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Sample records for kinase ck2beta subunit

  1. A-Raf kinase is a new interacting partner of protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1997-01-01

    In a search for protein kinase CK2 beta subunit binding proteins using the two-hybrid system, more than 1000 positive clones were isolated. Beside clones for the alpha' and beta subunit of CK2, there were clones coding for a so far unknown protein, whose partial cDNA sequence was already deposited...

  2. CK2(beta)tes gene encodes a testis-specific isoform of the regulatory subunit of casein kinase 2 in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalmykova, Alla I; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Polesskaya, Oksana O

    2002-01-01

    An earlier described CK2(beta)tes gene of Drosophila melanogaster is shown to encode a male germline specific isoform of regulatory beta subunit of casein kinase 2. Western-analysis using anti-CK2(beta)tes Ig revealed CK2(beta)tes protein in Drosophila testes extract. Expression of a CK2(beta...... and coimmunoprecipitation analysis of protein extract from Drosophila testes, we demonstrated an association between CK2(beta)tes and CK2alpha. Northern-analysis has shown that another regulatory (beta') subunit found recently in D. melanogaster genome is also testis-specific. Thus, we describe the first example of two...

  3. Isolation and characterization of a monoclonal anti-protein kinase CK2 beta-subunit antibody of the IgG class for the direct detection of CK2 beta-subunit in tissue cultures of various mammalian species and human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastainczyk, W; Schmidt-Spaniol, I; Boldyreff, B

    1995-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-protein kinase CK2 beta antibody was isolated and characterized. The antibody detects 1 pmol of purified recombinant CK2 beta-subunit after analysis on SDS-PAGE. Alternatively undenatured CK2 beta-subunit was detected by an ELISA assay either as recombinant CK2 beta......-subunit or in the CK2 holoenzyme (alpha 2 beta 2). Here, concentrations of the first antibody of 1 ng/ml still allowed the detection of the subunit. Immunoblotting of crude cellular extracts from various tissue cultures (man, mouse, and hamster), from human tumors, and the nonneoplastic tissue allowed the detection...... of the CK2 beta-subunit. The detected epitope of this antibody was, as determined by the epitope analysis technique, 123GLSDI127....

  4. The interaction of CK2alpha and CK2beta, the subunits of protein kinase CK2, requires CK2beta in a preformed conformation and is enthalpically driven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Brunstein, Elena; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    . In contrast to the cyclins in the case of the cyclin-dependent kinases CK2beta is no on-switch of CK2alpha; rather the formation of the CK2 holoenzyme is accompanied with an overall change of the enzyme's profile including a modulation of the substrate specificity, an increase of the thermostability......, and an allocation of docking sites for membranes and other proteins. In this study we used C-terminal deletion variants of human CK2alpha and CK2beta that were enzymologically fully competent and in particular able to form a heterotetrameric holoenzyme. With differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) we confirmed...

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for functionally non-redundant protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Eike; Wecklein, Heike; Stark, Felix; Jauch, Mandy; Raabe, Thomas

    2006-06-07

    Genes encoding for the two evolutionary highly conserved subunits of a heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme are present in all examined eukaryotic genomes. Depending on the organism, multiple transcription units encoding for a catalytically active CK2alpha subunit and/or a regulatory CK2beta subunit may exist. The phosphotransferase activity of members of the protein kinase CK2alpha family is thought to be independent of second messengers but is modulated by interaction with CK2beta-like proteins. In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, one gene encoding for a CK2alpha subunit and three genes encoding for CK2beta-like proteins are present. The X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for several CK2beta protein isoforms due to alternative splicing of its primary transcript. We addressed the question whether CK2beta-like proteins are redundant in function. Our in vivo experiments show that variations of the very C-terminal tail of CK2beta isoforms encoded by the X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit influence their functional properties. In addition, we find that CK2beta-like proteins encoded by the autosomal D. melanogaster genes CK2betates and CK2beta' cannot fully substitute for a loss of CK2beta isoforms encoded by DmCK2beta.

  6. Asymmetric expression of protein kinase CK2 subunits in human kidney tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stalter, G; Siemer, S; Becht, E

    1994-01-01

    of protein kinase CK2 alpha in tumors/normal tissue (T/N) was 1.58 and that of the protein kinase CK2 beta (T/N) was 2.65. The data suggest that the generally described increase in protein kinase CK2 activity in tumor cells may to some extent result from a deregulation in subunit biosynthesis or degradation...

  7. Development of a high-throughput screening-compatible assay to identify inhibitors of the CK2alpha/CK2beta interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochscherf, Jennifer; Lindenblatt, Dirk; Steinkrueger, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Increased activity of protein kinase CK2 is associated with various types of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic inflammation. In the search for CK2 inhibitors, attention has expanded toward compounds disturbing the interaction between CK2alpha and CK2beta in addition to established a...

  8. Phosphorylation of the Fas associated factor FAF1 by protein kinase CK2 and identification of serines 289 and 291 as the in vitro phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H H; Hjerrild, M; Guerra, B

    2001-01-01

    We previously identified the human Fas associated factor (FAF1) as one of the interacting partners of protein kinase CK2 beta subunit. Since FAF1 is a phosphoprotein we investigated whether it is a substrate for CK2. Here, we report the full length human FAF1 cDNA sequence, expression of FAF1...

  9. Protein kinase CK2 in health and disease: Protein kinase CK2: from structures to insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Raaf, J; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2009-01-01

    the critical region of CK2alpha recruitment is pre-formed in the unbound state. In CK2alpha the activation segment - a key element of protein kinase regulation - adapts invariably the typical conformation of the active enzymes. Recent structures of human CK2alpha revealed a surprising plasticity in the ATP......Within the last decade, 40 crystal structures corresponding to protein kinase CK2 (former name 'casein kinase 2'), to its catalytic subunit CK2alpha and to its regulatory subunit CK2beta were published. Together they provide a valuable, yet by far not complete basis to rationalize the biochemical...

  10. The beta subunit of casein kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Piontek, K; Schmidt-Spaniol, I

    1991-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the beta subunit of pig and mouse CKII were isolated. The porcine cDNA was expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and used for the production of anti-CKII-beta subunit specific antibodies....

  11. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Denaro, Luca; Redaelli, Marco; D'Avella, Domenico; Caretta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  12. Examination of transcript amounts and activity of protein kinase CK2 in muscle lysates of different types of human muscle pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuss, Dieter; Klascinski, Janine; Schubert, Steffen W; Moriabadi, Tehmur; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2008-09-01

    Motoneurons release the heparansulfate proteoglycan agrin and thereby activate the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), which is the main organizer of subsynaptic specializations at the neuromuscular junction. Recently, we showed that (1) the protein kinase CK2 interacts with the intracellular region of MuSK; (2) the CK2 protein is enriched and co-localized with MuSK at postsynaptic specializations; (3) CK2-mediated phosphorylation of serine residues within a specific MuSK epitope, named the kinase insert, regulates acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering; (4) muscle-specific CK2beta knockout mice develop a myasthenic phenotype due to impaired muscle endplate structure and function (see Genes Dev 20(13):1800-1816, 2006). Here, we investigated for the first time if CK2 is modulated in biopsies from human patients. To this end, we measured transcript amounts of the subunits CK2alpha and CK2beta and determined holoenzyme CK2 activity in 34 muscle biopsies of human patients with different muscle pathologies.

  13. Purification and characterization of recombinant protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays expressed in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Marta; Pages, Montserrat; Issinger, Olaf Georg

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant protein kinase subunits rmCK2alpha-1 and rmCK2beta-1 from Zea mays were expressed separately in Escherichia coli and assembled to a fully active tetrameric holoenzyme complex in vitro. The obtained maize holoenzyme was purified to homogeneity, biochemically characterized, and compared...... to CK2 from human. Kinetic measurements of the recombinant maize holoenzyme (rmCK2) revealed k(cat) values for ATP and GTP of 4 and 2s(-1), respectively; whereas the recombinant maize catalytic subunit showed almost equal values for ATP and GTP, i.e., ca. 0.8s(-1). A comparison of the k(cat)/K(m) ratio...

  14. Molecular cloning of the human casein kinase II α subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, H.; Heller-Harrison, R.; Buxton, J.; Czech, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding the α subunit of casein kinase II and a partial cDNA encoding the rat homologue were isolated by using a Drosophila casein kinase II cDNA probe. The 2.2-kb human cDNA contains a 1.2-kb open reading frame, 150 nucleotides of 5' leader, and 850 nucleotides of 3' noncoding region. Except for the first 7 deduced amino acids that are missing in the rat cDNA, the 328 amino acids beginning with the amino terminus are identical between human and rat. The Drosophila enzyme sequence is 90% identical with the human casein kinase II sequence, and there is only a single amino acid difference between the published partial bovine sequence and the human sequence. In addition, the C-terminus of the human cDNA has an extra 53 amino acids not present in Drosophila. Northern analysis of rat and human RNA showed predominant bands of 5.5, 3.1, and 1.8 kb. In rat tissues, brain and spleen had the highest levels of casein kinase II α subunit specific RNA, while skeletal muscle showed the lowest. Southern analysis of human cultured cell and tissue genomic DNA using the full-length cDNA probe revealed two bands with restriction enzymes that have no recognition sites within the cDNA and three to six bands with enzymes having single internal sites. These results are consistent with the possibility that two genes encode the α subunits

  15. Role of regulatory subunits and protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) in determining nuclear localization and activity of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J C; Wailes, L A; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1999-03-05

    Regulation of protein kinase A by subcellular localization may be critical to target catalytic subunits to specific substrates. We employed epitope-tagged catalytic subunit to correlate subcellular localization and gene-inducing activity in the presence of regulatory subunit or protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). Transiently expressed catalytic subunit distributed throughout the cell and induced gene expression. Co-expression of regulatory subunit or PKI blocked gene induction and prevented nuclear accumulation. A mutant PKI lacking the nuclear export signal blocked gene induction but not nuclear accumulation, demonstrating that nuclear export is not essential to inhibit gene induction. When the catalytic subunit was targeted to the nucleus with a nuclear localization signal, it was not sequestered in the cytoplasm by regulatory subunit, although its activity was completely inhibited. PKI redistributed the nuclear catalytic subunit to the cytoplasm and blocked gene induction, demonstrating that the nuclear export signal of PKI can override a strong nuclear localization signal. With increasing PKI, the export process appeared to saturate, resulting in the return of catalytic subunit to the nucleus. These results demonstrate that both the regulatory subunit and PKI are able to completely inhibit the gene-inducing activity of the catalytic subunit even when the catalytic subunit is forced to concentrate in the nuclear compartment.

  16. Subunits of the Snf1 kinase heterotrimer show interdependence for association and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Karin; Rubenstein, Eric M; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2006-09-08

    The Snf1 kinase and its mammalian orthologue, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), function as heterotrimers composed of a catalytic alpha-subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma. The beta-subunit is thought to hold the complex together and control subcellular localization whereas the gamma-subunit plays a regulatory role by binding to and blocking the function of an auto-inhibitory domain (AID) present in the alpha-subunit. In addition, catalytic activity requires phosphorylation by a distinct upstream kinase. In yeast, any one of three Snf1-activating kinases, Sak1, Tos3, or Elm1, can fulfill this role. We have previously shown that Sak1 is the only Snf1-activating kinase that forms a stable complex with Snf1. Here we show that the formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex requires the beta- and gamma-subunits in vivo. However, formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex is not necessary for glucose-regulated phosphorylation of the Snf1 activation loop. Snf1 kinase purified from cells lacking the beta-subunits do not contain any gamma-subunit, indicating that the Snf1 kinase does not form a stable alphagamma dimer in vivo. In vitro kinase assays using purified full-length and truncated Snf1 proteins demonstrate that the kinase domain, which lacks the AID, is significantly more active than the full-length Snf1 protein. Addition of purified beta- and gamma-subunits could stimulate the kinase activity of the full-length alpha-subunit but only when all three subunits were present, suggesting an interdependence of all three subunits for assembly of a functional complex.

  17. Cloning and sequencing of the casein kinase 2 alpha subunit from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobrowolska, G; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA coding for the alpha subunit of casein kinase 2 of Zea mays has been determined. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame of 996 nucleotides encoding a polypeptide comprising 332 amino acids. The primary amino acid sequence exhibits 75% identity to the alpha...... subunit and 71% identity to the alpha' subunit of human casein kinase 2....

  18. Characterization of cyclin-dependent kinases and Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunits in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Erick; López-Pacheco, Karla; Morales, Nataly; Coria, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have important roles in regulating key checkpoints between stages of the cell cycle. Their activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including through binding with cyclin proteins and the Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunit (CKS), and their phosphorylation at specific amino acids. Studies of the components involved in cell cycle control in parasitic protozoa are limited. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis in humans and is therefore important in public health; however, some of the basic biological processes used by this organism have not been defined. Here, we characterized proteins potentially involved in cell cycle regulation in T. vaginalis. Three genes encoding protein kinases were identified in the T. vaginalis genome, and the corresponding recombinant proteins (TvCRK1, TvCRK2, TvCRK5) were studied. These proteins displayed similar sequence features to CDKs. Two genes encoding CKSs were also identified, and the corresponding recombinant proteins were found to interact with TvCRK1 and TvCRK2 by a yeast two-hybrid system. One putative cyclin B protein from T. vaginalis was found to bind to and activate the kinase activities of TvCRK1 and TvCRK5, but not TvCRK2. This work is the first characterization of proteins involved in cell cycle control in T. vaginalis.

  19. Creatine kinase and creatine kinase subunit-B in coronary sinus blood in pacing-induced angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, J P; Ingerslev, J; Heinsvig, E M

    1982-01-01

    In nine out of 10 patients with angiographic documented coronary artery disease, pacing-induced angina pectoris provoked myocardial production of lactate, whereas no significant release of either creatine kinase or creatine kinase subunit-B to coronary sinus and peripheral venous blood could...

  20. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunits in Human Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Bondioni, Sara; Alberti, Luisella; Gilardini, Luisa; Invitti, Cecilia; Corbetta, Sabrina; Zappa, Marco A.; Ferrero, Stefano; Lania, Andrea G.; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—In human adipocytes, the cAMP-dependent pathway mediates signals originating from β-adrenergic activation, thus playing a key role in the regulation of important metabolic processes, i.e., lipolysis and thermogenesis. Cyclic AMP effects are mainly mediated by protein kinase A (PKA), whose R2B regulatory isoform is the most expressed in mouse adipose tissue, where it protects against diet-induced obesity and fatty liver development. The aim of the study was to investigate possible differences in R2B expression, PKA activity, and lipolysis in adipose tissues from obese and nonobese subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The expression of the different PKA regulatory subunits was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue samples from 20 nonobese and 67 obese patients. PKA activity and glycerol release were evaluated in total protein extract and adipocytes isolated from fresh tissue samples, respectively. RESULTS—Expression techniques showed that R2B was the most abundant regulatory protein, both at mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, R2B mRNA levels were significantly lower in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues from obese than nonobese patients and negatively correlated with BMI, waist circumference, insulin levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Moreover, both basal and stimulated PKA activity and glycerol release were significantly lower in visceral adipose tissue from obese patients then nonobese subjects. CONCLUSIONS—Our results first indicate that, in human adipose tissue, there are important BMI-related differences in R2B expression and PKA activation, which might be included among the multiple determinants involved in the different lipolytic response to β-adrenergic activation in obesity. PMID:19095761

  1. Isolation and characterization of recombinant human casein kinase II subunits alpha and beta from bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    cDNA encoding the casein kinase II (CKII) subunits alpha and beta of human origin were expressed in Escherichia coli using expression vector pT7-7. Significant expression was obtained with E. coli BL21(DE3). The CKII subunits accounted for approximately 30% of the bacterial protein; however, most...

  2. Purification of the alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase for structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotiroudis, T.G.; Heilmeyer, L.M.G. Jr.; Crabb, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Structural analysis of the alpha (Mr, 132,000) and beta (Mr, 113,000) subunits of phosphorylase kinase may provide clues to their yet unknown functions however purification remains problematic. Preparative RP-HPLC procedures yield inconveniently large, dilute solutions and concentration steps are required prior to subunit modification and fragmentation. Concentration of the β subunit usually results in significant losses due to insolubility. Using preparative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, they have purified the α, 7 , and β subunits from rabbit muscle phosphorylase kinase in a soluble and concentrated form suitable for structural studies. Phosphorylase kinase labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate in the α and α' subunits and fully 14 C-S-carboxymethylated was fractionated on a 5% acrylamide Laemmli slab gel. The subunit bands were visualized by fluorescence and by SDS precipitation then excised and electroeluted in the presence of SDS using an ELUTRAP device. From 4.5 mg of enzyme applied to a 4.5 mm thick gel about 70% of the α subunit and about 90% of the β subunit were typically recovered in less than 1 ml with overnight elution

  3. Role of the beta subunit of casein kinase-2 on the stability and specificity of the recombinant reconstituted holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human alpha subunit from casein kinase-2 (CK-2) was subjected, either alone or in combination with recombinant human beta subunit, to high temperature, tryptic digestion and urea treatment. In all three cases, it was shown that the presence of the beta subunit could drastically reduce...... the autophosphorylation site. It is suggested that the acidic domain of the beta subunit, encompassing residues 55-71, plays a role in the interactions between the beta and alpha subunits....

  4. Reconstitution of normal and hyperactivated forms of casein kinase-2 by variably mutated beta-subunits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-one mutants of the noncatalytic beta-subunit of human casein kinase-2 have been created, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. They are either modified at the autophosphorylation site (mutants beta delta 1-4 and beta A 5,6) or bear variable deletions in their C...

  5. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameter...

  6. Evolutionary Paths of the cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKA) Catalytic Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søberg, Kristoffer; Jahnsen, Tore; Rognes, Torbjørn; Skålhegg, Bjørn S.; Laerdahl, Jon K.

    2013-01-01

    3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) has served as a prototype for the large family of protein kinases that are crucially important for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. The PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the two genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood and characterized human kinases. Here we have studied the evolution of this gene family in chordates, arthropods, mollusks and other animals employing probabilistic methods and show that Cα and Cβ arose by duplication of an ancestral PKA catalytic subunit in a common ancestor of vertebrates. The two genes have subsequently been duplicated in teleost fishes. The evolution of the PRKACG retroposon in simians was also investigated. Although the degree of sequence conservation in the PKA Cα/Cβ kinase family is exceptionally high, a small set of signature residues defining Cα and Cβ subfamilies were identified. These conserved residues might be important for functions that are unique to the Cα or Cβ clades. This study also provides a good example of a seemingly simple phylogenetic problem which, due to a very high degree of sequence conservation and corresponding weak phylogenetic signals, combined with problematic nonphylogenetic signals, is nontrivial for state-of-the-art probabilistic phylogenetic methods. PMID:23593352

  7. The AMP-activated protein kinase beta 1 subunit modulates erythrocyte integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge, Emma L; McIntyre, Zoe; Clare, Simon; Arends, Mark J; Goulding, David; Isherwood, Christopher; Caetano, Susana S; Reviriego, Carmen Ballesteros; Swiatkowska, Agnieszka; Kane, Leanne; Harcourt, Katherine; Adams, David J; White, Jacqueline K; Speak, Anneliese O

    2017-01-01

    Failure to maintain a normal in vivo erythrocyte half-life results in the development of hemolytic anemia. Half-life is affected by numerous factors, including energy balance, electrolyte gradients, reactive oxygen species, and membrane plasticity. The heterotrimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that acts as a critical regulator of cellular energy balance. Previous roles for the alpha 1 and gamma 1 subunits in the control of erythrocyte survival have been reported. In the work described here, we studied the role of the beta 1 subunit in erythrocytes and observed microcytic anemia with compensatory extramedullary hematopoiesis together with splenomegaly and increased osmotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disruption of the regulatory beta subunit of protein kinase CK2 in mice leads to a cell-autonomous defect and early embryonic lethality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchou, Thierry; Vernet, Muriel; Blond, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    in mice leads to postimplantation lethality. Mutant embryos were reduced in size at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5). They did not exhibit signs of apoptosis but did show reduced cell proliferation. Mutant embryos were resorbed at E7.5. In vitro, CK2beta(-/-) morula development stopped after the blastocyst stage...

  9. Characterization of the alpha and beta subunits of casein kinase 2 by far-UV CD spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Brockel, C; Boldyreff, B

    1992-01-01

    Although Chou-Fasman calculations of the secondary structure of recombinant casein kinase 2 subunits alpha and beta suggest they have a similar overall conformation, circular dichroism (CD) studies show that substantial differences in the conformation of the two subunits exist. In addition......, no changes in the far-UV CD spectrum of the alpha subunit are observed in the presence of casein or the synthetic decapeptide substrate RRRDDDSDDD. Furthermore, the alpha-helical structure of the alpha subunit (but not the beta subunit) can be increased in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of heparin...

  10. Evolution of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA catalytic subunit isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Søberg

    Full Text Available The 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase, or protein kinase A (PKA, pathway is one of the most versatile and best studied signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. The two paralogous PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood model kinases in signal transduction research. In this work, we explore and elucidate the evolution of the alternative 5' exons and the splicing pattern giving rise to the numerous PKA catalytic subunit isoforms. In addition to the universally conserved Cα1/Cβ1 isoforms, we find kinase variants with short N-termini in all main vertebrate classes, including the sperm-specific Cα2 isoform found to be conserved in all mammals. We also describe, for the first time, a PKA Cα isoform with a long N-terminus, paralogous to the PKA Cβ2 N-terminus. An analysis of isoform-specific variation highlights residues and motifs that are likely to be of functional importance.

  11. Differential Roles of the Glycogen-Binding Domains of β Subunits in Regulation of the Snf1 Kinase Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Simmanjeet; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini; McCartney, Rhonda R.; Elbing, Karin; Schmidt, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, including the Snf1 kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are activated under conditions of nutrient stress. AMP-activated protein kinases are heterotrimeric complexes composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits. In this study, the role of the β subunits in the regulation of Snf1 activity was examined. Yeasts express three isoforms of the AMP-activated protein kinase consisting of Snf1 (α), Snf4 (γ), and one of three alternative β subunits, either Sip1, Sip2, or Gal83. The Gal83 isoform of the Snf1 complex is the most abundant and was analyzed in the greatest detail. All three β subunits contain a conserved domain referred to as the glycogen-binding domain. The deletion of this domain from Gal83 results in a deregulation of the Snf1 kinase, as judged by a constitutive activity independent of glucose availability. In contrast, the deletion of this homologous domain from the Sip1 and Sip2 subunits had little effect on Snf1 kinase regulation. Therefore, the different Snf1 kinase isoforms are regulated through distinct mechanisms, which may contribute to their specialized roles in different stress response pathways. In addition, the β subunits are subjected to phosphorylation. The responsible kinases were identified as being Snf1 and casein kinase II. The significance of the phosphorylation is unclear since the deletion of the region containing the phosphorylation sites in Gal83 had little effect on the regulation of Snf1 in response to glucose limitation. PMID:19897735

  12. Differential roles of the glycogen-binding domains of beta subunits in regulation of the Snf1 kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Simmanjeet; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini; McCartney, Rhonda R; Elbing, Karin; Schmidt, Martin C

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, including the Snf1 kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are activated under conditions of nutrient stress. AMP-activated protein kinases are heterotrimeric complexes composed of a catalytic alpha subunit and regulatory beta and gamma subunits. In this study, the role of the beta subunits in the regulation of Snf1 activity was examined. Yeasts express three isoforms of the AMP-activated protein kinase consisting of Snf1 (alpha), Snf4 (gamma), and one of three alternative beta subunits, either Sip1, Sip2, or Gal83. The Gal83 isoform of the Snf1 complex is the most abundant and was analyzed in the greatest detail. All three beta subunits contain a conserved domain referred to as the glycogen-binding domain. The deletion of this domain from Gal83 results in a deregulation of the Snf1 kinase, as judged by a constitutive activity independent of glucose availability. In contrast, the deletion of this homologous domain from the Sip1 and Sip2 subunits had little effect on Snf1 kinase regulation. Therefore, the different Snf1 kinase isoforms are regulated through distinct mechanisms, which may contribute to their specialized roles in different stress response pathways. In addition, the beta subunits are subjected to phosphorylation. The responsible kinases were identified as being Snf1 and casein kinase II. The significance of the phosphorylation is unclear since the deletion of the region containing the phosphorylation sites in Gal83 had little effect on the regulation of Snf1 in response to glucose limitation.

  13. Crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays at 2.1 A resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    CK2alpha is the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2, an acidophilic and constitutively active eukaryotic Ser/Thr kinase involved in cell proliferation. A crystal structure, at 2.1 A resolution, of recombinant maize CK2alpha (rmCK2alpha) in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, shows the enzyme in an ...

  14. Depletion of Mediator Kinase Module Subunits Represses Superenhancer-Associated Genes in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Domènech-Moreno, Eva; Niemelä, Elina H; Mäkelä, Tomi P

    2018-06-01

    In cancer, oncogene activation is partly mediated by acquired superenhancers, which therefore represent potential targets for inhibition. Superenhancers are enriched for BRD4 and Mediator, and both BRD4 and the Mediator MED12 subunit are disproportionally required for expression of superenhancer-associated genes in stem cells. Here we show that depletion of Mediator kinase module subunit MED12 or MED13 together with MED13L can be used to reduce expression of cancer-acquired superenhancer genes, such as the MYC gene, in colon cancer cells, with a concomitant decrease in proliferation. Whereas depletion of MED12 or MED13/MED13L caused a disproportional decrease of superenhancer gene expression, this was not seen with depletion of the kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK8) and CDK19. MED12-MED13/MED13L-dependent superenhancer genes were coregulated by β-catenin, which has previously been shown to associate with MED12. Importantly, β-catenin depletion caused reduced binding of MED12 at the MYC superenhancer. The effect of MED12 or MED13/MED13L depletion on cancer-acquired superenhancer gene expression was more specific than and partially distinct from that of BRD4 depletion, with the most efficient inhibition seen with combined targeting. These results identify a requirement of MED12 and MED13/MED13L for expression of acquired superenhancer genes in colon cancer, implicating these Mediator subunits as potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer, alone or together with BRD4. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. PRKACA: the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and adrenocortical tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel Sophie Berthon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic-AMP (cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA is the main effector of cAMP signaling in all tissues. Inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A gene, coding for the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, are responsible for Carney complex and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD. PRKAR1A inactivation and PKA dysregulation have been implicated in various types of adrenocortical pathologies associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (AICS from PPNAD to adrenocortical adenomas and cancer, and other forms of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAH. More recently, mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit C alpha (Cα, were also identified in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PRKACA copy number gain was found in the germline of several patients with cortisol-producing BAH, whereas the somatic Leu206Arg (c.617A>C recurrent PRKACA mutation was found in as many as half of all adrenocortical adenomas associated with AICS. In vitro analysis demonstrated that this mutation led to constitutive Cα activity, unregulated by its main partners, the PKA regulatory subunits. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the involvement of PRKACA in adrenocortical tumorigenesis, and our understanding of PKA’s role in adrenocortical lesions. We also discuss potential therapeutic advances that can be made through targeting of PRKACA and the PKA pathway.

  16. Stimulation of casein kinase II by epidermal growth factor: Relationship between the physiological activity of the kinase and the phosphorylation state of its beta subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, P.; Osheroff, N.; Glover, C.V.C.

    1990-01-01

    To determine relationships between the hormonal activation of casein kinase II and its phosphorylation state, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated and EGF-naive human A-431 carcinoma cells were cultured in the presence of [ 32 P]orthophosphate. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that casein kinase II in the cytosol of EGF-treated cells contained approximately 3-fold more incorporated [ 32 P]phosphate than did its counterpart in untreated cells. Levels of kinase phosphorylation paralleled levels of kinase activity over a wide range of EGF concentrations as well as over a time course of hormone action. Approximately 97% of the incorporated [ 32 P]phosphate was found in the β subunit of casein kinase II. Both activated and hormone-naive kinase contained radioactive phosphoserine and phosphothreonine but no phosphotyronsine. On the basis of proteolytic mapping experiments, EGF treatment of A-431 cells led to an increase in the average [ 32 P]phosphate content (i.e., hyperphosphorylation) of casein kinase II β subunit peptides which were modified prior to hormone treatment. Finally, the effect of alkaline phosphatase on the reaction kinetics of activated casein kinase II indicated that hormonal stimulation of the kinase resulted from the increase in its phosphorylation state

  17. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both Cα and Cβ are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism

  18. Isolation and characterization of human cDNA clones encoding the α and the α' subunits of casein kinase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozeman, F.J.; Litchfield, D.W.; Piening, C.; Takio, Koji; Walsh, K.A.; Krebs, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    Casein kinase II is a widely distributed protein serine/threonine kinase. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer, containing two α or α' subunits (or one of each) and two β subunits. Complementary DNA clones encoding the subunits of casein kinase II were isolated from a human T-cell λgt 10 library using cDNA clones isolated from Drosophila melanogasten. One of the human cDNA clones (hT4.1) was 2.2 kb long, including a coding region of 1176 bp preceded by 156 bp (5' untranslated region) and followed by 871 bp (3' untranslated region). The hT4.1 close was nearly identical in size and sequence with a cDNA clone from HepG2 human hepatoma cultured cells. Another of the human T-cell cDNA clones (hT9.1) was 1.8 kb long, containing a coding region of 1053 bp preceded by 171 by (5' untranslated region) and followed by 550 bp (3' untranslated region). Amino acid sequences deduced from these two cDNA clones were about 85% identical. Most of the difference between the two encoded polypeptides was in the carboxy-terminal region, but heterogeneity was distributed throughout the molecules. Partial amino acid sequence was determined in a mixture of α and α' subunits from bovine lung casein kinase II. The bovine sequences aligned with the 2 human cDNA-encoded polypeptides with only 2 discrepancies out of 535 amino acid positions. This confirmed that the two human T-cell cDNA clones encoded the α and α' subunits of casein kinase II. These studies show that there are two distinct catalytic subunits for casein II (α and α') and that the sequence of these subunits is largely conserved between the bovine and the human

  19. Interaction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase with PATZ1 (ZNF278)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Ravatn, Roald; Kudoh, Kazuya; Alabanza, Leah; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2010-01-01

    The effects of cAMP in cell are predominantly mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is composed of two genetically distinct subunits, catalytic (C) and regulatory (R), forming a tetrameric holoenzyme R 2 C 2 . The only known function for the R subunit is that of inhibiting the activity of the C subunit kinase. It has been shown that overexpression of RIα, but not the C subunit kinase, is associated with neoplastic transformation. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that mutation in the RIα, but not the C subunit is associated with increased resistance to the DNA-damaging anticancer drug cisplatin, thus suggesting that the RIα subunit of PKA may have functions independent of the kinase. We show here that the RIα subunit interacts with a BTB/POZ domain zinc-finger transcription factor, PATZ1 (ZNF278), and co-expression with RIα results in its sequestration in the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic/nuclear translocation is inducible by cAMP. C-terminus deletion abolishes PATZ1 interaction with RIα and results in its localization in the nucleus. PATZ1 transactivates the cMyc promoter and the presence of cAMP and co-expression with RIα modulates its transactivation. Moreover, PATZ1 is aberrantly expressed in cancer. Taken together, our results showed a potentially novel mechanism of cAMP signaling mediated through the interaction of RIα with PATZ1 that is independent of the kinase activity of PKA, and the aberrant expression of PATZ1 in cancer point to its role in cell growth regulation.

  20. Interaction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase with PATZ1 (ZNF278)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Weng-Lang [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States); Ravatn, Roald [Department of Medicine, University of Toledo, College of Medicine, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Kudoh, Kazuya [Department of Medicine, University of Toledo, College of Medicine, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan); Alabanza, Leah [Department of Medicine, University of Toledo, College of Medicine, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Chin, Khew-Voon, E-mail: khew-voon.chin@utoledo.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Toledo, College of Medicine, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    The effects of cAMP in cell are predominantly mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is composed of two genetically distinct subunits, catalytic (C) and regulatory (R), forming a tetrameric holoenzyme R{sub 2}C{sub 2}. The only known function for the R subunit is that of inhibiting the activity of the C subunit kinase. It has been shown that overexpression of RI{alpha}, but not the C subunit kinase, is associated with neoplastic transformation. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that mutation in the RI{alpha}, but not the C subunit is associated with increased resistance to the DNA-damaging anticancer drug cisplatin, thus suggesting that the RI{alpha} subunit of PKA may have functions independent of the kinase. We show here that the RI{alpha} subunit interacts with a BTB/POZ domain zinc-finger transcription factor, PATZ1 (ZNF278), and co-expression with RI{alpha} results in its sequestration in the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic/nuclear translocation is inducible by cAMP. C-terminus deletion abolishes PATZ1 interaction with RI{alpha} and results in its localization in the nucleus. PATZ1 transactivates the cMyc promoter and the presence of cAMP and co-expression with RI{alpha} modulates its transactivation. Moreover, PATZ1 is aberrantly expressed in cancer. Taken together, our results showed a potentially novel mechanism of cAMP signaling mediated through the interaction of RI{alpha} with PATZ1 that is independent of the kinase activity of PKA, and the aberrant expression of PATZ1 in cancer point to its role in cell growth regulation.

  1. The catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 structurally deviates from its maize homologue in complex with the nucleotide competitive inhibitor emodin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Klopffleisch, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (former name: casein kinase 2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha) attached to a dimer of noncatalytic subunits. Together with the cyclin-dependent kinases and the mitogen-activated protein kinases, CK2alpha belongs to the CMGC family of...

  2. Ser2 is the autophosphorylation site in the beta subunit from bicistronically expressed human casein kinase-2 and from native rat liver casein kinase-2 beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; James, P; Staudenmann, W

    1993-01-01

    Human casein kinase-2 (CK-2) subunits alpha and beta were bicistronically expressed in bacteria. The recombinant holoenzyme shared all investigated properties with the native CK-2 from mammalian sources (rat liver, Krebs II mouse ascites tumour cells). Contrary to recombinant human CK-2 produced...

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the protein kinase a subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentative growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galello, Fiorella; Pautasso, Constanza; Reca, Sol; Cañonero, Luciana; Portela, Paula; Moreno, Silvia; Rossi, Silvia

    2017-12-01

    Yeast cells can adapt their growth in response to the nutritional environment. Glucose is the favourite carbon source of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which prefers a fermentative metabolism despite the presence of oxygen. When glucose is consumed, the cell switches to the aerobic metabolism of ethanol, during the so-called diauxic shift. The difference between fermentative and aerobic growth is in part mediated by a regulatory mechanism called glucose repression. During glucose derepression a profound gene transcriptional reprogramming occurs and genes involved in the utilization of alternative carbon sources are expressed. Protein kinase A (PKA) controls different physiological responses following the increment of cAMP as a consequence of a particular stimulus. cAMP-PKA is one of the major pathways involved in the transduction of glucose signalling. In this work the regulation of the promoters of the PKA subunits during respiratory and fermentative metabolism are studied. It is demonstrated that all these promoters are upregulated in the presence of glycerol as carbon source through the Snf1/Cat8 pathway. However, in the presence of glucose as carbon source, the regulation of each PKA promoter subunits is different and only TPK1 is repressed by the complex Hxk2/Mig1 in the presence of active Snf1. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    25 dual-specificity phosphatase family members. In somatic cells, Wee1 is downregulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitin-mediated degradation to ensure rapid activation of CDK1 at the beginning of M phase. Here, we show that downregulation of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 by RNA...

  5. SH2 domains of the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulate binding to growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlade, C J; Ellis, C; Reedijk, M; Anderson, D; Mbamalu, G; Reith, A D; Panayotou, G; End, P; Bernstein, A; Kazlauskas, A

    1992-01-01

    The binding of cytoplasmic signaling proteins such as phospholipase C-gamma 1 and Ras GTPase-activating protein to autophosphorylated growth factor receptors is directed by their noncatalytic Src homology region 2 (SH2) domains. The p85 alpha regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, which associates with several receptor protein-tyrosine kinases, also contains two SH2 domains. Both p85 alpha SH2 domains, when expressed individually as fusion proteins in bacteria, bound stably to the activated beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Complex formation required PDGF stimulation and was dependent on receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The bacterial p85 alpha SH2 domains recognized activated beta PDGF receptor which had been immobilized on a filter, indicating that SH2 domains contact autophosphorylated receptors directly. Several receptor tyrosine kinases within the PDGF receptor subfamily, including the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor and the Steel factor receptor (Kit), also associate with PI 3-kinase in vivo. Bacterially expressed SH2 domains derived from the p85 alpha subunit of PI 3-kinase bound in vitro to the activated colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor and to Kit. We infer that the SH2 domains of p85 alpha bind to high-affinity sites on these receptors, whose creation is dependent on receptor autophosphorylation. The SH2 domains of p85 are therefore primarily responsible for the binding of PI 3-kinase to activated growth factor receptors. Images PMID:1372092

  6. Dithiothreitol activation of the insulin receptor/kinase does not involve subunit dissociation of the native α2β2 insulin receptor subunit complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, L.J.; Wilden, P.A.; Pessin, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The subunit composition of the dithiothreitol- (DTT) activated insulin receptor/kinase was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography under denaturing or nondenaturing conditions. Pretreatment of 32 P-labeled insulin receptors with 50 mM DTT followed by gel filtration chromatography in 0.1% SDS demonstrated the dissociation of the α 2 β 2 insulin receptor complex (M/sub r/ 400,000) into the monomeric 95,000 β subunit. In contrast, pretreatment of the insulin receptors with 1-50 mM DTT followed by gel filtration chromatography in 0.1% Triton X-100 resulted in no apparent alteration in mobility compared to the untreated insulin receptors. Resolution of this complex by nonreducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography demonstrated the existence of the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric complex with essentially no αβ heterodimeric or free monomeric β subunit species present. This suggests that the insulin receptor can reoxidize into the M/sub r/ 400,000 complex after the removal of DTT by gel filtration chromatography. To prevent reoxidation, the insulin receptors were pretreated with 50 mM DTT. Under the conditions the insulin receptors migrated as the M/sub r/ 400,000 α 2 β 2 complex. These results demonstrate that treatment of the insulin receptors with high concentrations of DTT, followed by removal of DTT by gel filtration, results in reoxidation of the reduced α 2 β 2 insulin receptor complex. Further, these results document that although the DTT stimulation of the insulin receptor/kinase does involve reduction of the insulin receptor subunits, it does not result in dissociation of the native α 2 β 2 insulin receptor subunit complex

  7. Characterization of the regulatory subunit from brain cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Tryptic peptides derived from the regulatory subunits of brain and heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase II were mapped by reverse phase HPLC. At 280 nm, 15 unique peptides were found only in the heart RII digest, while 5 other peptides were obtained only from brain RII. At 210 nm, 13 brain-RII specific and 15 heart-RII specific tryptic peptides were identified and resolved. Two-dimensional mapping analyses revealed that several 37 P-labeled tryptic fragments derived from the autophosphorylation and the photoaffinity labeled cAMP-binding sites of brain RII were separate and distinct from the 32 P-peptides isolated from similarly treated heart RII. The tryptic phosphopeptide containing the autophosphorylation site in brain RII was purified. The sequence and phosphorylation site is: Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Val-Cys-Ala-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Asn-Pro-Asp-Glu-Glu-Glu-Asp-Asp-Ala-Glu. Astrocytes and neurons exhibit high levels of the brain RII enzyme, while oligodendrocytes contain the heart RII enzyme. Monoclonal antibodies to bovine cerebral cortex RII were made and characterized. The antibodies elucidated a subtle difference between membrane-associated and cytosolic RII from cerebral cortex

  8. Interactions of polyomavirus middle T with the SH2 domains of the pp85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoakim, M; Hou, W; Liu, Y; Carpenter, C L; Kapeller, R; Schaffhausen, B S

    1992-01-01

    The binding of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase to the polyomavirus middle T antigen is facilitated by tyrosine phosphorylation of middle T on residue 315. The pp85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase contains two SH2 domains, one in the middle of the molecule and one at the C terminus. When assayed by blotting with phosphorylated middle T, the more N-terminal SH2 domain is responsible for binding to middle T. When assayed in solution with glutathione S transferase fusions, both SH2s are ca...

  9. Effect of microinjections of subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase on development, proliferation, and RNA synthesis in early embryos of the loach Misgurnus fossilis L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glukhov, A.I.; Benyumov, A.O.; Nesterova, M.V.; Severin, E.S.; Gazaryan, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the catalytic and regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II on development, proliferation, and RNA synthesis was studied in loach embryos. It was found that injection of the catalytic subunit in a physiological concentration leads to a disturbance in the course of development and inhibits proliferation and RNA synthesis in the embryos. An increase in the concentration of this protein above the physiological level leads to death of the embryos in the first hours of development. Injection of the regulatory subunit stimulated the incorporation of labeled uridine into the acid-insoluble fraction of the embryos, beginning with the gastrula stage. The cell nuclei of loach embryos injected with subunits of protein kinase type II were transplanted into activated loach egg cells: subunits of protein kinase type I had no effect on the ability of nuclei of undetermined loach embryo cells to provide de novo development and their effect was reversible

  10. β-subunit myristoylation functions as an energy sensor by modulating the dynamics of AMP-activated Protein Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nada; Ling, Naomi; Krishnamurthy, Srinath; Oakhill, Jonathan S; Scott, John W; Stapleton, David I; Kemp, Bruce E; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan; Gooley, Paul R

    2016-12-21

    The heterotrimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), consisting of α, β and γ subunits, is a stress-sensing enzyme that is activated by phosphorylation of its activation loop in response to increases in cellular AMP. N-terminal myristoylation of the β-subunit has been shown to suppress Thr172 phosphorylation, keeping AMPK in an inactive state. Here we use amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of the mammalian myristoylated and non-myristoylated inactivated AMPK (D139A) in the presence and absence of nucleotides. HDX MS data suggests that the myristoyl group binds near the first helix of the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain similar to other kinases. Our data, however, also shows that ATP.Mg 2+ results in a global stabilization of myristoylated, but not non-myristoylated AMPK, and most notably for peptides of the activation loop of the α-kinase domain, the autoinhibitory sequence (AIS) and the βCBM. AMP does not have that effect and HDX measurements for myristoylated and non-myristoylated AMPK in the presence of AMP are similar. These differences in dynamics may account for a reduced basal rate of phosphorylation of Thr172 in myristoylated AMPK in skeletal muscle where endogenous ATP concentrations are very high.

  11. Organization and alternative splicing of the Caenorhabditis elegans cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic-subunit gene (kin-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabish, M; Clegg, R A; Rees, H H; Fisher, M J

    1999-04-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A, PK-A) is multifunctional in nature, with key roles in the control of diverse aspects of eukaryotic cellular activity. In the case of the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, a gene encoding the PK-A catalytic subunit has been identified and two isoforms of this subunit, arising from a C-terminal alternative-splicing event, have been characterized [Gross, Bagchi, Lu and Rubin (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 6896-6907]. Here we report the occurrence of N-terminal alternative-splicing events that, in addition to generating a multiplicity of non-myristoylatable isoforms, also generate the myristoylated variant(s) of the catalytic subunit that we have recently characterized [Aspbury, Fisher, Rees and Clegg (1997) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 238, 523-527]. The gene spans more than 36 kb and is divided into a total of 13 exons. Each of the mature transcripts contains only 7 exons. In addition to the already characterized exon 1, the 5'-untranslated region and first intron actually contain 5 other exons, any one of which may be alternatively spliced on to exon 2 at the 5' end of the pre-mRNA. This N-terminal alternative splicing occurs in combination with either of the already characterized C-terminal alternative exons. Thus, C. elegans expresses at least 12 different isoforms of the catalytic subunit of PK-A. The significance of this unprecedented structural diversity in the family of PK-A catalytic subunits is discussed.

  12. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase subunits in skeletal muscle mammalian target of rapamycin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Long, Yun Chau

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy-sensing protein in skeletal muscle. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mediates translation initiation and protein synthesis through ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). AMPK...... activation reduces muscle protein synthesis by down-regulating mTOR signaling, whereas insulin mediates mTOR signaling via Akt activation. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated inhibitory effects on mTOR signaling depend on catalytic alpha2 and regulatory gamma3 subunits. Extensor digitorum longus muscle from...... (Thr37/46) (P mTOR targets, suggesting mTOR signaling is blocked by prior AMPK activation. The AICAR-induced inhibition was partly rescued...

  13. Phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit RIα by protein kinase G (PKG) primes PKA for catalytic activity in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haushalter, Kristofer J; Casteel, Darren E; Raffeiner, Andrea; Stefan, Eduard; Patel, Hemal H; Taylor, Susan S

    2018-03-23

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) is a pivotal signaling protein in eukaryotic cells. PKAc has two well-characterized regulatory subunit proteins, RI and RII (each having α and β isoforms), which keep the PKAc catalytic subunit in a catalytically inactive state until activation by cAMP. Previous reports showed that the RIα regulatory subunit is phosphorylated by cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) in vitro , whereupon phosphorylated RIα no longer inhibits PKAc at normal (1:1) stoichiometric ratios. However, the significance of this phosphorylation as a mechanism for activating type I PKA holoenzymes has not been fully explored, especially in cellular systems. In this study, we further examined the potential of RIα phosphorylation to regulate physiologically relevant "desensitization" of PKAc activity. First, the serine 101 site of RIα was validated as a target of PKGIα phosphorylation both in vitro and in cells. Analysis of a phosphomimetic substitution in RIα (S101E) showed that modification of this site increases PKAc activity in vitro and in cells, even without cAMP stimulation. Numerous techniques were used to show that although Ser 101 variants of RIα can bind PKAc, the modified linker region of the S101E mutant has a significantly reduced affinity for the PKAc active site. These findings suggest that RIα phosphorylation may be a novel mechanism to circumvent the requirement of cAMP stimulus to activate type I PKA in cells. We have thus proposed a model to explain how PKG phosphorylation of RIα creates a "sensitized intermediate" state that is in effect primed to trigger PKAc activity.

  14. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  15. Identification of aspartate-184 as an essential residue in the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, J.A.; Taylor, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    The hydrophobic carbodiimide dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) was previously shown to be an irreversible inhibitor of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and MgATP protected against inactivation. This inhibition by DCCD indicated that an essential carboxyl group was present at the active site of the enzyme even though identification of that carboxyl group was not possible. This presumably was because a nucleophile on the protein cross-linked to the electrophilic intermediate formed when the carbodiimide reacted with the carboxyl group. To circumvent this problem, the catalytic subunit first was treated with acetic anhydride to block accessible lysine residues, thus preventing intramolecular cross-linking. The DCCD reaction then was carried out in the presence of [ 14 C]glycine ethyl ester in order to trap any electrophilic intermediates that were generated by DCCD. The modified protein was treated with trypsin, and the resulting peptides were separated by HPLC. Two major radioactive peptides were isolated as well as one minor peptide. MgATP protected all three peptides from covalent modification. The two major peaks contained the same modified carboxyl group, which corresponded to Asp-184. The minor peak contained a modified glutamic acid, Glu-91. Both of these acidic residues are conserved in all protein kinases, which is consistent with their playing essential roles. The positions of Asp-184 and Glu-91 have been correlated with the overall domain structure of the molecule. Asp-184 may participate as a general base catalyst at the active site. A third carboxyl group, Glu-230, also was identified

  16. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Isoforms Regulate Growth and Differentiation in Mucor circinelloides: Essential Role of PKAR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, J.; McCormack, B.; Navarro, E.; Moreno, S.; Garre, V.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in the dimorphic fungus Mucor circinelloides. PKA holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (C) and two regulatory (R) subunits. In M. circinelloides, four genes encode the PKAR1, PKAR2, PKAR3, and PKAR4 isoforms of R subunits. We have constructed null mutants and demonstrate that each isoform has a different role in growth and differentiation. The most striking finding is that pkaR4 is an essential gene, because only heterokaryons were obtained in knockout experiments. Heterokaryons with low levels of wild-type nuclei showed an impediment in the emission of the germ tube, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in germ tube emergence. The remaining null strains showed different alterations in germ tube emergence, sporulation, and volume of the mother cell. The pkaR2 null mutant showed an accelerated germ tube emission and was the only mutant that germinated under anaerobic conditions when glycine was used as a nitrogen source, suggesting that pkaR2 participates in germ tube emergence by repressing it. From the measurement of the mRNA and protein levels of each isoform in the wild-type and knockout strains, it can be concluded that the expression of each subunit has its own mechanism of differential regulation. The PKAR1 and PKAR2 isoforms are posttranslationally modified by ubiquitylation, suggesting another regulation point in the specificity of the signal transduction. The results indicate that each R isoform has a different role in M. circinelloides physiology, controlling the dimorphism and contributing to the specificity of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway. PMID:22635921

  17. The autophosphorylation and p34cdc2 phosphorylation sites of casein kinase-2 beta-subunit are not essential for reconstituting the fully-active heterotetrameric holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    Two mutants of human casein kinase-2 beta-subunit with short deletions at either their amino (delta 1-4) or carboxy (delta 209-215) terminal side have been created that have lost the capability to undergo autophosphorylation and p34cdc2 mediated phosphorylation, respectively. Both mutants give rise...

  18. Efficient autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the beta-subunit by casein kinase-2 require the integrity of an acidic cluster 50 residues downstream from the phosphoacceptor site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1994-01-01

    Various beta-mutants were investigated either as subunits or as substrates for casein kinase 2 (CK-2), in the absence of presence of polylysine. A total of 21 beta-mutants were characterized for their susceptibility to autophosphorylation, by combining them in equimolar amounts with the recombina...

  19. Interactions of polyomavirus middle T with the SH2 domains of the pp85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoakim, M; Hou, W; Liu, Y; Carpenter, C L; Kapeller, R; Schaffhausen, B S

    1992-01-01

    The binding of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase to the polyomavirus middle T antigen is facilitated by tyrosine phosphorylation of middle T on residue 315. The pp85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase contains two SH2 domains, one in the middle of the molecule and one at the C terminus. When assayed by blotting with phosphorylated middle T, the more N-terminal SH2 domain is responsible for binding to middle T. When assayed in solution with glutathione S transferase fusions, both SH2s are capable of binding phosphorylated middle T. While both SH2 fusions can compete with intact pp85 for binding to middle T, the C-terminal SH2 is the more efficient of the two. Interaction between pp85 or its SH2 domains and middle T can be blocked by a synthetic peptide comprising the tyrosine phosphorylation sequence around middle T residue 315. Despite the fact that middle T can interact with both SH2s, these domains are not equivalent. Only the C-terminal SH2-middle T interaction was blocked by anti-SH2 antibody; the two SH2 fusions also interact with different cellular proteins. Images PMID:1380095

  20. Identification of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel target of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Ito, Takumi; Karasawa, Satoki; Enomoto, Teruya; Nashimoto, Akihiro; Hase, Yasuyoshi; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER) and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80), is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM), high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100-300 μM). The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR)-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient). Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK.

  1. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polekhina, Galina, E-mail: gpolekhina@svi.edu.au; Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha [St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia); O’Donnell, Paul [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W. [St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia)

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  2. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polekhina, Galina; Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein

  3. Functional intersection of ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit in coding end joining during V(D)J recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baeck-Seung; Gapud, Eric J; Zhang, Shichuan

    2013-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is initiated by the RAG endonuclease, which introduces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the border between two recombining gene segments, generating two hairpin-sealed coding ends and two blunt signal ends. ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) ar......V(D)J recombination is initiated by the RAG endonuclease, which introduces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the border between two recombining gene segments, generating two hairpin-sealed coding ends and two blunt signal ends. ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA......-PKcs) are serine-threonine kinases that orchestrate the cellular responses to DNA DSBs. During V(D)J recombination, ATM and DNA-PKcs have unique functions in the repair of coding DNA ends. ATM deficiency leads to instability of postcleavage complexes and the loss of coding ends from these complexes. DNA...... when ATM is present and its kinase activity is intact. The ability of ATM to compensate for DNA-PKcs kinase activity depends on the integrity of three threonines in DNA-PKcs that are phosphorylation targets of ATM, suggesting that ATM can modulate DNA-PKcs activity through direct phosphorylation of DNA...

  4. Small-angle scattering studies show distinct conformations of calmodulin in its complexes with two peptides based on the regulatory domain of the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trewhella, J.; Blumenthal, D.K.; Rokop, S.E.; Seeger, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to study the solution structures of calmodulin complexed with synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 342-366 and 301-326, designated PhK5 and PhK13, respectively, in the regulatory domain of the catalytic subunit of skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase. The scattering data show that binding of PhK5 to calmodulin induces a dramatic contraction of calmodulin, similar to that previously observed when calmodulin is complexed with the calmodulin-binding domain peptide from rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. In contrast, calmodulin remains extended upon binding PhK13. In the presence of both peptides, calmodulin also remains extended. Apparently, the presence of PhK13 inhibits calmodulin from undergoing the PhK5-induced contraction. These data indicate that there is a fundamentally different type of calmodulin-target enzyme interaction in the case of the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase compared with that for myosin light chain kinase

  5. Ethanol activation of protein kinase A regulates GABA-A receptor subunit expression in the cerebral cortex and contributes to ethanol-induced hypnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep eKumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases are implicated in neuronal cell functions such as modulation of ion channel function, trafficking and synaptic excitability. Both protein kinase C (PKC and A (PKA are involved in regulation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A receptors through phosphorylation. However, the role of PKA in regulating GABA-A receptors following acute ethanol exposure is not known. The present study investigated the role of PKA in ethanol effects on GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression in the P2 synaptosomal fraction of the rat cerebral cortex. Additionally, GABA-related behaviors were also examined. Rats were administered ethanol (2.0 – 3.5 g/kg or saline and PKC, PKA and GABA-A receptor α1 subunit levels were measured by Western blot analysis. Ethanol (3.5 g/kg transiently increased GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression and PKA RIIβ subunit expression at similar time points whereas PKA RIIα was increased at later time points. In contrast, PKC isoform expression remained unchanged. Notably, the moderate ethanol dose (2.0g/kg had no effect on GABA-A α1 subunit levels although PKA RIIα and RIIβ were increased at 10 and 60 minutes, when PKC isozymes are also known to be elevated. To determine if PKA activation was responsible for the ethanol-induced elevation of GABA-A α1 subunits, the PKA antagonist H89 was administered to rats prior to ethanol exposure. H89 administration prevented ethanol-induced increases in GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression. Moreover, increasing PKA activity intracerebroventricularly with Sp-cAMP prior to a hypnotic dose of ethanol increased ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex duration. This effect appears to be mediated in part by GABA-A receptors as increasing PKA activity also increased the duration of muscimol-induced loss of righting reflex. Overall these data suggest that PKA mediates ethanol-induced GABA-A receptor expression and contributes to ethanol behavioral effects involving GABA-A receptors.

