca, D; Nappi, V; Palmiotto, F; Carrozzo, M; Moretti, B

    2017-01-01

    Presepsin (sCD14-ST) is an emerging biomarker in the diagnosis of sepsis. In the field of orthopaedics, it could be useful in the diagnosis and management of periprosthetic joint infections (PJI). The aim of this study is to define the normal perioperative plasmatic levels of presepsin in patients undergoing primary cementless total hip replacement (THR) or primary cemented total knee replacement (TKR). For this purpose, 50 patients (19 male, 31 female, mean age= 64.04±8.88) were recruited. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A patients underwent cementless THR, whereas Group B patients underwent cemented TKR. On recruitment, anthropometric data, smocking status, osteoarthritis stage according to Kellgren and Lawrence, Harris Hip Score (HHS) for Group A patients and Knee Society Score (KSS) for Group B patients, drugs assumption and comorbidities were recorded. All the patients underwent serial blood tests, including complete blood count, presepsin (PS), C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) 24 hours before arthroplasty (T0) and at 24 (T1), 48 (T2), 72 (T3) and 96 (T4) hours postoperatively. Body temperature (θ) was recorded every six hours in the time lapse T0-T4. Presepsin plasmatic concentration was comparable at baseline in both groups. After surgery, however, a significant increase of presepsin was observed in Group A, whereas in Group B no significant changes of presepsin were recorded. A comparable trend of this biomarker was found in the two groups, i.e. presepsin increased from T0 to T3, when it reached its maximum value, and its decrease started at T4. Finally, presepsin resulted more accurate than CRP in the evaluation of perioperative inflammatory response in patients undergoing THR or TKR. These data will be helpful in defining a reference interval for presepsin in patients with prosthetic joint implants, and a cut-off of this biomarker for the diagnosis of PJI.

  18. Evaluation of a Musculoskeletal Model with Prosthetic Knee through Six Experimental Gait Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kia, Mohammad; Stylianou, Antonis P.; Guess, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the forces acting on musculoskeletal joint tissues during movement benefits tissue engineering, artificial joint replacement, and our understanding of ligament and cartilage injury. Computational models can be used to predict these internal forces, but musculoskeletal models that simultaneously calculate muscle force and the resulting loading on joint structures are rare. This study used publicly available gait, skeletal geometry, and instrumented prosthetic knee loading data [1]...

  19. Self-efficacy, pain, and quadriceps capacity at baseline predict changes in mobility performance over 2 years in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Nicholas M; Gatti, Anthony A; Stratford, Paul W; Maly, Monica R

    2018-02-01

    This study examined the extent to which baseline measures of quadriceps strength, quadriceps power, knee pain and self-efficacy for functional tasks, and their interactions, predicted 2-year changes in mobility performance (walking, stair ascent, stair descent) in women with knee osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that lesser strength, power and self-efficacy, and higher pain at baseline would each be independently associated with reduced mobility over 2 years, and each of pain and self-efficacy would interact with strength and power in predicting 2-year change in stair-climbing performance. This was a longitudinal, observational study of women with clinical knee osteoarthritis. At baseline and follow-up, mobility was assessed with the Six-Minute Walk Test, and stair ascent and descent tasks. Quadriceps strength and power, knee pain, and self-efficacy for functional tasks were also collected at baseline. Multiple linear regression examined the extent to which 2-year changes in mobility performances were predicted by baseline strength, power, pain, and self-efficacy, after adjusting for covariates. Data were analyzed for 37 women with knee osteoarthritis over 2 years. Lower baseline self-efficacy predicted decreased walking (β = 1.783; p = 0.030) and stair ascent (β = -0.054; p baseline pain intensity/frequency predicted decreased walking performance (β = 1.526; p = 0.002). Lower quadriceps strength (β = 0.051; p = 0.015) and power (β = 0.022; p = 0.022) interacted with lesser self-efficacy to predict worsening stair ascent performance. Strategies to sustain or improve mobility in women with knee osteoarthritis must focus on controlling pain and boosting self-efficacy. In those with worse self-efficacy, developing knee muscle capacity is an important target.

  20. The Effect of Patellar Denervation by Circumpatellar Electrocautery on Anterior Knee Pain Following Total Knee Replacement – An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Zacharia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES Anterior knee pain is a common problem in patients who have undergone TKR which causes dissatisfaction among them. There are Various methods for prevention of anterior knee pain following TKR .The  objective of this study is to determine the  effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on anterior knee pain following TKR and to compare the results with that of those patients who have undergone TKR without circumpatellar denervation. METHODS This is a cohort study conducted in Dept. of Orthopedics, Govt. Medical College, Kozhikode,kerala, 2014. Total sample size was 90.out of which 2 patients died during the study period. We lost follow up of 7 patients.  Among the remaining 81 patients 42 had undergone TKR with circumpatellar denervation using electocautery and 39 without circumpatellar denervation. They were kept under follow up. Patients were followed up postoperatively at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and at one year. At all postoperative visits, a clinical score was determined using the Knee Society score and the clinical anterior knee pain rating system described by Waters and Bentley RESULTS There is no statistically significant difference in AKP score between both groups.There is a statistically significant difference in the knee society score at 1st month(p value <.001.  But there is no difference on further follow up visits . CONCLUSION There is no statistically significant difference between final outcome of patients who underwent patella denervation using circumpatellar electrocauterisation and those without denervation  with respect to anterior knee pain among patients who have undergone TKR.

  1. Swing Phase Control of Semi-Active Prosthetic Knee Using Neural Network Predictive Control With Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkachai, Kittipong; Nilkhamhang, Itthisek

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, intelligent prosthetic knees have been developed that enable amputees to walk as normally as possible when compared to healthy subjects. Although semi-active prosthetic knees utilizing magnetorheological (MR) dampers offer several advantages, they lack the ability to generate active force that is required during some states of a normal gait cycle. This prevents semi-active knees from achieving the same level of performance as active devices. In this work, a new control algorithm for a semi-active prosthetic knee during the swing phase is proposed to reduce this gap. The controller uses neural network predictive control and particle swarm optimization to calculate suitable command signals. Simulation results using a double pendulum model show that the generated knee trajectory of the proposed controller is more similar to the normal gait than previous open-loop controllers at various ambulation speeds. Moreover, the investigation shows that the algorithm can be calculated in real time by an embedded system, allowing for easy implementation on real prosthetic knees.

  2. Spontaneous HIT syndrome post-knee replacement surgery with delayed recovery of thrombocytopenia: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Dilli Ram; Ghimire, Sushil; Dhital, Rashmi; Forman, Daniel A; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2017-09-01

    Recently published reports have established a heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT)-mimicking thromboembolic disorder without proximate heparin exposure, called spontaneous HIT syndrome. Although the pathophysiology remains unclear, anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies possibly triggered by exposure to knee cartilage glycosaminoglycans or other non-heparin polyanions found on bacterial surfaces and nucleic acids have been postulated. We present a 53-year-old female receiving antithrombotic prophylaxis with aspirin following right total knee replacement surgery (without perioperative or any previous lifetime heparin exposure) who acutely presented with high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) and right great saphenous vein thrombophlebitis on postoperative day (POD) 14; her platelet count at presentation was 13 × 10 9 /L. Prior to diagnostic consideration of spontaneous HIT syndrome, the patient briefly received unfractionated heparin (UFH) and one dose of enoxaparin. The patient's serum tested strongly positive for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies by two different PF4-dependent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and by serotonin release assay (SRA). Failure of fondaparinux anticoagulation (persisting HIT-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation) prompted switching to argatroban. Severe thrombocytopenia persisted (platelet count nadir, 12 × 10 9 /L, on POD21), and 9 days after starting argatroban symptomatic right leg deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) occurred, prompting switch to rivaroxaban. Thereafter, her course was uneventful, although platelet count recovery was prolonged, reaching 99 × 10 9 /L by POD45 and 199 × 10 9 /L by POD79. The patient's serum elicited strong serotonin release in the absence of heparin (seen even with 1/32 serum dilution) that was enhanced by pharmacological concentrations of UFH (0.1 and 0.3 IU/mL) and fondaparinux (0.1-1.2 μg/mL, i.e., in vitro fondaparinux "cross-reactivity"). Ultimately, platelet count recovery was

  3. Predictive Factors for Differentiating Between Septic Arthritis and Lyme Disease of the Knee in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Keith D; Brusalis, Christopher M; Nduaguba, Afamefuna M; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2016-05-04

    Differentiating between septic arthritis and Lyme disease of the knee in endemic areas can be challenging and has major implications for patient management. The purpose of this study was to identify a prediction rule to differentiate septic arthritis from Lyme disease in children presenting with knee pain and effusion. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients younger than 18 years of age with knee effusions who underwent arthrocentesis at our institution from 2005 to 2013. Patients with either septic arthritis (positive joint fluid culture or synovial white blood-cell count of >60,000 white blood cells/mm(3) with negative Lyme titer) or Lyme disease (positive Lyme immunoglobulin G on Western blot analysis) were included. To avoid misclassification bias, undiagnosed knee effusions and joints with both a positive culture and positive Lyme titers were excluded. Historical, clinical, and laboratory data were compared between groups to identify variables for comparison. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictive variables. One hundred and eighty-nine patients were studied: 23 with culture-positive septic arthritis, 26 with culture-negative septic arthritis, and 140 with Lyme disease. Multivariate binary logistic regression identified pain with short arc motion, history of fever reported by the patient or a family member, C-reactive protein of >4 mg/L, and age younger than 2 years as independent predictive factors for septic arthritis. A simpler model was developed that showed that the risk of septic arthritis with none of these factors was 2%, with 1 of these factors was 18%, with 2 of these factors was 45%, with 3 of these factors was 84%, or with all 4 of these factors was 100%. Although septic arthritis of the knee and Lyme monoarthritis share common features that can make them difficult to distinguish clinically, the presence of pain with short arc motion, C-reactive protein of >4.0 mg/L, patient-reported history of

  4. Excellence in fleet combat replacement squadrons: predicting carrier qualification success

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Martin P.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents a two-part analysis of excellence criteria for fleet combat replacement squadrons. Part one focuses on the qualitative issues and management techniques identified in outstanding fleet combat replacement squadrons. Part two develops and presents a regression model for predicting a fleet replacement squadron pilot's carrier qualification grade. The model was derived using standard linear regression techniques and the SPSSx software package of the Naval Postgraduate School. ...

  5. Semantic Factors Predict the Rate of Lexical Replacement of Content Words

    OpenAIRE

    Vejdemo, Susanne; H?rberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The rate of lexical replacement estimates the diachronic stability of word forms on the basis of how frequently a proto-language word is replaced or retained in its daughter languages. Lexical replacement rate has been shown to be highly related to word class and word frequency. In this paper, we argue that content words and function words behave differently with respect to lexical replacement rate, and we show that semantic factors predict the lexical replacement rate of content words. For t...

  6. Five-Year Survival of 20,946 Unicondylar Knee Replacements and Patient Risk Factors for Failure: An Analysis of German Insurance Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Elke; Gehrke, Thorsten; Günster, Christian; Hassenpflug, Joachim; Malzahn, Jürgen; Niethard, Fritz Uwe; Schräder, Peter; Zacher, Josef; Halder, Andreas

    2016-10-19

    Improvements in implant design and surgical technique of unicondylar knee arthroplasty have led to reduced revision rates, but patient selection seems to be crucial for success of such arthroplasties. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the 5-year implant survival rate of unicondylar knee replacements in Germany and to identify patient factors associated with an increased risk of revision, including >30 comorbid conditions. Using nationwide billing data of the largest German health-care insurance for inpatient hospital treatment, we identified patients who underwent unicondylar knee arthroplasty between 2006 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival curves with revision as the end point and log-rank tests were used to evaluate 5-year implant survival. A multivariable Cox regression model was used to determine factors associated with revision. The risk factors of age, sex, diagnosis, comorbidities, type of implant fixation, and hospital volume were analyzed. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. During the study period, a total of 20,946 unicondylar knee arthroplasties were included. The number of unicondylar knee arthroplasties per year increased during the study period from 2,527 in 2006 to 4,036 in 2012. The median patient age was 64 years (interquartile range, 56 to 72 years), and 60.4% of patients were female. During the time evaluated, the 1-year revision rate decreased from 14.3% in 2006 to 8.7% in 2011. The 5-year survival rate was 87.8% (95% CI, 87.3% to 88.3%). Significant risk factors (p 74 years was used as the reference); female sex (HR, 1.18 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.29]); complicated diabetes (HR, 1.47 [95% CI, 1.03 to 2.12]); depression (HR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.06 to 1.57]); obesity, defined as a body mass index of ≥30 kg/m 2 (HR, 1.13 [95% CI, 1.02 to 1.26]); and low-volume hospitals, denoted as an annual hospital volume of ≤10 cases (HR, 1.60 [95% CI, 1.39 to 1.84]), 11 to 20 cases (HR, 1.47 [95% CI, 1.27 to 1

  7. Associations between preoperative Oxford hip and knee scores and costs and quality of life of patients undergoing primary total joint replacement in the NHS England: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibich, Peter; Dakin, Helen A; Price, Andrew James; Beard, David; Arden, Nigel K; Gray, Alastair M

    2018-04-10

    To assess how costs and quality of life (measured by EuroQoL-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D)) before and after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) vary with age, gender and preoperative Oxford hip score (OHS) and Oxford knee score (OKS). Regression analyses using prospectively collected data from clinical trials, cohort studies and administrative data bases. UK secondary care. Men and women undergoing primary THR or TKR. The Hospital Episode Statistics data linked to patient-reported outcome measures included 602 176 patients undergoing hip or knee replacement who were followed up for up to 6 years. The Knee Arthroplasty Trial included 2217 patients undergoing TKR who were followed up for 12 years. The Clinical Outcomes in Arthroplasty Study cohort included 806 patients undergoing THR and 484 patients undergoing TKR who were observed for 1 year. EQ-5D-3L quality of life before and after surgery, costs of primary arthroplasty, costs of revision arthroplasty and the costs of hospital readmissions and ambulatory costs in the year before and up to 12 years after joint replacement. Average postoperative utility for patients at the 5th percentile of the OHS/OKS distribution was 0.61/0.5 for THR/TKR and 0.89/0.85 for patients at the 95th percentile. The difference between postoperative and preoperative EQ-5D utility was highest for patients with preoperative OHS/OKS lower than 10. However, postoperative EQ-5D utility was higher than preoperative utility for all patients with OHS≤46 and those with OKS≤44. In contrast, costs were generally higher for patients with low preoperative OHS/OKS than those with high OHS/OKS. For example, costs of hospital readmissions within 12 months after primary THR/TKR were £740/£888 for patients at the 5th percentile compared with £314/£404 at the 95th percentile of the OHS/OKS distribution. Our findings suggest that costs and quality of life associated with total joint replacement vary systematically with

  8. Dynamic knee alignment and collateral knee laxity and its variations in normal humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal eDeep

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of normal, arthritic and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non weight bearing position to standing weight bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees.

  9. Polyethylene wear of mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee replacement at 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, B J L; Simpson, D J; Kaptein, B L; Valstar, E R; Gill, H S; Murray, D W; Price, A J

    2011-04-01

    The Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) was designed to minimise wear utilising a fully-congruent, mobile, polyethylene bearing. Wear of polyethylene is a significant cause of revision surgery in UKR in the first decade, and the incidence increases in the second decade. Our study used model-based radiostereometric analysis to measure the combined wear of the upper and lower bearing surfaces in 13 medial-compartment Oxford UKRs at a mean of 20.9 years (17.2 to 25.9) post-operatively. The mean linear penetration of the polyethylene bearing was 1.04 mm (0.307 to 2.15), with a mean annual wear rate of 0.045 mm/year (0.016 to 0.099). The annual wear rate of the phase-2 bearings (mean 0.022 mm/year) was significantly less (p = 0.01) than that of phase-1 bearings (mean 0.07 mm/year). The linear wear rate of the Oxford UKR remains very low into the third decade. We believe that phase-2 bearings had lower wear rates than phase-1 implants because of the improved bearing design and surgical technique which decreased the incidence of impingement. We conclude that the design of the Oxford UKR gives low rates of wear in the long term.

  10. Associations of knee extensor strength and standing balance with physical function in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pua, Yong-Hao; Liang, Zhiqi; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Bryant, Adam L; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Clark, Ross A

    2011-12-01

    Knee extensor strength is an important correlate of physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis; however, it remains unclear whether standing balance is also a correlate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional associations of knee extensor strength, standing balance, and their interaction with physical function. One hundred four older adults with end-stage knee osteoarthritis awaiting a total knee replacement (mean ± SD age 67 ± 8 years) participated. Isometric knee extensor strength was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Standing balance performance was measured by the center of pressure displacement during quiet standing on a balance board. Physical function was measured by the self-report Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire and by the 10-meter fast-pace gait speed test. After adjustment for demographic and knee pain variables, we detected significant knee strength by standing balance interaction terms for both SF-36 physical function and fast-pace gait speed. Interrogation of the interaction revealed that standing balance in the anteroposterior plane was positively related to physical function among patients with lower knee extensor strength. Conversely, among patients with higher knee extensor strength, the standing balance-physical function associations were, or tended to be, negative. These findings suggest that although standing balance was related to physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis, this relationship was complex and dependent on knee extensor strength level. These results are of importance in developing intervention strategies and refining theoretical models, but they call for further study. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Stem cell application for osteoarthritis in the knee joint: A minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uth, Kristin; Trifonov, Dimitar

    2014-11-26

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic, indolent disease that will affect an ever increasing number of patients, especially the elderly and the obese. It is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage substance inside the knee which leads to pain, stiffness and tenderness. By some estimations in 2030, only in the United States, this medical condition will burden 67 million people. While conventional treatments like physiotherapy or drugs offer temporary relief of clinical symptoms, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Moreover, in severe cases of knee osteoarthritis total knee replacement may be required. Total knee replacements come together with high effort and costs and are not always successful. The aim of this review is to outline the latest advances in stem cell therapy for knee osteoarthritis as well as highlight some of the advantages of stem cell therapy over traditional approaches aimed at restoration of cartilage function in the knee. In addition to the latest advances in the field, challenges associated with stem cell therapy regarding knee cartilage regeneration and chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo are also outlined and analyzed. Furthermore, based on their critical assessment of the present academic literature the authors of this review share their vision about the future of stem cell applications in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Stem cell application for osteoarthritis in the knee joint: A minireview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristin; Uth; Dimitar; Trifonov

    2014-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic, indolent disease that will affect an ever increasing number of patients, especially the elderly and the obese. It is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage substance inside the knee which leads to pain, stiffness and tenderness. By some estimations in 2030, only in the United States, this medical condition will burden 67 million people. While conventional treatments like physiotherapy or drugs offer temporary relief of clinical symptoms, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Moreover, in severe cases of knee osteoarthritis total knee replacement may be required. Total knee replacements come together with high effort and costs and are not always successful. The aim of this review is to outline the latest advances in stem cell therapy for knee osteoarthritis as well as highlight some of the advantages of stem cell therapy over traditional approaches aimed at restoration of cartilage function in the knee. In addition to the latest advances in the field, challenges associated with stem cell therapy regarding knee cartilage regeneration and chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo are also outlined and analyzed. Furthermore, based on their critical assessment of the present academic literature the authors of this review share their vision about the future of stem cell applications in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of posterior cruciate ligament retaining high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; van der Zanden, A.C.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Background High-flexion knee replacements have been developed to accommodate a large range of flexion (>120°) after total knee arthroplasty. Both posterior cruciate ligament retaining and sacrificing high-flexion knee designs have been marketed. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the

  14. Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Arden, Nigel K

    2016-01-01

    , interfering with activities of daily living and the ability to work. Many patients tolerate pain, and many health-care providers accept pain and disability as inevitable corollaries of OA and ageing. Too often, health-care providers passively await final 'joint death', necessitating knee and hip replacements......-the regimes. Now is the time to begin the era of personalized prevention for knee OA....