  6. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. → Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. → Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. → Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1Δ cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1Δ cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1 + or cyr1Δ S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  7. RNA helicase DDX3 is a regulatory subunit of casein kinase 1 in Wnt-beta-catenin signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruciat, C.M.; Dolde, C.; de Groot, R.E.; Ohkawara, B.; Reinhard, C.; Korswagen, H.C.; Niehrs, C.

    2013-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 (CK1) members play key roles in numerous biological processes. They are considered "rogue" kinases, because their enzymatic activity appears unregulated. Contrary to this notion, we have identified the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 as a regulator of the Wnt-beta-catenin network, where

  8. Identification of a new adapter protein that may link the common beta subunit of the receptor for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-3, and IL-5 to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jücker, M; Feldman, R A

    1995-11-17

    Binding of human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) to its receptor induces the rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI 3-kinase). As hGM-CSF receptor (hGMR) does not contain a consensus sequence for binding of PI 3-kinase, hGMR must use a distinct mechanism for its association with and activation of PI 3-kinase. Here, we describe the identification of a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein of 76-85 kDa (p80) that associates with the common beta subunit of hGMR and with the SH2 domains of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase in hGM-CSF-stimulated cells. Src/Yes and Lyn were tightly associated with the p80.PI 3-kinase complex, suggesting that p80 and other phosphotyrosyl proteins present in the complex were phosphorylated by Src family kinases. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p80 was only detected in hGM-CSF or human interleukin-3-stimulated cells, suggesting that activation of p80 might be specific for signaling via the common beta subunit. We postulate that p80 functions as an adapter protein that may participate in linking the hGM-CSF receptor to the PI 3-kinase signaling pathway.

  9. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 μM isoproterenol and 50 μM GTP-γ-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 μM GTP-γ-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of β-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes

  10. Enhancing chemosensitivity to gemcitabine via RNA interference targeting the catalytic subunits of protein kinase CK2 in human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreutzer, Jan N; Ruzzene, Maria; Guerra, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a complex genetic disorder that is characterized by rapid progression, invasiveness, resistance to treatment and high molecular heterogeneity. Various agents have been used in clinical trials showing only modest improvements with respect to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, which continues to be the standard first-line treatment for this disease. However, owing to the overwhelming molecular alterations that have been reported in pancreatic cancer, there is increasing focus on targeting molecular pathways and networks, rather than individual genes or gene-products with a combination of novel chemotherapeutic agents. Cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the individual CK2 subunits. The CK2 protein expression levels were determined and the effect of its down-regulation on chemosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells was investigated. The present study examined the impact on cell death following depletion of the individual protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunits alone or in combination with gemcitabine and the molecular mechanisms by which this effect is achieved. Depletion of the CK2α or -α' subunits in combination with gemcitabine resulted in marked apoptotic and necrotic cell death in PANC-1 cells. We show that the mechanism of cell death is associated with deregulation of distinct survival signaling pathways. Cellular depletion of CK2α leads to phosphorylation and activation of MKK4/JNK while down-regulation of CK2α' exerts major effects on the PI3K/AKT pathway. Results reported here show that the two catalytic subunits of CK2 contribute differently to enhance gemcitabine-induced cell death, the reduced level of CK2α' being the most effective and that simultaneous reduction in the expression of CK2 and other survival factors might be an effective therapeutic strategy for enhancing the sensitivity of human pancreatic cancer towards chemotherapeutic agents

  11. Crystal structure of a C-terminal deletion mutant of human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermakova, Inessa; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2003-01-01

    structure of a C-terminal deletion mutant of human CK2alpha was solved and refined to 2.5A resolution. In the crystal the CK2alpha mutant exists as a monomer in agreement with the organization of the subunits in the CK2 holoenzyme. The refined structure shows the helix alphaC and the activation segment, two...

  12. The effect of polylysine on casein-kinase-2 activity is influenced by both the structure of the protein/peptide substrates and the subunit composition of the enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O

    1992-01-01

    , moreover, is variably accounted for by changes in Vmax and/or Km, depending on the structure of the peptide substrate. Maximum stimulation with all protein/peptide substrates tested requires the presence of the beta subunit, since the recombinant alpha subunit is much less responsive than CK2 holoenzyme......The mechanism by which polybasic peptides stimulate the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK2) has been studied by comparing the effect of polylysine on the phosphorylation of a variety of protein and peptide substrates by the native CK2 holoenzyme and by its recombinant catalytic alpha subunit, either...

  13. Casein kinase 2 down-regulation and activation by polybasic peptides are mediated by acidic residues in the 55-64 region of the beta-subunit. A study with calmodulin as phosphorylatable substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1994-01-01

    to substitute for wild-type beta-subunit as a suppressor of activity toward calmodulin. The only mutations that reduced the ability of the beta-subunit to suppress calmodulin phosphorylation activity, though being compatible with normal reconstitution of CK2 holoenzyme, were those affecting Asp55, Glu57...... are conversely ineffective. The latent "calmodulin kinase" activity of CK2 can also be specifically unmasked by a peptide (alpha[66-86]) reproducing a basic insert of the catalytic subunit. This effect is reversed by equimolar addition of a peptide (beta[55-71]) including the 55-64 acidic stretch of the beta......-subunit. Comparable polylysine stimulation was observed with the holoenzymes reconstituted with either beta wt or the beta mutants capable of assembling with the alpha-subunit, with the notable exception of those bearing Ala substitutions for acidic residues at positions 55, 57, and 59-61. These were nearly...

  14. A network of hydrophobic residues impeding helix alphaC rotation maintains latency of kinase Gcn2, which phosphorylates the alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gárriz, Andrés; Qiu, Hongfang; Dey, Madhusudan; Seo, Eun-Joo; Dever, Thomas E; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2009-03-01

    Kinase Gcn2 is activated by amino acid starvation and downregulates translation initiation by phosphorylating the alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha). The Gcn2 kinase domain (KD) is inert and must be activated by tRNA binding to the adjacent regulatory domain. Previous work indicated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gcn2 latency results from inflexibility of the hinge connecting the N and C lobes and a partially obstructed ATP-binding site in the KD. Here, we provide strong evidence that a network of hydrophobic interactions centered on Leu-856 also promotes latency by constraining helix alphaC rotation in the KD in a manner relieved during amino acid starvation by tRNA binding and autophosphorylation of Thr-882 in the activation loop. Thus, we show that mutationally disrupting the hydrophobic network in various ways constitutively activates eIF2alpha phosphorylation in vivo and bypasses the requirement for a key tRNA binding motif (m2) and Thr-882 in Gcn2. In particular, replacing Leu-856 with any nonhydrophobic residue activates Gcn2, while substitutions with various hydrophobic residues maintain kinase latency. We further provide strong evidence that parallel, back-to-back dimerization of the KD is a step on the Gcn2 activation pathway promoted by tRNA binding and autophosphorylation. Remarkably, mutations that disrupt the L856 hydrophobic network or enhance hinge flexibility eliminate the need for the conserved salt bridge at the parallel dimer interface, implying that KD dimerization facilitates the reorientation of alphaC and remodeling of the active site for enhanced ATP binding and catalysis. We propose that hinge remodeling, parallel dimerization, and reorientation of alphaC are mutually reinforcing conformational transitions stimulated by tRNA binding and secured by the ensuing autophosphorylation of T882 for stable kinase activation.

  15. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 negatively regulates chemokine signaling at a level downstream from G protein subunits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimenez-Sainz, MC; Murga, C; Kavelaars, A; Jurado-Pueyo, M; Krakstad, BF; Heijnen, CJ; Mayor, F; Aragay, AM

    The G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates and desensitizes ligand-activated G protein-coupled-receptors. Here, evidence is shown for a novel role of GRK2 in regulating chemokine-mediated signals. The presence of increased levels of GRK2 in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells

  16. Identification of a common amino acid polymorphism in the p85alpha regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Andersen, C B; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler

    1997-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) may regulate the basal plasma membrane glucose transporter recycling and the organization of the transporter intracellular pool in addition to being an insulin signal for translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. The objectives of the pres...

  17. Heterotrimeric G protein beta1gamma2 subunits change orientation upon complex formation with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) on a model membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton, Andrew P; Yang, Pei; Tesmer, Valerie M; Ding, Bei; Tesmer, John J G; Chen, Zhan

    2011-09-13

    Few experimental techniques can assess the orientation of peripheral membrane proteins in their native environment. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was applied to study the formation of the complex between G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 (GRK2) and heterotrimeric G protein β(1)γ(2) subunits (Gβγ) at a lipid bilayer, without any exogenous labels. The most likely membrane orientation of the GRK2-Gβγ complex differs from that predicted from the known protein crystal structure, and positions the predicted receptor docking site of GRK2 such that it would more optimally interact with GPCRs. Gβγ also appears to change its orientation after binding to GRK2. The developed methodology is widely applicable for the study of other membrane proteins in situ.

  18. Impact of rs361072 in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110beta gene on whole-body glucose metabolism and subunit protein expression in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Poulsen, Pernille; Holmkvist, Johan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is a major effector in insulin signaling. rs361072, located in the promoter of the gene (PIK3CB) for the p110beta subunit, has previously been found to be associated with homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in obese subjects...... infusion. rs361072 did not associate with insulin-stimulated peripheral glucose disposal despite a decreased muscle p85alpha:p110beta protein ratio (P(add) = 0.03) in G allele carriers. No association with HOMA-IR or type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.07, P = 0.5) was identified, and obesity did not interact...

  19. Characterization of protein kinase CK2 protein subunits and p53 in F9 teratocarcinoma cells in the absence and presence of cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küpper, M; Köster, M; Schmidt-Spaniol, I

    1994-01-01

    cell extracts treated with and without cisplatin were analyzed by ion exchange chromatography for protein kinase CK2 alpha/beta subunits and p53 distribution. The following results were obtained: (a) in crude extracts of cisplatin-treated cells, CK2 activity was sometimes reduced by as much as 50%; (b......The effect of cis-diaminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) on the induction of p53 and protein kinase CK2 activity was studied in the mouse teratocarcinoma cell line F9. Treatment of the cells with the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin led to the detection of p53 3 h after addition of the drug. F9...... by immunostaining, we have detected, at a concentration of approximately 200 mM NaCl, a protein of approximately 46 kDa which reacted with the CK2 alpha-specific antibody. This fraction was devoid of CK2 activity; and (d) cisplatin-treated cells exhibited p53 protein, which was mostly eluting ahead but also partly...

  20. Novel somatic mutations in the catalytic subunit of the protein kinase A as a cause of adrenal Cushing's syndrome: a European multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Kisker, Caroline; Calebiro, Davide; Mannelli, Massimo; Canu, Letizia; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Quinkler, Marcus; Rayes, Nada; Tabarin, Antoine; Laure Jullié, Marie; Mantero, Franco; Rubin, Beatrice; Waldmann, Jens; Bartsch, Detlef K; Pasquali, Renato; Lohse, Martin; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Somatic mutations in PRKACA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA), have been recently found in a high proportion of sporadic adenomas associated with Cushing's syndrome. The aim was to analyze the PRKACA mutation in a large cohort of patients with adrenocortical masses. Samples from nine European centers were included (Germany, n = 4; Italy, n = 4; France, n = 1). Samples were drawn from 149 patients with nonsecreting adenomas (n = 32 + 2 peritumoral), subclinical hypercortisolism (n = 36), Cushing's syndrome (n = 64 + 2 peritumoral), androgen-producing tumors (n = 4), adrenocortical carcinomas (n = 5 + 2 peritumoral), and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasias (n = 8). Blood samples were available from patients with nonsecreting adenomas (n = 15), subclinical hypercortisolism (n = 10), and Cushing's syndrome (n = 35). Clinical and hormonal data were collected. DNA amplification by PCR of exons 6 and 7 of the PRKACA gene and direct sequencing were performed. PRKACA heterozygous mutations were found in 22/64 samples of Cushing's syndrome patients (34%). No mutations were found in peritumoral tissue and blood samples or in other tumors examined. The c.617A>C (p.Leu206Arg) occurred in 18/22 patients. Furthermore, two novel mutations were identified: c.600_601insGTG/p.Cys200_Gly201insVal in three patients and c.639C>G+c.638_640insATTATCCTGAGG/p.Ser213Arg+p.Leu212_Lys214insIle-Ile-Leu-Arg) in one. All the mutations involved a region implicated in interaction between PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits. Patients with somatic PRKACA mutations showed higher levels of cortisol after dexamethasone test and a smaller adenoma size, compared with nonmutated subjects. These data confirm and extend previous observations that somatic PRKACA mutations are specific for adrenocortical adenomas causing Cushing's syndrome.

  1. C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor 2 Suppresses AKT Signaling and Invasive Activities of Gastric Cancer Cells by Blocking Expression of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Yin, Jie; Wang, Xuefei; Shao, Miaomiao; Duan, Fangfang; Wu, Weicheng; Peng, Peike; Jin, Jing; Tang, Yue; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Sun, Yihong; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    markers; these tumor-suppressive effects of CLEC2 required SYK. CLEC2 and SYK interacted physically, and SYK maintained the stability of CLEC2 in cells. AGS cells with CLEC2 knockdown had increased levels of phosphorylated AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, increased expression of Snail, reduced levels of E-cadherin, and formed more metastases in mice than AGS cells that expressed CLEC2; these knockdown changes were prevented by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Activation of CLEC2 in AGS cells reduced protein and messenger RNA levels of PI3K subunits p85 and p110; this effect was blocked by SYK inhibitor R406. Levels of CLEC2 and SYK proteins and messenger RNAs correlated in gastric tumor samples. CLEC2 suppresses metastasis of gastric cancer cells injected into mice, and prevents activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta signaling, as well as invasiveness and expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers in gastric cancer cell lines. CLEC2 prevents expression of PI3K subunits, in a SYK-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Isoform-specific interactions between meprin metalloproteases and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A: significance in acute and chronic kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyitegeka, Jean-Marie V.; Bastidas, Adam C.; Newman, Robert H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases are abundantly expressed in the brush-border membranes of kidney proximal tubules. Meprins are implicated in ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced renal injury and diabetic nephropathy. The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway modulates extracellular matrix metabolism in diabetic kidneys. The present study evaluated isoform-specific interactions between the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA C) and meprins. To this end, cytosolic-enriched kidney proteins from meprin αβ double knockout mice, and purified forms of recombinant mouse PKA Cα, Cβ1, and Cβ2, were incubated with activated forms of either homomeric meprin A or meprin B. The cleaved protein products were subjected to SDS-PAGE and analyzed by Coomassie staining and Western blot analysis. While meprin A only cleaved PKA Cβ1, meprin B cleaved all three PKA C isoforms. Analysis of the proteolytic fragments by mass spectrometry revealed that meprin A and B cleave the PKA C isoforms at defined sites, resulting in unique cleavage products. Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics demonstrated that meprin B-mediated cleavage of PKA Cα occurs at a rate consistent with that of other physiologically relevant meprin substrates. Meprin cleavage decreased the kinase activity of PKA Cα, Cβ1, and Cβ2. PKA C levels were higher in diabetic kidneys, with evidence of in vivo fragmentation in wild-type diabetic kidneys. Confocal microscopy showed localization of meprin A in the glomeruli of diabetic kidneys. At 3 h post-IR, PKA C levels in proximal tubules decreased compared with distal tubules, which lack meprins. These data suggest that meprins may impact kidney injury, in part, via modulation of PKA signaling pathways. PMID:25354939

  3. Dual Role for Hsc70 in the Biogenesis and Regulation of the Heme-Regulated Kinase of the α Subunit of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, Sheri; Thulasiraman, Vanitha; Matts, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The heme-regulated kinase of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (HRI) is activated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) in response to a number of environmental conditions, including heme deficiency, heat shock, and oxidative stress. Activation of HRI causes an arrest of initiation of protein synthesis. Recently, we have demonstrated that the heat shock cognate protein Hsc70 negatively modulates the activation of HRI in RRL in response to these environmental conditions. Hsc70 is also known to be a critical component of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery in RRL, which plays an obligatory role for HRI to acquire and maintain a conformation that is competent to activate. Using de novo-synthesized HRI in synchronized pulse-chase translations, we have examined the role of Hsc70 in the regulation of HRI biogenesis and activation. Like Hsp90, Hsc70 interacted with nascent HRI and HRI that was matured to a state which was competent to undergo stimulus-induced activation (mature-competent HRI). Interaction of HRI with Hsc70 was required for the transformation of HRI, as the Hsc70 antagonist clofibric acid inhibited the folding of HRI into a mature-competent conformation. Unlike Hsp90, Hsc70 also interacted with transformed HRI. Clofibric acid disrupted the interaction of Hsc70 with transformed HRI that had been matured and transformed in the absence of the drug. Disruption of Hsc70 interaction with transformed HRI in heme-deficient RRL resulted in its hyperactivation. Furthermore, activation of HRI in response to heat shock or denatured proteins also resulted in a similar blockage of Hsc70 interaction with transformed HRI. These results indicate that Hsc70 is required for the folding and transformation of HRI into an active kinase but is subsequently required to negatively attenuate the activation of transformed HRI. PMID:10454533

  4. DNA requirements for interaction of the C-terminal region of Ku80 with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-09-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Critical to NHEJ is the DNA-dependent interaction of the Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to form the DNA-PK holoenzyme. However, precisely how Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to DSBs ends to enhance its kinase activity has remained enigmatic, with contradictory findings reported in the literature. Here we address the role of the Ku80 C-terminal region (CTR) in the DNA-dependent interaction of Ku70/80 with DNA-PKcs using purified components and defined DNA structures. Our results show that the Ku80 CTR is required for interaction with DNA-PKcs on short segments of blunt ended 25bp dsDNA or 25bp dsDNA with a 15-base poly dA single stranded (ss) DNA extension, but this requirement is less stringent on longer dsDNA molecules (35bp blunt ended dsDNA) or 25bp duplex DNA with either a 15-base poly dT or poly dC ssDNA extension. Moreover, the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex preferentially forms on 25 bp DNA with a poly-pyrimidine ssDNA extension.Our work clarifies the role of the Ku80 CTR and dsDNA ends on the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and provides key information to guide assembly and biology of NHEJ complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. E3 Ligase Subunit Fbxo15 and PINK1 Kinase Regulate Cardiolipin Synthase 1 Stability and Mitochondrial Function in Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill B. Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is linked to mitochondrial injury, resulting in impaired cellular oxygen utilization; however, it is unknown how these events are linked on the molecular level. Cardiolipin, a mitochondrial-specific lipid, is generated by cardiolipin synthase (CLS1. Here, we show that S. aureus activates a ubiquitin E3 ligase component, Fbxo15, that is sufficient to mediate proteasomal degradation of CLS1 in epithelia, resulting in decreased cardiolipin availability and disrupted mitochondrial function. CLS1 is destabilized by the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1, which binds CLS1 to phosphorylate and regulates CLS1 disposal. Like Fbxo15, PINK1 interacts with and regulates levels of CLS1 through a mechanism dependent upon Thr219. S. aureus infection upregulates this Fbxo15-PINK1 pathway to impair mitochondrial integrity, and Pink1 knockout mice are less prone to S. aureus-induced ALI. Thus, ALI-associated disruption of cellular bioenergetics involves bioeffectors that utilize a phosphodegron to elicit ubiquitin-mediated disposal of a key mitochondrial enzyme.

  6. Intranuclear Delivery of a Novel Antibody-Derived Radiosensitizer Targeting the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Hairong [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Institute of Medical Virology, Wuhan University School of Medicine, Wuhan (China); Lee, Robert J. [Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Haura, Eric B. [Thoracic Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics Programs, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Edwards, John G. [Apeliotus Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Dynan, William S. [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Li Shuyi, E-mail: sli@georgiahealth.edu [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Apeliotus Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To inhibit DNA double-strand break repair in tumor cells by delivery of a single-chain antibody variable region fragment (ScFv 18-2) to the cell nucleus. ScFv 18-2 binds to a regulatory region of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), an essential enzyme in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, and inhibits DNA end-joining in a cell-free system and when microinjected into single cells. Development as a radiosensitizer has been limited by the lack of a method for intranuclear delivery to target cells. We investigated a delivery method based on folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. Methods and Materials: A recombinant ScFv 18-2 derivative was conjugated to folate via a scissile disulfide linker. Folate-ScFv 18-2 was characterized for its ability to be internalized by tumor cells and to influence the behavior of ionizing radiation-induced repair foci. Radiosensitization was measured in a clonogenic survival assay. Survival curves were fitted to a linear-quadratic model, and between-group differences were evaluated by an F test. Sensitization ratios were determined based on mean inhibitory dose. Results: Human KB and NCI-H292 lung cancer cells treated with folate-conjugated ScFv 18-2 showed significant radiosensitization (p < 0.001). Sensitization enhancement ratios were 1.92 {+-} 0.42 for KB cells and 1.63 {+-} 0.13 for NCI-H292 cells. Studies suggest that treatment inhibits repair of radiation-induced DSBs, as evidenced by the persistence of {gamma}-H2AX-stained foci and by inhibition of staining with anti-DNA-PKcs phosphoserine 2056. Conclusions: Folate-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for intranuclear delivery of an antibody-derived DNA repair inhibitor.

  7. Functional changes in the properties of the β-adrenoreceptors of pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    The β-adrenoreceptors were solubilized from the plasma membranes of pigeon erythrocytes, treated with N-ethylmaleimide, using deoxycholate. The removal of the deoxycholate leads to incorporation of receptors into phospholipid vesicles and a restoration of their biological activity. After fusion of vesicles containing reconstituted receptors with vesicles containing the N/sub s/-protein and the catalytic component, a restoration of the hormonal activity of the enzyme was observed. If vesicles containing β-adrenoreceptors were incubated before fusion with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the hormonal activity of the preparation obtained was lowered by 45-50%. The decrease in activity occurred on account of an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of isoproterenol and GPP(NH)p, as well as on account of a decrease in the activity in the stationary phase of activation. Phosphorylation of the β-adrenoreceptors leads to a decrease in the content of the ternary isoproterenol-receptor-N/sub s/-protein complex, participating in the activation of adenylate cyclase. Thus, phosphorylation of the receptors leads to disruptions of the mechanism of transmission of the hormonal signal, analogous to those observed in the desensitization of adenylate cyclase

  8. T-Cell-Specific Loss of the PI-3-Kinase p110α Catalytic Subunit Results in Enhanced Cytokine Production and Antitumor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Aragoneses-Fenoll

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K catalytic subunits p110α and p110δ are targets in cancer therapy expressed at high levels in T lymphocytes. The role of p110δ PI3K in normal or pathological immune responses is well established, yet the importance of p110α subunits in T cell-dependent immune responses is not clear. To address this problem, mice with p110α conditionally deleted in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (p110α−/−ΔT were used. p110α−/−ΔT mice show normal development of T cell subsets, but slightly reduced numbers of CD4+ T cells in the spleen. “In vitro,” TCR/CD3 plus CD28 activation of naive CD4+ and CD8+ p110α−/−ΔT T cells showed enhanced effector function, particularly IFN-γ secretion, T-bet induction, and Akt, Erk, or P38 activation. Tfh derived from p110α−/−ΔT cells also have enhanced responses when compared to normal mice, and IL-2 expanded p110α−/−ΔT CD8+ T cells had enhanced levels of LAMP-1 and Granzyme B. By contrast, the expansion of p110α−/−ΔT iTreg cells was diminished. Also, p110α−/−ΔT mice had enhanced anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH IFN-γ, or IL-4 responses and IgG1 and IgG2b anti-KLH antibodies, using CFA or Alum as adjuvant, respectively. When compared to WT mice, p110α−/−ΔT mice inoculated with B16.F10 melanoma showed delayed tumor progression. The percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was higher and the percentage of Treg cells lower in the spleen of tumor-bearing p110α−/−ΔT mice. Also, IFN-γ production in tumor antigen-activated spleen cells was enhanced. Thus, PI3K p110α plays a significant role in antigen activation and differentiation of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes modulating antitumor immunity.

  9. The crystal structure of the complex of Zea mays alpha subunit with a fragment of human beta subunit provides the clue to the architecture of protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistutta, R; Sarno, S; De Moliner, E

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of a complex between the catalytic alpha subunit of Zea mays CK2 and a 23-mer peptide corresponding the C-terminal sequence 181-203 of the human CK2 regulatory beta subunit has been determined at 3.16-A resolution. The complex, composed of two alpha chains and two peptides, ...

  10. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit functions in metastasis and influences survival in advanced-stage laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sha-Sha; Chen, Yong; Shen, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Sun, Peng; Dong, Jun; Guo, Gui-Fang; Chen, Ju-Gao; Xia, Liang-Ping; Hu, Pei-Li; Qiu, Hui-Juan; Liu, Shou-Sheng; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Wang, Wei; Hu, Wei-Han; Cai, Xiu-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is known to function in several types of cancer. In this study, we investigated the expression and clinicopathologic significance of DNA-PKcs in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 208 patients with advanced-stage LSCC treated at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China. We assessed DNA-PKcs and p16INK4a (p16) status using immunohistochemistry. We examined the association between DNA-PKcs expression and clinicopathologic features and survival outcomes. To evaluate the independent prognostic relevance of DNA-PKcs, we used univariate and multivariate Cox regression models. We estimated overall survival (OS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that 163/208 (78.4%) of the LSCC tissue samples exhibited high DNA-PKcs expression. High DNA-PKcs expression was significantly associated with survival outcomes ( P = 0.016) and distant metastasis ( P = 0.02; chi-squared test). High DNA-PKcs expression was associated with a significantly shorter OS and DMFS than low DNA-PKcs expression ( P = 0.029 and 0.033, respectively; log-rank test), and was associated with poor OS in the p16-positive subgroup ( P = 0.047). Multivariate analysis identified DNA-PKcs as an independent prognostic indicator of OS and DMFS in all patients ( P = 0.039 and 0.037, respectively). Conclusions : Our results suggest that patients with LSCC in whom DNA-PKcs expression is elevated have a higher incidence of distant metastasis and a poorer prognosis. DNA-PKcs may represent a marker of tumor progression in patients with p16-positive LSCC.

  11. SH2 Ligand-Like Effects of Second Cytosolic Domain of Na/K-ATPase α1 Subunit on Src Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Moumita; Duan, Qiming; Xie, Zijian

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that the α1 Na/K-ATPase interacts with Src to form a receptor complex. In vitro binding assays indicate an interaction between second cytosolic domain (CD2) of Na/K-ATPase α1 subunit and Src SH2 domain. Since SH2 domain targets Src to specific signaling complexes, we expressed CD2 as a cytosolic protein and studied whether it could act as a Src SH2 ligand in LLC-PK1 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses indicated a direct binding of CD2 to Src, consistent with the in vitro binding data. Functionally, CD2 expression increased basal Src activity, suggesting a Src SH2 ligand-like property of CD2. Consistently, we found that CD2 expression attenuated several signaling pathways where Src plays an important role. For instance, although it increased surface expression of Na/K-ATPase, it decreased ouabain-induced activation of Src and ERK by blocking the formation of Na/K-ATPase/Src complex. Moreover, it also attenuated cell attachment-induced activation of Src/FAK. Consequently, CD2 delayed cell spreading, and inhibited cell proliferation. Furthermore, these effects appear to be Src-specific because CD2 expression had no effect on EGF-induced activation of EGF receptor and ERK. Hence, the new findings indicate the importance of Na/K-ATPase/Src interaction in ouabain-induced signal transduction, and support the proposition that the CD2 peptide may be utilized as a Src SH2 ligand capable of blocking Src-dependent signaling pathways via a different mechanism from a general Src kinase inhibitor.

  12. SH2 Ligand-Like Effects of Second Cytosolic Domain of Na/K-ATPase α1 Subunit on Src Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moumita Banerjee

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have suggested that the α1 Na/K-ATPase interacts with Src to form a receptor complex. In vitro binding assays indicate an interaction between second cytosolic domain (CD2 of Na/K-ATPase α1 subunit and Src SH2 domain. Since SH2 domain targets Src to specific signaling complexes, we expressed CD2 as a cytosolic protein and studied whether it could act as a Src SH2 ligand in LLC-PK1 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses indicated a direct binding of CD2 to Src, consistent with the in vitro binding data. Functionally, CD2 expression increased basal Src activity, suggesting a Src SH2 ligand-like property of CD2. Consistently, we found that CD2 expression attenuated several signaling pathways where Src plays an important role. For instance, although it increased surface expression of Na/K-ATPase, it decreased ouabain-induced activation of Src and ERK by blocking the formation of Na/K-ATPase/Src complex. Moreover, it also attenuated cell attachment-induced activation of Src/FAK. Consequently, CD2 delayed cell spreading, and inhibited cell proliferation. Furthermore, these effects appear to be Src-specific because CD2 expression had no effect on EGF-induced activation of EGF receptor and ERK. Hence, the new findings indicate the importance of Na/K-ATPase/Src interaction in ouabain-induced signal transduction, and support the proposition that the CD2 peptide may be utilized as a Src SH2 ligand capable of blocking Src-dependent signaling pathways via a different mechanism from a general Src kinase inhibitor.

  13. Crystal structure of a polyhistidine-tagged recombinant catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase complexed with the peptide inhibitor PKI(5-24) and adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, N; Cox, S; Shaltiel, S; Taylor, S S; Xuong, N

    1997-04-15

    The crystal structure of the hexahistidine-tagged mouse recombinant catalytic subunit (H6-rC) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK), complexed with a 20-residue peptide inhibitor from the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor PKI(5-24) and adenosine, was determined at 2.2 A resolution. Novel crystallization conditions were required to grow the ternary complex crystals. The structure was refined to a final crystallographic R-factor of 18.2% with good stereochemical parameters. The "active" enzyme adopts a "closed" conformation as found in rC:PKI(5-24) [Knighton et al. (1991a,b) Science 253, 407-414, 414-420] and packs in a similar manner with the peptide providing a major contact surface. This structure clearly defines the subsites of the unique nucleotide binding site found in the protein kinase family. The adenosine occupies a mostly hydrophobic pocket at the base of the cleft between the two lobes and is completely buried. The missing triphosphate moiety of ATP is filled with a water molecule (Wtr 415) which replaces the gamma-phosphate of ATP. The glycine-rich loop between beta1 and beta2 helps to anchor the phosphates while the ribose ring is buried beneath beta-strand 2. Another ordered water molecule (Wtr 375) is pentacoordinated with polar atoms from adenosine, Leu 49 in beta-strand 1, Glu 127 in the linker strand between the two lobes, Tyr 330, and a third water molecule, Wtr 359. The conserved nucleotide fold can be defined as a lid comprised of beta-strand 1, the glycine-rich loop, and beta-strand 2. The adenine ring is buried beneath beta-strand 1 and the linker strand (120-127) that joins the small and large lobes. The C-terminal tail containing Tyr 330, a segment that lies outside the conserved core, covers this fold and anchors it in a closed conformation. The main-chain atoms of the flexible glycine-rich loop (residues 50-55) in the ATP binding domain have a mean B-factor of 41.4 A2. This loop is quite mobile, in striking contrast to the other

  14. Differentially regulated protein kinase A (PKA) activity in adipose tissue and liver is associated with resistance to diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance in mice that lack PKA regulatory subunit type IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Edra; Nesterova, Maria; Sinaii, Ninet; Szarek, Eva; Chanturiya, Tatyana; Mastroyannis, Spyridon A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-09-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling system is widely expressed and has a central role in regulating cellular metabolism in all organ systems affected by obesity. PKA has four regulatory (RIα, RIIα, RIβ, RIIβ) and four catalytic (Cα, Cβ, Cγ, Prkx) subunit isoforms that have tissue-specific expression profiles. In mice, knockout (KO) of RIIβ, the primary PKA regulatory subunit in adipose tissue or knockout of the catalytic subunit Cβ resulted in a lean phenotype that resists diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic complications. Here we report that the disruption of the ubiquitously expressed PKA RIIα subunit in mice (RIIαKO) confers resistance to diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis. After 2-week high-fat diet exposure, RIIαKO mice weighed less than wild-type littermates. Over time this effect was more pronounced in female mice that were also leaner than their wild-type counterparts, regardless of the diet. Decreased intake of a high-fat diet contributed to the attenuated weight gain in RIIαKO mice. Additionally, RIIα deficiency caused differential regulation of PKA in key metabolic organs: cAMP-stimulated PKA activity was decreased in liver and increased in gonadal adipose tissue. We conclude that RIIα represents a potential target for therapeutic interventions in obesity, glucose intolerance, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  15. Basic residues in the 74-83 and 191-198 segments of protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit are implicated in negative but not in positive regulation by the beta-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarno, S; Vaglio, P; Marin, O

    1997-01-01

    by the beta-subunit many fold more than that of alpha wild type, while extrastimulation by beta mutant D55L56E57A, observable with alpha wild type, is abolished with these mutants. These data support the conclusion that down regulation by the acidic residues clustered in the N-terminal moiety of beta...... is mediated by basic residues in the 74-83 and in the 191-198 sequences of the alpha-subunit. These are also implicated in substrate recognition consistent with the concept that the N-terminal acidic region of the beta subunit operates as a pseudosubstrate. In contrast, another CK2alpha mutant, V66A, is more...

  16. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly referred to as casein kinase II) is an evolutionary conserved, ubiquitous protein kinase. There are two paralog catalytic subunits, i.e. alpha (A1) and alpha' (A2). The alpha and alpha' subunits are linked to two beta subunits to produce a heterotetrameric structure...

  17. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeted against the type IIβ regulatory subunit mRNA of protein kinase inhibits cAMP-induced differentiation in HL-60 leukemia cells without affecting phorbol ester effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortora, G.; Clair, T.; Cho-Chung, Y.S.

    1990-01-01

    The type II β regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (RII β ) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the growth inhibition and differentiation induced by site-selective cAMP analogs in human cancer cells, but direct proof of this function has been lacking. To address this tissue, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells were exposed to RII β antisense synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide, and the effects on cAMP-induced growth regulation were examined. Exposure of these cells to RII β antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a decrease in cAMP analog-induced growth inhibition and differentiation without apparent effect on differentiation induced by phorbol esters. This loss in cAMP growth regulatory function correlated with a decrease in basal and induced levels of RII β protein. Exposure to RII β sense, RI α and RII α antisense, or irrelevant oligodeoxynucleotides had no such effect. These results show that the RII β regulatory subunit of protein kinase plays a critical role in the cAMP-induced growth regulation of HL-60 leukemia cells

  18. Interaction between CK2α and CK2β, the Subunits of Protein Kinase CK2: Thermodynamic Contributions of Key Residues on the CK2α Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, J; Bischoff, N; Kloppfleisch, K

    2011-01-01

    that Leu41 or Phe54 single mutations were most disruptive to binding of CK2β. Additionally, these CK2α mutants retained their kinase activity. Furthermore, the substitution of Leu41 in combination with Phe54 showed that the individual mutations were not additive, suggesting that the cooperative action...

  19. Adverse Effects of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase alpha 2-Subunit Deletion and High-Fat Diet on Heart Function and Ischemic Tolerance in Aged Female Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slámová, Kristýna; Papoušek, František; Janovská, Petra; Kopecký, Jan; Kolář, František

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2016), s. 33-42 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : AMP kinase * ischemia/reperfusion * myocardial infarction * aging * high-fat diet Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  20. Interaction of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase and its N-terminal SH2 domain with a PDGF receptor phosphorylation site: structural features and analysis of conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotou, G; Bax, B; Gout, I; Federwisch, M; Wroblowski, B; Dhand, R; Fry, M J; Blundell, T L; Wollmer, A; Waterfield, M D

    1992-01-01

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to investigate the structure of the p85 alpha subunit of the PI 3-kinase, a closely related p85 beta protein, and a recombinant SH2 domain-containing fragment of p85 alpha. Significant spectral changes, indicative of a conformational change, were observed on formation of a complex with a 17 residue peptide containing a phosphorylated tyrosine residue. The sequence of this peptide is identical to the sequence surrounding Tyr751 in the kinase-insert region of the platelet-derived growth factor beta-receptor (beta PDGFR). The rotational correlation times measured by fluorescence anisotropy decay indicated that phosphopeptide binding changed the shape of the SH2 domain-containing fragment. The CD and fluorescence spectroscopy data support the secondary structure prediction based on sequence analysis and provide evidence for flexible linker regions between the various domains of the p85 proteins. The significance of these results for SH2 domain-containing proteins is discussed. Images PMID:1330535

  1. Unexpected Binding Mode of a Potent Indeno[1,2-b]indole-Type Inhibitor of Protein Kinase CK2 Revealed by Complex Structures with the Catalytic Subunit CK2α and Its Paralog CK2α′

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hochscherf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase CK2, a member of the eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, is associated with cancer and other human pathologies and thus an attractive drug target. The indeno[1,2-b]indole scaffold is a novel lead structure to develop ATP-competitive CK2 inhibitors. Some indeno[1,2-b]indole-based CK2 inhibitors additionally obstruct ABCG2, an ABC half transporter overexpressed in breast cancer and co-responsible for drug efflux and resistance. Comprehensive derivatization studies revealed substitutions of the indeno[1,2-b]indole framework that boost either the CK2 or the ABCG2 selectivity or even support the dual inhibition potential. The best indeno[1,2-b]indole-based CK2 inhibitor described yet (IC50 = 25 nM is 5-isopropyl-4-(3-methylbut-2-enyl-oxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroindeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione (4p. Herein, we demonstrate the membrane permeability of 4p and describe co-crystal structures of 4p with CK2α and CK2α′, the paralogs of human CK2 catalytic subunit. As expected, 4p occupies the narrow, hydrophobic ATP site of CK2α/CK2α′, but surprisingly with a unique orientation: its hydrophobic substituents point towards the solvent while its two oxo groups are hydrogen-bonded to a hidden water molecule. An equivalent water molecule was found in many CK2α structures, but never as a critical mediator of ligand binding. This unexpected binding mode is independent of the interdomain hinge/helix αD region conformation and of the salt content in the crystallization medium.

  2. Halogenated benzimidazole inhibitors of phosphorylation, ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'', of the surface acidic proteins of the yeast ribosomal 60S subunit by endogenous protein kinases CK-II and PK60S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyszka, Ryszard; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Grankowski, Nikodem; Shugar, David

    1996-01-01

    Several halogeno benzimidazoles and 2-azabenzimidazoles, previously shown to be relatively selective inhibitors of protein kinases CK-I and/or CK-II from various sources, including CK-II from yeast [Szyszka et al. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 208, 418-424] inhibit also the yeast ribosomal protein kinase PK60S. The most effective inhibitor of CK-II and PK60S was tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TetraBr-2-azaBz), which was competitive with respect to ATP (and GTP in the case of CK-II) with K i values of 0.7 μM for CK-II, and 0.1 μM for PK60S. PK60S phosphorylates only three (YP1β, YB1β', YP2α) out of five polypeptides of pp13 kDa acidic proteins of 60S subunit phosphorylated by CK-II [Szyszka et al. (1995) Acta Biochim. Polon. 42, 357-362]. Accordingly, TetraBr-azaBz inhibits phosphorylation only of these polypeptides, catalysed by PK60S. Addition of TetraBr-2Bz to cultures of yeast cells, at concentrations which were without effect on cell growth, led to inhibition of intracellular phosphorylation of ribosomal acidic proteins, paralleling that observed ''in vitro''. TetraBr-2-azaBz is shown to be a useful tool for studies on the intracellular regulation of phosphorylation of the ribosomal 60S acidic proteins, which are involved in formation of active ribosomes. (author). 36 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  3. When phosphorylated at Thr148, the β2-subunit of AMP-activated kinase does not associate with glycogen in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongyang; Frankenberg, Noni T; Lamb, Graham D; Gooley, Paul R; Stapleton, David I; Murphy, Robyn M

    2016-07-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric complex that functions as an intracellular fuel sensor that affects metabolism, is activated in skeletal muscle in response to exercise and utilization of stored energy. The diffusibility properties of α- and β-AMPK were examined in isolated skeletal muscle fiber segments dissected from rat fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus and oxidative soleus muscles from which the surface membranes were removed by mechanical dissection. After the muscle segments were washed for 1 and 10 min, ∼60% and 75%, respectively, of the total AMPK pools were found in the diffusible fraction. After in vitro stimulation of the muscle, which resulted in an ∼80% decline in maximal force, 20% of the diffusible pool became bound in the fiber. This bound pool was not associated with glycogen, as determined by addition of a wash step containing amylase. Stimulation of extensor digitorum longus muscles resulted in 28% glycogen utilization and a 40% increase in phosphorylation of the downstream AMPK target acetyl carboxylase-CoA. This, however, had no effect on the proportion of total β2-AMPK that was phosphorylated in whole muscle homogenates measured by immunoprecipitation. These findings suggest that, in rat skeletal muscle, β2-AMPK is not associated with glycogen and that activation of AMPK by muscle contraction does not dephosphorylate β2-AMPK. These findings question the physiological relevance of the carbohydrate-binding function of β2-AMPK in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Long-term potentiation in the CA1 hippocampus induced by NR2A subunit-containing NMDA glutamate receptors is mediated by Ras-GRF2/Erk map kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-xue Jin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs are major contributors to long-term potentiation (LTP, a form of synaptic plasticity implicated in the process of learning and memory. These receptors consist of calcium-permeating NR1 and multiple regulatory NR2 subunits. A majority of studies show that both NR2A and NR2B-containing NMDARs can contribute to LTP, but their unique contributions to this form of synaptic plasticity remain poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we show that NR2A and NR2B-containing receptors promote LTP differently in the CA1 hippocampus of 1-month old mice, with the NR2A receptors functioning through Ras-GRF2 and its downstream effector, Erk Map kinase, and NR2B receptors functioning independently of these signaling molecules. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that NR2A-, but not NR2B, containing NMDA receptors induce LTP in pyramidal neurons of the CA1 hippocampus from 1 month old mice through Ras-GRF2 and Erk. This difference add new significance to the observation that the relative levels of these NMDAR subtypes is regulated in neurons, such that NR2A-containing receptors become more prominent late in postnatal development, after sensory experience and synaptic activity.

  5. Characterisation of mutations of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit, PIK3R2, in perisylvian polymicrogyria: a next-generation sequencing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Conti, Valerio; Timms, Andrew E; Smyser, Christopher D; Ahmed, Sarah; Carter, Melissa; Barnett, Sarah; Hufnagel, Robert B; Goldstein, Amy; Narumi-Kishimoto, Yoko; Olds, Carissa; Collins, Sarah; Johnston, Kathreen; Deleuze, Jean-François; Nitschké, Patrick; Friend, Kathryn; Harris, Catharine; Goetsch, Allison; Martin, Beth; Boyle, Evan August; Parrini, Elena; Mei, Davide; Tattini, Lorenzo; Slavotinek, Anne; Blair, Ed; Barnett, Christopher; Shendure, Jay; Chelly, Jamel; Dobyns, William B; Guerrini, Renzo

    2015-12-01

    Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (BPP), the most common form of regional polymicrogyria, causes the congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome, featuring oromotor dysfunction, cognitive impairment, and epilepsy. The causes of BPP are heterogeneous, but only a few genetic causes have been reported. The aim of this study was to identify additional genetic causes of BPP and characterise their frequency in this population. Children (aged ≤18 years) with polymicrogyria were enrolled into our research programme from July, 1980, to October, 2015, at two centres (Florence, Italy, and Seattle, WA, USA). We obtained samples (blood and saliva) throughout this period at both centres and did whole-exome sequencing on DNA from eight trios (two parents and one affected child) with BPP in 2014. After the identification of mosaic PIK3R2 mutations in two of these eight children, we performed targeted screening of PIK3R2 by two methods in a cohort of 118 children with BPP. First, we performed targeted sequencing of the entire PIK3R2 gene by single molecule molecular inversion probes (smMIPs) on 38 patients with BPP with normal to large head size. Second, we did amplicon sequencing of the recurrent PIK3R2 mutation (Gly373Arg) in 80 children with various types of polymicrogyria including BPP. One additional patient had clinical whole-exome sequencing done independently, and was included in this study because of the phenotypic similarity to our cohort. We identified a mosaic mutation (Gly373Arg) in a regulatory subunit of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, PIK3R2, in two children with BPP. Of the 38 patients with BPP and normal to large head size who underwent targeted next-generation sequencing by smMIPs, we identified constitutional and mosaic PIK3R2 mutations in 17 additional children. In parallel, one patient had the recurrent PIK3R2 mutation identified by clinical whole-exome sequencing. Seven of these 20 patients had BPP alone, and 13 had BPP in association with features of the

  6. A dynamic model of interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and catalytic subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Pepke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During the acquisition of memories, influx of Ca2+ into the postsynaptic spine through the pores of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors triggers processes that change the strength of excitatory synapses. The pattern of Ca2+influx during the first few seconds of activity is interpreted within the Ca2+-dependent signaling network such that synaptic strength is eventually either potentiated or depressed. Many of the critical signaling enzymes that control synaptic plasticity,including Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, are regulated by calmodulin, a small protein that can bindup to 4 Ca2+ ions. As a first step toward clarifying how the Ca2+-signaling network decides between potentiation or depression, we have created a kinetic model of the interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and CaMKII that represents our best understanding of the dynamics of these interactions under conditions that resemble those in a postsynaptic spine. We constrained parameters of the model from data in the literature, or from our own measurements, and then predicted time courses of activation and autophosphorylation of CaMKII under a variety of conditions. Simulations showed that species of calmodulin with fewer than four bound Ca2+ play a significant role in activation of CaMKII in the physiological regime,supporting the notion that processing of Ca2+ signals in a spine involves competition among target enzymes for binding to unsaturated species of CaM in an environment in which the concentration of Ca2+ is fluctuating rapidly. Indeed, we showed that dependence of activation on the frequency of Ca2+ transients arises from the kinetics of interaction of fluctuating Ca2+with calmodulin/CaMKII complexes. We used parameter sensitivity analysis to identify which parameters will be most beneficial to measure more carefully to improve the accuracy of predictions. This model provides a quantitative base from which to build more complex dynamic

  7. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein and Dendritic Local Translation of the Alpha Subunit of the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Messenger RNA Are Required for the Structural Plasticity Underlying Olfactory Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroles, Laura; Gribaudo, Simona; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Dubacq, Caroline; Mandairon, Nathalie; Greer, Charles August; Didier, Anne; Trembleau, Alain; Caillé, Isabelle

    2016-07-15

    In the adult brain, structural plasticity allowing gain or loss of synapses remodels circuits to support learning. In fragile X syndrome, the absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to defects in plasticity and learning deficits. FMRP is a master regulator of local translation but its implication in learning-induced structural plasticity is unknown. Using an olfactory learning task requiring adult-born olfactory bulb neurons and cell-specific ablation of FMRP, we investigated whether learning shapes adult-born neuron morphology during their synaptic integration and its dependence on FMRP. We used alpha subunit of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (αCaMKII) mutant mice with altered dendritic localization of αCaMKII messenger RNA, as well as a reporter of αCaMKII local translation to investigate the role of this FMRP messenger RNA target in learning-dependent structural plasticity. Learning induces profound changes in dendritic architecture and spine morphology of adult-born neurons that are prevented by ablation of FMRP in adult-born neurons and rescued by an metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist. Moreover, dendritically translated αCaMKII is necessary for learning and associated structural modifications and learning triggers an FMRP-dependent increase of αCaMKII dendritic translation in adult-born neurons. Our results strongly suggest that FMRP mediates structural plasticity of olfactory bulb adult-born neurons to support olfactory learning through αCaMKII local translation. This reveals a new role for FMRP-regulated dendritic local translation in learning-induced structural plasticity. This might be of clinical relevance for the understanding of critical periods disruption in autism spectrum disorder patients, among which fragile X syndrome is the primary monogenic cause. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Casein kinase-2 structure-function relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1992-01-01

    Nine mutants of human casein kinase-2 beta subunit have been created and assayed for their ability to assemble with the catalytic alpha subunit to give, at a 1:1 molar ratio, a fully competent CK-2 holoenzyme as judged by the following criteria: 1) the generation of an active heterotetrameric form...

  9. Crystal structure of human protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalyt...... as a docking partner for various protein kinases. Furthermore it shows an inter-domain mobility in the catalytic subunit known to be functionally important in protein kinases and detected here for the first time directly within one crystal structure.......The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalytic...... subunits, which make no direct contact with one another. Each catalytic subunit interacts with both regulatory chains, predominantly via an extended C-terminal tail of the regulatory subunit. The CK2 structure is consistent with its constitutive activity and with a flexible role of the regulatory subunit...

  10. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alison D; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit "kinase" module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways.

  11. A systematic evaluation of protein kinase a-a-kinase anchoring protein interaction motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Pepijn P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341566551; van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Kok, Bart; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Scholten, Arjen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313939780

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) in vertebrates is localized to specific locations in the cell via A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The regulatory subunits of the four PKA isoforms (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, and RIIβ) each form a homodimer, and their dimerization domain interacts with a small helical region present

  12. A systematic evaluation of protein kinase A-A-kinase anchoring protein interaction motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Pepijn P; van der Heyden, MAG; Kok, Bart; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) in vertebrates is localized to specific locations in the cell via A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The regulatory subunits of the four PKA isoforms (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, and RIIβ) each form a homodimer, and their dimerization domain interacts with a small helical region present

  13. Expression of casein kinase 2 during mouse embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mestres, P; Boldyreff, B; Ebensperger, C

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the expression and distribution of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) subunits in mouse embryos at different developmental stages. Expression was investigated at the mRNA level of CK-2 alpha- and beta-subunits by in situ hybridization and distribution at the protein level by immunohisto......This paper deals with the expression and distribution of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) subunits in mouse embryos at different developmental stages. Expression was investigated at the mRNA level of CK-2 alpha- and beta-subunits by in situ hybridization and distribution at the protein level...

  14. Protein kinase CK2 structure-function relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 subunits alpha and beta were expressed either separately or together in a bacterial expression system (pT7-7/BL21(DE3)) and purified to homogeneity. After mixing the subunits, a CK2 holoenzyme (alpha 2 beta 2) was spontaneously reconstituted, which displays identical features...... subunit have been prepared and assayed for their ability to assemble with the catalytic alpha subunit to give a fully competent CK2 holoenzyme. The beta subunit contains an acidic stretch (amino acid 55-64), which is obviously responsible for a negative control of enzyme activity since mutations...

  15. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  16. The carboxy terminus of p53 mimics the polylysine effect of protein kinase CK2-catalyzed MDM2 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Götz, C; Wagner, P

    1997-01-01

    The oncogene product MDM2 can be phosphorylated by protein kinase CK2 in vitro 0.5-1 mol of phosphate were incorporated per mol MDM2 protein. The catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 (alpha-subunit) catalyzed the incorporation of twice as much phosphate into the MDM2 protein as it was obtained...

  17. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160

    OpenAIRE

    Perrin, Arnaud; Rousseau, Jo?l; Tremblay, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adul...

  18. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  19. Casein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    The present review on casein kinases focuses mainly on the possible metabolic role of CK-2, with special emphasis on its behavior in pathological tissues. From these data at least three ways to regulate CK-2 activity emerge: (i) CK-2 activity changes during embryogenesis, being high at certain...

  20. A Global Protein Kinase and Phosphatase Interaction Network in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Ashton; Choi, Hyungwon; Sharom, Jeffrey R.; Boucher, Lorrie; Neduva, Victor; Larsen, Brett; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Stark, Chris; Liu, Guomin; Ahn, Jessica; Dewar-Darch, Danielle; Reguly, Teresa; Tang, Xiaojing; Almeida, Ricardo; Qin, Zhaohui Steve; Pawson, Tony; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of protein kinases and phosphatases with their regulatory subunits and substrates underpin cellular regulation. We identified a kinase and phosphatase interaction (KPI) network of 1844 interactions in budding yeast by mass spectrometric analysis of protein complexes. The KPI network contained many dense local regions of interactions that suggested new functions. Notably, the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc14 associated with multiple kinases that revealed roles for Cdc14 in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, the DNA damage response, and metabolism, whereas interactions of the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) uncovered new effector kinases in nitrogen and carbon metabolism. An extensive backbone of kinase-kinase interactions cross-connects the proteome and may serve to coordinate diverse cellular responses. PMID:20489023

  1. Kinases and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas Cicenas; Egle Zalyte; Amos Bairoch; Pascale Gaudet

    2018-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of enzymes catalyzing protein phosphorylation. The human genome contains 518 protein kinase genes, 478 of which belong to the classical protein kinase family and 40 are atypical protein kinases [...

  2. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Anna; Teichert, Ines; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-06-21

    The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. The striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex is highly conserved from yeasts to humans and is an important regulator of numerous eukaryotic developmental processes, such as cellular signaling and cell development. Although functional insights into the STRIPAK complex are accumulating, the detailed molecular mechanisms of single subunits are only partially understood

  3. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  4. CIKS, a connection to Ikappa B kinase and stress-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, A; Chariot, A; Claudio, E; Cunningham, K; Siebenlist, U

    2000-09-12

    Pathogens, inflammatory signals, and stress cause acute transcriptional responses in cells. The induced expression of genes in response to these signals invariably involves transcription factors of the NF-kappaB and AP-1/ATF families. Activation of NF-kappaB factors is thought to be mediated primarily via IkappaB kinases (IKK), whereas that of AP-1/ATF can be mediated by stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs; also named Jun kinases or JNKs). IKKalpha and IKKbeta are two catalytic subunits of a core IKK complex that also contains the regulatory subunit NEMO (NF-kappaB essential modulator)/IKKgamma. The latter protein is essential for activation of the IKKs, but its mechanism of action is not known. Here we describe the molecular cloning of CIKS (connection to IKK and SAPK/JNK), a previously unknown protein that directly interacts with NEMO/IKKgamma in cells. When ectopically expressed, CIKS stimulates IKK and SAPK/JNK kinases and it transactivates an NF-kappaB-dependent reporter. Activation of NF-kappaB is prevented in the presence of kinase-deficient, interfering mutants of the IKKs. CIKS may help to connect upstream signaling events to IKK and SAPK/JNK modules. CIKS could coordinate the activation of two stress-induced signaling pathways, functions reminiscent of those noted for tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor adaptor proteins.

  5. CIKS, a connection to IκB kinase and stress-activated protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Antonio; Chariot, Alain; Claudio, Estefania; Cunningham, Kirk; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2000-01-01

    Pathogens, inflammatory signals, and stress cause acute transcriptional responses in cells. The induced expression of genes in response to these signals invariably involves transcription factors of the NF-κB and AP-1/ATF families. Activation of NF-κB factors is thought to be mediated primarily via IκB kinases (IKK), whereas that of AP-1/ATF can be mediated by stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs; also named Jun kinases or JNKs). IKKα and IKKβ are two catalytic subunits of a core IKK complex that also contains the regulatory subunit NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator)/IKKγ. The latter protein is essential for activation of the IKKs, but its mechanism of action is not known. Here we describe the molecular cloning of CIKS (connection to IKK and SAPK/JNK), a previously unknown protein that directly interacts with NEMO/IKKγ in cells. When ectopically expressed, CIKS stimulates IKK and SAPK/JNK kinases and it transactivates an NF-κB-dependent reporter. Activation of NF-κB is prevented in the presence of kinase-deficient, interfering mutants of the IKKs. CIKS may help to connect upstream signaling events to IKK and SAPK/JNK modules. CIKS could coordinate the activation of two stress-induced signaling pathways, functions reminiscent of those noted for tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor adaptor proteins. PMID:10962033

  6. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Beier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general.

  7. Stress-induced activation of protein kinase CK2 by direct interaction with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayed, M; Kim, S O; Salh, B S

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of proteins that are important in cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we demonstrate that the stress signaling agents anisomycin, arsenite, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulate the specific enzyme activity of CK2...... in the human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by up to 8-fold, and this could be blocked by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. We show that p38alpha MAP kinase, in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, can directly interact with the alpha and beta subunits of CK2 to activate the holoenzyme through what appears...

  8. Characterization of fimbrial subunits from Bordetella species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, F.R.; Heide, H.G.J. van der; Avest, A.R. ter; Welinder, K.G.; Livey, I.; Zeijst, B.A.M. van der; Gaastra, W.

    Using antisera raised against serotype 2 and 3 fimbrial subunits from Bordetella pertussis, serologically related polypeptides were detected in Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella avium strains. The two B. pertussis fimbrial subunits, and three of the serologically

  9. Identification and cloning of a gamma 3 subunit splice variant of the human GABA(A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, C F; Christjansen, K N; Hastrup, S; Hartvig, L

    2000-05-31

    cDNA sequences encoding two forms of the GABA(A) gamma 3 receptor subunit were cloned from human hippocampus. The nucleotide sequences differ by the absence (gamma 3S) or presence (gamma 3L) of 18 bp located in the presumed intracellular loop between transmembrane region (TM) III and IV. The extra 18 bp in the gamma 3L subunit generates a consensus site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC). Analysis of human genomic DNA encoding the gamma 3 subunit reveals that the 18 bp insert is contiguous with the upstream proximal exon.

  10. Identification of novel transcriptional regulators of PKA subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative promoter-reporter screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautasso, Constanza; Reca, Sol; Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Chua, Gordon; Galello, Fiorella; Portela, Paula; Zaremberg, Vanina; Rossi, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling is a broad pathway that plays important roles in the transduction of environmental signals triggering precise physiological responses. However, how PKA achieves the cAMP-signal transduction specificity is still in study. The regulation of expression of subunits of PKA should contribute to the signal specificity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae PKA holoenzyme contains two catalytic subunits encoded by TPK1, TPK2 and TPK3 genes, and two regulatory subunits encoded by BCY1 gene. We studied the activity of these gene promoters using a fluorescent reporter synthetic genetic array screen, with the goal of systematically identifying novel regulators of expression of PKA subunits. Gene ontology analysis of the identified modulators showed enrichment not only in the category of transcriptional regulators, but also in less expected categories such as lipid and phosphate metabolism. Inositol, choline and phosphate were identified as novel upstream signals that regulate transcription of PKA subunit genes. The results support the role of transcription regulation of PKA subunits in cAMP specificity signaling. Interestingly, known targets of PKA phosphorylation are associated with the identified pathways opening the possibility of a reciprocal regulation. PKA would be coordinating different metabolic pathways and these processes would in turn regulate expression of the kinase subunits. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Detection of protein kinase activity by renaturation in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anostario, M. Jr.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a procedure for identifying protein kinase activity in protein samples following electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Proteins are allowed to renature directly in the gel by removal of detergent. The gel is then incubated with [γ- 32 P]ATP to allow renatured protein kinases to autophosphorylate or to phosphorylate various substrates which can be incorporated into the gel. The positions of the radiolabeled proteins can then be detected by autoradiography. With this technique, using purified catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, enzyme concentrations as low as 0.01 μg can be detected on gels containing 1.0 mg/ml casein. The procedure is also applicable for the determination of active subunits of multisubunit protein kinases. For example, when the two subunits of casein kinase II are separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and allowed to renature, only the larger α subunit shows activity. This procedure can also be used to detect and distinguish kinases present in heterogeneous mixtures. Starting with a particulate fraction from LSTRA, a murine T cell lymphoma, several distinct enzymes were detected, including a 30,000 Dalton protein with protein-tyrosine kinase activity. This same enzyme has also been detected in T lymphocytes and other T lymphoid cell lines

  12. Protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI): a family of endogenous neuropeptides that modulate neuronal cAMP-dependent protein kinase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, George D; Dewey, William L

    2006-02-01

    Signal transduction cascades involving cAMP-dependent protein kinase are highly conserved among a wide variety of organisms. Given the universal nature of this enzyme it is not surprising that cAMP-dependent protein kinase plays a critical role in numerous cellular processes. This is particularly evident in the nervous system where cAMP-dependent protein kinase is involved in neurotransmitter release, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. Protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI) is an endogenous thermostable peptide that modulates cAMP-dependent protein kinase function. PKI contains two distinct functional domains within its amino acid sequence that allow it to: (1) potently and specifically inhibit the activity of the free catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and (2) export the free catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase from the nucleus. Three distinct PKI isoforms (PKIalpha, PKIbeta, PKIgamma) have been identified and each isoform is expressed in the brain. PKI modulates neuronal synaptic activity, while PKI also is involved in morphogenesis and symmetrical left-right axis formation. In addition, PKI also plays a role in regulating gene expression induced by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Future studies should identify novel physiological functions for endogenous PKI both in the nervous system and throughout the body. Most interesting will be the determination whether functional differences exist between individual PKI isoforms which is an intriguing possibility since these isoforms exhibit: (1) cell-type specific tissue expression patterns, (2) different potencies for the inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and (3) expression patterns that are hormonally, developmentally and cell-cycle regulated. Finally, synthetic peptide analogs of endogenous PKI will continue to be invaluable tools that are used to elucidate the role of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in a variety of cellular processes throughout the nervous

  13. Mechanism of polyphosphate kinase from Propionibacterium shermanii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Polyphosphate kinase, which catalyzes the reaction shown below, is one of two enzymes which have been reported to catalyze the synthesis of polyphosphate. Purification performed by ammonium sulfate precipitation (0-40% fraction) was followed by chromatography. The enzyme represents 70% of the protein in the hydroxylapatite pool and is stable at this level of purity. The subunit molecular weight was determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel analysis, (83,000 +/- 3000), nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, (80,000 and 86,000 daltons), gel filtration (Biogel A 0.5m column was 85,000 +/- 4000.) Polyphosphate kinase appears to be a monomeric enzyme of ∼83,000 daltons. Four assays were developed for polyphosphate kinase. Basic proteins such as polylysine stimulate the synthesis of polyphosphate, these proteins cause precipitation of polyphosphate kinase from relatively impure enzyme extracts: Synthesized polyphosphate interacts noncovalently with the basic protein-enzyme precipitate. Efficient synthesis of polyphosphate requires the addition of either phosphate or short chain polyphosphate. Synthesis did occur at 1/10 the rate when neither of these two compounds were included. Initiation, elongation, and termination events of polyphosphate synthesis were examined. Short chain polyphosphate acts as a primer, with [ 32 P] short-chain polyphosphate incorporation into long chain polyphosphate by the kinase

  14. Radioimmunoassay of bovine heart protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, N.; Rosen, O.M.; Reichlin, M.

    1976-01-01

    Immunization of guinea pigs with bovine cardiac cAMP-dependent protein kinase (ATP : protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) resulted in the development of precipitating antibodies to the cAMP-binding subunit of the enzyme. Both the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated cAMP-binding protein of the protein kinase reacted with the antiserum. A radioimmunoassay was developed that detects 10 ng of holoenzyme and permits measurement of enzyme concentrations in bovine cardiac muscle. Bovine liver, kidney, brain, and skeletal muscle contain protein kinases which are immunologically identical to those found in bovine cardiac muscle. However, the proportion of immunoreactive enzyme activity differed for each tissue. All of the immunologically nonreactive enzyme in skeletal muscle and heart was separable from immunoreactive enzyme by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Rat tissues and pig heart contained protein kinase activity that cross reacted immunologically in a nonparallel fashion with bovine cardiac enzyme. These results indicate that cAMP-dependent protein kinases within and between species are immunologically heterogeneous

  15. Purification and characterization of the three Snf1-activating kinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Karin; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2006-02-01

    Members of the Snf1/AMPK family of protein kinases are activated by distinct upstream kinases that phosphorylate a conserved threonine residue in the Snf1/AMPK activation loop. Recently, the identities of the Snf1- and AMPK-activating kinases have been determined. Here we describe the purification and characterization of the three Snf1-activating kinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The identities of proteins associated with the Snf1-activating kinases were determined by peptide mass fingerprinting. These kinases, Sak1, Tos3 and Elm2 do not appear to require the presence of additional subunits for activity. Sak1 and Snf1 co-purify and co-elute in size exclusion chromatography, demonstrating that these two proteins form a stable complex. The Snf1-activating kinases phosphorylate the activation loop threonine of Snf1 in vitro with great specificity and are able to do so in the absence of beta and gamma subunits of the Snf1 heterotrimer. Finally, we showed that the Snf1 kinase domain isolated from bacteria as a GST fusion protein can be activated in vitro and shows substrate specificity in the absence of its beta and gamma subunits.

  16. A CK2 site is reversibly phosphorylated in the photosystem II subunit CP29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, M G; Croce, R; Polverino-De Laureto, P; Bassi, R

    1996-12-16

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of protein function. In chloroplast thylakoids several photosystem II subunits, including the major antenna light-harvesting complex II and several core complex components, are reversibly phosphorylated depending on the redox state of the electron carriers. A previously unknown reversible phosphorylation event has recently been described on the CP29 subunit which leads to conformational changes and protection from cold stress (Bergantino, E., Dainese, P., Cerovic, Z. Sechi, S. and Bassi, R. (1995) J. Biol Chem. 270, 8474-8481). In this study, we have identified the phosphorylation site on the N-terminal, stroma-exposed domain, showing that it is located in a sequence not homologous to the other members of the Lhc family. The phosphorylated sequence is unique in chloroplast membranes since it meets the requirements for CK2 (casein kinase II) kinases. The possibility that this phosphorylation is involved in a signal transduction pathway is discussed.

  17. AKAP18:PKA-RIIα structure reveals crucial anchor points for recognition of regulatory subunits of PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Frank; Roske, Yvette; Schulz, Maike Svenja; Autenrieth, Karolin; Bertinetti, Daniela; Faelber, Katja; Zühlke, Kerstin; Kreuchwig, Annika; Kennedy, Eileen J; Krause, Gerd; Daumke, Oliver; Herberg, Friedrich W; Heinemann, Udo; Klussmann, Enno

    2016-07-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) interact with the dimerization/docking (D/D) domains of regulatory subunits of the ubiquitous protein kinase A (PKA). AKAPs tether PKA to defined cellular compartments establishing distinct pools to increase the specificity of PKA signalling. Here, we elucidated the structure of an extended PKA-binding domain of AKAP18β bound to the D/D domain of the regulatory RIIα subunits of PKA. We identified three hydrophilic anchor points in AKAP18β outside the core PKA-binding domain, which mediate contacts with the D/D domain. Such anchor points are conserved within AKAPs that bind regulatory RII subunits of PKA. We derived a different set of anchor points in AKAPs binding regulatory RI subunits of PKA. In vitro and cell-based experiments confirm the relevance of these sites for the interaction of RII subunits with AKAP18 and of RI subunits with the RI-specific smAKAP. Thus we report a novel mechanism governing interactions of AKAPs with PKA. The sequence specificity of each AKAP around the anchor points and the requirement of these points for the tight binding of PKA allow the development of selective inhibitors to unequivocally ascribe cellular functions to the AKAP18-PKA and other AKAP-PKA interactions. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Subunit Stoichiometry of Human Muscle Chloride Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlke, Christoph; Knittle, Timothy; Gurnett, Christina A.; Campbell, Kevin P.; George, Alfred L.

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cl? channels belonging to the ClC family appear to function as homomultimers, but the number of subunits needed to form a functional channel is controversial. To determine subunit stoichiometry, we constructed dimeric human skeletal muscle Cl? channels in which one subunit was tagged by a mutation (D136G) that causes profound changes in voltage-dependent gating. Sucrose-density gradient centrifugation experiments indicate that both monomeric and dimeric hClC-1 channels in their ...

  19. Purification and properties of a ribosomal casein kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1977-01-01

    A casein kinase was isolated and purifed from rabbit reticulocytes. About 90% of the enzyme activity co-sedimented with the ribosomal fraction, whereas about 10% of the enzyme activity was found in the ribosome-free supernatant. Both casein kinases (the ribosome-bound enzyme as well as the free...... suggested that the casein kinase is a dimer composed of subunits of identical molecular weight. The enzyme utilizes GTP as well as ATP as a phosphoryl donor. It preferentially phosphorylates acidic proteins, in particular the model substrates casein and phosvitin. Casein kinase is cyclic AMP...

  20. Thymidine kinases in archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, A.R.; Matakos, A.; Sandrini, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-six fully sequenced archaeal genomes were searched for genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). We identified only 5 human-like thymidine kinase 1 genes (TK1s) and none for non-TK1 kinases. Four TK1s were identified in the Euryarchaea and one was found in the Crenarcha...

  1. The calcium channel β2 (CACNB2 subunit repertoire in teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Rachel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyocyte contraction is initiated by influx of extracellular calcium through voltage-gated calcium channels. These oligomeric channels utilize auxiliary β subunits to chaperone the pore-forming α subunit to the plasma membrane, and to modulate channel electrophysiology 1. Several β subunit family members are detected by RT-PCR in the embryonic heart. Null mutations in mouse β2, but not in the other three β family members, are embryonic lethal at E10.5 due to defects in cardiac contractility 2. However, a drawback of the mouse model is that embryonic heart rhythm is difficult to study in live embryos due to their intra-uterine development. Moreover, phenotypes may be obscured by secondary effects of hypoxia. As a first step towards developing a model for contributions of β subunits to the onset of embryonic heart rhythm, we characterized the structure and expression of β2 subunits in zebrafish and other teleosts. Results Cloning of two zebrafish β2 subunit genes (β2.1 and β2.2 indicated they are membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK-family genes. Zebrafish β2 genes show high conservation with mammals within the SH3 and guanylate kinase domains that comprise the "core" of MAGUK proteins, but β2.2 is much more divergent in sequence than β2.1. Alternative splicing occurs at the N-terminus and within the internal HOOK domain. In both β2 genes, alternative short ATG-containing first exons are separated by some of the largest introns in the genome, suggesting that individual transcript variants could be subject to independent cis-regulatory control. In the Tetraodon nigrovidis and Fugu rubripes genomes, we identified single β2 subunit gene loci. Comparative analysis of the teleost and human β2 loci indicates that the short 5' exon sequences are highly conserved. A subset of 5' exons appear to be unique to teleost genomes, while others are shared with mammals. Alternative splicing is temporally and

  2. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  3. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All political...

  4. A cGMP kinase mutant with increased sensitivity to the protein kinase inhibitor peptide PKI(5-24).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, P; Kamm, S; Nau, U; Pfeifer, A; Hofmann, F

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to the active domain of the heat-stable inhibitor protein PKI are very potent inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, but are extremely weak inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we tried to confer PKI sensitivity to cGMP kinase by site-directed mutagenesis. The molecular requirements for high affinity inhibition by PKI were deduced from the crystal structure of the cAMP kinase/PKI complex. A prominent site of interaction are residues Tyr235 and Phe239 in the catalytic subunit, which from a sandwich-like structure with Phe10 of the PKI(5-24) peptide. To increase the sensitivity for PKI, the cGMP kinase codons at the corresponding sites, Ser555 and Ser559, were changed to Tyr and Phe. The mutant cGMP kinase was stimulated half maximally by cGMP at 3-fold higher concentrations (240 nM) than the wild type (77 nM). Wild type and mutant cGMP kinase did not differ significantly in their Km and Vmax for three different substrate peptides. The PKI(5-24) peptide inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the mutant cGMP kinase with higher potency than that of wild type, with Ki values of 42 +/- .3 microM and 160 +/- .7 microM, respectively. The increased affinity of the mutant cGMP kinase was specific for the PKI(5-24) peptide. Mutation of the essential Phe10 in the PKI(5-24) sequence to an Ala yielded a peptide that inhibited mutant and wild type cGMP kinase with similar potency, with Ki values of 160 +/- 11 and 169 +/- 27 microM, respectively. These results suggest that the mutations Ser555Tyr and Ser559Phe are required, but not sufficient, for high affinity inhibition of cGMP kinase by PKI.

  5. In Search of Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting the Flexible CK2 Subunit Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Bestgen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase CK2 is a tetrameric holoenzyme composed of two catalytic (α and/or α’ subunits and two regulatory (β subunits. Crystallographic data paired with fluorescence imaging techniques have suggested that the formation of the CK2 holoenzyme complex within cells is a dynamic process. Although the monomeric CK2α subunit is endowed with a constitutive catalytic activity, many of the plethora of CK2 substrates are exclusively phosphorylated by the CK2 holoenzyme. This means that the spatial and high affinity interaction between CK2α and CK2β subunits is critically important and that its disruption may provide a powerful and selective way to block the phosphorylation of substrates requiring the presence of CK2β. In search of compounds inhibiting this critical protein–protein interaction, we previously designed an active cyclic peptide (Pc derived from the CK2β carboxy-terminal domain that can efficiently antagonize the CK2 subunit interaction. To understand the functional significance of this interaction, we generated cell-permeable versions of Pc, exploring its molecular mechanisms of action and the perturbations of the signaling pathways that it induces in intact cells. The identification of small molecules inhibitors of this critical interaction may represent the first-choice approach to manipulate CK2 in an unconventional way.

  6. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemi...

  7. The testis-specific Cα2 subunit of PKA is kinetically indistinguishable from the common Cα1 subunit of PKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herberg Friedrich W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two variants of the α-form of the catalytic (C subunit of protein kinase A (PKA, designated Cα1 and Cα2, are encoded by the PRKACA gene. Whereas Cα1 is ubiquitous, Cα2 expression is restricted to the sperm cell. Cα1 and Cα2 are encoded with different N-terminal domains. In Cα1 but not Cα2 the N-terminal end introduces three sites for posttranslational modifications which include myristylation at Gly1, Asp-specific deamidation at Asn2 and autophosphorylation at Ser10. Previous reports have implicated specific biological features correlating with these modifications on Cα1. Since Cα2 is not modified in the same way as Cα1 we tested if they have distinct biochemical activities that may be reflected in different biological properties. Results We show that Cα2 interacts with the two major forms of the regulatory subunit (R of PKA, RI and RII, to form cAMP-sensitive PKAI and PKAII holoenzymes both in vitro and in vivo as is also the case with Cα1. Moreover, using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, we show that the interaction patterns of the physiological inhibitors RI, RII and PKI were comparable for Cα2 and Cα1. This is also the case for their potency to inhibit catalytic activities of Cα2 and Cα1. Conclusion We conclude that the regulatory complexes formed with either Cα1 or Cα2, respectively, are indistinguishable.

  8. Cloning and characterization of a G protein-activated human phosphoinositide-3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, B; Volinia, S; Hanck, T; Rubio, I; Loubtchenkov, M; Malek, D; Stoyanova, S; Vanhaesebroeck, B; Dhand, R; Nürnberg, B

    1995-08-04

    Phosphoinositide-3 kinase activity is implicated in diverse cellular responses triggered by mammalian cell surface receptors and in the regulation of protein sorting in yeast. Receptors with intrinsic and associated tyrosine kinase activity recruit heterodimeric phosphoinositide-3 kinases that consist of p110 catalytic subunits and p85 adaptor molecules containing Src homology 2 (SH2) domains. A phosphoinositide-3 kinase isotype, p110 gamma, was cloned and characterized. The p110 gamma enzyme was activated in vitro by both the alpha and beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins (G proteins) and did not interact with p85. A potential pleckstrin homology domain is located near its amino terminus. The p110 gamma isotype may link signaling through G protein-coupled receptors to the generation of phosphoinositide second messengers phosphorylated in the D-3 position.

  9. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  10. Src-family-tyrosine kinase Lyn is critical for TLR2-mediated NF-κB activation through the PI 3-kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubiana, Julie; Rossi, Anne-Lise; Belaidouni, Nadia; Grimaldi, David; Pene, Frederic; Chafey, Philippe; Comba, Béatrice; Camoin, Luc; Bismuth, Georges; Claessens, Yann-Erick; Mira, Jean-Paul; Chiche, Jean-Daniel

    2015-10-01

    TLR2 has a prominent role in host defense against a wide variety of pathogens. Stimulation of TLR2 triggers MyD88-dependent signaling to induce NF-κB translocation, and activates a Rac1-PI 3-kinase dependent pathway that leads to transactivation of NF-κB through phosphorylation of the P65 NF-κB subunit. This transactivation pathway involves tyrosine phosphorylations. The role of the tyrosine kinases in TLR signaling is controversial, with discrepancies between studies using only chemical inhibitors and knockout mice. Here, we show the involvement of the tyrosine-kinase Lyn in TLR2-dependent activation of NF-κB in human cellular models, by using complementary inhibition strategies. Stimulation of TLR2 induces the formation of an activation cluster involving TLR2, CD14, PI 3-kinase and Lyn, and leads to the activation of AKT. Lyn-dependent phosphorylation of the p110 catalytic subunit of PI 3-kinase is essential to the control of PI 3-kinase biological activity upstream of AKT and thereby to the transactivation of NF-κB. Thus, Lyn kinase activity is crucial in TLR2-mediated activation of the innate immune response in human mononuclear cells. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Mechanisms of regulation of SNF1/AMPK/SnRK1 protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozet, Pierre; Margalha, Leonor; Confraria, Ana; Rodrigues, Américo; Martinho, Cláudia; Adamo, Mattia; Elias, Carlos A.; Baena-González, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting 1)-related protein kinases 1 (SnRKs1) are the plant orthologs of the budding yeast SNF1 and mammalian AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). These evolutionarily conserved kinases are metabolic sensors that undergo activation in response to declining energy levels. Upon activation, SNF1/AMPK/SnRK1 kinases trigger a vast transcriptional and metabolic reprograming that restores energy homeostasis and promotes tolerance to adverse conditions, partly through an induction of catabolic processes and a general repression of anabolism. These kinases typically function as a heterotrimeric complex composed of two regulatory subunits, β and γ, and an α-catalytic subunit, which requires phosphorylation of a conserved activation loop residue for activity. Additionally, SNF1/AMPK/SnRK1 kinases are controlled by multiple mechanisms that have an impact on kinase activity, stability, and/or subcellular localization. Here we will review current knowledge on the regulation of SNF1/AMPK/SnRK1 by upstream components, post-translational modifications, various metabolites, hormones, and others, in an attempt to highlight both the commonalities of these essential eukaryotic kinases and the divergences that have evolved to cope with the particularities of each one of these systems. PMID:24904600

  12. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  13. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  14. Ribosomal S6 Kinase Cooperates with Casein Kinase 2 to Modulate the Drosophila Circadian Molecular Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akten, Bikem; Tangredi, Michelle M.; Jauch, Eike; Roberts, Mary A.; Ng, Fanny; Raabe, Thomas; Jackson, F. Rob

    2009-01-01

    There is a universal requirement for post-translational regulatory mechanisms in circadian clock systems. Previous work in Drosophila has identified several kinases, phosphatases and an E3 ligase that are critical for determining the nuclear translocation and/or stability of clock proteins. The present study evaluated the function of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in the Drosophila circadian system. In mammals, RSK1 is a light- and clock-regulated kinase known to be activated by the MAPK pathway, but there is no direct evidence that it functions as a component of the circadian system. Here, we show that Drosophila S6KII RNA displays rhythms in abundance, indicative of circadian control. Importantly, an S6KII null mutant exhibits a short-period circadian phenotype that can be rescued by expression of the wild-type gene in clock neurons, indicating a role for S6KII in the molecular oscillator. Peak PER clock protein expression is elevated in the mutant, indicative of enhanced stability, whereas per mRNA level is decreased, consistent with enhanced feedback repression. Gene reporter assays show that decreased S6KII is associated with increased PER repression. Surprisingly, we demonstrate a physical interaction between S6KII and the Casein Kinase 2 regulatory subunit (CK2β), suggesting a functional relationship between the two kinases. In support of such a relationship, there are genetic interactions between S6KII and CK2 mutations, in vivo, which indicate that CK2 activity is required for S6KII action. We propose that the two kinases cooperate within clock neurons to fine-tune circadian period, improving the precision of the clock mechanism. PMID:19144847

  15. Liberated PKA Catalytic Subunits Associate with the Membrane via Myristoylation to Preferentially Phosphorylate Membrane Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillo, Shane E; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Takahashi, Maho; Miao, Sheng; Andrade, Adriana L; Fortin, Dale A; Yang, Guang; Qin, Maozhen; Smoody, Barbara F; Stork, Philip J S; Zhong, Haining

    2017-04-18

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has diverse functions in neurons. At rest, the subcellular localization of PKA is controlled by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). However, the dynamics of PKA upon activation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that elevation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in neuronal dendrites causes a significant percentage of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKA-C) molecules to be released from the regulatory subunit (PKA-R). Liberated PKA-C becomes associated with the membrane via N-terminal myristoylation. This membrane association does not require the interaction between PKA-R and AKAPs. It slows the mobility of PKA-C and enriches kinase activity on the membrane. Membrane-residing PKA substrates are preferentially phosphorylated compared to cytosolic substrates. Finally, the myristoylation of PKA-C is critical for normal synaptic function and plasticity. We propose that activation-dependent association of PKA-C renders the membrane a unique PKA-signaling compartment. Constrained mobility of PKA-C may synergize with AKAP anchoring to determine specific PKA function in neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization, subcellular localization and nuclear targeting of casein kinase 2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peracchia, G; Jensen, A B; Culiáñez-Macià, F A

    1999-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized the genomic clone of maize casein kinase 2 (CK2) alpha subunit using the previously described alphaCK2-1 cDNA clone as a probe. The genomic clone is 7.5 kb long and contains 10 exons, separated by 9 introns of different size, two larger than 1.5 kb and the others...

  17. Protein implicated in nonsyndromic mental retardation regulates protein kinase A (PKA) activity

    KAUST Repository

    Altawashi, Azza; Jung, Sung Yun; Liu, Dou; Su, Bing; Qin, Jun

    2012-01-01

    capacitytoformdendritesandsynapsesinculture. Atthebiochemical level,CC2D1Atransduces signals to the cyclic adenosine 3?,5?-monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway during neuronal cell differentiation. PKA activity is compromised, and the translocation of its catalytic subunit

  18. Deletion of individual Ku subunits in mice causes an NHEJ-independent phenotype potentially by altering apurinic/apyrimidinic site repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J. Choi (Yong Jun); H. Li (Han); M.Y. Son (Mi Young); X.-H. Wang (Xiao-Hong); J.L. Fornsaglio (Jamie L.); R.W. Sobol (Robert W.); M. Lee (Moonsook); J. Vijg (Jan); S. Imholz (Sandra); M.E.T. Dollé (Martijn); H. van Steeg (Harry); E. Reiling (Erwin); P. Hasty (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractKu70 and Ku80 form a heterodimer called Ku that forms a holoenzyme with DNA dependent-protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKCS) to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) through the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As expected mutating these genes in mice caused a similar DSB

  19. The vacuolar V1/V0-ATPase is involved in the release of the HOPS subunit Vps41 from vacuoles, vacuole fragmentation and fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeda, Kozue; Cabrera, Margarita; Rohde, Jan

    2008-01-01

    At yeast vacuoles, phosphorylation of the HOPS subunit Vps41 depends on the Yck3 kinase. In a screen for mutants that mimic the yck3Delta phenotype, in which Vps41 accumulates in vacuolar dots, we observed that mutants in the V0-part of the V0/V1-ATPase, in particular in vma16Delta, also accumulate...

  20. The Subunit Principle in Scar Face Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahat, Ahmed; Lashin, Riham

    2017-06-01

    Facial scaring is considered one of the most difficult cosmetic problems for any plastic surgeon to solve. The condition is more difficult if the direction of the scar is not parallel to relaxed skin tension lines. Attempts to manage this difficult situation included revisions using geometric designs, Z plasties or W plasties to camouflage the straight line visible scaring. The use of long-lasting resorbable sutures was tried too. Recently, the use of botulinum toxin during revision improved the results. Fractional CO2 lasers, microfat grafts, and platelet-rich plasma were added to the armamentarium. The scar is least visible if placed in the junction between the facial subunits. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the subunit principle to improve the results of scar revision. Four patients were included in this study. Tissue expansion of the intact part of the subunit allowed shifting the scar to the junction between the affected subunit and the adjacent one. Tissue expansion, delivery of the expanders, and advancement of the flaps were successful in all patients. The fact that this is a 2-stage procedure and sacrifices some of the intact skin from the affected facial subunit, makes this technique reserved to patients with ugly facial scars who are ambitious to improve their appearance.

  1. Differential regulation of synaptic and extrasynaptic α4 GABA(A) receptor populations by protein kinase A and protein kinase C in cultured cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnsack, John Peyton; Carlson, Stephen L; Morrow, A Leslie

    2016-06-01

    The GABAA α4 subunit exists in two distinct populations of GABAA receptors. Synaptic GABAA α4 receptors are localized at the synapse and mediate phasic inhibitory neurotransmission, while extrasynaptic GABAA receptors are located outside of the synapse and mediate tonic inhibitory transmission. These receptors have distinct pharmacological and biophysical properties that contribute to interest in how these different subtypes are regulated under physiological and pathological states. We utilized subcellular fractionation procedures to separate these populations of receptors in order to investigate their regulation by protein kinases in cortical cultured neurons. Protein kinase A (PKA) activation decreases synaptic α4 expression while protein kinase C (PKC) activation increases α4 subunit expression, and these effects are associated with increased β3 S408/409 or γ2 S327 phosphorylation respectively. In contrast, PKA activation increases extrasynaptic α4 and δ subunit expression, while PKC activation has no effect. Our findings suggest synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA α4 subunit expression can be modulated by PKA to inform the development of more specific therapeutics for neurological diseases that involve deficits in GABAergic transmission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phorbol ester-induced serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor decreases its tyrosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, S; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1988-03-05

    The effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the function of the insulin receptor was examined in intact hepatoma cells (Fao) and in solubilized extracts purified by wheat germ agglutinin chromatography. Incubation of ortho[32P]phosphate-labeled Fao cells with TPA increased the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor 2-fold after 30 min. Analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides from the beta-subunit of the receptor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and determination of their phosphoamino acid composition suggested that TPA predominantly stimulated phosphorylation of serine residues in a single tryptic peptide. Incubation of the Fao cells with insulin (100 nM) for 1 min stimulated 4-fold the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Prior treatment of the cells with TPA inhibited the insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation by 50%. The receptors extracted with Triton X-100 from TPA-treated Fao cells and purified on immobilized wheat germ agglutinin retained the alteration in kinase activity and exhibited a 50% decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphotransferase activity toward exogenous substrates. This was due primarily to a decrease in the Vmax for these reactions. TPA treatment also decreased the Km of the insulin receptor for ATP. Incubation of the insulin receptor purified from TPA-treated cells with alkaline phosphatase decreased the phosphate content of the beta-subunit to the control level and reversed the inhibition, suggesting that the serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit was responsible for the decreased tyrosine kinase activity. Our results support the notion that the insulin receptor is a substrate for protein kinase C in the Fao cell and that the increase in serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the receptor produced by TPA treatment inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vivo and in vitro. These data suggest that protein kinase C may regulate the function

  3. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003357.htm Pyruvate kinase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... energy when oxygen levels are low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. In the laboratory, white blood ...

  4. Phosphorylation of sites 3 and 2 in rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase by a multifunctional protein kinase (ATP-citrate lyase kinase)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheorain, V.S.; Ramakrishna, S.; Benjamin, W.B.; Soderling, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    A multifunctional protein kinase, purified from rat liver as ATP-citrate lyase kinase, has been identified as a glycogen synthase kinase. This kinase catalyzed incorporation of up to 1.5 mol of and]2number 2 PO 4 /mol of synthase subunit associated with a decrease in the glycogen synthase activity ratio from 0.85 to a value of 0.15. Approximately 65-70% of the 34 PO 4 was incorporated into site 3 and 30-35% into site 2 as determined by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. This multifunctional kinase was distinguished from glycogen synthase kinase-3 on the basis of nucleotide and protein substrate specificities. Since the phosphate contents in glycogen synthase of sites 3 and 2 are altered in diabetes and by insulin administration, the possible involvement of the multifunctional kinase was explored. Glycogen synthase purified from diabetic rabbits was phosphorylated in vitro by this multifunctional kinase at only 10% of the rate compared to synthase purified from control rabbits. Treatment of the diabetics with insulin restored the synthase to a form that was readily phosphorylated in vitro

  5. Cloning and expression of human deoxycytidine kinase cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chottiner, E.G.; Shewach, D.S.; Datta, N.S.; Ashcraft, E.; Gribbin, D.; Ginsburg, D.; Fox, I.H.; Mitchell, B.S.

    1991-01-01

    Deoxycytidine (dCyd) kinase is required for the phosphorylation of several deoxyribonucleosides and certain nucleoside analogs widely employed as antiviral and chemotherapeutic agents. Detailed analysis of this enzyme has been limited, however, by its low abundance and instability. Using oligonucleotides based on primary amino acid sequence derived from purified dCyd kinase, the authors have screened T-lymphoblast cDNA libraries and identified a cDNA sequence that encodes a 30.5-kDa protein corresponding to the subunit molecular mass of the purified protein. Expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli results in a 40-fold increase in dCyd kinase activity over control levels. Northern blot analysis reveals a single 2.8-kilobase mRNA expressed in T lymphoblasts at 5- to 10-fold higher levels than in B lymphoblasts, and decreased dCyd kinase mRNA levels are present in T-lymphoblast cell lines resistant to arabinofuranosylcytosine and dideoxycytidine. These findings document that this cDNA encodes the T-lymphoblast dCyd kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of dAdo and dGuo as well as dCyd and arabinofuranosylcytosine

  6. Immunochemical aspects of crotoxim and its subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazone, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Crotamine and crotoxin with the subunits - phospholipase A and crotapotin - were obtained by purification from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom. Interaction studies of the subunits using crotalic antiserum, indicated that: crotoxin is formed of crotapotin and phospholipase A with the molar ratio of 1 to 1; using crotapotin 125 I the presence of a soluble complex was shown with the same antiserum. Immunological precipitation reactions demonstrated that crotapotin is antigenic: crotapotin and phospholipase A presented similar antigenic determinants; crotoxin antiserum reacted with each one of the submits; when the subunits are mixed to form synthetic crotoxin some antigenic determinants are masked in the process of interaction. Crotamine, interacted with crotapotin 1:1, without hidden antigenic determinants crotapotin antigenic site seems to be formed by, at least, one lysine. Enzimatical activity of phospholipase A apreared to be dependent on some reaction conditions when its arginine residues are blocked. Tyrosines of phospholipase A are more susceptible to labelling with 131 I than crotapotin. Gama irradiation of aqueous solutions of the subunits produced modifications in the ultraviolet spectra. A decrease of the enzymatic activity occured as a function of radiation dosis. Immunological activities of crotapotin and phospholipase A were not altered [pt

  7. Involvement of stress-activated protein kinase in the cellular response to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine and other DNA-damaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, A; Datta, R; Yuan, Z M; Kharbanda, S; Kufe, D

    1995-12-01

    The cellular response to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) includes activation of Jun/AP-1, induction of c-jun transcription, and programmed cell death. The stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases stimulate the transactivation function of c-jun by amino terminal phosphorylation. The present work demonstrates that ara-C activates p54 SAP kinase. The finding that SAP kinase is also activated by alkylating agents (mitomycin C and cisplatinum) and the topoisomerase I inhibitor 9-amino-camptothecin supports DNA damage as an initial signal in this cascade. The results demonstrate that ara-C also induces binding of SAP kinase to the SH2/SH3-containing adapter protein Grb2. SAP kinase binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2, while interaction of the p85 alpha-subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex. The results also demonstrate that ara-C treatment is associated with inhibition of lipid and serine kinase activities of PI 3-kinase. The potential significance of the ara-C-induced interaction between SAP kinase and PI 3-kinase is further supported by the demonstration that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, stimulates SAP kinase activity. The finding that Wortmannin treatment is also associated with internucleosomal DNA fragmentation may support a potential link between PI 3-kinase and regulation of both SAP kinase and programmed cell death.

  8. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B bind to the SH2 domains of phospholipase C-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurd, J W; Bissoon, N

    1997-08-01

    The NMDA receptor has recently been found to be phosphorylated on tyrosine. To assess the possible connection between tyrosine phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor and signaling pathways in the postsynaptic cell, we have investigated the relationship between tyrosine phosphorylation and the binding of NMDA receptor subunits to the SH2 domains of phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma). A glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein containing both the N- and the C-proximal SH2 domains of PLC-gamma was bound to glutathione-agarose and reacted with synaptic junctional proteins and glycoproteins. Tyrosine-phosphorylated PSD-GP180, which has been identified as the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, bound to the SH2-agarose beads in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Immunoblot analysis with antibodies specific for individual NMDA receptor subunits showed that both NR2A and NR2B subunits bound to the SH2-agarose. No binding occurred to GST-agarose lacking an associated SH2 domain, indicating that binding was specific for the SH2 domains. The binding of receptor subunits increased after the incubation of synaptic junctions with ATP and decreased after treatment of synaptic junctions with exogenous protein tyrosine phosphatase. Immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that NR2A and NR2B were phosphorylated on tyrosine and further that tyrosine phosphorylation of each of the subunits was increased after incubation with ATP. The results demonstrate that NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B will bind to the SH2 domains of PLC-gamma and that isolated synaptic junctions contain endogenous protein tyrosine kinase(s) that can phosphorylate both NR2A and NR2B receptor subunits, and suggest that interaction of the tyrosine-phosphorylated NMDA receptor with proteins that contain SH2 domains may serve to link it to signaling pathways in the postsynaptic cell.

  9. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  10. Probes of the Mitochondrial cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Jennifer R.; Lawrence, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a fluorescent assay to detect activity of the mitochondrial cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is described. A peptide-based sensor was utilized to quantify the relative amount of PKA activity present in each compartment of the mitochondria (the outer membrane, the intermembrane space, and the matrix). In the process of validating this assay, we discovered that PKA activity is regulated by the protease calpain. Upon exposure of bovine heart mitochondria to digitonin, Ca2+, and a variety of electron transport chain inhibitors, the regulatory subunits of the PKA holoenzyme (R2C2) are digested, releasing active catalytic subunits. This proteolysis is attenuated by calpain inhibitor I (ALLN). PMID:23410952

  11. Enterococcus faecalis phosphomevalonate kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doun, Stephanie S.; Burgner, John W.; Briggs, Scott D.; Rodwell, Victor W.

    2005-01-01

    The six enzymes of the mevalonate pathway of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis represent potential for addressing a pressing human health concern, the development of antibiotics against resistant strains of the Gram-positive streptococci. We previously characterized the first four of the mevalonate pathway enzymes of Enterococcus faecalis, and here characterize the fifth, phosphomevalonate kinase (E.C. 2.7.4.2). E. faecalis genomic DNA and the polymerase chain reaction were used to clone DNA thought to encode phosphomevalonate kinase into pET28b(+). Double-stranded DNA sequencing verified the sequence of the recombinant gene. The encoded N-terminal hexahistidine-tagged protein was expressed in Escherichia coli with induction by isopropylthiogalactoside and purified by Ni++ affinity chromatography, yield 20 mg protein per liter. Analysis of the purified protein by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established it as E. faecalis phosphomevalonate kinase. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that the kinase exists in solution primarily as a dimer. Assay for phosphomevalonate kinase activity used pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase to couple the formation of ADP to the oxidation of NADH. Optimal activity occurred at pH 8.0 and at 37°C. The activation energy was ~5.6 kcal/mol. Activity with Mn++, the preferred cation, was optimal at about 4 mM. Relative rates using different phosphoryl donors were 100 (ATP), 3.6 (GTP), 1.6 (TTP), and 0.4 (CTP). Km values were 0.17 mM for ATP and 0.19 mM for (R,S)-5-phosphomevalonate. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 3.9 μmol substrate converted per minute per milligram protein. Applications to an immobilized enzyme bioreactor and to drug screening and design are discussed. PMID:15802646

  12. From Phosphosites to Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a pivotal role in propagating the phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks in living cells. With the overwhelming quantities of phosphoproteomics data being generated, the number of identified phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) is ever increasing. Often, proteomics investigations...... sequence motifs, mostly based on large scale in vivo and in vitro experiments. The context of the kinase and the phosphorylated proteins in a biological system is equally important for predicting association between the enzymes and substrates, an aspect that is also being tackled with available...

  13. Alteration of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase activity in rabbit ciliary processes by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamere, N.A.; Socci, R.R.; King, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    The response of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na,K-ATPase) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase was examined in membranes obtained from rabbit iris-ciliary body. In the presence of the protein kinase together with 10(-5) M cAMP, Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced. No change in Na,K-ATPase activity was detected in response to the protein kinase without added cAMP. Likewise cAMP alone did not alter Na,K-ATPase activity. Reduction of Na,K-ATPase activity was also observed in the presence of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. The response of the enzyme to the kinase catalytic subunit was also examined in membranes obtained from rabbit ciliary processes. In the presence of 8 micrograms/ml of the catalytic subunit, ciliary process Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced by more than 50%. To examine whether other ATPases were suppressed by the protein kinase, calcium-stimulated ATPase activity was examined; its activity was stimulated by the catalytic subunit. To test whether the response of the ciliary process Na,K-ATPase is unique, experiments were also performed using membrane preparations from rabbit lens epithelium or rabbit kidney; the catalytic subunit significantly reduced the activity of Na,K-ATPase from the kidney but not the lens. These Na,K-ATPase studies suggest that in the iris-ciliary body, cAMP may alter sodium pump activity. In parallel 86Rb uptake studies, we observed that ouabain-inhibitable potassium uptake by intact pieces of iris-ciliary body was reduced by exogenous dibutryl cAMP or by forskolin

  14. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  15. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the α subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single β subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the α subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub sα/ relative to G/sub ichemical bond/ and G/sub ochemical bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with [ 125 I]protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the β subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the α subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium

  16. Multiple isoforms for the catalytic subunit of PKA in the basal fungal lineage Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Núñez, Lucas; Ocampo, Josefina; Gottlieb, Alexandra M; Rossi, Silvia; Moreno, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) activity is involved in dimorphism of the basal fungal lineage Mucor. From the recently sequenced genome of Mucor circinelloides we could predict ten catalytic subunits of PKA. From sequence alignment and structural prediction we conclude that the catalytic core of the isoforms is conserved, and the difference between them resides in their amino termini. This high number of isoforms is maintained in the subdivision Mucoromycotina. Each paralogue, when compared to the ones form other fungi is more homologous to one of its orthologs than to its paralogs. All of these fungal isoforms cannot be included in the class I or II in which fungal protein kinases have been classified. mRNA levels for each isoform were measured during aerobic and anaerobic growth. The expression of each isoform is differential and associated to a particular growth stage. We reanalyzed the sequence of PKAC (GI 20218944), the only cloned sequence available until now for a catalytic subunit of M. circinelloides. PKAC cannot be classified as a PKA because of its difference in the conserved C-tail; it shares with PKB a conserved C2 domain in the N-terminus. No catalytic activity could be measured for this protein nor predicted bioinformatically. It can thus be classified as a pseudokinase. Its importance can not be underestimated since it is expressed at the mRNA level in different stages of growth, and its deletion is lethal. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radioimmunoassay measurement of creatine kinase BB in the serum of schizophrenic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, M H; Friedhoff, A J [New York Univ., NY (USA). Medical Center

    1980-10-23

    Brain type creatine kinase (BB) isoenzyme was measured using a highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay procedure (limit of detection, 1 ..mu..g/l of sample) in two schizophrenic populations, an acute non-medicated group consisting of 35 subjects and a chronic group of 15 subjects. Since the assay can also measure the B subunit of MB isoenzyme, patients were selected so as to exclude subjects with possible heart, kidney or other ailments which might result in an increased serum creatine kinase B subunit. Both the acute schizophrenics (3.0 +- 0.23) x S.E.M. and the chronic schizophrenics (2.9 +- 0.33) had serum levels of creatine kinase BB similar to those of controls (2.8 +- 0.21) and non-cardiac patients (3.5 +- 0.58). Patients having myocardial infarction or neurovascular surgery had elevated creatine kinase B subunit. Similar but much less sensitive quantitative results were obtained using agarose multizonal electrophoresis.

  18. Radioimmunoassay measurement of creatine kinase BB in the serum of schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, M.H.; Friedhoff, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Brain type creatine kinase (BB) isoenzyme was measured using a highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay procedure (limit of detection, 1 μg/l of sample) in two schizophrenic populations, an acute non-medicated group consisting of 35 subjects and a chronic group of 15 subjects. Since the assay can also measure the B subunit of MB isoenzyme, patients were selected so as to exclude subjects with possible heart, kidney or other ailments which might result in an increased serum creatine kinase B subunit. Both the acute schizophrenics (3.0 +- 0.23) x S.E.M. and the chronic schizophrenics (2.9 +- 0.33) had serum levels of creatine kinase BB similar to those of controls (2.8 +- 0.21) and non-cardiac patients (3.5 +- 0.58). Patients having myocardial infarction or neurovascular surgery had elevated creatine kinase B subunit. Similar but much less sensitive quantitative results were obtained using agarose multizonal electrophoresis. (Auth.)

  19. NSs protein of rift valley fever virus promotes posttranslational downregulation of the TFIIH subunit p62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2011-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is an important emerging pathogen of humans and ruminants. Its NSs protein has previously been identified as a major virulence factor that suppresses host defense through three distinct mechanisms: it directly inhibits beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter activity, it promotes the degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), and it suppresses host transcription by disrupting the assembly of the basal transcription factor TFIIH through sequestration of its p44 subunit. Here, we report that in addition to PKR, NSs also promotes the degradation of the TFIIH subunit p62. Infection of cells with the RVFV MP-12 vaccine strain reduced p62 protein levels to below the detection limit early in the course of infection. This NSs-mediated downregulation of p62 was posttranslational, as it was unaffected by pharmacological inhibition of transcription or translation and MP-12 infection had no effect on p62 mRNA levels. Treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors but not inhibition of lysosomal acidification or nuclear export resulted in a stabilization of p62 in the presence of NSs. Furthermore, p62 could be coprecipitated with NSs from lysates of infected cells. These data suggest that the RVFV NSs protein is able to interact with the TFIIH subunit p62 inside infected cells and promotes its degradation, which can occur directly in the nucleus.

  20. Comparison of phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins from HeLa and Krebs II ascites-tumour cells by cyclic AMP-dependent and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Beier, H; Speichermann, N

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in vitro by essentially homogeneous preparations of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase was compared. Each protein kinase was added at a concentration of 30nM. Ribosomal proteins were...... by the cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme. Between 0.1 and 0.2 mol of phosphate was incorporated/mol of these phosphorylated proteins. With the exception of protein S7, the same proteins were also major substrates for the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase. Time courses of the phosphorylation of individual proteins...... from the small and large ribosomal subunits in the presence of either protein kinase suggested four types of phosphorylation reactions: (1) proteins S2, S10 and L5 were preferably phosphorylated by the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase; (2) proteins S3 and L6 were phosphorylated at very similar rates...

  1. Protein kinase C involvement in focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix molecules such as fibronectin can promote cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation. Although some interactions of fibronectin with cell surface receptors have now been identified, the consequent activation of intracellular messenger systems by cell/matrix interactions have...... still to be elucidated. We show here that the kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 reduce focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in response to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner, and that activators of protein kinase C can promote their formation under conditions where they do not normally form....... Fibroblasts spread within 1h on substrata composed of fibronectin and formed focal adhesions by 3h, as monitored by interference reflection microscopy (IRM) and by labeling for talin, vinculin and integrin beta 1 subunits. In addition, stress fibers were visible. When cells were allowed to spread for 1h...

  2. PKA catalytic subunit compartmentation regulates contractile and hypertrophic responses to β-adrenergic signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jason H.; Polanowska-Grabowska, Renata K.; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Shields, Charles W.; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    β-adrenergic signaling is spatiotemporally heterogeneous in the cardiac myocyte, conferring exquisite control to sympathetic stimulation. Such heterogeneity drives the formation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling microdomains, which regulate Ca2+ handling and contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that the nucleus independently comprises a PKA signaling microdomain regulating myocyte hypertrophy. Spatially-targeted FRET reporters for PKA activity identified slower PKA activation and lower isoproterenol sensitivity in the nucleus (t50 = 10.60±0.68 min; EC50 = 89.00 nmol/L) than in the cytosol (t50 = 3.71±0.25 min; EC50 = 1.22 nmol/L). These differences were not explained by cAMP or AKAP-based compartmentation. A computational model of cytosolic and nuclear PKA activity was developed and predicted that differences in nuclear PKA dynamics and magnitude are regulated by slow PKA catalytic subunit diffusion, while differences in isoproterenol sensitivity are regulated by nuclear expression of protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). These were validated by FRET and immunofluorescence. The model also predicted differential phosphorylation of PKA substrates regulating cell contractility and hypertrophy. Ca2+ and cell hypertrophy measurements validated these predictions and identified higher isoproterenol sensitivity for contractile enhancements (EC50 = 1.84 nmol/L) over cell hypertrophy (EC50 = 85.88 nmol/L). Over-expression of spatially targeted PKA catalytic subunit to the cytosol or nucleus enhanced contractile and hypertrophic responses, respectively. We conclude that restricted PKA catalytic subunit diffusion is an important PKA compartmentation mechanism and the nucleus comprises a novel PKA signaling microdomain, insulating hypertrophic from contractile β-adrenergic signaling responses. PMID:24225179

  3. Muscular subunits transplantation for facial reanimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazan André Salo Buslik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present an alternative technique for reconstruction of musculocutaneous damages in the face transferring innervated subsegments(subunits of the latissimus dorsi flap for replacement of various facial mimetic muscles. METHODS: One clinical case of trauma with skin and mimetic muscles damage is described as an example of the technique. The treatment was performed with microsurgical transfer of latissimus dorsi muscle subunits. Each subunit present shape and dimensions of the respective mimetic muscles replaced. The origin, insertions and force vectors for the mimicmuscle lost were considered. Each subsegment has its own arterial and venous supply with a motor nerve component for the muscular unit. RESULTS: Pre and one year postoperative photos registration of static and dynamic mimic aspects, as well as digital electromyography digital data of the patients were compared. The transplanted muscular units presented myoeletric activity, fulfilling both the functional and cosmetic aspect. CONCLUSION: This technique seems to be a promising way to deal with the complex musculocutaneous losses of the face as well as facial palsy.

  4. Influvac, a trivalent inactivated subunit influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Fabiano, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Influenza represents a major sanitary and socio-economic burden and vaccination is universally considered the most effective strategy for preventing the disease and its complications. Traditional influenza vaccines have been on the market since the late 1940s, with million of doses administered annually worldwide, and demonstrated a substantial efficacy and safety. The trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine has been available for more than 25 years and has been studied in healthy children, adults and the elderly and in people affected by underlying chronic medical conditions. We describe vaccine technology focusing on subunit vaccine production procedures and mode of action and provide updated information on efficacy and safety available data. A review of efficacy and safety data in healthy subjects and in high risk populations from major sponsor- and investigator-driven studies. The vaccine showed a good immunogenicity and a favorable safety profile in all target groups. In the panorama of actually available influenza vaccines, trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine represents a well-established tool for preventing flu and the associated complications.

  5. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  6. Mechanism of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulation of AMPA receptor gating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Skov; Jenkins, Meagan A; Banke, Tue G

    2011-01-01

    The function, trafficking and synaptic signaling of AMPA receptors are tightly regulated by phosphorylation. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylates the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit at Ser831 to increase single-channel conductance. We show that CaMKII increases the conductanc...

  7. Reconstruction of the yeast Snf1 kinase regulatory network reveals its role as a global energy regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2009-01-01

    Highly conserved among eukaryotic cells, the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of carbon metabolism. To map the complete network of interactions around AMPK in yeast (Snf1) and to evaluate the role of its regulatory subunit Snf4, we measured global mRNA, protein and metabolite...

  8. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction study of the three PASTA domains of the Ser/Thr kinase Stk1 from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paracuellos, Patricia; Ballandras, Allison; Robert, Xavier; Cozzone, Alain J.; Duclos, Bertrand; Gouet, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Crystallization conditions have been determined for an extracellular portion of the Ser/Thr kinase Stk1 from the human pathogen S. aureus that contains three PASTA subunits. Synchrotron data have been collected to a resolution of 2.9 Å. Phasing is in progress. PASTA subunits (∼70 amino acids) are specific to bacterial serine/threonine kinases and to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and are involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus contains a serine/threonine kinase, Stk1, which plays a major role in virulence. A recombinant His-tagged portion of the extracellular domain of Stk1 containing three PASTA subunits has been crystallized using zinc sulfate as a crystallizing agent. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4 1 22, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.0, b = 68.0, c = 158.1 Å. Structure determination by the MAD method is now in progress

  9. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  10. A simple electrostatic switch important in the activation of type I protein kinase A by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Dominico; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Pennypacker, Juniper K; McCammon, J Andrew; Taylor, Susan S

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic AMP activates protein kinase A by binding to an inhibitory regulatory (R) subunit and releasing inhibition of the catalytic (C) subunit. Even though crystal structures of regulatory and catalytic subunits have been solved, the precise molecular mechanism by which cyclic AMP activates the kinase remains unknown. The dynamic properties of the cAMP binding domain in the absence of cAMP or C-subunit are also unknown. Here we report molecular-dynamics simulations and mutational studies of the RIalpha R-subunit that identify the C-helix as a highly dynamic switch which relays cAMP binding to the helical C-subunit binding regions. Furthermore, we identify an important salt bridge which links cAMP binding directly to the C-helix that is necessary for normal activation. Additional mutations show that a hydrophobic "hinge" region is not as critical for the cross-talk in PKA as it is in the homologous EPAC protein, illustrating how cAMP can control diverse functions using the evolutionarily conserved cAMP-binding domains.