  15. Combined intravenous, topical and oral tranexamic acid administration in total knee replacement: Evaluation of safety in patients with previous thromboembolism and effect on hemoglobin level and transfusion rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Joris A; Lameijer, Joost R C; Snoeker, Barbara A M

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the safety of combined intravenous, oral and topical tranexamic acid (TXA) in primary total knee replacement. We assessed dose-related efficacy on hemoglobin level, transfusion, length of stay and thromboembolic complications. In addition, TXA safety in patients with previous history of thromboembolism >12months ago was monitored specifically. From January 2013 until January 2016, 922 patients were included who received TXA after primary total knee replacement. Patients without TXA administration or with thromboembolic events 10-25mg/kg and >25-50mg/kg. Between the three TXA groups no significant difference was found in thromboembolic complications (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE)), wound leakage and transfusion rate. For patients with DVT or PE in their history >12months ago specifically, no more complications were noted in higher-TXA-dosage groups compared to the low-dosage group. Length of stay was shorter in the highest-TXA-dosage group compared with lower-dosage groups (median two vs three days). With high TXA dose a smaller difference between pre- and postoperative Hb was found: the >25-50mg/kg TXA group had a 0.419mmol/l smaller decrease in postoperative hemoglobin compared to the lowest-dosage group (Ptopical TXA is effective in knee replacement and can safely be given to patients with a thromboembolic history >12months ago. High dosage (>25-50mg/kg) TXA resulted in the smallest decrease in postoperative hemoglobin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melloni, Pietro; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious

  17. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melloni, Pietro [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: pmelloni@cspt.es; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious.

  18. A real time biofeedback using Kinect and Wii to improve gait for post-total knee replacement rehabilitation: a case study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinger, Pazit; Zeina, Daniel; Teshome, Assefa K; Skinner, Elizabeth; Begg, Rezaul; Abbott, John Haxby

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a low-cost real-time biofeedback system to assist with rehabilitation for patients following total knee replacement (TKR) and to assess its feasibility of use in a post-TKR patient case study design with a comparison group. The biofeedback system consisted of Microsoft Kinect(TM) and Nintendo Wii balance board with a dedicated software. A six-week inpatient rehabilitation program was augmented by biofeedback and tested in a single patient following TKR. Three patients underwent a six weeks standard rehabilitation with no biofeedback and served as a control group. Gait, function and pain were assessed and compared before and after the rehabilitation. The biofeedback software incorporated real time visual feedback to correct limb alignment, movement pattern and weight distribution. Improvements in pain, function and quality of life were observed in both groups. The strong improvement in the knee moment pattern demonstrated in the case study indicates feasibility of the biofeedback-augmented intervention. This novel biofeedback software has used simple commercially accessible equipment that can be feasibly incorporated to augment a post-TKR rehabilitation program. Our preliminary results indicate the potential of this biofeedback-assisted rehabilitation to improve knee function during gait. Research is required to test this hypothesis. Implications for Rehabilitation The real-time biofeedback system developed integrated custom-made software and simple low-cost commercially accessible equipment such as Kinect and Wii board to provide augmented information during rehabilitation following TKR. The software incorporated key rehabilitation principles and visual feedback to correct alignment of the lower legs, pelvic and trunk as well as providing feedback on limbs weight distribution. The case study patient demonstrated greater improvement in their knee function where a more normal biphasic knee moment was achieved following the six

  19. The natural course of radionuclide bone scanning in the evaluation of total knee replacement--a 2 year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, B R; Boeckstyns, M; Stadeager, Carsten Preben

    1990-01-01

    In order to establish the natural course of radionuclide bone scanning images after total knee replacement 41 consecutive patients were scheduled for examination 3, 7, 12 and 24 months after surgery. The mean age was 69 years (range 50-80 years); the female:male ratio was 4:1. Thirty-two patients...... completed the entire program. A total of 143 99Tcm medronic acid complex scintigrams was performed. No significant difference between the grades of total scintigraphic uptake at any of the four examinations nor any difference between the first and the last examinations could be demonstrated (P = 0...

  20. The trivector approach for minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzo, Francesco; Rossi, Stefano Marco Paolo

    2012-09-01

    One of the main criticisms of minimally invasive approaches in total knee arthroplasty has been their poor adaptability in cases of major deformity or stiffness of the knee joint. When they are used in such cases, excessive soft-tissue tension is needed to provide appropriate joint exposure. Here, we describe the "mini trivector approach," which has become our standard approach for total knee replacement because it permits us to enlarge the indication for minimally or less invasive total knee replacement to many knees where quad sparing, a subvastus approach, or a mini quad or mini midvastus snip may not be sufficient to achieve correct exposure. It consists of a limited double snip of the VMO and the quadriceps tendon that reduces tension on the extensor mechanism and allows easier verticalization of the patella as well as good joint exposure.

  1. Prosthesis alignment affects axial rotation motion after total knee replacement: a prospective in vivo study combining computed tomography and fluoroscopic evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harman Melinda K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical consequences of alignment errors in total knee replacement (TKR have led to the rigorous evaluation of surgical alignment techniques. Rotational alignment in the transverse plane has proven particularly problematic, with errors due to component malalignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and an overall mismatch between the femoral and tibial components’ relative positions. Ranges of nominal rotational alignment are not well defined, especially for the tibial component and for relative rotational mismatch, and some studies advocate the use of mobile-bearing TKR to accommodate the resulting small rotation errors. However, the relationships between prosthesis rotational alignment and mobile-bearing polyethylene insert motion are poorly understood. This prospective, in vivo study evaluates whether component malalignment and mismatch affect axial rotation motions during passive knee flexion after TKR. Methods Eighty patients were implanted with mobile-bearing TKR. Rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components was measured from postoperative CT scans. All TKR were categorized into nominal or outlier groups based on defined norms for surgical rotational alignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and relative rotational mismatch between the femoral and tibial components. Axial rotation motion of the femoral, tibial and polyethylene bearing components was measured from fluoroscopic images acquired during passive knee flexion. Results Axial rotation motion was generally accomplished in two phases, dominated by polyethylene bearing rotation on the tibial component in early to mid-flexion and then femoral component rotation on the polyethylene articular surface in later flexion. Opposite rotations of the femur-bearing and bearing-baseplate articulations were evident at flexion greater than 80°. Knees with outlier alignment had lower magnitudes of axial rotation and distinct transitions from external to

  2. Early rehabilitation after total knee replacement surgery: a multicenter, noninferiority, randomized clinical trial comparing a home exercise program with usual outpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Annie S Y; Nairn, Lillias; Harmer, Alison R; Crosbie, Jack; March, Lyn; Parker, David; Crawford, Ross; Fransen, Marlene

    2015-02-01

    To determine, at 6 weeks postsurgery, if a monitored home exercise program (HEP) is not inferior to usual care rehabilitation for patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee replacement (TKR) surgery for osteoarthritis. We conducted a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients ages 45-75 years were allocated at the time of hospital discharge to usual care rehabilitation (n = 196) or the HEP (n = 194). Outcomes assessed 6 weeks after surgery included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function subscales, knee range of motion, and the 50-foot walk time. The upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) mean difference favoring usual care was used to determine noninferiority. At 6 weeks after surgery there were no significant differences between usual care and HEP, respectively, for pain (7.4 and 7.2; 95% CI mean difference [MD] -0.7, 0.9), physical function (22.5 and 22.4; 95% CI MD -2.5, 2.6), knee flexion (96° and 97°; 95% CI MD -4°, 2°), knee extension (-7° and -6°; 95% CI MD -2°, 1°), or the 50-foot walk time (12.9 and 12.9 seconds; 95% CI MD -0.8, 0.7 seconds). At 6 weeks, 18 patients (9%) allocated to usual care and 11 (6%) to the HEP did not achieve 80° knee flexion. There was no difference between the treatment allocations in the number of hospital readmissions. The HEP was not inferior to usual care as an early rehabilitation protocol after primary TKR. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Seasonality of service provision in hip and knee surgery: a possible contributor to waiting times? A time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Ross E G; Moineddin, Rahim; Crighton, Eric J; Mamdani, Muhammad

    2006-03-01

    The question of how best to reduce waiting times for health care, particularly surgical procedures such as hip and knee replacements is among the most pressing concern of the Canadian health care system. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that significant seasonal variation exists in the performance of hip and knee replacement surgery in the province of Ontario. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis examining all hip and knee replacement surgeries in people over the age of 65 in the province of Ontario, Canada between 1992 and 2002. The main outcome measure was monthly hospitalization rates per 100,000 population for all hip and knee replacements. There was a marked increase in the rate of hip and knee replacement surgery over the 10-year period as well as an increasing seasonal variation in surgeries. Highly significant (Fisher Kappa = 16.05, p Holidays and utilization caps appear to exert a significant influence on the rate of service provision. It is expected that waiting times for hip and knee replacement could be reduced by reducing seasonal fluctuations in service provision and benchmarking services to peak delivery. The results highlight the importance of system behaviour in seasonal fluctuation of service delivery.

  4. Adductor canal block for post-operative analgesia after simultaneous bilateral total knee replacement: A randomised controlled trial to study the effect of addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhee Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Knee replacement surgery causes tremendous post-operative pain and adductor canal block (ACB is used for post-operative analgesia. This is a randomised, controlled, three-arm parallel group study using different doses of dexmedetomidine added to ropiavcaine for ACB. Methods: A total of 150 patients aged 18–75 years, scheduled for simultaneous bilateral total knee replacement, received ultrasound-guided ACB. They were randomised into three groups -Group A received ACB with plain ropivacaine; Groups B and C received ACB with ropivacaine and addition of dexmedetomidine 0.25 μg/kg and 0.50 μg/kg, respectively, on each side of ACB. The primary outcome was the duration of analgesia. Total opioid consumption, success of early ambulation, and level of patient satisfaction were also assessed. Results: The patient characteristics and block success rates were comparable in all groups. Group C patients had longer duration of analgesia (Group C 18.4 h ± 7.4; Group B 14.6 ± 7.1; Group A 10.8 ± 7; P < 0.001; lesser tramadol consumption (Group C 43.8 mg ± 53.2; Group B 76.4 ± 49.6; Group A 93.9 mg ± 58.3; P < 0.001 and lesser pain on movement (P < 0.001. The patients in Group B and C walked more steps than in Group A (P < 0.002. The level of patient satisfaction was highest in Group C (P < 0.001. Conclusions: The addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine resulted in longer duration of analgesia after adductor canal block for simultaneous bilateral total knee replacement surgery.

  5. A preclinical numerical assessment of a polyetheretherketone femoral component in total knee arthroplasty during gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, L. de; Janssen, D.W.; Briscoe, A.; Verdonschot, N.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conventional total knee replacement designs show high success rates but in the long term, the stiff metal components may affect bone quality of the distal femur. In this study we introduce an all-polymer total knee replacement device containing a PEEK femoral component on an UHMWPE

  6. Younger age increases the risk of early prosthesis failure following primary total knee replacement for osteoarthritis. A follow-up study of 32,019 total knee replacements in the Finnish Arthroplasty Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julin, Jaakko; Jämsen, Esa; Puolakka, Timo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Moilanen, Teemu

    2010-08-01

    Total knee replacements (TKRs) are being increasingly performed in patients aged age of the patient and prosthesis survival following primary TKR using nationwide data collected from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. From Jan 1, 1997 through Dec 31, 2003, 32,019 TKRs for primary or secondary osteoarthritis were reported to the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. The TKRs were followed until the end of 2004. During the follow-up, 909 TKRs were revised, 205 (23%) due to infection and 704 for other reasons. Crude overall implant survival improved with increasing age between the ages of 40 and 80. The 5-year survival rates were 92% and 95% in patients aged 65 years of age (p age groups 65 years remained after adjustment for these factors (p age impairs the prognosis of TKR and is associated with increased revision rates for non-infectious reasons. Diagnosis, sex, type of TKR, use of patellar component, and fixation method partly explain the differences, but the effects of physical activity, patient demands, and obesity on implant survival in younger patients warrant further research.

  7. Kinematic and kinetic analysis of the knee joint before and after a PCL retaining total knee replacement during gait and single step ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Alexandros; Lallos, Stergios; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Darras, Nikolaos; Tzomaki, Magda; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to capture and analyze the kinetics and kinematics and determine the functional performance of the osteoarthritic knee after a posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retaining total knee arthroplasty. Kinematic and kinetic gait analysis of level walking was performed in 20 subjects (12 female and 8 male) with knee ostoarthritis. These patients were free of any neurological diseases that could affect their normal gait. Mean age was 69.6 ± 6.6 years; mean height was 157.6 cm ± 7.6 cm; and mean weight was 77.2 ± 12.1 kg. Full body gait analyses were performed using the BIOKIN 3D motion analysis system before and 9 months after total knee arthroplasty procedures. Single-step ascending kinetic analyses and plantar pressure distribution analyses were also performed for all subjects. International Knee Society Scores (IKSSs) were also assessed pre- and postoperatively. Significant increases were noted postoperatively in average cadence (preoperative mean = 99.26, postoperative mean = 110.5; p knee adduction moment were also reported postoperatively. All patients showed a significant improvement of knee kinetics and kinematics after a PCL retaining total knee arthroplasty. Significant differences were found in the cadence, step length, stride length, and walk velocity postoperatively. IKSSs also significantly improved. Further research is warranted to determine the clinical relevance of these findings.

  8. A new approach to knee joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarychta, P

    2018-04-01

    The main aim of this new approach dedicated to knee arthroplasty is to provide an automated method for determining the cutting planes of both the head of femur and the head of tibia in knee replacement surgery. This paper shows a new approach differing from standard procedures associated with manual determination of the mechanical axis of the lower extremity (during surgery) and replacing them with a procedure based on the imprints (with selected cutting planes) of the two heads of bones. Both these imprints have been performed on the basis of the toposcan of the lower limb (before surgery). This methodology has been implemented in MATLAB and tested in clinical CT images of the lower limb in the coronal and transverse planes (61 studies) and in clinical MRI studies of the knee joint in coronal plane (107 studies). Correct results were obtained for about 90% cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Single intravenous tranexamic acid dose to reduce blood loss in primary total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Parra Ruiz, B; Ferrández Martínez, J; Martínez López, J F

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a single intravenous dose of tranexamic acid in order to reduce blood loss in total knee replacement. Prospective observational study of the administration of tranexamic acid in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty from November 2013 to February 2015, in which an autologous blood recovery system was used. The study included 98 patients, distributed into two groups of 49 patients according to whether or not they received intravenous tranexamic acid. The primary endpoint was the number of patients requiring autologous transfusion from the recovery system autologous blood recovery system. No drop-outs were recorded during follow-up. There were no significant differences between groups as regards the preoperative and hospital variables. The mean preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit at 24 and 48 hours postoperatively were similar in both groups. The average volume of bleeding in the autologous blood recovery system and estimated average blood loss was lower in patients who had been administered tranexamic acid, with significant differences. No patients in the group that was administered tranexamic acid required blood autotransfusion. The transfusion rate was zero in the two groups. No adverse events related to the administration of tranexamic acid were recorded. Intravenous administration of tranexamic acid, according to the described protocol, has presented a non-autotransfusion or allo-transfusion rate of 100%, with no increased incidence of thrombotic events. Thus, its use in this group of patients is recommended. The indication should be individualized, its use justified in the patient medical records, and informed consent is mandatory. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. A preclinical numerical assessment of a polyetheretherketone femoral component in total knee arthroplasty during gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, Lennert; Janssen, Dennis W.; Briscoe, Adam; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Background Conventional total knee replacement designs show high success rates but in the long term, the stiff metal components may affect bone quality of the distal femur. In this study we introduce an all-polymer total knee replacement device containing a PEEK femoral component on an UHMWPE tibial

  11. Three-Dimensional Isotropic Fat-Suppressed Proton Density-Weighted MRI at 3 Tesla Using a T/R-Coil Can Replace Multiple Plane Two-Dimensional Sequences in Knee Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, R; Gieseke, J; Luetkens, J A; Kupczyk, P; Maedler, B; Kukuk, G M; Träber, F; Agha, B; Rauch, M; Rajakaruna, N; Willinek, W; Schild, H H; Hadizadeh, D R

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether a 3 D proton density-weighted fat-suppressed sequence (PDwFS) of the knee is able to replace multiplanar 2D-PDwFS. 52 patients (26 men, mean age: 41.9 ± 14.5years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee at 3.0 Tesla using a T/R-coil. The imaging protocol included 3 planes of 2D-PDwFS (acquisition time (AT): 6:40 min; voxel sizes: 0.40 - 0.63 × 0.44 - 0.89 × 3mm³) and a 3D-PDwFS (AT: 6:31 min; voxel size: 0.63 × 0.68 × 0.63mm³). Homogeneity of fat suppression (HFS), artifacts, and image sharpness (IS) were evaluated on a 5-point scale (5[excellent] - 1[non-diagnostic]). The sum served as a measure for the overall image quality (OIQ). Contrast ratios (CR) compared to popliteal muscle were calculated for the meniscus (MEN), anterior (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL). In 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery, two radiologists evaluated the presence of meniscal, ligamental and cartilage lesions to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. The CR was higher in the ACL, PCL and MEN in 3D- PDwFS compared to 2D-PDwFS (p Tesla Using a T/R-Coil Can Replace Multiple Plane Two-Dimensional Sequences in Knee Imaging. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2016; 188: 949 - 956. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. What is the optimal time point to assess patient-reported recovery after hip and knee replacement? A systematic review and analysis of routinely reported outcome data from the English patient-reported outcome measures programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, John Patrick; Bastaki, Hamad; Dawson, Jill

    2013-07-30

    It is unclear if there is a clinically important improvement in the six to 12-month recovery period after hip and knee replacement. This is an obvious gap in the evidence required by patients undergoing these procedures. It is also an issue for the English PROMs (Patient-Reported Outcome Measures) Programme which uses 6-month outcome data to compare the results of hospitals that perform hip and knee replacements. A systematic review of studies reporting the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) or Oxford Knee Score (OKS) at 12 months after surgery was performed. This was compared with six-month outcome data collected for 60, 160 patients within the English PROMs programme. A minimally important difference of one standard error of the measurement, equivalent to 2.7 for the OHS and 2.1 for the OKS, was adopted. Six studies reported OHS data for 10 different groups containing 8,308 patients in total. In eight groups the change scores reported were at least 2.7 points higher than the six-month change observed in the PROMs programme (20.2 points). Nine studies reported OKS data for 13 different groups containing 4,369 patients in total. In eight groups the change scores reported were at least 2.1 points higher than the six-month change observed in the PROMs programme (15.0 points). There is some evidence from this systematic review that clinically important improvement in the Oxford hip and knee scores occurs in the six to 12 month recovery period. This trend is more apparent for hip than knee replacement. Therefore we recommend that the English Department of Health study the impact on hospital comparisons of using 12- rather than six-month outcome data.

  13. Evaluation of the Wii Balance Board for walking aids prediction: proof-of-concept study in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pua, Yong-Hao; Clark, Ross A; Ong, Peck-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To provide proof-of-concept for the validity of the Wii Balance Board (WBB) measures to predict the type of walking aids required by inpatients with a recent (≤4 days) total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A cross-sectional sample of 89 inpatients (mean age, 67.0±8 years) with TKA was analyzed. A multivariable proportional odds prediction model was constructed using 8 pre-specified predictors – namely, age, sex, body mass index, knee pain, knee range-of-motion, active knee lag, and WBB-derived standing balance. The type of walking aids prescribed on day 4 post-surgery was the outcome of interest – an ordinal variable with 4 categories (walking stick, narrow- and broad-base quadstick, and walking frame). Women, increasing body mass index, and poorer standing balance were independently associated with greater odds for requiring walking aids with a larger base-of-support. The concordance-index of the prediction model was 0.74. The model comprising only WBB-derived standing balance had nearly half (44%) the explanatory power of the full model. Adding WBB-derived standing balance to conventional demographic and knee variables resulted in a continuous net reclassification index of 0.60 (95%CI,0.19-1.01), predominantly due to better identification of patients who required walking aids with a large base-of-support (sensitivity gain). The WBB was able to provide quantitative measures of standing balance which could assist healthcare professionals in prescribing the appropriate type of walking aids for patients. Further investigation is needed to assess whether using the WBB could lead to meaningful changes in clinical outcomes such as falls.

  14. Evaluation of the Wii Balance Board for walking aids prediction: proof-of-concept study in total knee arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hao Pua

    Full Text Available To provide proof-of-concept for the validity of the Wii Balance Board (WBB measures to predict the type of walking aids required by inpatients with a recent (≤4 days total knee arthroplasty (TKA.A cross-sectional sample of 89 inpatients (mean age, 67.0±8 years with TKA was analyzed. A multivariable proportional odds prediction model was constructed using 8 pre-specified predictors – namely, age, sex, body mass index, knee pain, knee range-of-motion, active knee lag, and WBB-derived standing balance. The type of walking aids prescribed on day 4 post-surgery was the outcome of interest – an ordinal variable with 4 categories (walking stick, narrow- and broad-base quadstick, and walking frame.Women, increasing body mass index, and poorer standing balance were independently associated with greater odds for requiring walking aids with a larger base-of-support. The concordance-index of the prediction model was 0.74. The model comprising only WBB-derived standing balance had nearly half (44% the explanatory power of the full model. Adding WBB-derived standing balance to conventional demographic and knee variables resulted in a continuous net reclassification index of 0.60 (95%CI,0.19-1.01, predominantly due to better identification of patients who required walking aids with a large base-of-support (sensitivity gain.The WBB was able to provide quantitative measures of standing balance which could assist healthcare professionals in prescribing the appropriate type of walking aids for patients. Further investigation is needed to assess whether using the WBB could lead to meaningful changes in clinical outcomes such as falls.

  15. Polietileno tibial móvel na artroplastia total do joelho Mobile polyethylene bearing in total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alexandre de Araújo Barros Cobra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O desgaste do polietileno tibial utilizado nas artroplastias de joelho origina partículas que, quando fagocitadas, dão início à cascata de eventos biológicos que levam à osteólise e consequente afrouxamento dos componentes da prótese. Assim sendo, alternativas para o polietileno têm sido pesquisadas com o objetivo de minimizar o desgaste e, com isso, aumentar a durabilidade das artroplastias. Uma dessas opções é a utilização de polietilenos tibiais móveis, que apresentam maior conformidade do que os polietilenos fixos, ao mesmo tempo em que permitem autoalinhamento rotacional entre os componentes, melhorando, dessa forma, a cinética e a cinemática da prótese. São apresentados aqui, de forma resumida, porém abrangente, o conceito, os fundamentos biomecânicos, as indicações, os resultados esperados e complicações dos polietilenos tibiais móveis nas artroplastias totais do joelho.Debris of polyethylene tibial bearings have been recognized as a major cause for the onset of the cascade of biological events leading to osteolysis and loosening of prosthetic components after total knee arthroplasty. Since then, research has been focused on alternative bearing surfaces in order to minimize the amount and rate of polyethylene wear off and, in doing so, increasing the survivorship rate for knee arthroplasties. One such option is to have a mobile tibial bearing allowing more conformity and rotational self-alignment of the components, improving kinetics and kinematics of the prosthesis. The authors present a resumed but throughout and comprehensive review of the rationale, biomechanics fundamentals, indications, pitfalls, outcomes and complications for the use of mobile tibial bearings in total knee replacement.

  16. Comparison of fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Huys, Maxime; Pariat, Jacques; Roubineau, François; Flouzat Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Dubory, Arnaud

    2018-02-01

    There is no information comparing the results of fixed-bearing total knee replacement and mobile-bearing total knee replacement in the same patients previously treated by high tibial osteotomy. The purpose was therefore to compare fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee replacements in patients treated with previous high tibial osteotomy. We compared the results of 57 patients with osteoarthritis who had received a fixed-bearing prosthesis after high tibial osteotomy with the results of 41 matched patients who had received a rotating platform after high tibial osteotomy. The match was made for length of follow-up period. The mean follow-up was 17 years (range, 15-20 years). The patients were assessed clinically and radiographically. The pre-operative knee scores had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. So was the case with the intra-operative releases, blood loss, thromboembolic complications and infection rates in either group. There was significant improvement in both groups of knees, and no significant difference was observed between the groups (i.e., fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing knees) for the mean Knee Society knee clinical score (95 and 92 points, respectively), or the Knee Society knee functional score (82 and 83 points, respectively) at the latest follow-up. However, the mean post-operative knee motion was higher for the fixed-bearing group (117° versus 110°). In the fixed-bearing group, one knee was revised because of periprosthetic fracture. In the rotating platform mobile-bearing group, one knee was revised because of aseptic loosening of the tibial component. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship for revision at ten years of follow-up was 95.2% for the fixed bearing prosthesis and 91.1% for the rotating platform mobile-bearing prosthesis. Although we did manage to detect significant differences mainly in clinical and radiographic results between the two groups, we found no superiority or inferiority of the mobile

  17. Seasonality of service provision in hip and knee surgery: A possible contributor to waiting times? A time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The question of how best to reduce waiting times for health care, particularly surgical procedures such as hip and knee replacements is among the most pressing concern of the Canadian health care system. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that significant seasonal variation exists in the performance of hip and knee replacement surgery in the province of Ontario. Methods We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis examining all hip and knee replacement surgeries in people over the age of 65 in the province of Ontario, Canada between 1992 and 2002. The main outcome measure was monthly hospitalization rates per 100 000 population for all hip and knee replacements. Results There was a marked increase in the rate of hip and knee replacement surgery over the 10-year period as well as an increasing seasonal variation in surgeries. Highly significant (Fisher Kappa = 16.05, p 2Autoreg = 0.85 seasonality was identified in the data. Conclusion Holidays and utilization caps appear to exert a significant influence on the rate of service provision. It is expected that waiting times for hip and knee replacement could be reduced by reducing seasonal fluctuations in service provision and benchmarking services to peak delivery. The results highlight the importance of system behaviour in seasonal fluctuation of service delivery.

  18. Predictive value of MRI features for development of radiographic osteoarthritis in a cohort of participants with pre-radiographic knee osteoarthritis-the CHECK study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oudenaarde, Kim; Jobke, Björn; Oostveen, Ans C M; Marijnissen, Annekarien C A; Wolterbeek, Ron; Wesseling, Janet; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Bloem, Hans L; Reijnierse, Monique; Kloppenburg, Margreet

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether MRI features are associated with development of radiographic knee OA and can be used as a predictive tool in early knee OA. METHODS: In 148 participants of the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee study (mean age 56 years, 78% women), with a Kellgren Lawrence (KL) score ⩽1, we

  19. A randomised, controlled trial of circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement without patellar resurfacing: a concise follow-up at a mean of 3.7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Jonbergen, H P W; Scholtes, V A B; Poolman, R W

    2014-04-01

    In the absence of patellar resurfacing, we have previously shown that the use of electrocautery around the margin of the patella improved the one-year clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR). In this prospective randomised study we compared the mean 3.7 year (1.1 to 4.2) clinical outcomes of 300 TKRs performed with and without electrocautery of the patellar rim: this is an update of a previous report. The overall prevalence of anterior knee pain was 32% (95% confidence intervals [CI] 26 to 39), and 26% (95% CI 18 to 35) in the intervention group compared with 38% (95% CI 29 to 48) in the control group (chi-squared test; p = 0.06). The overall prevalence of anterior knee pain remained unchanged between the one-year and 3.7 year follow-up (chi-squared test; p = 0.12). The mean total Western Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Indices and the American Knee Society knee and function scores at 3.7 years' follow-up were similar in the intervention and control groups (repeated measures analysis of variance p = 0.43, p = 0.09 and p = 0.59, respectively). There were no complications. A total of ten patients (intervention group three, control group seven) required secondary patellar resurfacing after the first year. Our study suggests that the improved clinical outcome with electrocautery denervation compared with no electrocautery is not maintained at a mean of 3.7 years' follow-up.

  20. Characteristics of Fibromyalgia Independently Predict Poorer Long‐Term Analgesic Outcomes Following Total Knee and Hip Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Andrew G.; Hassett, Afton L.; Tsodikov, Alex; Hallstrom, Brian R.; Wood, Nathan I.; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While psychosocial factors have been associated with poorer outcomes after knee and hip arthroplasty, we hypothesized that augmented pain perception, as occurs in conditions such as fibromyalgia, may account for decreased responsiveness to primary knee and hip arthroplasty. Methods A prospective, observational cohort study was conducted. Preoperative phenotyping was conducted using validated questionnaires to assess pain, function, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. Participants also completed the 2011 fibromyalgia survey questionnaire, which addresses the widespread body pain and comorbid symptoms associated with characteristics of fibromyalgia. Results Of the 665 participants, 464 were retained 6 months after surgery. Since individuals who met criteria for being classified as having fibromyalgia were expected to respond less favorably, all primary analyses excluded these individuals (6% of the cohort). In the multivariate linear regression model predicting change in knee/hip pain (primary outcome), a higher fibromyalgia survey score was independently predictive of less improvement in pain (estimate −0.25, SE 0.044; P fibromyalgia survey score (P = 0.00032). The fibromyalgia survey score was also independently predictive of change in overall pain and patient global impression of change. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the fibromyalgia survey score is a robust predictor of poorer arthroplasty outcomes, even among individuals whose score falls well below the threshold for the categorical diagnosis of fibromyalgia. PMID:25772388

  1. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the STAR care pathway compared to usual care for patients with chronic pain after total knee replacement: study protocol for a UK randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Bertram, Wendy; Beswick, Andrew D; Blom, Ashley W; Bruce, Julie; Burston, Amanda; Dennis, Jane; Garfield, Kirsty; Howells, Nicholas; Lane, Athene; McCabe, Candy; Moore, Andrew J; Noble, Sian; Peters, Tim J; Price, Andrew; Sanderson, Emily; Toms, Andrew D; Walsh, David A; White, Simon; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2018-02-21

    Approximately 20% of patients experience chronic pain after total knee replacement. There is little evidence for effective interventions for the management of this pain, and current healthcare provision is patchy and inconsistent. Given the complexity of this condition, multimodal and individualised interventions matched to pain characteristics are needed. We have undertaken a comprehensive programme of work to develop a care pathway for patients with chronic pain after total knee replacement. This protocol describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of a complex intervention care pathway compared with usual care. This is a pragmatic two-armed, open, multi-centred randomised controlled trial conducted within secondary care in the UK. Patients will be screened at 2 months after total knee replacement and 381 patients with chronic pain at 3 months postoperatively will be recruited. Recruitment processes will be optimised through qualitative research during a 6-month internal pilot phase. Patients are randomised using a 2:1 intervention:control allocation ratio. All participants receive usual care as provided by their hospital. The intervention comprises an assessment clinic appointment at 3 months postoperatively with an Extended Scope Practitioner and up to six telephone follow-up calls over 12 months. In the assessment clinic, a standardised protocol is followed to identify potential underlying causes for the chronic pain and enable appropriate onward referrals to existing services for targeted and individualised treatment. Outcomes are assessed by questionnaires at 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The co-primary outcomes are pain severity and pain interference assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory at 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes relate to resource use, function, neuropathic pain, mental well-being, use of pain medications, satisfaction with pain relief, pain frequency, capability

  2. Is the posterior cruciate ligament destabilized after the tibial cut in a cruciate retaining total knee replacement? An anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liabaud, Barthelemy; Patrick, David A; Geller, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-01

    Cruciate retaining total knee replacement has been shown to effectively improve pain and quality of life. Successful outcomes depend on many factors, including the maintenance of a competent posterior cruciate ligament. This study sought to anatomically analyze the percentage of PCL injured during a full transverse, tibial cut, thus altering normal function. One hundred and thirty five consecutive knee MRIs taken from 2006 to 2011 were selected from a single surgeon's database for this study. Only subjects with non-arthritic knees were considered for this study; the lack of degenerative joint disease (DJD) was confirmed via a radiological report. The optimal view of the PCL's tibial attachment was observed using the sagittal view of the knee, with a T1 signal. One hundred and twenty two usable images were viewed electronically, and measurements were made using the standardized transverse cut implant guidelines. The percentage of PCL remaining following the cut was categorized into five different groups: 0% (no PCL undermined), 1-49%, 50-74%, 75-99% and 100% (PCL undermined entirely). Overall only 9.0% (n=11) would have not endured any damage to the PCL with a transverse tibial saw cut, while 79.6% (n=98) would have had 50% or more of the PCL undermined. Of the 98 patients with more than 50% resected, 52.1% (n=51 patients) presented complete destabilization of the PCL. The percentage of PCL destabilized was not significant across age groups (p=0.280), gender (p=0.586), or operative side (p=0.460). Independent of age, gender, and operative side, a majority of PCLs are more than 50% destabilized following the standard transverse tibial cut. II. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Level of response to telematic questionnaires on Health Related Quality of Life on total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besalduch-Balaguer, M; Aguilera-Roig, X; Urrútia-Cuchí, G; Puntonet-Bruch, A; Jordan-Sales, M; González-Osuna, A; Celaya-Ibáñez, F; Colomina-Morales, J

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaires measuring health-related quality of life are difficult to perform and obtain for patients and professionals. Computerised tools are now available to collect this information. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of patients undergoing total knee replacement to fill in health-related quality-of-life questionnaires using a telematic platform. Ninety eight consecutive patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were included. Participants were given an access code to enter the website where they had to respond to 2 questionnaires (SF8 and the reduced WOMAC), and 3 additional questions about the difficulty in completing the questionnaires. A total of 98 patients agreed to participate: 45 males and 53 females (mean age 72.7 years). Fourteen did not agree to participate due to lack of internet access. Of the final 84 participants, 50% entered the website, and only 36 answered all questions correctly. Of the patients who answered the questionnaire, 80% were helped by a relative or friend, and 22% reported difficulty accessing internet. The use of telematic systems to respond to health-related quality of life questionnaires should be used cautiously, especially in elderly population. It is likely that the population they are directed at is not prepared to use this type of technology. Therefore, before designing telematics questionnaires it must be ensured that they are completed properly. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  5. Association of knee confidence with pain, knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skou, Søren T; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-05-01

    To investigate associations between self-reported knee confidence and pain, self-reported knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 100 participants with symptomatic and radiographic medial tibiofemoral compartment osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment recruited for a randomized controlled trial. The extent of knee confidence, assessed using a 5-point Likert scale item from the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, was set as the dependent variable in univariable and multivariable ordinal regression, with pain during walking, self-reported knee instability, quadriceps strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking as independent variables. One percent of the participants were not troubled with lack of knee confidence, 17% were mildly troubled, 50% were moderately troubled, 26% were severely troubled, and 6% were extremely troubled. Significant associations were found between worse knee confidence and higher pain intensity, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion. The multivariable model consisting of the same variables significantly accounted for 24% of the variance in knee confidence (P knee confidence is associated with higher pain, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps muscle strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. Since previous research has shown that worse knee confidence is predictive of functional decline in knee OA, addressing lack of knee confidence by treating these modifiable impairments could represent a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Can combined use of low-level lasers and hyaluronic acid injections prolong the longevity of degenerative knee joints?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ip D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Ip, Nga Yue FuAsia Medical Pain Centre, Grand Plaza, Mong Kok, Hong KongBackground: This study evaluated whether half-yearly hyaluronic acid injection together with low-level laser therapy in addition to standard conventional physical therapy can successfully postpone the need for joint replacement surgery in elderly patients with bilateral symptomatic tricompartmental knee arthritis.Methods: In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 70 consecutive unselected elderly patients with bilateral tricompartmental knee arthritis were assigned at random to either one of two conservative treatment protocols to either one of the painful knees. Protocol A consisted of conventional physical therapy plus a sham light source plus saline injection, and protocol B consisted of protocol A with addition of half-yearly hyaluronic acid injection as well as low-level laser treatment instead of using saline and a sham light source. Treatment failure was defined as breakthrough pain necessitating joint replacement.Results: Among the 140 painful knees treated with either protocol A or protocol B, only one of the 70 painful knees treated by protocol B required joint replacement, whereas 15 of the 70 painful knees treated by protocol A needed joint replacement surgery (P<0.05.Conclusion: We conclude that half-yearly hyaluronic acid injections together with low-level laser therapy should be incorporated into the standard conservative treatment protocol for symptomatic knee arthritis, because it may prolong the longevity of the knee joint without the need for joint replacement.Keywords: knee osteoarthritis, hyaluronic acid injection, low-level laser, outcome

  7. Association of anterior cruciate ligament injury with knee osteoarthritis and total knee replacement: A retrospective cohort study from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsiung Lin

    Full Text Available This study aimed to support the potential protective role of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction against the development of osteoarthritis (OA.In this retrospective cohort study, the long-term results of ACL reconstruction in Taiwan were evaluated based on data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD. In total, 8,769 eligible cases were included from 11,921 ACL-injured patients. The cumulative incidence rates of OA and total knee replacement (TKR were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of OA.There was a lower cumulative incidence of OA among ACL-reconstructed patients (271, 33.1% than among non-reconstructed patients (1,874, 40.3%; p < 0.001. Patients who underwent ACL reconstruction had a lower cumulative incidence of TKR during the follow-up period (0.6% than the non-reconstructed patients (4.6%, p < 0.001. After adjusting for covariates, ACL-injured patients who underwent reconstruction within one month after ACL injury showed a significantly lower risk of OA than those who never underwent reconstruction (adjusted HR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.69-0.99.These results indicate that ACL reconstruction might not provide complete protection from OA development after traumatic knee injury but does yield a lower cumulative incidence of OA development and TKR. Moreover, based on the present study, ACL-injured patients should undergo reconstruction as early as possible (within one month to lower the risk of OA.