  11. Soybean glycinin subunits: Characterization of physicochemical and adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaoqun; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Sun, Xiuzhi

    2006-10-04

    Soybean proteins have shown great potential for applications as renewable and environmentally friendly adhesives. The objective of this work was to study physicochemical and adhesion properties of soy glycinin subunits. Soybean glycinin was extracted from soybean flour and then fractionated into acidic and basic subunits with an estimated purity of 90 and 85%, respectively. Amino acid composition of glycinin subunits was determined. The high hydrophobic amino acid content is a major contributor to the solubility behavior and water resistance of the basic subunits. Acidic subunits and glycinin had similar solubility profiles, showing more than 80% solubility at pH 2.0-4.0 or 6.5-12.0, whereas basic subunits had considerably lower solubility with the minimum at pH 4.5-8.0. Thermal analysis using a differential scanning calorimeter suggested that basic subunits form new oligomeric structures with higher thermal stability than glycinin but no highly ordered structures present in isolated acidic subunits. The wet strength of basic subunits was 160% more than that of acidic subunits prepared at their respective isoelectric points (pI) and cured at 130 degrees C. Both pH and the curing temperature significantly affected adhesive performance. High-adhesion water resistance was usually observed for adhesives from protein prepared at their pI values and cured at elevated temperatures. Basic subunits are responsible for the water resistance of glycinin and are a good starting material for the development of water-resistant adhesives.

  12. Intrasteric control of AMPK via the gamma1 subunit AMP allosteric regulatory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julian; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Van Denderen, Bryce J W; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W; Witters, Lee A; Stapleton, David; Kemp, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a alphabetagamma heterotrimer that is activated in response to both hormones and intracellular metabolic stress signals. AMPK is regulated by phosphorylation on the alpha subunit and by AMP allosteric control previously thought to be mediated by both alpha and gamma subunits. Here we present evidence that adjacent gamma subunit pairs of CBS repeat sequences (after Cystathionine Beta Synthase) form an AMP binding site related to, but distinct from the classical AMP binding site in phosphorylase, that can also bind ATP. The AMP binding site of the gamma(1) CBS1/CBS2 pair, modeled on the structures of the CBS sequences present in the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase crystal structure, contains three arginine residues 70, 152, and 171 and His151. The yeast gamma homolog, snf4 contains a His151Gly substitution, and when this is introduced into gamma(1), AMP allosteric control is substantially lost and explains why the yeast snf1p/snf4p complex is insensitive to AMP. Arg70 in gamma(1) corresponds to the site of mutation in human gamma(2) and pig gamma(3) genes previously identified to cause an unusual cardiac phenotype and glycogen storage disease, respectively. Mutation of any of AMP binding site Arg residues to Gln substantially abolishes AMP allosteric control in expressed AMPK holoenzyme. The Arg/Gln mutations also suppress the previously described inhibitory properties of ATP and render the enzyme constitutively active. We propose that ATP acts as an intrasteric inhibitor by bridging the alpha and gamma subunits and that AMP functions to derepress AMPK activity.

  13. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of cAMP-dependent protein kinase by 4-azido-2-nitrophenyladenylyl pyrophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.R.; Ho, H.T.; Wong, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    A photoaffinity analogue of ATP, 4-azido-2-nitrophenyl-adenylyl pyrophosphate (ANAP) has been synthesized to investigate the topographical interaction between the catalytic and the regulatory subunits of the bovine heart type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The synthesis involves coupling of 4-azido-2-nitrophenyl phosphate with adenosine 5'-monophosphomorpholidate. ANAP has an absorption maximum at 260 nm (molar absorptivity = 35.4 x 10 3 M -1 cm -1 ) and a shoulder at 320 nm. Kinetically, ANAP inhibits the enzyme competitively against ATP with a Ki of 0.37 mM. The catalytic subunit is inactivated by ANAP upon photolysis in the presence of magnesium ion. ATP protects the enzyme from photoinactivation but the regulatory subunit does not. Gel electrophoretic analysis of the enzyme labeled by [ 14 C]ANAP shows that the photoincorporated ANAP is associated mainly with the catalytic subunit, even when the regulator dimer is in twelve fold excess. Little or no ANAP is found incorporated into the regulator subunit. The data suggest that the photoreactive portion of ANAP does not lie within reach of the regulatory protein when the analogue is bound to the catalytic subunit

  15. Mcs2 and a novel CAK subunit Pmh1 associate with Skp1 in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamps, Sophie; Westerling, Thomas; Pihlak, Arno; Tafforeau, Lionel; Vandenhaute, Jean; Maekelae, Tomi P.; Hermand, Damien

    2004-01-01

    The Mcs6 CDK together with its cognate cyclin Mcs2 represents the CDK-activating kinase (CAK) of fission yeast Cdc2. We have attempted to determine complexes in which Mcs6 and Mcs2 mediate this and possible other functions. Here we characterize a novel interaction between Mcs2 and Skp1, a component of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F box protein) ubiquitin ligase. Furthermore, we identify a novel protein termed Pmh1 through its association with Skp1. Pmh1 associates with the Mcs6-Mcs2 complex, enhancing its kinase activity, and represents the apparent homolog of metazoan Mat1. Association of Mcs2 or Pmh1 with Skp1 does not appear to be involved in proteolytic degradation, as these complexes do not contain Pcu1, and levels of Mcs2 or Pmh1 are not sensitive to inhibition of SCF and the 26S proteasome. The identified interactions between Skp1 and two regulatory CAK subunits may reflect a novel mechanism to modulate activity and specificity of the Mcs6 kinase

  16. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Inhibiting Src family tyrosine kinase activity blocks glutamate signalling to ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB but not JNK in cultured striatal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossthwaite, Andrew J; Valli, Haseeb; Williams, Robert J

    2004-03-01

    Glutamate receptor activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling cascades has been implicated in diverse neuronal functions such as synaptic plasticity, development and excitotoxicity. We have previously shown that Ca2+-influx through NMDA receptors in cultured striatal neurones mediates the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent pathway. Exposing neurones to the Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, but not the inactive analogue PP3, inhibited NMDA receptor-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB in a concentration-dependent manner, and reduced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. To establish a link between Src family tyrosine kinase-mediated phosphorylation and PI 3-kinase signalling, affinity precipitation experiments were performed with the SH2 domains of the PI 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85. This revealed a Src-dependent phosphorylation of a focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-p85 complex on glutamate stimulation. Demonstrating that PI3-kinase is not ubiquitously involved in NMDA receptor signal transduction, the PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 did not prevent NMDA receptor Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2). Further, inhibiting Src family kinases increased NMDA receptor-dependent JNK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that Src family kinase-dependent cascades may physiologically limit signalling to JNK. These results demonstrate that Src family tyrosine kinases and PI3-kinase are pivotal regulators of NMDA receptor signalling to ERK/Akt and JNK in striatal neurones.

  18. The PKA-C3 catalytic subunit is required in two pairs of interneurons for successful mating of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Marlène; Sunderhaus, Elizabeth; Wentzell, Jill S; Kuntz, Sara; Strauss, Roland; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2018-02-06

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been shown to play a role in a plethora of cellular processes ranging from development to memory formation. Its activity is mediated by the catalytic subunits whereby many species express several paralogs. Drosophila encodes three catalytic subunits (PKA-C1-3) and whereas PKA-C1 has been well studied, the functions of the other two subunits were unknown. PKA-C3 is the orthologue of mammalian PRKX/Pkare and they are structurally more closely related to each other than to other catalytic subunits within their species. PRKX is expressed in the nervous system in mice but its function is also unknown. We now show that the loss of PKA-C3 in Drosophila causes copulation defects, though the flies are active and show no defects in other courtship behaviours. This phenotype is specifically due to the loss of PKA-C3 because PKA-C1 cannot replace PKA-C3. PKA-C3 is expressed in two pairs of interneurons that send projections to the ventro-lateral protocerebrum and the mushroom bodies and that synapse onto motor neurons in the ventral nerve cord. Rescue experiments show that expression of PKA-C3 in these interneurons is sufficient for copulation, suggesting a role in relaying information from the sensory system to motor neurons to initiate copulation.

  19. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  20. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  1. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets. PMID:24212825

  2. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sridharan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  3. A conserved Mediator–CDK8 kinase module association regulates Mediator–RNA polymerase II interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Sato, Shigeo; Tomomori-Sato, Chieri; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan W.; Asturias, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    The CDK8 kinase module (CKM) is a conserved, dissociable Mediator subcomplex whose component subunits were genetically linked to the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) and individually recognized as transcriptional repressors before Mediator was identified as a preeminent complex in eukaryotic transcription regulation. We used macromolecular electron microscopy and biochemistry to investigate the subunit organization, structure, and Mediator interaction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKM. We found that interaction of the CKM with Mediator’s Middle module interferes with CTD-dependent RNAPII binding to a previously unknown Middle module CTD-binding site targeted early on in a multi-step holoenzyme formation process. Taken together, our results reveal the basis for CKM repression, clarify the origin of the connection between CKM subunits and the CTD, and suggest that a combination of competitive interactions and conformational changes that facilitate holoenzyme formation underlie the Mediator mechanism. PMID:23563140

  4. Protein Kinase CK2 Content in GL261 Mouse Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Font, Laura; Alcaraz, Estefania; Plana, Maria; Candiota, Ana Paula; Itarte, Emilio; Arús, Carles

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and aggressive human glial tumour with a median survival of 14-15 months. Temozolomide (TMZ) is the standard chemotherapeutic choice for GBM treatment. Unfortunately, chemoresistence always ensues with concomitant tumour regrowth. Protein kinase CK2 (CK2) contributes to tumour development, proliferation, and suppression of apoptosis in cancer and it is overexpressed in human GBM. Targeting CK2 in GBM treatment may benefit patients. With this translational perspective in mind, we have studied the CK2 expression level by Western blot analysis in a preclinical model of GBM: GL261 cells growing orthotopically in C57BL/6 mice. The expression level of the CK2 catalytic subunit (CK2α) was higher in tumour (about 4-fold) and in contralateral brain parenchyma (more than 2-fold) than in normal brain parenchyma (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant changes were found in CK2 regulatory subunit (CK2β) expression, suggesting an increased unbalance of CK2α/CK2β in GL261 tumours with respect to normal brain parenchyma, in agreement with a differential role of these two subunits in tumours.

  5. Human aldolase B subunit-specific radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaka, M.; Alpert, E.

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the direct quantification of aldolase B in human serum and tissues. The method is a double-antibody radioimmunoassay technique using radioiodinated aldolase B homopolymer as ligand, chicken antibodies to aldolase B and rabbit antibodies to chicken IgG. This radioimmunoassay was shown to be specific for the aldolase B subunit, with no cross-reactivity with either human aldolase A subunit or homopolymeric human aldolase C (C 4 ). The lowest measurable amount by this method was 2 ng/ml. Aldolase B is predominantly found in normal liver tissue, with relatively-high aldolase B levels also observed in kidney. Aldolase B levels in the serum obtained from 11 normal subjects ranged from 23 to 38 ng/ml, with a mean of 28.5 +- 9.2 (S.D.) ng/ml. Almost all of patients with hepatitis had serum aldolase B levels greater than 30 ng/ml. In cancer patients, serum aldolase B was slightly elevated in patients with metastatic liver cancer and primary lever cell carcinoma, whereas no elevation of serum aldolase B was shown in patients without liver metastasis. (Auth.)

  6. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  7. Subunit stoichiometry of the chloroplast photosystem I complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, B.D.; Malkin, R.

    1988-01-01

    A native photosystem I (PS I) complex and a PS I core complex depleted of antenna subunits has been isolated from the uniformly 14 C-labeled aquatic higher plant, Lemna. These complexes have been analyzed for their subunit stoichiometry by quantitative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results for both preparations indicate that one copy of each high molecular mass subunit is present per PS I complex and that a single copy of most low molecular mass subunits is also present. These results suggest that iron-sulfur center X, an early PS I electron acceptor proposed to bind to the high molecular mass subunits, contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster which is bound to a dimeric structure of high molecular mass subunits, each providing 2 cysteine residues to coordinate this cluster

  8. Impact of kinase activating and inactivating patient mutations on binary PKA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Ruth; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Bachmann, Verena; Stefan, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger molecule cAMP links extracellular signals to intracellular responses. The main cellular cAMP effector is the compartmentalized protein kinase A (PKA). Upon receptor initiated cAMP-mobilization, PKA regulatory subunits (R) bind cAMP thereby triggering dissociation and activation of bound PKA catalytic subunits (PKAc). Mutations in PKAc or RIa subunits manipulate PKA dynamics and activities which contribute to specific disease patterns. Mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling contribute to carcinogenesis or hormone excess, while inactivating mutations cause hormone deficiency or resistance. Here we extended the application spectrum of a Protein-fragment Complementation Assay based on the Renilla Luciferase to determine binary protein:protein interactions (PPIs) of the PKA network. We compared time- and dose-dependent influences of cAMP-elevation on mutually exclusive PPIs of PKAc with the phosphotransferase inhibiting RIIb and RIa subunits and the protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI). We analyzed PKA dynamics following integration of patient mutations into PKAc and RIa. We observed that oncogenic modifications of PKAc(L206R) and RIa(Δ184-236) as well as rare disease mutations in RIa(R368X) affect complex formation of PKA and its responsiveness to cAMP elevation. With the cell-based PKA PPI reporter platform we precisely quantified the mechanistic details how inhibitory PKA interactions and defined patient mutations contribute to PKA functions.

  9. Insulin resistance in uremia: Insulin receptor kinase activity in liver and muscle from chronic uremic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchin, F.; Ittoop, O.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the partially purified insulin receptors from liver and skeletal muscle in a rat model of severe chronic uremia. 125 I-insulin binding was higher in the liver from uremic rats when compared with ad libitum- and pair-fed controls. Furthermore, the ability of insulin to stimulate the autophosphorylation of the β-subunit and insulin receptor kinase activity using Glu 80 , Tyr 20 as exogenous phosphoacceptor was increased in the liver of the uremic animals. The structural characteristics of the receptors, as determined by electrophoretic mobilities of affinity labeled α-subunit and the phosphorylated β-subunit, were normal in uremia. 125 I-insulin binding and insulin receptor kinase activity were similar in the skeletal muscle from uremic and pair- and ad libitum-fed animals. Thus the data are supportive of the hypothesis that in liver and muscle of chronic uremic rats, insulin resistance is due to a defect(s) distal to the insulin receptor kinase

  10. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqin eLi; Sigrid A Langhans

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during developme...

  11. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode......The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR expression profile of the target APCs. Here, we review state-of-the-art formulation approaches employed for the inclusion of immunostimulators and subunit...

  12. Drosophila Protein Kinase CK2: Genetics, Regulatory Complexity and Emerging Roles during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohna Bandyopadhyay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CK2 is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is highly conserved amongst all eukaryotes. It is a well-known oncogenic kinase that regulates vital cell autonomous functions and animal development. Genetic studies in the fruit fly Drosophila are providing unique insights into the roles of CK2 in cell signaling, embryogenesis, organogenesis, neurogenesis, and the circadian clock, and are revealing hitherto unknown complexities in CK2 functions and regulation. Here, we review Drosophila CK2 with respect to its structure, subunit diversity, potential mechanisms of regulation, developmental abnormalities linked to mutations in the gene encoding CK2 subunits, and emerging roles in multiple aspects of eye development. We examine the Drosophila CK2 “interaction map” and the eye-specific “transcriptome” databases, which raise the prospect that this protein kinase has many additional targets in the developing eye. We discuss the possibility that CK2 functions during early retinal neurogenesis in Drosophila and mammals bear greater similarity than has been recognized, and that this conservation may extend to other developmental programs. Together, these studies underscore the immense power of the Drosophila model organism to provide new insights and avenues to further investigate developmentally relevant targets of this protein kinase.

  13. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) stimulates pancreatic cancer growth through overexpressing GABAA receptor pi subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Akio; Hosokawa, Masayo; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2007-10-15

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) functions primarily as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature central nervous system, and GABA/GABA receptors are also present in nonneural tissues, including cancer, but their precise function in nonneuronal or cancerous cells has thus far been poorly defined. Through the genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells as well as subsequent reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analyses, we identified the overexpression of GABA receptor pi subunit (GABRP) in PDAC cells. We also found the expression of this peripheral type GABAA receptor subunit in few adult human organs. Knockdown of endogenous GABRP expression in PDAC cells by small interfering RNA attenuated PDAC cell growth, suggesting its essential role in PDAC cell viability. Notably, the addition of GABA into the cell culture medium promoted the proliferation of GABRP-expressing PDAC cells, but not GABRP-negative cells, and GABAA receptor antagonists inhibited this growth-promoting effect by GABA. The HEK293 cells constitutively expressing exogenous GABRP revealed the growth-promoting effect of GABA treatment. Furthermore, GABA treatment in GABRP-positive cells increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk) cascade. Clinical PDAC tissues contained a higher level of GABA than normal pancreas tissues due to the up-regulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 expression, suggesting their autocrine/paracrine growth-promoting effect in PDACs. These findings imply that GABA and GABRP could play important roles in PDAC development and progression, and that this pathway can be a promising molecular target for the development of new therapeutic strategies for PDAC.

  14. Cdc7 kinase - a new target for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan; Mahalingam, Devalingam; O'Dwyer, Michael; Santocanale, Corrado; Kelly, Kevin; Carew, Jennifer; Giles, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The cell division cycle 7 (Cdc7) is a serine threonine kinase that is of critical importance in the regulation of normal cell cycle progression. Cdc7 kinase is highly conserved during evolution and much has been learned about its biological roles in humans through the study of lower eukaryotes, particularly yeasts. Two important regulator proteins, Dbf4 and Drf1, bind to and modulate the kinase activity of human Cdc7 which phosphorylates several sites on Mcm2 (minichromosome maintenance protein 2), one of the six subunits of the replicative DNA helicase needed for duplication of the genome. Through regulation of both DNA synthesis and DNA damage response, both key functions in the survival of tumour cells, Cdc7 becomes an attractive target for pharmacological inhibition. There are much data available on the pre-clinical anti-cancer effects of Cdc7 depletion and although there are no available Cdc7 inhibitors in clinical trials as yet, several lead compounds are being optimised for this purpose. In this review, we will address the current status of Cdc7 as an important target for new drug development.

  15. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  16. Myristoylated α subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the α subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (α 45 and α 52 ), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (α 41 ), a 40-kDa protein (α 40 ), and the 36-kDa β subunit. No protein that comigrated with the α subunit of G 0 (unknown function) (α 39 ) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of [ 3 H]myristic acid, α 41 and α 40 contained 3 H label, while the β subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified α 41 and α 39 from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein β and γ subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (α, β, and γ) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with α 41 , α 40 , and α 39 was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins

  17. Development of a Subunit Vaccine for Contagious Bovine ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Their work has set the stage for commercial development of a sub-unit vaccine. ... The sub-unit vaccine will be cost-effective, easy to produce, and safe. How it will make a ... IDRC invites applications for the IDRC Doctoral Research Awards.

  18. Tyr721 regulates specific binding of the CSF-1 receptor kinase insert to PI 3'-kinase SH2 domains: a model for SH2-mediated receptor-target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, M; Liu, X; van der Geer, P; Letwin, K; Waterfield, M D; Hunter, T; Pawson, T

    1992-01-01

    Efficient binding of active phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3'-kinase to the autophosphorylated macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) requires the noncatalytic kinase insert (KI) region of the receptor. To test whether this region could function independently to bind PI 3'-kinase, the isolated CSF-1R KI was expressed in Escherichia coli, and was inducibly phosphorylated on tyrosine. The tyrosine phosphorylated form of the CSF-1R KI bound PI 3'-kinase in vitro, whereas the unphosphorylated form had no binding activity. The p85 alpha subunit of PI 3'-kinase contains two Src homology (SH)2 domains, which are implicated in the interactions of signalling proteins with activated receptors. Bacterially expressed p85 alpha SH2 domains complexed in vitro with the tyrosine phosphorylated CSF-1R KI. Binding of the CSF-1R KI to PI 3'-kinase activity, and to the p85 alpha SH2 domains, required phosphorylation of Tyr721 within the KI domain, but was independent of phosphorylation at Tyr697 and Tyr706. Tyr721 was also critical for the association of activated CSF-1R with PI 3'-kinase in mammalian cells. Complex formation between the CSF-1R and PI 3'-kinase can therefore be reconstructed in vitro in a specific interaction involving the phosphorylated receptor KI and the SH2 domains of p85 alpha. Images PMID:1314163

  19. Memory Deficits Induced by Inflammation Are Regulated by α5-Subunit-Containing GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian-Shi Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation causes learning and memory deficits through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the pathogenesis of memory loss associated with inflammation and found that we could reverse memory deficits by pharmacologically inhibiting α5-subunit-containing γ-aminobutyric acid type A (α5GABAA receptors and deleting the gene associated with the α5 subunit. Acute inflammation reduces long-term potentiation, a synaptic correlate of memory, in hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, and this reduction was reversed by inhibition of α5GABAA receptor function. A tonic inhibitory current generated by α5GABAA receptors in hippocampal neurons was increased by the key proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Interleukin-1β also increased the surface expression of α5GABAA receptors in the hippocampus. Collectively, these results show that α5GABAA receptor activity increases during inflammation and that this increase is critical for inflammation-induced memory deficits.

  20. Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Duanwu; Lin, Juan; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases are a group of threonine/serine protein kinases with a relatively conserved kinase domain but distinct non-kinase regions. A number of different domain structures, such as death and caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) domains, were found in different RIP family members, and these domains should be keys in determining the specific function of each RIP kinase. It is known that RIP kinases participate in different biological processes, incl...

  1. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Perrin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adult human muscle, but laminin subunit alpha 1 (LAMA1 gene is expressed only during embryogenesis. We thus developed an alternative method to laminin-111 protein repeated administration by inducing expression of the endogenous mouse Lama1 gene. This was done with the CRSPR/Cas9 system, i.e., by targeting the Lama1 promoter with one or several gRNAs and a dCas9 coupled with the VP160 transcription activation domain. Lama1 mRNA (qRT-PCR and proteins (immunohistochemistry and western blot were not detected in the control C2C12 myoblasts and in control muscles. However, significant expression was observed in cells transfected and in mouse muscles electroporated with plasmids coding for dCas9-VP160 and a gRNA. Larger synergic increases were observed by using two or three gRNAs. The increased Lama1 expression did not modify the expression of the α7 and β1 integrins. Increased expression of Lama1 by the CRISPR/Cas9 system will have to be further investigated by systemic delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 components to verify whether this could be a treatment for several myopathies.

  2. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Arnaud; Rousseau, Joël; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2017-03-17

    Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adult human muscle, but laminin subunit alpha 1 (LAMA1) gene is expressed only during embryogenesis. We thus developed an alternative method to laminin-111 protein repeated administration by inducing expression of the endogenous mouse Lama1 gene. This was done with the CRSPR/Cas9 system, i.e., by targeting the Lama1 promoter with one or several gRNAs and a dCas9 coupled with the VP160 transcription activation domain. Lama1 mRNA (qRT-PCR) and proteins (immunohistochemistry and western blot) were not detected in the control C2C12 myoblasts and in control muscles. However, significant expression was observed in cells transfected and in mouse muscles electroporated with plasmids coding for dCas9-VP160 and a gRNA. Larger synergic increases were observed by using two or three gRNAs. The increased Lama1 expression did not modify the expression of the α7 and β1 integrins. Increased expression of Lama1 by the CRISPR/Cas9 system will have to be further investigated by systemic delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 components to verify whether this could be a treatment for several myopathies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Studies on the subunits of human glycoprotein hormones in relation to reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, C.

    1977-01-01

    In this review summarising present knowledge of the biological and immunological activity of the subunits of human glycoprotein hormones, the specificity of the α-subunit and β-subunit radioimmunoassays are discussed. The crossreaction studies performed with the α-subunit radioimmunoassays are aummarised in one table while those with the β-subunit radioimmunoassays are presented in a second table. (JIW)

  4. INTRINSIC REGULATION OF HEMOGLOBIN EXPRESSION BY VARIABLE SUBUNIT INTERFACE STRENGTHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, James M.; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Padovan, Julio C.; Chait, Brian T.; Manning, Lois R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The expression of the six types of human hemoglobin subunits over time is currently considered to be regulated mainly by transcription factors that bind to upstream control regions of the gene (the “extrinsic” component of regulation). Here we describe how subunit pairing and further assembly to tetramers in the liganded state is influenced by the affinity of subunits for one another (the “intrinsic” component of regulation). The adult hemoglobin dimers have the strongest subunit interfaces and the embryonic hemoglobins are the weakest with fetal hemoglobins of intermediate strength, corresponding to the temporal order of their expression. These variable subunit binding strengths and the attenuating effects of acetylation contribute to the differences with which these hemoglobin types form functional O2-binding tetramers consistent with gene switching. PMID:22129306

  5. Regulation of synaptic inhibition by phospho-dependent binding of the AP2 complex to a YECL motif in the GABAA receptor γ2 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Josef T.; Chen, Guojun; Kukhtina, Viktoria; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Gu, Zhenglin; Tretter, Verena; Smith, Katharine R.; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena; Saenger, Wolfram; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of the number of γ2-subunit-containing GABAA receptors (GABAARs) present at synapses is critical for correct synaptic inhibition and animal behavior. This regulation occurs, in part, by the controlled removal of receptors from the membrane in clathrin-coated vesicles, but it remains unclear how clathrin recruitment to surface γ2-subunit-containing GABAARs is regulated. Here, we identify a γ2-subunit-specific Yxxφ-type-binding motif for the clathrin adaptor protein, AP2, which is located within a site for γ2-subunit tyrosine phosphorylation. Blocking GABAAR-AP2 interactions via this motif increases synaptic responses within minutes. Crystallographic and biochemical studies reveal that phosphorylation of the Yxxφ motif inhibits AP2 binding, leading to increased surface receptor number. In addition, the crystal structure provides an explanation for the high affinity of this motif for AP2 and suggests that γ2-subunit-containing heteromeric GABAARs may be internalized as dimers or multimers. These data define a mechanism for tyrosine kinase regulation of GABAAR surface levels and synaptic inhibition. PMID:18305175

  6. Regulation of synaptic inhibition by phospho-dependent binding of the AP2 complex to a YECL motif in the GABAA receptor gamma2 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Josef T; Chen, Guojun; Kukhtina, Viktoria; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Gu, Zhenglin; Tretter, Verena; Smith, Katharine R; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Saenger, Wolfram; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J

    2008-03-04

    The regulation of the number of gamma2-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) present at synapses is critical for correct synaptic inhibition and animal behavior. This regulation occurs, in part, by the controlled removal of receptors from the membrane in clathrin-coated vesicles, but it remains unclear how clathrin recruitment to surface gamma2-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is regulated. Here, we identify a gamma2-subunit-specific Yxxvarphi-type-binding motif for the clathrin adaptor protein, AP2, which is located within a site for gamma2-subunit tyrosine phosphorylation. Blocking GABA(A)R-AP2 interactions via this motif increases synaptic responses within minutes. Crystallographic and biochemical studies reveal that phosphorylation of the Yxxvarphi motif inhibits AP2 binding, leading to increased surface receptor number. In addition, the crystal structure provides an explanation for the high affinity of this motif for AP2 and suggests that gamma2-subunit-containing heteromeric GABA(A)Rs may be internalized as dimers or multimers. These data define a mechanism for tyrosine kinase regulation of GABA(A)R surface levels and synaptic inhibition.

  7. Spatial distribution of "tissue-specific" antigens in the developing human heart and skeletal muscle. I. An immunohistochemical analysis of creatine kinase isoenzyme expression patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, A.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Virágh, S.; Kálmán, F.; Morris, G. E.; Man, N. T.; Lamers, W. H.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies against the M and B subunit isoforms of creatine kinase (CK) we have investigated their distribution in developing human skeletal and cardiac muscle immunohistochemically. It is demonstrated that in skeletal muscle, a switch from CK-B to CK-M takes place around the week 8

  8. NSs Protein of Rift Valley Fever Virus Promotes Posttranslational Downregulation of the TFIIH Subunit p62▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is an important emerging pathogen of humans and ruminants. Its NSs protein has previously been identified as a major virulence factor that suppresses host defense through three distinct mechanisms: it directly inhibits beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter activity, it promotes the degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), and it suppresses host transcription by disrupting the assembly of the basal transcription factor TFIIH through sequestration of its p44 subunit. Here, we report that in addition to PKR, NSs also promotes the degradation of the TFIIH subunit p62. Infection of cells with the RVFV MP-12 vaccine strain reduced p62 protein levels to below the detection limit early in the course of infection. This NSs-mediated downregulation of p62 was posttranslational, as it was unaffected by pharmacological inhibition of transcription or translation and MP-12 infection had no effect on p62 mRNA levels. Treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors but not inhibition of lysosomal acidification or nuclear export resulted in a stabilization of p62 in the presence of NSs. Furthermore, p62 could be coprecipitated with NSs from lysates of infected cells. These data suggest that the RVFV NSs protein is able to interact with the TFIIH subunit p62 inside infected cells and promotes its degradation, which can occur directly in the nucleus. PMID:21543505

  9. The light subunit of system bo,+ is fully functional in the absence of the heavy subunit

    OpenAIRE

    Reig, Núria; Chillarón, Josep; Bartoccioni, Paola; Fernández, Esperanza; Bendahan, Annie; Zorzano, Antonio; Kanner, Baruch; Palacín, Manuel; Bertran, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The heteromeric amino acid transporters are composed of a type II glycoprotein and a non-glycosylated polytopic membrane protein. System bo,+ exchanges dibasic for neutral amino acids. It is composed of rBAT and bo,+AT, the latter being the polytopic membrane subunit. Mutations in either of them cause malfunction of the system, leading to cystinuria. bo,+AT-reconstituted systems from HeLa or MDCK cells catalysed transport of arginine that was totally dependent on the presence of one of the bo...

  10. A historical overview of protein kinases and their targeted small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Protein kinases play a predominant regulatory role in nearly every aspect of cell biology and they can modify the function of a protein in almost every conceivable way. Protein phosphorylation can increase or decrease enzyme activity and it can alter other biological activities such as transcription and translation. Moreover, some phosphorylation sites on a given protein are stimulatory while others are inhibitory. The human protein kinase gene family consists of 518 members along with 106 pseudogenes. Furthermore, about 50 of the 518 gene products lack important catalytic residues and are called protein pseudokinases. The non-catalytic allosteric interaction of protein kinases and pseudokinases with other proteins has added an important regulatory feature to the biochemistry and cell biology of the protein kinase superfamily. With rare exceptions, a divalent cation such as Mg2+ is required for the reaction. All protein kinases exist in a basal state and are activated only as necessary by divergent regulatory stimuli. The mechanisms for switching between dormant and active protein kinases can be intricate. Phosphorylase kinase was the first protein kinase to be characterized biochemically and the mechanism of its regulation led to the discovery of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A, or PKA), which catalyzes the phosphorylation and activation of phosphorylase kinase. This was the first protein kinase cascade or signaling module to be elucidated. The epidermal growth factor receptor-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling module contains protein-tyrosine, protein-serine/threonine, and dual specificity protein kinases. PKA has served as a prototype of this enzyme family and more is known about this enzyme than any other protein kinase. The inactive PKA holoenzyme consists of two regulatory and two catalytic subunits. After binding four molecules of cAMP, the holoenzyme dissociates into a regulatory subunit dimer (each monomer binds two cAMP) and two free and active

  11. Bisphenol-A rapidly enhanced passive avoidance memory and phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits in hippocampus of young rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaohong; Li Tao; Luo Qingqing; Hong Xing; Xie Lingdan; Tian Dong

    2011-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, is found to influence development of brain and behaviors in rodents. The previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to BPA impaired learning-memory and inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits expressions in hippocampus during the postnatal development in rats; and in cultured hippocampal neurons, BPA rapidly promotes dynamic changes in dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit NR2B. In the present study, we examined the rapid effect of BPA on passive avoidance memory and NMDAR in the developing hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at the age of postnatal day 18. The results showed that BPA or estradiol benzoate (EB) rapidly extended the latency to step down from the platform 1 h after footshock and increased the phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, and mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampus within 1 h. While 24 h after BPA or EB treatment, the improved memory and the increased phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, ERK disappeared. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an estrogen receptors (ERs) antagonist, ICI182,780, or an ERK-activating kinase inhibitor, U0126, significantly attenuated EB- or BPA-induced phosphorylations of NR1, NR2B, and ERK within 1 h. These data suggest that BPA rapidly enhanced short-term passive avoidance memory in the developing rats. A non-genomic effect via ERs may mediate the modulation of the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B through ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: → BPA rapidly extended the latency to step down from platform 1 h after footshock. → BPA rapidly increased pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK in hippocampus within 1 h. → ERs antagonist or MEK inhibitor attenuated BPA-induced pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK.

  12. Genomic analysis of murine DNA-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, A.; Abe, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The gene of catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase is responsible gene for SCID mice. The molecules play a critical role in non-homologous end joining including the V(D)J recombination. Contribution of the molecules to the difference of radiosensitivity and the susceptibility to cancer has been suggested. Here we show the entire nucleotide sequence of approximately 193 kbp and 84 kbp genomic regions encoding the entire DNA-PKcs gene in the mouse and chicken respectively. Retroposon was found in the intron 51 of mouse genomic DNA-PKcs gene but in human and chicken. Comparative analysis of these two species strongly suggested that only two genes, DNA-PKcs and MCM4, exist in the region of both species. Several conserved sequences and cis elements, however, were predicted. Recently, the orthologous region for the human DNA-PKcs locus was completed. The results of further comparative study will be discussed

  13. Fission yeast shelterin regulates DNA polymerases and Rad3(ATR kinase to limit telomere extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Chang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies in fission yeast have previously identified evolutionarily conserved shelterin and Stn1-Ten1 complexes, and established Rad3(ATR/Tel1(ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the shelterin subunit Ccq1 at Thr93 as the critical post-translational modification for telomerase recruitment to telomeres. Furthermore, shelterin subunits Poz1, Rap1 and Taz1 have been identified as negative regulators of Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment. However, it remained unclear how telomere maintenance is dynamically regulated during the cell cycle. Thus, we investigated how loss of Poz1, Rap1 and Taz1 affects cell cycle regulation of Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomere association of telomerase (Trt1(TERT, DNA polymerases, Replication Protein A (RPA complex, Rad3(ATR-Rad26(ATRIP checkpoint kinase complex, Tel1(ATM kinase, shelterin subunits (Tpz1, Ccq1 and Poz1 and Stn1. We further investigated how telomere shortening, caused by trt1Δ or catalytically dead Trt1-D743A, affects cell cycle-regulated telomere association of telomerase and DNA polymerases. These analyses established that fission yeast shelterin maintains telomere length homeostasis by coordinating the differential arrival of leading (Polε and lagging (Polα strand DNA polymerases at telomeres to modulate Rad3(ATR association, Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment.

  14. A chimeric cyclic interferon-α2b peptide induces apoptosis by sequential activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase Cδ and p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, V C; Bertucci, L; Furmento, V A; Peña, C; Marino, V J; Roguin, L P

    2013-06-10

    We have previously demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1/3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation are involved in the apoptotic response triggered by a chimeric cyclic peptide of the interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) in WISH cells. Since the peptide also induced serine phosphorylation of STAT proteins, in the present study we examined the kinase involved in serine STAT1 phosphorylation and the signaling effectors acting upstream such activation. We first found that p38 MAPK is involved in serine STAT1 phosphorylation, since a reduction of phophoserine-STAT1 levels was evident after incubating WISH cells with cyclic peptide in the presence of a p38 pharmacological inhibitor or a dominant-negative p38 mutant. Next, we demonstrated that the peptide induced activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ). Based on this finding, the role of this kinase was then evaluated. After incubating WISH cells with a PKCδ inhibitor or after decreasing PKCδ expression levels by RNA interference, both peptide-induced serine STAT1 and p38 phosphorylation levels were significantly decreased, indicating that PKCδ functions as an upstream regulator of p38. We also showed that PKCδ and p38 activation stimulated by the peptide was inhibited by a specific pharmacological inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or by a dominant-negative p85 PI3K-regulatory subunit, suggesting that PI3K is upstream in the signaling cascade. In addition, the role of PI3K and PKCδ in cyclic peptide-induced apoptosis was examined. Both signaling effectors were found to regulate the antiproliferative activity and the apoptotic response triggered by the cyclic peptide in WISH cells. In conclusion, we herein demonstrated that STAT1 serine phosphorylation is mediated by the sequential activation of PI3K, PKCδ and p38 MAPK. This signaling cascade contributes to the antitumor effect induced by the chimeric IFN-α2b cyclic peptide in WISH cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc

  15. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, K Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  16. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kevin Pfister

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  17. Herpesviruses in the Activated Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase-δ Syndrome

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    Jeffrey I. Cohen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is important for multiple stages of herpesvirus replication including virus entry, replication, latency, and reactivation. Recently, patients with gain-of-function mutations in the p110δ-catalytic subunit of PI3K or in the p85-regulatory subunit of PI3K have been reported. These patients have constitutively active PI3K with hyperactivation of Akt. They present with lymphoproliferation and often have infections, particularly recurrent respiratory infections and/or severe virus infections. The most frequent virus infections are due to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV; patients often present with persistent EBV and/or CMV viremia, EBV lymphoproliferative disease, or CMV lymphadenitis. No patients have been reported with CMV pneumonia, colitis, or retinitis. Other herpesvirus infections have included herpes simplex pneumonia, recurrent zoster, and varicella after vaccination with the varicella vaccine. Additional viral infections have included adenovirus viremia, severe warts, and extensive Molluscum contagiosum virus infection. The increased susceptibility to virus infections in these patients is likely due to a reduced number of long-lived memory CD8 T cells and an increased number of terminally differentiated effector CD8 T cells.

  18. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

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    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  19. The composition and function of the striatin-interacting phosphatases and kinases (STRIPAK) complex in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kück, Ulrich; Beier, Anna M; Teichert, Ines

    2016-05-01

    The striatin-interacting phosphatases and kinases (STRIPAK) complex is a highly conserved eukaryotic protein complex that was recently described for diverse animal and fungal species. Here, we summarize our current knowledge about the composition and function of the STRIPAK complex from the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora, which we discovered by investigating sexually sterile mutants (pro), having a defect in fruiting body development. Mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis defined core subunits of the STRIPAK complex, which have structural homologs in animal and other fungal organisms. These subunits (and their mammalian homologs) are PRO11 (striatin), PRO22 (STRIP1/2), SmMOB3 (Mob3), PRO45 (SLMAP), and PP2AA, the structural, and PP2Ac, the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Beside fruiting body formation, the STRIPAK complex controls vegetative growth and hyphal fusion in S. macrospora. Although the contribution of single subunits to diverse cellular and developmental processes is not yet fully understood, functional analysis has already shown that mammalian homologs are able to substitute the function of distinct fungal STRIPAK subunits. This underscores the view that fungal model organisms serve as useful tools to get a molecular insight into cellular and developmental processes of eukaryotes in general. Future work will unravel the precise localization of single subunits within the cell and decipher their STRIPAK-related and STRIPAK-independent functions. Finally, evidence is accumulating that there is a crosstalk between STRIPAK and various signaling pathways, suggesting that eukaryotic development is dependent on STRIPAK signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promotes cancer cell migration via mitogen activated protein kinase activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, David L; Ohannessian, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions activate signaling cascades such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK). Integrin binding to extracellular matrix increases tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK activity by expression of its carboxyl terminus decreases cell motility, and cells from FAK deficient mice also show reduced migration. Paxillin is a focal adhesion protein which is also phosphorylated on tyrosine. FAK recruitment of paxillin to the cell membrane correlates with Shc phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Decreased FAK expression inhibits papilloma formation in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model. We previously demonstrated that MAPK activation was required for growth factor induced in vitro migration and invasion by human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lines. Adapter protein recruitment to integrin subunits was examined by co-immunoprecipitation in SCC cells attached to type IV collagen or plastic. Stable clones overexpressing FAK or paxillin were created using the lipofection technique. Modified Boyden chambers were used for invasion assays. In the present study, we showed that FAK and paxillin but not Shc are recruited to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain following attachment of SCC cells to type IV collagen. Overexpression of either FAK or paxillin stimulated cancer cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane which was dependent on MAPK activity. We concluded that recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promoted cancer cell migration via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway

  1. Recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promotes cancer cell migration via mitogen activated protein kinase activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohannessian Arthur

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions activate signaling cascades such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK. Integrin binding to extracellular matrix increases tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. Inhibition of FAK activity by expression of its carboxyl terminus decreases cell motility, and cells from FAK deficient mice also show reduced migration. Paxillin is a focal adhesion protein which is also phosphorylated on tyrosine. FAK recruitment of paxillin to the cell membrane correlates with Shc phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Decreased FAK expression inhibits papilloma formation in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model. We previously demonstrated that MAPK activation was required for growth factor induced in vitro migration and invasion by human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC lines. Methods Adapter protein recruitment to integrin subunits was examined by co-immunoprecipitation in SCC cells attached to type IV collagen or plastic. Stable clones overexpressing FAK or paxillin were created using the lipofection technique. Modified Boyden chambers were used for invasion assays. Results In the present study, we showed that FAK and paxillin but not Shc are recruited to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain following attachment of SCC cells to type IV collagen. Overexpression of either FAK or paxillin stimulated cancer cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane which was dependent on MAPK activity. Conclusions We concluded that recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promoted cancer cell migration via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

  2. 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, metabolism and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbach, William G; Sakamoto, Kei; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2004-01-01

    The 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a member of a metabolite-sensing protein kinase family that functions as a metabolic 'fuel gauge' in skeletal muscle. AMPK is a ubiquitous heterotrimeric protein, consisting of an alpha catalytic, and beta and gamma regulatory subunits that exist in multiple isoforms and are all required for full enzymatic activity. During exercise, AMPK becomes activated in skeletal muscle in response to changes in cellular energy status (e.g. increased adenosine monophosphate [AMP]/adenosine triphosphate [ATP] and creatine/phosphocreatine ratios) in an intensity-dependent manner, and serves to inhibit ATP-consuming pathways, and activate pathways involved in carbohydrate and fatty-acid metabolism to restore ATP levels. Recent evidence shows that although AMPK plays this key metabolic role during acute bouts of exercise, it is also an important component of the adaptive response of skeletal muscles to endurance exercise training because of its ability to alter muscle fuel reserves and expression of several exercise-responsive genes. This review discusses the putative roles of AMPK in acute and chronic exercise responses, and suggests avenues for future AMPK research in exercise physiology and biochemistry.

  3. Pituitary glycoprotein hormone a-subunit secretion by cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of the a-subunit of pituitary glycoprotein hormones usually follows the secretion of intact gonadotropins and is increased in gonadal failure and decreased in isolated gonadotropin deficiency. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of the a-subunit in the serum of patients with cirrhosis of the liver and to compare the results obtained for eugonadal cirrhotic patients with those obtained for cirrhotic patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Forty-seven of 63 patients with cirrhosis (74.6% presented hypogonadism (which was central in 45 cases and primary in 2, 7 were eugonadal, and 9 women were in normal menopause. The serum a-subunit was measured by the fluorimetric method using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity with LH, TSH, FSH and hCG was 6.5, 1.2, 4.3 and 1.1%, respectively, with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV of less than 5% and an interassay CV of 5%, and sensitivity limit of 4 ng/l. The serum a-subunit concentration ranged from 36 to 6253 ng/l, with a median of 273 ng/l. The median was 251 ng/l for patients with central hypogonadism and 198 ng/l for eugonadal patients. The correlation between the a-subunit and basal LH levels was significant both in the total sample (r = 0.48, P<0.01 and in the cirrhotic patients with central hypogonadism (r = 0.33, P = 0.02. Among men with central hypogonadism there was a negative correlation between a-subunit levels and total testosterone levels (r = 0.54, P<0.01 as well as free testosterone levels (r = -0.53, P<0.01. In conclusion, although the a-subunit levels are correlated with LH levels, at present they cannot be used as markers for hypogonadism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

  4. Chitin and stress induced protein kinase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Azevedo da Silva, Raquel; Bressendorff, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The assays described here are pertinent to protein kinase studies in any plant. They include an immunoblot phosphorylation/activation assay and an in-gel activity assay for MAP kinases (MPKs) using the general protein kinase substrate myelin basic protein. They also include a novel in-gel peptide...... substrate assay for Snf1-related kinase family 2 members (SnRK2s). This kinase family-specific assay overcomes some limitations of in-gel assays and permits the identification of different types of kinase activities in total protein extracts....

  5. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  6. p56Lck and p59Fyn Regulate CD28 Binding to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein GRB-2, and T Cell-Specific Protein-Tyrosine Kinase ITK: Implications for T-Cell Costimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Monika; Cai, Yun-Cai; Bunnell, Stephen C.; Heyeck, Stephanie D.; Berg, Leslie J.; Rudd, Christopher E.

    1995-09-01

    T-cell activation requires cooperative signals generated by the T-cell antigen receptor ξ-chain complex (TCRξ-CD3) and the costimulatory antigen CD28. CD28 interacts with three intracellular proteins-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), T cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase ITK (formerly TSK or EMT), and the complex between growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 and son of sevenless guanine nucleotide exchange protein (GRB-2-SOS). PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 bind to the CD28 phosphotyrosine-based Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif by means of intrinsic Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains. The requirement for tyrosine phosphorylation of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif for SH2 domain binding implicates an intervening protein-tyrosine kinase in the recruitment of PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 by CD28. Candidate kinases include p56Lck, p59Fyn, ξ-chain-associated 70-kDa protein (ZAP-70), and ITK. In this study, we demonstrate in coexpression studies that p56Lck and p59Fyn phosphorylate CD28 primarily at Tyr-191 of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif, inducing a 3- to 8-fold increase in p85 (subunit of PI 3-kinase) and GRB-2 SH2 binding to CD28. Phosphatase digestion of CD28 eliminated binding. In contrast to Src kinases, ZAP-70 and ITK failed to induce these events. Further, ITK binding to CD28 was dependent on the presence of p56Lck and is thus likely to act downstream of p56Lck/p59Fyn in a signaling cascade. p56Lck is therefore likely to be a central switch in T-cell activation, with the dual function of regulating CD28-mediated costimulation as well as TCR-CD3-CD4 signaling.

  7. Probing the functional subunits of the tonoplast H+-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, S.K.; Lai, S.; Sze, H.

    1986-01-01

    The tonoplast ATPase of oat roots is composed of at least three polypeptides of 72, 60, and 16 kDa. The 16 kDA polypeptide covalently binds N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and is postulated to be a component of the proton channel. Initial studies to identify other subunits indicate that both the 72 and 60 kDa subunits covalently bind 14 C]-7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole and [ 14 C]N-ethylamleimide, inhibitors of the tonoplast ATPase. ATP prevents binding of these inhibitors suggesting that both the 72 and 60 kDa subunits are involved in substrate binding. Polyclonal antibody has been made to the 72 kDa subunit. Western blot analysis of tonoplast vesicles reveals single reactive polypeptide (72 kDa). The antibody shows no cross-reactivity towards either the mitochondrial F 1 -ATPase or the plasma membrane ATPase. This antibody specifically inhibits ATP hydrolysis and ATP-dependent H + pumping in native tonoplast vesicles. The authors conclude that the 72 kDa subunit is intimately associated with the catalytic (or ATP-binding) site

  8. Activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases and cAMP-binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol during dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenina, M.N.; Solenov, E.I.; Ivanova, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, the binding of cAMP, and the spectrum of cAMP-binding proteins in the cytosol of the renal papilla was studied in intact rats and in rats after 24 h on a water-deprived diet. It was found that the activation of protein kinases by 10 -6 M cAMP is significantly higher in the experimental animals than in the intact animals. In chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, the positions of the peaks of specific reception of cAMP corresponded to the peaks of the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases of types I and II. In this case, in intact animals more than 80% of the binding activity was detected in peaks II, whereas in rats subjected to water deprivation, more than 60% of the binding was observed in peak I. The general regulatory activity of the cytosol was unchanged in the experimental animals in comparison with intact animals. It is suggested that during dehydration there is an induction of the synthesis of the regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the renal papilla

  9. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  10. Novel subunit structure observed for noncooperative hemoglobin from Urechis caupo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolatkar, P R; Meador, W E; Stanfield, R L; Hackert, M L

    1988-03-05

    Tetrameric hemoglobin from the "fat innkeeper" worm Urechis caupo possesses a novel subunit arrangement having an "inside out" quaternary structure in that the G/H helices are located on the outer surface of the tetramer. A 5-A resolution crystal structure reveals that although the individual subunits are beta-like, having a distinct D helix and the general myoglobin fold, the subunit contacts are very different from those previously observed for hemoglobins. Furthermore, the hemoglobin from U. caupo is also quite different from the unusual hemoglobin tetramer from clam which also has its G/H helices on the outer surface but with the hemes in close proximity through E-F helical contacts (Royer, W. E., Jr., Love, W. E., and Fenderson, F. F. (1985) Nature 316, 277-280).

  11. Dynamic properties of motor proteins with two subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; III, Hubert Phillips

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of motor protein molecules consisting of two subunits is investigated using simple discrete stochastic models. Exact steady-state analytical expressions are obtained for velocities and dispersions for any number of intermediate states and conformations between the corresponding binding states of proteins. These models enable us to provide a detailed description and comparison of two different mechanisms of the motion of motor proteins along the linear tracks: the hand-over-hand mechanism, when the motion of subunits alternate; and the inchworm mechanism, when one subunit is always trailing another one. It is shown that the proteins in the hand-over-hand mechanism move faster and fluctuate more than the molecules in the inchworm mechanism. The effect of external forces on dynamic properties of motor proteins is also discussed. Finally, a quantitative method, based on experimental observations for single motor proteins, is proposed for distinguishing between two mechanisms of motion

  12. CSNAP Is a Stoichiometric Subunit of the COP9 Signalosome

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    Shelly Rozen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The highly conserved COP9 signalosome (CSN complex is a key regulator of all cullin-RING-ubiquitin ligases (CRLs, the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Until now, it was accepted that the CSN is composed of eight canonical components. Here, we report the discovery of an additional integral and stoichiometric subunit that had thus far evaded detection, and we named it CSNAP (CSN acidic protein. We show that CSNAP binds CSN3, CSN5, and CSN6, and its incorporation into the CSN complex is mediated through the C-terminal region involving conserved aromatic residues. Moreover, depletion of this small protein leads to reduced proliferation and a flattened and enlarged morphology. Finally, on the basis of sequence and structural properties shared by both CSNAP and DSS1, a component of the related 19S lid proteasome complex, we propose that CSNAP, the ninth CSN subunit, is the missing paralogous subunit of DSS1.

  13. Cholera Toxin B: One Subunit with Many Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan J. Baldauf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT, which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA and the B subunit (CTB. CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction.

  14. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery: How Close Are We?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    , such as influenza, tuberculosis, and Ebola, for which no good universal vaccines exist. At least two pharmaceutical improvements are expected to help filling this gap: i) The development of thermostable vaccine dosage forms, and ii) the full exploitation of the adjuvant technology for subunit vaccines to potentiate...... strong immune responses. This review highlights the status and recent advances in formulation and pulmonary delivery of thermostable human subunit vaccines. Such vaccines are very appealing from compliance, distribution and immunological point of view: Being non-invasive, inhalable vaccines are self...... immunity. Here, I review state of the art and perspectives in formulation design and processing methods for powder-based subunit vaccines intended for pulmonary administration, and present dry powder inhaler technologies suitable for translating these vaccines into clinical trials....

  15. IGF-1-dependent subunit communication of the IGF-1 holoreceptor: Interactions between αβ heterodimeric receptor halves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilden, P.A.; Treadway, J.L.; Morrison, B.D.; Pessin, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of 125 I-IGF-1 affinity cross-linking and β-subunit autophosphorylation has indicated that IGF-1 induces a covalent association of isolated αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptors into an α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric state, in a similar manner to that observed for the insulin receptor. The formation of the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric IGF-1 receptor complex from the partially purified αβ heterodimers was time dependent with half-maximal formation in approximately 30 min at saturating IGF-1 concentrations. The IGF-1-dependent association of the partially purified αβ heterodimers into an α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric state was specific for the IGF-1 receptors since IGF-1 was unable to stimulate the protein kinase activity of the purified αβ heterodimeric insulin receptor complex. Incubation of the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric IGF-1 holoreceptor with the specific sulfhydryl agent iodoacetamide (IAN) did not alter 125 I-IGF-1 binding or IGF-1 stimulation of protein kinase activity. However, IAN treatment of the αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptors inhibited the IGF-1 dependent covalent formation of the disulfide-linked α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric complex. These data indicate that IGF-1 induces the covalent association of isolated αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complexes into a disulfide-linked α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric state whereas Mn/MgATP induces a noncovalent association. Therefore, unlike the insulin receptor in which noncovalent association is sufficient for kinase activation, only the covalent assembly of the IGF-1 receptor αβ heterodimers into the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric holoreceptor complex is associated with ligand-stimulated protein kinase activation

  16. Polo kinase Cdc5 is a central regulator of meiosis I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attner, Michelle A.; Miller, Matthew P.; Ee, Ly-sha; Elkin, Sheryl K.; Amon, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation yield four haploid gametes from one diploid cell. The Polo kinase Cdc5 is required for meiotic progression, but how Cdc5 coordinates multiple cell-cycle events during meiosis I is not understood. Here we show that CDC5-dependent phosphorylation of Rec8, a subunit of the cohesin complex that links sister chromatids, is required for efficient cohesin removal from chromosome arms, which is a prerequisite for meiosis I chromosome segregation. CDC5 also establishes conditions for centromeric cohesin removal during meiosis II by promoting the degradation of Spo13, a protein that protects centromeric cohesin during meiosis I. Despite CDC5’s central role in meiosis I, the protein kinase is dispensable during meiosis II and does not even phosphorylate its meiosis I targets during the second meiotic division. We conclude that Cdc5 has evolved into a master regulator of the unique meiosis I chromosome segregation pattern. PMID:23918381

  17. Phosphorylation of dynamin I on Ser-795 by protein kinase C blocks its association with phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Powell, K A; Valova, V A; Malladi, C S

    2000-01-01

    Dynamin I is phosphorylated in nerve terminals exclusively in the cytosolic compartment and in vitro by protein kinase C (PKC). Dephosphorylation is required for synaptic vesicle retrieval, suggesting that its phosphorylation affects its subcellular localization. An in vitro phospholipid binding ...... assay was established that prevents lipid vesiculation and dynamin lipid insertion into the lipid. Dynamin I bound the phospholipid in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner, with an apparent affinity of 230 +/- 51 nM. Optimal binding occurred with mixtures of phosphatidylserine...... the phosphorylation site in PKCalpha-phosphorylated dynamin I as a single site at Ser-795, located near a binding site for the SH3 domain of p85, the regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, phosphorylation had no effect on dynamin binding to a bacterially expressed p85-SH3 domain. Thus...

  18. Bone Abnormalities in Mice with Protein Kinase A (PKA) Defects Reveal a Role of Cyclic AMP Signaling in Bone Stromal Cell-Dependent Tumor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Shapiro, J M; Saloustros, E; Stratakis, C A

    2016-11-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is an important enzyme for all eukaryotic cells. PKA phosphorylates other proteins, thus, it is essential for the regulation of many diverse cellular functions, including cytoplasmic trafficking and signaling, organelle structure and mitochondrial oxidation, nuclear gene expression, the cell cycle, and cellular division. The PKA holoenzyme is composed of 2 regulatory and 2 catalytic subunits. Four regulatory (R1α, R1β, R2α, and R2β) and 4 catalytic subunits (Cα, Cβ, Cγ, and Prkx) have been identified, giving rise to mainly PKA-I (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R1α or R1β), or PKA-II (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R2α or R2β). Mutations in the PKA subunits can lead to altered total PKA activity or abnormal PKA-I to PKA-II ratio, leading to various abnormalities in both humans and mice. These effects can be tissue-specific. We studied the effect of PKA subunit defects on PKA activity and bone morphology of mice that were single or double heterozygous for null alleles of the various PKA subunit genes. Bone lesions including fibrous dysplasia, myxomas, osteo-sarcomas, -chondromas and -chondrosarcomas were found in these mice. Observational and molecular studies showed that these lesions were derived from bone stromal cells (BSCs). We conclude that haploinsufficiency for different PKA subunit genes affected bone lesion formation, new bone generation, organization, and mineralization in variable ways. This work identified a PKA subunit- and activity-dependent pathway of bone lesion formation from BSCs with important implications for understanding how cyclic AMP affects the skeleton and its tumorigenesis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Cables1 controls p21/Cip1 protein stability by antagonizing proteasome subunit alpha type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Li, Z; Li, Z J; Cheng, K; Du, Y; Fu, H; Khuri, F R

    2015-05-07

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor 1A, p21/Cip1, is a vital cell cycle regulator, dysregulation of which has been associated with a large number of human malignancies. One critical mechanism that controls p21 function is through its degradation, which allows the activation of its associated cell cycle-promoting kinases, CDK2 and CDK4. Thus delineating how p21 is stabilized and degraded will enhance our understanding of cell growth control and offer a basis for potential therapeutic interventions. Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism that controls the dynamic status of p21 through its interaction with Cdk5 and Abl enzyme substrate 1 (Cables1). Cables1 has a proposed role as a tumor suppressor. We found that upregulation of Cables1 protein was correlated with increased half-life of p21 protein, which was attributed to Cables1/p21 complex formation and supported by their co-localization in the nucleus. Mechanistically, Cables1 interferes with the proteasome (Prosome, Macropain) subunit alpha type 3 (PSMA3) binding to p21 and protects p21 from PSMA3-mediated proteasomal degradation. Moreover, silencing of p21 partially reverses the ability of Cables1 to induce cell death and inhibit cell proliferation. In further support of a potential pathophysiological role of Cables1, the expression level of Cables1 is tightly associated with p21 in both cancer cell lines and human lung cancer patient tumor samples. Together, these results suggest Cables1 as a novel p21 regulator through maintaining p21 stability and support the model that the tumor-suppressive function of Cables1 occurs at least in part through enhancing the tumor-suppressive activity of p21.

  20. Autoregulation of kinase dephosphorylation by ATP binding in AGC protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tung O; Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S; Rodeck, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    AGC kinases, including the three Akt (protein kinase B) isoforms, protein kinase A (PKA) and all protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, require activation loop phosphorylation (threonine 308 in Akt1) as well as phosphorylation of a C-terminal residue (serine 473 in Akt1) for catalytic activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets. Conversely, phosphatases reverse these phosphorylations. Virtually all cellular processes are affected by AGC kinases, a circumstance that has led to intense scrutiny of the molecular mechanisms that regulate phosphorylation of these kinases. Here, we review a new layer of control of phosphorylation in Akt, PKA and PKC pointing to ATP binding pocket occupancy as a means to decelerate dephosphorylation of these and, potentially, other kinases. This additional level of kinase regulation opens the door to search for new functional motifs for the rational design of non- ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that discriminate within and between protein kinase families.

  1. Autoregulation of kinase dephosphorylation by ATP binding to AGC protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    AGC kinases, including the three Akt (protein kinase B) isoforms, protein kinase A (PKA) and all protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, require activation loop phosphorylation (threonine 308 in Akt1) as well as phosphorylation of a C-terminal residue (serine 473 in Akt1) for catalytic activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets. Conversely, phosphatases reverse these phosphorylations. Virtually all cellular processes are affected by AGC kinases, a circumstance that has led to intense scrutiny of the molecular mechanisms that regulate phosphorylation of these kinases. Here, we review a new layer of control of phosphorylation in Akt, PKA and PKC pointing to ATP binding pocket occupancy as a means to decelerate dephosphorylation of these and, potentially, other kinases. This additional level of kinase regulation opens the door to search for new functional motifs for the rational design of non-ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that discriminate within and between protein kinase families. PMID:22262182

  2. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Src kinase regulation by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Src and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases are regulatory proteins that play key roles in cell differentiation, motility, proliferation, and survival. The initially described phosphorylation sites of Src include an activating phosphotyrosine 416 that results from autophosphorylation, and an inhibiting phosphotyrosine 527 that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk homologous kinase. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 527 increases Src kinase activity. Candidate phosphotyrosine 527 phosphatases include cytoplasmic PTP1B, Shp1 and Shp2, and transmembrane enzymes include CD45, PTPα, PTPε, and PTPλ. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 416 decreases Src kinase activity. Thus far PTP-BL, the mouse homologue of human PTP-BAS, has been shown to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine 416 in a regulatory fashion. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase mediates the phosphorylation of Src Tyr138; this phosphorylation has no direct effect on Src kinase activity. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor and the ErbB2/HER2 growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinases mediate the phosphorylation of Src Tyr213 and activation of Src kinase activity. Src kinase is also a substrate for protein-serine/threonine kinases including protein kinase C (Ser12), protein kinase A (Ser17), and CDK1/cdc2 (Thr34, Thr46, and Ser72). Of the three protein-serine/threonine kinases, only phosphorylation by CDK1/cdc2 has been demonstrated to increase Src kinase activity. Although considerable information on the phosphoprotein phosphatases that catalyze the hydrolysis of Src phosphotyrosine 527 is at hand, the nature of the phosphatases that mediate the hydrolysis of phosphotyrosine 138 and 213, and phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues has not been determined

  4. Phosphopeptide binding by Sld3 links Dbf4-dependent kinase to MCM replicative helicase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Tom D; Yeeles, Joseph Tp; Diffley, John Fx

    2016-05-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires the assembly of active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicases at replication origins by a set of conserved and essential firing factors. This process is controlled during the cell cycle by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and in response to DNA damage by the checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk1. Here we show that Sld3, previously shown to be an essential CDK and Rad53 substrate, is recruited to the inactive MCM double hexamer in a DDK-dependent manner. Sld3 binds specifically to DDK-phosphorylated peptides from two MCM subunits (Mcm4, 6) and then recruits Cdc45. MCM mutants that cannot bind Sld3 or Sld3 mutants that cannot bind phospho-MCM or Cdc45 do not support replication. Moreover, phosphomimicking mutants in Mcm4 and Mcm6 bind Sld3 without DDK and facilitate DDK-independent replication. Thus, Sld3 is an essential "reader" of DDK phosphorylation, integrating signals from three distinct protein kinase pathways to coordinate DNA replication during S phase. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Specific phosphopeptide binding regulates a conformational change in the PI 3-kinase SH2 domain associated with enzyme activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoelson, S E; Sivaraja, M; Williams, K P; Hu, P; Schlessinger, J; Weiss, M A

    1993-01-01

    SH2 (src-homology 2) domains define a newly recognized binding motif that mediates the physical association of target phosphotyrosyl proteins with downstream effector enzymes. An example of such phosphoprotein-effector coupling is provided by the association of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) with specific phosphorylation sites within the PDGF receptor, the c-Src/polyoma virus middle T antigen complex and the insulin receptor substrate IRS-1. Notably, phosphoprotein association with the SH2 domains of p85 also stimulates an increase in catalytic activity of the PI 3-kinase p110 subunit, which can be mimicked by phosphopeptides corresponding to targeted phosphoprotein phosphorylation sites. To investigate how phosphoprotein binding to the p85 SH2 domain stimulates p110 catalytic activation, we have examined the differential effects of phosphotyrosine and PDGF receptor-, IRS-1- and c-Src-derived phosphopeptides on the conformation of an isolated SH2 domain of PI 3-kinase. Although phosphotyrosine and both activating and non-activating phosphopeptides bind to the SH2 domain, activating phosphopeptides bind with higher affinity and induce a qualitatively distinct conformational change as monitored by CD and NMR spectroscopy. Amide proton exchange and protease protection assays further show that high affinity, specific phosphopeptide binding induces non-local dynamic SH2 domain stabilization. Based on these findings we propose that specific phosphoprotein binding to the p85 subunit induces a change in SH2 domain structure which is transmitted to the p110 subunit and regulates enzymatic activity by an allosteric mechanism. Images PMID:8382612

  6. Signaling network of the Btk family kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y; Kung, H J

    2000-11-20

    The Btk family kinases represent new members of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, which include Btk/Atk, Itk/Emt/Tsk, Bmx/Etk, and Tec. They are characterized by having four structural modules: PH (pleckstrin homology) domain, SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, SH2 (Src homology 2) domain and kinase (Src homology 1) domain. Increasing evidence suggests that, like Src-family kinases, Btk family kinases play central but diverse modulatory roles in various cellular processes. They participate in signal transduction in response to virtually all types of extracellular stimuli which are transmitted by growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors, antigen-receptors and integrins. They are regulated by many non-receptor tyrosine kinases such as Src, Jak, Syk and FAK family kinases. In turn, they regulate many of major signaling pathways including those of PI3K, PLCgamma and PKC. Both genetic and biochemical approaches have been used to dissect the signaling pathways and elucidate their roles in growth, differentiation and apoptosis. An emerging new role of this family of kinases is cytoskeletal reorganization and cell motility. The physiological importance of these kinases was amply demonstrated by their link to the development of immunodeficiency diseases, due to germ-line mutations. The present article attempts to review the structure and functions of Btk family kinases by summarizing our current knowledge on the interacting partners associated with the different modules of the kinases and the diverse signaling pathways in which they are involved.

  7. Evaluation of subunit vaccines against feline immunodeficiency virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Verschoor, E.J.; Willemse, M.J.; Stam, J.G.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Pouwels, H.; Chalmers, S.K.; Sondermeijer, P.J.; Hesselink, W.; Ronde, A. de

    1996-01-01

    Subunit vaccines prepared against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection were evaluated in two trials. First, cats were immunized with bacterial expression products of an envelope fragment that contained the V3 neutralization domain of the FIV surface protein fused to either galactokinase

  8. Partial agonists and subunit selectivity at NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Rune; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2010-01-01

    Subunit-selective ligands for glutamate receptors remains an area of interest as glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and involved in a number of diseased states in the central nervous system (CNS). Few subtype-selective ligands are known, especially among the N...

  9. Therapeutic potential of Mediator complex subunits in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amol; Ansari, Suraiya A

    2018-01-01

    The multisubunit Mediator is an evolutionary conserved transcriptional coregulatory complex in eukaryotes. It is needed for the transcriptional regulation of gene expression in general as well as in a gene specific manner. Mediator complex subunits interact with different transcription factors as well as components of RNA Pol II transcription initiation complex and in doing so act as a bridge between gene specific transcription factors and general Pol II transcription machinery. Specific interaction of various Mediator subunits with nuclear receptors (NRs) and other transcription factors involved in metabolism has been reported in different studies. Evidences indicate that ligand-activated NRs recruit Mediator complex for RNA Pol II-dependent gene transcription. These NRs have been explored as therapeutic targets in different metabolic diseases; however, they show side-effects as targets due to their overlapping involvement in different signaling pathways. Here we discuss the interaction of various Mediator subunits with transcription factors involved in metabolism and whether specific interaction of these transcription factors with Mediator subunits could be potentially utilized as therapeutic strategy in a variety of metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphisms exhibit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Nicotine is the major addictive substance in cigarettes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are thought to play an important role in nicotine addiction of smokers. One of the genes, α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ...

  11. Structural interaction of novel dendrimer and subunits with water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    interaction study with solvents are essential [4-6] and several subunits are used for .... slowed down the viscous flow with higher excess limiting viscosities of the 2,4,6- ..... Practical Organic Chemistry, 5th ed.; Wiley: New York; 1989; p 300. 14.

  12. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  13. Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of hemoglobin and its isolated subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, G.R.; Cook, D.C.; Berger, R.L.; Friedman, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of 90% enriched 57Fe hemoglobin and its isolated subunits have been prepared. Moessbauer spectroscopic measurements have been made on three such samples. Sample one contained contributions of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and carbonmonoxyhemoglobin. This sample was studied from a temperature of 90 K down to 230 mK. Measurements were also made at 4.2 K using a small applied magnetic field of 1.0 T. In general, the measured quadrupole splittings and isomer shifts for each component agreed with previous measurements on single component samples in the literature, and thus demonstrated that chemically enriched hemoglobin has not been altered. The second and third samples were isolated alpha and beta subunits, respectively. We have found measurable Moessbauer spectral differences between the HbO 2 sites in the alpha subunit sample and the beta subunit sample. The measured Moessbauer spectral areas indicate that the iron ion has the largest mean-square displacement at the deoxy Hb sites as compared to that at the oxy- and carbonmonoxy Hb sites. The mean-square displacement at the HbO 2 sites is the smallest

  14. Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duanwu; Lin, Juan; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases are a group of threonine/serine protein kinases with a relatively conserved kinase domain but distinct non-kinase regions. A number of different domain structures, such as death and caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) domains, were found in different RIP family members, and these domains should be keys in determining the specific function of each RIP kinase. It is known that RIP kinases participate in different biological processes, including those in innate immunity, but their downstream substrates are largely unknown. This review will give an overview of the structures and functions of RIP family members, and an update of recent progress in RIP kinase research. PMID:20383176

  15. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run Lei

    Full Text Available The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development.

  16. Functional labeling of insulin receptor subunits in live cells. Alpha 2 beta 2 species is the major autophosphorylated form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Marchand-Brustel, Y.; Ballotti, R.; Gremeaux, T.; Tanti, J.F.; Brandenburg, D.; Van Obberghen, E.

    1989-01-01

    Both receptor subunits were functionally labeled in order to provide methods allowing, in live cells and in broken cell systems, concomitant evaluation of the insulin receptor dual function, hormone binding, and kinase activity. In cell-free systems, insulin receptors were labeled on their alpha-subunit with 125I-photoreactive insulin, and on their beta-subunit by autophosphorylation. Thereafter, phosphorylated receptors were separated from the complete set of receptors by means of anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Using this approach, a subpopulation of receptors was found which had bound insulin, but which were not phosphorylated. Under nonreducing conditions, receptors appeared in three oligomeric species identified as alpha 2 beta 2, alpha 2 beta, and alpha 2. Mainly the alpha 2 beta 2 receptor species was found to be phosphorylated while insulin was bound to alpha 2 beta 2, alpha 2 beta, and alpha 2 forms. In live cells, biosynthetic labeling of insulin receptors was used. Receptors were first labeled with [35S]methionine. Subsequently, the addition of insulin led to receptor autophosphorylation by virtue of the endogenous ATP pool. The total amount of [35S]methionine-labeled receptors was precipitated with antireceptor antibodies, whereas with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, only the phosphorylated receptors were isolated. Using this approach we made the two following key findings: (1) Both receptor species, alpha 2 beta 2 and alpha 2 beta, are present in live cells and in comparable amounts. This indicates that the alpha 2 beta form is not a degradation product of the alpha 2 beta 2 form artificially generated during receptor preparation. (2) The alpha 2 beta 2 species is the prevalently autophosphorylated form

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Michael [San Diego, CA; Hibi, Masahiko [San Diego, CA; Lin, Anning [La Jolla, CA

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  19. The rational design of a novel potent analogue of the 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor compound C with improved selectivity and cellular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machrouhi, Fouzia; Ouhamou, Nouara; Laderoute, Keith; Calaoagan, Joy; Bukhtiyarova, Marina; Ehrlich, Paula J.; Klon, Anthony E.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized analogues of compound C, a non-specific inhibitor of 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), using a computational fragment-based drug design (FBDD) approach. Synthesizing only twenty-seven analogues yielded a compound that was equipotent to compound C in the inhibition of the human AMPK (hAMPK) α2 subunit in the heterotrimeric complex in vitro, exhibited significantly improved selectivity against a subset of relevant kinases, and demonstrated enhanced cellular inhibition of AMPK. PMID:20932747

  20. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca 2+ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting 32 P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated 32 P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor

  1. Protein Kinase A subunits of the ascomycete pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola regulate asexual fructification, filamentation, melanization and osmosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    As in many fungi, asexual reproduction of Mycosphaerella graminicola in planta is a complex process that requires proper differentiation of the infectious hyphae in the substomatal cavities of foliar tissue before pycnidia with conidia can be formed. In this study, we have investigated the role of

  2. The 3' untranslated region of human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Regulatory subunit 1 contains regulatory elements affecting transcript stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratti Antonia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDK5R1 plays a central role in neuronal migration and differentiation during central nervous system development. CDK5R1 has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders and proposed as a candidate gene for mental retardation. The remarkable size of CDK5R1 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR suggests a role in post-transcriptional regulation of CDK5R1 expression. Results The bioinformatic study shows a high conservation degree in mammals and predicts several AU-Rich Elements (AREs. The insertion of CDK5R1 3'-UTR into luciferase 3'-UTR causes a decreased luciferase activity in four transfected cell lines. We identified 3'-UTR subregions which tend to reduce the reporter gene expression, sometimes in a cell line-dependent manner. In most cases the quantitative analysis of luciferase mRNA suggests that CDK5R1 3'-UTR affects mRNA stability. A region, leading to a very strong mRNA destabilization, showed a significantly low half-life, indicating an accelerated mRNA degradation. The 3' end of the transcript, containing a class I ARE, specifically displays a stabilizing effect in neuroblastoma cell lines. We also observed the interaction of the stabilizing neuronal RNA-binding proteins ELAV with the CDK5R1 transcript in SH-SY5Y cells and identified three 3'-UTR sub-regions showing affinity for ELAV proteins. Conclusion Our findings evince the presence of both destabilizing and stabilizing regulatory elements in CDK5R1 3'-UTR and support the hypothesis that CDK5R1 gene expression is post-transcriptionally controlled in neurons by ELAV-mediated mechanisms. This is the first evidence of the involvement of 3'-UTR in the modulation of CDK5R1 expression. The fine tuning of CDK5R1 expression by 3'-UTR may have a role in central nervous system development and functioning, with potential implications in neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders.

  3. Conformational plasticity of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 and its consequences for regulation and drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2010-01-01

    well to the constitutive activity of the enzyme, meaning, its independence from phosphorylation or other characteristic control factors. Most CK2alpha structures are based on the enzyme from Zea mays, supplemented by an increasing number of human CK2alpha structures. In the latter a surprising...... plasticity of important ATP-binding elements - the interdomain hinge region and the glycine-rich loop - was discovered. In fully active CK2alpha the hinge region is open and does not anchor the ATP ribose, but alternatively it can adopt a closed conformation, form hydrogen bonds to the ribose moiety and thus...

  4. A proteomic approach for comprehensively screening substrates of protein kinases such as Rho-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuki Amano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are major components of signal transduction pathways in multiple cellular processes. Kinases directly interact with and phosphorylate downstream substrates, thus modulating their functions. Despite the importance of identifying substrates in order to more fully understand the signaling network of respective kinases, efficient methods to search for substrates remain poorly explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined mass spectrometry and affinity column chromatography of the catalytic domain of protein kinases to screen potential substrates. Using the active catalytic fragment of Rho-kinase/ROCK/ROK as the model bait, we obtained about 300 interacting proteins from the rat brain cytosol fraction, which included the proteins previously reported as Rho-kinase substrates. Several novel interacting proteins, including doublecortin, were phosphorylated by Rho-kinase both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method would enable identification of novel specific substrates for kinases such as Rho-kinase with high sensitivity.

  5. Effect of high and low molecular weight glutenin subunits, and subunits of gliadin on physicochemical parameters of different wheat genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Souza Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of functional properties of wheat flour by specific tests allows genotypes with appropriate characteristics to be selected for specific industrial uses. The objective of wheat breeding programs is to improve the quality of germplasm bank in order to be able to develop wheat with suitable gluten strength and extensibility for bread making. The aim of this study was to evaluate 16 wheat genotypes by correlating both glutenin subunits of high and low molecular weight and gliadin subunits with the physicochemical characteristics of the grain. Protein content, sedimentation volume, sedimentation index, and falling number values were analyzed after the grains were milled. Hectoliter weight and mass of 1000 seeds were also determined. The glutenin and gliadin subunits were separated using polyacrylamide gel in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The data were evaluated using variance analysis, Pearson's correlation, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis. The IPR 85, IPR Catuara TM, T 091015, and T 091069 genotypes stood out from the others, which indicate their possibly superior grain quality with higher sedimentation volume, higher sedimentation index, and higher mass of 1000 seeds; these genotypes possessed the subunits 1 (Glu-A1, 5 + 10 (Glu-D1, c (Glu-A3, and b (Glu-B3, with exception of T 091069 genotype that possessed the g allele instead of b in the Glu-B3.

  6. Trans-kingdom mimicry underlies ribosome customization by a poxvirus kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sujata; Rollins, Madeline G; Fuchs, Gabriele; Procter, Dean J; Hall, Elizabeth A; Cozzolino, Kira; Sarnow, Peter; Savas, Jeffrey N; Walsh, Derek

    2017-06-29

    Ribosomes have the capacity to selectively control translation through changes in their composition that enable recognition of specific RNA elements. However, beyond differential subunit expression during development, evidence for regulated ribosome specification within individual cells has remained elusive. Here we report that a poxvirus kinase phosphorylates serine/threonine residues in the human small ribosomal subunit protein, receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1), that are not phosphorylated in uninfected cells or cells infected by other viruses. These modified residues cluster in an extended loop in RACK1, phosphorylation of which selects for translation of viral or reporter mRNAs with 5' untranslated regions that contain adenosine repeats, so-called polyA-leaders. Structural and phylogenetic analyses revealed that although RACK1 is highly conserved, this loop is variable and contains negatively charged amino acids in plants, in which these leaders act as translational enhancers. Phosphomimetics and inter-species chimaeras have shown that negative charge in the RACK1 loop dictates ribosome selectivity towards viral RNAs. By converting human RACK1 to a charged, plant-like state, poxviruses remodel host ribosomes so that adenosine repeats erroneously generated by slippage of the viral RNA polymerase confer a translational advantage. Our findings provide insight into ribosome customization through trans-kingdom mimicry and the mechanics of species-specific leader activity that underlie poxvirus polyA-leaders.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is a key mediator of central sensitization in painful inflammatory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezet, Sophie; Marchand, Fabien; D'Mello, Richard; Grist, John; Clark, Anna K.; Malcangio, Marzia; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Williams, Robert J.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Here we show that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is a key player in the establishment of central sensitization, the spinal cord phenomenon associated with persistent afferent inputs and contributing to chronic pain states. We demonstrated electrophysiologically that PI3K is required for the full expression of spinal neuronal wind-up. In an inflammatory pain model, intrathecal administration of LY294002, a potent PI3K inhibitor, dose-dependently inhibited pain related behavior. This effect was correlated with a reduction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and CaMKinase II. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in the phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B, decreased translocation to the plasma membrane of the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit in the spinal cord and a reduction of evoked neuronal activity as measured using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Our study suggests that PI3K is a major factor in the expression of central sensitization after noxious inflammatory stimuli. PMID:18417706

  8. Functional characterization of autophosphorylation sites of the activated insulin receptor-tyrosine kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Riveros, J.R.; Lane, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin receptor, solubilized from 3T3-L1 cellular membranes and then purified, was autophosphorylated with [γ- 32 P]ATP in the absence or presence of insulin. Specific phosphopeptides generated by trypsin digestion of the 32 P-labeled β-subunit were identified and separated by reverse phase HPLC. In the absence of insulin, radioactivity of the phosphopeptides is evenly distributed among four major peaks designated as sites I, II, III and IV, according to their order of elution. This pattern is maintained for at least the first 30 min of autophosphorylation. When the reaction is carried out in the presence of insulin, > 50% of the total 32 P radioactivity is found in site I and the rate of 32 P incorporation into this site is markedly higher than into sites II, III and IV. Maximal activation of tyrosine kinase activity, as estimated by substrate phosphorylation, is coincident with the nearly complete phosphorylation of site I. Delayed activation of previously autophosphorylated receptor by insulin, but not by EGF or IGF-I, produced a similar pattern where phosphorylated site I predominates. These observations indicate that one major insulin-regulated autophosphorylation site in the β-subunit is responsible for activation of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. The isolation of this phosphopeptide on a preparative scale and its characterization are now in progress

  9. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Xin

    2017-08-31

    Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases), Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1), BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1), MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases), mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1), AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase) and protein kinase B (AKT). By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  10. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1, BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1, MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases, mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1, AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase and protein kinase B (AKT. By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  11. The evolutionarily conserved mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 links protective innate immune responses and xenobiotic detoxification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses.

  12. The evolutionarily conserved mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 links protective innate immune responses and xenobiotic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; McEwan, Deborah L; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2014-05-01

    Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses.

  13. Sulfate-activating enzymes of Penicillium chrysogenum. The ATP sulfurylase.adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate complex does not serve as a substrate for adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renosto, F.; Martin, R.L.; Segel, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    At a noninhibitory steady state concentration of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS), increasing the concentration of Penicillium chrysogenum ATP sulfurylase drives the rate of the APS kinase-catalyzed reaction toward zero. The result indicates that the ATP sulfurylase.APS complex does not serve as a substrate for APS kinase, i.e. there is no ''substrate channeling'' of APS between the two sulfate-activating enzymes. APS kinase had no effect on the [S]0.5 values, nH values, or maximum isotope trapping in the single turnover of ATP sulfurylase-bound [ 35 S]APS. Equimolar APS kinase (+/- MgATP or APS) also had no effect on the rate constants for the inactivation of ATP sulfurylase by phenylglyoxal, diethylpyrocarbonate, or N-ethylmaleimide. Similarly, ATP sulfurylase (+/- ligands) had no effect on the inactivation of equimolar APS kinase by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, diethylpyrocarbonate, or heat. (The last promotes the dissociation of dimeric APS kinase to inactive monomers.) ATP sulfurylase also had no effect on the reassociation of APS kinase subunits at low temperature. The cumulative results suggest that the two sulfate activating enzymes do not associate to form a ''3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase'' complex

  14. Lipid composition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase mutants of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernejc, Katarina; Bencina, Mojca

    2003-08-29

    Lipid composition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) Aspergillus niger mutants with overexpressed or deleted genes for either regulatory and/or the catalytic subunit of PKA was analyzed. Disruption of the gene encoding the PKA regulatory subunit resulted in 20% less total lipids, 30% less neutral lipids, four times more glycolipids and two-fold higher triacylglycerol lipase activity compared to the control strain. Concomitantly a five-fold decrease in phosphatidylcholine, accompanied with 1.5-, 1.8- and 2.8-fold increases in phosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, was determined, respectively. The lack of PKA activity, due to the disruption of a gene encoding the PKA catalytic subunit, resulted in a 1.6-times increase in total lipids with two times more neutral lipids associated with lower triacylglycerol lipase activity and a decrease in phospholipids. The mutants with unrestricted PKA activity synthesized twice as much citric acid as the control strain and three times more than strains lacking PKA activity. The results indicate the involvement of cAMP-mediated PKA activity in regulation of lipid biosynthesis as well as citric acid synthesis.

  15. Protein kinase CK2 mutants defective in substrate recognition. Purification and kinetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarno, S; Vaglio, P; Meggio, F

    1996-01-01

    Five mutants of protein kinase CK2 alpha subunit in which altogether 14 basic residues were singly to quadruply replaced by alanines (K74A,K75A,K76A,K77A; K79A, R80A,K83A; R191A,R195A,K198A; R228A; and R278A, K279A,R280A) have been purified to near homogeneity either as such or after addition...... of the recombinant beta subunit. By this latter procedure five mutated tetrameric holoenzymes were obtained as judged from their subunit composition, sedimentation coefficient on sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, and increased activity toward a specific peptide substrate as compared with the isolated alpha......191A,R195A, K198A; K79A,R80A,K83A; and K74A,K75A, K76A,K77A are assayed with the peptides RRRADDSADDDD, RRRADDSDDADD, and RRRADDSDDDAA, respectively. In contrast, the phosphorylation efficiencies of the other substituted peptides decrease more markedly with these mutants than with CK2 wild type...

  16. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  17. Electrophysiology and Beyond: Multiple roles of Na+ channel β subunits in development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Gustavo A.; Isom, Lori L.

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) β subunits are not “auxiliary.” These multifunctional molecules not only modulate Na+ current (INa), but also function as cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) – playing roles in aggregation, migration, invasion, neurite outgrowth, and axonal fasciculation. β subunits are integral members of VGSC signaling complexes at nodes of Ranvier, axon initial segments, and cardiac intercalated disks, regulating action potential propagation through critical intermolecular and cell-cell communication events. At least in vitro, many β subunit cell adhesive functions occur both in the presence and absence of pore-forming VGSC α subunits, and in vivo β subunits are expressed in excitable as well as non-excitable cells, thus β subunits may play important functional roles on their own, in the absence of α subunits. VGSC β1 subunits are essential for life and appear to be especially important during brain development. Mutations in β subunit genes result in a variety of human neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, some cancer cells exhibit alterations in β subunit expression during metastasis. In short, these proteins, originally thought of as merely accessory to α subunits, are critical players in their own right in human health and disease. Here we discuss the role of VGSC β subunits in the nervous system. PMID:20600605

  18. Identification of Toxoplasma gondii cAMP dependent protein kinase and its role in the tachyzoite growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Kurokawa

    Full Text Available cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA has been implicated in the asexual stage of the Toxoplasma gondii life cycle through assaying the effect of a PKA-specific inhibitor on its growth rate. Since inhibition of the host cell PKA cannot be ruled out, a more precise evaluation of the role of PKA, as well as characterization of the kinase itself, is necessary.The inhibitory effects of two PKA inhibitors, H89, an ATP-competitive chemical inhibitor, and PKI, a substrate-competitive mammalian natural peptide inhibitor, were estimated. In the in vitro kinase assay, the inhibitory effect of PKI on a recombinant T. gondii PKA catalytic subunit (TgPKA-C was weaker compared to that on mammalian PKA-C. In a tachyzoite growth assay, PKI had little effect on the growth of tachyzoites, whereas H89 strongly inhibited it. Moreover, T. gondii PKA regulatory subunit (TgPKA-R-overexpressing tachyzoites showed a significant growth defect.Our data suggest that PKA plays an important role in the growth of tachyzoites, and the inhibitory effect of substrate-competitive inhibitor PKI on T. gondii PKA was low compared to that of the ATP competitive inhibitor H89.

  19. Control of PNG kinase, a key regulator of mRNA translation, is coupled to meiosis completion at egg activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masatoshi; Petrova, Boryana; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2017-05-30

    The oocyte-to-embryo transition involves extensive changes in mRNA translation, regulated in Drosophila by the PNG kinase complex whose activity we show here to be under precise developmental control. Despite presence of the catalytic PNG subunit and the PLU and GNU activating subunits in the mature oocyte, GNU is phosphorylated at Cyclin B/CDK1sites and unable to bind PNG and PLU. In vitro phosphorylation of GNU by CyclinB/CDK1 blocks activation of PNG. Meiotic completion promotes GNU dephosphorylation and PNG kinase activation to regulate translation. The critical regulatory effect of phosphorylation is shown by replacement in the oocyte with a phosphorylation-resistant form of GNU, which promotes PNG-GNU complex formation, elevation of Cyclin B, and meiotic defects consistent with premature PNG activation. After PNG activation GNU is destabilized, thus inactivating PNG. This short-lived burst in kinase activity links development with maternal mRNA translation and ensures irreversibility of the oocyte-to-embryo transition.

  20. Architecture of the large subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Leitner, Alexander; Bieri, Philipp; Voigts-Hoffmann, Felix; Erzberger, Jan P; Leibundgut, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ban, Nenad

    2014-01-23

    Mitochondrial ribosomes synthesize a number of highly hydrophobic proteins encoded on the genome of mitochondria, the organelles in eukaryotic cells that are responsible for energy conversion by oxidative phosphorylation. The ribosomes in mammalian mitochondria have undergone massive structural changes throughout their evolution, including ribosomal RNA shortening and acquisition of mitochondria-specific ribosomal proteins. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of the 39S large subunit of the porcine mitochondrial ribosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 4.9 Å resolution. The structure, combined with data from chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry experiments, reveals the unique features of the 39S subunit at near-atomic resolution and provides detailed insight into the architecture of the polypeptide exit site. This region of the mitochondrial ribosome has been considerably remodelled compared to its bacterial counterpart, providing a specialized platform for the synthesis and membrane insertion of the highly hydrophobic protein components of the respiratory chain.

  1. Testing experimental subunit furunculosis vaccines for rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika H.; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (AS) is the etiological agent of typical furunculosis in salmonid fish. The disease causes bacterial septicemia and is a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide, inducing high morbidity and mortality. In this study we vaccinated rainbow...... trout with subunit vaccines containing protein antigens that were selected based on an in silico antigen discovery approach. Thus, the proteome of AS strain A449 was analyzed by an antigen discovery platform and its proteins consequently ranked by their predicted ability to evoke protective immune...... response against AS. Fourteen proteins were prepared in 3 different experimental subunit vaccine combinations and used to vaccinate rainbow trout by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. We tested the proteins for their ability to elicit antibody production and protection. Thus, fish were exposed to virulent...

  2. Mapping of the Mouse Actin Capping Protein Beta Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper John A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, a heterodimer of α and β subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three isoforms of CPβ produced by alternatively splicing from one gene; lower organisms have one gene and one isoform. Results We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the β subunit of mouse CP and identified its chromosomal location by interspecies backcross mapping. Conclusions The CPβ gene (Cappb1 mapped to Chromosome 4 between Cdc42 and D4Mit312. Three mouse mutations, snubnose, curly tail, and cribriform degeneration, map in the vicinity of the β gene.

  3. Oncogenic exon 2 mutations in Mediator subunit MED12 disrupt allosteric activation of cyclin C-CDK8/19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Ju; Shen, Hailian; Spaeth, Jason M; Tolvanen, Jaana H; Failor, Courtney; Knudtson, Jennifer F; McLaughlin, Jessica; Halder, Sunil K; Yang, Qiwei; Bulun, Serdar E; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Schenken, Robert S; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Boyer, Thomas G

    2018-03-30

    Somatic mutations in exon 2 of the RNA polymerase II transcriptional Mediator subunit MED12 occur at high frequency in uterine fibroids (UFs) and breast fibroepithelial tumors as well as recurrently, albeit less frequently, in malignant uterine leimyosarcomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and colorectal cancers. Previously, we reported that UF-linked mutations in MED12 disrupt its ability to activate cyclin C (CycC)-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) in Mediator, implicating impaired Mediator-associated CDK8 activity in the molecular pathogenesis of these clinically significant lesions. Notably, the CDK8 paralog CDK19 is also expressed in myometrium, and both CDK8 and CDK19 assemble into Mediator in a mutually exclusive manner, suggesting that CDK19 activity may also be germane to the pathogenesis of MED12 mutation-induced UFs. However, whether and how UF-linked mutations in MED12 affect CDK19 activation is unknown. Herein, we show that MED12 allosterically activates CDK19 and that UF-linked exon 2 mutations in MED12 disrupt its CDK19 stimulatory activity. Furthermore, we find that within the Mediator kinase module, MED13 directly binds to the MED12 C terminus, thereby suppressing an apparent UF mutation-induced conformational change in MED12 that otherwise disrupts its association with CycC-CDK8/19. Thus, in the presence of MED13, mutant MED12 can bind, but cannot activate, CycC-CDK8/19. These findings indicate that MED12 binding is necessary but not sufficient for CycC-CDK8/19 activation and reveal an additional step in the MED12-dependent activation process, one critically dependent on MED12 residues altered by UF-linked exon 2 mutations. These findings confirm that UF-linked mutations in MED12 disrupt composite Mediator-associated kinase activity and identify CDK8/19 as prospective therapeutic targets in UFs. © 2018 Park et al.

  4. Engineering of kinase-based protein interacting devices: active expression of tyrosine kinase domains

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz Galicia, Miriam Escarlet

    2018-01-01

    is then translated into a FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) signal is here proposed. To this end, DNA constructs for interaction amplification (split kinases), positive controls (intact kinase domains), scaffolding proteins and phosphopeptide - SH2-domain

  5. ASIC subunit ratio and differential surface trafficking in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jiangping; Hu, Youjia; Zha, Xiang-ming

    2016-01-08

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are key mediators of acidosis-induced responses in neurons. However, little is known about the relative abundance of different ASIC subunits in the brain. Such data are fundamental for interpreting the relative contribution of ASIC1a homomers and 1a/2 heteromers to acid signaling, and essential for designing therapeutic interventions to target these channels. We used a simple biochemical approach and semi-quantitatively determined the molar ratio of ASIC1a and 2 subunits in mouse brain. Further, we investigated differential surface trafficking of ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC2b. ASIC1a subunits outnumber the sum of ASIC2a and ASIC2b. There is a region-specific variation in ASIC2a and 2b expression, with cerebellum and striatum expressing predominantly 2b and 2a, respectively. Further, we performed surface biotinylation and found that surface ASIC1a and ASIC2a ratio correlates with their total expression. In contrast, ASIC2b exhibits little surface presence in the brain. This result is consistent with increased co-localization of ASIC2b with an ER marker in 3T3 cells. Our data are the first semi-quantitative determination of relative subunit ratio of various ASICs in the brain. The differential surface trafficking of ASICs suggests that the main functional ASICs in the brain are ASIC1a homomers and 1a/2a heteromers. This finding provides important insights into the relative contribution of various ASIC complexes to acid signaling in neurons.

  6. Measuring Kinase Activity-A Global Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Marissa L; McDonald, Ian M; East, Michael P; Johnson, Gary L; Graves, Lee M

    2017-11-01

    The kinase enzymes within a cell, known collectively as the kinome, play crucial roles in many signaling pathways, including survival, motility, differentiation, stress response, and many more. Aberrant signaling through kinase pathways is often linked to cancer, among other diseases. A major area of scientific research involves understanding the relationships between kinases, their targets, and how the kinome adapts to perturbations of the cellular system. This review will discuss many of the current and developing methods for studying kinase activity, and evaluate their applications, advantages, and disadvantages. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3595-3606, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. β-Arrestin interacts with the beta/gamma subunits of trimeric G-proteins and dishevelled in the Wnt/Ca(2+ pathway in xenopus gastrulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Seitz

    Full Text Available β-Catenin independent, non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways play a major role in the regulation of morphogenetic movements in vertebrates. The term non-canonical Wnt signaling comprises multiple, intracellularly divergent, Wnt-activated and β-Catenin independent signaling cascades including the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity and the Wnt/Ca(2+ cascades. Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity and Wnt/Ca(2+ pathways share common effector proteins, including the Wnt ligand, Frizzled receptors and Dishevelled, with each other and with additional branches of Wnt signaling. Along with the aforementioned proteins, β-Arrestin has been identified as an essential effector protein in the Wnt/β-Catenin and the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity pathway. Our results demonstrate that β-Arrestin is required in the Wnt/Ca(2+ signaling cascade upstream of Protein Kinase C (PKC and Ca(2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CamKII. We have further characterized the role of β-Arrestin in this branch of non-canonical Wnt signaling by knock-down and rescue experiments in Xenopus embryo explants and analyzed protein-protein interactions in 293T cells. Functional interaction of β-Arrestin, the β subunit of trimeric G-proteins and Dishevelled is required to induce PKC activation and membrane translocation. In Xenopus gastrulation, β-Arrestin function in Wnt/Ca(2+ signaling is essential for convergent extension movements. We further show that β-Arrestin physically interacts with the β subunit of trimeric G-proteins and Dishevelled, and that the interaction between β-Arrestin and Dishevelled is promoted by the beta/gamma subunits of trimeric G-proteins, indicating the formation of a multiprotein signaling complex.

  8. Global Proteome Analysis Identifies Active Immunoproteasome Subunits in Human Platelets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M.; Brown, Lyda M.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. PMID:25146974

  9. Global proteome analysis identifies active immunoproteasome subunits in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M; Brown, Lyda M; Hoffman, Michael D; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of TSH subunits in thyroid diseases and endocrine opthalmopahty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, W.

    1982-01-01

    Highly sensitive radioimmunoassays of hTSH sub-units were developed. The hormone preparations were labelled with 125-iodine according to a modified chloramine -T method, and purified by chromatography using biogel P6 and P60. Rabbit antisera were used as antibodies. Separation of the antibody-bound and of the free antigens was carried out via the double antibody method. The antiserum required for this purpose was obtained from a goat. The sensitivity of the assay was influenced by changing the protein content of the buffer, the incubation volume, the tracer amounts, the incubation time and the incubation temperature. For hTSH-α, the lowest detectable limit was found to be 50 pg/ml, for hTSH-#betta# 20 pg/ml. Thus, the sub-units could be determined for 98% of the patients under review. The #betta#-TSH radioimmunoassay is largely specific, TSH cross-reacts to a degree of 5%. The computerized evoluation was carried out by means of Spline approximation using the Siemens 4004 computer. Precision and accurateness are in compliance with generally accpted criteria. The serum levels of α and #betta# sub-units showed no discordancy with regard to TSH. In all groups of patients examined, the levels of the hormone-specific #betta#-chain were found to be exclusively dependent upon the actual thyroid activity. (orig.) [de

  11. The p110beta isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signals downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally redundant with p110gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermet-Guibert, Julie; Bjorklof, Katja; Salpekar, Ashreena; Gonella, Cristiano; Ramadani, Faruk; Bilancio, Antonio; Meek, Stephen; Smith, Andrew J H; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2008-06-17

    The p110 isoforms of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) are acutely regulated by extracellular stimuli. The class IA PI3K catalytic subunits (p110alpha, p110beta, and p110delta) occur in complex with a Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing p85 regulatory subunit, which has been shown to link p110alpha and p110delta to Tyr kinase signaling pathways. The p84/p101 regulatory subunits of the p110gamma class IB PI3K lack SH2 domains and instead couple p110gamma to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we show, using small-molecule inhibitors with selectivity for p110beta and cells derived from a p110beta-deficient mouse line, that p110beta is not a major effector of Tyr kinase signaling but couples to GPCRs. In macrophages, both p110beta and p110gamma contributed to Akt activation induced by the GPCR agonist complement 5a, but not by the Tyr kinase ligand colony-stimulating factor-1. In fibroblasts, which express p110beta but not p110gamma, p110beta mediated Akt activation by the GPCR ligands stromal cell-derived factor, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and lysophosphatidic acid but not by the Tyr kinase ligands PDGF, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1. Introduction of p110gamma in these cells reduced the contribution of p110beta to GPCR signaling. Taken together, these data show that p110beta and p110gamma can couple redundantly to the same GPCR agonists. p110beta, which shows a much broader tissue distribution than the leukocyte-restricted p110gamma, could thus provide a conduit for GPCR-linked PI3K signaling in the many cell types where p110gamma expression is low or absent.

  12. The p110β isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signals downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally redundant with p110γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermet-Guibert, Julie; Bjorklof, Katja; Salpekar, Ashreena; Gonella, Cristiano; Ramadani, Faruk; Bilancio, Antonio; Meek, Stephen; Smith, Andrew J. H.; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2008-01-01

    The p110 isoforms of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) are acutely regulated by extracellular stimuli. The class IA PI3K catalytic subunits (p110α, p110β, and p110δ) occur in complex with a Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing p85 regulatory subunit, which has been shown to link p110α and p110δ to Tyr kinase signaling pathways. The p84/p101 regulatory subunits of the p110γ class IB PI3K lack SH2 domains and instead couple p110γ to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we show, using small-molecule inhibitors with selectivity for p110β and cells derived from a p110β-deficient mouse line, that p110β is not a major effector of Tyr kinase signaling but couples to GPCRs. In macrophages, both p110β and p110γ contributed to Akt activation induced by the GPCR agonist complement 5a, but not by the Tyr kinase ligand colony-stimulating factor-1. In fibroblasts, which express p110β but not p110γ, p110β mediated Akt activation by the GPCR ligands stromal cell-derived factor, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and lysophosphatidic acid but not by the Tyr kinase ligands PDGF, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1. Introduction of p110γ in these cells reduced the contribution of p110β to GPCR signaling. Taken together, these data show that p110β and p110γ can couple redundantly to the same GPCR agonists. p110β, which shows a much broader tissue distribution than the leukocyte-restricted p110γ, could thus provide a conduit for GPCR-linked PI3K signaling in the many cell types where p110γ expression is low or absent. PMID:18544649

  13. eIF2α Kinases Control Chalone Production in Dictyostelium discoideum ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Robert L.; Xiong, Yanhua; Kirsten, Janet H.; Singleton, Charles K.

    2011-01-01

    Growing Dictyostelium cells secrete CfaD and AprA, two proteins that have been characterized as chalones. They exist within a high-molecular-weight complex that reversibly inhibits cell proliferation, but not growth, via cell surface receptors and a signaling pathway that includes G proteins. How the production of these two proteins is regulated is unknown. Dictyostelium cells possess three GCN2-type eukaryotic initiation factor 2 α subunit (eIF2α) kinases, proteins that phosphorylate the translational initiation factor eIF2α and possess a tRNA binding domain involved in their regulation. The Dictyostelium kinases have been shown to function during development in regulating several processes. We show here that expression of an unregulated, activated kinase domain greatly inhibits cell proliferation. The inhibitory effect on proliferation is not due to a general inhibition of translation. Instead, it is due to enhanced production of a secreted factor(s). Indeed, extracellular CfaD and AprA proteins, but not their mRNAs, are overproduced in cells expressing the activated kinase domain. The inhibition of proliferation is not seen when the activated kinase domain is expressed in cells lacking CfaD or AprA or in cells that contain a nonphosphorylatable eIF2α. We conclude that production of the chalones CfaD and AprA is translationally regulated by eIF2α phosphorylation. Both proteins are upregulated at the culmination of development, and this enhanced production is lacking in a strain that possesses a nonphosphorylatable eIF2α. PMID:21278229

  14. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  15. Skeletal myocyte hypertrophy requires mTOR kinase activity and S6K1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In-Hyun; Erbay, Ebru; Nuzzi, Paul; Chen Jie

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and growth, with the ribosomal subunit S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) as one of the key downstream signaling effectors. A critical role of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle differentiation has been identified recently, and an unusual regulatory mechanism independent of mTOR kinase activity and S6K1 is revealed. An mTOR pathway has also been reported to regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy, but the regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. Here, we report the investigation of mTOR's function in insulin growth factor I (IGF-I)-induced C2C12 myotube hypertrophy. Added at a later stage when rapamycin no longer had any effect on normal myocyte differentiation, rapamycin completely blocked myocyte hypertrophy as measured by myotube diameter. Importantly, a concerted increase of average myonuclei per myotube was observed in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes, which was also inhibited by rapamycin added at a time when it no longer affected normal differentiation. The mTOR protein level, its catalytic activity, its phosphorylation on Ser2448, and the activity of S6K1 were all found increased in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes compared to unstimulated myotubes. Using C2C12 cells stably expressing rapamycin-resistant forms of mTOR and S6K1, we provide genetic evidence for the requirement of mTOR and its downstream effector S6K1 in the regulation of myotube hypertrophy. Our results suggest distinct mTOR signaling mechanisms in different stages of skeletal muscle development: While mTOR regulates the initial myoblast differentiation in a kinase-independent and S6K1-independent manner, the hypertrophic function of mTOR requires its kinase activity and employs S6K1 as a downstream effector

  16. HSP90 inhibitors potentiate PGF2α-induced IL-6 synthesis via p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Fujita

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 that is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, is recognized to be a major molecular chaperone. We have previously reported that prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, a potent bone remodeling mediator, stimulates the synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6 through p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and p38 MAP kinase in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells, and that Rho-kinase acts at a point upstream of p38 MAP kinase. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of HSP90 in the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 synthesis and the underlying mechanism in MC3T3-E1 cells. Geldanamycin, an inhibitor of HSP90, significantly amplified both the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 release and the mRNA expression levels. In addition, other HSP90 inhibitors, 17-allylamino-17demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-AAG and 17-dimethylamino-ethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG and onalespib, enhanced the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 release. Geldanamycin, 17-AAG and onalespib markedly strengthened the PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Geldanamycin and 17-AAG did not affect the PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT-1, a substrate of Rho-kinase, and the protein levels of RhoA and Rho-kinase. In addition, HSP90-siRNA enhanced the PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, significantly suppressed the amplification by geldanamycin, 17-AAG or 17-DMAG of the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 release. Our results strongly suggest that HSP90 negatively regulates the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 synthesis in osteoblasts, and that the effect of HSP90 is exerted through regulating p38 MAP kinase activation.

  17. Engineering of kinase-based protein interacting devices: active expression of tyrosine kinase domains

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz Galicia, Miriam Escarlet

    2018-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions modulate cellular processes in health and disease. However, tracing weak or rare associations or dissociations of proteins is not a trivial task. Kinases are often regulated through interaction partners and, at the same time, themselves regulate cellular interaction networks. The use of kinase domains for creating a synthetic sensor device that reads low concentration protein-protein interactions and amplifies them to a higher concentration interaction which is then translated into a FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) signal is here proposed. To this end, DNA constructs for interaction amplification (split kinases), positive controls (intact kinase domains), scaffolding proteins and phosphopeptide - SH2-domain modules for the reading of kinase activity were assembled and expression protocols for fusion proteins containing Lyn, Src, and Fak kinase domains in bacterial and in cell-free systems were optimized. Also, two non-overlapping methods for measuring the kinase activity of these proteins were stablished and, finally, a protein-fragment complementation assay with the split-kinase constructs was tested. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated that features such as codon optimization, vector design and expression conditions have an impact on the expression yield and activity of kinase-based proteins. Furthermore, it has been found that the defined PURE cell-free system is insufficient for the active expression of catalytic kinase domains. In contrast, the bacterial co-expression with phosphatases produced active kinase fusion proteins for two out of the three tested Tyrosine kinase domains.

  18. AMP-activated protein kinase in contraction regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism: necessary and/or sufficient?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the contraction-activated heterotrimeric 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein is proposed to regulate the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes by increasing substrate uptake and turnover in addition to regulating the transcription of proteins involved...... in mitochondrial biogenesis and other aspects of promoting an oxidative muscle phenotype. Here, the current knowledge on the expression of AMPK subunits in human quadriceps muscle and evidence from rodent studies suggesting distinct AMPK subunit expression pattern in different muscle types is reviewed. Then......, the intensity and time dependence of AMPK activation in human quadriceps and rodent muscle are evaluated. Subsequently, a major part of this review critically examines the evidence supporting a necessary and/or sufficient role of AMPK in a broad spectrum of skeletal muscle contraction-relevant processes...

  19. The cytochrome oxidase subunit I and subunit III genes in Oenothera mitochondria are transcribed from identical promoter sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Schobel, Werner; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1987-01-01

    Two loci encoding subunit III of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) in Oenothera mitochondria have been identified from a cDNA library of mitochondrial transcripts. A 657-bp sequence block upstream from the open reading frame is also present in the two copies of the COX subunit I gene and is presumably involved in homologous sequence rearrangement. The proximal points of sequence rearrangements are located 3 bp upstream from the COX I and 1139 bp upstream from the COX III initiation codons. The 5'-termini of both COX I and COX III mRNAs have been mapped in this common sequence confining the promoter region for the Oenothera mitochondrial COX I and COX III genes to the homologous sequence block. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:15981332

  20. Oncogenic Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Directly Phosphorylate Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a Resistance Mechanism to FAK-Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Timothy A; Lenzo, Felicia L; Figel, Sheila A; Grapes, Abigail T; Cance, William G

    2016-12-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a major drug target in cancer and current inhibitors targeted to the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase domain have entered clinical trials. However, preliminary results have shown limited single-agent efficacy in patients. Despite these unfavorable data, the molecular mechanisms that drive intrinsic and acquired resistance to FAK-kinase inhibitors are largely unknown. We have demonstrated that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) can directly bypass FAK-kinase inhibition in cancer cells through phosphorylation of FAK's critical tyrosine 397 (Y397). We also showed that HER2 forms a direct protein-protein interaction with the FAK-FERM-F1 lobe, promoting direct phosphorylation of Y397. In addition, FAK-kinase inhibition induced two forms of compensatory RTK reprogramming: (i) the rapid phosphorylation and activation of RTK signaling pathways in RTK High cells and (ii) the long-term acquisition of RTKs novel to the parental cell line in RTK Low cells. Finally, HER2 +: cancer cells displayed resistance to FAK-kinase inhibition in 3D growth assays using a HER2 isogenic system and HER2 + cancer cell lines. Our data indicate a novel drug resistance mechanism to FAK-kinase inhibitors whereby HER2 and other RTKs can rescue and maintain FAK activation (pY397) even in the presence of FAK-kinase inhibition. These data may have important ramifications for existing clinical trials of FAK inhibitors and suggest that individual tumor stratification by RTK expression would be important to predict patient response to FAK-kinase inhibitors. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 3028-39. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Propranolol decreases retention of fear memory by modulating the stability of surface glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits in the lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Li, Ming-Xing; Wang, Can-Ming; Guan, Xin-Lei; Wu, Peng-Fei; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Jin, You; Ni, Lan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2015-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder with enhanced retention of fear memory and has profound impact on quality of life for millions of people worldwide. The β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol has been used in preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of PTSD, but the mechanisms underlying its potential efficacy on fear memory retention remain to be elucidated. We investigated the action of propranolol on the retention of conditioned fear memory, the surface expression of glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits of AMPA receptors and synaptic adaptation in the lateral amygdala (LA) of rats. Propranolol attenuated reactivation-induced strengthening of fear retention while reducing enhanced surface expression of GluA1 subunits and restoring the impaired long-term depression in LA. These effects of propranolol were mediated by antagonizing reactivation-induced enhancement of adrenergic signalling, which activates PKA and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and then regulates the trafficking of AMPA receptors via phosphorylation of GluA1 subunits at the C-terminus. Both i.p. injection and intra-amygdala infusion of propranolol attenuated reactivation-induced enhancement of fear retention. Reactivation strengthens fear retention by increasing the level of noradrenaline and promotes the surface expression of GluA1 subunits and the excitatory synaptic transmission in LA. These findings uncover one mechanism underlying the efficiency of propranolol on retention of fear memories and suggest that β-adrenoceptor antagonists, which act centrally, may be more suitable for the treatment of PTSD. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Effects of light and the regulatory B-subunit composition of protein phosphatase 2A on the susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana to aphid (Myzus persicae) infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Brwa; Karpinska, Barbara; Konert, Grzegorz; Durian, Guido; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signaling pathways are complex and poorly understood but protein kinase/phosphatase cascades are potentially important components. Aphid fecundity and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection were determined in the low light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and in mutant lines defective in either the protein phosphatase (PP)2A regulatory subunit B'γ (gamma; pp2a-b'γ) or B'ζ (zeta; pp2a-b'ζ1-1 and pp2a-b'ζ 1-2) and in gamma zeta double mutants (pp2a-b'γζ) lacking both subunits. All the mutants except for pp2a-b'ζ 1-1 had significantly lower leaf areas than the wild type. Susceptibility to P. syringae was similar in all genotypes. In contrast, aphid fecundity was significantly decreased in the pp2a-b'γ mutant relative to the wild type but not in the pp2a-b'γζ double mutant. A high light pre-treatment, which led to a significant increase in rosette growth in all mutant lines but not in the wild type, led to a significant decrease in aphid fecundity in all genotypes. The high light pre-treatment abolished the differences in aphid resistance observed in the pp2a-b'γ mutant relative to the wild type. The light and CO2 response curves for photosynthesis were changed in response to the high light pre-treatment, but the high light effects were similar in all genotypes. These data demonstrate that a pre-exposure to high light and the composition of B-subunits on the trimeric PP2A holoenzymes are important in regulating plant resistance to aphids. The functional specificity for the individual regulatory B-subunits may therefore limit aphid colonization, depending on the prevailing abiotic stress environment.