  8. Patient Self-Assessed Passive Range of Motion of the Knee Cannot Replace Health Professional Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Madsen, Frank; Odgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients can accurately self-assess their knee passive range of motion (PROM). A picture-based questionnaire for patient self-assessment of knee PROM was developed and posted to patients. The self-assessed PROM from 58 patients was compared...... (≥ 10-degree flexion contracture). Surgeon- and patient-assessed knee PROM showed a mean difference (95% limits of agreement) of -2.1 degrees (-42.5 to 38.3 degrees) for flexion and -8.1 degrees (-28.8 to 12.7 degrees) for extension. The sensitivity of patient self-assessed PROM in identifying knee...

  9. Comparative analysis of quadriceps and hamstrings strength in knee osteoarthritis before and after total knee arthroplasty: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naasson Trindade Cavanellas

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Compare the maximal isokinetic muscle strength of knee extensor and flexor muscles between patients with knee osteoarthritis and patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Volunteers were divided into five groups (n = 20: Control; Ahlbäck I and II; Ahlbäck IV; six months after total knee arthroplasty; 12 months after total knee arthroplasty. An isokinetic knee strength evaluation was conducted for the quadriceps and hamstrings at 60°/s. Results: Significant differences in the peak torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings were found among the groups (p < 0.001. The Ahlbäck IV, six-month, and 12-month postoperative groups demonstrated lower values when compared to the Control and Ahlbäck I and II groups. When percentage values were compared to the Control group, mean differences ranged from 7% to 41%. Conclusion: Patients with healthy knees or early stage osteoarthritis have higher quadriceps and hamstrings strengths than those with a more advanced stage of the disease, even after knee replacement. These findings suggest that the traditional rehabilitation programs do not recover strength to levels observed in individuals without knee osteoarthritis.

  10. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Contralateral Patella Tendon Avulsion Post Primary Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extensor mechanism failure secondary to knee replacement could be due to tibial tubercle avulsion, Patellar tendon rupture, patellar fracture or quadriceps tendon rupture. An incidence of Patella tendon rupture of 0.17% and Quadriceps tendon rupture of around 0.1% has been reported after Total knee arthroplasty. These are considered a devastating complication that substantially affects the clinical results and are challenging situations to treat with surgery being the mainstay of the treatment. Case Description: We report here an interesting case of a patellar tendon rupture of one knee and Quadriceps tendon rupture of the contralateral knee following simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in a case of inflammatory arthritis patient. End to end repair for Quadriceps tear and augmentation with Autologous Hamstring tendon graft was done for Patella tendon rupture. OUTCOME: Patient was followed up for a period of 1 year and there was no Extension lag with a flexion of 100 degrees in both the knees. DISCUSSION: The key learning points and important aspects of diagnosing these injuries early and the management techniques are described in this unique case of bilateral extensor mechanism disruption following knee replacements.

  11. In vitro wear assessments of fixed and mobile UHMWPE total knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affatato, Saverio; Bracco, Pierangiola; Sudanese, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this study we examined the wear behaviour of total knee UHMWPE menisci. ► We used two different knee designs: mobile and fixed menisci. ► We used a knee simulator and FTIR analyses to evaluate the wear behaviour. ► Our conclusions are that the two designs had a different wear behaviour. - Abstract: This work discusses the wear behaviour of two different ultra-high-molecular-weight-polyethylene tibial component designs. Mobile and fixed bearings were tested on a knee wear simulator for 5 million cycles using bovine calf serum as lubricant. We correlated the wear results with the chemical characterisation of the investigated materials: Fourier Transformed Infra Red Spectroscopy analyses, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and cross-link density measurements were used to assess the chemical features of this polyethylene. Mobile and fixed polyethylene inserts showed a different wear behaviour: the mobile designs components showed lower weight losses than the fixed components (109 ± 6 mg and 163 ± 80 mg, respectively). Significant statistical differences were observed in wear rate (P = 0.035, Kolmogorov–Smirnov Test for two samples). From a molecular point of view, typical radiation-induced oxidation profiles were observed in all the tested polyethylene samples, but the overall degradation was more significant in the fixed bearing inserts and this is likely to play a role on the wear performances

  12. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  13. Incidence of hip and knee replacement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis following the introduction of biological DMARDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, René Lindholm; Hawley, Samuel; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    person-years were calculated for patients with RA and GPCs in 6-month periods. Levels and trends in the pre-bDMARD (1996-2001) were compared with the bDMARD era (2003-2016) using segmented linear regression interrupted by a 1-year lag period (2002). RESULTS: We identified 30 404 patients with incident RA......OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of the introduction of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and associated rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management guidelines on the incidence of total hip (THR) and knee replacements (TKR) in Denmark. METHODS: Nationwide register-based cohort...... in 1996. In patients with RA, introduction of bDMARDs was associated with a decreasing incidence rate of TKR, whereas the incidence of THR had started to decrease before bDMARD introduction....

  14. The relationship between limited MRI section analyses and volumetric assessment of synovitis in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, L.A.; Keenan, A.-M.; Grainger, A.J.; Emery, P.; McGonagle, D.; Conaghan, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether simple, limited section analysis can replace detailed volumetric assessment of synovitis in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-five patients with clinical and radiographic OA of the knee were assessed for synovitis using gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The volume of enhancing synovium was quantitatively assessed in four anatomical sites (the medial and lateral parapatellar recesses, the intercondylar notch and the suprapatellar pouch) by summing the volumes of synovitis in consecutive sections. Four different combinations of section analysis were evaluated for their ability to predict total synovial volume. RESULTS: A total of 114 intra-articular sites were assessed. Simple linear regression demonstrated that the best predictor of total synovial volume was the analysis containing the inferior, mid and superior sections of each of the intra-articular sites, which predicted between 40-80% (r 2 =0.396, p 2 =0.818, p<0.001 for medial parapatellar recess) of the total volume assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a three-section analysis on axial post-gadolinium sequences provides a simple surrogate measure of synovial volume in OA knees

  15. The relationship between limited MRI section analyses and volumetric assessment of synovitis in knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, L.A. [Academic Unit of Medical Physics, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: lar@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk; Keenan, A.-M. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, P. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); McGonagle, D. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Calderdale Royal Hospital, Salterhebble, Halifax (United Kingdom); Conaghan, P.G. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    AIM: To assess whether simple, limited section analysis can replace detailed volumetric assessment of synovitis in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-five patients with clinical and radiographic OA of the knee were assessed for synovitis using gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The volume of enhancing synovium was quantitatively assessed in four anatomical sites (the medial and lateral parapatellar recesses, the intercondylar notch and the suprapatellar pouch) by summing the volumes of synovitis in consecutive sections. Four different combinations of section analysis were evaluated for their ability to predict total synovial volume. RESULTS: A total of 114 intra-articular sites were assessed. Simple linear regression demonstrated that the best predictor of total synovial volume was the analysis containing the inferior, mid and superior sections of each of the intra-articular sites, which predicted between 40-80% (r {sup 2}=0.396, p<0.001 for notch; r {sup 2}=0.818, p<0.001 for medial parapatellar recess) of the total volume assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a three-section analysis on axial post-gadolinium sequences provides a simple surrogate measure of synovial volume in OA knees.

  16. Associations between socioeconomic status and primary total knee joint replacements performed for osteoarthritis across Australia 2003-10: data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sharon L; Lane, Stephen E; Lorimer, Michelle; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Wluka, Anita E; Page, Richard S; Osborne, Richard H; Pasco, Julie A; Sanders, Kerrie M; Cashman, Kara; Ebeling, Peter R; Graves, Stephen E

    2014-10-28

    Relatively little is known about the social distribution of total knee joint replacement (TKR) uptake in Australia. We examine associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and TKR performed for diagnosed osteoarthritis 2003-10 for all Australian males and females aged ≥ 30 yr. Data of primary TKR (n=213,018, 57.4% female) were ascertained from a comprehensive national joint replacement registry. Residential addresses were matched to Australian Census data to identify area-level social disadvantage, and categorised into deciles. Estimated TKR rates were calculated. Poisson regression was used to model the relative risk (RR) of age-adjusted TKR per 1,000py, stratified by sex and SES. A negative relationship was observed between TKR rates and SES deciles. Females had a greater rate of TKR than males. Surgery utilisation was greatest for all adults aged 70-79 yr. In that age group differences in estimated TKR per 1,000py between deciles were greater for 2010 than 2003 (females: 2010 RR 4.32 and 2003 RR 3.67; males: 2010 RR 2.04 and 2003 RR 1.78). Identifying factors associated with TKR utilisation and SES may enhance resource planning and promote surgery utilisation for end-stage osteoarthritis.

  17. Development of nanostructured PVD coatings for total knee replacement joints using HIPIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugumaran, Arunprabhu A.

    The aim of this study was to develop thin film coatings for total knee replacement joints using high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS). An industrial size four cathode magnetron sputtering system equipped with direct current (DC) and HIPIMS power supplies was used for this purpose. Initially, Plasma diagnostics were carried out using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) while sputtering Ti target in Ar + N2 atmosphere by utilizing various HIP IMS/conventional DCMS (henceforth UBM) source combinations by varying the process parameters such as coil current and N2 flow. Then, single layer titanium nitride (TiN) coating was deposited by varying the degree of HIPIMS utilisation and the process parameters such as bias voltage and coil current to thoroughly understand the effect of degree of HIPIMS utilisation on the microstructure, residual stress, texture, mechanical, tribological and corrosion properties of such coatings. The degree of HIPIMS utilisation was altered by increasing the number of HIPIMS targets used for the deposition. Four different source combinations were used for this purpose, as follows: 4 cathodes in conventional DCMS mode to deposit pure UBM coating, 1 HIPIMS + 3UBM and 2HIPIMS + 2UBM cathodes to deposit combined HIPIMS/UBM coatings and 2HIPIMS cathodes to deposit pure HIPIMS coatings. TiN/NbN, TiCN/NbCN and CrN/NbN multilayer coatings were deposited on CoCr alloy test buttons along with other (HSS, SS and Si) substrates since our intended application is on total knee replacement joints made of CoCr alloy. The knowledge gained by investigating the TiN (Ar + N[2]) plasma and the properties of TiN was used to determine the process parameters for depositing the multilayer coatings. X- ray diffraction (XRD) technique was used for calculating the texture, residual stress and bilayer thickness of the coatings. Nanoindentation method was used to determine the nano hardness of the coatings. The adhesion strength of the coatings was estimated by

  18. Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients With Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhi-Wei Jonathan; Pang, Hee Nee

    2016-11-01

    We report our experience with outcomes of poliomyelitis in the Asian population. Sixteen total knee replacements in 14 patients with polio-affected knees were followed up for at least 18 months. Follow-up assessment included scoring with the American Knee Society Score (AKSS), Oxford knee score, and Short Form 36 Health Survey scores. The mean AKSS improved from 25.59 preoperatively to 82.94 at 24 months, with greater improvement in the knee score. The mean Oxford knee score improved from 40.82 preoperatively to 20.53 at 24 months. The mean AKSS pain score rose from 2.35 to 47.66 at 24 months. The Short Form 36 Health Survey physical functioning and bodily pain scores improved for all patients. Primary total knee arthroplasty of poliomyelitis-affected limbs shows good outcomes, improving quality of life, and decreasing pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Collateral ligament strains during knee joint laxity evaluation before and after TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delport, Hendrik; Labey, Luc; De Corte, Ronny; Innocenti, Bernardo; Vander Sloten, Jos; Bellemans, Johan

    2013-08-01

    Passive knee stability is provided by the soft tissue envelope. There is consensus among orthopedic surgeons that good outcome in Total Knee Arthroplasty requires equal tension in the medial/lateral compartment of the knee joint, as well as equal tension in the flexion/extension gap. The purpose of this study was to quantify the ligament laxity in the normal non-arthritic knee before and after Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty. We hypothesized that the Medial/Lateral Collateral Ligament shows minimal changes in length when measured directly by extensometers in the native human knee during varus/valgus laxity testing. We also hypothesized that due to differences in material properties and surface geometry, native laxity is difficult to reconstruct using a Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee. Six specimens were used to perform this in vitro cadaver test using extensometers to provide numerical values for laxity and varus-valgus tilting in the frontal plane. This study enabled a precise measurement of varus-valgus laxity as compared with the clinical assessment. The strains in both ligaments in the replaced knee were different from those in the native knee. Both ligaments were stretched in extension, in flexion the Medial Collateral Ligament tends to relax and the Lateral Collateral Ligament remains tight. As material properties and surface geometry of the replaced knee add stiffness to the joint, we recommend to avoid overstuffing the joint, when using this type of Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty, in order to obtain varus/valgus laxity close to the native joint. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Variability of indication criteria in knee and hip replacement: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Raquel; Latorre, Amaia; Aizpuru, Felipe; Guenaga, Jose I; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Escobar, Antonio; García, Lidia; Herrera-Espiñeira, Carmen

    2010-10-26

    Total knee (TKR) and hip (THR) replacement (arthroplasty) are effective surgical procedures that relieve pain, improve patients' quality of life and increase functional capacity. Studies on variations in medical practice usually place the indications for performing these procedures to be highly variable, because surgeons appear to follow different criteria when recommending surgery in patients with different severity levels. We therefore proposed a study to evaluate inter-hospital variability in arthroplasty indication. The pre-surgical condition of 1603 patients included was compared by their personal characteristics, clinical situation and self-perceived health status. Patients were asked to complete two health-related quality of life questionnaires: the generic SF-12 (Short Form) and the specific WOMAC (Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities) scale. The type of patient undergoing primary arthroplasty was similar in the 15 different hospitals evaluated.The variability in baseline WOMAC score between hospitals in THR and TKR indication was described by range, mean and standard deviation (SD), mean and standard deviation weighted by the number of procedures at each hospital, high/low ratio or extremal quotient (EQ5-95), variation coefficient (CV5-95) and weighted variation coefficient (WCV5-95) for 5-95 percentile range. The variability in subjective and objective signs was evaluated using median, range and WCV5-95. The appropriateness of the procedures performed was calculated using a specific threshold proposed by Quintana et al for assessing pain and functional capacity. The variability expressed as WCV5-95 was very low, between 0.05 and 0.11 for all three dimensions on WOMAC scale for both types of procedure in all participating hospitals. The variability in the physical and mental SF-12 components was very low for both types of procedure (0.08 and 0.07 for hip and 0.03 and 0.07 for knee surgery patients). However, a moderate-high variability was detected in

  1. Comparison of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Artificial Joint Replacement between Musculoskeletal Tumors and Osteoarthritis of the Knee by a Single Surgeon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Fu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the event of VTE (Venous Thromboembolism Event after total artificial joint replacement between two groups diagnosed with either musculoskeletal tumors or osteoarthritis (OA of the knee. From 2004 to 2014, a total of 1,402 patients (308 in tumor group, 1,094 in OA group were involved in this study. The rate of asymptomatic DVT (Deep vein thrombosis was significantly higher in tumor group when compared with OA group. Though both the incidence of symptomatic DVT and PE (Pulmonary embolism were slightly higher in tumor group, no significant difference was detected. Tumor patients suffered an almost equal risk of VTE compared with OA patients except a higher rate of asymptomatic DVT after total artificial joint replacement. For patients with tumor, no significant association was observed between any potential risk factor and DVT.