  3. Effects of light and the regulatory Beta subunit composition of protein phosphatase 2A on the susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana to aphid (Myzus persicae infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brwa eRasool

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signalling pathways are complex and poorly understood but protein kinase/phosphatase cascades are potentially important components. Aphid fecundity and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection were determined in the low light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and in mutant lines defective in either the protein phosphatase (PP2A regulatory subunit B’γ (gamma; pp2a-b’γ or B’ζ (zeta; pp2a-b’ζ1-1 and pp2a-b’ζ1-2 and in gamma zeta double mutants (pp2a-b’γζ lacking both subunits. All the mutants except for pp2a-b’ζ1-1 had significantly lower leaf areas than the wild type. Susceptibility to P. syringae was similar in all genotypes. In contrast, aphid fecundity was significantly decreased in the pp2a-b’γ mutant relative to the wild type but not in the pp2a-b’γζ double mutant. A high light pre-treatment, which led to a significant increase in rosette growth in all mutant lines but not in the wild type, led to a significant decrease in aphid fecundity in all genotypes. The high light pre-treatment abolished the differences in aphid resistance observed in the pp2a-b’γ mutant relative to the wild type. The light and CO2 response curves for photosynthesis were changed in response to the high light pre-treatment, but the high light effects were similar in all genotypes. These data demonstrate that a pre-exposure to high light and the composition of subunits on the trimeric PP2A holoenzymes are important in regulating plant resistance to aphids. The functional specificity for the individual regulatory B-subunits may therefore limit aphid colonisation, depending on the prevailing abiotic stress environment.

  4. A rice kinase-protein interaction map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Richter, Todd; Chen, Mei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Seo, Young Su; Xie, Mingtang; Zheng, Xianwu; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Stevenson, Rebecca A; Dardick, Christopher; Li, Ying; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Fahong; Bartley, Laura E; Chern, Mawsheng; Bart, Rebecca; Chen, Xiuhua; Zhu, Lihuang; Farmerie, William G; Gribskov, Michael; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Fromm, Michael E; Ronald, Pamela C; Song, Wen-Yuan

    2009-03-01

    Plants uniquely contain large numbers of protein kinases, and for the vast majority of the 1,429 kinases predicted in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome, little is known of their functions. Genetic approaches often fail to produce observable phenotypes; thus, new strategies are needed to delineate kinase function. We previously developed a cost-effective high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system. Using this system, we have generated a protein interaction map of 116 representative rice kinases and 254 of their interacting proteins. Overall, the resulting interaction map supports a large number of known or predicted kinase-protein interactions from both plants and animals and reveals many new functional insights. Notably, we found a potential widespread role for E3 ubiquitin ligases in pathogen defense signaling mediated by receptor-like kinases, particularly by the kinases that may have evolved from recently expanded kinase subfamilies in rice. We anticipate that the data provided here will serve as a foundation for targeted functional studies in rice and other plants. The application of yeast two-hybrid and TAPtag analyses for large-scale plant protein interaction studies is also discussed.

  5. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based drug discovery approach, we have identified small-molecule histidine-kinase

  6. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DAN-PK), a key enzyme in the re-ligation of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    Repair pathways of DNA are now defined and some important findings have been discovered in the last few years. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NEH) is a crucial process in the repair of radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEj implies at least three steps: the DNA free-ends must get closer, preparation of the free-ends by exonucleases and then a transient hybridization in a region of DNA with weak homology. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is the key enzyme in this process. DNA-PK is a nuclear serine/threonine kinase that comprises three components: a catalytic subunit (DNA-PK cs ) and two regulatory subunits, DNA-binding proteins, Ku80 and Ku70. The severe combined immuno-deficient (scid) mice are deficient in DNA-PK cs : this protein is involved both in DNA repair and in the V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes. It is a protein-kinase of the P13-kinase family and which can phosphorylate Ku proteins, p53 and probably some other proteins still unknown. DNA-PK is an important actor of DSBs repair (induced by ionising radiations or by drugs like etoposide), but obviously it is not the only mechanism existing in the cell for this function. Some others, like homologous recombination, seem also to have a great importance for cell survival. (authors)

  7. A conserved mechanism of autoinhibition for the AMPK kinase domain: ATP-binding site and catalytic loop refolding as a means of regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littler, Dene R.; Walker, John R.; Davis, Tara; Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E.; Finerty, Patrick J. Jr; Newman, Elena; Mackenzie, Farell; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-01-01

    A 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated kinase domain from the α2 subunit of human AMPK, the first from a multicellular organism, is presented. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved trimeric protein complex that is responsible for energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here, a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated kinase domain from the α2 subunit of human AMPK, the first from a multicellular organism, is presented. This human form adopts a catalytically inactive state with distorted ATP-binding and substrate-binding sites. The ATP site is affected by changes in the base of the activation loop, which has moved into an inhibited DFG-out conformation. The substrate-binding site is disturbed by changes within the AMPKα2 catalytic loop that further distort the enzyme from a catalytically active form. Similar structural rearrangements have been observed in a yeast AMPK homologue in response to the binding of its auto-inhibitory domain; restructuring of the kinase catalytic loop is therefore a conserved feature of the AMPK protein family and is likely to represent an inhibitory mechanism that is utilized during function

  8. Biglycan- and Sphingosine Kinase-1 Signaling Crosstalk Regulates the Synthesis of Macrophage Chemoattractants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Tzung-Harn Hsieh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In its soluble form, the extracellular matrix proteoglycan biglycan triggers the synthesis of the macrophage chemoattractants, chemokine (C-C motif ligand CCL2 and CCL5 through selective utilization of Toll-like receptors (TLRs and their adaptor molecules. However, the respective downstream signaling events resulting in biglycan-induced CCL2 and CCL5 production have not yet been defined. Here, we show that biglycan stimulates the production and activation of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1 in a TLR4- and Toll/interleukin (IL-1R domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon (IFN-β (TRIF-dependent manner in murine primary macrophages. We provide genetic and pharmacological proof that SphK1 is a crucial downstream mediator of biglycan-triggered CCL2 and CCL5 mRNA and protein expression. This is selectively driven by biglycan/SphK1-dependent phosphorylation of the nuclear factor NF-κB p65 subunit, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Importantly, in vivo overexpression of soluble biglycan causes Sphk1-dependent enhancement of renal CCL2 and CCL5 and macrophage recruitment into the kidney. Our findings describe the crosstalk between biglycan- and SphK1-driven extracellular matrix- and lipid-signaling. Thus, SphK1 may represent a new target for therapeutic intervention in biglycan-evoked inflammatory conditions.

  9. Phosphorylation-induced changes in the energetic frustration in human Tank binding kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Shahrukh; Kumar, Vijay; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-07-14

    Tank binding kinase 1 (TBK-1) plays an important role in immunity, inflammation, autophagy, cell growth and proliferation. Nevertheless, a key molecular and structural detail of TBK-1 phosphorylation and activation has been largely unknown. Here we investigated the energy landscape of phosphorylated (active) and unphosphorylated (inactive) forms of human TBK-1 to characterize the interplay between phosphorylation and local frustration. By employing the algorithm equipped with energy function and implemented in Frustratometer web-server (http://www.frustratometer.tk), we quantify the role of frustration in the activation of TBK-1. Accordingly, the conformational changes were observed in phosphoregulated active and inactive TBK-1. Substantial changes in frustration, flexibility and interatomic motions were observed among different forms of TBK-1. Structurally rigid kinase domain constitutes a minimally frustrated hub in the core of the catalytic domain, and highly frustrated clusters mainly at the C-lobe might enable the conformational transitions during activation. Also, a large network of highly frustrated interactions is found in the SDD domain of TBK-1 involved in protein-protein interactions and dimerization. The contact maps of the activation loop and α-C helix of kinase domain showed significant changes upon phosphorylation. Cross correlation analysis indicate that both intra and inter subunit correlated motions increases with phosphorylation of TBK-1. Phosphorylation thus introduces subtle changes in long-range contacts that might lead to significant conformational change of TBK-1. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. dependent/calmodulin- stimulated protein kinase from moss

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    stimulated protein kinase; CDPK, calmodulin domain-like protein kinase; KM14, 14 amino acid synthetic peptide; .... used were obtained from Sigma Chemical Company, USA, ..... Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

  11. The Protein Kinase RSK Family - Roles in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lannigan, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    The Ser/Thr protein kinase p90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) is an important downstream effector of mitogen-activated protein kinase but its roles in prostate cancer have not been previously examined...

  12. Structural coupling of SH2-kinase domains links Fes and Abl substrate recognition and kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Kofler, Michael; Hantschel, Oliver; Gish, Gerald D; Grebien, Florian; Salah, Eidarus; Neudecker, Philipp; Kay, Lewis E; Turk, Benjamin E; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Pawson, Tony; Knapp, Stefan

    2008-09-05

    The SH2 domain of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases can enhance catalytic activity and substrate recognition, but the molecular mechanisms by which this is achieved are poorly understood. We have solved the structure of the prototypic SH2-kinase unit of the human Fes tyrosine kinase, which appears specialized for positive signaling. In its active conformation, the SH2 domain tightly interacts with the kinase N-terminal lobe and positions the kinase alphaC helix in an active configuration through essential packing and electrostatic interactions. This interaction is stabilized by ligand binding to the SH2 domain. Our data indicate that Fes kinase activation is closely coupled to substrate recognition through cooperative SH2-kinase-substrate interactions. Similarly, we find that the SH2 domain of the active Abl kinase stimulates catalytic activity and substrate phosphorylation through a distinct SH2-kinase interface. Thus, the SH2 and catalytic domains of active Fes and Abl pro-oncogenic kinases form integrated structures essential for effective tyrosine kinase signaling.

  13. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Lenskjold, Toke; Jacoby, Anne Sophie

    2016-01-01

    cells were quantitated using enzyme immunometric assays. The activity of GSK-3β (serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β/total GSK-3β) was lower at baseline compared with follow-up. No significant mean change over time was observed in levels of total GSK-3β and serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β. Exploratory......Evidence indicates a role for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and in cognitive disturbances; however, the natural variation in GSK-3β activity over time is unknown. We aimed to investigate GSK-3β activity over time and its possible correlation...... with emotional lability, subjective mood fluctuations and cognitive function in healthy individuals. Thirty-seven healthy subjects were evaluated with neuropsychological tests and blood samples at baseline and 12-week follow-up. Total GSK-3β and serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β in peripheral blood mononuclear...

  14. TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Abruzzese

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML during pregnancy has became recently a matter of continuous debate.  The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients.  Patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy.  This fact has come the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are not infrequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for all the approved TKIs, as well as suggest how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy.

  15. The inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase by full-length hepatitis C virus NS3/4A complex is due to ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoubala, M; Holt, J; Clegg, R A; Rowlands, D J; Harris, M

    2001-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease, but the molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis remain to be established. The HCV non-structural protein NS3 complexes with NS4A and has three enzymatic activities: a proteinase and a helicase/NTPase. Recently, catalytically inactive NS3 fragments containing an arginine-rich motif have been reported to interact with, and inhibit, the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA C-subunit). Here we demonstrate that full-length, catalytically active NS3/4A, purified from recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells, is also able to inhibit PKA C-subunit in vitro. This inhibition was abrogated by mutation of either the arginine-rich motif or the conserved helicase motif II, both of which also abolished NTPase activity. As PKA C-subunit inhibition was also enhanced by poly(U) (an activator of NS3 NTPase activity), we hypothesized that PKA C-subunit inhibition could be due to NS3/4A-mediated ATP hydrolysis. This was confirmed by experiments in which a constant ATP concentration was maintained by addition of an ATP regeneration system--under these conditions PKA C-subunit inhibition was not observed. Interestingly, the mutations also abrogated the ability of wild-type NS3/4A to inhibit the PKA-regulated transcription factor CREB in transiently transfected hepatoma cells. Our data are thus not consistent with the previously proposed model in which the arginine-rich motif of NS3 was suggested to act as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor of PKA C-subunit. However, in vivo effects of NS3/4A suggest that ATPase activity may play a role in viral pathology in the infected liver.

  16. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, R.M.B. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia]|[Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal). Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of {sup 35}S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author).

  17. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, R.M.B.; Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35 S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author)

  18. Flexible Connectors between Capsomer Subunits that Regulate Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasek, Mary L; Maurer, Joshua B; Hendrix, Roger W; Duda, Robert L

    2017-08-04

    Viruses build icosahedral capsids of specific size and shape by regulating the spatial arrangement of the hexameric and pentameric protein capsomers in the growing shell during assembly. In the T=7 capsids of Escherichia coli bacteriophage HK97 and other phages, 60 capsomers are hexons, while the rest are pentons that are correctly positioned during assembly. Assembly of the HK97 capsid to the correct size and shape has been shown to depend on specific ionic contacts between capsomers. We now describe additional ionic interactions within capsomers that also regulate assembly. Each is between the long hairpin, the "E-loop," that extends from one subunit to the adjacent subunit within the same capsomer. Glutamate E153 on the E-loop and arginine R210 on the adjacent subunit's backbone alpha-helix form salt bridges in hexamers and pentamers. Mutations that disrupt these salt bridges were lethal for virus production, because the mutant proteins assembled into tubes or sheets instead of capsids. X-ray structures show that the E153-R210 links are flexible and maintained during maturation despite radical changes in capsomer shape. The E153-R210 links appear to form early in assembly to enable capsomers to make programmed changes in their shape during assembly. The links also prevent flattening of capsomers and premature maturation. Mutant phenotypes and modeling support an assembly model in which flexible E153-R210 links mediate capsomer shape changes that control where pentons are placed to create normal-sized capsids. The E-loop may be conserved in other systems in order to play similar roles in regulating assembly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sex Hormone Receptor Expression in the Human Vocal Fold Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirgezen, Tolga; Sunter, Ahmet Volkan; Yigit, Ozgur; Huq, Gulben Erdem

    2017-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the existence of sex hormone receptors in the subunits of vocal fold. This is a cadaver study. The androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors were examined in the epithelium (EP), superficial layer of the lamina propria (SLP), vocal ligament (VL), and macula flava (MF) of the vocal folds from 42 human cadavers (21 male, 21 female) by immunohistochemical methods. Their staining ratios were scored and statistically compared. The androgen receptor score was significantly higher for the MF than for the EP and SLP (P vocal fold, mostly in the MF and VLs. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. N-linked glycans are required on epithelial Na+ channel subunits for maturation and surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlan, Ossama B; Kinlough, Carol L; Myerburg, Michael M; Shi, Shujie; Chen, Jingxin; Blobner, Brandon M; Buck, Teresa M; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Hughey, Rebecca P; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2018-03-01

    Epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) subunits undergo N-linked glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum where they assemble into an αβγ complex. Six, 13, and 5 consensus sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) for N-glycosylation reside in the extracellular domains of the mouse α-, β-, and γ-subunits, respectively. Because the importance of ENaC N-linked glycans has not been fully addressed, we examined the effect of preventing N-glycosylation of specific subunits on channel function, expression, maturation, and folding. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes or Fischer rat thyroid cells with αβγ-ENaC lacking N-linked glycans on a single subunit reduced ENaC activity as well as the inhibitory response to extracellular Na + . The lack of N-linked glycans on the β-subunit also precluded channel activation by trypsin. However, channel activation by shear stress was N-linked glycan independent, regardless of which subunit was modified. We also discovered that the lack of N-linked glycans on any one subunit reduced the total and surface levels of cognate subunits. The lack of N-linked glycans on the β-subunit had the largest effect on total levels, with the lack of N-linked glycans on the γ- and α-subunits having intermediate and modest effects, respectively. Finally, channels with wild-type β-subunits were more sensitive to limited trypsin proteolysis than channels lacking N-linked glycans on the β-subunit. Our results indicate that N-linked glycans on each subunit are required for proper folding, maturation, surface expression, and function of the channel.

  1. Global regulatory roles of the cAMP/PKA pathway revealed by phenotypic, transcriptomic and phosphoproteomic analyses in a null mutant of the PKA catalytic subunit in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chengjun; Wu, Mei; Bing, Jian; Tao, Li; Ding, Xuefen; Liu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Guanghua

    2017-07-01

    The conserved cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays critical roles in the regulation of morphological transitions and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. It has long been thought that the PKA catalytic subunit is essential for cell viability in this fungus. Paradoxically, the single adenylyl cyclase-encoding gene, CYR1, which is required for the production of cAMP in C. albicans, is not essential for cell growth. Here, a double mutant of TPK1 and TPK2 (tpk2/tpk2 tpk1/tpk1, t2t1), which encode two isoforms of the PKA catalytic subunit was successfully generated, suggesting that this subunit is not essential for cell viability. Inactivation of the PKA catalytic subunit blocked filamentation and dramatically attenuated white-to-opaque switching, but promoted sexual mating. Comparative transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that the t2t1 and cyr1/cyr1 mutants exhibited similar global gene expression profiles. Compared with the WT strain, the general transcriptional activity and metabolism were significantly decreased in both the t2t1 and cyr1/cyr1 mutants. Using combined phosphoproteomic and bioinformatic analyses, we identified 181 potential PKA phosphorylation targets, which represent 148 unique proteins involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes. The study sheds new insights into the global regulatory features of the cAMP/PKA pathway in C. albicans. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A charged residue at the subunit interface of PCNA promotes trimer formation by destabilizing alternate subunit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ramaswamy, S.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential accessory factor in DNA replication and repair, is a ring-shaped homotrimer. A novel nontrimeric structure of E113G-mutant PCNA protein is reported, which shows that this protein forms alternate subunit interactions. It is concluded that the charged side chain of Glu113 promotes normal trimer formation by destabilizing these alternate subunit interactions. Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential replication accessory factor that interacts with a variety of proteins involved in DNA replication and repair. Each monomer of PCNA has an N-terminal domain A and a C-terminal domain B. In the structure of the wild-type PCNA protein, domain A of one monomer interacts with domain B of a neighboring monomer to form a ring-shaped trimer. Glu113 is a conserved residue at the subunit interface in domain A. Two distinct X-ray crystal structures have been determined of a mutant form of PCNA with a substitution at this position (E113G) that has previously been studied because of its effect on translesion synthesis. The first structure was the expected ring-shaped trimer. The second structure was an unanticipated nontrimeric form of the protein. In this nontrimeric form, domain A of one PCNA monomer interacts with domain A of a neighboring monomer, while domain B of this monomer interacts with domain B of a different neighboring monomer. The B–B interface is stabilized by an antiparallel β-sheet and appears to be structurally similar to the A–B interface observed in the trimeric form of PCNA. The A–A interface, in contrast, is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Because the E113G substitution is located on this hydrophobic surface, the A–A interface should be less favorable in the case of the wild-type protein. This suggests that the side chain of Glu113 promotes trimer formation by destabilizing these possible alternate subunit interactions

  3. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    OpenAIRE

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta ...

  4. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits are located on rat liver endosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyke Rebecca W

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat liver endosomes contain activated insulin receptors and downstream signal transduction molecules. We undertook these studies to determine whether endosomes also contain heterotrimeric G proteins that may be involved in signal transduction from G protein-coupled receptors. Results By Western blotting Gsα, Giα1,2, Giα3 and Gβ were enriched in both canalicular (CM and basolateral (BLM membranes but also readily detectable on three types of purified rat liver endosomes in the order recycling receptor compartment (RRC > compartment for uncoupling of receptor and ligand (CURL > multivesicular bodies (MVB >> purified secondary lysosomes. Western blotting with antibodies to Na, K-ATPase and to other proteins associated with plasma membranes and intracellular organelles indicated this was not due to contamination of endosome preparations by CM or BLM. Adenylate cyclase (AC was also identified on purified CM, BLM, RRC, CURL and MVB. Percoll gradient fractionation of liver postnuclear supernatants demonstrated co-occurrence of endosomes and heterotrimeric G protein subunits in fractions with little plasma membrane markers. By confocal microscopy, punctate staining for Gsα, Giα3 and Gβ corresponded to punctate areas of endocytosed Texas red-dextran in hepatocytes from control and cholera toxin-treated livers. Conclusion We conclude that heterotrimeric G protein subunits as well as AC likely traffic into hepatocytes on endosome membranes, possibly generating downstream signals spatially separate from signalling generated at the plasma membrane, analogous to the role(s of internalized insulin receptors.

  5. Fungal mediator tail subunits contain classical transcriptional activation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2015-04-01

    Classical activation domains within DNA-bound eukaryotic transcription factors make weak interactions with coactivator complexes, such as Mediator, to stimulate transcription. How these interactions stimulate transcription, however, is unknown. The activation of reporter genes by artificial fusion of Mediator subunits to DNA binding domains that bind to their promoters has been cited as evidence that the primary role of activators is simply to recruit Mediator. We have identified potent classical transcriptional activation domains in the C termini of several tail module subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis Mediator, while their N-terminal domains are necessary and sufficient for their incorporation into Mediator but do not possess the ability to activate transcription when fused to a DNA binding domain. This suggests that Mediator fusion proteins actually are functioning in a manner similar to that of a classical DNA-bound activator rather than just recruiting Mediator. Our finding that deletion of the activation domains of S. cerevisiae Med2 and Med3, as well as C. dubliniensis Tlo1 (a Med2 ortholog), impairs the induction of certain genes shows these domains function at native promoters. Activation domains within coactivators are likely an important feature of these complexes and one that may have been uniquely leveraged by a common fungal pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site

  8. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  9. Protein kinase-dependent oxidative regulation of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump: evidence from in vivo and in vitro modulation of cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A S; Hamilton, Elisha J; Rasmussen, Helge H; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-06-15

    The widely reported stimulation of the cardiac Na(+)-K(+) pump by protein kinase A (PKA) should oppose other effects of PKA to increase contractility of the normal heart. It should also reduce harmful raised myocyte Na(+) levels in heart failure, yet blockade of the β1 adrenergic receptor (AR), coupled to PKA signalling, is beneficial. We treated rabbits with the β1 AR antagonist metoprolol to modulate PKA activity and studied cardiac myocytes ex vivo. Metoprolol increased electrogenic pump current (Ip) in voltage clamped myocytes and reduced glutathionylation of the β1 pump subunit, an oxidative modification causally related to pump inhibition. Activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin to enhance cAMP synthesis or inclusion of the catalytic subunit of PKA in patch pipette solutions abolished the increase in Ip in voltage clamped myocytes induced by treatment with metoprolol, supporting cAMP/PKA-mediated pump inhibition. Metoprolol reduced myocardial PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, reduced coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47(phox) and membranous p22(phox) NADPH oxidase subunits and reduced myocardial O2(•-)-sensitive dihydroethidium fluorescence. Treatment also enhanced coimmunoprecipitation of the β1 pump subunit with glutaredoxin 1 that catalyses de-glutathionylation. Since angiotensin II induces PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase, we examined the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with captopril. This treatment had no effect on PKA activity but reduced the activity of PKC, reduced β1 subunit glutathionylation and increased Ip. The PKA-induced Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibition we report should act with other mechanisms that enhance contractility of the normal heart but accentuate the harmful effects of raised cytosolic Na(+) in the failing heart. This scheme is consistent with the efficacy of β1 AR blockade in the treatment of heart failure.

  10. Protein kinase-dependent oxidative regulation of the cardiac Na+–K+ pump: evidence from in vivo and in vitro modulation of cell signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A S; Hamilton, Elisha J; Rasmussen, Helge H; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-01-01

    The widely reported stimulation of the cardiac Na+–K+ pump by protein kinase A (PKA) should oppose other effects of PKA to increase contractility of the normal heart. It should also reduce harmful raised myocyte Na+ levels in heart failure, yet blockade of the β1 adrenergic receptor (AR), coupled to PKA signalling, is beneficial. We treated rabbits with the β1 AR antagonist metoprolol to modulate PKA activity and studied cardiac myocytes ex vivo. Metoprolol increased electrogenic pump current (Ip) in voltage clamped myocytes and reduced glutathionylation of the β1 pump subunit, an oxidative modification causally related to pump inhibition. Activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin to enhance cAMP synthesis or inclusion of the catalytic subunit of PKA in patch pipette solutions abolished the increase in Ip in voltage clamped myocytes induced by treatment with metoprolol, supporting cAMP/PKA-mediated pump inhibition. Metoprolol reduced myocardial PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, reduced coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47phox and membranous p22phox NADPH oxidase subunits and reduced myocardial O2•−-sensitive dihydroethidium fluorescence. Treatment also enhanced coimmunoprecipitation of the β1 pump subunit with glutaredoxin 1 that catalyses de-glutathionylation. Since angiotensin II induces PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase, we examined the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with captopril. This treatment had no effect on PKA activity but reduced the activity of PKC, reduced β1 subunit glutathionylation and increased Ip. The PKA-induced Na+–K+ pump inhibition we report should act with other mechanisms that enhance contractility of the normal heart but accentuate the harmful effects of raised cytosolic Na+ in the failing heart. This scheme is consistent with the efficacy of β1 AR blockade in the treatment of heart failure. PMID:23587884

  11. Nuclear Overhauser effect studies on the conformation of magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate bound to rabbit muscle creatine kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosevear, P.R.; Powers, V.M.; Dowhan, D.; Mildvan, A.S.; Kenyon, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear Overhauser effects were used to determine interproton distances on MgATP bound to rabbit muscle creatine kinase. The internuclear distances were used in a distance geometry program that objectively determines both the conformation of the bound MgATP and its uniqueness. Two classes of structures were found that satisfied the measured interproton distances. Both classes had the same anti glycosidic torsional angle (X = 78 +/- 10 0 ) but differed in their ribose ring puckers (O1'-endo or C4'-exo). The uniqueness of the glycosidic torsional angle is consistent with the preference of creatine kinase for adenine nucleotides. One of these conformations of MgATP bound to creatine kinase is indistinguishable from the conformation found for Co(NH 3 ) 4 ATP bound to the catalytic subunit of protein kinase, which also has a high specificity for adenine nucleotides. Distance geometry calculations also suggest that upper limit distances, when low enough (≤ 3.4 A), can be used instead of measured distances to define, within experimental error, the glycosidic torsional angle of bound nucleotides. However, this approach does not permit an evaluation of the ribose ring pucker

  12. Roles of the SH2 and SH3 domains in the regulation of neuronal Src kinase functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groveman, Bradley R; Xue, Sheng; Marin, Vedrana; Xu, Jindong; Ali, Mohammad K; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Yu, Xian-Min

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that intra-domain interactions between Src family kinases (SFKs), stabilized by binding of the phosphorylated C-terminus to the SH2 domain and/or binding of the SH2 kinase linker to the SH3 domain, lock the molecules in a closed conformation, disrupt the kinase active site, and inactivate SFKs. Here we report that the up-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) induced by expression of constitutively active neuronal Src (n-Src), in which the C-terminus tyrosine is mutated to phenylalanine (n-Src/Y535F), is significantly reduced by dysfunctions of the SH2 and/or SH3 domains of the protein. Furthermore, we found that dysfunctions of SH2 and/or SH3 domains reduce auto-phosphorylation of the kinase activation loop, depress kinase activity, and decrease NMDAR phosphorylation. The SH2 domain plays a greater regulatory role than the SH3 domain. Our data also show that n-Src binds directly to the C-terminus of the NMDAR NR2A subunit in vitro, with a K(D) of 108.2 ± 13.3 nM. This binding is not Src kinase activity-dependent, and dysfunctions of the SH2 and/or SH3 domains do not significantly affect the binding. These data indicate that the SH2 and SH3 domains may function to promote the catalytic activity of active n-Src, which is important in the regulation of NMDAR functions. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  13. Non-opsonic phagocytosis of Legionella pneumophila by macrophages is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvenir D Tachado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, is an intracellular pathogen that causes Legionnaires' disease in humans, a potentially lethal pneumonia. L. pneumophila has the ability to enter and replicate in the host and is essential for pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phagocytosis was measured by cell invasion assays. Construction of PI3K mutant by PCR cloning and expression of dominant negative mutant was detected by Western blot. PI3K activity was measured by 32P labeling and detection of phospholipids products by thin layer chromatography. Infection of macrophages with virulent L. pneumophila stimulated the formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PIP3, a phosphorylated lipid product of PI3K whereas two structurally distinct phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, reduced L. pneumophila entry into macrophages in a dose-dependent fashion. Furthermore, PI3K activation led to Akt stimulation, a serine/threonine kinase, which was also inhibited by wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast, PI3K and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt activities were lower in macrophages infected with an avirulent bacterial strain. Only virulent L. pneumophila increased lipid kinase activity present in immunoprecipitates of the p85alpha subunit of class I PI3K and tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. In addition, macrophages expressing a specific dominant negative mutant of PI3K reduced L. pneumophila entry into these cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Entry of L. pneumophila is mediated by PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These results suggest an important role for PI3K and Akt in the L. pneumophila infection process. They point to possible novel strategies for undermining L. pneumophila host uptake and reducing pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease.

  14. dsRNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR and its Role in Stress, Signaling and HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane F. Meurs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR plays multiple roles in cells, in response to different stress situations. As a member of the interferon (IFN‑Stimulated Genes, PKR was initially recognized as an actor in the antiviral action of IFN, due to its ability to control translation, through phosphorylation, of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2a. As such, PKR participates in the generation of stress granules, or autophagy and a number of viruses have designed strategies to inhibit its action. However, PKR deficient mice resist most viral infections, indicating that PKR may play other roles in the cell other than just acting as an antiviral agent. Indeed, PKR regulates several signaling pathways, either as an adapter protein and/or using its kinase activity. Here we review the role of PKR as an eIF2a kinase, its participation in the regulation of the NF-kB, p38MAPK and insulin pathways, and we focus on its role during infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV. PKR binds the HCV IRES RNA, cooperates with some functions of the HCV core protein and may represent a target for NS5A or E2. Novel data points out for a role of PKR as a pro-HCV agent, both as an adapter protein and as an eIF2a-kinase, and in cooperation with the di-ubiquitin-like protein ISG15. Developing pharmaceutical inhibitors of PKR may help in resolving some viral infections as well as stress-related damages.

  15. cAMP-dependent kinase does not modulate the Slack sodium-activated potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuwer, Megan O; Picchione, Kelly E; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2009-09-01

    The Slack gene encodes a Na(+)-activated K(+) channel and is expressed in many different types of neurons. Like the prokaryotic Ca(2+)-gated K(+) channel MthK, Slack contains two 'regulator of K(+) conductance' (RCK) domains within its carboxy terminal, domains likely involved in Na(+) binding and channel gating. It also contains multiple consensus protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites and although regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation, modulation by PKA has not been determined. To test if PKA directly regulates Slack, nystatin-perforated patch whole-cell currents were recorded from a human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cell line stably expressing Slack. Bath application of forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator, caused a rapid and complete inhibition of Slack currents however, the inactive homolog of forskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin caused a similar effect. In contrast, bath application of 8-bromo-cAMP did not affect the amplitude nor the activation kinetics of Slack currents. In excised inside-out patch recordings, direct application of the PKA catalytic subunit to patches did not affect the open probability of Slack channels nor was open probability affected by direct application of protein phosphatase 2B. Preincubation of cells with the protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720 also did not change current density. Finally, mutating the consensus phosphorylation site located between RCK domain 1 and domain 2 from serine to glutamate did not affect current activation kinetics. We conclude that unlike PKC, phosphorylation by PKA does not acutely modulate the function and gating activation kinetics of Slack channels.

  16. Efficient expression of functional (α6β22β3 AChRs in Xenopus oocytes from free subunits using slightly modified α6 subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Kai-Kwong Ley

    Full Text Available Human (α6β2(α4β2β3 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs are essential for addiction to nicotine and a target for drug development for smoking cessation. Expressing this complex AChR is difficult, but has been achieved using subunit concatamers. In order to determine what limits expression of α6* AChRs and to efficiently express α6* AChRs using free subunits, we investigated expression of the simpler (α6β22β3 AChR. The concatameric form of this AChR assembles well, but is transported to the cell surface inefficiently. Various chimeras of α6 with the closely related α3 subunit increased expression efficiency with free subunits and produced pharmacologically equivalent functional AChRs. A chimera in which the large cytoplasmic domain of α6 was replaced with that of α3 increased assembly with β2 subunits and transport of AChRs to the oocyte surface. Another chimera replacing the unique methionine 211 of α6 with leucine found at this position in transmembrane domain 1 of α3 and other α subunits increased assembly of mature subunits containing β3 subunits within oocytes. Combining both α3 sequences in an α6 chimera increased expression of functional (α6β22β3 AChRs to 12-fold more than with concatamers. This is pragmatically useful, and provides insights on features of α6 subunit structure that limit its expression in transfected cells.

  17. Characterisation by nuclear magnetic resonance of the β catalytic subunit of the chloroplastic coupling factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Francois

    1986-09-01

    This academic work addressed the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the structural and dynamic study of the catalytic sub-unit of the extrinsic section of a membrane complex, the chloroplastic H+-ATPase. This work included the development of a protocol of preparation and quantitative purification of β subunits isolated from the CF1 for the elaboration of a concentrated sample for NMR, and then the study of the β subunit by using proton NMR

  18. Antibodies to the α-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.; Yu, J.; Bai, D.H.; Hester, P.Y.; Kim, K.

    1985-01-01

    Simple methods for the generation, purification, and assay of antibodies to the α-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hen have been described. Chicken antibodies against the α-subunit inhibit insulin binding to the receptor and stimulate glucose oxidation as well as autophosphorylation of the β-subunit. Thus the properties of chicken antibodies are very similar to those of antibodies found in human autoimmune diseases and different from rabbit antibodies obtained against the same antigen

  19. Compensatory expression of human -Acetylglucosaminyl-1-phosphotransferase subunits in mucolipidosis type III gamma

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl , Sandra; Tiede , Stephan; Castrichini , Monica; Cantz , Michael; Gieselmann , Volkmar; Braulke , Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The N-Acetylglucosaminyl-1-phosphotransferase plays a key role in the generation of mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) recognition markers essential for efficient transport of lysosomal hydrolases to lysosomes. The phosphotransferase is composed of six subunits (?2, ?2, ?2). The ?- and ?-subunits are catalytically active and encoded by a single gene, GNPTAB, whereas the ?-subunit encoded by GNPTG is proposed to recognize conformational structures common to lysosomal enzymes. Defects in GN...

  20. Protein Kinase A in Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caretta, Antonio; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla

    2011-01-01

    In the past, many chromosomal and genetic alterations have been examined as possible causes of cancer. However, some tumors do not display a clear molecular and/or genetic signature. Therefore, other cellular processes may be involved in carcinogenesis. Genetic alterations of proteins involved in signal transduction have been extensively studied, for example oncogenes, while modifications in intracellular compartmentalization of these molecules, or changes in the expression of unmodified genes have received less attention. Yet, epigenetic modulation of second messenger systems can deeply modify cellular functioning and in the end may cause instability of many processes, including cell mitosis. It is important to understand the functional meaning of modifications in second messenger intracellular pathways and unravel the role of downstream proteins in the initiation and growth of tumors. Within this framework, the cAMP system has been examined. cAMP is a second messenger involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. It acts mainly through its binding to cAMP-activated protein kinases (PKA), that were suggested to participate in the onset and progression of various tumors. PKA may represent a biomarker for tumor detection, identification and staging, and may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment of tumors

  1. Protein Kinase A in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caretta, Antonio; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla, E-mail: carla.mucignat@unipd.it [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 3, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    In the past, many chromosomal and genetic alterations have been examined as possible causes of cancer. However, some tumors do not display a clear molecular and/or genetic signature. Therefore, other cellular processes may be involved in carcinogenesis. Genetic alterations of proteins involved in signal transduction have been extensively studied, for example oncogenes, while modifications in intracellular compartmentalization of these molecules, or changes in the expression of unmodified genes have received less attention. Yet, epigenetic modulation of second messenger systems can deeply modify cellular functioning and in the end may cause instability of many processes, including cell mitosis. It is important to understand the functional meaning of modifications in second messenger intracellular pathways and unravel the role of downstream proteins in the initiation and growth of tumors. Within this framework, the cAMP system has been examined. cAMP is a second messenger involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. It acts mainly through its binding to cAMP-activated protein kinases (PKA), that were suggested to participate in the onset and progression of various tumors. PKA may represent a biomarker for tumor detection, identification and staging, and may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment of tumors.

  2. The NH2-terminal php domain of the alpha subunit of the Escherichia coli replicase binds the epsilon proofreading subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Anna; McHenry, Charles S

    2006-05-05

    The alpha subunit of the replicase of all bacteria contains a php domain, initially identified by its similarity to histidinol phosphatase but of otherwise unknown function (Aravind, L., and Koonin, E. V. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 3746-3752). Deletion of 60 residues from the NH2 terminus of the alpha php domain destroys epsilon binding. The minimal 255-residue php domain, estimated by sequence alignment with homolog YcdX, is insufficient for epsilon binding. However, a 320-residue segment including sequences that immediately precede the polymerase domain binds epsilon with the same affinity as the 1160-residue full-length alpha subunit. A subset of mutations of a conserved acidic residue (Asp43 in Escherichia coli alpha) present in the php domain of all bacterial replicases resulted in defects in epsilon binding. Using sequence alignments, we show that the prototypical gram+ Pol C, which contains the polymerase and proofreading activities within the same polypeptide chain, has an epsilon-like sequence inserted in a surface loop near the center of the homologous YcdX protein. These findings suggest that the php domain serves as a platform to enable coordination of proofreading and polymerase activities during chromosomal replication.

  3. Regulation of the interaction between protein kinase C-related protein kinase 2 (PRK2) and its upstream kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettori, Rosalia; Sonzogni, Silvina; Meyer, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    of numerous AGC kinases, including the protein kinase C-related protein kinases (PRKs). Here we studied the docking interaction between PDK1 and PRK2 and analyzed the mechanisms that regulate this interaction. In vivo labeling of recombinant PRK2 by (32)P(i) revealed phosphorylation at two sites......, the activation loop and the Z/TM in the C-terminal extension. We provide evidence that phosphorylation of the Z/TM site of PRK2 inhibits its interaction with PDK1. Our studies further provide a mechanistic model to explain different steps in the docking interaction and regulation. Interestingly, we found...... that the mechanism that negatively regulates the docking interaction of PRK2 to the upstream kinase PDK1 is directly linked to the activation mechanism of PRK2 itself. Finally, our results indicate that the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the interaction between PRK2 and PDK1 are specific for PRK2 and do...

  4. Isoprenoid biosynthesis and mevalonate kinase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Mevalonaat Kinase Deficiëntie (MKD) is een aangeboren ziekte geassocieerd met heftige koortsaanvallen die drie tot vier dagen aanhouden en gepaard gaan met koude rillingen, gewrichtsklachten, huiduitslag, hoofdpijn, duizeligheid, buikpijn, braken en diarree. De koortsaanvallen treden gemiddeld eens

  5. Expression Profiling of Tyrosine Kinase Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz

    2000-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  6. MAP kinase cascades in Arabidopsis innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Roux, Milena Edna; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors which trigger MAPK-dependent innate ...

  7. Protein Kinases in Human Breast Carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cane, William

    1998-01-01

    .... Rak is a novel nuclear tyrosine that our group has identified in breast cancer tissues and cell lines that has structural homology to the Src tyrosine kinase, with SH2 and SH3 domains at its amino terminus...

  8. Distinct forms of the β subunit of GTP-binding regulatory proteins identified by molecular cloning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, H.K.W.; Amatruda, T.T. III; Birren, B.W.; Simon, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    Two distinct β subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins have been identified by cDNA cloning and are referred to as β 1 and β 1 subunits. The bovine transducin β subunit (β 1 ) has been cloned previously. The author now isolated and analyzed cDNA clones that encode the β 2 subunit from bovine adrenal, bovine brain, and a human myeloid leukemia cell line, HL-60. The 340-residue M/sub r/ 37,329 Β 2 protein is 90% identical with β 1 in predicted amino acid sequence, and it is also organized as a series of repetitive homologous segments. The major mRNA that encodes the bovine β 2 subunit is 1.7 kilobases in length. It is expressed at lower levels than β 1 subunit mRNA in all tissues examined. The β 1 and β 2 messages are expressed in cloned human cell lines. Hybridization of cDNA probes to bovine DNA showed that β 1 and β 2 are encoded by separate genes. The amino acid sequences for the bovine and human β 2 subunit are identical, as are the amino acid sequences for the bovine and human β 1 subunit. This evolutionary conservation suggests that the two β subunits have different roles in the signal transduction process

  9. Translation activity of chimeric ribosomes composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Tsuji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome composition, consisting of rRNA and ribosomal proteins, is highly conserved among a broad range of organisms. However, biochemical studies focusing on ribosomal subunit exchangeability between organisms remain limited. In this study, we show that chimeric ribosomes, composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or E. coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits, are active for β-galactosidase translation in a highly purified E. coli translation system. Activities of the chimeric ribosomes showed only a modest decrease when using E. coli 30 S subunits, indicating functional conservation of the 50 S subunit between these bacterial species.

  10. Specific radioimmunoassay of HCG and its α and β subunits: methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, A.M.; Schoonbrood, J.; Franchimont, P.

    1976-01-01

    To create antisera that are specific for the radioimmunoassay of HCG and its subunits, the antisera are neutralized by incubation with LH or HCG. For each RIA system the inhibition curves of HCG and its subunits LH, FSH, TSH and STH are obtained. The 125 I labelled hormones HCG, α and β subunits and LH were chromatographed over a Sephadex G 100 column. Serum of menopausal and pregnant women were chromatographed in the same way and the fractions subjected to RIA. HCG and its subunits were determined by RIA in the sera of patients with different kinds of cancer

  11. Immunochemical analysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus (luteus) F1-ATPase and its subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, C; Salton, M R

    1983-08-31

    The F1-ATPase from Micrococcus lysodeikticus has been purified to 95% protein homogeneity in this laboratory and as all other bacterial F1S, possesses five distinct subunits with molecular weights ranging from 60 000 to 10 000 (Huberman, M. and Salton, M.R.J. (1979) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 547, 230-240). In this communication, we demonstrate the immunochemical reactivities of antibodies to native and SDS-dissociated subunits with the native and dissociated F1-ATPase and show that: (1) the antibodies generated to the native or SDS-dissociated subunits react with the native molecule; (2) all of the subunits comprising the F1 are antigenically unique as determined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis and the Ouchterlony double-diffusion techniques; (3) antibodies to the SDS-denatured individual delta- and epsilon-subunits can be used to destabilize the interaction of these specific subunits with the rest of the native F1; and (4) all subunit antibodies as well as anti-native F1 were found to inhibit ATPase activity to varying degrees, the strongest inhibition being seen with antibodies to the total F1 and anti-alpha- and anti-beta-subunit antibodies. The interaction of specific subunit antibodies may provide a new and novel way to study further and characterize the catalytic portions of F1-ATPases and in general may offer an additional method for the examination of multimeric proteins.

  12. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Jennifer L.; Kuntz, Steven G.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either act...

  13. Regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) after ionizing radiation; Regulation der Glykogen Synthase Kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) nach ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, K.A.

    2006-12-15

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) phosphorylates the Mdm2 protein in the central domain. This phosphorylation is absolutely required for p53 degradation. Ionizing radiation inactivates GSK-3{beta} by phosphorylation at serine 9 and in consequence prevents Mdm2 mediated p53 degradation. During the work for my PhD I identified Akt/PKB as the kinase that phosphorylates GSK-3{beta} at serine 9 after ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation leads to phosphorylation of Akt/PKB at threonine 308 and serine 473. The PI3 Kinase inhibitor LY294002 completely abolished Akt/PKB serine 473 phosphorylation and prevented the induction of GSK-3{beta} serine 9 phosphorylation after ionizing radiation. Interestingly, the most significant activation of Akt/PKB after ionizing radiation occurred in the nucleus while cytoplasmic Akt/PKB was only weakly activated after radiation. By using siRNA, I showed that Akt1/PKBa, but not Akt2/PKB{beta}, is required for phosphorylation of GSK- 3{beta} at serine 9 after ionizing radiation. Phosphorylation and activation of Akt/PKB after ionizing radiation depends on the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a member of the PI3 Kinase family, that is activated by free DNA ends. Both, in cells from SCID mice and after knockdown of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK by siRNA in osteosarcoma cells, phosphorylation of Akt/PKB at serine 473 and of GSK-3{beta} at serine 9 was completely abolished. Consistent with the principle that phosphorylation of GSK-3 at serine 9 contributes to p53 stabilization after radiation, the accumulation of p53 in response to ionizing radiation was largely prevented by downregulation of DNA-PK. From these results I conclude, that ionizing radiation induces a signaling cascade that leads to Akt1/PKBa activation mediated by DNA-PK dependent phosphorylation of serine 473. After activation Akt1/PKBa phosphorylates and inhibits GSK-3{beta} in the nucleus. The resulting hypophosphorylated form of Mdm2 protein is no longer

  14. Effect of HMM Glutenin Subunits on Wheat Quality Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Horvat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutenin is a group of polymeric gluten proteins. Glutenin molecules consist of glutenin subunits linked together with disulphide bonds and having higher (HMM-GS and lower (LMM-GS molecular mass. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of the influence of HMM-GS on flour processing properties. Seven bread wheat genotypes with contrasting quality attributes and different HMM-GS composition were analyzed during three years. The composition and quantity of HMM-GS were determined by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. The quality diversity among genotypes was estimated by the analysis of wheat grain, and flour and bread quality parameters. The presence of HMM glutenin subunits 1 and 2* at Glu-A1 and the subunits 5+10 at Glu-D1 loci, as well as a higher proportion of total HMM-GS, had a positive effect on wheat quality. Cluster analysis of the three groups of data (genotype and HMM-GS, flour and bread quality, and dough rheology yielded the same hierarchical structure for the first top three levels, and similarity of the corresponding dendrograms was proved by the principal eigenvalues of the corresponding Euclidian distance matrices. The obtained similarity in classification based on essentially different types of measurements reflects strong natural association between genetic data, product quality and physical properties. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to effectively reduce large data set into lower dimensions of latent variables amenable for the analysis. PCA analysis of the total set of data (15 variables revealed a very strong interrelationship between the variables. The first three PCA components accounted for 96 % of the total variance, which was significant to the level of 0.05 and was considered as the level of experimental error. These data imply that the quality of wheat cultivars can be contributed to HMM-GS data and should be taken into account in breeding programs assisted by computer models with the aim to

  15. The interaction between AMPKβ2 and the PP1-targeting subunit R6 is dynamically regulated by intracellular glycogen content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Dahlmans, Vivian; Rubio-Villena, Carla; Chanda, Dipanjan; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida; Coumans, Will A; Liu, Yilin; Voncken, J Willem; Luiken, Joost J F P; Glatz, Jan F C; Sanz, Pascual; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic stress-sensing kinase. We previously showed that glucose deprivation induces autophosphorylation of AMPKβ at Thr-148, which prevents the binding of AMPK to glycogen. Furthermore, in MIN6 cells, AMPKβ1 binds to R6 (PPP1R3D), a glycogen-targeting subunit of protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1), thereby regulating the glucose-induced inactivation of AMPK. In the present study, we further investigated the interaction of R6 with AMPKβ and the possible dependency on Thr-148 phosphorylation status. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analyses and co-immunoprecipitation (IP) of the overexpressed proteins in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T) cells revealed that both AMPKβ1 and AMPK-β2 wild-type (WT) isoforms bind to R6. The AMPKβ-R6 interaction was stronger with the muscle-specific AMPKβ2-WT and required association with the substrate-binding motif of R6. When HEK293T cells or C2C12 myotubes were cultured in high-glucose medium, AMPKβ2-WT and R6 weakly interacted. In contrast, glycogen depletion significantly enhanced this protein interaction. Mutation of AMPKβ2 Thr-148 prevented the interaction with R6 irrespective of the intracellular glycogen content. Treatment with the AMPK activator oligomycin enhanced the AMPKβ2-R6 interaction in conjunction with increased Thr-148 phosphorylation in cells grown in low-glucose medium. These data are in accordance with R6 binding directly to AMPKβ2 when both proteins detach from the diminishing glycogen particle, which is simultaneous with increased AMPKβ2 Thr-148 autophosphorylation. Such a model points to a possible control of AMPK by PP1-R6 upon glycogen depletion in muscle. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  16. Complexes between the LKB1 tumor suppressor, STRADα/β and MO25α/β are upstream kinases in the AMP-activated protein kinase cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessi Dario R

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK cascade is a sensor of cellular energy charge that acts as a 'metabolic master switch' and inhibits cell proliferation. Activation requires phosphorylation of Thr172 of AMPK within the activation loop by upstream kinases (AMPKKs that have not been identified. Recently, we identified three related protein kinases acting upstream of the yeast homolog of AMPK. Although they do not have obvious mammalian homologs, they are related to LKB1, a tumor suppressor that is mutated in the human Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome. We recently showed that LKB1 exists as a complex with two accessory subunits, STRADα/β and MO25α/β. Results We report the following observations. First, two AMPKK activities purified from rat liver contain LKB1, STRADα and MO25α, and can be immunoprecipitated using anti-LKB1 antibodies. Second, both endogenous and recombinant complexes of LKB1, STRADα/β and MO25α/β activate AMPK via phosphorylation of Thr172. Third, catalytically active LKB1, STRADα or STRADβ and MO25α or MO25β are required for full activity. Fourth, the AMPK-activating drugs AICA riboside and phenformin do not activate AMPK in HeLa cells (which lack LKB1, but activation can be restored by stably expressing wild-type, but not catalytically inactive, LKB1. Fifth, AICA riboside and phenformin fail to activate AMPK in immortalized fibroblasts from LKB1-knockout mouse embryos. Conclusions These results provide the first description of a physiological substrate for the LKB1 tumor suppressor and suggest that it functions as an upstream regulator of AMPK. Our findings indicate that the tumors in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome could result from deficient activation of AMPK as a consequence of LKB1 inactivation.

  17. Overexpression of protein kinase A - RIalpha reduces lipofection efficiency of cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, K K; Rosenblatt, J

    2001-04-10

    Cisplatin-resistant variant A2780CP/vector cells were 4.0-5.3-fold more transfectable and 7.6-fold more resistant to cisplatin than their parent cisplatin-sensitive human ovarian carcinoma A2780/vector cells. Overexpression of cAMP-dependent protein kinase Type I regulatory alpha subunit (PKA-RIalpha) gene in A2780CP cells significantly reduced (maximum 47.0%) the transfection activity, with a slight reduction (maximum 27.3%) of cisplatin resistance, of A2780CP cells. However, RIalpha-overexpressing A2780CP (A2780CP/RIalpha) cells were still 2.5-to 3.0-fold more transfectable and 5.5-fold more resistant to cisplatin than A2780 cells. This results suggest that gene transfer efficiency is associated with cisplatin resistance, in part, through the PKA-mediated cAMP signal transduction pathway.

  18. Functional role of AMP-activated protein kinase in the heart during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musi, Nicolas; Hirshman, Michael F; Arad, Michael; Xing, Yanqiu; Fujii, Nobuharu; Pomerleau, Jason; Ahmad, Ferhaan; Berul, Charles I; Seidman, Jon G; Tian, Rong; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2005-04-11

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role in maintaining energy homeostasis and cardiac function during ischemia in the heart. However, the functional role of AMPK in the heart during exercise is unknown. We examined whether acute exercise increases AMPK activity in mouse hearts and determined the significance of these increases by studying transgenic (TG) mice expressing a cardiac-specific dominant-negative (inactivating) AMPKalpha2 subunit. Exercise increased cardiac AMPKalpha2 activity in the wild type mice but not in TG. We found that inactivation of AMPK did not result in abnormal ATP and glycogen consumption during exercise, cardiac function assessed by heart rhythm telemetry and stress echocardiography, or in maximal exercise capacity.

  19. AMP kinase expression and activity in human skeletal muscle: effects of immobilization, retraining, and creatine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eijnde, Bert O.; Derave, Wim; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    The effects of leg immobilization and retraining in combination with oral creatine intake on muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein expression and phosphorylation status were investigated. A double-blind trial was performed in young healthy volunteers (n = 22). A cast immobilized...... the right leg for 2 wk, whereafter the knee-extensor muscles of that leg were retrained for 6 wk. Half of the subjects received creatine monohydrate throughout the study (Cr; from 15 g down to 2.5 g daily), and the others ingested placebo (P; maltodextrin). Before and after immobilization and retraining...... that immobilization-induced muscle inactivity for 2 wk does not alter AMPK a1-, a2-, and ß2-subunit expression or a-AMPK phosphorylation status. Furthermore, the present observations indicate that AMPK probably is not implicated in the previously reported beneficial effects of oral creatine supplementation on muscle...

  20. Fibronectin phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Sumi; Sugiyama, Yayoi; Imada, Masaru

    1988-01-01

    The presence of membrane-associated, extracellular protein kinase (ecto-protein kinase) and its substrate proteins was examined with serum-free cultures of Swiss 3T3 fibroblast. When cells were incubated with [γ- 32 ]ATP for 10 min at 37 degree C, four proteins with apparent molecular weights between 150 and 220 kDa were prominently phosphorylated. These proteins were also radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase catalyzed iodination and were sensitive to mild tryptic digestion, suggesting that they localized on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix. Phosphorylation of extracellular proteins with [γ- 32 P]ATP in intact cell culture is consistent with the existence of ecto-protein kinase. Anti-fibronectin antibody immunoprecipitated one of the phosphoproteins which comigrated with a monomer and a dimer form of fibronectin under reducing and nonreducing conditions of electrophoresis, respectively. The protein had affinity for gelatin as demonstrated by retention with gelatin-conjugated agarose. This protein substrate of ecto-protein kinase was thus concluded to be fibronectin. The sites of phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase were compared with those of intracellularly phosphorylated fibronectin by the analysis of radiolabeled amino acids and peptides. Ecto-protein kinase phosphorylated fibronectin at serine and threonine residues which were distinct from the sites of intracellular fibronectin phosphorylation

  1. The PIM kinases in hematological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Yesid; Giles, Francis J; Swords, Ronan T

    2012-02-01

    The PIM genes represent a family of proto-oncogenes that encode three different serine/threonine protein kinases (PIM1, PIM2 and PIM3) with essential roles in the regulation of signal transduction cascades, which promote cell survival, proliferation and drug resistance. PIM kinases are overexpressed in several hematopoietic tumors and support in vitro and in vivo malignant cell growth and survival, through cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis. PIM kinases do not have an identified regulatory domain, which means that these proteins are constitutively active once transcribed. They appear to be critical downstream effectors of important oncoproteins and, when overexpressed, can mediate drug resistance to available agents, such as rapamycin. Recent crystallography studies reveal that, unlike other kinases, they possess a hinge region, which creates a unique binding pocket for ATP, offering a target for an increasing number of potent small-molecule PIM kinase inhibitors. Preclinical studies in models of various hematologic cancers indicate that these novel agents show promising activity and some of them are currently being evaluated in a clinical setting. In this review, we profile the PIM kinases as targets for therapeutics in hematologic malignancies.

  2. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidick, Christina [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany); El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E. [Biomedical Research, Human Brain Proteomics II, Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS, Dortmund 44139 (Germany); Stenmark, Harald [Department of Biochemistry, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, Oslo 0310 (Norway); Platta, Harald W., E-mail: harald.platta@rub.de [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany)

    2014-12-23

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept.

  3. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidick, Christina; El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E.; Stenmark, Harald; Platta, Harald W.

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept

  4. Determination of hCG-alpha subunit in threatened pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talas, M.; Pohanka, J.; Fingerova, H.; Janouskova, M.; Krikal, Z.; Prasilova, J.; Zupkova, H.

    1987-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of the hCG-alpha subunit was made using an antibody anti hCG-alpha serum, highly purified hCG-alpha for 125 I-labelling and the standard hCG-alpha. Sera of healthy pregnant women sampled throughout the whole pregnancies were used to determine x-bar±S.D. of hCG-alpha for 14-day intervals. Included in the study were groups of women with high risk of premature labor, late toxemia of pregnancy, twins and fetal hypotrophy. It was shown that increased hCG-alpha is found in pregnant women in whom signs of late toxemia of pregnancy are combined with high risk of premature labor, or with twin pregnancies, while in those with fetal hypotrophy hCG-alpha is within normal limits. (author). 3 figs., 7 refs

  5. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  6. Glycine Receptor α2 Subunit Activation Promotes Cortical Interneuron Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Avila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycine receptors (GlyRs are detected in the developing CNS before synaptogenesis, but their function remains elusive. This study demonstrates that functional GlyRs are expressed by embryonic cortical interneurons in vivo. Furthermore, genetic disruption of these receptors leads to interneuron migration defects. We discovered that extrasynaptic activation of GlyRs containing the α2 subunit in cortical interneurons by endogenous glycine activates voltage-gated calcium channels and promotes calcium influx, which further modulates actomyosin contractility to fine-tune nuclear translocation during migration. Taken together, our data highlight the molecular events triggered by GlyR α2 activation that control cortical tangential migration during embryogenesis.

  7. The subunit structure of the extracellular hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, Marcio H.L.; Naves, Cristiani F.; Xavier, Luciana P.; Santoro, Marcelo M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata was purified to homogeneity by a two step purification protocol using a gel filtration column (Superose 6 HR/Pharmacia ) followed by an anion exchange chromatography (MONO-Q Sepharose/Pharmacia). The dissociation products were analysed by a 5 - 15 % Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS-PAGE) giving a band of 270 K Daltons and a band of 180 K Daltons after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol. The same profile was obtained in a 3.5 % Agarose gel electrophoresis containing SDS (SDS-AGE) showing additional bands of higher molecular weight. These bands were proposed to be monomers, dimers and trimers and, after reduction in a Bidimensional SDS-AGE, the proposed monomers and dimers were decomposed in two and four bands that were interpreted as 1 - 4 chains. The hemoglobin was digested by four different proteases ( Thrombin, Trypsin, Chymotrypsin and Subtilisin ) showing several equivalent fragments with molecular weights multiples of its minimum molecular weight ( 17.7 K Daltons). The circular dichroism spectrum of the protein showed a characteristic high α-helix content. We proposed that this hemoglobin is a pentamer of approx. 360 K Daltons subunits each formed by two 180 K Daltons chains linked in pairs by disulfide bridges and each of these chains comprises ten Heme binding domains. These data were compared to other Planorbidae extracellular hemoglobins. Up to now, the quaternary structure of this hemoglobin (shape and disposition of the subunits) is unknown. It is intended to elucidate its structure by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering in Brazilian National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (LNLS). (author)

  8. Protein kinase activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates cytokine-dependent cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Thomas

    Full Text Available The dual specificity protein/lipid kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, promotes growth factor-mediated cell survival and is frequently deregulated in cancer. However, in contrast to canonical lipid-kinase functions, the role of PI3K protein kinase activity in regulating cell survival is unknown. We have employed a novel approach to purify and pharmacologically profile protein kinases from primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells that phosphorylate serine residues in the cytoplasmic portion of cytokine receptors to promote hemopoietic cell survival. We have isolated a kinase activity that is able to directly phosphorylate Ser585 in the cytoplasmic domain of the interleukin 3 (IL-3 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF receptors and shown it to be PI3K. Physiological concentrations of cytokine in the picomolar range were sufficient for activating the protein kinase activity of PI3K leading to Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival but did not activate PI3K lipid kinase signaling or promote proliferation. Blockade of PI3K lipid signaling by expression of the pleckstrin homology of Akt1 had no significant impact on the ability of picomolar concentrations of cytokine to promote hemopoietic cell survival. Furthermore, inducible expression of a mutant form of PI3K that is defective in lipid kinase activity but retains protein kinase activity was able to promote Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival in the absence of cytokine. Blockade of p110α by RNA interference or multiple independent PI3K inhibitors not only blocked Ser585 phosphorylation in cytokine-dependent cells and primary human AML blasts, but also resulted in a block in survival signaling and cell death. Our findings demonstrate a new role for the protein kinase activity of PI3K in phosphorylating the cytoplasmic tail of the GM-CSF and IL-3 receptors to selectively regulate cell survival highlighting the importance of targeting

  9. Differential regulation of thyrotropin subunit apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.; Weintraub, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of TSH apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone was studied by incubating pituitaries from normal and hypothyroid (3 weeks post-thyroidectomy) rats in medium containing [ 14 C]alanine and [ 3 H] glucosamine. After 6 h, samples were sequentially treated with anti-TSH beta to precipitate TSH and free TSH beta, anti-LH beta to clear the sample of LH and free LH beta, then anti-LH alpha to precipitate free alpha-subunit. Total proteins were acid precipitated. All precipitates were subjected to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, which were then sliced and assayed by scintillation spectrometry. In hypothyroid pituitaries plus medium, [ 14 C]alanine incorporation in combined and free beta-subunits was 26 times normal and considerably greater than the 3.4-fold increase seen in total protein; combined and free alpha-subunits showed no specific increase in apoprotein synthesis. [ 3 H]Glucosamine incorporation in combined alpha- and beta-subunits in hypothyroid samples was 13 and 21 times normal, respectively, and was greater than the 1.9-fold increase in total protein; free alpha-subunit showed no specific increase in carbohydrate synthesis. The glucosamine to alanine ratio, reflecting relative glycosylation of newly synthesized molecules, was increased in hypothyroidism for combined alpha-subunits, but not for combined beta-subunits, free alpha-subunits, or total proteins. In summary, short term hypothyroidism selectively stimulated TSH beta apoprotein synthesis and carbohydrate synthesis of combined alpha- and beta-subunits. Hypothyroidism also increased the relative glycosylation of combined alpha-subunit. Thus, thyroid hormone deficiency appears to alter the rate-limiting step in TSH assembly (i.e. beta-subunit synthesis) as well as the carbohydrate structure of TSH, which may play important roles in its biological function

  10. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  11. Roles of the β subunit hinge domain in ATP synthase F1 sector: Hydrophobic network formed by introduced βPhe174 inhibits subunit rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Kashiwagi, Sachiko; Kojima, Masaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Futai, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    The ATP synthase β subunit hinge domain (βPhe148 ∼ βGly186, P-loop/α-helixB/loop/β-sheet4, Escherichia coli residue numbering) dramatically changes in conformation upon nucleotide binding. We previously reported that F 1 with the βSer174 to Phe mutation in the domain lowered the γ subunit rotation speed, and thus decreased the ATPase activity [M. Nakanishi-Matsui, S. Kashiwagi, T. Ubukata, A. Iwamoto-Kihara, Y. Wada, M. Futai, Rotational catalysis of Escherichia coli ATP synthase F 1 sector. Stochastic fluctuation and a key domain of the β subunit, J. Biol. Chem. 282 (2007) 20698-20704.]. Homology modeling indicates that the amino acid replacement induces a hydrophobic network, in which the βMet159, βIle163, and βAla167 residues of the β subunit are involved together with the mutant βPhe174. The network is expected to stabilize the conformation of β DP (nucleotide-bound form of the β subunit), resulting in increased activation energy for transition to β E (empty β subunit). The modeling further predicts that replacement of βMet159 with Ala or Ile weakens the hydrophobic network. As expected, these two mutations experimentally suppressed the ATPase activities as well as subunit rotation of βS174F. Furthermore, the rotation rate decreased with the increase of the strength in the hydrophobic network. These results indicate that the smooth conformational change of the β subunit hinge domain is pertinent for the rotational catalysis.

  12. Prolonged seizure activity leads to increased Protein Kinase A activation in the rat pilocarpine model of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, James M; Kurz, Jonathan E; Low, Brian; Churn, Severn B

    2009-08-04

    Status epilepticus is a life-threatening form of seizure activity that represents a major medical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Protein Kinase A is an important regulator of synaptic strength that may play an important role in the development of status epilepticus-induced neuronal pathology. This study demonstrated an increase in PKA activity against exogenous and endogenous substrates during later stages of SE. As SE progressed, a significant increase in PKA-mediated phosphorylation of an exogenous peptide substrate was demonstrated in cortical structures. The increased activity was not due to altered expression of either regulatory or catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Through the use of phospho-specific antibodies, this study also investigated the effects of SE on the phosphorylation of the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor. After the onset of continuous seizure activity, an increase in phosphorylation of the PKA site on the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA receptor was observed. These data suggest a potential mechanism by which SE may increase neuronal excitability in the cortex, potentially leading to maintenance of seizure activity or long-term neuronal pathology.

  13. The crystal structure of Toxoplasma gondii pyruvate kinase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Bakszt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase (PK, which catalyzes the final step in glycolysis converting phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate, is a central metabolic regulator in most organisms. Consequently PK represents an attractive therapeutic target in cancer and human pathogens, like Apicomplexans. The phylum Aplicomplexa, a group of exclusively parasitic organisms, includes the genera Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma, the etiological agents of malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis respectively. Toxoplasma gondii infection causes a mild illness and is a very common infection affecting nearly one third of the world's population.We have determined the crystal structure of the PK1 enzyme from T. gondii, with the B domain in the open and closed conformations. We have also characterized its enzymatic activity and confirmed glucose-6-phosphate as its allosteric activator. This is the first description of a PK enzyme in a closed inactive conformation without any bound substrate. Comparison of the two tetrameric TgPK1 structures indicates a reorientation of the monomers with a concomitant change in the buried surface among adjacent monomers. The change in the buried surface was associated with significant B domain movements in one of the interacting monomers.We hypothesize that a loop in the interface between the A and B domains plays an important role linking the position of the B domain to the buried surface among monomers through two α-helices. The proposed model links the catalytic cycle of the enzyme with its domain movements and highlights the contribution of the interface between adjacent subunits. In addition, an unusual ordered conformation was observed in one of the allosteric binding domains and it is related to a specific apicomplexan insertion. The sequence and structural particularity would explain the atypical activation by a mono-phosphorylated sugar. The sum of peculiarities raises this enzyme as an emerging target for drug discovery.

  14. The crystal structure of Toxoplasma gondii pyruvate kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakszt, Rebecca; Wernimont, Amy; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Mok, Man Wai; Hills, Tanya; Hui, Raymond; Pizarro, Juan C

    2010-09-14

    Pyruvate kinase (PK), which catalyzes the final step in glycolysis converting phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate, is a central metabolic regulator in most organisms. Consequently PK represents an attractive therapeutic target in cancer and human pathogens, like Apicomplexans. The phylum Aplicomplexa, a group of exclusively parasitic organisms, includes the genera Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma, the etiological agents of malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis respectively. Toxoplasma gondii infection causes a mild illness and is a very common infection affecting nearly one third of the world's population. We have determined the crystal structure of the PK1 enzyme from T. gondii, with the B domain in the open and closed conformations. We have also characterized its enzymatic activity and confirmed glucose-6-phosphate as its allosteric activator. This is the first description of a PK enzyme in a closed inactive conformation without any bound substrate. Comparison of the two tetrameric TgPK1 structures indicates a reorientation of the monomers with a concomitant change in the buried surface among adjacent monomers. The change in the buried surface was associated with significant B domain movements in one of the interacting monomers. We hypothesize that a loop in the interface between the A and B domains plays an important role linking the position of the B domain to the buried surface among monomers through two α-helices. The proposed model links the catalytic cycle of the enzyme with its domain movements and highlights the contribution of the interface between adjacent subunits. In addition, an unusual ordered conformation was observed in one of the allosteric binding domains and it is related to a specific apicomplexan insertion. The sequence and structural particularity would explain the atypical activation by a mono-phosphorylated sugar. The sum of peculiarities raises this enzyme as an emerging target for drug discovery.

  15. The Crystal Structure of Toxoplasma gondii Pyruvate Kinase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakszt, R.; Wernimont, A; Allali-Hassani, A; Mok, M; Hills, T; Hui, R; Pizarro, J

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK), which catalyzes the final step in glycolysis converting phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate, is a central metabolic regulator in most organisms. Consequently PK represents an attractive therapeutic target in cancer and human pathogens, like Apicomplexans. The phylum Aplicomplexa, a group of exclusively parasitic organisms, includes the genera Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma, the etiological agents of malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis respectively. Toxoplasma gondii infection causes a mild illness and is a very common infection affecting nearly one third of the world's population. We have determined the crystal structure of the PK1 enzyme from T. gondii, with the B domain in the open and closed conformations. We have also characterized its enzymatic activity and confirmed glucose-6-phosphate as its allosteric activator. This is the first description of a PK enzyme in a closed inactive conformation without any bound substrate. Comparison of the two tetrameric TgPK1 structures indicates a reorientation of the monomers with a concomitant change in the buried surface among adjacent monomers. The change in the buried surface was associated with significant B domain movements in one of the interacting monomers. We hypothesize that a loop in the interface between the A and B domains plays an important role linking the position of the B domain to the buried surface among monomers through two {alpha}-helices. The proposed model links the catalytic cycle of the enzyme with its domain movements and highlights the contribution of the interface between adjacent subunits. In addition, an unusual ordered conformation was observed in one of the allosteric binding domains and it is related to a specific apicomplexan insertion. The sequence and structural particularity would explain the atypical activation by a mono-phosphorylated sugar. The sum of peculiarities raises this enzyme as an emerging target for drug discovery.

  16. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Aurelia Ball

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well.

  17. Crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum pyruvate kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Cook

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase plays a critical role in cellular metabolism of glucose by serving as a major regulator of glycolysis. This tetrameric enzyme is allosterically regulated by different effector molecules, mainly phosphosugars. In response to binding of effector molecules and substrates, significant structural changes have been identified in various pyruvate kinase structures. Pyruvate kinase of Cryptosporidium parvum is exceptional among known enzymes of protozoan origin in that it exhibits no allosteric property in the presence of commonly known effector molecules. The crystal structure of pyruvate kinase from C. parvum has been solved by molecular replacement techniques and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. In the active site a glycerol molecule is located near the γ-phosphate site of ATP, and the protein structure displays a partially closed active site. However, unlike other structures where the active site is closed, the α6' helix in C. parvum pyruvate kinase unwinds and assumes an extended conformation. In the crystal structure a sulfate ion is found at a site that is occupied by a phosphate of the effector molecule in many pyruvate kinase structures. A new feature of the C. parvum pyruvate kinase structure is the presence of a disulfide bond cross-linking the two monomers in the asymmetric unit. The disulfide bond is formed between cysteine residue 26 in the short N-helix of one monomer with cysteine residue 312 in a long helix (residues 303-320 of the second monomer at the interface of these monomers. Both cysteine residues are unique to C. parvum, and the disulfide bond remained intact in a reduced environment. However, the significance of this bond, if any, remains unknown at this time.

  18. Novel adapter proteins that link the human GM-CSF receptor to the phosphatidylino-sitol 3-kinase and Shc/Grb2/ras signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jücker, M; Feldman, R A

    1996-01-01

    We have used a human GM-CSF-dependent hematopoietic cell line that responds to physiological concentrations of hGM-CSF to analyze a set of signaling events that occur in normal myelopoiesis and whose deregulation may lead to leukemogenesis. Stimulation of these cells with hGM-CSF induced the assembly of multimeric complexes that contained known and novel phosphotyrosyl proteins. One of the new proteins was a major phosphotyrosyl substrate of 76-85 kDa (p80) that was directly associated with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase through the SH2 domains of p85. p80 also associated with the beta subunit of the activated hGM-CSF receptor, and assembly of this complex correlated with activation of PI 3-kinase. A second phosphotyrosyl protein we identified, p140, associated with the Shc and Grb2 adapter proteins by direct binding to a novel phosphotyrosine-interacting domain located at the N-terminus of Shc. and to the SH3 domains of Grb2, respectively. The Shc/p140/Grb2 complex was found to be constitutively activated in acute myeloid leukemia cells, indicating that activation of this pathway may be a necessary step in the development of some leukemias. The p80/p85/PI 3-kinase and the Shc/Grb2/p140 complexes were tightly associated with Src family kinases, which were prime candidates for phosphorylation of Shc, p80, p140 and other phosphotyrosyl substrates present in these complexes. Our studies suggest that p80 and p140 may link the hGM-CSF receptor to the PI 3-kinase and Shc/Grb2/ras signaling pathways, respectively, and that abnormal activation of hGM-CSF-dependent targets may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  19. The Set1/COMPASS histone H3 methyltransferase helps regulate mitosis with the CDK1 and NIMA mitotic kinases in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Anglin, Sarah Lea; Osmani, Aysha H; Osmani, Stephen A

    2014-08-01

    Mitosis is promoted and regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation catalyzed by the essential NIMA and CDK1 kinases in the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Protein methylation mediated by the Set1/COMPASS methyltransferase complex has also been shown to regulate mitosis in budding yeast with the Aurora mitotic kinase. We uncover a genetic interaction between An-swd1, which encodes a subunit of the Set1 protein methyltransferase complex, with NIMA as partial inactivation of nimA is poorly tolerated in the absence of swd1. This genetic interaction is additionally seen without the Set1 methyltransferase catalytic subunit. Importantly partial inactivation of NIMT, a mitotic activator of the CDK1 kinase, also causes lethality in the absence of Set1 function, revealing a functional relationship between the Set1 complex and two pivotal mitotic kinases. The main target for Set1-mediated methylation is histone H3K4. Mutational analysis of histone H3 revealed that modifying the H3K4 target residue of Set1 methyltransferase activity phenocopied the lethality seen when either NIMA or CDK1 are partially functional. We probed the mechanistic basis of these genetic interactions and find that the Set1 complex performs functions with CDK1 for initiating mitosis and with NIMA during progression through mitosis. The studies uncover a joint requirement for the Set1 methyltransferase complex with the CDK1 and NIMA kinases for successful mitosis. The findings extend the roles of the Set1 complex to include the initiation of mitosis with CDK1 and mitotic progression with NIMA in addition to its previously identified interactions with Aurora and type 1 phosphatase in budding yeast. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Role of adiponectin/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adiponectin/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (ADP/PI3k/Akt) signal transduction pathway has an important role in promoting cell survival. This study was designed to determine if the ADP/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a role in the mechanism of ischemia–reperfusion injury in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats ...

  1. Phosphorylation of nm23/nucleoside diphosphate kinase by casein kinase 2 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, M; Issinger, O G; Lascu, I

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated phosphorylation of human nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and of homologous NDPK from different species by human casein kinase 2 (CK-2). The human NDPK isotypes A and B were phosphorylated by CK-2 in vitro both when the purified proteins and total lysate of HL-60 leukemia...

  2. Survey of tyrosine kinase signaling reveals ROS kinase fusions in human cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Lei Gu

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma, also known as bile duct cancer, is the second most common primary hepatic carcinoma with a median survival of less than 2 years. The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of this disease are not clear. To survey activated tyrosine kinases signaling in cholangiocarcinoma, we employed immunoaffinity profiling coupled to mass spectrometry and identified DDR1, EPHA2, EGFR, and ROS tyrosine kinases, along with over 1,000 tyrosine phosphorylation sites from about 750 different proteins in primary cholangiocarcinoma patients. Furthermore, we confirmed the presence of ROS kinase fusions in 8.7% (2 out of 23 of cholangiocarcinoma patients. Expression of the ROS fusions in 3T3 cells confers transforming ability both in vitro and in vivo, and is responsive to its kinase inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that ROS kinase is a promising candidate for a therapeutic target and for a diagnostic molecular marker in cholangiocarcinoma. The identification of ROS tyrosine kinase fusions in cholangiocarcinoma, along with the presence of other ROS kinase fusions in lung cancer and glioblastoma, suggests that a more broadly based screen for activated ROS kinase in cancer is warranted.

  3. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  4. Role of plasma membrane-associated AKAPs for the regulation of cardiac IK1 current by protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Claudia; Scherer, Daniel; Köpple, Christoph; Kulzer, Martin; Korkmaz, Sevil; Xynogalos, Panagiotis; Thomas, Dierk; Kaya, Ziya; Scholz, Eberhard; Backs, Johannes; Karle, Christoph; Katus, Hugo A; Zitron, Edgar

    2017-05-01

    The cardiac I K1 current stabilizes the resting membrane potential of cardiomyocytes. Protein kinase A (PKA) induces an inhibition of I K1 current which strongly promotes focal arrhythmogenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation have only partially been elucidated yet. Furthermore, the role of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) in this regulation has not been examined to date. The objective of this project was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of I K1 by PKA and to identify novel molecular targets for antiarrhythmic therapy downstream β-adrenoreceptors. Patch clamp and voltage clamp experiments were used to record currents and co-immunoprecipitation, and co-localization experiments were performed to show spatial and functional coupling. Activation of PKA inhibited I K1 current in rat cardiomyocytes. This regulation was markedly attenuated by disrupting PKA-binding to AKAPs with the peptide inhibitor AKAP-IS. We observed functional and spatial coupling of the plasma membrane-associated AKAP15 and AKAP79 to Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 channel subunits, but not to Kir2.3 channels. In contrast, AKAPyotiao had no functional effect on the PKA regulation of Kir channels. AKAP15 and AKAP79 co-immunoprecipitated with and co-localized to Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 channel subunits in ventricular cardiomyocytes. In this study, we provide evidence for coupling of cardiac Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 subunits with the plasma membrane-bound AKAPs 15 and 79. Cardiac membrane-associated AKAPs are a functionally essential part of the regulatory cascade determining I K1 current function and may be novel molecular targets for antiarrhythmic therapy downstream from β-adrenoreceptors.

  5. Regulated appearance of NMDA receptor subunits and channel functions during in vitro neuronal differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelitai, Márta; Schlett, Katalin; Varju, Patrícia; Eisel, Ulrich; Madarász, Emília

    The schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and the appearance of functional NMDA-gated ion channels were investigated during the retinoic acid (RA) induced neuronal differentiation of NE-4C, a p53-deficient mouse neuroectodermal progenitor cell line. NR2A. NR2B, and NR2D subunit transcripts

  6. Differential expression of BK channel isoforms and beta-subunits in rat neuro-vascular tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Asser Nyander; Wulf, Helle; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the expression of splice variants and beta-subunits of the BK channel (big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel, Slo1, MaxiK, K(Ca)1.1) in rat cerebral blood vessels, meninges, trigeminal ganglion among other tissues. An alpha-subunit splice variant X1(+24) was found expresse...

  7. Differential antibiotic sensitivity determined by the large ribosomal subunit in thermophilic archaea.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggero, D; Londei, P

    1996-01-01

    Hybrid ribosomes obtained by mixing the ribosomal subunits of the extremely thermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Desulfurococcus mobilis were tested for their sensitivity to selected antibiotics. It is shown that structural differences in the large ribosomal subunits determine qualitatively and quantitatively the patterns of response to alpha-sarcin and paromomycin in these species.

  8. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  9. O-GlcNAcylation modulates PKA-CREB signaling in a manner specific to PKA catalytic subunit isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Nana; Ma, Denglei; Gu, Jianlan; Shi, Jianhua; Xu, Xiaotao; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei; Chu, Dandan

    2018-02-26

    O-GlcNAcylation is a post-translational modification of proteins. Protein kinase A (PKA)-cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) signaling plays critical roles in multiple biological processes. Isoforms α and β of PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) and CREB are modified by O-GlcNAcylation. In the present study, we determined the role of O-GlcNAcylation in PKAc isoform-specific CREB signaling. We found that up-regulation of O-GlcNAcylation enhanced CREB phosphorylation, but suppressed CREB expression in exogenous PKAc isoform-unspecific manner. PKAc isoforms affected exogenous expression of OGT or OGA and protein O-GlcNAcylation differently. Up-regulation of O-GlcNAcylation did not significantly affect net PKAcα-CREB signaling, but enhanced PKAcβ-CREB signaling. The role of O-GlcNAcylation in PKA-CREB signaling was desensitized by insulin treatment. This study suggests a role of O-GlcNAcylation in PKA-CREB signaling by affecting phosphorylation of CREB in a PKAc isoform-specific manner. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ghrelin upregulates the phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor by activating GHSR1a and Fyn in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrout, Liza; Isokawa, Masako

    2018-01-01

    Ghrelin and its receptor GHSR1a have been shown to exert numerous physiological functions in the brain, in addition to the well-established orexigenic role in the hypothalamus. Earlier work indicated that ghrelin stimulated the phosphorylation of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and enhanced synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. In the present study, we report that the exogenous application of ghrelin increased GluN2B phosphorylation. This increase was independent of GluN2B subunit activity or NMDAR channel activity. However, it depended on the activation of GHSR1a and Fyn as it was blocked by D-Lys3-GHRP-6 and PP2, respectively. Inhibitors for G-protein-regulated second messengers, such as Rp-cAMP, H89, TBB, ryanodine, and thapsigargin, unexpectedly enhanced GluN2B phosphorylation, suggesting that cAMP, PKA, casein kinase II, and cytosolic calcium signaling may oppose to the effect of ghrelin on the phosphorylation of GluN2B. Our findings suggest that 1) GluN2B is likely a molecular target of ghrelin and GHSR1a-driven signaling cascades, and 2) the ghrelin-mediated phosphorylation of GluN2B depends on Fyn activation under complex negative regulation by other second messengers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Decreased phosphorylation of δ and ε subunits of the acetylcholine receptor coincides with delayed postsynaptic maturation in PKC θ deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuza, Maria A; Besalduch, Núria; González, Carmen; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Tomàs, Marta; Nelson, Phillip G; Tomàs, Josep

    2010-09-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity is involved in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) redistribution at the neuromuscular junction in vivo during postnatal maturation. Here we studied, in PKC theta (PKCtheta) deficient mice (KO), how the theta isoform of PKC is involved in the nAChR cluster maturation that is accompanied by the developmental activity-dependent neuromuscular synapse elimination process. We found that axonal elimination and dispersion of nAChR from the postsynaptic plaques and its redistribution to form the mature postsynaptic apparatus were delayed but not totally suppressed in PKCtheta deficient mice. Moreover, the delay in the maturation of the morphology of the nAChR clusters during the early postnatal synapse elimination period in the PKCtheta deficient mice coincides with a reduction in the PKCtheta-mediated phosphorylation on the delta subunit of the nAChR. In addition, we show evidence for PKCtheta regulation of PKA in normally phosphorylating the epsilon subunit of nAChR. We have also found that the theta isoform of PKC is located on the postsynaptic component of the neuromuscular junction but is also expressed by motoneurons in the spinal cord and in the motor nerve terminals. The results allow us to hypothesize that a spatially specific and opposing action of PKCtheta and PKA may result in activity-dependent alterations to synaptic connectivity at both the nerve inputs and the postsynaptic nAChR clusters. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Link between Protein Kinase CK2 and Atypical Kinase Rio1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Kubiński

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The atypical kinase Rio1 is widespread in many organisms, ranging from Archaebacteria to humans, and is an essential factor in ribosome biogenesis. Little is known about the protein substrates of the enzyme and small-molecule inhibitors of the kinase. Protein kinase CK2 was the first interaction partner of Rio1, identified in yeast cells. The enzyme from various sources undergoes CK2-mediated phosphorylation at several sites and this modification regulates the activity of Rio1. The aim of this review is to present studies of the relationship between the two different kinases, with respect to CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Rio1, regulation of Rio1 activity, and similar susceptibility of the kinases to benzimidazole inhibitors.

  13. syk kinase activation by a src kinase-initiated activation loop phosphorylation chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hillal, O.; Kurosaki, T.; Yamamura, H.; Kinet, J.-P.; Scharenberg, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the syk tyrosine kinase occurs almost immediately following engagement of many types of antigen receptors, including Fc receptors, but the mechanism through which syk is activated is currently unclear. Here we demonstrate that Fc receptor-induced syk activation occurs as the result of phosphorylation of the syk activation loop by both src family kinases and other molecules of activated syk, suggesting that syk activation occurs as the result of a src kinase-initiated activation loop phosphorylation chain reaction. This type of activation mechanism predicts that syk activation would exhibit exponential kinetics, providing a potential explanation for its rapid and robust activation by even weak antigen receptor stimuli. We propose that a similar mechanism may be responsible for generating rapid activation of other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, such as those of the Bruton tyrosine kinase/tec family, as well. PMID:9050880

  14. Mouse hippocampal GABAB1 but not GABAB2 subunit-containing receptor complex levels are paralleling retrieval in the multiple-T-maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil eKeihan Falsafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors known to be involved in learning and memory. Although a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive processes is evident, there is no information on hippocampal GABAB receptor complexes in a multiple T maze (MTM task, a robust paradigm for evaluation of spatial learning.Trained or untrained (yoked control C57BL/6J male mice (n=10/group were subjected to the MTM task and sacrificed 6 hours following their performance. Hippocampi were taken, membrane proteins extracted and run on blue native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against GABAB1, GABAB1a and GABAB2. Immunoprecipitation with subsequent mass spectrometric identification of co-precipitates was carried out to show if GABAB1 and GABAB2 as well as other interacting proteins co-precipitate. An antibody shift assay (ASA and a proximity ligation assay (PLA were also used to see if the two GABAB subunits are present in the receptor complex.Single bands were observed on Western blots, each representing GABAB1, GABAB1a or GABAB2 at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 100 kDa. Subsequently, densitometric analysis revealed that levels of GABAB1 and GABAB1a but not GABAB2- containing receptor complexes were significantly higher in trained than untrained groups. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric studies confirmed the presence of GABAB1, GABAB2, calcium calmodulin kinases I and II, GluA1 and GluA2 as constituents of the complex. ASA and PLA also showed the presence of the two subunits of GABAB receptor within the complex. It is shown that increased levels of GABAB1 subunit-containing complexes are paralleling performance in a land maze.

  15. The target landscape of clinical kinase drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaeger, Susan; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Wilhelm, Mathias; Polzer, Harald; Vick, Binje; Koenig, Paul-Albert; Reinecke, Maria; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Petzoldt, Svenja; Meng, Chen; Zecha, Jana; Reiter, Katrin; Qiao, Huichao; Helm, Dominic; Koch, Heiner; Schoof, Melanie; Canevari, Giulia; Casale, Elena; Depaolini, Stefania Re; Feuchtinger, Annette; Wu, Zhixiang; Schmidt, Tobias; Rueckert, Lars; Becker, Wilhelm; Huenges, Jan; Garz, Anne-Kathrin; Gohlke, Bjoern-Oliver; Zolg, Daniel Paul; Kayser, Gian; Vooder, Tonu; Preissner, Robert; Hahne, Hannes; Tõnisson, Neeme; Kramer, Karl; Götze, Katharina; Bassermann, Florian; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Walch, Axel; Greif, Philipp A; Schneider, Sabine; Felder, Eduard Rudolf; Ruland, Juergen; Médard, Guillaume; Jeremias, Irmela; Spiekermann, Karsten; Kuster, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    Kinase inhibitors are important cancer therapeutics. Polypharmacology is commonly observed, requiring thorough target deconvolution to understand drug mechanism of action. Using chemical proteomics, we analyzed the target spectrum of 243 clinically evaluated kinase drugs. The data revealed previously unknown targets for established drugs, offered a perspective on the "druggable" kinome, highlighted (non)kinase off-targets, and suggested potential therapeutic applications. Integration of phosphoproteomic data refined drug-affected pathways, identified response markers, and strengthened rationale for combination treatments. We exemplify translational value by discovering SIK2 (salt-inducible kinase 2) inhibitors that modulate cytokine production in primary cells, by identifying drugs against the lung cancer survival marker MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase), and by repurposing cabozantinib to treat FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia. This resource, available via the ProteomicsDB database, should facilitate basic, clinical, and drug discovery research and aid clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Janus kinase inhibitors: jackpot or potluck?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran Keechilat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The reports of a unique mutation in the Janus kinase-2 gene (JAK2 in polycythemia vera by several independent groups in 2005 quickly spurred the development of the Janus kinase inhibitors. In one of the great victories of translational research in recent times, the first smallmolecule Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib entered a phase I trial in 2007. With the approval of ruxolitinib by the US Federal Drug Administration in November 2011 for high-risk and intermediate-2 risk myelofibrosis, a change in paradigm has occurred in the management of a subset of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN: primary myelofibrosis, post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis, and post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis. Whereas the current evidence for ruxolitinib only covers high-risk and intermediate-2 risk myelofibrosis, inhibitors with greater potency are likely to offer better disease control and survival advantage in patients belonging to these categories, and possibly to the low-risk and intermediate-1 risk categories of MPN as well. But use of the Janus kinase inhibitors also probably has certain disadvantages, such as toxicity, resistance, withdrawal phenomenon, non-reversal of histology, and an implausible goal of disease clone eradication, some of which could offset the gains. In spite of this, Janus kinase inhibitors are here to stay, and for use in more than just myeloproliferative neoplasms.

  17. Protocols for the Design of Kinase-focused Compound Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Edgar; Wroblowski, Berthold; Buyck, Christophe; Neefs, Jean-Marc; Meyer, Christophe; Cummings, Maxwell D; van Vlijmen, Herman

    2018-05-01

    Protocols for the design of kinase-focused compound libraries are presented. Kinase-focused compound libraries can be differentiated based on the design goal. Depending on whether the library should be a discovery library specific for one particular kinase, a general discovery library for multiple distinct kinase projects, or even phenotypic screening, there exists today a variety of in silico methods to design candidate compound libraries. We address the following scenarios: 1) Datamining of SAR databases and kinase focused vendor catalogues; 2) Predictions and virtual screening; 3) Structure-based design of combinatorial kinase inhibitors; 4) Design of covalent kinase inhibitors; 5) Design of macrocyclic kinase inhibitors; and 6) Design of allosteric kinase inhibitors and activators. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Submitochondrial distributions and stabilities of subunits 4, 5, and 6 of yeast cytochrome oxidase in assembly defective mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, D M; Tzagoloff, A

    1997-08-04

    The concentration and submitochondrial distribution of the subunit polypeptides of cytochrome oxidase have been studied in wild type yeast and in different mutants impaired in assembly of this respiratory complex. All the subunit polypeptides of the enzyme are associated with mitochondrial membranes of wild type cells, except for a small fraction of subunits 4 and 6 that is recovered in the soluble protein fraction of mitochondria. Cytochrome oxidase mutants consistently display a severe reduction in the steady-state concentration of subunit 1 due to its increased turnover. As a consequence, most of subunit 4, which normally is associated with subunit 1, is found in the soluble fraction. A similar shift from membrane-bound to soluble subunit 6 is seen in mutants blocked in expression of subunit 5a. In contrast, null mutations in COX6 coding for subunit 6 promote loss of subunit 5a. The absence of subunit 5a in the cox6 mutant is the result of proteolytic degradation rather than regulation of its expression by subunit 6. The possible role of the ATP-dependent proteases Rca1p and Afg3p in proteolysis of subunits 1 and 5a has been assessed in strains with combined mutations in COX6, RCA1, and/or AFG3. Immunochemical assays indicate that another protease(s) must be responsible for most of the proteolytic loss of these proteins.

  19. Persistence of the mitochondrial permeability transition in the absence of subunit c of human ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiuya; Ford, Holly C; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2017-03-28

    The permeability transition in human mitochondria refers to the opening of a nonspecific channel, known as the permeability transition pore (PTP), in the inner membrane. Opening can be triggered by calcium ions, leading to swelling of the organelle, disruption of the inner membrane, and ATP synthesis, followed by cell death. Recent proposals suggest that the pore is associated with the ATP synthase complex and specifically with the ring of c-subunits that constitute the membrane domain of the enzyme's rotor. The c-subunit is produced from three nuclear genes, ATP5G1 , ATP5G2 , and ATP5G3 , encoding identical copies of the mature protein with different mitochondrial-targeting sequences that are removed during their import into the organelle. To investigate the involvement of the c-subunit in the PTP, we generated a clonal cell, HAP1-A12, from near-haploid human cells, in which ATP5G1 , ATP5G2 , and ATP5G3 were disrupted. The HAP1-A12 cells are incapable of producing the c-subunit, but they preserve the characteristic properties of the PTP. Therefore, the c-subunit does not provide the PTP. The mitochondria in HAP1-A12 cells assemble a vestigial ATP synthase, with intact F 1 -catalytic and peripheral stalk domains and the supernumerary subunits e, f, and g, but lacking membrane subunits ATP6 and ATP8. The same vestigial complex plus associated c-subunits was characterized from human 143B ρ 0 cells, which cannot make the subunits ATP6 and ATP8, but retain the PTP. Therefore, none of the membrane subunits of the ATP synthase that are involved directly in transmembrane proton translocation is involved in forming the PTP.

  20. Mining Protein Evolution for Insights into Mechanisms of Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Auxiliary Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinarolo, Steven; Granata, Daniele; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Ahern, Christopher A

    2018-02-21

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) beta (β) subunits have been called the "overachieving" auxiliary ion channel subunit. Indeed, these subunits regulate the trafficking of the sodium channel complex at the plasma membrane and simultaneously tune the voltage-dependent properties of the pore-forming alpha-subunit. It is now known that VGSC β-subunits are capable of similar modulation of multiple isoforms of related voltage-gated potassium channels, suggesting that their abilities extend into the broader voltage-gated channels. The gene family for these single transmembrane immunoglobulin beta-fold proteins extends well beyond the traditional VGSC β1-β4 subunit designation, with deep roots into the cell adhesion protein family and myelin-related proteins - where inherited mutations result in a myriad of electrical signaling disorders. Yet, very little is known about how VGSC β-subunits support protein trafficking pathways, the basis for their modulation of voltage-dependent gating, and, ultimately, their role in shaping neuronal excitability. An evolutionary approach can be useful in yielding new clues to such functions as it provides an unbiased assessment of protein residues, folds, and functions. An approach is described here which indicates the greater emergence of the modern β-subunits roughly 400 million years ago in the early neurons of Bilateria and bony fish, and the unexpected presence of distant homologues in bacteriophages. Recent structural breakthroughs containing α and β eukaryotic sodium channels containing subunits suggest a novel role for a highly conserved polar contact that occurs within the transmembrane segments. Overall, a mixture of approaches will ultimately advance our understanding of the mechanism for β-subunit interactions with voltage-sensor containing ion channels and membrane proteins.

  1. Topographic antigenic determinants recognized by monoclonal antibodies on human choriogonadotropin beta-subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidart, J.M.; Troalen, F.; Salesse, R.; Bousfield, G.R.; Bohuon, C.J.; Bellet, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a first attempt to study the antibody-combining sites recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the beta-subunit of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). Two groups of antibodies were first defined by their ability to recognize only the free beta-subunit or the free and combined subunit. Antibodies FBT-11 and FBT-11-L bind only to hCG beta-subunit but not to hCG, whereas antibodies FBT-10 and D1E8 bind to both the beta-subunit and the hormone. In both cases, the antigenic determinants were localized to the core of the protein (residues 1-112), indicating the weak immunogenicity of the specific carboxyl-terminal extension of hCG-beta. Nine synthetic peptides spanning different regions of hCG-beta and lutropin-beta were assessed for their capacity to inhibit antibody binding. A synthetic peptide inclusive of the NH2-terminal region (residues 1-7) of the hCG beta-subunit was found to inhibit binding to the radiolabeled subunit of a monoclonal antibody specific for free hCG-beta (FBT-11). Further delineation of the antigenic site recognized by this antibody provided evidence for the involvement of fragment 82-92. Moreover, monoclonal antibody FBT-11 inhibited the recombination of hCG-beta to hCG-alpha, indicating that its antigenic determinant might be located nearby or in the hCG-beta portion interacting with the alpha-subunit. Binding of monoclonal antibody FBT-10, corresponding to the second antigenic determinant, was weakly inhibited by fragment 82-105 and did not impair the recombination of the hCG beta-subunit to the hCG alpha-subunit. Its combining site appeared to be located in a region of the intact native choriogonadotropin present at the surface of the hormone-receptor complex

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) inhibitors: importance of the morpholine ring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrs, M.; Kobarecny, J.; Jun, D.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Bartek, Jiří; Kuca, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2015), s. 41-71 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0044 Grant - others:University Hospital Hradec Kralove(CZ) 00179906; Faculty of Military Health Sciences, University of Defence(CZ) SV/FVZ201402 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DEPENDENT PROTEIN-KINASE * STRAND BREAK REPAIR * SELECTIVE PI3K-BETA INHIBITORS * TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED KINASE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.589, year: 2015

  3. Alteration of skin wound healing in keratinocyte-specific mediator complex subunit 1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Fumihito; Nakajima, Takeshi; Inui, Shigeki; Reddy, Janardan K; Itami, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    MED1 (Mediator complex subunit 1) is a co-activator of various transcription factors that function in multiple transcriptional pathways. We have already established keratinocyte-specific MED1 null mice (Med1(epi-/-)) that develop epidermal hyperplasia. Herein, to investigate the function(s) of MED1 in skin wound healing, full-thickness skin wounds were generated in Med1(epi-/-) and age-matched wild-type mice and the healing process was analyzed. Macroscopic wound closure and the re-epithelialization rate were accelerated in 8-week-old Med1(epi-/-) mice compared with age-matched wild-type mice. Increased lengths of migrating epithelial tongues and numbers of Ki67-positive cells at the wounded epidermis were observed in 8-week-old Med1(epi-/-) mice, whereas wound contraction and the area of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts in the granulation tissue were unaffected. Migration was enhanced in Med1(epi-/-) keratinocytes compared with wild-type keratinocytes in vitro. Immunoblotting revealed that the expression of follistatin was significantly decreased in Med1(epi-/-) keratinocytes. Moreover, the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was enhanced before and after treatment of Med1(epi-/-) keratinocytes with activin A in vitro. Cell-cycle analysis showed an increased ratio of S phase cells after activin A treatment of Med1(epi-/-) keratinocytes compared with wild-type keratinocytes. These findings indicate that the activin-follistatin system is involved in this acceleration of skin wound healing in 8-week-old Med1(epi-/-) mice. On the other hand, skin wound healing in 6-month-old Med1(epi-/-) mice was significantly delayed with decreased numbers of Ki67-positive cells at the wounded epidermis as well as BrdU-positive label retaining cells in hair follicles compared with age-matched wild-type mice. These results agree with our previous observation that hair follicle bulge stem cells are reduced in older Med1(epi-/-) mice, indicating a decreased contribution of hair

  4. N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soromani Christina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Covalent modifications of proteins provide a mechanism to control protein function. Here, we have investigated modifications of the heptameric Sec complex which is responsible for post-translational protein import into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. It consists of the Sec61 complex (Sec61p, Sbh1p, Sss1p which on its own mediates cotranslational protein import into the ER and the Sec63 complex (Sec63p, Sec62p, Sec71p, Sec72p. Little is known about the biogenesis and regulation of individual Sec complex subunits. Results We show that Sbh1p when it is part of the Sec61 complex is phosphorylated on T5 which is flanked by proline residues. The phosphorylation site is conserved in mammalian Sec61ß, but only partially in birds, and not in other vertebrates or unicellular eukaryotes, suggesting convergent evolution. Mutation of T5 to A did not affect the ability of mutant Sbh1p to complement the growth defect in a Δsbh1Δsbh2 strain, and did not result in a hypophosphorylated protein which shows that alternate sites can be used by the T5 kinase. A survey of yeast phosphoproteome data shows that Sbh1p can be phosphorylated on multiple sites which are organized in two patches, one at the N-terminus of its cytosolic domain, the other proximal to the transmembrane domain. Surprisingly, although N-acetylation has been shown to interfere with ER targeting, we found that both Sbh1p and Sec62p are cotranslationally N-acetylated by NatA, and N-acetyl-proteome data indicate that Sec61p is modified by the same enzyme. Mutation of the N-acetylation site, however, did not affect Sec62p function in posttranslational protein import into the ER. Disabling NatA resulted in growth retardation, but not in co- or posttranslational translocation defects or instability of Sec62p or Sbh1p. Conclusions We conclude that N-acetylation of transmembrane and tail-anchored proteins does not interfere with their ER-targeting, and that Sbh1p phosphorylation on T5

  5. Alteration of skin wound healing in keratinocyte-specific mediator complex subunit 1 null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihito Noguchi

    Full Text Available MED1 (Mediator complex subunit 1 is a co-activator of various transcription factors that function in multiple transcriptional pathways. We have already established keratinocyte-specific MED1 null mice (Med1(epi-/- that develop epidermal hyperplasia. Herein, to investigate the function(s of MED1 in skin wound healing, full-thickness skin wounds were generated in Med1(epi-/- and age-matched wild-type mice and the healing process was analyzed. Macroscopic wound closure and the re-epithelialization rate were accelerated in 8-week-old Med1(epi-/- mice compared with age-matched wild-type mice. Increased lengths of migrating epithelial tongues and numbers of Ki67-positive cells at the wounded epidermis were observed in 8-week-old Med1(epi-/- mice, whereas wound contraction and the area of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts in the granulation tissue were unaffected. Migration was enhanced in Med1(epi-/- keratinocytes compared with wild-type keratinocytes in vitro. Immunoblotting revealed that the expression of follistatin was significantly decreased in Med1(epi-/- keratinocytes. Moreover, the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was enhanced before and after treatment of Med1(epi-/- keratinocytes with activin A in vitro. Cell-cycle analysis showed an increased ratio of S phase cells after activin A treatment of Med1(epi-/- keratinocytes compared with wild-type keratinocytes. These findings indicate that the activin-follistatin system is involved in this acceleration of skin wound healing in 8-week-old Med1(epi-/- mice. On the other hand, skin wound healing in 6-month-old Med1(epi-/- mice was significantly delayed with decreased numbers of Ki67-positive cells at the wounded epidermis as well as BrdU-positive label retaining cells in hair follicles compared with age-matched wild-type mice. These results agree with our previous observation that hair follicle bulge stem cells are reduced in older Med1(epi-/- mice, indicating a decreased contribution of hair

  6. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  7. RGS16 inhibits breast cancer cell growth by mitigating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Genqing; Bansal, Geetanjali; Xie, Zhihui; Druey, Kirk M

    2009-08-07

    Aberrant activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway supports growth of many tumors including those of breast, lung, and prostate. Resistance of breast cancer cells to targeted chemotherapies including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has been linked to persistent PI3K activity, which may in part be due to increased membrane expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors (HER2 and HER3). Recently we found that proteins of the RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) family suppress PI3K activity downstream of the receptor by sequestering its p85alpha subunit from signaling complexes. Because a substantial percentage of breast tumors have RGS16 mutations and reduced RGS16 protein expression, we investigated the link between regulation of PI3K activity by RGS16 and breast cancer cell growth. RGS16 overexpression in MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibited EGF-induced proliferation and Akt phosphorylation, whereas shRNA-mediated extinction of RGS16 augmented cell growth and resistance to TKI treatment. Exposure to TKI also reduced RGS16 expression in MCF7 and BT474 cell lines. RGS16 bound the amino-terminal SH2 and inter-SH2 domains of p85alpha and inhibited its interaction with the EGF receptor-associated adapter protein Gab1. These results suggest that the loss of RGS16 in some breast tumors enhances PI3K signaling elicited by growth factors and thereby promotes proliferation and TKI evasion downstream of HER activation.

  8. Casein Kinase 1 Coordinates Cohesin Cleavage, Gametogenesis, and Exit from M Phase in Meiosis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Mengoli, Valentina; Rojas, Julie; Jonak, Katarzyna; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-01-09

    Meiosis consists of DNA replication followed by two consecutive nuclear divisions and gametogenesis or spore formation. While meiosis I has been studied extensively, less is known about the regulation of meiosis II. Here we show that Hrr25, the conserved casein kinase 1δ of budding yeast, links three mutually independent key processes of meiosis II. First, Hrr25 induces nuclear division by priming centromeric cohesin for cleavage by separase. Hrr25 simultaneously phosphorylates Rec8, the cleavable subunit of cohesin, and removes from centromeres the cohesin protector composed of shugoshin and the phosphatase PP2A. Second, Hrr25 initiates the sporulation program by inducing the synthesis of membranes that engulf the emerging nuclei at anaphase II. Third, Hrr25 mediates exit from meiosis II by activating pathways that trigger the destruction of M-phase-promoting kinases. Thus, Hrr25 synchronizes formation of the single-copy genome with gamete differentiation and termination of meiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Verkaik, Nicole S; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van Gent, Dik C

    2003-12-15

    DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks the action of exonucleases and ligases. The DNA termini become accessible after autophosphorylation of DNA-PK(CS), which we demonstrate to require synapsis of DNA ends. Interestingly, the presence of DNA-PK prevents ligation of the two synapsed termini, but allows ligation to another DNA molecule. This alteration of the ligation route is independent of the type of ligase that we used, indicating that the intrinsic architecture of the DNA-PK complex itself is not able to support ligation of the synapsed DNA termini. We present a working model in which DNA-PK creates a stable molecular bridge between two DNA ends that is remodeled after DNA-PK autophosphorylation in such a way that the extreme termini become accessible without disrupting synapsis. We infer that joining of synapsed DNA termini would require an additional protein factor.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA depletion by ethidium bromide decreases neuronal mitochondrial creatine kinase: Implications for striatal energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Emily Booth; Aicher, Aidan Edward; Fessel, Joshua Patrick; Konradi, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the discrete genome which encodes subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is present at highly variable copy numbers across cell types. Though severe mtDNA depletion dramatically reduces mitochondrial function, the impact of tissue-specific mtDNA reduction remains debated. Previously, our lab identified reduced mtDNA quantity in the putamen of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients who had developed L-DOPA Induced Dyskinesia (LID), compared to PD patients who had not developed LID and healthy subjects. Here, we present the consequences of mtDNA depletion by ethidium bromide (EtBr) treatment on the bioenergetic function of primary cultured neurons, astrocytes and neuron-enriched cocultures from rat striatum. We report that EtBr inhibition of mtDNA replication and transcription consistently reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and that neurons are significantly more sensitive to EtBr than astrocytes. EtBr also increases glycolytic activity in astrocytes, whereas in neurons it reduces the expression of mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA and levels of phosphocreatine. Further, we show that mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA is similarly downregulated in dyskinetic PD patients, compared to both non-dyskinetic PD patients and healthy subjects. Our data support a hypothesis that reduced striatal mtDNA contributes to energetic dysregulation in the dyskinetic striatum by destabilizing the energy buffering system of the phosphocreatine/creatine shuttle.

  11. Creatine kinase radioimmunoassay and isoenzyme electrophoresis compared in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homburger, H.A.; Jacob, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    We compared, in 116 patients, the relative usefulness of results of tests for creatine kinase B-isoenzymes, as measured by radioimmunoassay, and the MB isoenzyme, as measured by electrophoresis, in diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The radioimmunoassay was specific for isoenzymes of creatine kinase containing the B subunit. All patients with acute transmural infarcts had positive test results by both techniques, but concentrations of B-isoenzymes were more frequently above normal than were MB bands in the case of patients with acute subendocardial infarcts and in the case of all patients with acute myocardial infarcts from whom sera were collected more than 24 h after onset of chest pain. Concentrations of B-isoenzymes also were increased, even when MB bands were not electrophoretically detectable in specimens from several patients without documented acute myocardial infarcts. These abnormal results presumably were caused by increased concentrations of the BB isoenzyme in serum. Accordingly, an increased concentration of B-isoenzymes had less diagnostic specificity and predictive value for acute myocardial infarction than did a detectable MB band. Results of isoenzyme electrophoresis were more reliable for establishing this diagnosis, but the results of radioimmunoassay were more reliable for excluding it in patients with chest pain as the primary symptom

  12. Mitochondrial DNA depletion by ethidium bromide decreases neuronal mitochondrial creatine kinase: Implications for striatal energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Booth Warren

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, the discrete genome which encodes subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is present at highly variable copy numbers across cell types. Though severe mtDNA depletion dramatically reduces mitochondrial function, the impact of tissue-specific mtDNA reduction remains debated. Previously, our lab identified reduced mtDNA quantity in the putamen of Parkinson's Disease (PD patients who had developed L-DOPA Induced Dyskinesia (LID, compared to PD patients who had not developed LID and healthy subjects. Here, we present the consequences of mtDNA depletion by ethidium bromide (EtBr treatment on the bioenergetic function of primary cultured neurons, astrocytes and neuron-enriched cocultures from rat striatum. We report that EtBr inhibition of mtDNA replication and transcription consistently reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and that neurons are significantly more sensitive to EtBr than astrocytes. EtBr also increases glycolytic activity in astrocytes, whereas in neurons it reduces the expression of mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA and levels of phosphocreatine. Further, we show that mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA is similarly downregulated in dyskinetic PD patients, compared to both non-dyskinetic PD patients and healthy subjects. Our data support a hypothesis that reduced striatal mtDNA contributes to energetic dysregulation in the dyskinetic striatum by destabilizing the energy buffering system of the phosphocreatine/creatine shuttle.