  2. The Impact of Regression to the Mean on Economic Evaluation in Quasi-Experimental Pre-Post Studies: The Example of Total Knee Replacement Using Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Chris; Petrie, Dennis; Dowsey, Michelle M; Choong, Peter F; Clarke, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Many treatments are evaluated using quasi-experimental pre-post studies susceptible to regression to the mean (RTM). Ignoring RTM could bias the economic evaluation. We investigated this issue using the contemporary example of total knee replacement (TKR), a common treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis of the knee. Data (n = 4796) were obtained from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database, a longitudinal observational study of osteoarthritis. TKR patients (n = 184) were matched to non-TKR patients, using propensity score matching on the predicted hazard of TKR and exact matching on osteoarthritis severity and health-related quality of life (HrQoL). The economic evaluation using the matched control group was compared to the standard method of using the pre-surgery score as the control. Matched controls were identified for 56% of the primary TKRs. The matched control HrQoL trajectory showed evidence of RTM accounting for a third of the estimated QALY gains from surgery using the pre-surgery HrQoL as the control. Incorporating RTM into the economic evaluation significantly reduced the estimated cost effectiveness of TKR and increased the uncertainty. A generalized ICER bias correction factor was derived to account for RTM in cost-effectiveness analysis. RTM should be considered in economic evaluations based on quasi-experimental pre-post studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Psychiatric disease as a risk factor in fast-track hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gylvin, Silas Hinsch; Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that patients with psychiatric disorders tend to do worse than patients without a psychiatric diagnosis when undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Whether this is due to their psychiatric condition, pharmacological treatment, a combination...... role of psychotropic drugs in the perioperative course. This will be useful when planning future strategies for improvement of surgical outcome following hip and knee arthroplasty....

  4. THE EFFICACY OF ANGLE-MATCHED ISOKINETIC KNEE FLEXOR AND EXTENSOR STRENGTH PARAMETERS IN PREDICTING AGILITY TEST PERFORMANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Matt; Naylor, James

    2017-10-01

    Agility is a fundamental performance element in many sports, but poses a high risk of injury. Hierarchical modelling has shown that eccentric hamstring strength is the primary determinant of agility performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between knee flexor and extensor strength parameters and a battery of agility tests. Controlled laboratory study. Nineteen recreational intermittent games players completed an agility battery and isokinetic testing of the eccentric knee flexors (eccH) and concentric knee extensors (conQ) at 60, 180 and 300°·s -1 . Peak torque and the angle at which peak torque occurred were calculated for eccH and conQ at each speed. Dynamic control ratios (eccH:conQ) and fast:slow ratios (300:60) were calculated using peak torque values, and again using angle-matched data, for eccH and conQ. The agility test battery differentiated linear vs directional changes and prescriptive vs reactive tasks. Linear regression showed that eccH parameters were generally a better predictor of agility performance than conQ parameters. Stepwise regression showed that only angle-matched strength ratios contributed to the prediction of each agility test. Trdaitionally calculated strength ratios using peak torque values failed to predict performance. Angle-matched strength parameters were able to account for 80% of the variation in T-test performance, 70% of deceleration distance, 55% of 10m sprint performance, and 44% of reactive change of direction speed. Traditionally calculated strength ratios failed to predict agility performance, whereas angle-matched strength ratios had better predictive ability and featured in a predictive stepwise model for each agility task. 2c.

  5. Emergency Department Visits Following Elective Total Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery: Identifying Gaps in Continuity of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Remington, Austin; Kwong, Jereen; Curtin, Catherine; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina

    2017-06-21

    Major joint replacement surgical procedures are common, elective procedures with a care episode that includes both inpatient readmissions and postoperative emergency department (ED) visits. Inpatient readmissions are well studied; however, to our knowledge, little is known about ED visits following these procedures. We sought to characterize 30-day ED visits following a major joint replacement surgical procedure. We used administrative records from California, Florida, and New York, from 2010 through 2012, to identify adults undergoing total knee and hip arthroplasty. Factors associated with increased risk of an ED visit were estimated using hierarchical regression models controlling for patient variables with a fixed hospital effect. The main outcome was an ED visit within 30 days of discharge. Among the 152,783 patients who underwent major joint replacement, 5,229 (3.42%) returned to the inpatient setting and 8,883 (5.81%) presented to the ED for care within 30 days. Among ED visits, 17.94% had a primary diagnosis of pain and 25.75% had both a primary and/or a secondary diagnosis of pain. Patients presenting to the ED for subsequent care had more comorbidities and were more frequently non-white with public insurance relative to those not returning to the ED (p care insurance coverage expansions are uncertain; however, there are ongoing attempts to improve quality across the continuum of care. It is therefore essential to ensure that all patients, particularly vulnerable populations, receive appropriate postoperative care, including pain management. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  6. Prediction of cartilaginous tissue repair after knee joint distraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, J A D; Welsing, P M; van Roermund, P M; Custers, R J H; Kuchuk, N O; Lafeber, F P J G G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For young patients (<65years), knee joint distraction (KJD) may be a joint-saving treatment option for end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Distracting the femur from the tibia by five millimeters for six to eight weeks using an external fixation frame results in cartilaginous tissue repair,

  7. Manipulation under anesthesia for stiffness after total knee replacement: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Nawghare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stiffness following total knee replacement (TKR is a debilitating complication. Manipulation under anesthesia (MUA, arthroscopy, and open arthrolysis are used to treat the stiffness. Objectives: The aim of the review was to answer the following questions. What is the gain in range of motion (ROM after MUA for stiffness following TKR? Is the gain in ROM after MUA for stiffness following TKR retained at the last follow-up? What is the gender distribution amongst the patients presenting for MUA following TKR? What is the mean age of the patients presenting for MUA following TKR? What is the influence of timing of MUA following TKR on the ROM? The review was aimed towards establishing the current available evidence regarding MUA for stiffness. Materials and Methods: A systematic review of the current available literature was performed and the relevant studies were critically appraised. Results: Nine studies were identified to be relevant to the review (1-Level 2; 2-Level 3; 6-Level 4. It was found that there was a gain in the ROM after MUA and it was retained at the final follow-up. The patients presenting for MUA were younger and were predominantly females. Early MUA was found to be more effective, although late MUA was also beneficial. Conclusions: With limited and low quality of evidence, it is not possible to draw any conclusions.

  8. Is Participation in Certain Sports Associated With Knee Osteoarthritis? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Hootman, Jennifer M; Sitler, Michael R; Harris, Kyle P; Cattano, Nicole M

    2017-06-02

      Information regarding the relative risks of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a result of sport participation is critical for shaping public health messages and for informing knee-OA prevention strategies. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the association between participation in specific sports and knee OA.   We completed a systematic literature search in September 2012 using 6 bibliographic databases (PubMed; Ovid MEDLINE; Journals@Ovid; American College of Physicians Journal Club; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Review, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects; and Ovid HealthStar), manual searches (4 journals), and reference lists (56 articles).   Studies were included if they met the following 4 criteria: (1) an aim was to investigate an association between sport participation and knee OA; (2) the outcome measure was radiographic knee OA, clinical knee OA, total knee replacement, self-reported diagnosis of knee OA, or placement on a waiting list for a total knee replacement; (3) the study design was case control or cohort; and (4) the study was written in English. Articles were excluded if the study population had an underlying condition other than knee OA.   One investigator extracted data (eg, group descriptions, knee OA prevalence, source of nonexposed controls).   The overall knee-OA prevalence in sport participants (n = 3759) was 7.7%, compared with 7.3% among nonexposed controls (referent group n = 4730, odds ratio [OR] = 1.1). Specific sports with a significantly higher prevalence of knee OA were soccer (OR = 3.5), elite-level long-distance running (OR = 3.3), competitive weight lifting (OR = 6.9), and wrestling (OR = 3.8). Elite-sport (soccer or orienteering) and nonelite-sport (soccer or American football) participants without a history of knee injury had a greater prevalence of knee OA than nonexposed participants.   Participants in soccer (elite and nonelite

  9. Pre-operative Predictive Factors of Post-operative Pain in Patients With Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Clara; Díaz-Heredia, Jorge; Berraquero, María Luisa; Crespo, Pablo; Loza, Estíbaliz; Ruiz Ibán, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze pre-surgical predictive factors of post-surgical pain in patients undergoing hip or knee arthoplasty. A systematic literature review was performed. We defined a sensitive strategy on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library up to May 2013. The inclusion criteria were: patients undertaking knee and/or hip arthroplasty, adults with moderate or severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale) in whom predictive factors of post-surgical pain were evaluated before surgery. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, controlled trials and observational studies were selected. We excluded animals and basic science articles, reviews of prosthesis, prosthesis due to fractures, patients with rheumatic diseases or studies with mixed population in which disaggregated data was not possible to obtain. A total 37 articles of moderate quality were selected. The articles included representative patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty in our country; most of them were aged 60 years or above, with osteoarthritis, and with a high rate of obesity and comorbidities. We found great variability regarding the type of studies and predictive factors. There was a strong association between post-surgical pain and the following pre-surgical factors: female gender, low socio-economic status, higher pain, comorbidities, low back pain, poor functional status, and psychological factors (depression, anxiety or catastrophic pain). There are pre-surgical factors that might influence post-surgical pain in patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty. Therefore, they should be taken into account when considering an arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Relatives in older patients' fast-track treatment programme during total hip or knee replacement. A grounded theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    and considerate support in concern for the patients; Substituting mode, with practical and cognitive support; and Adapting mode, by trying to fit in with the patients’ and health professionals’ requirements. Study II: 16 patients aged 70 to 94 were included and data was collected through 15 non......The aim of this Ph.D.-dissertation was to generate grounded theories of relatives, patients, and health professionals’ pattern of behaviour, respectively, in relation to the relatives of older patients’ fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. The dissertation includes...... to the older patients’ self-determination of being autonomous and how they adapt and are perceived in the health professionals’ environment. This may be useful to the health professionals in orthopaedic fast-track treatment programmes and their future collaboration with older patients and their relatives....

  11. Does using a femoral nerve block for total knee replacement decrease postoperative delirium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjo Sakura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of peripheral nerve blocks on postoperative delirium in older patients has not been studied. Peripheral nerve blocks may reduce the incidence of postoperative opioid use and its side effects such as delirium via opioid-sparing effect. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in patients who underwent total knee replacement. Baseline cognitive function was assessed using the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status. Postoperative delirium was measured using the Confusion Assessment Method postoperatively. Incidence of postoperative delirium was compared in two postoperative management groups: femoral nerve block ± patient-controlled analgesia and patient-controlled analgesia only. In addition, pain levels (using numeric rating scales and opioid use were compared in two groups. Results 85 patients were studied. The overall incidence of postoperative delirium either on postoperative day one or day two was 48.1%. Incidence of postoperative delirium in the femoral nerve block group was lower than patient controlled analgesia only group (25% vs. 61%, P = 0.002. However, there was no significant difference between the groups with respect to postoperative pain level or the amount of intravenous opioid use. Conclusions Femoral nerve block reduces the incidence of postoperative delirium. These results suggest that a larger randomized control trial is necessary to confirm these preliminary findings.

  12. Effectiveness of Music Listening in Patients With Total Knee Replacement During CPM Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chung; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chen, Su-Ru; Tseng, Yen-Ting; Lin, Pi-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of music listening on the anxiety, heart rate variability (HRV), and joint range of motion (ROM) of patients undergoing continuous passive motion (CPM) after total knee replacement surgery. An experimental design was used. Participants in the experimental group (n = 49) listened to music from 10 min before receiving CPM until the end of the session (25 min in total) on the first and second day following surgery, whereas participants in the control group (n = 42) did not listen to music but rested quietly in bed starting 10 min before and throughout CPM. Compared with the control group, the experimental group exhibited significantly lower anxiety levels (p CPM angles (p < .05) during treatment and increased active flexion ROM (p < .05) upon discharge. The low-frequency (LF)/high-frequency (HF) power ratio, normalized LF HRV, and normalized HF HRV of the two groups differed significantly, indicating that the patients in the experimental group had greater parasympathetic activity compared with those in the control group. Music listening can effectively reduce patient anxiety and enhance the ROM of their joints during postoperative rehabilitation. Health-care practitioners should consider including music listening as a routine practice for postoperative rehabilitation following orthopedic surgery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. OARSI recommended performance-based tests to assess physical function in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement.......To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement....

  14. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-05-20

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP). 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Satisfaction with joint replacement in public versus private hospitals: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adie, Sam; Dao, Alan; Harris, Ian A; Naylor, Justine M; Mittal, Rajat

    2012-09-01

    In Australia, the majority of total knee and hip replacement surgeries occur in the private sector. Outcome-based research needs to be inclusive of this sector if the findings are intended to reflect the broader picture. This study compares outcomes up to 1 year post knee and hip replacement between patients treated in the public and private sectors. A prospective, observational study was performed in four high-volume joint replacement centres: two public, two private. Experienced orthopaedic surgeons contributed via their public and private practices. Knee and hip patients were recruited preoperatively. Self-reported questionnaires were completed preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months post-operatively. The primary outcome was satisfaction with surgery. Secondary outcomes included Oxford score, and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores. Regression modelling was performed to adjust for potential confounders. Three hundred and thirty-one patients (184 public, 147 private; 215 knees, 116 hips) were recruited, with 6- and 12-month follow-up rates of 95% and 89%, respectively. Satisfaction rates were high in both public and private patients (approximately 90%) at 6 and 12 months, but private patients were less likely to be satisfied after adjusting for the strong effect of patient expectation. For both hip and knee cohorts, no between-sector differences were found in either the magnitude or rate of improvement in Oxford score or quality of life post-operatively. Joint replacement outcomes are similar for patients treated in public and private hospitals. Surgeons should manage patient expectation prior to surgery, particularly in private patients. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. Predicting the Functional Roles of Knee Joint Muscles from Internal Joint Moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flaxman, Teresa E; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knee muscles are commonly labeled as flexors or extensors and aptly stabilize the knee against sagittal plane loads. However, how these muscles stabilize the knee against adduction-abduction and rotational loads remains unclear. Our study sought 1) to classify muscle roles as they r...... on its role in maintaining knee joint stability in the frontal and transverse loading planes. This is useful for delineating the roles of biarticular knee joint muscles and could have implications in robotics, musculoskeletal modeling, sports sciences, and rehabilitation....

  17. Risk factors for knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis, a population based, prospective cohort study of 315,495 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apold, Hilde; Meyer, Haakon E; Nordsletten, Lars; Furnes, Ove; Baste, Valborg; Flugsrud, Gunnar B

    2014-06-23

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common and disabling condition. We wanted to investigate the modifiable risk factors Body Mass Index (BMI) and physical activity, using knee replacement (KR) as a marker for severely symptomatic disease, focusing on the interaction between these risk factors. 315,495 participants (mean age 43.0 years) from national health screenings were followed prospectively with respect to KR identified by linkage to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Data were analysed by Cox proportional hazard regression. During 12 years of follow up 1,323 individuals received KR for primary OA. There was a dose-response relationship between BMI and heavy labour, and later KR. Comparing the highest versus the lowest quarter of BMI, the relative risk was 6.2 (95% CI: 4.2-9.0) in men and 11.1 (95% CI: 7.8-15.6) in women. Men reporting intensive physical activity at work had a relative risk of 2.4 (95% CI: 1.8-3.2) versus men reporting sedentary activity at work, the corresponding figure in women being 2.3 (95% CI: 1.7-3.2). The effect of BMI and physical activity at work was additive. The heaviest men with the most strenuous work had a RR of 11.7 (95% CI: 5.9-23.1) compared to the ones with the lowest BMI and most sedentary work. For women the corresponding RR was 15.8 (95% CI: 8.2-30.3). There was no association between physical activity during leisure and KR. We found that a high BMI and intensive physical activity at work both contribute strongly to the risk of having a KR. As the two risk factors seem to act independently, people with strenuous physical work with a high BMI are at particularly high risk for severely disabling OA of the knee, and should be targeted with effective preventive measures.

  18. Predicting Factors for Allogeneic Blood Transfusion and Excessive Postoperative Blood Loss after Single Low-Dosage Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application in Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paphon Sa-ngasoongsong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA application has become a popular method for perioperative blood loss (PBL reduction in total knee replacement (TKR. Nevertheless, through our knowledge, no previous studies had shown the correlation perioperative factors and the risk of excessive PBL or need of blood transfusion (BT after IA-TXA. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in patients underwent 299 primary TKRs, using IA-TXA, during 2-year period (2013-2014. Patient’s characteristic and perioperative data were reviewed and collected. PBL was measured as total hemoglobin loss (THL, estimated total blood loss (ETBL, and drainage volume per kg (DV/kg. Excessive PBL was defined as PBL that exceeded 90th percentile. Results. From multivariate analysis, low preoperative hemoglobin (Hb level and body mass index (BMI were the significant predictors of postoperative BT (p<0.0001 and 0.003, resp.. Excessive THL significant associated with preoperative Hb (p<0.0001. Excessive ETBL significantly associated with preoperative Hb, height, preoperative range-of-motion, and creatinine clearance (p<0.05 all. Low BMI and large prosthesis size were the significant predictors of excessive DV/kg (p=0.0001 and 0.002, resp.. Conclusions. Low preoperative Hb and BMI were the significant risks of postoperative transfusion after TKR with IA-TXA. Moreover, multiple perioperative factors could result in higher PBL.

  19. Predictors of length of stay and patient satisfaction after hip and knee replacement surgery: fast-track experience in 712 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Holm, Gitte; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Very few studies have focused on patient characteristics that influence length of stay (LOS) in fast-track total hip (THR) and knee arthroplasty (TKR). The aim of this prospective study was to identify patient characteristics associated with LOS and patient satisfaction...... aids, pre- and postoperative hemoglobin levels, the need for blood transfusion, ASA score, and time between surgery and mobilization, were all found to influence postoperative outcome in general, and LOS and patient satisfaction in particular. INTERPRETATION: We identified several patient...... characteristics that influence postoperative outcome, LOS, and patient satisfaction in our series of consecutive fast-track joint replacement patients, enabling further attention to be paid to certain aspects of surgery and rehabilitation....

  20. The volume of the human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziolis, Georg; Roehner, Eric; Windisch, Christoph; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Despite its clinical relevance, particularly in septic knee surgery, the volume of the human knee joint has not been established to date. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine knee joint volume and whether or not it is dependent on sex or body height. Sixty-one consecutive patients (joints) who were due to undergo endoprosthetic joint replacement were enrolled in this prospective study. During the operation, the joint volume was determined by injecting saline solution until a pressure of 200 mmHg was achieved in the joint. The average volume of all knee joints was 131 ± 53 (40-290) ml. The volume was not found to be dependent on sex, but it was dependent on the patients' height (R = 0.312, p = 0.014). This enabled an estimation of the joint volume according to V = 1.6 height - 135. The considerable inter-individual variance of the knee joint volume would suggest that it should be determined or at least estimated according to body height if the joint volume has consequences for the diagnostics or therapy of knee disorders.

  1. Classification of baseline toxicants for QSAR predictions to replace fish acute toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nendza, Monika; Müller, Martin; Wenzel, Andrea

    2017-03-22

    Fish acute toxicity studies are required for environmental hazard and risk assessment of chemicals by national and international legislations such as REACH, the regulations of plant protection products and biocidal products, or the GHS (globally harmonised system) for classification and labelling of chemicals. Alternative methods like QSARs (quantitative structure-activity relationships) can replace many ecotoxicity tests. However, complete substitution of in vivo animal tests by in silico methods may not be realistic. For the so-called baseline toxicants, it is possible to predict the fish acute toxicity with sufficient accuracy from log K ow and, hence, valid QSARs can replace in vivo testing. In contrast, excess toxicants and chemicals not reliably classified as baseline toxicants require further in silico, in vitro or in vivo assessments. Thus, the critical task is to discriminate between baseline and excess toxicants. For fish acute toxicity, we derived a scheme based on structural alerts and physicochemical property thresholds to classify chemicals as either baseline toxicants (=predictable by QSARs) or as potential excess toxicants (=not predictable by baseline QSARs). The step-wise approach identifies baseline toxicants (true negatives) in a precautionary way to avoid false negative predictions. Therefore, a certain fraction of false positives can be tolerated, i.e. baseline toxicants without specific effects that may be tested instead of predicted. Application of the classification scheme to a new heterogeneous dataset for diverse fish species results in 40% baseline toxicants, 24% excess toxicants and 36% compounds not classified. Thus, we can conclude that replacing about half of the fish acute toxicity tests by QSAR predictions is realistic to be achieved in the short-term. The long-term goals are classification criteria also for further groups of toxicants and to replace as many in vivo fish acute toxicity tests as possible with valid QSAR

  2. Variability of indication criteria in knee and hip replacement: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarasqueta Cristina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee (TKR and hip (THR replacement (arthroplasty are effective surgical procedures that relieve pain, improve patients' quality of life and increase functional capacity. Studies on variations in medical practice usually place the indications for performing these procedures to be highly variable, because surgeons appear to follow different criteria when recommending surgery in patients with different severity levels. We therefore proposed a study to evaluate inter-hospital variability in arthroplasty indication. Methods The pre-surgical condition of 1603 patients included was compared by their personal characteristics, clinical situation and self-perceived health status. Patients were asked to complete two health-related quality of life questionnaires: the generic SF-12 (Short Form and the specific WOMAC (Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities scale. The type of patient undergoing primary arthroplasty was similar in the 15 different hospitals evaluated. The variability in baseline WOMAC score between hospitals in THR and TKR indication was described by range, mean and standard deviation (SD, mean and standard deviation weighted by the number of procedures at each hospital, high/low ratio or extremal quotient (EQ5-95, variation coefficient (CV5-95 and weighted variation coefficient (WCV5-95 for 5-95 percentile range. The variability in subjective and objective signs was evaluated using median, range and WCV5-95. The appropriateness of the procedures performed was calculated using a specific threshold proposed by Quintana et al for assessing pain and functional capacity. Results The variability expressed as WCV5-95 was very low, between 0.05 and 0.11 for all three dimensions on WOMAC scale for both types of procedure in all participating hospitals. The variability in the physical and mental SF-12 components was very low for both types of procedure (0.08 and 0.07 for hip and 0.03 and 0.07 for knee surgery patients

  3. Radiographic pseudochondrocalcinosis in early failure of a cemented total knee replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloen, P.; Burke, D. W.; Chew, F. S.; Mildrum, R.

    1998-01-01

    We observed a case of early-onset osteolysis in a cemented total knee arthroplasty. Preoperative radiographs suggested numerous radiopaque particles covering the polyethylene insert. Findings at the time of revision confirmed the presence of small radiopaque polymethylmethacrylate particles on the

  4. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  5. Patellofemoral Joint Replacement and Nickel Allergy: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Syed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal allergy is an unusual complication of joint replacement that may cause aseptic loosening and necessitate joint revision surgery. We present the case of nickel allergy causing aseptic loosening following patellofemoral joint replacement (PFJR in a 54-year-old male. Joint revision surgery to a nickel-free total knee replacement was performed with good results. Our literature review shows that there is no evidence to guide the management of metal allergy in PFJR. The evidence from studies of total knee replacement is limited to retrospective case series and case reports and gives contradictory recommendations. The optimal management strategy for metal allergy in PFJR is not clear. We recommend allergy testing in patients with history of metal allergy and use of an allergen-free implant in those with positive tests. As there is no gold standard test to establish metal allergy, the choice of test should be guided by availability and recommendation from the local unit of dermatology and allergy testing. We recommend investigation for metal allergy in patients with implant loosening where other causes have been excluded.

  6. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  7. Hyperextension injuries of the knee. Do patterns of bone bruising predict soft tissue injury?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A.M.; Gibbons, C.E.R. [Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Pillai, J.K.; Roberton, B.J. [Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Gulati, V. [Homerton University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2018-02-15

    To establish whether patterns of soft tissue injury following knee hyperextension are associated with post-traumatic 'bone bruise' distribution. Patients with a knee MRI within one year of hyperextension injury were identified at our institution over a 7 year period. MRIs, plain radiographs and clinical details of these patients were reviewed. Twenty-five patients were identified (median time from injury to MRI = 24 days). The most common sites of bone bruising were the anteromedial tibial plateau (48%) and anterolateral tibial plateau (44%). There were high rates of injury to the posterior capsule (52%), ACL (40%) and PCL (40%) but lower rates of injury to the menisci (20%), medial and lateral collateral ligaments (16%) and posterolateral corner (16%). Anterior tibial plateau oedema and rupture of the posterior capsule predicted cruciate ligament injury [OR = 10.5 (p = 0.02) and 24.0 (p = 0.001) respectively]. Whilst anterolateral tibial plateau oedema strongly predicted PCL injury [OR = 26.0, p = 0.003], ACL injury was associated with a variable pattern of bone bruising. Meniscal injury was unrelated to the extent or pattern of bone bruising. 5 out of 8 patients with a 'double sulcus' on the lateral radiograph had ACL injury. The presence of a double sulcus showed significant association with anteromedial kissing contusions (OR = 7.8, p = 0.03). Following knee hyperextension, bone bruising patterns may be associated with cruciate ligament injury. Other structures are injured less frequently and have weaker associations with bone bruise distribution. The double sulcus sign is a radiographic marker that confers a high probability of ACL injury. (orig.)

  8. Relationship between intraoperative regional cerebral oxygen saturation trends and cognitive decline after total knee replacement: a post-hoc analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Fátima; Doñate, Marta; Boget, Teresa; Bogdanovich, Ana; Basora, Misericordia; Torres, Ferran; Gracia, Isabel; Fàbregas, Neus

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral regional brain oxygen saturation (rSO2) trends, reflecting intraoperative brain oxygen imbalance, could warn of brain dysfunction. Various types of cognitive impairment, such as memory decline, alterations in executive function or subjective complaints, have been described three months after surgery. Our aim was to explore the potential utility of rSO2 values as a warning sign for the development of different types of decline in postoperative psychological function. Observational post-hoc analysis of data for the patient sample (n = 125) of a previously conducted clinical trial in patients over the age of 65 years undergoing total knee replacement under spinal anesthesia. Demographic, hemodynamic and bilateral rSO2 intraoperative values were recorded. An absolute rSO2 value of 20% or >25% below baseline were chosen as relevant cutoffs. Composite function test scores were created from baseline to three months for each patient and adjusted for the mean (SD) score changes for a control group (n = 55). Tests were used to assess visual-motor coordination and executive function (VM-EF) (Wechsler Digit Symbol-Coding and Visual Reproduction, Trail Making Test) and memory (Auditory Verbal Learning, Wechsler Memory Scale); scales were used to assess psychological symptoms. We observed no differences in baseline rSO2 values; rSO2 decreased significantly in all patients during surgery (P Left and right rSO2 values were asymmetric in patients who had memory decline (mean [SD] left-right ratio of 95.03 [8.51] vs 101.29 [6.7] for patients with no changes, P = 0.0012). The mean right-left difference in rSO2 was also significant in these patients (-2.87% [4.73%], lower on the right, P = 0.0034). Detection of a trend to asymmetry in rSO2 values can warn of possible postoperative onset of memory decline. Psychological symptoms and memory decline were common three months after knee replacement in our patients over the age of 65 years.

  9. Comparison of blood loss between using non central part cutting knee prosthesis and distal central part cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malairungsakul, Anan

    2014-12-01

    Patients who undergo knee replacement surgery may need to receive a blood transfusion due to blood loss during the operation. Therefore it was important to improve the design of knee implant operative procedures in an attempt to reduce the rate of blood loss. The present study aimed to compare the blood loss between two types of knee replacement surgery. This is a retrospective study in which 78 patients received cemented knee replacements in Phayao Hospital between October 2010 and March 2012. There were two types of surgical procedure: 1) using an implant position covering the end of the femoral bone without cutting into the central part of the distal femoral, 2) using an implant position covering the end of the femoral bone cutting the central part of the distal femoral. Blood loss, blood transfusion, hemoglobin and hematocrit were recorded preoperatively, immediately postsurgery and 48 hours after surgery. Findings revealed that the knee replacement surgery using the implant position covering the end of the femoral bone without cutting the central part of the distal femoral significantly lowered the rate of blood loss when compared to using the implant position covering the end of the femoral bone with central cutting of the distal femor. The average blood loss during the operation without cutting at the central part of distal femoral was 49.50 ± 11.11 mL; whereas the operation cutting the central part of the distal femoral was 58.50 ± 11.69 mL. As regards blood loss, the knee replacement surgery using the implant position covering the end ofthefemoral bone without cutting the central part of distal femor was better than using the implant position covering the end of the femoral bone cutting at the central part of the distal femor.

  10. Reduced Operating Time but Not Blood Loss With Cruciate Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermesan, Dinu; Trocan, Ilie; Prejbeanu, Radu; Poenaru, Dan V; Haragus, Horia; Gratian, Damian; Marrelli, Massimo; Inchingolo, Francesco; Caprio, Monica; Cagiano, Raffaele; Tatullo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no consensus regarding the use of retaining or replacing cruciate implants for patients with limited deformity who undergo a total knee replacement. Scope of this paper is to evaluate whether a cruciate sparing total knee replacement could have a reduced operating time compared to a posterior stabilized implant. Methods For this purpose, we performed a randomized study on 50 subjects. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon in the same conditions to minimize bias and only knees with a less than 20 varus deviation and/or maximum 15° fixed flexion contracture were included. Results Surgery time was significantly shorter with the cruciate retaining implant (P = 0.0037). The mean duration for the Vanguard implant was 68.9 (14.7) and for the NexGen II Legacy was 80.2 (11.3). A higher range of motion, but no significant Knee Society Scores at 6 months follow-up, was used as controls. Conclusions In conclusion, both implants had the potential to assure great outcomes. However, if a decision has to be made, choosing a cruciate retaining procedure could significantly reduce the surgical time. When performed under tourniquet, this gain does not lead to reduced blood loss. PMID:25584102

  11. Rosetta Structure Prediction as a Tool for Solving Difficult Molecular Replacement Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Molecular replacement (MR), a method for solving the crystallographic phase problem using phases derived from a model of the target structure, has proven extremely valuable, accounting for the vast majority of structures solved by X-ray crystallography. However, when the resolution of data is low, or the starting model is very dissimilar to the target protein, solving structures via molecular replacement may be very challenging. In recent years, protein structure prediction methodology has emerged as a powerful tool in model building and model refinement for difficult molecular replacement problems. This chapter describes some of the tools available in Rosetta for model building and model refinement specifically geared toward difficult molecular replacement cases.

  12. Cemented total knee replacement in 24 dogs: surgical technique, clinical results, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Matthew J; Leone, Kendall A; Lamonte, Kimberly; Townsend, Katy L; Mann, Kenneth A

    2009-07-01

    To characterize the performance of cemented total knee replacement (TKR) in dogs. Preclinical research study. Skeletally mature, male Hounds (25-30 kg; n=24) with no preexisting joint pathology. Dogs had unilateral cemented TKR and were evaluated at 6, 12, 26, or 52 weeks (6 dogs/time point) by radiography, bone density analysis, visual gait assessment, and direct measurement of thigh circumference and stifle joint range of motion as indicators of functional recovery. At study end, the stability of the cemented tibial component was determined by destructive mechanical testing. Joint stability was excellent in 16 dogs (67%) and good in 8 dogs. None of the tibial components had evidence of migration or periprosthetic osteolysis whereas 1 femoral component was loose at 52 weeks. There was an early and significant decrease in tibial bone density, likely because of disuse of the operated limb. Dogs returned to full activity by 12 weeks. The tibial cement-bone interface maintained its strength over 52 weeks. Cement provides stable fixation of the tibial component in canine TKR. Cemented TKR yields adequate clinical function and stifle joint excursion in the dog. Clinical studies are needed to determine the long-term fate of cemented TKR implants, to assess the influence of implant design on implant fixation and wear, and to obtain objective functional data.

  13. Prospective associations of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and CRP genetic risk scores with risk of total knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis in a diverse cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadyab, A H; Terkeltaub, R; Kooperberg, C; Reiner, A; Eaton, C B; Jackson, R D; Krok-Schoen, J L; Salem, R M; LaCroix, A Z

    2018-05-22

    To examine associations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and polygenic CRP genetic risk scores (GRS) with risk of end-stage hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA), defined as incident total hip (THR) or knee replacement (TKR) for OA. This study included a cohort of postmenopausal white, African American, and Hispanic women from the Women's Health Initiative. Women were followed from baseline to date of THR or TKR, death, or December 31, 2014. Medicare claims data identified THR and TKR. Hs-CRP and genotyping data were collected at baseline. Three CRP GRS were constructed: 1) a 4-SNP GRS comprised of genetic variants representing variation in the CRP gene among European populations; 2) a multilocus 18-SNP GRS of genetic variants significantly associated with CRP levels in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies; and 3) a 5-SNP GRS of genetic variants significantly associated with CRP levels among African American women. In analyses conducted separately among each race and ethnic group, there were no significant associations of ln hs-CRP with risk of THR or TKR, after adjusting for age, body mass index, lifestyle characteristics, chronic diseases, hormone therapy use, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. CRP GRS were not associated with risk of THR or TKR in any ethnic group. Serum levels of ln hs-CRP and genetically-predicted CRP levels were not associated with risk of THR or TKR for OA among a diverse cohort of women. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  15. Urinary Prothrombin Fragment 1+2 in relation to Development of Non-Symptomatic and Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolic Events following Total Knee Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borris, Lars Carl; Breindahl, Morten; Rud-Lassen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1+2 is excreted in urine (uF1+2) as a result of in vivo thrombin generation and can be a marker of coagulation status after an operative procedure. This study compared uF1+2 levels in patients with symptomatic and non-symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee...... replacement (TKR) and in event-free sex- and age-matched controls. Significantly higher median uF1+2 levels were seen in the VTE patients on days 1, 3, and the day of venography (mostly day 7) after TKR compared with controls. The uF1+2 levels tended to be high in some patients with symptomatic VTE; however...

  16. Intraoperative low-dose ketamine infusion reduces acute postoperative pain following total knee replacement surgery: a prospective, randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Pelin; Gokcinar, Derya; Karabeyoglu, Isil; Topcu, Hulya; Cicek, Gizem Selen; Gogus, Nermin

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of intraoperative low-dose ketamine with general anesthesia on postoperative pain after total knee replacement surgery. A randomized, double-blind comparative study. Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, from January and June 2011. Sixty adults undergoing total knee arthroplasty were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups of equal size to receive either racemic ketamine infusion (6 μg/kg/minute) or the same volume of saline. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure each patient's level of pain at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Time to first analgesic request, postoperative morphine consumption and the incidence of side effects were also recorded. Low-dose ketamine infusion prolonged the time to first analgesic request. It also reduced postoperative cumulative morphine consumption at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours postsurgery (p < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores were also significantly lower in the ketamine group than placebo, at all observation times. Incidences of side effects were similar in both study groups. Intraoperative continuous low-dose ketamine infusion reduced pain and postoperative analgesic consumption without affecting the incidence of side effects.

  17. Age prediction formulae from radiographic assessment of skeletal maturation at the knee in an Irish population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Jean E

    2014-01-01

    Age estimation in living subjects is primarily achieved through assessment of a hand-wrist radiograph and comparison with a standard reference atlas. Recently, maturation of other regions of the skeleton has also been assessed in an attempt to refine the age estimates. The current study presents a method to predict bone age directly from the knee in a modern Irish sample. Ten maturity indicators (A-J) at the knee were examined from radiographs of 221 subjects (137 males; 84 females). Each indicator was assigned a maturity score. Scores for indicators A-G, H-J and A-J, respectively, were totalled to provide a cumulative maturity score for change in morphology of the epiphyses (AG), epiphyseal union (HJ) and the combination of both (AJ). Linear regression equations to predict age from the maturity scores (AG, HJ, AJ) were constructed for males and females. For males, equation-AJ demonstrated the greatest predictive capability (R(2)=0.775) while for females equation-HJ had the strongest capacity for prediction (R(2)=0.815). When equation-AJ for males and equation-HJ for females were applied to the current sample, the predicted age of 90% of subjects was within ±1.5 years of actual age for male subjects and within +2.0 to -1.9 years of actual age for female subjects. The regression formulae and associated charts represent the most contemporary method of age prediction currently available for an Irish population, and provide a further technique which can contribute to a multifactorial approach to age estimation in non-adults.

  18. Do modern total knee replacements offer better value for money? A health economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, David F; Clement, Nicholas D; Burnett, Richard; Patton, James T; Moran, Mathew; Howie, Colin R; Simpson, A H R W; Gaston, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Cost effectiveness is an increasingly important factor in today's healthcare environment, and selection of arthroplasty implant is not exempt from such concerns. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs) are the typical tool for this type of evaluation. Using this methodology, joint arthroplasty has been shown to be cost effective; however, studies directly comparing differing prostheses are lacking. Data was gathered in a single-centre prospective double-blind randomised controlled trial comparing the outcome of modern and traditional knee implants, using the Short Form 6 dimensional (SF-6D) score and quality adjusted life year (QALY) methodology. There was significant improvement in the SF-6D score for both groups at one year (p traditional design at one year (0.141 versus 0.143, p = 0.94). This difference resulted in the modern implant costing £298 less per QALY at one year. This study demonstrates that modern implant technology does not influence the cost-effectiveness of TKA using the SF-6D and QALY methodology. This type of analysis however assesses health status, and is not sensitive to joint specific function. Evolutionary design changes in implant technology are thus unlikely to influence QALY analysis following joint replacement, which has important implications for implant procurement.

  19. Personality, function and satisfaction in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaesh, Rishikesan; Jenkins, Paul; Lane, Judith V; Knight, Sara; Macdonald, Deborah; Howie, Colin

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between personality and joint-specific function, general physical and general mental health in patients undergoing total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA). One hundred and eighty-four patients undergoing THA and 205 undergoing TKA were assessed using the Eysneck Personality Questionnaire, brief version (EPQ-BV). General physical and mental health was measured using the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire and the EuroQol (EQ-5D). Joint-specific function was measured using the Oxford hip or knee score. The "unstable introvert" personality type was associated with poorer pre-operative function and health in patients with hip arthrosis. In patients with knee arthrosis, there was poorer general health in those with "stable extrovert" and "unstable introvert" types. Personality was not an independent predictor of outcome following TKA or THA. The main predictor was pre-operative function and health. Comorbidity was an important covariate of both pre-operative and postoperative function. Personality may play a role in the interaction of these disease processes with function and health perception. It may also affect the response and interpretation of psychometric and patient-reported outcome measures. It may be important to characterise and identify these traits in potential arthroplasty patients as it may help deliver targeted education and management to improve outcomes in certain groups.

  20. ESB Clinical Biomechanics Award 2008: Complete data of total knee replacement loading for level walking and stair climbing measured in vivo with a follow-up of 6-10 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinlein, Bernd; Kutzner, Ines; Graichen, Friedmar; Bender, Alwina; Rohlmann, Antonius; Halder, Andreas M; Beier, Alexander; Bergmann, Georg

    2009-05-01

    Detailed information about the loading of the knee joint is required for various investigations in total knee replacement. Up to now, gait analysis plus analytical musculo-skeletal models were used to calculate the forces and moments acting in the knee joint. Currently, all experimental and numerical pre-clinical tests rely on these indirect measurements which have limitations. The validation of these methods requires in vivo data; therefore, the purpose of this study was to provide in vivo loading data of the knee joint. A custom-made telemetric tibial tray was used to measure the three forces and three moments acting in the implant. This prosthesis was implanted into two subjects and measurements were obtained for a follow-up of 6 and 10 months, respectively. Subjects performed level walking and going up and down stairs using a self-selected comfortable speed. The subjects' activities were captured simultaneously with the load data on a digital video tape. Customized software enabled the display of all information in one video sequence. The highest mean values of the peak load components from the two subjects were as follows: during level walking the forces were 276%BW (percent body weight) in axial direction, 21%BW (medio-lateral), and 29%BW (antero-posterior). The moments were 1.8%BW*m in the sagittal plane, 4.3%BW*m (frontal plane) and 1.0%BW*m (transversal plane). During stair climbing the axial force increased to 306%BW, while the shear forces changed only slightly. The sagittal plane moment increased to 2.4%BW*m, while the frontal and transversal plane moments decreased slightly. Stair descending produced the highest forces of 352%BW (axial), 35%BW (medio-lateral), and 36%BW (antero-posterior). The sagittal and frontal plane moments increased to 2.8%BW*m and 4.6%BW*m, respectively, while the transversal plane moment changed only slightly. Using the data obtained, mechanical simulators can be programmed according to realistic load profiles. Furthermore

  1. Total knee replacement plus physical and medical therapy or treatment with physical and medical therapy alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Roos, Ewa M.; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a lack of high quality evidence concerning the efficacy of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to international evidence-based guidelines, treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) should include patient education, exercise and weight loss. Insoles....../or NSAIDs. Patients will be randomised to either receiving or not receiving a TKA in addition to the optimised non-surgical treatment. The primary outcome will be the change from baseline to 12 months on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)4 defined as the average score for the subscale...

  2. A 5-year profile of the incidence of total joint replacement in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During this period there was a 28% increase in the number of TJRs performed annually with an average increase of 20% in total hip replacements and 40% in total knee replacements. The number of surgeons involved in joint replacement during the survey period decreased by 7% in state-subsidised institutions but ...

  3. Estimating the Mechanical Behavior of the Knee Joint during Crouch Gait: Implications for Real-Time Motor Control of Robotic Knee Orthoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Diane L.; Bulea, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy frequently exhibit crouch gait, a pathological walking pattern characterized by excessive knee flexion. Knowledge of the knee joint moment during crouch gait is necessary for the design and control of assistive devices used for treatment. Our goal was to 1) develop statistical models to estimate knee joint moment extrema and dynamic stiffness during crouch gait, and 2) use the models to estimate the instantaneous joint moment during weight-acceptance. We retrospectively computed knee moments from 10 children with crouch gait and used stepwise linear regression to develop statistical models describing the knee moment features. The models explained at least 90% of the response value variability: peak moment in early (99%) and late (90%) stance, and dynamic stiffness of weight-acceptance flexion (94%) and extension (98%). We estimated knee extensor moment profiles from the predicted dynamic stiffness and instantaneous knee angle. This approach captured the timing and shape of the computed moment (root-mean-squared error: 2.64 Nm); including the predicted early-stance peak moment as a correction factor improved model performance (root-mean-squared error: 1.37 Nm). Our strategy provides a practical, accurate method to estimate the knee moment during crouch gait, and could be used for real-time, adaptive control of robotic orthoses. PMID:27101612

  4. Surgical Stabilization of the Medial Capsulo-Ligamentous Envelope in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Green, DO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study will evaluate an alternative method in which a four prong bone staple was used to repair the medial collateral ligament following over-release or avulsion injuries in (#6 cases during a total knee arthroplasty. The use of a four prong bone staple to repair medial collateral ligament injuries status post total knee replacement will provide satisfactory results with respect to post-operative knee stability and range of motion. Our retrospective review revealed that all six patients improved with regards to range of motion following the total knee arthroplasty. We feel that repair of the medial collateral ligament with a four-prong bone staple is a viable option after an over-release or avulsion injury sustained during a total knee arthroplasty.

  5. Anteroposterior glide versus rotating platform low contact stress (LCS knee arthroplasty: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn-Jones Charles

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fifty thousand knee replacements are performed annually in the UK at an estimated cost of £150 million. Post-operative improvement depends on a number of factors including implant design and patient associated factors. To our knowledge there are no published study's comparing the results of AP glide and rotating platform designs of LCS knee arthroplasty. Therefore we feel that a study is required to investigate and compare the effects of two types of LCS total knee arthroplasty on joint proprioception and range of motion. Methods/Design Patients will be randomised to receive either a LCS AP glide or Rotating platform prosthesis. Clinical scores (Oxford knee score, American knee society score, EuroQol, range of motion and proprioception will be assessed prior to and at 3,6, 12 and 24 months after the operation. Proprioception will be assessed in terms of absolute error angle (mean difference between the target angle and the response angle. Knee angles will be measured in degrees using an electromagnetic tracking device, Polhemus 3Space Fastrak that detects positions of sensors placed on the test limb. Student's t-test will be used to compare the mean of two groups. Discussion Evidence is lacking concerning the best prosthesis to use for patients undergoing total knee replacement. This pragmatic randomised trial will test the null hypothesis that anteroposterior glide LCS knee arthroplasty does not result in better post operative knee motion and proprioception as compared to rotating platform LCS knee. Trial Registration ISRCTN52943804

  6. Prometheus payment model: application to hip and knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Amita; Mohr, Beth A; Williams, Jeffery O; Soobader, Mah-Jabeen; de Brantes, Francois

    2009-10-01

    The Prometheus Payment Model offers a potential solution to the failings of the current fee-for-service system and various forms of capitation. At the core of the Prometheus model are evidence-informed case rates (ECRs), which include a bundle of typical services that are informed by evidence and/or expert opinion as well as empirical data analysis, payment based on the severity of patients, and allowances for potentially avoidable complications (PACs) and other provider-specific variations in payer costs. We outline the methods and findings of the hip and knee arthroplasty ECRs with an emphasis on PACs. Of the 2076 commercially insured patients undergoing hip arthroplasty in our study, PAC costs totaled $7.8 million (14% of total costs; n = 699 index PAC stays). Similarly, PAC costs were $12.7 million (14% of total costs; n = 897 index PAC stays) for 3403 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. By holding the providers clinically and financially responsible for PACs, and by segmenting and quantifying the type of PACs generated during and after the procedure, the Prometheus model creates an opportunity for providers to focus on the reduction of PACs, including readmissions, making the data actionable and turn the waste related to PAC costs into potential savings.

  7. Development and fabrication of patient-specific knee implant using additive manufacturing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Robert; Rochman, Arif

    2017-10-01

    Total knee replacement is the most effective treatment to relief pain and restore normal function in a diseased knee joint. The aim of this research was to develop a patient-specific knee implant which can be fabricated using additive manufacturing techniques and has reduced wear rates using a highly wear resistant materials. The proposed design was chosen based on implant requirements, such as reduction in wear rates as well as strong fixation. The patient-specific knee implant improves on conventional knee implants by modifying the articulating surfaces and bone-implant interfaces. Moreover, tribological tests of different polymeric wear couples were carried out to determine the optimal materials to use for the articulating surfaces. Finite element analysis was utilized to evaluate the stresses sustained by the proposed design. Finally, the patient-specific knee implant was successfully built using additive manufacturing techniques.

  8. Use of Kinesiology Taping in Rehabilitation after Knee Arthroplasty: a Randomised Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Czekierda, Weronika; Woźniak, Kamil; Hadamus, Anna; Białoszewski, Dariusz

    2017-10-31

    Proprioception and body balance after knee arthroplasty have a considerable impact on restoration of joint function and a normal gait pattern. Kinesiology Taping (KT) is a method that may be able to influence these factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of KT application on sensorimotor efficiency, balance and gait in patients undergoing rehabili-ta--tion after knee replacement surgery. The study involved 120 male and female patients (mean age was 69 years) after total knee repla-cement. The patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Experimental Group (n=51) and Control Group (n=60). Both groups underwent standard rehabilitation lasting 20 days. In addition, the Experimental Group received KT applications. Treat-ment outcomes were assessed based on tests evaluating balance, joint position sense and functional gait performance, conducted both before and after the therapy. Statistically significant improvements were noted across all the parameters assessed in the Experimental Group (p<0.005). Significant improvements were also seen in the Control Group (p<0.005), but, in percentage terms, the improvement was higher in the Experimental Group. The only exception was the right/left foot load distribution, whose symmetry improved proportionally in both groups. 1. Patients after knee replacement surgery have considerable proprioception deficits, impaired body balance and reduced functional performance, which may increase the risk of falls in this group of patients. 2. Both standard physiotherapy and combination therapy with Kinesiology Taping (modified by the present authors) used in patients after knee arthroplasty may considerably improve the level of proprioception, body balance and overall functional performance. 3. The technique of dynamic taping proposed in this paper may optimise standard physiotherapy used in patients after knee arthroplasty and increase its clinical efficacy. Further studies are required.

  9. Efficacy of multimodal, systematic non-surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis for patients not eligible for a total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, S. T.; Roos, E. M.; Laursen, M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: It is recommended that non-operative treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) should be individually tailored and include multiple treatment modalities. Despite these recommendations, no one has yet investigated the efficacy of combining several non-surgical treatment modalities...

  10. Associations Between Knee Effusion-synovitis and Joint Structural Changes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Blizzard, Leigh; Antony, Benny; Han, Weiyu; Zhu, Zhaohua; Cicuttini, Flavia; Wluka, Anita E; Winzenberg, Tania; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2017-11-01

    To describe the associations between effusion-synovitis and joint structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) over 24 months. A posthoc analysis using data from a randomized controlled trial in 413 patients with symptomatic OA (aged 63 ± 7 yrs, 208 women). Knee effusion-synovitis volume and score, cartilage defects, cartilage volume, and bone marrow lesions (BML) were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes were assessed using radiograph. Least significant change criterion was used to define change in effusion-synovitis volume. Knee symptoms were assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index. Multivariable linear/logistic regression and multilevel generalized mixed-effects models were used in longitudinal analyses. Total effusion-synovitis volume increased modestly from baseline (8.0 ± 8.5 ml) to followup (9.0 ± 10.5 ml). Baseline BML, cartilage defect, JSN, and osteophyte scores were positively associated with change in effusion-synovitis volume (p effusion-synovitis score (p effusion-synovitis score nor volume consistently predicted change in the above structures except cartilage volume. In the mixed-effects models, knee effusion-synovitis was positively associated with BML (volume: β = 1.19 ml/grade; score: OR = 1.75/grade) and cartilage defects (volume: β = 1.87 ml/grade; score: OR = 2.22/grade), while negatively associated with cartilage volume loss. Change in effusion-synovitis volume was positively correlated with changes in knee pain and stiffness scores (p effusion-synovitis, but effusion-synovitis did not predict knee structural changes. These findings suggest that synovial inflammation is likely the result of joint structural abnormalities in established OA. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000495022.

  11. Development and validation of a weight-bearing finite element model for total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woiczinski, M; Steinbrück, A; Weber, P; Müller, P E; Jansson, V; Schröder, Ch

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful procedure for osteoarthritis. However, some patients (19%) do have pain after surgery. A finite element model was developed based on boundary conditions of a knee rig. A 3D-model of an anatomical full leg was generated from magnetic resonance image data and a total knee prosthesis was implanted without patella resurfacing. In the finite element model, a restarting procedure was programmed in order to hold the ground reaction force constant with an adapted quadriceps muscle force during a squat from 20° to 105° of flexion. Knee rig experimental data were used to validate the numerical model in the patellofemoral and femorotibial joint. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses of Young's modulus of the patella cartilage, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) stiffness, and patella tendon origin were performed. Pearson's correlations for retropatellar contact area, pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were near to 1. Lowest root mean square error for retropatellar pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were found for the baseline model setup with Young's modulus of 5 MPa for patella cartilage, a downscaled PCL stiffness of 25% compared to the literature given value and an anatomical origin of the patella tendon. The results of the conducted finite element model are comparable with the experimental results. Therefore, the finite element model developed in this study can be used for further clinical investigations and will help to better understand the clinical aspects after TKA with an unresurfaced patella.

  12. Leisure time physical activity and the risk of hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis: a population based cohort study (The HUNT Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Marianne Bakke; Hellevik, Alf Inge; Baste, Valborg; Furnes, Ove; Langhammer, Arnulf; Flugsrud, Gunnar; Nordsletten, Lars; Zwart, John Anker; Storheim, Kjersti

    2016-02-16

    The relationship between leisure time physical activity (LPA) and hip and knee OA and subsequent joint replacement has not yet been clearly defined. Some studies have found the risk of knee replacement (TKR) to increase with high levels of LPA, while others have found no overall relationship to either TKR or hip replacement (THR). The aim was to investigate the association between LPA and the risk of severe end-stage OA, defined as THR or TKR due to primary OA, in a large population-based cohort. Participants in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) were followed prospectively to identify THR and TKR using the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Self-reported LPA was classified as inactive, low, moderate or high. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) according to levels of LPA with adjustments for confounding variables. Analyses were performed by age (<45, 45-59 and ≥60 years) and sex. A total of 66 964 participants (mean age 46.8 years (SD 16.3) were included in the analyses. We identified 1636 THRs and 1016 TKRs due to primary OA during 17.0 years (median) of follow-up. High LPA was significantly associated with THR for women <45 years (HR 1.78, 95 % CI 1.08-2.94) and men between 45-59 years (HR 1.53, 95 % CI 1.10-2.13) at baseline. A significant trend was found only among women < 45 years at baseline (p = 0.02). We found that LPA was significantly associated with TKR for women only (HR 1.45, 95 % CI 1.03-2.04). No measures of LPA were associated with TKR for men. In this population-based study, high level of LPA was associated with increased risk of THR where a significant trend of LPA was seen among women <45 years at baseline. For TKR, high LPA was associated with increased risk only in women. In contrast to previous studies, this study shows a possible association between high LPA and the risk of THR.

  13. The value of FDG-PET in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, Katrin D.M.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Strobel, Klaus [University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Romero, Jose [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopaedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Joint Diseases at Hirslanden Clinic, EndoClinic Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Ziegler, Oliver [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopaedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Ortho Zentrum Rosenheim, Rosenheim (Germany); Kamel, Ehab M. [University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hodler, Juerg [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty and to relate FDG uptake to the location of soft tissue pain. Twenty-eight patients with painful total knee arthroplasty had a clinical examination, standard radiographs, CT measurement of rotation of the femoral component and FDG-PET (18 PET/CT, 10 PET). The diagnosis of infection was based on microbiological examinations of surgical specimens (n=12) or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months (n=16),{sup 99m}Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody scintigraphy and joint aspiration. Twenty-seven of 28 patients presented with diffuse synovial FDG uptake. Additional focal extrasynovial FDG uptake was observed in 19 knees. Twenty-four of the 28 patients had a diagnosis of internal femoral malrotation. The remaining four patients showed no rotation (0 ) and 3 , 4 and 7 of external rotation, respectively. Three patients presented with the additional diagnosis of an infected total knee replacement. Pain was described as diffuse (n=10) or focal (n=18). In two knees a relationship between pain location and FDG uptake was observed. Of ten patients with a severe internal femoral component rotation (>6 ), seven had focal uptake, four in the femoral periosteum and three in the tibial periosteum. The difference between knees with severe malrotation and the remaining knees was not significant (p=1.000, Fisher's Exact Test). Diffuse synovial and focal extrasynovial FDG-PET uptake is commonly found in patients with malrotation of the femoral component and is not related to pain location. The information provided by FDG-PET does not contribute to the diagnosis and management of individual patients with persistent pain after total knee replacement. (orig.)

  14. The value of FDG-PET in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpe, Katrin D.M.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Strobel, Klaus; Romero, Jose; Ziegler, Oliver; Kamel, Ehab M.; Hodler, Juerg

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty and to relate FDG uptake to the location of soft tissue pain. Twenty-eight patients with painful total knee arthroplasty had a clinical examination, standard radiographs, CT measurement of rotation of the femoral component and FDG-PET (18 PET/CT, 10 PET). The diagnosis of infection was based on microbiological examinations of surgical specimens (n=12) or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months (n=16), 99m Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody scintigraphy and joint aspiration. Twenty-seven of 28 patients presented with diffuse synovial FDG uptake. Additional focal extrasynovial FDG uptake was observed in 19 knees. Twenty-four of the 28 patients had a diagnosis of internal femoral malrotation. The remaining four patients showed no rotation (0 ) and 3 , 4 and 7 of external rotation, respectively. Three patients presented with the additional diagnosis of an infected total knee replacement. Pain was described as diffuse (n=10) or focal (n=18). In two knees a relationship between pain location and FDG uptake was observed. Of ten patients with a severe internal femoral component rotation (>6 ), seven had focal uptake, four in the femoral periosteum and three in the tibial periosteum. The difference between knees with severe malrotation and the remaining knees was not significant (p=1.000, Fisher's Exact Test). Diffuse synovial and focal extrasynovial FDG-PET uptake is commonly found in patients with malrotation of the femoral component and is not related to pain location. The information provided by FDG-PET does not contribute to the diagnosis and management of individual patients with persistent pain after total knee replacement. (orig.)

  15. Valid MR imaging predictors of prior knee arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discepola, Federico; Le, Huy B.Q.; Park, John S.; Clopton, Paul; Knoll, Andrew N.; Austin, Matthew J.; Resnick, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether fibrosis of the medial patellar reticulum (MPR), lateral patellar reticulum (LPR), deep medial aspect of Hoffa's fat pad (MDH), or deep lateral aspect of Hoffa's fat pad (LDH) is a valid predictor of prior knee arthroscopy. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained for this HIPPA-compliant study. Initially, fibrosis of the MPR, LPR, MDH, or LDH in MR imaging studies of 50 patients with prior knee arthroscopy and 100 patients without was recorded. Subsequently, two additional radiologists, blinded to clinical data, retrospectively and independently recorded the presence of fibrosis of the MPR in 50 patients with prior knee arthroscopy and 50 without. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for detecting the presence of fibrosis in the MPR were calculated. κ statistics were used to analyze inter-observer agreement. Fibrosis of each of the regions examined during the first portion of the study showed a significant association with prior knee arthroscopy (p < 0.005 for each). A patient with fibrosis of the MPR, LDH, or LPR was 45.5, 9, or 3.7 times more likely, respectively, to have had a prior knee arthroscopy. Logistic regression analysis indicated that fibrosis of the MPR supplanted the diagnostic utility of identifying fibrosis of the LPR, LDH, or MDH, or combinations of these (p ≥ 0.09 for all combinations). In the second portion of the study, fibrosis of the MPR demonstrated a mean sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 72%, PPV of 75%, NPV of 81%, and accuracy of 77% for predicting prior knee arthroscopy. Analysis of MR images can be used to determine if a patient has had prior knee arthroscopy by identifying fibrosis of the MPR, LPR, MDH, or LDH. Fibrosis of the MPR was the strongest predictor of prior knee arthroscopy. (orig.)

  16. Valid MR imaging predictors of prior knee arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Discepola, Federico; Le, Huy B.Q. [McGill University Health Center, Jewsih General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Park, John S. [Annapolis Radiology Associates, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Annapolis, MD (United States); Clopton, Paul; Knoll, Andrew N.; Austin, Matthew J.; Resnick, Donald L. [University of California San Diego (UCSD), Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    To determine whether fibrosis of the medial patellar reticulum (MPR), lateral patellar reticulum (LPR), deep medial aspect of Hoffa's fat pad (MDH), or deep lateral aspect of Hoffa's fat pad (LDH) is a valid predictor of prior knee arthroscopy. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained for this HIPPA-compliant study. Initially, fibrosis of the MPR, LPR, MDH, or LDH in MR imaging studies of 50 patients with prior knee arthroscopy and 100 patients without was recorded. Subsequently, two additional radiologists, blinded to clinical data, retrospectively and independently recorded the presence of fibrosis of the MPR in 50 patients with prior knee arthroscopy and 50 without. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for detecting the presence of fibrosis in the MPR were calculated. {kappa} statistics were used to analyze inter-observer agreement. Fibrosis of each of the regions examined during the first portion of the study showed a significant association with prior knee arthroscopy (p < 0.005 for each). A patient with fibrosis of the MPR, LDH, or LPR was 45.5, 9, or 3.7 times more likely, respectively, to have had a prior knee arthroscopy. Logistic regression analysis indicated that fibrosis of the MPR supplanted the diagnostic utility of identifying fibrosis of the LPR, LDH, or MDH, or combinations of these (p {>=} 0.09 for all combinations). In the second portion of the study, fibrosis of the MPR demonstrated a mean sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 72%, PPV of 75%, NPV of 81%, and accuracy of 77% for predicting prior knee arthroscopy. Analysis of MR images can be used to determine if a patient has had prior knee arthroscopy by identifying fibrosis of the MPR, LPR, MDH, or LDH. Fibrosis of the MPR was the strongest predictor of prior knee arthroscopy. (orig.)

  17. PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-11-01

    PEEK-OPTIMA ™ (Invibio Ltd, UK) has been considered as an alternative joint arthroplasty bearing material due to its favourable mechanical properties and the biocompatibility of its wear debris. In this study, the potential to use injection moulded PEEK-OPTIMA ™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of a total knee replacement was investigated in terms of its wear performance. Experimental wear simulation of three cobalt chrome and three PEEK-OPTIMA ™ femoral components articulating against all-polyethylene tibial components was carried out under two kinematic conditions: 3 million cycles under intermediate kinematics (maximum anterior-posterior displacement of 5 mm) followed by 3 million cycles under high kinematic conditions (anterior-posterior displacement 10 mm). The wear of the GUR1020 ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was assessed by gravimetric analysis; for both material combinations under each kinematic condition, the mean wear rates were low, that is, below 5 mm 3 /million cycles. Specifically, under intermediate kinematic conditions, the wear rate of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was 0.96 ± 2.26 mm 3 /million cycles and 2.44 ± 0.78 mm 3 /million cycle against cobalt chrome and PEEK-OPTIMA ™ implants, respectively (p = 0.06); under high kinematic conditions, the wear rates were 2.23 ± 1.85 mm 3 /million cycles and 4.44 ± 2.35 mm 3 /million cycles, respectively (p = 0.03). Following wear simulation, scratches were apparent on the surface of the PEEK-OPTIMA ™ femoral components. The surface topography of the femoral components was assessed using contacting profilometry and showed a statistically significant increase in measured surface roughness of the PEEK-OPTIMA ™ femoral components compared to the cobalt chrome implants. However, this did not appear to influence the wear rate, which remained linear over the duration of

  18. PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    PEEK-OPTIMA™ (Invibio Ltd, UK) has been considered as an alternative joint arthroplasty bearing material due to its favourable mechanical properties and the biocompatibility of its wear debris. In this study, the potential to use injection moulded PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of a total knee replacement was investigated in terms of its wear performance. Experimental wear simulation of three cobalt chrome and three PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components articulating against all-polyethylene tibial components was carried out under two kinematic conditions: 3 million cycles under intermediate kinematics (maximum anterior-posterior displacement of 5 mm) followed by 3 million cycles under high kinematic conditions (anterior-posterior displacement 10 mm). The wear of the GUR1020 ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was assessed by gravimetric analysis; for both material combinations under each kinematic condition, the mean wear rates were low, that is, below 5 mm3/million cycles. Specifically, under intermediate kinematic conditions, the wear rate of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was 0.96 ± 2.26 mm3/million cycles and 2.44 ± 0.78 mm3/million cycle against cobalt chrome and PEEK-OPTIMA™ implants, respectively (p = 0.06); under high kinematic conditions, the wear rates were 2.23 ± 1.85 mm3/million cycles and 4.44 ± 2.35 mm3/million cycles, respectively (p = 0.03). Following wear simulation, scratches were apparent on the surface of the PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components. The surface topography of the femoral components was assessed using contacting profilometry and showed a statistically significant increase in measured surface roughness of the PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components compared to the cobalt chrome implants. However, this did not appear to influence the wear rate, which remained linear over the duration of the study. These

  19. Intraoperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusion Reduces Acute Postoperative Pain Following Total Knee Replacement Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelin Cengiz, P.; Gokcinar, D.; Karabeyoglu, I.; Topcu, H.; Cicek, G. S.; Gogus, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intraoperative low-dose ketamine with general anesthesia on postoperative pain after total knee replacement surgery. Study Design: A randomized, double-blind comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, from January and June 2011. Methodology: Sixty adults undergoing total knee arthroplasty were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups of equal size to receive either racemic ketamine infusion (6.25 g/kg/minute) or the same volume of saline. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure each patient's level of pain at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Time to first analgesic request, postoperative morphine consumption and the incidence of side effects were also recorded. Results: Low-dose ketamine infusion prolonged the time to first analgesic request. It also reduced postoperative cumulative morphine consumption at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours postsurgery (p < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores were also significantly lower in the ketamine group than placebo, at all observation times. Incidences of side effects were similar in both study groups. Conclusion: Intraoperative continuous low-dose ketamine infusion reduced pain and postoperative analgesic consumption without affecting the incidence of side effects. (author)

  20. Tibial rotation kinematics subsequent to knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Duane J.; Khatib, Yasser H.; Parker, David A.; Jenkin, Deanne E.; Molnar, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted joint replacement has facilitated precise intraoperative measurement of knee kinematics. The changes in “screw home mechanism” (SHM) resulting from Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with different prostheses and constraints has not yet been accurately described. Methods A pilot study was first completed. Intraoperative kinematic data was collected two groups of 15 patients receiving different prostheses. Results On average, patients lost 5.3° of ER (SD = 6.1°). There was no significant difference between the prostheses or different prosthetic constraints. Conclusions There significant loss of SHM after TKA. Further research is required to understand its impact on patient function. PMID:25829754

  1. An Informational Algorithm as the Basis for Perception-Action Control of the Instantaneous Axes of the Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wangdo; Espanha, Margarida M; Veloso, António P; Araújo, Duarte; João, Filipa; Carrão, Luis; Kohles, Sean S

    2013-03-27

    Traditional locomotion studies emphasize an optimization of the desired movement trajectories while ignoring sensory feedback. We propose an information based theory that locomotion is neither triggered nor commanded but controlled. The basis for this control is the information derived from perceiving oneself in the world. Control therefore lies in the human-environment system. In order to test this hypothesis, we derived a mathematical foundation characterizing the energy that is required to perform a rotational twist, with small amplitude, of the instantaneous axes of the knee (IAK). We have found that the joint's perception of the ground reaction force may be replaced by the co-perception of muscle activation with appropriate intensities. This approach generated an accurate comparison with known joint forces and appears appropriate in so far as predicting the effect on the knee when it is free to twist about the IAK.

  2. Hemophilia A Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with High Responding Inhibitors Complicating Total Knee Arthroplasty: Embolization: A Cost-Reducing Alternative to Medical Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kickuth, Ralph; Anderson, Suzanne; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Laemmle, Bernhard; Eggli, Stefan; Triller, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Joint hemorrhages are very common in patients with severe hemophilia. Inhibitors in patients with hemophilia are allo-antibodies that neutralize the activity of the clotting factor. After total knee replacement, rare intra-articular bleeding complications might occur that do not respond to clotting factor replacement. We report a 40-year-old male with severe hemophilia A and high responding inhibitors presenting with recurrent knee joint hemorrhage after bilateral knee prosthetic surgery despite adequate clotting factor treatment. There were two episodes of marked postoperative hemarthrosis requiring extensive use of subsititution therapy. Eleven days postoperatively, there was further hemorrhage into the right knee. Digital subtraction angiography diagnosed a complicating pseudoaneurysm of the inferior lateral geniculate artery and embolization was successfully performed. Because clotting factor replacement therapy has proved to be excessively expensive and prolonged, especially in patients with inhibitors, we recommend the use of cost-effective early angiographic embolization

  3. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Patellar Kinematics and Patellofemoral Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Hidenori; Tada, Mitsunori; Harato, Kengo; Okuma, Kazunari; Nagura, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    Patellofemoral complications are one of the main problems after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The design of the TKA component may affect the patellar biomechanics, which may be associated with this postoperative complication. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of TKA and prosthesis designs on the patellar kinematics and patellofemoral pressure. Using fresh-frozen cadavers, we measured the patellofemoral pressure, patella offset, and patella tilt in the following 4 conditions: normal knee (patella replacement only), cruciate-retaining TKA, condylar-stabilizing TKA, and posterior-stabilized TKA. The patellofemoral pressure increased significantly after the cruciate-retaining TKA and condylar-stabilizing TKA compared with the normal knee. The patella offset in the normal knee decreased with increasing knee flexion angles, while the patella offset in the TKA knees did not change significantly through the full range of motion. The amount of lateral patella tilt in the normal knee was significantly larger than the TKA knees in the full range of motion. Although the femoral components are designed to reproduce an anatomical patellar tracking, the physiological patellar kinematics were not observed. Relatively high patellofemoral pressure and kinematic change after TKA may be associated with postoperative complications such as the anterior knee pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SYNDROME-PATHOGENETIC APPROACH TO MEDICAL REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AFTER THE TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Udartsev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment 103 patients in term of 4-6 months after total hip and knee replacement were examined. Established that in the operated limb disorders of regional blood flow in the form of chronic lympho-venous insufficiency and changes in the functional state of neuromuscular apparatus in the form of muscle dysfunction, autonomic dysfunction occured. According to detected characteristics the medical rehabilitation for patients of the 1st group (52 patients was based on the combination of therapeutic factors complex usage, each of which exerts a specific effect on pathogenesis of a certain syndrome or their different combinations, and developing therapeutic factors are summarized and potentiated. That is why balneo-radon-kinesiotherapy, intermittent pneumocompression, low-frequency magnetotherapy, transcranial electroanalgesia, electrical myostimulation, pelotherapy, taking of central myorelexanat tizanidine were included in the treatment program. Among the patients of the 2nd group medical rehabilitation was based exclusively on motion state and bodily exercises. The analysis of treatment showed the advantage of syndrome-pathogenetic approach, applied for the 1st group of patients: joint range of motions increased by 33,1%, venous drainage increased by 24,4%, neuromuscular apparatus duty improved by 51,8%, involuntary nervous system balance normalized, functional outcome of the medical rehabilitation improved by 73,1%.

  5. Value of radiographic examination of the knee joint for the orthopedic surgeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, M.; Hofmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    Extended radiographic examinations offer excellent options for diagnosis and strategy for treatment of the knee joint. The whole-leg radiograph is indispensable in measuring alignment for osteotomy or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fluoroscopically assisted varus-valgus stress radiographs provide the possibility for verifying mechanical function of the implanted knee prosthesis. Ultrasound examinations have been widely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is the golden standard to examine intra-articular structures of the knee (meniscus, ligaments, cartilage) and surrounding soft tissue. For evaluating femoral and tibial torsion and determining axial rotation of TKA, computed tomography (CT) is best qualified. Imaging of the patellofemoral joint (patella instability) is difficult; CT scans in combination with true lateral radiographs seem to be helpful. (orig.) [de

  6. Weighted cumulative exposure models helped identify an association between early knee-pain consultations and future knee OA diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dahai; Peat, George; Bedson, John; Edwards, John J; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Jordan, Kelvin P

    2016-08-01

    To establish the association between prior knee-pain consultations and early diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis (OA) by weighted cumulative exposure (WCE) models. Data were from an electronic health care record (EHR) database (Consultations in Primary Care Archive). WCE functions for modeling the cumulative effect of time-varying knee-pain consultations weighted by recency were derived as a predictive tool in a population-based case-control sample and validated in a prospective cohort sample. Two WCE functions ([i] weighting of the importance of past consultations determined a priori; [ii] flexible spline-based estimation) were comprehensively compared with two simpler models ([iii] time since most recent consultation; total number of past consultations) on model goodness of fit, discrimination, and calibration both in derivation and validation phases. People with the most recent and most frequent knee-pain consultations were more likely to have high WCE scores that were associated with increased risk of knee OA diagnosis both in derivation and validation phases. Better model goodness of fit, discrimination, and calibration were observed for flexible spline-based WCE models. WCE functions can be used to model prediagnostic symptoms within routine EHR data and provide novel low-cost predictive tools contributing to early diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. International comparative evaluation of knee replacement with fixed or mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Stephen; Sedrakyan, Art; Baste, Valborg; Gioe, Terence J; Namba, Robert; Martínez Cruz, Olga; Stea, Susanna; Paxton, Elizabeth; Banerjee, Samprit; Isaacs, Abby J; Robertsson, Otto

    2014-12-17

    Posterior-stabilized total knee prostheses were introduced to address instability secondary to loss of posterior cruciate ligament function, and they have either fixed or mobile bearings. Mobile bearings were developed to improve the function and longevity of total knee prostheses. In this study, the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries used a distributed health data network to study a large cohort of posterior-stabilized prostheses to determine if the outcome of a posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis differs depending on whether it has a fixed or mobile-bearing design. Aggregated registry data were collected with a distributed health data network that was developed by the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries to reduce barriers to participation (e.g., security, proprietary, legal, and privacy issues) that have the potential to occur with the alternate centralized data warehouse approach. A distributed health data network is a decentralized model that allows secure storage and analysis of data from different registries. Each registry provided data on mobile and fixed-bearing posterior-stabilized prostheses implanted between 2001 and 2010. Only prostheses associated with primary total knee arthroplasties performed for the treatment of osteoarthritis were included. Prostheses with all types of fixation were included except for those with the rarely used reverse hybrid (cementless tibial and cemented femoral components) fixation. The use of patellar resurfacing was reported. The outcome of interest was time to first revision (for any reason). Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with linear mixed models with survival probability as the unit of analysis. This study includes 137,616 posterior-stabilized knee prostheses; 62% were in female patients, and 17.6% had a mobile bearing. The results of the fixed-effects model indicate that in the first year the mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized prostheses had a significantly higher hazard

  8. Does measurement of the anatomic axis consistently predict hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA) for knee alignment studies in osteoarthritis? Analysis of long limb radiographs from the multicenter osteoarthritis (MOST) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, L; Felson, D; Zhang, Y; Niu, J; Lam, Y-M; Segal, N; Lynch, J; Cooke, T D V

    2011-01-01

    Researchers commonly use the femoral shaft-tibial shaft angle (FS-TS) from knee radiographs to estimate the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA) in studies examining risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA) incidence and progression. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between HKA and FS-TS, depending on the method of calculating FS-TS and the direction and degree of knee deformity. 120 full-length digital radiographs were assigned, with 30 in each of four alignment groups (0.0°-4.9°, and ≥5.0° of varus and valgus), from a large cohort of persons with and at risk of knee OA. HKA and five measures of FS-TS (using progressively shorter shaft leng