  13. beta2-adaptin is constitutively de-phosphorylated by serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A and phosphorylated by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Menné, C; Kastrup, J

    2000-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis includes cycles of assembly and disassembly of the clathrin-coated vesicle constituents. How these cycles are regulated is still not fully known but previous studies have indicated that phosphorylation of coat subunits may play a role. Here we describe that beta2-ada...... the hypothesis that phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation of coat proteins plays a regulatory role in the assembly/disassembly cycle of clathrin-coated vesicles.......Clathrin-mediated endocytosis includes cycles of assembly and disassembly of the clathrin-coated vesicle constituents. How these cycles are regulated is still not fully known but previous studies have indicated that phosphorylation of coat subunits may play a role. Here we describe that beta2......-adaptin undergoes cycles of phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in intact cells. Thus, beta2-adaptin was constitutively de-phosphorylated by serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase in vivo. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated...

  14. Protein Kinases in Shaping Plant Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Wang, Bo; Xin, Xiaoyun; Ren, Dongtao

    2018-02-13

    Plant architecture, the three-dimensional organization of the plant body, includes the branching pattern and the size, shape, and position of organs. Plant architecture is genetically controlled and is influenced by environmental conditions. The regulations occur at most of the stages from the first division of the fertilized eggs to the final establishment of plant architecture. Among the various endogenous regulators, protein kinases and their associated signaling pathways have been shown to play important roles in regulating the process of plant architecture establishment. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms by which plant architecture formation is regulated by protein kinases, especially mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Membrane depolarization-induced RhoA/Rho-associated kinase activation and sustained contraction of rat caudal arterial smooth muscle involves genistein-sensitive tyrosine phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Yanagihara, Hayato; Nakagawa, Jun-ichi; Hishinuma, Shigeru; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P.; Shoji, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROK) activation plays an important role in K+-induced contraction of rat caudal arterial smooth muscle (Mita et al., Biochem J. 2002; 364: 431–40). The present study investigated a potential role for tyrosine kinase activity in K+-induced RhoA activation and contraction. The non-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, but not the src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, inhibited K+-induced sustained contraction (IC50 = 11.3 ± 2.4 µM). Genistein (10 µM) inhibited the K+-induced increase in myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation without affecting the Ca2+ transient. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate induced contraction that was reversed by genistein (IC50 = 6.5 ± 2.3 µM) and the ROK inhibitor Y-27632 (IC50 = 0.27 ± 0.04 µM). Vanadate also increased LC20 phosphorylation in a genistein- and Y-27632-dependent manner. K+ stimulation induced translocation of RhoA to the membrane, which was inhibited by genistein. Phosphorylation of MYPT1 (myosin-targeting subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase) was significantly increased at Thr855 and Thr697 by K+ stimulation in a genistein- and Y-27632-sensitive manner. Finally, K+ stimulation induced genistein-sensitive tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins of ∼55, 70 and 113 kDa. We conclude that a genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinase, activated by the membrane depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, is involved in the RhoA/ROK activation and sustained contraction induced by K+. Ca2+ sensitization, myosin light chain phosphatase, RhoA, Rho-associated kinase, tyrosine kinase PMID:24133693

  16. The Role of PAS Kinase in PASsing the Glucose Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne H. Grose

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PAS kinase is an evolutionarily conserved nutrient responsive protein kinase that regulates glucose homeostasis. Mammalian PAS kinase is activated by glucose in pancreatic beta cells, and knockout mice are protected from obesity, liver triglyceride accumulation, and insulin resistance when fed a high-fat diet. Yeast PAS kinase is regulated by both carbon source and cell integrity stress and stimulates the partitioning of glucose toward structural carbohydrate biosynthesis. In our current model for PAS kinase regulation, a small molecule metabolite binds the sensory PAS domain and activates the enzyme. Although bona fide PAS kinase substrates are scarce, in vitro substrate searches provide putative targets for exploration.

  17. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing [γ- 32 P]ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when [ 32 P]GTP was substituted for [ 32 P]ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein

  18. 2-Aminobenzimidazoles as potent Aurora kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min; Bui, Minna; Shen, Wang; Baskaran, Subramanian; Allen, Darin A; Elling, Robert A; Flanagan, W Michael; Fung, Amy D; Hanan, Emily J; Harris, Shannon O; Heumann, Stacey A; Hoch, Ute; Ivy, Sheryl N; Jacobs, Jeffrey W; Lam, Stuart; Lee, Heman; McDowell, Robert S; Oslob, Johan D; Purkey, Hans E; Romanowski, Michael J; Silverman, Jeffrey A; Tangonan, Bradley T; Taverna, Pietro; Yang, Wenjin; Yoburn, Josh C; Yu, Chul H; Zimmerman, Kristin M; O'Brien, Tom; Lew, Willard

    2009-09-01

    This Letter describes the discovery and key structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a series of 2-aminobenzimidazoles as potent Aurora kinase inhibitors. 2-Aminobenzimidazole serves as a bioisostere of the biaryl urea residue of SNS-314 (1c), which is a potent Aurora kinase inhibitor and entered clinical testing in patients with solid tumors. Compared to SNS-314, this series of compounds offers better aqueous solubility while retaining comparable in vitro potency in biochemical and cell-based assays; in particular, 6m has also demonstrated a comparable mouse iv PK profile to SNS-314.

  19. Subunit association as the stabilizing determinant for archaeal methionine adenosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Francisco; Alfonso, Carlos; Taylor, John C; Markham, George D; Pajares, María A

    2009-07-01

    Archaea contain a class of methionine adenosyltransferases (MATs) that exhibit substantially higher stability than their mesophilic counterparts. Their sequences are highly divergent, but preserve the essential active site motifs of the family. We have investigated the origin of this increased stability using chemical denaturation experiments on Methanococcus jannaschii MAT (Mj-MAT) and mutants containing single tryptophans in place of tyrosine residues. The results from fluorescence, circular dichroism, hydrodynamic, and enzyme activity measurements showed that the higher stability of Mj-MAT derives largely from a tighter association of its subunits in the dimer. Local fluorescence changes, interpreted using secondary structure predictions, further identify the least stable structural elements as the C-terminal ends of beta-strands E2 and E6, and the N-terminus of E3. Dimer dissociation however requires a wider perturbation of the molecule. Additional analysis was initially hindered by the lack of crystal structures for archaeal MATs, a limitation that we overcame by construction of a 3D-homology model of Mj-MAT. This model predicts preservation of the chain topology and three-domain organization typical of this family, locates the least stable structural elements at the flat contact surface between monomers, and shows that alterations in all three domains are required for dimer dissociation.

  20. The Regulation of NF-κB Subunits by Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Christian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The NF-κB transcription factor is the master regulator of the inflammatory response and is essential for the homeostasis of the immune system. NF-κB regulates the transcription of genes that control inflammation, immune cell development, cell cycle, proliferation, and cell death. The fundamental role that NF-κB plays in key physiological processes makes it an important factor in determining health and disease. The importance of NF-κB in tissue homeostasis and immunity has frustrated therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting NF-κB activation. However, significant research efforts have revealed the crucial contribution of NF-κB phosphorylation to controlling NF-κB directed transactivation. Importantly, NF-κB phosphorylation controls transcription in a gene-specific manner, offering new opportunities to selectively target NF-κB for therapeutic benefit. This review will focus on the phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits and the impact on NF-κB function.

  1. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  2. Editing modifies the GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlson, Johan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Haussler, David

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) pre-mRNA editing by the ADAR enzyme family has the potential to increase the variety of the proteome. This editing by adenosine deamination is essential in mammals for a functional brain. To detect novel substrates for A-to-I editing we have used an experimental method...... to find selectively edited sites and combined it with bioinformatic techniques that find stem-loop structures suitable for editing. We present here the first verified editing candidate detected by this screening procedure. We show that Gabra-3, which codes for the alpha3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor......, is a substrate for editing by both ADAR1 and ADAR2. Editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA recodes an isoleucine to a methionine. The extent of editing is low at birth but increases with age, reaching close to 100% in the adult brain. We therefore propose that editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA is important for normal brain...

  3. Vaccine profile of herpes zoster (HZ/su) subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anthony L; Heineman, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) causes an often severe and painful rash in older people and may be complicated by prolonged pain (postherpetic neuralgia; PHN) and by dissemination in immune-compromised patients. HZ results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, often associated with age-related or other causes of decreased T cell immunity. A live attenuated vaccine boosts this immunity and provides partial protection against HZ, but this decreases with age and declines over 8 years. Areas covered: A new HZ subunit (HZ/su) vaccine combines a key surface VZV glycoprotein (E) with a T cell-boosting adjuvant system (AS01 B ) and is administered by two intramuscular injections two months apart. Expert commentary: HZ/su showed excellent efficacy of ~90% in immunocompetent adults ≥50 and ≥70 years of age, respectively, in the ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 phase III controlled trials. Efficacy was unaffected by advancing age and persisted for >3 years. Approximately 9.5% of subjects had severe, but transient (1-2 days) injection site pain, swelling or redness. Compliance with both vaccine doses was high (95%). The vaccine will have a major impact on HZ management. Phase I-II trials showed safety and immunogenicity in severely immunocompromised patients. Phase III trial results are expected soon.

  4. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  5. Fc receptor gamma subunit polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansari, Aliya; Ollier, W.E.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Gul, Ahmet; Inanac, Murat; Ordi, Jose; Teh, Lee-Suan; Hajeer, Ali H.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the possible association between Fc receptor gamma polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have investigated the full FcR gamma gene for polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand confirmational polymorphisms and DNA sequencing .The polymorphisms identified were genotype using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Systemic lupus erythematosus cases and controls were available from 3 ethnic groups: Turkish, Spanish and Caucasian. The study was conducted in the year 2001 at the Arthritis Research Campaign, Epidemiology Unit, Manchester University Medical School, Manchester, United Kingdom. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, 2 in the promoter, one in intron 4 and, 2 in the 3'UTR. Four of the 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were relatively common and investigated in the 3 populations. Allele and genotype frequencies of all 4 investigated SNPs were not statistically different cases and controls. fc receptor gamma gene does not appear to contribute to SLE susceptibility. The identified polymorphisms may be useful in investigating other diseases where receptors containing the FcR gamma subunit contribute to the pathology. (author)

  6. Regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, K.A.

    2006-12-01

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylates the Mdm2 protein in the central domain. This phosphorylation is absolutely required for p53 degradation. Ionizing radiation inactivates GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and in consequence prevents Mdm2 mediated p53 degradation. During the work for my PhD I identified Akt/PKB as the kinase that phosphorylates GSK-3β at serine 9 after ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation leads to phosphorylation of Akt/PKB at threonine 308 and serine 473. The PI3 Kinase inhibitor LY294002 completely abolished Akt/PKB serine 473 phosphorylation and prevented the induction of GSK-3β serine 9 phosphorylation after ionizing radiation. Interestingly, the most significant activation of Akt/PKB after ionizing radiation occurred in the nucleus while cytoplasmic Akt/PKB was only weakly activated after radiation. By using siRNA, I showed that Akt1/PKBa, but not Akt2/PKBβ, is required for phosphorylation of GSK- 3β at serine 9 after ionizing radiation. Phosphorylation and activation of Akt/PKB after ionizing radiation depends on the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a member of the PI3 Kinase family, that is activated by free DNA ends. Both, in cells from SCID mice and after knockdown of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK by siRNA in osteosarcoma cells, phosphorylation of Akt/PKB at serine 473 and of GSK-3β at serine 9 was completely abolished. Consistent with the principle that phosphorylation of GSK-3 at serine 9 contributes to p53 stabilization after radiation, the accumulation of p53 in response to ionizing radiation was largely prevented by downregulation of DNA-PK. From these results I conclude, that ionizing radiation induces a signaling cascade that leads to Akt1/PKBa activation mediated by DNA-PK dependent phosphorylation of serine 473. After activation Akt1/PKBa phosphorylates and inhibits GSK-3β in the nucleus. The resulting hypophosphorylated form of Mdm2 protein is no longer able to degrade p53 which in

  7. CZK3, a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog in Cercospora zeae-maydis, regulates cercosporin biosynthesis, fungal development, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Won-Bo; Dunkle, Larry D

    2003-09-01

    The fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis causes gray leaf spot of maize and produces cercosporin, a photosensitizing perylenequinone with toxic activity against a broad spectrum of organisms. However, little is known about the biosynthetic pathway or factors that regulate cercosporin production. Analysis of a cDNA subtraction library comprised of genes that are up-regulated during cercosporin synthesis revealed a sequence highly similar to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in other fungi. Sequencing and conceptual translation of the full-length genomic sequence indicated that the gene, which we designated CZK3, contains a 4,119-bp open reading frame devoid of introns and encodes a 1,373-amino acid sequence that is highly similar to Wis4, a MAP kinase kinase kinase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Targeted disruption of CZK3 suppressed expression of genes predicted to participate in cercosporin biosynthesis and abolished cercosporin production. The disrupted mutants grew faster on agar media than the wild type but were deficient in conidiation and elicited only small chlorotic spots on inoculated maize leaves compared with rectangular necrotic lesions incited by the wild type. Complementation of disruptants with the CZK3 open reading frame and flanking sequences restored wild-type levels of conidiation, growth rate, and virulence as well as the ability to produce cercosporin. The results suggest that cercosporin is a virulence factor in C. zeae-maydis during maize pathogenesis, but the pleiotropic effects of CZK3 disruption precluded definitive conclusions.

  8. Evidence that Autophosphorylation of the Major Sporulation Kinase in Bacillus subtilis Is Able To Occur in trans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Seram Nganbiton; Kiehler, Brittany; Haggett, Lindsey; Fujita, Masaya

    2015-08-01

    . Autophosphorylation of histidine kinases is known to occur by either the cis (one subunit of kinase phosphorylating itself within the multimer) or the trans (one subunit of the multimer phosphorylates the other subunit) mechanism. The present study provided direct in vivo and in vitro evidence that autophosphorylation of the major sporulation histidine kinase (KinA) is able to occur in trans within the homotetramer complex. While the physiological and mechanistic significance of the trans autophosphorylation reaction remains obscure, understanding the detailed reaction mechanism of the sporulation kinase is the first step toward gaining insight into the molecular mechanisms of the initiation of sporulation, which is believed to be triggered by unknown factors produced under conditions of nutrient depletion. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Regulation of proximal tubule vacuolar H+-ATPase by PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-bataineh, Mohammad M.; Gong, Fan; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Myerburg, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) mediates ATP-driven H+ transport across membranes. This pump is present at the apical membrane of kidney proximal tubule cells and intercalated cells. Defects in the V-ATPase and in proximal tubule function can cause renal tubular acidosis. We examined the role of protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the V-ATPase in the proximal tubule as these two kinases coregulate the V-ATPase in the collecting duct. As the proximal tubule V-ATPases have different subunit compositions from other nephron segments, we postulated that V-ATPase regulation in the proximal tubule could differ from other kidney tubule segments. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat ex vivo kidney slices revealed that the V-ATPase was present in the proximal tubule both at the apical pole, colocalizing with the brush-border marker wheat germ agglutinin, and in the cytosol when slices were incubated in buffer alone. When slices were incubated with a cAMP analog and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, the V-ATPase accumulated at the apical pole of S3 segment cells. These PKA activators also increased V-ATPase apical membrane expression as well as the rate of V-ATPase-dependent extracellular acidification in S3 cell monolayers relative to untreated cells. However, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased PKA-induced V-ATPase apical accumulation in proximal tubules of kidney slices and decreased V-ATPase activity in S3 cell monolayers. Our results suggest that in proximal tubule the V-ATPase subcellular localization and activity are acutely coregulated via PKA downstream of hormonal signals and via AMPK downstream of metabolic stress. PMID:24553431

  10. Unchanged thymidine triphosphate pools and thymidine metabolism in two lines of thymidine kinase 2-mutated fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangini, Miriam; Rampazzo, Chiara; Franzolin, Elisa; Lara, Mari-Carmen; Vilà, Maya R; Martí, Ramon; Bianchi, Vera

    2009-02-01

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine in mitochondria. Its function becomes essential for dTTP synthesis in noncycling cells, where cytosolic dTTP synthesis via R1/R2 ribonucleotide reductase and thymidine kinase 1 is turned down. Mutations in the nuclear gene for TK2 cause a fatal mtDNA depletion syndrome. Only selected cell types are affected, suggesting that the other cells compensate for the TK2 deficiency by adapting the enzyme network that regulates dTTP synthesis outside S-phase. Here we looked for such metabolic adaptation in quiescent cultures of fibroblasts from two TK2-deficient patients with a slow-progressing syndrome. In cell extracts, we measured the activities of TK2, deoxycytidine kinase, thymidine phosphorylase, deoxynucleotidases and the amounts of the three ribonucleotide reductase subunits. Patient cells contained 40% or 5% TK2 activity and unchanged activities of the other enzymes. However, their mitochondrial and cytosolic dTTP pools were unchanged, and also the overall composition of the dNTP pools was normal. TK2-dependent phosphorylation of [(3)H]thymidine in intact cells and the turnover of the dTTP pool showed that even the fibroblasts with 5% residual TK2 activity synthesized dTTP at an almost normal rate. Normal fibroblasts apparently contain more TK2 than needed to maintain dTTP during quiescence, which would explain why TK2-mutated fibroblasts do not manifest mtDNA depletion despite their reduced TK2 activity.

  11. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for probing the relative abundance of cyclin-dependent kinases in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Kurzawa

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependant kinases play a central role in coordinating cell growth and division, and in sustaining proliferation of cancer cells, thereby constituting attractive pharmacological targets. However, there are no direct means of assessing their relative abundance in living cells, current approaches being limited to antigenic and proteomic analysis of fixed cells. In order to probe the relative abundance of these kinases directly in living cells, we have developed a fluorescent peptide biosensor with biligand affinity for CDKs and cyclins in vitro, that retains endogenous CDK/cyclin complexes from cell extracts, and that bears an environmentally-sensitive probe, whose fluorescence increases in a sensitive fashion upon recognition of its targets. CDKSENS was introduced into living cells, through complexation with the cell-penetrating carrier CADY2 and applied to assess the relative abundance of CDK/Cyclins through fluorescence imaging and ratiometric quantification. This peptide biosensor technology affords direct and sensitive readout of CDK/cyclin complex levels, and reports on differences in complex formation when tampering with a single CDK or cyclin. CDKSENS further allows for detection of differences between different healthy and cancer cell lines, thereby enabling to distinguish cells that express high levels of these heterodimeric kinases, from cells that present decreased or defective assemblies. This fluorescent biosensor technology provides information on the overall status of CDK/Cyclin complexes which cannot be obtained through antigenic detection of individual subunits, in a non-invasive fashion which does not require cell fixation or extraction procedures. As such it provides promising perspectives for monitoring the response to therapeutics that affect CDK/Cyclin abundance, for cell-based drug discovery strategies and fluorescence-based cancer diagnostics.

  12. Molecular evolution of a-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP-7: implications in comparative PKA compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Keven R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs are molecular scaffolding proteins mediating the assembly of multi-protein complexes containing cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA, directing the kinase in discrete subcellular locations. Splice variants from the AKAP7 gene (AKAP15/18 are vital components of neuronal and cardiac phosphatase complexes, ion channels, cardiac Ca2+ handling and renal water transport. Results Shown in evolutionary analyses, the formation of the AKAP7-RI/RII binding domain (required for AKAP/PKA-R interaction corresponds to vertebrate-specific gene duplication events in the PKA-RI/RII subunits. Species analyses of AKAP7 splice variants shows the ancestral AKAP7 splice variant is AKAP7α, while the ancestral long form AKAP7 splice variant is AKAP7γ. Multi-species AKAP7 gene alignments, show the recent formation of AKAP7δ occurs with the loss of native AKAP7γ in rats and basal primates. AKAP7 gene alignments and two dimensional Western analyses indicate that AKAP7γ is produced from an internal translation-start site that is present in the AKAP7δ cDNA of mice and humans but absent in rats. Immunofluorescence analysis of AKAP7 protein localization in both rat and mouse heart suggests AKAP7γ replaces AKAP7δ at the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum in species other than rat. DNA sequencing identified Human AKAP7δ insertion-deletions (indels that promote the production of AKAP7γ instead of AKAP7δ. Conclusions This AKAP7 molecular evolution study shows that these vital scaffolding proteins developed in ancestral vertebrates and that independent mutations in the AKAP7 genes of rodents and early primates has resulted in the recent formation of AKAP7δ, a splice variant of likely lesser importance in humans than currently described.

  13. Myosin light chain kinase phosphorylation in tracheal smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stull, J.T.; Hsu, L.C.; Tansey, M.G.; Kamm, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    Purified myosin light chain kinase from smooth muscle is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, and the multifunctional calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Because phosphorylation in a specific site (site A) by any one of these kinases desensitizes myosin light chain kinase to activation by Ca2+/calmodulin, kinase phosphorylation could play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contractility. This possibility was investigated in 32 P-labeled bovine tracheal smooth muscle. Treatment of tissues with carbachol, KCl, isoproterenol, or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate increased the extent of kinase phosphorylation. Six primary phosphopeptides (A-F) of myosin light chain kinase were identified. Site A was phosphorylated to an appreciable extent only with carbachol or KCl, agents which contract tracheal smooth muscle. The extent of site A phosphorylation correlated to increases in the concentration of Ca2+/calmodulin required for activation. These results show that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C do not affect smooth muscle contractility by phosphorylating site A in myosin light chain kinase. It is proposed that phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase in site A in contracting tracheal smooth muscle may play a role in the reported desensitization of contractile elements to activation by Ca2+

  14. Crystal structure of the P pilus rod subunit PapA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Verger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available P pili are important adhesive fibres involved in kidney infection by uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. P pili are assembled by the conserved chaperone-usher pathway, which involves the PapD chaperone and the PapC usher. During pilus assembly, subunits are incorporated into the growing fiber via the donor-strand exchange (DSE mechanism, whereby the chaperone's G1 beta-strand that complements the incomplete immunoglobulin-fold of each subunit is displaced by the N-terminal extension (Nte of an incoming subunit. P pili comprise a helical rod, a tip fibrillum, and an adhesin at the distal end. PapA is the rod subunit and is assembled into a superhelical right-handed structure. Here, we have solved the structure of a ternary complex of PapD bound to PapA through donor-strand complementation, itself bound to another PapA subunit through DSE. This structure provides insight into the structural basis of the DSE reaction involving this important pilus subunit. Using gel filtration chromatography and electron microscopy on a number of PapA Nte mutants, we establish that PapA differs in its mode of assembly compared with other Pap subunits, involving a much larger Nte that encompasses not only the DSE region of the Nte but also the region N-terminal to it.

  15. Structural characterization of recombinant crustacyanin subunits from the lobster Homarus americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Pincolini, Elisa; McClintock, Timothy S.; Rössle, Manfred; Berni, Rodolfo; Cianci, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The two recombinant apo subunits H1 and H2 from H. americanus have been structurally characterized. Reconstitution studies with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85–95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits. Crustacean crustacyanin proteins are linked to the production and modification of carapace colour, with direct implications for fitness and survival. Here, the structural and functional properties of the two recombinant crustacyanin subunits H 1 and H 2 from the American lobster Homarus americanus are reported. The two subunits are structurally highly similar to the corresponding natural apo crustacyanin CRTC and CRTA subunits from the European lobster H. gammarus. Reconstitution studies of the recombinant crustacyanin proteins H 1 and H 2 with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85–95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits from H. gammarus in complex with astaxanthin. Moreover, correlations between the presence of crustacyanin genes in crustacean species and the resulting carapace colours with the spectral properties of the subunits in complex with astaxanthin confirmed this genotype–phenotype linkage

  16. Self-subunit swapping occurs in another gene type of cobalt nitrile hydratase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Self-subunit swapping is one of the post-translational maturation of the cobalt-containing nitrile hydratase (Co-NHase family of enzymes. All of these NHases possess a gene organization of , which allows the activator protein to easily form a mediatory complex with the α-subunit of the NHase after translation. Here, we discovered that the incorporation of cobalt into another type of Co-NHase, with a gene organization of , was also dependent on self-subunit swapping. We successfully isolated a recombinant NHase activator protein (P14K of Pseudomonas putida NRRL-18668 by adding a Strep-tag N-terminal to the P14K gene. P14K was found to form a complex [α(StrepP14K(2] with the α-subunit of the NHase. The incorporation of cobalt into the NHase of P. putida was confirmed to be dependent on the α-subunit substitution between the cobalt-containing α(StrepP14K(2 and the cobalt-free NHase. Cobalt was inserted into cobalt-free α(StrepP14K(2 but not into cobalt-free NHase, suggesting that P14K functions not only as a self-subunit swapping chaperone but also as a metallochaperone. In addition, NHase from P. putida was also expressed by a mutant gene that was designed with a order. Our findings expand the general features of self-subunit swapping maturation.

  17. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel β1/β1B Subunits Regulate Cardiac Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi Edokobi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myocyte contraction is initiated by a set of intricately orchestrated electrical impulses, collectively known as action potentials (APs. Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs are responsible for the upstroke and propagation of APs in excitable cells, including cardiomyocytes. NaVs consist of a single, pore-forming α subunit and two different β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional cell adhesion molecules and channel modulators that have cell type and subcellular domain specific functional effects. Variants in SCN1B, the gene encoding the Nav-β1 and -β1B subunits, are linked to atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, e.g., Brugada syndrome, as well as to the early infantile epileptic encephalopathy Dravet syndrome, all of which put patients at risk for sudden death. Evidence over the past two decades has demonstrated that Nav-β1/β1B subunits play critical roles in cardiac myocyte physiology, in which they regulate tetrodotoxin-resistant and -sensitive sodium currents, potassium currents, and calcium handling, and that Nav-β1/β1B subunit dysfunction generates substrates for arrhythmias. This review will highlight the role of Nav-β1/β1B subunits in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology.

  18. Therapeutic relevance of the PP2A-B55 inhibitory kinase MASTL/Greatwall in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Fernández, Mónica; Sanz-Flores, María; Sanz-Castillo, Belén; Salazar-Roa, María; Partida, David; Zapatero-Solana, Elisabet; Ali, H Raza; Manchado, Eusebio; Lowe, Scott; VanArsdale, Todd; Shields, David; Caldas, Carlos; Quintela-Fandino, Miguel; Malumbres, Marcos

    2017-12-11

    PP2A is a major tumor suppressor whose inactivation is frequently found in a wide spectrum of human tumors. In particular, deletion or epigenetic silencing of genes encoding the B55 family of PP2A regulatory subunits is a common feature of breast cancer cells. A key player in the regulation of PP2A/B55 phosphatase complexes is the cell cycle kinase MASTL (also known as Greatwall). During cell division, inhibition of PP2A-B55 by MASTL is required to maintain the mitotic state, whereas inactivation of MASTL and PP2A reactivation is required for mitotic exit. Despite its critical role in cell cycle progression in multiple organisms, its relevance as a therapeutic target in human cancer and its dependence of PP2A activity is mostly unknown. Here we show that MASTL overexpression predicts poor survival and shows prognostic value in breast cancer patients. MASTL knockdown or knockout using RNA interference or CRISPR/Cas9 systems impairs proliferation of a subset of breast cancer cells. The proliferative function of MASTL in these tumor cells requires its kinase activity and the presence of PP2A-B55 complexes. By using a new inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in breast cancer cells, we show that genetic ablation of MASTL displays a significant therapeutic effect in vivo. All together, these data suggest that the PP2A inhibitory kinase MASTL may have both prognostic and therapeutic value in human breast cancer.

  19. Structures of Staphylococcus aureus D-tagatose-6-phosphate kinase implicate domain motions in specificity and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miallau, Linda; Hunter, William N; McSweeney, Sean M; Leonard, Gordon A

    2007-07-06

    High resolution structures of Staphylococcus aureus d-tagatose-6-phosphate kinase (LacC) in two crystal forms are herein reported. The structures define LacC in apoform, in binary complexes with ADP or the co-factor analogue AMP-PNP, and in a ternary complex with AMP-PNP and D-tagatose-6-phosphate. The tertiary structure of the LacC monomer, which is closely related to other members of the pfkB subfamily of carbohydrate kinases, is composed of a large alpha/beta core domain and a smaller, largely beta "lid." Four extended polypeptide segments connect these two domains. Dimerization of LacC occurs via interactions between lid domains, which come together to form a beta-clasp structure. Residues from both subunits contribute to substrate binding. LacC adopts a closed structure required for phosphoryl transfer only when both substrate and co-factor are bound. A reaction mechanism similar to that used by other phosphoryl transferases is proposed, although unusually, when both substrate and co-factor are bound to the enzyme two Mg(2+) ions are observed in the active site. A new motif of amino acid sequence conservation common to the pfkB subfamily of carbohydrate kinases is identified.

  20. RUNX1 regulates phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway: role in chemotherapy sensitivity in acute megakaryocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Holly; Xie, Chengzhi; LaFiura, Katherine M; Dombkowski, Alan A; Buck, Steven A; Boerner, Julie L; Taub, Jeffrey W; Matherly, Larry H; Ge, Yubin

    2009-09-24

    RUNX1 (AML1) encodes the core binding factor alpha subunit of a heterodimeric transcription factor complex which plays critical roles in normal hematopoiesis. Translocations or down-regulation of RUNX1 have been linked to favorable clinical outcomes in acute leukemias, suggesting that RUNX1 may also play critical roles in chemotherapy responses in acute leukemias; however, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The median level of RUNX1b transcripts in Down syndrome (DS) children with acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMkL) were 4.4-fold (P regulation of PIK3CD by RUNX1 was further confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter gene assays. Further, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, and cytosine arabinoside synergized in antileukemia effects on Meg-01 and primary pediatric AMkL cells. Our results suggest that RUNX1 may play a critical role in chemotherapy response in AMkL by regulating the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Thus, the treatment of AMkL may be improved by integrating PI3-kinase or Akt inhibitors into the chemotherapy of this disease.

  1. Three human alcohol dehydrogenase subunits: cDNA structure and molecular and evolutionary divergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, T.; Szeto, S.; Yoshida, A.

    1986-01-01

    Class I human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD + oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) consists of several homo- and heterodimers of α, β, and γ subunits that are governed by the ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 loci. The authors previously cloned a full length of cDNA for the β subunit, and the complete sequence of 374 amino acid residues was established. cDNAs for the α and γ subunits were cloned and characterized. A human liver cDNA library, constructed in phage λgt11, was screened by using a synthetic oligonucleotide probe that was matched to the γ but not to the β sequence. Clone pUCADHγ21 and clone pUCADHα15L differed from β cDNA with respect to restriction sites and hybridization with the nucleotide probe. Clone pUCADHγ21 contained an insertion of 1.5 kilobase pairs (kbp) and encodes 374 amino acid residues compatible with the reported amino acid sequence of the γ subunit. Clone pUCADHα15L contained an insertion of 2.4 kbp and included nucleotide sequences that encode 374 amino acid residues for another subunit, the γ subunit. In addition, this clone contained the sequences that encode the COOH-terminal part of the β subunit at its extended 5' region. The amino acid sequences and coding regions of the cDNAs of the three subunits are very similar. A high degree of resemblance is observed also in their 3' noncoding regions. However, distinctive differences exist in the vicinity of the Zn-binding cysteine residue at position 46. Based on the cDNA sequences and the deduced amino acid sequences of the three subunits, their structural and evolutionary relationships are discussed

  2. Regulated appearance of NMDA receptor subunits and channel functions during in vitro neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelitai, Márta; Schlett, Katalin; Varju, Patrícia; Eisel, Ulrich; Madarász, Emília

    2002-04-01

    The schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and the appearance of functional NMDA-gated ion channels were investigated during the retinoic acid (RA) induced neuronal differentiation of NE-4C, a p53-deficient mouse neuroectodermal progenitor cell line. NR2A, NR2B, and NR2D subunit transcripts were present in both nondifferentiated and neuronally differentiated cultures, while NR2C subunits were expressed only transiently, during the early period of neural differentiation. Several splice variants of NR1 were detected in noninduced progenitors and in RA-induced cells, except the N1 exon containing transcripts that appeared after the fourth day of induction, when neuronal processes were already formed. NR1 and NR2A subunit proteins were detected both in nondifferentiated progenitor cells and in neurons, while the mature form of NR2B subunit protein appeared only at the time of neuronal process elongation. Despite the early presence of NR1 and NR2A subunits, NMDA-evoked responses could be detected in NE-4C neurons only after the sixth day of induction, coinciding in time with the expression of the mature NR2B subunit. The formation of functional NMDA receptors also coincided with the appearance of synapsin I and synaptophysin. The lag period between the production of the subunits and the onset of channel function suggests that subunits capable of channel formation cannot form functional NMDA receptors until a certain stage of neuronal commitment. Thus, the in vitro neurogenesis by NE-4C cells provides a suitable tool to investigate some inherent regulatory processes involved in the initial maturation of NMDA receptor complexes. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. NSs Virulence Factor of Rift Valley Fever Virus Engages the F-Box Proteins FBXW11 and β-TRCP1 To Degrade the Antiviral Protein Kinase PKR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, Markus; Lau, Simone; Samuel, Charles E; Hornung, Veit; Weber, Friedemann

    2016-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is a relevant pathogen of both humans and livestock in Africa. The nonstructural protein NSs is a major virulence factor known to suppress the type I interferon (IFN) response by inhibiting host cell transcription and by proteasomal degradation of a major antiviral IFN effector, the translation-inhibiting protein kinase PKR. Here, we identified components of the modular SCF (Skp1, Cul1, F-box protein)-type E3 ubiquitin ligases as mediators of PKR destruction by NSs. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the conserved SCF subunit Skp1 protected PKR from NSs-mediated degradation. Consequently, RVFV replication was severely reduced in Skp1-depleted cells when PKR was present. SCF complexes have a variable F-box protein subunit that determines substrate specificity for ubiquitination. We performed an siRNA screen for all (about 70) human F-box proteins and found FBXW11 to be involved in PKR degradation. The partial stabilization of PKR by FBXW11 depletion upregulated PKR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the PKR substrate eIF2α and caused a shutoff of host cell protein synthesis in RVFV-infected cells. To maximally protect PKR from the action of NSs, knockdown of structurally and functionally related FBXW1 (also known as β-TRCP1), in addition to FBXW11 deletion, was necessary. Consequently, NSs was found to interact with both FBXW11 and β-TRCP1. Thus, NSs eliminates the antiviral kinase PKR by recruitment of SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligases containing FBXW11 and β-TRCP1 as substrate recognition subunits. This antagonism of PKR by NSs is essential for efficient RVFV replication in mammalian cells. Rift Valley fever virus is a pathogen of humans and animals that has the potential to spread from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula to other regions. A major virulence mechanism is the proteasomal degradation of the antiviral kinase PKR by the viral protein NSs. Here, we demonstrate that NSs

  4. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF. PMID:26664257

  5. Effect of glutenin subunits on the baking quality of Brazilian wheat genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Mariana Souza; Scholz, Maria Brígida dos Santos; Miranda, Martha Zavariz; Franco, Célia Maria Landi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the high and low molecular weight glutenin subunits on the grain traits of sixteen Brazilian wheat genotypes. Grain hardness index, milling traits, physicochemical and rheological properties of the flour, and specific volume and firmness of the bread were evaluated. Physicochemical properties of the flour were not influenced by glutenin subunits. Genotypes with subunits at the Glu-B1 (17+18 or 7+8), Glu-D1 (5+10), and Glu-A3 (b) were associa...

  6. Inhibition of herpesvirus and influenza virus replication by blocking polymerase subunit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palù, Giorgio; Loregian, Arianna

    2013-09-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a key role in many biological processes, including virus replication in the host cell. Since most of the PPIs are functionally essential, a possible strategy to inhibit virus replication is based on the disruption of viral protein complexes by peptides or small molecules that interfere with subunit interactions. In particular, an attractive target for antiviral drugs is the binding between the subunits of essential viral enzymes. This review describes the development of new antiviral compounds that inhibit herpesvirus and influenza virus replication by blocking interactions between subunit proteins of their polymerase complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Side-effects of protein kinase inhibitors on ion channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... with aberrant kinase activity, including cancers, arthritis and cardiovascular disorders. Several strategies .... family, the β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK), the ribosomal S6 ..... urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. While no ...

  8. Creatine kinase activity is associated with blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brewster, Lizzy M.; Mairuhu, Gideon; Bindraban, Navin R.; Koopmans, Richard P.; Clark, Joseph F.; van Montfrans, Gert A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously hypothesized that high activity of creatine kinase, the central regulatory enzyme of energy metabolism, facilitates the development of high blood pressure. Creatine kinase rapidly provides adenosine triphosphate to highly energy-demanding processes, including cardiovascular

  9. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, N.E.; Clausen, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 angstrom resolution...

  10. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases in mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada-Reisch, Ann

    2004-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of mitochondrial disorders, manifested by a decreased mtDNA copy number and respiratory chain dysfunction. Primary MDS are inherited autosomally and may affect a single organ or multiple tissues. Mutated mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside kinases; deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) and thymidine kinase 2 (TK2), were associated with the hepatocerebral and myopathic forms of MDS respectively. dGK and TK2 are key enzymes in the mitochondrial nucleotide salvage pathway, providing the mitochondria with deoxyribonucleotides (dNP) essential for mtDNA synthesis. Although the mitochondrial dNP pool is physically separated from the cytosolic one, dNP's may still be imported through specific transport. Non-replicating tissues, where cytosolic dNP supply is down regulated, are thus particularly vulnerable to dGK and TK2 deficiency. The overlapping substrate specificity of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) may explain the relative sparing of muscle in dGK deficiency, while low basal TK2 activity render this tissue susceptible to TK2 deficiency. The precise pathophysiological mechanisms of mtDNA depletion due to dGK and TK2 deficiencies remain to be determined, though recent findings confirm that it is attributed to imbalanced dNTP pools.

  11. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    current barriers of kinase inhibitors, including poor selectivity and emergence of drug resistance. In spite of the small number of identified allosteric inhibitors in comparison with that of inhibitors targeting the ATP pocket, encouraging results, such as the FDA-approval of the first small...

  12. Plant PA signaling via diacylglycerol kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arisz, S.A.; Testerink, C.; Munnik, T.

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a pivotal role in the plant's response to environmental signals. Besides phospholipase D (PLD) activity, PA can also be generated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK). To establish which metabolic route is activated, a differential

  13. Nonorthologous gene displacement of phosphomevalonate kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, S. M.; Waterham, H. R.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK; EC 2.7.4.2) catalyzes the phosphorylation of 5-phosphomevalonate into 5-diphosphomevalonate, an essential step in isoprenoid biosynthesis via the mevalonate pathway. So far, two nonorthologous genes encoding PMK have been described, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ERG8

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... CD44, an adhesion molecule, has been reported to be a binding site for ... receptors in mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. ... surface expression and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, ... Abbreviations used: Abs, antibodies; ANOVA, analysis of variance; AP-1, activator protein -1; BCG, ...

  15. Kinase-Centric Computational Drug Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Volkamer, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Kinases are among the most studied drug targets in industry and academia, due to their involvement in a majority of cellular processes and, upon dysregulation, in a variety of diseases including cancer, inflammation, and autoimmune disorders. The high interest in this druggable protein family

  16. Kinases involved in Rec8 phosphorylation revealed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anger, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 14 (2010), s. 2708-2708 ISSN 1538-4101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : kinases * Rec8 * meisosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.999, year: 2010

  17. Gene regulation by MAP kinase cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signaling modules that transduce extracellular stimuli to a range of cellular responses. Research in yeast and metazoans has shown that MAPK-mediated phosphorylation directly or indirectly regulates the activity of transcription factors. Plant ...

  18. Preparation of kinase-biased compounds in the search for lead inhibitors of kinase targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Justine Y Q; Langston, Steven; Adams, Ruth; Beevers, Rebekah E; Boyce, Richard; Burckhardt, Svenja; Cobb, James; Ferguson, Yvonne; Figueroa, Eva; Grimster, Neil; Henry, Andrew H; Khan, Nawaz; Jenkins, Kerry; Jones, Mark W; Judkins, Robert; Major, Jeremy; Masood, Abid; Nally, James; Payne, Helen; Payne, Lloyd; Raphy, Gilles; Raynham, Tony; Reader, John; Reader, Valérie; Reid, Alison; Ruprah, Parminder; Shaw, Michael; Sore, Hannah; Stirling, Matthew; Talbot, Adam; Taylor, Jess; Thompson, Stephen; Wada, Hiroki; Walker, David

    2005-05-01

    This work describes the preparation of approximately 13,000 compounds for rapid identification of hits in high-throughput screening (HTS). These compounds were designed as potential serine/threonine or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The library consists of various scaffolds, e.g., purines, oxindoles, and imidazoles, whereby each core scaffold generally includes the hydrogen bond acceptor/donor properties known to be important for kinase binding. Several of these are based upon literature kinase templates, or adaptations of them to provide novelty. The routes to their preparation are outlined. A variety of automation techniques were used to prepare >500 compounds per scaffold. Where applicable, scavenger resins were employed to remove excess reagents and when necessary, preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for purification. These compounds were screened against an 'in-house' kinase panel. The success rate in HTS was significantly higher than the corporate compound collection. Copyright (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Kinase detection with gallium nitride based high electron mobility transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Matthew S; Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Arellano, Consuelo; Xie, Jinqiao; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-07-01

    A label-free kinase detection system was fabricated by the adsorption of gold nanoparticles functionalized with kinase inhibitor onto AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The HEMTs were operated near threshold voltage due to the greatest sensitivity in this operational region. The Au NP/HEMT biosensor system electrically detected 1 pM SRC kinase in ionic solutions. These results are pertinent to drug development applications associated with kinase sensing.

  20. Diversity, classification and function of the plant protein kinase superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases belong to a large superfamily with hundreds to thousands of copies and are components of essentially all cellular functions. The goals of this study are to classify protein kinases from 25 plant species and to assess their evolutionary history in conjunction with consideration of their molecular functions. The protein kinase superfamily has expanded in the flowering plant lineage, in part through recent duplications. As a result, the flowering plant protein kinase r...

  1. P. berghei telomerase subunit TERT is essential for parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka A Religa

    Full Text Available Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA, though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼ 950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert- mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further

  2. Molecular cloning of the α subunit of human and guinea pig leukocyte adhesion glycoprotein Mo1: Chromosomal localization and homology to the α subunits of integrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaout, M.A.; Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Pierce, M.W.; Harris, P.; Tenen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface-glycoprotein Mo1 is a member of the family of leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (Leu-CAMs) that includes lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and p150,95. Each Leu-CAM is a heterodimer with a distinct α subunit noncovalently associated with a common β subunit. The authors describe the isolation and analysis of two partial cDNA clones encoding the α subunit of the Leu-CAM Mo1 in humans and guinea pigs. A monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the guinea pig α chain was used for immunoscreening a λgt11 expression library. The sequence of a 378-base-pair insert from one immunoreactive clone revealed a single continuous open reading frame encoding 126 amino acids including a 26-amino acid tryptic peptide isolated from the purified guinea pig α subunit. A cDNA clone of identical size was isolated from a human monocyte/lymphocyte cDNA library by using the guinea pig clone as a probe. The human clone also encoded a 126-amino acid peptide including the sequence of an additional tryptic peptide present in purified human Mo1α chain. Southern analysis of DNA from hamster-human hybrids localized the human Mo1α chain to chromosome 16, which has been shown to contain the gene for the α chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1. These data suggest that the α subunits of Leu-CAMs evolved by gene duplication from a common ancestral gene and strengthen the hypothesis that the α subunits of these heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules on myeloid and lymphoid cells, platelets, and fibroblasts are evolutionary related

  3. p21-activated Kinase1(PAK1) can promote ERK activation in a kinase independent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Fu, Meng; Wang, Lifeng

    2013-01-01

    204) although phosphorylation of b-Raf (Ser445) and c-Raf (Ser 338) remained unchanged. Furthermore, increased activation of the PAK1 activator Rac1 induced the formation of a triple complex of Rac1, PAK1 and Mek1, independent of the kinase activity of PAK1. These data suggest that PAK1 can stimulate...... MEK activity in a kinase independent manner, probably by serving as a scaffold to facilitate interaction of c-Raf....

  4. The Roles of Protein Kinases in Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Karl Peter; Mizuno, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, more than 250 protein kinases are expressed, but only a few of these kinases are currently known to enable learning and memory. Based on this information it appears that learning and memory-related kinases either impact on synaptic transmission by altering ion channel properties or ion channel density, or regulate…

  5. Epac Signaling Is Required for Cocaine-Induced Change in AMPA Receptor Subunit Composition in the Ventral Tegmental Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Chen, Yao; Tong, Jiaqing; Reynolds, Ashley M; Proudfoot, Sarah C; Qi, Jinshun; Penzes, Peter; Lu, Youming; Liu, Qing-Song

    2016-04-27

    Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) and protein kinase A (PKA) are intracellular receptors for cAMP. Although PKA and its downstream effectors have been studied extensively in the context of drug addiction, whether and how Epac regulates cellular and behavioral effects of drugs of abuse remain essentially unknown. Epac is known to regulate AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking. Previous studies have shown that a single cocaine exposure in vivo leads to an increase in GluA2-lacking AMPARs in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). We tested the hypothesis that Epac mediates cocaine-induced changes in AMPAR subunit composition in the VTA. We report that a single cocaine injection in vivo in wild-type mice leads to inward rectification of EPSCs and renders EPSCs sensitive to a GluA2-lacking AMPAR blocker in VTA dopamine neurons. The cocaine-induced increase in GluA2-lacking AMPARs was absent in Epac2-deficient mice but not in Epac1-deficient mice. In addition, activation of Epac with the selective Epac agonist 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP (8-CPT) recapitulated the cocaine-induced increase in GluA2-lacking AMPARs, and the effects of 8-CPT were mediated by Epac2. We also show that conditioned place preference to cocaine was impaired in Epac2-deficient mice and in mice in which Epac2 was knocked down in the VTA but was not significantly altered in Epac1-deficient mice. Together, these results suggest that Epac2 is critically involved in the cocaine-induced change in AMPAR subunit composition and drug-cue associative learning. Addictive drugs, such as cocaine, induce long-lasting adaptions in the reward circuits of the brain. A single intraperitoneal injection of cocaine leads to changes in the composition and property of the AMPAR that carries excitatory inputs to dopamine neurons. Here, we provide evidence that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a cAMP sensor protein, is required for the cocaine-induced changes of the AMPAR. We found that the

  6. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  7. Kinase impact assessment in the landscape of fusion genes that retain kinase domains: a pan-cancer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pora; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Assessing the impact of kinase in gene fusion is essential for both identifying driver fusion genes (FGs) and developing molecular targeted therapies. Kinase domain retention is a crucial factor in kinase fusion genes (KFGs), but such a systematic investigation has not been done yet. To this end, we analyzed kinase domain retention (KDR) status in chimeric protein sequences of 914 KFGs covering 312 kinases across 13 major cancer types. Based on 171 kinase domain-retained KFGs including 101 kinases, we studied their recurrence, kinase groups, fusion partners, exon-based expression depth, short DNA motifs around the break points and networks. Our results, such as more KDR than 5′-kinase fusion genes, combinatorial effects between 3′-KDR kinases and their 5′-partners and a signal transduction-specific DNA sequence motif in the break point intronic sequences, supported positive selection on 3′-kinase fusion genes in cancer. We introduced a degree-of-frequency (DoF) score to measure the possible number of KFGs of a kinase. Interestingly, kinases with high DoF scores tended to undergo strong gene expression alteration at the break points. Furthermore, our KDR gene fusion network analysis revealed six of the seven kinases with the highest DoF scores (ALK, BRAF, MET, NTRK1, NTRK3 and RET) were all observed in thyroid carcinoma. Finally, we summarized common features of ‘effective’ (highly recurrent) kinases in gene fusions such as expression alteration at break point, redundant usage in multiple cancer types and 3′-location tendency. Collectively, our findings are useful for prioritizing driver kinases and FGs and provided insights into KFGs’ clinical implications. PMID:28013235

  8. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) Subunit of the Iejimalides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendlik, Matthew T.; Cottard, Muriel; Rein, Tobias

    1997-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) subunit of the iejimalides has been accomplished through a combination of an asymmetric Homer-Wadsworth-Emmons condensation and a chiral pool approach. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  9. Identification of a conserved archaeal RNA polymerase subunit contacted by the basal transcription factor TFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, C P; Jackson, S P; Bell, S D

    2001-12-14

    Archaea possess two general transcription factors that are required to recruit RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoters in vitro. These are TBP, the TATA-box-binding protein and TFB, the archaeal homologue of TFIIB. Thus, the archaeal and eucaryal transcription machineries are fundamentally related. In both RNAP II and archaeal transcription systems, direct contacts between TFB/TFIIB and the RNAP have been demonstrated to mediate recruitment of the polymerase to the promoter. However the subunit(s) directly contacted by these factors has not been identified. Using systematic yeast two-hybrid and biochemical analyses we have identified an interaction between the N-terminal domain of TFB and an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoK. Intriguingly, homologues of RpoK are found in all three nuclear RNA polymerases (Rpb6) and also in the bacterial RNA polymerase (omega-subunit).

  10. Subunit architecture and functional modular rearrangements of the transcriptional mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Tomomori-Sato, Chieri; Sato, Shigeo; Conaway, Ronald C; Conaway, Joan W; Asturias, Francisco J

    2014-06-05

    The multisubunit Mediator, comprising ∼30 distinct proteins, plays an essential role in gene expression regulation by acting as a bridge between DNA-binding transcription factors and the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription machinery. Efforts to uncover the Mediator mechanism have been hindered by a poor understanding of its structure, subunit organization, and conformational rearrangements. By overcoming biochemical and image analysis hurdles, we obtained accurate EM structures of yeast and human Mediators. Subunit localization experiments, docking of partial X-ray structures, and biochemical analyses resulted in comprehensive mapping of yeast Mediator subunits and a complete reinterpretation of our previous Mediator organization model. Large-scale Mediator rearrangements depend on changes at the interfaces between previously described Mediator modules, which appear to be facilitated by factors conducive to transcription initiation. Conservation across eukaryotes of Mediator structure, subunit organization, and RNA polymerase II interaction suggest conservation of fundamental aspects of the Mediator mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  12. Two subunits of human ORC are dispensable for DNA replication and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Etsuko; Kiran, Manjari; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Singh, Samarendra; Kiran, Shashi; Dutta, Anindya

    2016-12-01

    The six-subunit Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) is believed to be an essential eukaryotic ATPase that binds to origins of replication as a ring-shaped heterohexamer to load MCM2-7 and initiate DNA replication. We have discovered that human cell lines in culture proliferate with intact chromosomal origins of replication after disruption of both alleles of ORC2 or of the ATPase subunit, ORC1 . The ORC1 or ORC2 -depleted cells replicate with decreased chromatin loading of MCM2-7 and become critically dependent on another ATPase, CDC6, for survival and DNA replication. Thus, either the ORC ring lacking a subunit, even its ATPase subunit, can load enough MCM2-7 in partnership with CDC6 to initiate DNA replication, or cells have an ORC-independent, CDC6-dependent mechanism to load MCM2-7 on origins of replication.

  13. Hypoxia Induces Changes in AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activity and Energy Metabolism in Muscle Tissue of the Oriental River Prawn Macrobrachium nipponense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Sun

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia has important effects on biological activity in crustaceans, and modulation of energy metabolism is a crucial aspect of crustaceans’ ability to respond to hypoxia. The adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK enzyme is very important in cellular energy homeostasis; however, little information is known about the role of AMPK in the response of prawns to acute hypoxia. In the present study, three subunits of AMPK were cloned from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense. The full-length cDNAs of the α, β, and γ AMPK subunits were 1,837, 3,174, and 3,773 bp long, with open reading frames of 529, 289, and 961 amino acids, respectively. Primary amino acid sequence alignment of these three subunits revealed conserved similarity between the functional domains of the M. nipponense AMPK protein with AMPK proteins of other animals. The expression of the three AMPK subunits was higher in muscle tissue than in other tissues. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of AMPKα, AMPKβ, and AMPKγ were significantly up-regulated in M. nipponense muscle tissue after acute hypoxia. Probing with a phospho-AMPKα antibody revealed that AMPK is phosphorylated following hypoxia; this phosphorylation event was found to be essential for AMPK activation. Levels of glucose and lactic acid in hemolymph and muscle tissue were significantly changed over the course of hypoxia and recovery, indicating dynamic changes in energy metabolism in response to hypoxic stress. The activation of AMPK by hypoxic stress in M. nipponense was compared to levels of muscular AMP, ADP, and ATP, as determined by HPLC; it was found that activation of AMPK may not completely correlate with AMP:ATP ratios in prawns under hypoxic conditions. These findings confirm that the α, β, and γ subunits of the prawn AMPK protein are regulated at the transcriptional and protein levels during hypoxic stress to facilitate maintenance of energy homeostasis.

  14. CK2: a protein kinase in need of control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Boldyreff, B; Sarno, S

    1999-01-01

    that are responsible for the recognition of phosphoacceptor substrates and for down-regulation by the beta-subunit and by polyanionic inhibitors. The resolution of the crystal structure of Zea mays CK2 alpha-subunit has disclosed the structural features that are responsible for high basal activity and for unusual...

  15. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Oxazolidinone Antibiotic Linezolid Bound to the 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito,J.; Kanyo, Z.; Wang, D.; Franceschi, F.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.; Duffy, E.

    2008-01-01

    The oxazolidinone antibacterials target the 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes. To gain insight into their mechanism of action, the crystal structure of the canonical oxazolidinone, linezolid, has been determined bound to the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. Linezolid binds the 50S A-site, near the catalytic center, which suggests that inhibition involves competition with incoming A-site substrates. These results provide a structural basis for the discovery of improved oxazolidinones active against emerging drug-resistant clinical strains.

  17. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Yolima P.; Granados, Sara T.; Latorre, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM) and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BK) is unique among the superfamily of K+ channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K+ channels) and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K+ conductance domains (RCK domains), where the Ca2+-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3, and β4) and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous, and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above. PMID:25346693

  18. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolima P. Torres

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca+2-activated K+ channel (BK is unique among the superfamily of K+ channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K+ channels and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K+ conductance domains (RCK domains, where the Ca2+-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3 & β4 and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca+2 sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above.

  19. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Yolima P; Granados, Sara T; Latorre, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM) and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK) is unique among the superfamily of K(+) channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K(+) channels) and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K(+) conductance domains (RCK domains), where the Ca(2+)-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3, and β4) and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca(2+) sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous, and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: subunit structure, functional binding sites, and ion transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.A.; Dunn, S.M.J.; Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Middlemas, D.S.; Crawford, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been highly conserved during animal evolution, and in all the species and tissues studied so far, including mammals, it is a pseudosymmetric, pentameric complex of related subunits with very similar physical properties. All subunits of these nicotinic receptors were derived from a common ancestral gene, probably by way of gene duplications occurring very early in animal evolution. 45 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs