WorldWideScience

Sample records for kathryn deibler jeannine

  1. Kathryn Toure | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    Kathryn Toure started her career in New York City in refugee resettlement before working for the Centre for International and Comparative Studies at the University of Iowa. She moved to West Africa where she worked with Africa Online, the Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa, and eventually as ...

  2. EL NIÑO Queer 0 CRECER OBLICUAMENTE EN EL SIGLO VEINTE, POR KATHRYN BOND STOCKTON

    Cortés, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    The Queer Child, por Kathryn Bond se sitúa en un lugar incómodo entre las teorías de género y las de la infancia. Ha sido criticado por no ajustarse a las formas tradicionales de acercarse a los estudios de la infancia, y mal comprendido como una defensa de que todos los niños son homosexuales. La aproximación de Bond Stockton no es histórica ni psicológica, sino que se sitúa en el ámbito más amplio y difuso de la teoría-crítica y los estudios culturales. Desde allí, pretende descubrir los im...

  3. Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

  4. The construction of gender in Estonian school textbooks / Jeannine Richards

    Richards, Jeannine

    2001-01-01

    Uurimusest, mille eesmärgiks oli analüüsida nais- ja meessoo kujutamist inglise keele õpikus. Vaadeldavaks õpikuks on : Sotter, Ingrid ; Vahtra, Leida. English : step five. 5th print.- Tallinn : Koolibri, 1997

  5. Teaching more than english? : Gender roles in english language textbooks / Jeannine Richards

    Richards, Jeannine

    2002-01-01

    Artiklis analüüsitakse soorolle inglise keele õpikutes "TipTop 5. Student's book" (S. Rixon, J. Moates. London; Basingstoke: Macmillan. Tallinn: Koolibri, 1996) ja "English Step 5" (I. Sotter, L. Vahtra. Tallinn: Koolibri, 1997)

  6. Dictionary Unit for South African English, headed by Kathryn ...

    Information Technology

    It is testimony to the enduring success of the work ... The lexicographical work from the unit ... On a point of etymology, we learn from the entry on spam that it ... I remember the effectivenesss of a recent women's magazine's headline debat- ... the mines were founded in Natal and to a lesser extent, the eastern Cape (Mes-.

  7. Kathryn Touré | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    Carrières · Communiquez avec nous · Plan du site. Abonnez-vous à notre bulletin pour recevoir les nouvelles du CRDI chaque mois. Abonnez-vous · Droits d'auteur · Éthique de la recherche · Politique de libre accès · Politique de confidentialité · Transparence · Utilisation du site Web. Suivez-nous; Facebook · Twitter ...

  8. Reality check for rosy view of convergence / Kathryn Tully

    Tully, Kathryn

    2002-01-01

    Ülevaade EL-i kandidaatriikide aktsiaturgude arengust ja EL-iga liitumise edasilükkumisest tulenevatest ohtudest välisinvesteeringutele. Lisa. Tabelid ja skeem: kandidaatriikide EL-i ja Euroopa Rahaliiduga liitumise tõenäosus %-des jaanuar 2004-2007; kandidaatriikide poolt välisvaluutas välja antud võlakirjad jaanuar-august 2002; võimalikud takistused EL-i laienemise ajakavale

  9. An interview with Patrick Tam by Kathryn Senior.

    Tam, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    Patrick Tam's research is focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of body patterning during mouse development. He agreed to be interviewed by Development to talk about his interest in mouse development, new concepts in gastrulation, X-linked diseases and his dream of an African safari.

  10. The application of business models to medical research: interviews with two founders of directed-philanthropy foundations. Interview with Scott Johnson and Don Listwin by Kathryn A. Phillips.

    Scott, Johnson; Listwin, Don

    2007-01-01

    A new trend in research funding has emerged: directed philanthropy, in which the donor plays an active, hands-on role in managing the research by applying a "business model." Although such efforts now represent only a small portion of foundation funding, they have potentially far-reaching implications because (1) the approach of using a business model is being applied more broadly and (2) the success or failure of these efforts may portend the fate of larger translational efforts. The author conducted interviews with Scott Johnson of the Myelin Repair Foundation and Don Listwin of the Canary Foundation in the fall of 2006.

  11. The CMS team celebrates the arrival of the "Tube". From left to right, sitting: Blanca Perea Solano, Jeannine Muffat-Joly, Ariella Cattai (Tracker Technical Coordinator). Standing: Georges Roiron, Hans Postema, Eric Albert, Paolo Petagna, Arvid Larsson, Nuno Bernardino Rodrigues, Enzo Carrone, Jack Hill.

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    CMS: Aerospace goes underground : gleaming aluminium on the outside and carbon black on the inside, as long as a sedan and taller than a man, a strange hollow cylinder arrived at CERN by truck August 26.

  12. 75 FR 10259 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    2010-03-05

    ... Pasteuria Bioscience Incorporated, 12085 Research Drive, Suite 185, Alachua, FL 32615). Active Ingredient: Pasteuria usgae. Proposed Uses: Strawberries. Contact: Jeannine Kausch, (703) 347-8920, [email protected

  13. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... blind.” News & Events Events Calendar ... Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  14. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... blind.” News & Events Events Calendar ... Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  15. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... blind.” News & Events Events Calendar ... Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  16. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... blind.” News & Events Events Calendar ... Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  17. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... blind.” News & Events Events Calendar ... Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  18. 78 FR 3422 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    2013-01-16

    ... included in any currently registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide.... Box 667, Ames, IA 50010. Active Ingredient: Trichoderma fertile strain JM41R at 96.0%. Product Type: Fungicide. Proposed Use: Manufacturing use. Contact: Jeannine Kausch, (703) 347-8920, email address: kausch...

  19. Proposed Closure of Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina

    1990-07-01

    royal fern (Osmunda regalis), poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), and cane (Arundinaria gigantea). Common vines are yellow jasmine (Gelsemium... Ledbetter , Major, U.S. Air Force, Attorney, AFRCE-BMS/DES B.S., 1973, Mathematics, University of Georgia. Athens M.A., 1978, 1 ublic Administration...Richard Garthe F. Lee Howell Murray Geddes Sharon F. Howell Peggy J. Geddes Gary Hoyve Fred G. Gerty Greg Hucks C-5 Jeannine Hucks Jessie R. Lee Lacy K

  20. Cognitive Changes in Presymptomatic Parkinson’s Disease

    2006-09-01

    Society, 8(2), 203) Hillier, A, Beversdorf, D.Q., Raymer , A., Williamson, D.J.G., & Heilman, K.M. Abnormal emotional word ratings in parkinson’s...disease. (submitted). Raymer A, Beversdorf D, Mitchell A, Williamson D, Heilman KM. Emotion word ratings in individuals with Parkinson’s Disease...Rhodes, Robert ; Mielke, Jeannine B. ; Riestra, Alonso ; Womack, Kyle ; Okun, Michael S. ; Reeves, Dennis L. ; Crosson, Bruce ; 1, 2 1, 2 1 1 1 3 1

  1. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ... This website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  2. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ... This website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  3. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ... This website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  4. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  5. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ... This website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  6. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  7. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  8. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  9. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  10. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  11. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ... maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  12. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ... maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  13. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ... maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  14. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ... maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  15. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ... maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  16. Vene allveelaevnikud Hollywoodi filmis / Mart Linnart

    Linnart, Mart, 1962-

    2002-01-01

    USA mängufilm nõukogude allveelaevaga 1991.a. toimunud avariist "K-19 : The Widowmaker" (režissöör Kathryn Bigelow) esilinastus Venemaal Peterburi Mariinski teatris. Osalesid ka avarii läbiteinud veteranid

  17. Naised mõrvarite jälil / Kaisa Karu

    Karu, Kaisa

    2010-01-01

    Kanal 2 ekraanil kaks naispeaosalistega krimisarja : uurija Lilly Rush (Kathryn Morris) sarjas "Jahtunud jälg" (USA, 2003-... ) ja Brenda Leigh Johnson (Kyra Sedgwick) seriaalis "Vahelevõtja" (USA, 2005-... )

  18. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  19. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  20. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  1. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  2. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  3. 78 FR 33146 - Importance of Clear Safety Procedures for Temporary Removal From Service of Highway-Rail Grade...

    2013-06-03

    ... Safety Advisory 2002-01. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: George Hartman, Staff Director, Signal and...., Washington, DC 20590 (phone: 202-493- 6225, email: George.Hartman@dot.gov ), or Kathryn Shelton, Trial...

  4. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  5. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  6. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  7. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  8. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  9. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... NEI Women Scientists Advisory Committee (WSAC) Board of Scientific Counselors National Advisory Eye Council (NAEC) Donating to ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  10. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... NEI Women Scientists Advisory Committee (WSAC) Board of Scientific Counselors National Advisory Eye Council (NAEC) Donating to ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  11. Pop / Mart Kuldkepp

    Kuldkepp, Mart

    2008-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Me, Myself and I "Aastaajad", Madonna "Hard Candy", Kathryn Williams and Neill MacColl "Two", Tindersticks "The Hungry Saw", Joy Division "The Best of Joy Divison", Quiet Village "Silent Movie"

  12. Iron fortification of foods

    Wiemer, Kathryn L; Clydesdale, F. M

    1985-01-01

    ... Massachusetts General Milk, Minneapolis, Inc. Minnesota Nutrition Kathryn L. Wiemer With t h e s u p p o r t of T H E NUTRITION FOUNDATION 1985 ACADEMIC PRESS, I N C . (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich...

  13. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ... Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ...

  14. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ... Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ...

  15. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ... Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ...

  16. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ... Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ...

  17. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ... Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ...

  18. Synthesis of Evidence for Tobacco Taxation Policy Reform in West ...

    Existing evidence shows that tobacco taxation policies, when they make tobacco ... annual conference of McGill's Institute for the Study of International Development. ... In this ROSSA bulletin: Meet Kathryn Toure, the new regional director of ...

  19. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Press Releases News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  20. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... Press Releases News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  1. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... Press Releases News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  2. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... Press Releases News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  3. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... Press Releases News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  4. Review of U.S. Army Aviation Accident Reports: Prevalence of Environmental Stressors and Medical Conditions

    2017-10-18

    terminology related to an aforementioned stressor or medical condition. Table 1 presents the identified operational stressor with the keywords extracted...USAARL Report No. 2018-02 Review of U.S. Army Aviation Accident Reports: Prevalence of Environmental Stressors and Medical Conditions By Kathryn...Environmental Stressors and Medical Conditions N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Feltman, Kathryn A. Kelley, Amanda M. Curry, Ian P. Boudreaux, David A. Milam

  5. Nevezutshaja podlodka / Otari Sarkisjan

    Sarkisjan, Otari

    2004-01-01

    USA mängufilm nõukogude allveelaevaga 1991.a. toimunud avariist "K-19 : The Widowmaker" (režissöör Kathryn Bigelow). Laeval kohe peale avariid töötanud Daniil Titribojan võrdleb tegelikku sündmust ja filmis kujutatut

  6. Filmide auhinnajahi hooaeg jätkub

    2010-01-01

    Ameerika Filmikriitikute Ühing andis aasta parima filmi, lavastaja ja meesnäitleja auhinna režissöör Kathryn Bigelow filmi "Piinakamber" (USA, 2008) tegijatele. Parima naisnäitleja auhinna sai Yolande Moreau rolli eest filmis "Séraphine" (Prantsusmaa-Belgia, 2008), parim stsenaarium oli vendade Coenite filmil "Tõsine mees" (USA, 2009)

  7. "Piinakambri" perenaine / Margit Tõnson

    Tõnson, Margit, 1978-

    2010-01-01

    2009. a. filmiloomingu kuus Oscarit sai Kathryn Bigelow mängufilm "Piinakamber". Selle võiduga on ta esimene naisrežissöör, kes võitnud parima lavastaja auhinna. Sõjafilmist, mille tegevus toimub Iraagis ja mis räägib pommirühma igapäevasest elust

  8. "K-19" vsplõla v Peterburge

    2002-01-01

    USA mängufilm nõukogude allveelaevaga 1991.a. toimunud avariist "K-19 : The Widowmaker" (režissöör Kathryn Bigelow) esilinastus Venemaal Peterburi Mariinski teatris. Osalesid ka avarii läbiteinud veteranid. Artikli lõpus Andrei Plahhovi intervjuu režissööriga

  9. Proceedings 2013: Selected Papers from the Seventeenth College-Wide Conference for Students in Languages, Linguistics & Literature (17th, Honolulu, Hawai'i, April 20, 2013)

    Holdway, Jennifer, Ed.; Wilson, Brittany, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The theme for this year's College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa was "Engaged Language Research and Practice," with the plenary speech given by Dr. Kathryn A. Davis. Following a preface from the editors and plenary speaker highlights, contents of these proceedings include: Section I:…

  10. Modeling indoor air pollution

    Pepper, D. W; Carrington, David B

    2009-01-01

    ... and ventilation from the more popular textbooks and monographs. We wish to especially acknowledge Dr. Xiuling Wang, who diligently converted many of our old FORTRAN codes into MATLAB files, and also developed the COMSOL example files. Also we thank Ms. Kathryn Nelson who developed the website for the book and indoor air quality computer codes. We are grateful to ...

  11. Adamkus encouraged to grant citizenship to U.S. basketball player

    2006-01-01

    Kuigi uus Leedu kodakondsusseaduse muudatus lubab anda Leedu koondises mängivatele välismaa tippsportlastele Leedu kodakondsuse, lükkas president Valdas Adamkus USA korvpalluri Kathryn Douglas'e kodakondsustaotluse tagasi. Sama ka: Adamkus denies U.S. basketball star citizenship//The Baltic Times 2006, 24-30 aug., lk 4

  12. A Haphazard Reading of McHugh and Barlow (2010)

    McHugh, R. Kathryn; Barlow, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Replies to comments on Do haphazard reviews provide sound directions for dissemination efforts? by Eileen Gambrill and Julia H. Littell on the current authors' article The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments: A review of current efforts by Kathryn R. McHugh and David H. Barlow. In their commentary, Gambrill…

  13. Do Haphazard Reviews Provide Sound Directions for Dissemination Efforts?

    Gambrill, Eileen; Littell, Julia H.

    2010-01-01

    Comments on The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments: A review of current efforts by Kathryn R. McHugh and David H. Barlow. The lead article in the February-March issue by McHugh and Barlow (2010) emphasized the need for "dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments."…

  14. Indiana Jones Punalipulises Põhjamere laevastikus / Jaan Ruus

    Ruus, Jaan, 1938-2017

    2002-01-01

    USA mängufilm nõukogude allveelaevaga 1991.a. toimunud avariist "K-19 : The Widowmaker" (režissöör Kathryn Bigelow) esilinastus Venemaal Peterburi Mariinski teatris. Osalesid ka avarii läbiteinud veteranid. Ka nende ja vene kriitikute hinnanguid

  15. Role of Endogenous Peptides and Enzymes in the Pathogenesis of ...

    1. Michael LS. Relationship between pancreatitis and lung diseases. Respiration Physiology 2001; 128(1): 13–. 16. 2. Scott FG, Yang J, Kathryn B, Krista H, Heather CPK. Epling-Burnette, Yanhua P, James N, Michel MM. Acute Pancreatitis Induces FasL Gene Expression and Apoptosis in the Liver. J Surg Res 2004; 122(2):.

  16. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2* Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue11The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  17. 77 FR 66183 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    2012-11-02

    ..., and Decommissioning of an 150- megawatt Photovoltaic Solar Energy Facility and Generation-Intertie..., Restoration Design Energy Project, Proposed Resource Management Plan Amendments, Identifying Lands Across Arizona Suitable for Renewable Energy Development, AZ, Review Period Ends: 12/03/2012, Contact: Kathryn...

  18. 75 FR 71701 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations of Experts for the Review of a Draft...

    2010-11-24

    ... fluctuation in microbial populations. The EPA Office of the Science Advisor's Risk Assessment Forum has.... Kathryn Gallagher, Executive Director, Risk Assessment Forum, Office of the Science Advisor US EPA, Mail... person or organization may nominate qualified individuals in the areas of expertise described above for...

  19. Blue Ridge Commons: Environmental Activism and Forest History in Western North Carolina

    Poshendra Satyal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Blue Ridge Commons: Environmental Activism and Forest History in Western North Carolina. By Kathryn Newfont. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia Press, 2012. xxiii + 369 pp. US$ 26.95 (paperback, US$ 69.95 (hardcover. ISBN 978-0-8203-4125-5.

  20. Subventions et bourses en faveur de l'égalité des sexes et du ...

    La Seed Alliance repère et encourage les occasions d'étendre l'application des ... In this ROSSA bulletin: Meet Kathryn Toure, the new regional director of IDRC's ... in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

  1. Microfinance and Information and Communication Technologies ...

    Microfinance and Information and Communication Technologies : HIVOS STAR Program (Eastern and Southern Africa) ... Studies. Management information systems for microfinance background to the workshop ... In this ROSSA bulletin: Meet Kathryn Toure, the new regional director of IDRC's sub-Saharan Africa office.

  2. Correction to Hilton et al. (2004)

    Hilton, N. Zoe; Harris, Grant T.; Rice, Marnie E.; Lang, Carol; Cormier, Catherine A.; Lines, Kathryn J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports errors in the article "A Brief Actuarial Assessment for the Prediction of Wife Assault Recidivism: The Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment," by N. Zoe Hilton, Grant T. Harris, Marnie E. Rice, Carol Lang, Catherine A. Cormier, and Kathryn J. Lines (Psychological Assessment, 2004, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 267-275). On page 272,…

  3. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 1, January-February 2008

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Leadership Lessons From Schools Becoming "Data Wise" (Jennifer L. Steele and Kathryn Parker Boudett); (2) A Guide on the Side: Mentors Help New Leaders Prepare for Life in the…

  4. Developing Effective Programs for Special Education Students Who Are Homeless. ERIC Digest #E504.

    Heflin, L. Juane

    This digest, based on a larger document titled, "Homeless and in Need of Special Education," by L. Juane Heflin and Kathryn Rudy, focuses on educational aspects of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act. Briefly discussed are: the effects of homelessness on children (e.g., increased health problems); the educational implications…

  5. Interagency and Multinational Information Sharing Architecture and Solutions (IMISAS) Project

    2012-02-01

    Kristina [Eds.]: Human Factors. Psychologie sicheren Handelns in Risikosituationen. – Heidelberg: Springer Medizin Verlag, 2008. [Badke-Schaub et al...Heinz; Spada, Hans [Eds.]: Wissenspsychologie. – München; Weinheim: Psychologie Verlags Union, 1988. [Smith 2011] Smith, Kathryn (United States...VA. [Ulich/Mayring 1992] Ulich, Dieter; Mayring, Philipp: Psychologie der Emotionen. – Stuttgart et al.: Kohlhammer, 1992. UNCLASSIFIED K-65

  6. Erratum: Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications.

    2016-02-29

    A correction was made to: Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications. There was an error with an author's given name. The author's name was corrected to: Katye M. Fichter from: Kathryn M. Fichter.

  7. Research Article Special Issue

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... BCI is a technology that enables one to connect the brain activities of an ..... [1] Christopher P, Lee S, Kathryn M, Michael S. EPOC-alypse mind controlled car. ... [10] Schachinger D, Schindler K, Kluge T. Automatic reduction of ...

  8. Small Potatoes No More.

    Ries, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Idaho has improved its historically poor career and technical education programs by changing priorities and increasing state support. A large grant from the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation is being used to develop professional-technical academies and to train career and technical teachers. (JOW)

  9. What can Design Bring to Strategy? Designing Thinking as a Tool for Innovation and Change

    Kathryn Best

    2011-01-01

    This publication by Kathryn Best accompanied the Lector’s inauguration as head of the research group Cross-media, Brand, Reputation & Design Management (CBRD) in January 2011. The book outlines current debates around the Creative Industries, business and design education and the place of ’well

  10. 75 FR 28809 - Notice of Request for Public Comment

    2010-05-24

    ... use of genetic technologies and, as warranted, to provide advice on these issues. For more information... Services (HHS) on genetics education and training of health care professionals, public health providers... 301-496- 9839. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kathryn Camp, NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities...

  11. Frederick National Lab Aids Liberian Hospitals Through Project C.U.R.E. | FNLCR Staging

    When Project C.U.R.E.'s much-needed medical supplies and equipment arrive in Liberia, the Frederick National Lab’s Kathryn Kynvin is there to receive and distribute the donations to hospitals who continue to treat survivors of the most recent Ebola

  12. Frederick National Lab Aids Liberian Hospitals Through Project C.U.R.E. | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    When Project C.U.R.E.'s much-needed medical supplies and equipment arrive in Liberia, the Frederick National Lab’s Kathryn Kynvin is there to receive and distribute the donations to hospitals who continue to treat survivors of the most recent Ebola

  13. Development and Verification of Body Armor Target Geometry Created Using Computed Tomography Scans

    2017-07-13

    Computed Tomography Scans by Autumn R Kulaga, Kathryn L Loftis, and Eric Murray Approved for public release; distribution is...Army Research Laboratory Development and Verification of Body Armor Target Geometry Created Using Computed Tomography Scans by Autumn R Kulaga...Development and Verification of Body Armor Target Geometry Created Using Computed Tomography Scans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  14. STEM | News

    Women's Initiative is starting a grassroots effort to publish profiles of the lab's women employees : experimental physicist March 19, 2018 | Fermilab As a child, Kirsty Duffy learned about the smallest building one to share it with the world. Bring a folding chair March 6, 2018 | Kathryn Jepsen National Society

  15. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  16. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  17. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  18. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  19. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  20. Making a difference through veterinary public health.

    2016-06-11

    More than 100 people gathered in Birmingham on April 23 for the third joint conference of the Veterinary Public Health Association and the Association of Government Vets. With the theme of 'VPH hands on - making a difference together', the meeting considered the role vets play in society through their work on public health and sustainability. Kathryn Clark reports. British Veterinary Association.

  1. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  2. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  3. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ... Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  4. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  5. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  6. "Feminist" Teaching/Teaching "Feminism"

    Carillo, Ellen C.

    2007-01-01

    The stakes are high for feminist teachers. Susan A. Basow, Nancy T. Silberg, Kathryn Duncan, Michael Stasio, and others have reported disturbing findings regarding the discrepancy between student evaluations of male professors and female professors. Professors who have identified themselves as feminists or committed to practicing feminist…

  7. Reviews | Feinauer | Lexikos

    Jonathan Crowther (Editor), Kathryn Kavanagh (Assistant Editor) and. Michael Ashby (Phonetics Editor). Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English, 5th edition· (New International Students' Edition) 1995, x + 1428 pp. ISBN 0-19-431423-5. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Price R54,95.

  8. Florida Language, Speech and Hearing Association Journal, 1994.

    Langhans, Joseph J., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This annual volume is an annual compilation of articles that address evaluation, treatment, efficacy, and credentialing, and a synopsis of programs that provide speech, language, hearing, and swallowing services. Featured articles include: (1) "Verification of Credentials and Privileging Review" (Kathryn W. Enchelmayer); (2) "The…

  9. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  10. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  11. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  12. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  13. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  14. About the Eye

    Full Text Available ... blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” ... DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  15. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” ... DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  16. The Visual System

    Full Text Available ... blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” ... DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  17. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Full Text Available ... blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” ... DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  18. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Full Text Available ... blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” ... DeMott, Media Relations Kathryn.DeMott@nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ...

  19. ROSSA's newsletter - January 2018 | IDRC - International ...

    2018-01-22

    Jan 22, 2018 ... In this ROSSA bulletin: Meet Kathryn Toure, the new regional director of ... of dried insect products as livestock feed in fish and poultry production. ... the Developing World (OWSD), IDRC is pleased to announce that the ... change and adaptive water management: Innovative solutions from the Global South”.

  20. Taxation of Tobacco Products in West Africa | CRDI - Centre de ...

    22 déc. 2011 ... Taxation of Tobacco Products in West Africa. In December 2007, Research for International Tobacco Control (RITC) undertook an ... Dans ce bulletin du BRAS: Faites connaissance avec Kathryn Touré, la nouvelle directrice ...

  1. Centre for Environmental Economics and Policy in Africa | Page 2 ...

    ... in Africa : an analysis of the efficacy of fuel taxation for pollution control in South Africa ... de l'Institut d'étude du développement international de l'Université McGill ... Dans ce bulletin du BRAS: Faites connaissance avec Kathryn Touré, ...

  2. Des solutions fiscales pour une réduction optimale du tabagisme en ...

    Centre de recherches pour le développement international Gouvernement du Canada ... taxation du tabac, l¿insuffisance de données probantes locales constitue ... de taxes sur les recettes fiscales de leur gouvernement et sur la santé publique, et de ... Dans ce bulletin du BRAS: Faites connaissance avec Kathryn Touré, ...

  3. Regional Synthesis and Dissemination of Research Results in ...

    Over the past five years, IDRC's Rural Poverty and Environment (RPE) program initiative has funded a number of projects in eastern and southern Africa. While these projects have ... newsletter - January 2018. In this ROSSA bulletin: Meet Kathryn Toure, the new regional director of IDRC's sub-Saharan Africa office.

  4. Helping for Change

    Neuringer, Allen; Oleson, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    In "Helping for Change," Allen Neuringer and Kathryn Oleson describe another strategy that individuals can use to achieve their green goals. You might ask, "How can helping someone else help me change when I'm in the habit of not fulfilling my own promises?" The authors answer that question by explaining how the social reinforcement in a helping…

  5. Research in karst aquifers developed in high-mountain areas combining KARSYS models with springs discharge records. Picos de Europa, Spain

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Meléndez, Mónica; Malard, Arnauld; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Heredia, Nemesio; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; García-Sansegundo, Joaquín

    2014-05-01

    The study of karst aquifers developed in high-mountain areas is quite complex since the application of many techniques of hydrogeology in these areas is difficult, expensive, and requires many hours of field work. In addition, the access to the study area is usually conditioned by the orography and the meteorological conditions. A pragmatic approach to study these aquifers can be the combination of geometric models of the aquifer with the monitoring of the discharge rate of springs and the meteorological records. KARSYS approach (Jeannin et al. 2013) allows us to elaborate a geometric model of karst aquifers establishing the boundaries of the groundwater bodies, the main drainage axes and providing evidences of the catchment delineation of the springs. The aim of this work is to analyse the functioning of the karst aquifer from the western and central part of the Picos de Europa Mountains (Spain) combining the KARSYS approach, the discharge record from two springs and the meteorological records (rain, snow and temperature). The Picos de Europa (North Spain) is a high-mountains area up to 2.6 km altitude with 2,500 mm/year of precipitations. The highest part of these mountains is covered by snow four to seven months a year. The karst aquifer is developed in Carboniferous limestone which is strongly compartmentalized in, at least, 17 groundwater bodies. The method of work includes: 1) the elaboration of a hydrogeological 3D model of the geometry of the karst aquifers by KARSYS approach, 2) the definition of the springs catchment areas based on the hydrogeological 3D model, 3) the selection of two representative springs emerging from the aquifers to study it, 4) the continuous monitoring of water levels in two karst springs since October 2013, 5) the transformation of the water level values to flow values using height-stream relation curves constructed by measures of the spring discharge, and 5) the comparison of the spring discharge rate records and meteorological

  6. The Limits of Fair Use in Military Scholarship: When, How, and From Whom to Request Permission to Use Copyrighted Works

    2010-01-01

    69 J. AIR L. & COM. 743 (2004) (citing a popular song performed by the Beatles ). 152 E.g., Emily Kathryn Taylor, Note, Infringicus Maximus! An...16 JANUARY 2010 • THE ARMY LAWYER • DA PAM 27-50-440 The Limits of Fair Use in Military Scholarship: When, How, and From Whom to Request...throughout the military.1 Specialty journals, such as The Army Lawyer, and the Military, Naval, and Air Force Law Reviews (combined military publications

  7. STS-49 crew in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) during simulation

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers participate in a simulation in JSC's Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEH) and seated on the FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, MS Kathryn C. Thornton, and MS Pierre J. Thuot.

  8. Libraries: A Vision for the 90’s and Beyond. Proceedings of the Military Librarians Workshop (34th Annual), October 9-12, 1990

    1991-01-08

    University, is such a system. MDX diagnoses tho existence and cause of the liver syndrome known as "cholestasis." It banieo Its diagnosis on patient history...and Gretchen Cheung. Nonvoting members present were: Marcia Hanna and Paul Klinefelter . Also present were: Gary Walter, Kathryn Marshall, James Byrn... Klinefelter who is optimistic that the project can be renlized. All past Hosts of MLW should be contacted for their memoirs. It was hoped to publish

  9. Role of nutrition in performance enhancement and postexercise recovery

    Beck, Kathryn L; Thomson, Jasmine S; Swift, Richard J; von Hurst, Pamela R

    2015-01-01

    Kathryn L Beck,1 Jasmine S Thomson,2 Richard J Swift,1 Pamela R von Hurst11School of Food and Nutrition, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, College of Health, Massey University Albany, Auckland, 2School of Food and Nutrition, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, College of Health, Massey University Manawatu, Palmerston North, New ZealandAbstract: A number of factors contribute to success in sport, and diet is a key component. An athlete's dietary requirements...

  10. Literary representations of death, dying and bereavement in children´s literature

    Schroth, Klara Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Death, dying and bereavement are universal human concerns and yet never fully compre-hensible or knowable. In order to find an approach to the topic, this paper examines and analyses literary representations of death, dying and bereavement in Anglophone literature for children. Scholars such as Kathryn James or Roberta Seelinger Trites have argued for a shift from objective and realistic representations in pre-1980 children’s novels towards an increasing use of narrative devices and fantastic...

  11. Modified Bayesian Kriging for Noisy Response Problems for Reliability Analysis

    2015-01-01

    52242, USA nicholas-gaul@uiowa.edu Mary Kathryn Cowles Department of Statistics & Actuarial Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences , The...Forrester, A. I. J., & Keane, A. J. (2009). Recent advances in surrogate-based optimization. Progress in Aerospace Sciences , 45(1–3), 50-79. doi...Wiley. [27] Sacks, J., Welch, W. J., Toby J. Mitchell, & Wynn, H. P. (1989). Design and analysis of computer experiments. Statistical Science , 4

  12. Consumer sleep monitors: is there a baby in the bathwater?

    Bianchi, Matt; Russo,Kathryn; Goparaju,Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Kathryn Russo,1 Balaji Goparaju,1 Matt T Bianchi1,2 1Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The rapid expansion of consumer sleep devices is outpacing the validation data necessary to assess the potential use of these devices in clinical and research settings. Common sleep monitoring devices utilize a variety of sensors to track movement as well as cardiac and respiratory physiology. The variety ...

  13. Kuulates ja võrreldes : Soome Jalostuspäivät Tamperes 19.02.2011 / Raigo Kollom

    Kollom, Raigo, 1936-

    2011-01-01

    Lühiülevaade veebruaris Tamperes toimunud Jalotuspäivät koolitusest, mille peaesinejad olid Taani DWB tõuraamatu aretusjuht ja WBFSH peasekretär Karina Christiansen, dr Kathryn F. Stock Hannoveri Veterinaarmeditsiini Ülikoolist ja Soome parim takistussõitja Mikael Forsten ning põhiteemaks ratsahobuste aretus, samuti võrreldakse artiklis eri riikide hobumajanduse teenistuses olevad keskandmebaase ja aretusvalikuid. Järgneb ajakirja lõpus ESHKS infolehe veergudel

  14. Tugevus ja nõrkus : loovus ja endised tööstusalad Hollandis = Strength and vulnerability : creativity and former indastrial sites in the Netherlands / Klaske Havik

    Havik, Klaske, 1975-

    2005-01-01

    2003. a. septembris Amsterdamis toimunud konverentsist "Loovus ja linn" (peaesineja Richard Florida). Kasvulavade poliitikast. Westergasfabriek'i ümberkujundamisest (AB Mecanoo, Kathryn Gustafson), NDSM-i sadamakai kultuurikeskkonnaks kujundamisest (arhitektuuribürood loetletud) Amsterdamis, disainitehaseks renoveeritud Van Nelle tehasest (renoveerimist juhtis Wessel de Jonge, ruumikujundus: Claessens & Erdmann), ööklubist "Now & Wow" (arhitekt Marten de Jong, disainerid Robbert de Vrieze, Martijn van der Wiel), klubist "Las Palmas" Rotterdamis jm. Bibliograafia lk. 57

  15. Astronaut training for STS 41-D mission

    1984-01-01

    Astronauts David C. Leestma and Kathryn D. Sullivan, two of three 41-D mission specialists, rehearse some of the duties they will be performing on their flight. Dr. Sullivan holds the Krimsky rule against her cheekbones as part of an ongoing Shuttle study on near vision acuity. Astronaut Leestma reviews a flight data file flipbook. They are seated on the floor of the Space Shuttle Simulator, in front of the forward middeck lockers.

  16. The Fallacy of Leadership Removal Strategies in 21st Century Counterinsurgency

    2011-06-18

    Kathryn Gregory, "Shining Path, Tupac Amaru (Peru, leftists)," Council on Foreign Relations, August 27, 2009, http://www.cfr.org/terrorism/shining-path... tupac -amaru-peru-leftists/p9276 (accessed November 28, 2010) 51 are still present and in 2008 alone they executed 64 attacks, killing police...34Shining Path, Tupac Amaru (Peru, leftists)." Council of Foreign Relations. August 27, 2009. http://www.cfr.org/terrorism/shining-path- tupac - amaru-peru

  17. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2003

    2003-01-01

    The following staff members with 25 years' service in 2003 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 20 November 2003: ALLIOD Patrick/ATGESCHONKE Gunther/AB AYMON Marcel/HRGLASER Maurice/EP BAUDET Serge/TISHUGOT Bernard/AB BENOIT-JEANNIN Brigitte/SPLJOUVE Christian/AT BERRY Peter/HRJULLIARD André/ST BIERI Catherine/STLAFAGE Patrice/ST BLANC Didier/STLAJUST Danièle/DSU BLANC Michel/ITLEGRAND Dominique/AT BOCH Guy/ITLONG Serge/EST BONZANO Roberto/STLYONNET André/EP BURCKHART Doris/EPMALOD-DOGNIN Jean-Pierre/ST BURNS Alan/ABMAURY Stephan/AC BURTIN Gérard/ABMILES John/AT CARENA Wisla/EPMONET René/EST CASTEL André/ESTMULLER André/TIS CLIFF Frank/HRPERREAL Pierre/AT CUCCURU Giovanni/ATPETERSEN Jørgen/EP DAMIANI Michel/ABPETIT Patrick/EP DELUCINGE Evelyne/ATPIERRE Patrice/AB DHOTE Patrick/SPLROUX Jacques/EP FLUCKIGER François/ITSAMYN Dirk/EP FORESTE Antonio/ESTSAVIOZ Jean Jacques/AB FRAIS...

  18. Inception horizon concept as a basis for sinkhole hazard mapping

    Vouillamoz, J.; Jeannin, P.-Y.; Kopp, L.; Chantry, R.

    2012-04-01

    high probability of karst occurrence. ASSESSMENT OF THE SOFT-SEDIMENT COVER Classical geological investigations (mapping, DEM analysis, drilling, etc.) are used to establish a map of the thickness of soft-sediment on top of the limestone. This can also be included in the 3D model. The combination of the void and soft-sediment information in the 3D model makes it possible to derive the sinkhole hazard map. This is currently being developed and applied in the Vaud canton and first results will be presented. BIBLIOGRAPHY FILIPPONI, M., JEANNIN, P. & TACHER, L. (2009): Evidence of inception horizons in karst conduit networks. Geomorphology, 106, 86-99. FILIPPONI, M., SCHMASSMANN, S., JEANNIN, P. Y. & PARRIAUX, A. (2011): Karst - ALEA - Method a risk assessment method of karst for tunnel projects: Application to the Tunnel of Flims (GR, Switzerland). Proc. 9th conference on limestone hydrogeology. Besançon, France. p. 181-184.

  19. Preliminary characterization of an alpine karst aquifer in a complex geological setting using the KARSYS approach. Picos de Europa, North Spain

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Malard, Arnauld; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; García-Sansegundo, Joaquín; Meléndez, Mónica; Sendra, Gemma

    2013-04-01

    Research applied to karst aquifers linked to a homogeneous limestone in high mountain areas affected by several tectonic events is a hard task, due to methodological constraints and the uncertainties of the geological data. The KARSYS approach (Jeannin et al. 2012) is based on the combination of existing geological data and basic principles of karst hydraulic, allowing for characterizing the geometry of an aquifer considering a smaller amount of data than other methods. The Picos de Europa (North Spain) is an alpine karst massif with a surface area of 700 km2, peaks up to 2,648 m and fluvial gorges up to 2,000 m deep, including about 270 km of cave passage. The bedrock is mainly composed of Ordovician quartzite covered by massive Carboniferous limestone and is affected by two systems of thrusts and other faults. The most of the geological structures are from Variscan orogeny (Carboniferous in age), some of them could be originated or modified during the Permian-Mesozoic extensional episode, and the others were originated or reactivated during the Alpine Orogeny. Therefore, the Picos de Europa can be considered as a complex geological environment in which usual hydrogeological methods are difficult to use. The aim of this study is to characterize the geometry of the Picos de Europa aquifers applying the KARSYS approach. The approach includes: 1) the identification of aquifer and aquiclude formations; 2) the inventory of the main springs; 3) the establishment of a 3D geological model, focused on the aquifer boundaries; 4) the implementation of the hydraulic features within the 3D model and the delineation of the karst system. The main aquifer of the Picos de Europa is developed within the Carboniferous limestone and displays a complex geometry generally limited and divided into several unconfined groundwater bodies by Ordovician to Carboniferous rocks related to the thrusts. The lowest limit of the aquifer is marked by the N-dipping detachment level of the thrusts

  20. El papel de actores transnacionales a propósito de la situación derechos humanos en Venezuela

    Falah, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    A partir de febrero de 2014, la historia de la República Bolivariana se fracturó. El descontento popular, la protesta social y las marchas pacíficas son reprimidas como consecuencia de un abuso de poder por parte del gobierno del presidente Nicolás Maduro. Las redes de información y comunicación, en los términos de Margaret Keck y Kathryn Sikkink, han jugado un papel fundamental para poner en evidencia las violaciones sistemáticas a los DD.HH., siendo estos el factor principal que vulnera la ...

  1. The Dictionary Unit for South African English. South African Concise Oxford Dictionary

    Rajend Mesthrie

    2011-01-01

    The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary (henceforth SACOD) is a South Af-rican version of the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the first time that this particular hybrid has been prepared. It is testimony to the enduring success of the work of the Dictionary Unit for South African English at Rhodes University, headed by teams that included Jean and William Branford in the 1970s, Penny Silva in the 1990s and now, Kathryn Kavanagh. The lexicographical work from the unit saw the publication of fou...

  2. STS-33 crewmembers on KSC LC Pad 39B 195 ft level with OV-103 in background

    1990-01-01

    STS-33 crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), take a break from training activities to pose for group portrait in front of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, at the 195 ft level elevator entrance at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B. Left to right are Pilot John E. Blaha, Mission Specialist (MS) Kathryn C. Thornton, MS Manley L. Carter, Jr, Commander Frederick D. Gregory, and MS F. Story Musgrave. Visible in the background is the catwalk to OV-103's side hatch.

  3. Commuter Air Carrier Symposium (2nd) January 15-16, 1981 .

    1981-01-16

    AJAN B1 UNCLASSIFIED FAA-ASF-300-81-b NL J , E EEEIEEEI mIhIhhEIhEEEI EEIhIhEIhEEIhE IIIIIIIIIIIIIu IIIEII~lElI Second ot Denrpotmn A Fodeol~(ntiorpom...Kathryn B. Creedy AVMARK, Inc. Commuter Air 1120 19th St., N.W. 4827 Rugby Ave. Washington, D.C. 20002 Bethesda, MD 20008 J. Keith Carter Albert J...Commuter Air Piper Aircraft Corp. 4823 Rugby Rd. 3000 Medulla Rd. Bethesda, MD 20014 Lakeland, Florida 33803 -Calvin Davison ’ Crowell & Moring 1100

  4. Guest Editorial

    Dolly Samson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is an honor and a pleasure to have the December 2013 issue of Higher Learning Research Communications dedicate its issue to selected papers from the 4th International Conference on Teaching and Learning, held in Bangkok in November, 2013. The conference theme, Higher Learning in the ASEAN Context, highlights the emerging community of ten Southeast Asian nations and the upcoming launch of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC in 2015. The AEC will affect higher education systems in Southeast Asia in terms of harmonization of higher education and student mobility. This emerging regional demographic gives us a glimpse of the future of transnational education. The papers selected for this issue represent research both within and outside of ASEAN, all touching on aspects of transnational education. Jeannin reports on how diversity affects students’ learning in an international classroom in Thailand. Billingham, Gragg, and Bentley (Australia highlight technology integration as an internationalizing practice. Ling considers challenges and outcomes of bilingual teaching and learning at the graduate level in Vietnam, contributing to the postgraduate educational field, which has not been amply explored in this matter. Stetz and Bauman (US ask us to rethink the efficacy of recording our lectures for online viewing. Hartfield (Australia, Beltram-Cruz (Philippines, and Cruz (Philippines review new pedagogical paradigms utilizing technology. Al-Masum and Chowdhury report on problems and progress at Bangladesh Open University in bringing higher education to an underserved population. Throughout this issue, the authors bring a sense of internationality and the transnational transformation of higher education, along with the ubiquity of technology in the hands of the students and its impact on our teaching and learning styles. This issue of the HLRC Journal highlights some impacts that ASEAN and the AEC can and will have on higher education everywhere.

  5. Postherpetic neuralgia: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and pain management pharmacology

    Mallick-Searle T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theresa Mallick-Searle,1 Brett Snodgrass,2 Jeannine M Brant,3 1Pain Management Center, Stanford Health Care, Redwood City, CA, 2LifeLinc Pain Centers, Cordova, TN, 3Billings Clinic, Billings, MT, USA Abstract: Herpes zoster, also known as shingles, is a distinctive clinical condition caused by the reactivation of latent varicella zoster (chickenpox virus following an initial infection. Approximately 1 million cases of herpes zoster occur annually in the US, and one in every three people develops herpes zoster during their lifetime. Postherpetic neuralgia is a neuropathic pain syndrome characterized by pain that persists for months to years after resolution of the herpes zoster rash. It stems from damage to peripheral and central neurons that may be a byproduct of the immune/inflammatory response accompanying varicella zoster virus reactivation. Patients with postherpetic neuralgia report decreased quality of life and interference with activities of daily living. Approaches to management of postherpetic neuralgia include preventing herpes zoster through vaccination and/or antiviral treatment, and administering specific medications to treat pain. Current guidelines recommend treatment of postherpetic neuralgia in a hierarchical manner, with calcium channel α2-δ ligands (gabapentin and pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, nortriptyline, or desipramine, or topical lidocaine patches as first-line drugs. The safety and tolerability of pharmacologic therapies for pain are important issues to consider as postherpetic neuralgia affects primarily an older population. Patients should be educated on appropriate dosing, titration if applicable, the importance of adherence to treatment for optimal effectiveness, and possible side effects. Health-care professionals play a key role in helping to ameliorate the pain caused by postherpetic neuralgia through early recognition and diligent assessment of the problem; recommending evidence

  6. Do essencialismo ao não essencialismo? reflexões sobre a identidade cultural do MST From essentialism to non essentialism? reflections about cultural identity of MST

    Fábio Souza da Cruz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho apresenta um estudo envolvendo um movimento social, o MST (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem-Terra, e as noções de identidade cultural. A investigação desenvolve um breve exercício de contextualização do movimento através de sua história, seu relacionamento com o poder e sua estrutura nos dias atuais. Com relação aos marcos teórico-metodológicos, a pesquisa adota os pressupostos de Kathryn Woodward (2000, Stuart Hall (2002 e Zygmunt Bauman (2005 e os discursos dos integrantes do movimento retirados do estudo de recepção realizado por Cruz (2006. Como discussão central, pretende-se analisar os desafios do MST em tempos de globalização.The work presents a study involving a social movement, the MST (Portuguese acronym for Movement of the Agricultural Landless Workers, and the slight knowledge of cultural identity. The inquiry develops a brief exercise combining the meaning of the movement through its history, its relationship with the power and its structure in the current days. In regard to theoretical-methodological landmarks, the research adopts pressupositions of Kathryn Woodward (2000, Stuart Hall (2002 e Zygmunt Bauman (2005 and speeches of people from the movement, taken from Cruz' study of reception (2006. As central quarrel, it is intended to analyze the challenges of the MST in globalization times.

  7. La socialización de las normas internacionales de los derechos humanos en las prácticas domésticas: introducción | The socialization of international human rights norms into domestic practices: introduction

    Thomas RISSE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Risse y Kathryn Sikkink plantean en este texto la importancia del impacto de las normas internacionales en las políticas domésticas y proponen un “modelo en espiral” en cinco fases para comprender los cambios en la interiorización de los derechos humanos como norma por parte de los estados. Desarrollan una teoría que explica las etapas y los mecanismos a través de los cuales las normas internacionales generan cambios en el comportamiento de los actores internacionales y transnacionales, y que ayuda a comprender mejor el impacto general de las normas en la política internacional. Este proceso mediante el cual las normas internacionales son interiorizadas e implementadas domésticamente puede ser entendido según los autores como un proceso de socialización. In this article Thomas Risse y Kathryn Sikkink analyze the importance of international norms impact over domestic politics and propose a five phases “spiral model” to explain the changes in human rights internalization by the states. They develop a theoretical framework that explains the stages and mechanisms by which international norms promote changes in international and transnational actors behavior, and that serves to a better comprehension of the general norms impact over international politics. The process by which international norms are internalized and implented on the domestic level can be understood, according to the authors, as a socialization process.

  8. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2009-01-14

    failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur. After releasing Revision 0 of this report, an independent review of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis was conducted by Dr. Robert P. Kennedy of RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting and Dr. Anestis S. Veletsos of Rice University. Revision I was then issued to address their review comments (included in Appendix D). Additional concerns involving the evaluation of concrete anchor loads and allowables were found during a second review by Drs. Kennedy and Veletsos (see Appendix G). Extensive additional analysis was performed on the anchors, which is detailed by Deibler et al. (2008a, 2008b). The current report (Revision 2) references this recent work, and additional analysis is presented to show that anchor loads do not concentrate significantly in the presence of a local buckle.

  9. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT-BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    Mackey, T.C.; Johnson, K.I.; Deibler, J.E.; Pilli, S.P.; Rinker, M.W.; Karri, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    bolt failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur. After releasing Revision 0 of this report, an independent review of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis was conducted by Dr. Robert P. Kennedy of RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting and Dr. Anestis S. Veletsos of Rice University. Revision I was then issued to address their review comments (included in Appendix D). Additional concerns involving the evaluation of concrete anchor loads and allowables were found during a second review by Drs. Kennedy and Veletsos (see Appendix G). Extensive additional analysis was performed on the anchors, which is detailed by Deibler et al. (2008a, 2008b). The current report (Revision 2) references this recent work, and additional analysis is presented to show that anchor loads do not concentrate significantly in the presence of a local buckle

  10. Adjunctive therapy in Parkinson's disease: the role of rasagiline

    Gaines KD

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn D Gaines,1 Vanessa K Hinson21Department of Neurology, Aurora Advanced Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, 2Department of Neurosciences, Movement Disorders Program, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, currently affecting 1.5 million people in the US. In this review, we describe the diagnostic and pathological features of Parkinson's disease, as well as its clinical course. We then review pharmacologic treatments for the disease, with a particular focus on therapies adjunctive to levodopa and specifically the role of rasagiline. We review the four pivotal rasagiline trials, and discuss rasagiline and its use as adjunctive therapy for Parkinson's disease. Finally, we discuss potential side effects, drug interactions, and other practical aspects concerning the use of rasagiline in Parkinson's disease.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, treatment, rasagiline, clinical trials

  11. Technology-Assisted Behavioral Intervention to Extend Sleep Duration: Development and Design of the Sleep Bunny Mobile App.

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Duffecy, Jennifer; Reid, Kathryn; Begale, Mark; Caccamo, Lauren

    2018-01-10

    Despite the high prevalence of short sleep duration (29.2% of adults sleep popularity of wearable sleep trackers provides an opportunity to engage users in interventions. The objective of this study was to outline the theoretical foundation and iterative process of designing the "Sleep Bunny," a technology-assisted sleep extension intervention including a mobile phone app, wearable sleep tracker, and brief telephone coaching. We conducted a two-step process in the development of this intervention, which was as follows: (1) user testing of the app and (2) a field trial that was completed by 2 participants with short sleep duration and a cardiovascular disease risk factor linked to short sleep duration (body mass index [BMI] >25). All participants had habitual sleep duration consequences of sleep loss. ©Kelly Glazer Baron, Jennifer Duffecy, Kathryn Reid, Mark Begale, Lauren Caccamo. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 10.01.2018.

  12. Peripheral T cell lymphoma: clinical utility of romidepsin

    Sawey K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Zain, Kathryn SaweyNYU Langone Medical Center, New York, USAIntroduction: Direct therapeutic targets, such as aberrant tumor cell genes and tumor cell markers, have been the focus of cancer treatment for more than 50 years. The resulting damage to normal cells and emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells after exposure to conventional chemotherapy have led researchers to study indirect targets, like the tumor vasculature. A more recent indirect approach involves targeting the epigenetic modifiers, DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to be active cytotoxic agents in T cell lymphoma. The current treatments approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for relapsed cutaneous T cell lymphoma are vorinostat and romidepsin. The diversity and rarity of peripheral T cell lymphomas present a challenge for effective treatment. With their poor overall survival rate, new targeted therapies need to be developed.Keywords: peripheral T cell lymphoma, treatment, romidepsin

  13. [AN OVERALL SOUND PROCESS] Becoming Neoclassical: Instrumentation in the Sketches for Webern's Concerto, Op. 24

    David H. Miller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In September 1928 Anton Webern wrote to publisher Emil Hertzka to report on the composition of a work “in the spirit of some of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos.” In June 1934 that work stood completed as the Concerto for Nine Instruments, Op. 24. While Op. 24 has been celebrated as a paradigmatic example of Webern’s forward-looking serial techniques, it simultaneously exhibits a strong neoclassical influence, as Kathryn Bailey (1991 has demonstrated in her study of sonata and ritornello principles in the Concerto’s first movement. Neoclassical models may have also played a role in dramatically shifting conceptions of instrumentation and genre evident in sketches from the work’s extended period of composition, during which time it transformed from a piece for large symphonic orchestra, to a concerto for solo piano with orchestral accompaniment, to a concerto grosso with a continuo-like piano part. The dramatic shifts found in the sketches are best understood in relation to Webern’s compositional activities in the decade preceding Op. 24. During this period, Webern revised several of his pre-World War I orchestral compositions, reducing the size and diversity of the ensembles with an eye towards Fasslichkeit (“comprehensibility”; a similar goal motivated the arrangements he produced for Arnold Schoenberg’s Society for Private Musical Performances. When considered alongside an instrumentation-centric view of the sketches for Op. 24, these activities suggest an intriguing view of the Concerto. If its twelve-tone row marks Op. 24 as an apex of Webern’s serial technique, its instrumentation makes it an apex of his neoclassicism.In September 1928 Anton Webern wrote to publisher Emil Hertzka to report on the composition of a work “in the spirit of some of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos.” In June 1934 that work stood completed as the Concerto for Nine Instruments, Op. 24. While Op. 24 has been celebrated as a paradigmatic example

  14. Book Reviews

    Redactie KITLV

    1999-07-01

    -Arlene Torres, Jean P. Peterman, Telling their stories: Puerto Rican Women and abortion. Boulder CO: Westview Press, 1996. ix + 112 pp. -Trevor W. Purcell, Philip Sherlock ,The story of the Jamaican People. Kingston: Ian Randle; Princeton: Markus Wiener, 1998. xii + 434 pp., Hazel Bennett (eds -Howard Fergus, Donald Harman Akenson, If the Irish ran the world: Montserrat, 1630-1730. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1997. xii + 273 pp. -John S. Brierley, Lawrence S. Grossman, The political ecology of bananas: Contract farming, peasants, and agrarian change in the Eastern Caribbean. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998. xx + 268 pp. -Mindie Lazarus-Black, Jeannine M. Purdy, Common law and colonised peoples: Studies in Trinidad and Western Australia. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Dartmouth, 1997. xii + 309. -Stephen Slemon, Barbara Lalla, Defining Jamaican fiction: Marronage and the discourse of survival. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1996. xi + 224 pp. -Stephen Slemon, Renu Juneja, Caribbean transactions: West Indian culture in literature. -Sue N. Greene, Richard F. Patteson, Caribbean Passages: A critical perspective on new fiction from the West Indies. Boulder CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1998. ix + 187 pp. -Harold Munneke, Ivelaw L. Griffith ,Democracy and human rights in the Caribbean. Boulder CO: Westview Press, 1997. vii + 278 pp., Betty N. Sedoc-Dahlberg (eds -Francisco E. Thoumi, Ivelaw Lloyd Griffith, Drugs and security in the Caribbean: Sovereignty under seige. University Park: Penn State University Press, 1997. xx + 295 pp. -Michiel Baud, Eric Paul Roorda, The dictator next door: The good neighbor policy and the Trujillo regime in the Dominican republic, 1930-1945. Durham NC: Duke University Press, 1998. xii + 337 pp. -Peter Mason, Wim Klooster, The Dutch in the Americas 1600-1800. Providence RI: The John Carter Brown Library, 1997. xviii + 101 pp. -David R. Watters, Aad H. Versteeg ,The archaeology of Aruba: The Tanki Flip site

  15. Editorial

    The Editors

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue of Higher Learning Research Communications is dedicated to selected papers from the 4th International Conference on Teaching and Learning (ICTL, held in Bangkok during November 13-15, 2013. The papers reflect the exciting changes occurring in ASEAN countries, especially in Higher Education. As the 21st century brings about new social changes and economic challenges, many Higher Education institutions seek to prepare students to face a constantly changing and globalized world. In that regard, the papers selected reflect how some Higher Education institutions are preparing to achieve this goal: internationalizing their curricula and incorporating technology into the classrooms. The first three papers deal with the concept of internationalization in Higher Education. Internationalization can be seen from two different perspectives: first, from foreign students crossing borders in order to look for educational and professional opportunities and, second, from local students seeking to acquire the necessary skills to succeed in a globalized world. With this in mind, Jeannin presents in her paper research conducted in order to determine how students perceive diversity in an international university in Thailand. Understanding how different students perceive diversity in multicultural and multilingual Higher Education settings can be a useful tool when trying to achieve internationalization. Billingham, Gragg, and Bentley, as well as Ling, offer specific cases of how academic institutions can achieve internationalization. Ling focuses on an important area in terms of globalization and internationalization: language acquisition in the postgraduate context. The importance of second language acquisition is evident in a globalized world, but research on language acquisition for professionals seeking postgraduate studies is limited. In this context, Ling’s study starts to fill a void in postgraduate Higher Education research by assessing

  16. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT-DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT-TOP TANKS

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2007-01-01

    The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed in support of the

  17. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT TOP TANKS

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2007-02-16

    The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed

  18. Foreword

    Lorenzo Bartalesi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Aesthetics emerges today as a young and lively field of studies whose main aim is to rethink the traditional questions of philosophical Aesthetics in the light of biological theories, in particular in the light of Darwin's evolutionary theory by means of natural selection. The aim of this issue is to introduce Evolutionary Aesthetics into the Italian philosophical debate. Contributions collected cover almost entirely the lively, multifaceted spectrum of the discipline: 1 the high-debated question of the adaptive value of aesthetic sense, artistic practices and art fruition (Stephen Davies, Zach Norwood, Joseph Carroll; 2 the evolutionary explanation of human sexual preferences and production of artefacts (Hannes Rusch & Eckart Voland; 3 the possibility for a Darwinian non-reductionist definition of art as a culturally differentiated behavior (Kathryn Coe; Nancy E. Aiken; Roberta Dreon; 4 a comparative analysis of aesthetic experience from a cognitive viewpoint (Gianluca Consoli and from a morphological one (Salvatore Tedesco; 5 the influence of Darwinian perspective beyond the English boundaries, with particular reference to the Italian scientific community in the Nineteenth century (Elena Canadelli and to the tradition of Gestaltpsychologie (Michele Gardini; 6 a naturalistic approach to aesthetic experience and medial experience (Antonino Pennisi & Francesco Parisi.

  19. The Haunting Presence of the Feminine: Virginia Woolf in the Streets of London

    Agnieszka Pantuchowicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with the theme of the location of haunting in Gothic interiors and the confusion of life and death and the “sub-central” positioning of the feminine as the hidden source of fearfulness, the paper analyzes Virginia Woolf’s “Street Haunting: A London Adventure” as an example of a narrative written from the position of the haunting in which the figure of fearful feminine is transformed into a “hauntess” participating in the public world on equal rights with others. Woolf’s text, though seemingly positing the protagonist in the position of flâneuse, in fact implicitly criticizes flâneuring as a masculine kind of looking and participating in the public space. Taking place away from home, Woolf’s strolling in the streets of London carnivalizes (in the Bakhtinian sense the activity by way of a joyful blurring of the split between the home and the market. Transgressing what Kathryn Simpson calls “the male privilege of the flâneur” (2010, p. 47 and rendering the transgression as haunting, Woolf evades participation in the masculine world of traffic and exchange by way of bringing the space of the Gothic confinement, and also of entombment, to the public.

  20. The Dictionary Unit for South African English. South African Concise Oxford Dictionary

    Rajend Mesthrie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary (henceforth SACOD is a South Af-rican version of the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the first time that this particular hybrid has been prepared. It is testimony to the enduring success of the work of the Dictionary Unit for South African English at Rhodes University, headed by teams that included Jean and William Branford in the 1970s, Penny Silva in the 1990s and now, Kathryn Kavanagh. The lexicographical work from the unit saw the publication of four editions of the Dictionary of Southern African English (1978, 1980, 1987, 1991, a South African Pocket Oxford Dictionary (SAPOD and the Dictionary of South African English on Historical Principles (DOSAEHP (1995. SACOD differs from the rest in several ways. It is larger in scope than SAPOD, smaller than DOSAEHP, and unlike DOSAE and DOSAEHP, does not deal with South African words alone. Based on the 10th edition of the Concise Oxford Dictionary SACOD has excised some words from the parent, whilst adding many new words of general English as well as of South Africa.

  1. The development of human visual cortex and clinical implications

    Siu CR

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Caitlin R Siu,1 Kathryn M Murphy1,2 1McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery and Study (MiNDS Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 2Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Abstract: The primary visual cortex (V1 is the first cortical area that processes visual information. Normal development of V1 depends on binocular vision during the critical period, and age-related losses of vision are linked with neurobiological changes in V1. Animal studies have provided important details about the neurobiological mechanisms in V1 that support normal vision or are changed by visual diseases. There is very little information, however, about those neurobiological mechanisms in human V1. That lack of information has hampered the translation of biologically inspired treatments from preclinical models to effective clinical treatments. We have studied human V1 to characterize the expression of neurobiological mechanisms that regulate visual perception and neuroplasticity. We have identified five stages of development for human V1 that start in infancy and continue across the life span. Here, we describe these stages, compare them with visual and anatomical milestones, and discuss implications for translating treatments for visual disorders that depend on neuroplasticity of V1 function. Keywords: development, human visual cortex, amblyopia, synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic, GABAergic, receptors

  2. Bicavitary effusion secondary to liver lobe torsion in a dog

    Khan Z

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zaheda Khan,1 Kathryn Gates,2 Stephen A Simpson,31Emergency and Critical Care, Animal Specialty and Emergency Center, Los Angeles, CA, 2Emergency and Critical Care, Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services, Culver City, CA 3Emergency and Critical Care, Southern California Veterinary Specialty Hospital, Irvine, CA, USA Abstract: We described the diagnosis and successful treatment of pleural and peritoneal effusion secondary to liver lobe torsion in a dog. A 12-year-old female spayed Borzoi dog was referred for heart failure. Emergency room thoracic and abdominal ultrasound showed a large volume of pleural effusion with mild peritoneal effusion and an abdominal mass. Pleural fluid analysis classified the effusion as exudative. A complete ultrasound revealed mild peritoneal effusion and decreased blood flow to the right liver lobe. Other causes of bicavitary effusion were ruled out based on blood work, ultrasound, echocardiogram, and computed tomography. The patient was taken to surgery and diagnosed with caudate liver lobe torsion and had a liver lobectomy. At the 2-week postoperative recheck, the patient was doing well and there was complete resolution of the pleural effusion. Liver lobe torsion is a rare occurrence in dogs and can be difficult to diagnose. Clinical signs are nonspecific for liver lobe torsion and patients may present in respiratory distress with significant pleural fluid accumulation. When assessing patients with pleural and peritoneal effusion, liver lobe torsion should be considered as a differential diagnosis.Keywords: pleural effusion, peritoneal effusion, hepatic torsion

  3. Pediatric central venous access devices: nursing interventions

    Duffy EA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Duffy, Kathryn N Nelson Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: A central venous catheter (CVC is an indwelling catheter that provides permanent or temporary stable venous access for both acute and chronically ill pediatric patients. These catheters provide stable venous access that can be used for a variety of medical purposes including drawing blood, hemodynamic monitoring, infusion of intravenous medications, infusion of intravenous fluids, chemotherapy, blood products, and parenteral nutrition. Each day, nurses access and care for CVCs in infants, children, and adolescents; the precision of this care can prevent life-threatening complications. The purpose of this review and the case study is to highlight the importance and components of evidence-based nursing practice in pediatric CVC care. A historical perspective of CVC care is provided in conjunction with current national initiatives to improve patient outcomes for children with CVCs. Infection prevention, clinical practice guidelines, quality improvement, and evidence-based care bundles are discussed. Keywords: pediatric nursing, central venous catheters, central line-associated bloodstream infection, care bundles, pediatric case study 

  4. In-center hemodialysis absenteeism: prevalence and association with outcomes

    Gray KS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn S Gray, Dena E Cohen, Steven M Brunelli DaVita Clinical Research, Minneapolis, MN, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the rate of missed treatments among hemodialysis (HD patients, and the association between treatment nonadherence and clinical outcomes.Data source: The data used in this study were based on electronic medical records and Medicare claims.Study design: This is a retrospective, observational study.Principal findings: HD patients miss 9.9% of all treatments. Approximately half of the missed treatments are due to observable medical events, predominantly hospitalizations, while half result from nonadherence (“absence”. A single absence is associated with a 1.4-fold greater risk of hospitalization, and a 2.2-fold greater risk of death in the subsequent 30 days.Conclusion: Treatment nonadherence is common among HD patients and is associated with adverse outcomes. Interventions that improve adherence may improve patient health and reduce costs. Keywords: Medicare, ambulatory/outpatient care, epidemiology, chronic disease

  5. Implementation of an interactive database interface utilizing HTML, PHP, JavaScript, and MySQL in support of water quality assessments in the Northeastern North Carolina Pasquotank Watershed

    Guion, A., Jr.; Hodgkins, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Center of Excellence in Remote Sensing Education and Research (CERSER) has implemented three research projects during the summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program gathering water quality data for local waterways. The data has been compiled manually utilizing pen and paper and then entered into a spreadsheet. With the spread of electronic devices capable of interacting with databases, the development of an electronic method of entering and manipulating the water quality data was pursued during this project. This project focused on the development of an interactive database to gather, display, and analyze data collected from local waterways. The database and entry form was built in MySQL on a PHP server allowing participants to enter data from anywhere Internet access is available. This project then researched applying this data to the Google Maps site to provide labeling and information to users. The NIA server at http://nia.ecsu.edu is used to host the application for download and for storage of the databases. Water Quality Database Team members included the authors plus Derek Morris Jr., Kathryne Burton and Mr. Jeff Wood as mentor.

  6. Child-rearing practices of primary caregivers of HIV-infected children: An integrative review of the literature.

    Klunklin, Pimpaporn; Harrigan, Rosanne C

    2002-08-01

    The number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children has increased because of the HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic. Yet little is known about the child-rearing practices of these children's primary caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe what is known about the child-rearing practices of primary caregivers of HIV-infected children. The review covers a 10-year period from 1990 to 2000. Three electronic bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and AIDSLINE) were explored. Key words used were HIV-positive children, caregivers, and child-rearing. A total of 50 papers were examined. Using the Matrix Method, each paper was evaluated according to five frames of reference: journal, purpose, sample, method, and findings. Content analysis was used to identity salient themes. Themes that emerged were: caregiver, child, and interactions or child-rearing practices. These findings affirm the parent-child interaction model generated by Kathryn E. Barnard and support this framework as a tool for investigating the relationships between these children and their caregivers. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  7. Two pathographies: a study in illness and literature.

    Hawkins, A

    1984-08-01

    This study compares two autobiographical descriptions of illness--the seventeenth-century John Donne's Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and the twentieth-century Cornelius and Kathryn Ryan's A Private Battle. I begin by identifying the basic structure in both narratives as parallel to that of the case history, and then show how each individual's experience is shaped by the conditions of illness appropriate to their respective cultures. Lastly, I discuss the way in which both authors understand and represent sickness, as well as their respective therapies, in terms of a particular metaphoric construct: for Donne, it is the analogy between illness of the body and illness of the soul; for Ryan it is the analogy between illness and war. The stance of each towards his illness is conditioned by this metaphoric model: Donne's is one of acceptance, of conforming to the will of God; Ryan's is one of resistance, of fighting heroically until the very end. Thus these metaphors are functional as well as aesthetic: they serve as figural modalities whereby the patient/author hopes to transcend his illness.

  8. Pneumatology and discipleship: Trinity and church in the theology of Stanley Grenz

    Roland Spjuth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s ecclesiology, the notion of the Spirit and the church has been heavily influenced by a recent and broad retrieval of Trinitarian theology. In this article, I discuss this in relationship to baptist and evangelical traditions as it is represented by Stanley Grenz. His “theology for the community of God” demonstrates the fruitfulness of the Trinitarian retrieval for such traditions. However, the main argument in the article is that it also implies certain risks. According to the Baptist tradition, the central message of the New Testament is the invitation to be a disciple of Jesus Christ. As Kathryn Tanner and Karen Kilby have argued elsewhere, when the biblical challenge to be like Jesus Christ is turned into a more general exhortation to become an image of the Trinity, it often results in abstract ethics and an ecclesiology that focuses mainly on general exhortations to love and to live in community. In contrast, this article claims that the biblical notion of discipleship has greater possibilities to allow for a more substantial and more holistic account of the Church, one that reunites ecclesiology, ethics and the Spirit’s transformative work within liturgy, charismatic service and mission.

  9. Consumer sleep monitors: is there a baby in the bathwater?

    Russo K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Russo,1 Balaji Goparaju,1 Matt T Bianchi1,2 1Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The rapid expansion of consumer sleep devices is outpacing the validation data necessary to assess the potential use of these devices in clinical and research settings. Common sleep monitoring devices utilize a variety of sensors to track movement as well as cardiac and respiratory physiology. The variety of sensors and user-specific factors offer the potential, at least theoretically, for clinically relevant information. We describe the current challenges for interpretation of consumer sleep monitoring data, since the devices are mainly used in nonmedical contexts (consumer use although medically-definable sleep disorders may commonly occur in this setting. A framework for addressing questions of how certain devices might be useful is offered. We suggest that multistage validation efforts are crucially needed, from the level of sensor data and algorithm output, to extrapolations beyond healthy adults and into other populations and real-world environments. Keywords: movement, cardiac and respiratory physiology, sensor, consumer sleep monitoring data

  10. New perspectives on targeted therapy in ovarian cancer

    Coward JIG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jermaine IG Coward,1–3 Kathryn Middleton,1 Felicity Murphy1 1Mater Health Services, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Inflammtion and Cancer Therapeutics Group, Mater Research, University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. During the last 15 years, there has been only marginal improvement in 5 year overall survival. These daunting statistics are compounded by the fact that despite all subtypes exhibiting striking heterogeneity, their systemic management remains identical. Although changes to the scheduling and administration of chemotherapy have improved outcomes to a degree, a therapeutic ceiling is being reached with this approach, resulting in a number of trials investigating the efficacy of targeted therapies alongside standard treatment algorithms. Furthermore, there is an urge to develop subtype-specific studies in an attempt to improve outcomes, which currently remain poor. This review summarizes the key studies with antiangiogenic agents, poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor/human epidermal growth factor receptor family targeting, in addition to folate receptor antagonists and insulin growth factor receptor inhibitors. The efficacy of treatment paradigms used in non-ovarian malignancies for type I tumors is also highlighted, in addition to recent advances in appropriate patient stratification for targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer. Keywords: antiangiogenic therapy, high-grade serous, low grade ovarian cancer, PARP inhibition, cancer-related inflammation

  11. Depressive symptoms of midlife Latinas: effect of immigration and sociodemographic factors

    Sternberg RM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Maria Sternberg, Kathryn A Lee University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Family Health Care Nursing, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: Immigrant Latinas may have different cultural attitudes toward menopause and aging, and may experience higher levels of distress associated with adaptation to their new environment. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to describe the frequency of depressive symptoms experienced by premenopausal Latinas (40–50 years of age living in the United States and compare Latinas born in the US with immigrant Latinas on stress and sociodemographic factors that influence depressive symptom experience. Analysis was conducted on a subsample of 94 self-identified Latinas who participated in a longitudinal study and completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D scale at enrollment and 6 months. Immigrant Latinas had a significantly higher CES-D (14.4 ± 11.1 than US-born Latinas (10.0 ± 7.9 and the difference remained at 6 months. There was no difference in age, body mass index (BMI, self-report of general health, or perceived stress. Higher BMI, work-related stress, and insufficient income for essential daily needs were associated with depressive symptom scores in immigrant Latinas. High BMI and less education were associated with depressive symptom scores in the US-born Latinas. Keywords: Hispanic women, Latinas, immigration, depression, midlife, menopause

  12. Authenticity and War Junkies: Making the Iraq War Real in Films and TV Series

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2011-01-01

    ), and Paul Greengrass’s Green Zone (2010). The films break from tradition by dismissing both the mythic heroism that pervades World War 2 films and the disillusionment of many Vietnam War films. A shared trait in the films and TV-series is a striving for authenticity and a tendency associated with this......This article examines some of the important changes in the films (and TV-series) about the Iraq War. Focus will be on the combat films: Brian De Palma’s Redacted (2007), Nick Broomfield’s Battle for Haditha (2007), HBO’s mini-series Generation Kill (2008), Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker (2008......: the depiction of American soldiers as war junkies. What has become of the noble intentions, the ideas of freedom and democracy, once linked with the US military? Without judging, the films depict the new generation of American soldiers, raised in a historical vacuum, young men who see war as just another...

  13. Anidulafungin in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Kathryn Sabol

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Sabol, Tawanda GumboUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: More antifungal agents have reached clinical use in the past two decades than at any other time. The echinocandins have been a welcome addition to this group, with the latest being anidulafungin. There are several lines of evidence to support anidulafungin’s role as primary therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients, and as alternative therapy to fluconazole in patients with esophageal candidiasis with azole intolerance or triazole-resistant Candida. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies in animals have demonstrated superior efficacy, defined as maximal microbial kill, when compared to fluconazole, regardless of the fluconazole susceptibility of the Candida species. These studies, as well as dose-effect studies in patients, also support the currently recommended dose of anidulafungin. A well designed randomized controlled trial has demonstrated anidulafungin’s efficacy in patients with invasive candidiasis. In this paper, we argue that anidulafungin may be preferable to fluconazole for the treatment of candidemia. However, as of yet, the difference between anidulafungin and the other two licensed echinocandins as first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis is unclear. On the other hand, there is insufficient evidence as of yet to support first-line use of anidulafungin in patients with neutropenia or aspergillosis.Keywords: anidulafungin, pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, efficacy, candidiasis

  14. Estrogens of multiple classes and their role in mental health disease mechanisms

    Cheryl S Watson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheryl S Watson1, Rebecca A Alyea1, Kathryn A Cunningham2, Yow-Jiun Jeng11Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Univ of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Gender and sex hormones can influence a variety of mental health states, including mood, cognitive development and function, and vulnerability to neurodegenerative diseases and brain damage. Functions of neuronal cells may be altered by estrogens depending upon the availability of different physiological estrogenic ligands; these ligands and their effects vary with life stages, the genetic or postgenetic regulation of receptor levels in specific tissues, or the intercession of competing nonphysiological ligands (either intentional or unintentional, beneficial to health or not. Here we review evidence for how different estrogens (physiological and environmental/dietary, acting via different estrogen receptor subtypes residing in alternative subcellular locations, influence brain functions and behavior. We also discuss the families of receptors and transporters for monoamine neurotransmitters and how they may interact with the estrogenic signaling pathways.Keywords: estrogen receptor α, estrogen receptor β, GPR30, GPER, xenoestrogens, phytoestrogens, transporters, brain function, neurotransmitter receptors

  15. Philosophy and Literature; Philosophy as Literature: Call for Papers

    2013-11-01

    to the essential story. •\tThe literary merit of philosophical writing: a secondary concern to the primary quest for truth? •\tThe dialectic of abstraction and embodiment. •\tThe literary form as the accurate expression of moral truths because of the embodied and particular nature of moral philosophy. (Nussbaum. •\tThe importance of fiction, poetry and song for guiding thought, strengthening observation, developing critical thinking. (Confucius. •\tAuthors who conceive of the novel as more than story; as a genre that ‘brings together every device and every form of knowledge in order to shed light on existence.’ (Kundera on Broch. Also, Musil, Calvino, Coetzee, George Eliot. •\tPhilosophy as performance and philosophical plays. •\tPhilosophers who also write literary fiction. We also invite: •\tCreative writing that investigates an original philosophical problem. •\tBook reviews of relevant creative and scholarly works that explore the above themes. Submission guidelines Articles should: •\tBe between 4000 and 6000 words in length, including footnotes. •\tConform to the journal’s style guide available here: http://fhrc.flinders.edu.au/transnational/submissions.html •\tBe accompanied by abstract of about 200 words. •\tBe accompanied by an author biography of 150 words. •\tBe attached as a Microsoft Word document to an email addressed to Kathryn Koromilas kathryn.koromilas@adelaide.edu.au. Please add subject line: Submission TNL Philosophy as literature. Deadline for submissions 30 June 2014.

  16. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie) and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katies dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpsons Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  17. 2012 Aspen Winter Conference New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials, February 5-10, 2012

    Moore, Joel; Rabe, Karin; Nayak, Chetan; Troyer, Matthias

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DOE Budget Period: 10/1/2011 to 9/30/2012 Contract # DE-SC0007479 New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Condensed Matter Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 5 to 10, 2012. Seventy-four participants from seven countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials. There were 34 formal talks, and a number of informal discussions held during the week. Talks covered a variety of topics related to DOE BES priorities, including, for example, advanced photon techniques (Hasan, Abbamonte, Orenstein, Shen, Ghosh) and predictive theoretical modeling of materials properties (Rappe, Pickett, Balents, Zhang, Vanderbilt); the full conference schedule is provided with this report. The week's events included a public lecture (Quantum Matters given by Chetan Nayak from Microsoft Research) and attended by 234 members of the public, and a physics caf© geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Kathryn Moler (Stanford University) and Andrew M. Rappe (University of Pennsylvania) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by Joel Moore (University of California Berkeley), Chetan Nayak (Microsoft Research), Karin Rabe (Rutgers University), and Matthias Troyer (ETH Zurich). Two organizers who did not attend the conference were Gabriel Aeppli (University College London & London Centre for Nanotechnology) and Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford University & Max Planck Hamburg).

  18. Web-Based Therapist Training in Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depression: Pilot Study.

    Kobak, Kenneth A; Lipsitz, Joshua D; Markowitz, John C; Bleiberg, Kathryn L

    2017-07-17

    Training mental health professionals to deliver evidence-based therapy (EBT) is now required by most academic accreditation bodies, and evaluating the effectiveness of such training is imperative. However, shortages of time, money, and trained EBT clinician teachers make these challenges daunting. New technologies may help. The authors have developed the first empirically evaluated comprehensive Internet therapist training program for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). The aim of this study was to examine whether (1) the training protocol would increase clinicians' knowledge of IPT concepts and skills and (2) clinicians would deem the training feasible as measured by satisfaction and utility ratings. A total of 26 clinicians enrolled in the training, consisting of (1) a Web-based tutorial on IPT concepts and techniques; (2) live remote training via videoconference, with trainees practicing IPT techniques in a role-play using a case vignette; and (3) a Web-based portal for therapists posttraining use to help facilitate implementation of IPT and maintain adherence over time. Trainees' knowledge of IPT concepts and skills improved significantly (Ptraining component enhanced their professional expertise. Mean rating of applied learning was 3.9 (scale range from 1=very little to 5=a great deal). Overall satisfaction rating was 3.5 (range from 1=very dissatisfied to 4=very satisfied). Results support the efficacy and feasibility of this technology in training clinicians in EBTs and warrant further empirical evaluation. ©Kenneth A Kobak, Joshua D Lipsitz, John C Markowitz, Kathryn L Bleiberg. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 17.07.2017.

  19. You are my teachers.

    Edlich, Richard F

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Owen Wangensteen reminded Dr. Edlich that the chief responsibility of a teacher is to create an atmosphere friendly to learning. Dr Wangensteen indicated that the role of professor has been defined as that of teacher, clinician, and investigator. He then indicated that two more responsibilities must be added: (1) sideline cheerleader and (2) regimental water carrier. Above all those enumerated functions, he believed that the most important concern of a professor is to create an atmosphere friendly to learning. He/she must have the willingness to recognize every type of talent and ability and to encourage men/women of promise. He must be the professor of the open door, easily accessible to students, residents, and associates. The major goal of Dr. Edlich's comments, as he receives the Distinguished Medical Alumni Award from The Minneapolis Medical Alumni Association (Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) is to acknowledge his distinguished colleagues and friends who have served as his teachers during his academic career. They include the following individuals: Theodore J. Edlich, III, President of Total Action Against Poverty; Elizabeth C. Edlic, Cofounder/Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of OneWorldLive; Richard F. Edlich, Jr., President of Edlich Realty; Rachel C. Edlich, Executive Vice President and Cofounder of OneWorldLive; William B. Long, III, MD, President and Medical Director of Trauma Specialists LLP; William P. Magee, MD, Cofounder and Director of Operation Smile; John Barrow, President of Coolibar Incorporated; Mary M. Barrow, Cofounder of Coolibar Incorporated; Kathryne L. Winters, Website Manager and Senior Research Assistant; Lise Borel, DDS, Independent Pharmaceutical/Biotechnical Consultant; Mary Jude Cox, MD, Board Certified Glaucoma Specialist, Teaching Staff at Wills Eye Hospital Glaucoma Service; John Wish, PhD, Member of the Board of The Association of Air Medical Services, Director of the Research Committee; and Dr. Andrew J. Gear, Plastic

  20. Topiramate improves neurovascular function, epidermal nerve fiber morphology, and metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Boyd A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Amanda L Boyd, Patricia M Barlow, Gary L Pittenger, Kathryn F Simmons, Aaron I VinikDepartment of Internal Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAPurpose: To assess the effects of topiramate on C-fiber function, nerve fiber morphology, and metabolism (including insulin sensitivity, obesity, and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.Patients and methods: We conducted an 18-week, open-label trial treating patients with topiramate. Twenty subjects with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy (61.5 ± 1.29 years; 15 male, 5 female were enrolled and completed the trial. Neuropathy was evaluated by total neuropathy scores, nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory tests, laser Doppler skin blood flow, and intraepidermal nerve fibers in skin biopsies.Results: Topiramate treatment improved symptoms compatible with C-fiber dysfunction. Weight, blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c also improved. Laser Doppler skin blood flow improved significantly after 12 weeks of treatment, but returned to baseline at 18 weeks. After 18 weeks of treatment there was a significant increase in intraepidermal nerve fiber length at the forearm, thigh, and proximal leg. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density was significantly increased by topiramate in the proximal leg.Conclusion: This study is the first to demonstrate that it is possible to induce skin intraepidermal nerve fiber regeneration accompanied by enhancement of neurovascular function, translating into improved symptoms as well as sensory nerve function. The simultaneous improvement of selective metabolic indices may play a role in this effect, but this remains to be determined.Keywords: diabetic neuropathy, skin blood flow, skin biopsy, diabetes

  1. Role of biomarkers in understanding and treating children with asthma: towards personalized care

    Lang JE

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jason E Lang,1 Kathryn V Blake21Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Nemours Children's Hospital, Orlando, FL, USA; 2Center for Pharmacogenomics and Translational Research, Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases affecting children. Despite publicized expert panels on asthma management and the availability of high-potency inhaled corticosteroids, asthma continues to pose an enormous burden on quality of life for children. Research into the genetic and molecular origins of asthma are starting to show how distinct disease entities exist within the syndrome of "asthma". Biomarkers can be used to diagnose underlying molecular mechanisms that can predict the natural course of disease or likely response to drug treatment. The progress of personalized medicine in the care of children with asthma is still in its infancy. We are not yet able to apply stratified asthma treatments based on molecular phenotypes, although that time may be fast approaching. This review discusses some of the recent advances in asthma genetics and the use of current biomarkers that can help guide improved treatment. For example, the fraction of expired nitric oxide and serum Immunoglobulin E (IgE (including allergen-specific IgE, when evaluated in the context of recurrent asthma symptoms, are general predictors of allergic airway inflammation. Biomarker assays for secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and cysteinyl leukotrienes are both promising areas of study that can help personalize management, not just for pharmacologic management, but also education and prevention efforts.Keywords: asthma, biomarkers, children, management

  2. Severe lamotrigine toxicosis in a dog

    Sawyer D

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Danielle Sawyer, Kathryn Gates Emergency and Critical Care Department, Advanced Critical Care and Emergency Specialty Services, Culver City, CA, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to describe a case of severe lamotrigine toxicosis in a dog, which was successfully treated using minimal medical interventions. Case summary: A 7-month-old male, intact, Labrador mix was evaluated because of acute onset of vomiting, rigidity, and dull mentation after ingesting lamotrigine tablets. The estimated oral dose that had been ingested was 278 mg/kg (611.6 mg/lb. Physical examination was unremarkable other than abnormalities noted in the cardiovascular and neurological systems. Neurological examination revealed dull mentation, vertical nystagmus, four-legged extensor limb rigidity, and alligator rolling. Cardiovascular examination revealed pale pink mucous membranes and multifocal ventricular tachycardia. Intravenous (IV fluids were started at three times maintenance (180 mL/kg/day. Methocarbamol (100 mg/kg [220 mg/lb], rectally and lidocaine (2 mg/kg [4.4 mg/lb, IV] were administered. Twenty-four and seventy-two hours after presentation, the dog was clinically normal with no ventricular tachycardia being noted. Conclusion: Lamotrigine (6-[2,3-dichlorophenyl]-1,2,4-triazine-3,5-diamine is an anticonvulsant medication used in humans, which inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels. The clinical success of this case suggests that administration of only methocarbamol for the neurologic effects and lidocaine for the arrhythmias, as well as supportive IV fluid therapy, could be a successful treatment strategy for dogs, even with severe lamotrigine toxicosis. Keywords: arrhythmia, toxicity, multifocal ventricular tachycardia, poison

  3. Role of nutrition in performance enhancement and postexercise recovery

    Beck KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn L Beck,1 Jasmine S Thomson,2 Richard J Swift,1 Pamela R von Hurst11School of Food and Nutrition, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, College of Health, Massey University Albany, Auckland, 2School of Food and Nutrition, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, College of Health, Massey University Manawatu, Palmerston North, New ZealandAbstract: A number of factors contribute to success in sport, and diet is a key component. An athlete's dietary requirements depend on several aspects, including the sport, the athlete's goals, the environment, and practical issues. The importance of individualized dietary advice has been increasingly recognized, including day-to-day dietary advice and specific advice before, during, and after training and/or competition. Athletes use a range of dietary strategies to improve performance, with maximizing glycogen stores a key strategy for many. Carbohydrate intake during exercise maintains high levels of carbohydrate oxidation, prevents hypoglycemia, and has a positive effect on the central nervous system. Recent research has focused on athletes training with low carbohydrate availability to enhance metabolic adaptations, but whether this leads to an improvement in performance is unclear. The benefits of protein intake throughout the day following exercise are now well recognized. Athletes should aim to maintain adequate levels of hydration, and they should minimize fluid losses during exercise to no more than 2% of their body weight. Supplement use is widespread in athletes, with recent interest in the beneficial effects of nitrate, beta-alanine, and vitamin D on performance. However, an unregulated supplement industry and inadvertent contamination of supplements with banned substances increases the risk of a positive doping result. Although the availability of nutrition information for athletes varies, athletes will benefit from the advice of a registered dietician or nutritionist

  4. Application of Synchronous Text-Based Dialogue Systems in Mental Health Interventions: Systematic Review.

    Hoermann, Simon; McCabe, Kathryn L; Milne, David N; Calvo, Rafael A

    2017-07-21

    Synchronous written conversations (or "chats") are becoming increasingly popular as Web-based mental health interventions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to evaluate and summarize the quality of these interventions. The aim of this study was to review the current evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of online one-on-one mental health interventions that use text-based synchronous chat. A systematic search was conducted of the databases relevant to this area of research (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online [MEDLINE], PsycINFO, Central, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, IEEE, and ACM). There were no specific selection criteria relating to the participant group. Studies were included if they reported interventions with individual text-based synchronous conversations (ie, chat or text messaging) and a psychological outcome measure. A total of 24 articles were included in this review. Interventions included a wide range of mental health targets (eg, anxiety, distress, depression, eating disorders, and addiction) and intervention design. Overall, compared with the waitlist (WL) condition, studies showed significant and sustained improvements in mental health outcomes following synchronous text-based intervention, and post treatment improvement equivalent but not superior to treatment as usual (TAU) (eg, face-to-face and telephone counseling). Feasibility studies indicate substantial innovation in this area of mental health intervention with studies utilizing trained volunteers and chatbot technologies to deliver interventions. While studies of efficacy show positive post-intervention gains, further research is needed to determine whether time requirements for this mode of intervention are feasible in clinical practice. ©Simon Hoermann, Kathryn L McCabe, David N Milne, Rafael A Calvo. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 21.07.2017.

  5. Book Reviews

    F.J.M. Selier

    1985-01-01

    . Paris, CNRS, 1981, two tomes, 597 pp. - Silvia W. de Groot, Sally Price, Co-wives and calabashes, Ann Arbor, The University of Michigan Press, 1984, 224 p., ill. - N.O. Kielstra, Gene R. Garthwaite, Khans and Shahs. A documentary analysis of the Bakhtiary in Iran, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1983. 213 pp. - G.L. Koster, Jeff Opland, Xhosa oral poetry. Aspects of a black South African tradition, Cambridge Studies in oral and literate culture 7, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge , London, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, Sydney, 1983, XII + 303 pp. - Adam Kuper, Hans Medick, Interest and emotion: Essays on the study of family and kinship, Cambridge University Press, 1984., David Warren Sabean (eds. - C.A. van Peursen, Peter Kloos, Antropologie als wetenschap. Coutinho, Muidenberg 1984 (204 p.. - Jerome Rousseau, Jeannine Koubi, Rambu solo’: “la fumée descend”. Le culte des morts chez les Toradja du Sud. Paris: Editions du CNRS, 1982. 530 pages, 3 maps, 73 pictures. - H.C.G. Schoenaker, Miklós Szalay, Ethnologie und Geschichte: zur Grundlegung einer ethnologischen geschichtsschreibung; mit beispielen aus der Geschichte der Khoi-San in Südafrika. Dietrich Reimer Verlag, Berlin 1983, 292 S. - F.J.M. Selier, Ghaus Ansari, Town-talk, the dynamics of urban anthropology, 170 pp., Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1983., Peter J.M. Nas (eds. - A.A. Trouwborst, Serge Tcherkézoff, Le Roi Nyamwezi, la droite et la gauche. Revision comparative des classifications dualistes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Paris:Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 1983, 154 pp. - Pieter van der Velde, H. Boekraad, Te Elfder Ure 32: Verwantschap en produktiewijze, Jaargang 26 nummer 3 (maart 1983., G. van den Brink, R. Raatgever (eds. - E.Ch.L. van der Vliet, Sally Humphreys, The family, women and death. Comparative studies. London, Boston etc.: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983 (International Library of Anthropology. xiv + 210 pp. - W.F. Wertheim, T. Svensson, Indonesia

  6. Assessing the Equivalence of Paper, Mobile Phone, and Tablet Survey Responses at a Community Mental Health Center Using Equivalent Halves of a 'Gold-Standard' Depression Item Bank.

    Brodey, Benjamin B; Gonzalez, Nicole L; Elkin, Kathryn Ann; Sasiela, W Jordan; Brodey, Inger S

    2017-09-06

    halves, with the potential to simplify future experimental methodologies. Among community mental health care recipients, the PROMIS items function similarly whether administered via paper, tablet, or mobile phone. User satisfaction across modalities was also similar. Because paper, tablet, and mobile phone administrations yielded similar results, the choice of technology should be based on factors such as convenience and can even be changed during a study without adversely affecting the comparability of results. ©Benjamin B Brodey, Nicole L Gonzalez, Kathryn Ann Elkin, W Jordan Sasiela, Inger S Brodey. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 06.09.2017.

  7. Book Reviews

    Gerard Termorshuizen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available - Adriaan Bedner, Joachim Sterly, Simbu plant-lore; Plants used by the people in the Central Highlands of New Guinea; Volume 1: The people and their plant-lore; Volume 2: Botanical survey of Simbu plants; Volume 3: Ethnographical key. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag, 1997, 23 9 + 323 + 275 pp. - H.J.M. Claessen, Jan Rensel, Home in the islands; Housing and social change in the Pacific. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 1997, vii + 264 pp., Margaret Rodman (eds. - Peter van Eeuwijk, Norbert Kohnen, Traditionelle Medizin auf den Philippinen; Angstbewältigung und kognition bei Krankheiten. Stuttgart: Steiner, 1992, 396 pp. [Beiträge zur Südasienforschung 154.] - C.D. Grijns, William A. Smalley, Linguistic diversity and national unity; Language ecology in Thailand. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994, xv + 436 pp. - Nico Kaptein, Ulrike Freitag, Hadhrami traders, scholars, and statesmen in the Indian Ocean, 1750s-1960s. Leiden: Brill, 1997, x + 392 pp., William G. Clarence-Smith (eds. - Elsbeth Locher-Scholten, Raden Ajeng Kartini, On feminism and nationalism; Kartini’s letters to Stella Zeehandelar 1899-1903, translated and with an introduction by Joost Coté. Clayton, Victoria: Monash Asia Instiute, Monash University, xxiii + 129 pp. - Alison Murray, L. Manderson, Sites of desire, economies of pleasure: Sexualities in Asia and the Pacific. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997, xii + 367 pp., M. Jolly (eds. - Chris Penders, Harry A. Poeze, Politiek-Politioneele Overzichten van Nederlandsch-Indië, Deel IV, 1935-1941. Leiden: KITLV Uitgeverij, 1994, xciv + 485 pp. - Kathryn Robinson, Henk Schulte Nordholt, The spell of power; A history of Balinese politics 1650-1940. Leiden: The KITLV Press, 1996, ix + 389 pp. [VKI 170.] - Eric Tagliacozzo, Carl A. Trocki, Gangsters, democracy, and the state in Southeast Asia. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 1998, 94 pp. [Cornell University Southeast Asia Program

  8. Testimonials and Informational Videos on Branded Prescription Drug Websites: Experimental Study to Assess Influence on Consumer Knowledge and Perceptions.

    Sullivan, Helen W; O'Donoghue, Amie C; Gard Read, Jennifer; Amoozegar, Jacqueline B; Aikin, Kathryn J; Rupert, Douglas J

    2018-01-23

    measures (P>.05). In addition, we noted a few differences among the types of videos. Including risks in branded drug website videos may increase in-video risk retention at the expense of text-only risk retention. ©Helen W Sullivan, Amie C O'Donoghue, Jennifer Gard Read, Jacqueline B Amoozegar, Kathryn J Aikin, Douglas J Rupert. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 23.01.2018.

  9. Direct-to-Consumer Promotion of Prescription Drugs on Mobile Devices: Content Analysis.

    Aikin, Kathryn J; Sullivan, Helen W; Dolina, Suzanne; Lynch, Molly; Squiers, Linda B

    2017-07-04

    with both benefit and risk information, 71% (25/35) presented benefits before risks and 51% (18/35) used a bigger font for benefits than for risks. These results indicate that, while risks and benefits are both represented in mobile communications and their associated landing pages, they are not equally prominent and accessible. This has implications for compliance with FDA fair balance regulations. ©Kathryn J Aikin, Helen W Sullivan, Suzanne Dolina, Molly Lynch, Linda B Squiers. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 04.07.2017.

  10. Systemic low-grade inflammation in post-traumatic stress disorder: a systematic review

    Speer K

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Speer,1 Dominic Upton,2 Stuart Semple,1,3 Andrew McKune1–4 1Discipline of Sport and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 2Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 4Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa Abstract: Studies examining post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD have either emphasized a relationship between PTSD and a systemically pro-inflammatory state or identified a link between PTSD and chronic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for a relationship between individuals with PTSD and systemic low-grade inflammation that has been proposed to underlie chronic disease development in this population. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature (January 2006 to April 2017 in accordance with the PRISMA statement in the following four databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus with Full Text. The search strategy was limited to articles published in peer-reviewed journals and to human studies. Nine studies measuring systemic inflammation and discussing its role in chronic disease development were selected for inclusion in this review. The association between markers of systemic inflammation and PTSD was evaluated by the measurement of a variety of systemic inflammatory markers including acute-phase proteins, complement proteins, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, natural killer cells, and white blood cells. In general, systemic inflammatory biomarkers were elevated across the studies in the PTSD groups. There is evidence that PTSD is underpinned by the presence of a systemic low-grade inflammatory state. This inflammation may be the mechanism associated with increased risk for chronic disease in the PTSD population. From

  11. Reliability and validity of the test of incremental respiratory endurance measures of inspiratory muscle performance in COPD

    Formiga MF

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Magno F Formiga,1,2 Kathryn E Roach,1 Isabel Vital,3 Gisel Urdaneta,3 Kira Balestrini,3 Rafael A Calderon-Candelario,3,4 Michael A Campos,3,4,* Lawrence P Cahalin1,* 1Department of Physical Therapy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Coral Gables, FL, USA; 2CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasilia, Brazil; 3Pulmonary Section, Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA; 4Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance (TIRE provides a comprehensive assessment of inspiratory muscle performance by measuring maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP over time. The integration of MIP over inspiratory duration (ID provides the sustained maximal inspiratory pressure (SMIP. Evidence on the reliability and validity of these measurements in COPD is not currently available. Therefore, we assessed the reliability, responsiveness and construct validity of the TIRE measures of inspiratory muscle performance in subjects with COPD. Patients and methods: Test–retest reliability, known-groups and convergent validity assessments were implemented simultaneously in 81 male subjects with mild to very severe COPD. TIRE measures were obtained using the portable PrO2 device, following standard guidelines. Results: All TIRE measures were found to be highly reliable, with SMIP demonstrating the strongest test–retest reliability with a nearly perfect intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC of 0.99, while MIP and ID clustered closely together behind SMIP with ICC values of about 0.97. Our findings also demonstrated known-groups validity of all TIRE measures, with SMIP and ID yielding larger effect sizes when compared to MIP in distinguishing between subjects of different COPD status. Finally, our analyses confirmed convergent validity for both SMIP

  12. Assessing Unmet Information Needs of Breast Cancer Survivors: Exploratory Study of Online Health Forums Using Text Classification and Retrieval.

    McRoy, Susan; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Wang, Yanshan; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Haddad, Tufia C; Liu, Hongfang

    2018-05-15

    a third of breast cancer survivors' questions would be addressed by the materials currently provided to them. ©Susan McRoy, Majid Rastegar-Mojarad, Yanshan Wang, Kathryn J. Ruddy, Tufia C. Haddad, Hongfang Liu. Originally published in JMIR Cancer (http://cancer.jmir.org), 15.05.2018.

  13. Severe mental illness and chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study in the United Kingdom

    Iwagami M

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Masao Iwagami,1 Kathryn E Mansfield,1 Joseph F Hayes,2 Kate Walters,3 David PJ Osborn,2,4 Liam Smeeth,1 Dorothea Nitsch,1 Laurie A Tomlinson1 1Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 2Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK; 3Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK; 4Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Objective: We investigated the burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD among patients with severe mental illness (SMI. Methods: We identified patients with SMI among all those aged 25–74 registered in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink as on March 31, 2014. We compared the prevalence of CKD (two measurements of estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 for ≥3 months and renal replacement therapy between patients with and without SMI. For patients with and without a history of lithium prescription separately, we used logistic regression to examine the association between SMI and CKD, adjusting for demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and known CKD risk factors. Results: The CKD prevalence was 14.6% among patients with SMI and a history of lithium prescription (n = 4,295, 3.3% among patients with SMI and no history of lithium prescription (n = 24,101, and 2.1% among patients without SMI (n = 2,387,988; P < 0.001. The prevalence of renal replacement therapy was 0.23%, 0.15%, and 0.11%, respectively (P = 0.012. Compared to patients without SMI, the fully adjusted odds ratio for CKD was 6.49 (95% CI 5.84–7.21 for patients with SMI and a history of lithium prescription and 1.45 (95% CI 1.34–1.58 for patients with SMI and no history of lithium prescription. The higher prevalence of CKD in patients with SMI may, in part, be explained by more frequent blood testing as compared to the general population. Conclusion: CKD is identified more commonly among

  14. Closing the loop in person-centered care: patient experiences of a chronic kidney disease self-management intervention

    Havas K

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Havas,1,2 Clint Douglas,1 Ann Bonner1–3 1School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, 2NHMRC Chronic Kidney Disease Centre for Research Excellence, University of Queensland, 3Kidney Health Service, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Purpose: The provision of self-management support (SMS for people with earlier stages (1–4 of chronic kidney disease (CKD can improve patient outcomes and extend time to dialysis. However, attempts to deliver such support have often not taken patient preferences into account. After the development, implementation, and quantitative evaluation of the person-centered CKD-SMS intervention, the aim of this study was to investigate participant experiences and perceptions of the program, as well as to seek suggestions to improve future SMS attempts.Patients and methods: Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with almost all (63/66 participants in the CKD-SMS. Deductive categories were derived from previous research into self-management from the CKD patient’s perspective, and this was supplemented by categories that emerged inductively during multiple readings of interview transcripts. Content analysis was used to analyze interview data.Results: Participants recognized self-management of CKD as complex and multifaceted. They felt that the CKD-SMS helped them develop skills to engage in necessary self-management tasks, as well as their knowledge about their condition and confidence to take an active role in their healthcare. These participants experience a healthcare environment that is characterized by complexity and inconsistency, and participation in the intervention helped them to navigate it. The benefit of participating in this research to contribute to the scientific literature was also recognized by participants. Overall, participants found the CKD-SMS useful in its current format, and made some suggestions for future interventions

  15. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    Witzeman K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Witzeman,1 Ruby HN Nguyen,2 Alisa Eanes,3 Sawsan As-Sanie,4 Denniz Zolnoun51Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, 2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3Pelvic Pain Research Unit, Division of Advanced Laparoscopy and Pelvic Pain, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: An estimated 8.3%–16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD. Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy.Objective: To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD.Design: In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity.Methods: We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100 was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the

  16. Von Hippel-Lindau status influences phenotype of liver cancers arising from PTEN loss

    Sendor AB

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Adam B Sendor,1 Kathryn E Hacker,1 Shufen Chen,1 Armando L Corona,1 Oishee Sen,1 Derek Y Chiang,1 Anna Snavely,1 Arlin B Rogers,2 Stephanie A Montgomery,1 W Kimryn Rathmell,1 Autumn J McRee11Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Section of Pathology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USABackground: PTEN loss contributes to the development of liver diseases including hepatic steatosis and both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and cholangiocarcinoma (CC. The factors that influence the penetrance of these conditions are unclear. We explored the influence of sustained hypoxia signaling through co-deletion of Pten and Vhl in a murine model.Methods: We used a CreER-linked Keratin 18 mouse model to conditionally delete Pten, Vhl or both in somatic cells of adult mice, evaluating the resultant tumors by histology and gene expression microarray. Existing sets of gene expression data for human HCC and CC were examined for pathways related to those observed in the murine tumors, and a cohort of human CC samples was evaluated for relationships between HIF-1α expression and clinical outcomes.Results: Both Pten deletion genotypes developed liver tumors, but with differing phenotypes. Pten deletion alone led to large hepatic tumors with widespread hepatosteatosis. Co-deletion of Pten and Vhl with the Keratin 18 promoter resulted in reduced steatosis and a reduced tumor burden that was characterized by a trabecular architecture similar to CC. Genes associated with hepatic steatosis were coordinately expressed in the human HCC dataset, while genes involved in hypoxia response were upregulated in tumors from the human CC dataset. HIF-1α expression and overall survival were examined in an independent cohort of human CC tumors with no statistical differences uncovered.Conclusion: Pten deletion in Keratin 18 expressing cells leads to

  17. A novel nomogram for the treatment of astigmatism with femtosecond-laser arcuate incisions at the time of cataract surgery

    Baharozian CJ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Connor J Baharozian,1 Christian Song,2,3 Kathryn M Hatch,2,3 Jonathan H Talamo2,3 1Boston University School of Medicine, 2Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine an arcuate incision (AI nomogram to treat astigmatism during femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective, cohort study. Femtosecond laser (FSL-assisted transepithelial AIs were created at a 9.0 mm optical zone, 80% depth, centered on the limbus. We modified the manual Donnenfeld limbal relaxing incision nomogram to 70% for with-the-rule (WTR, 80% for oblique (OBL, and 100% for against-the-rule (ATR astigmatism. The correction index (CI equaled AI-induced astigmatism/target-induced astigmatism. Measures included preoperative keratometric corneal cylinder (Pre Kcyl, postoperative Kcyl (Post Kcyl, and postoperative residual refractive astigmatism (Post RRA. Results: Mean Pre Kcyl and 1–2 months Post RRA in 161 eyes of 116 patients were 0.626±0.417 diopters (D (range 0.5–2 D, and 0.495±0.400 D (range 0–1.5 D, respectively. Mean absolute astigmatic changes (Pre Kcyl–Post Kcyl without accounting for axis change in the WTR, ATR, and OBL groups were 0.165±0.383 D (P<0.001, 0.374±0.536 D (P<0.001, and 0.253±0.416 D (P=0.02, respectively. Mean absolute astigmatic changes using RRA as the postoperative measurement (Pre Kcyl–Post RRA without accounting for axis change were 0.440±0.461 D (P<0.001, 0.238±0.571 D (P<0.05, 0.154±0.450 (P=0.111 in WTR, ATR, and OBL groups, respectively. CIs for WTR, ATR, and OBL were 0.53, 1.01, and 0.95, respectively. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications related to the AIs.Conclusion: Transepithelial FSL-AIs using the modified Donnenfeld nomogram show potential for management of mild to moderate corneal astigmatism. An increase in the magnitude or reduction of the optical zone

  18. Using Robots at Home to Support Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Garrett, Jeff; Jepsen, Nicola; Li Ogilvie, Vickie; Ahn, Ho Seok; Robinson, Hayley; Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Rouse, Paul; Pillai, Avinesh; MacDonald, Bruce

    2018-02-13

    especially useful for patients struggling with adherence. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615000259549; http://www.anzctr.org.au (Archived by WebCite at  http://www.webcitation.org/6whIjptLS). ©Elizabeth Broadbent, Jeff Garrett, Nicola Jepsen, Vickie Li Ogilvie, Ho Seok Ahn, Hayley Robinson, Kathryn Peri, Ngaire Kerse, Paul Rouse, Avinesh Pillai, Bruce MacDonald. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 13.02.2018.

  19. Assessment of vitamin D levels in newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes mellitus comparing two methods of measurement: a facility's experience in the Middle Eastern country of Bahrain

    Al-Haddad FA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatima Ahmed Al-Haddad,1 Mansoor H Rajab,2 S Mahmood Al-Qallaf,3 Abdulrahman O Musaiger,4 Kathryn H Hart5 1Dietetic Unit for Hospitals, 2Pediatric Endocrine and Diabetes Team, Pediatric Department, Salmaniya Medical Complex, 3Pharmacy Program, College of Health Sciences, University of Bahrain, Manama, 4Nutrition and Health Studies Unit Deanship of Scientific Research, University of Bahrain, Sakheer, Kingdom of Bahrain; 5School of Biosciences and Medicine, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK Background: The number of children being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is on the rise and has more than doubled in the past 10 years in Bahrain. Some studies have linked low vitamin D levels with an increased risk of diabetes. There are concerns regarding the variations in circulating 25(OHD levels measured by different laboratories and by using different analytical techniques. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the vitamin D levels of newly diagnosed children with T1DM using the “gold standard method” with high-pressure liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry methods compared to the chemiluminescence micro-particle immunoassay (CMIA used in a hospital laboratory. Subjects: Eighteen children, aged 6–12 years, who received a confirmed diagnosis of T1DM in 2014 were chosen as subjects. Methods: Serum vitamin D levels were assessed in a hospital, while an extra aliquot of blood collected during routine blood collection after acquiring informed written consents from the subjects, and sent to Princess Al-Jawhara Center for Molecular Medicine and Inherited Disorders to be analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS. Results: The mean age of the study group was 9±2 years. The mean total of 25(OHD levels (D3 and D2 assessed by UPLC-MS/MS was 49.7±18.8, whereas the mean total of 25(OHD levels obtained from the CMIA assay was 44.60±13

  20. A Gamified Smartphone App to Support Engagement in Care and Medication Adherence for HIV-Positive Young Men Who Have Sex With Men (AllyQuest): Development and Pilot Study.

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa; Muessig, Kathryn; Knudtson, Kelly; Srivatsa, Mala; Lawrence, Ellena; LeGrand, Sara; Hotten, Anna; Hosek, Sybil

    2018-04-30

    number of days logged into the app and knowledge and confidence in ability to reliably take HIV medications. AllyQuest represents a new, highly scalable solution that is well-suited to meet the specific prevention and care needs of HIV+ YMSM. The development of this intervention is both timely and vital, given the urgency of the ongoing HIV epidemic among YMSM. ©Lisa Hightow-Weidman, Kathryn Muessig, Kelly Knudtson, Mala Srivatsa, Ellena Lawrence, Sara LeGrand, Anna Hotten, Sybil Hosek. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 30.04.2018.

  1. El voluntariado y la identidad voluntaria como herramientas neoliberales: en pauta el voluntariado contra el cáncer infantil piauiense

    Lourdes Almeida Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available El argumento desarrollado reside en que el tercer sector es una construcción político-económica del Estado para la implantación del programa neoliberal de reducción de la acción social estatal, y el voluntariado una construcción revalorada socioculturalmente, en los últimos años, en Brasil. El voluntariado, como identidad social, es una de las herramientas de legitimación de la nueva postura del Estado brasileño. Con la reducción de la acción social del Estado, hubo la disminución con lo social por parte de este y la consecuente responsabilidad de la sociedad por la gerencia de políticas sociales puntuales y focalistas. La cultura de los voluntariados promovió la construcción de las identidades voluntarias. En este proceso, los derechos sociales y la solidaridad social fueron transformados en deberes sociales y solidaridad voluntaria y local, como es el caso del voluntariado de la Red Femenina de Combate al Cáncer de Piauí (RFCC-PI, organización social que actúa en la prevención y terapéutica de cáncer. Concluimos que el tercer sector y los voluntariados, de entre ellos el de la RFCC-PI, son campo de minas, debido al Estado financiar/subsidiar inúmeras categorías del tercer sector y, así, desfavorecer las demandas sociales. Sin embargo, independientemente del contexto neoliberal brasileño, la importancia del voluntariado de la RFCC-PI está en su acción complementaria del cuidado humanizado a personas con cáncer, uniendo medicina y terapia lúdica. Los autores utilizados en este análisis son: Ana Amaral (2003; Zygmunt Bauman (2005; Elaine Behring (2003; Paula Bonfim (2010; Lúcia Costa (2006; Denys Cuche (2002; Victor Ferreira (2005; Stuart Hall (2000; Rodrigo Horochovski (2003; José Mendes (2002; Maria Luiza Mestriner (2005; Thomaz Silva (2000, Susan Sontag (1984 e Kathryn Woodward (2000. La metodología se basó en la revisión de la literatura, análisis de documentos, entrevistas y trabajo de campo.

  2. Role and uptake of human papillomavirus vaccine in adolescent health in the United States

    Sudenga SL

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Staci L Sudenga, Kathryn E Royse, Sadeep ShresthaDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Both the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines, Gardasil® and Cervarix®, are licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer in females, and Gardasil is also licensed for the prevention of genital warts and anal cancer in both males and females. This review focuses on the uptake of these vaccines in adolescent males and females in the USA and the barriers associated with vaccine initiation and completion. In the USA in 2009, approximately 44.3% of adolescent females aged 13–17 years had received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine, but only 26.7% had received all three doses. In general, the Northeast and Midwest regions of the USA have the highest rates of HPV vaccine initiation in adolescent females, while the Southeast has the lowest rates of vaccine initiation. Uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine in adolescent females did not vary by race/ethnicity; however, completion of all three doses is lower among African Americans (23.1% and Latinos (23.4% compared with Caucasians (29.3%. At present, vaccination rates among adolescent females are lower than expected, and thus vaccine models suggest that it is more cost-effective to vaccinate both adolescent males and females. Current guidelines for HPV vaccination in adolescent males is recommended only for “permissive use,” which leaves this population out of routine vaccination for HPV. The uptake of the vaccine is challenged by the high cost, feasibility, and logistics of three-dose deliveries. The biggest impact on acceptability of the vaccine is by adolescents, physicians, parents, and the community. Future efforts need to focus on HPV vaccine education among adolescents and decreasing the barriers associated with poor vaccine uptake and completion in adolescents before their sexual debut, but Papanicolau

  3. Successful long-term weight loss maintenance in a rural population

    Milsom VA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa A Milsom1,2, Kathryn M Ross Middleton2, Michael G Perri21Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USABackground: Few investigations of successful long-term weight loss beyond two years have been conducted, and none has examined weight changes in medically underserved rural populations of older adults. The purpose of this study was to assess long-term weight loss maintenance 3.5 years after the completion of an initial six-month lifestyle intervention for obesity among women aged 50–75 years residing in rural communities.Methods: One hundred and ten obese women with a mean (± standard deviation age of 60.08 ± 6.17 years and mean body mass index of 36.76 ± 5.10 kg/m2 completed an in-person assessment during which their weight and adherence to behavioral weight management strategies were evaluated.Results: Participants showed a mean weight reduction of 10.17% ± 5.0% during the initial six-month intervention and regained 6.95% ± 9.44% from the completion of treatment to follow-up assessment 3.5 years later. A substantial proportion of participants (41.80% were able to maintain weight reductions of 5% or greater from baseline to follow-up. "Successful" participants (those who maintained losses of 5% or greater at follow-up reported weighing themselves, self-monitoring their intake and calories, planning meals in advance, and choosing lower calorie foods with greater frequency than "unsuccessful" participants (those who lost less than 5%.Conclusion: Collectively, these findings indicate that a large proportion of participants were able to maintain clinically significant weight losses for multiple years after treatment, and that self-monitoring was a key component of successful long-term weight management.Keywords: obesity, weight loss, weight maintenance, lifestyle intervention, rural, health disparities

  4. Nanoemulsion as a carrier to improve the topical anti-inflammatory activity of stem bark extract of Rapanea ferruginea

    Dal Mas J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Juarana Dal Mas,1 Tailyn Zermiani,1 Liliani C Thiesen,1 Joana LM Silveira,2 Kathryn ABS da Silva,1 Márcia M de Souza,1 Angela Malheiros,1 Tania MB Bresolin,1 Ruth M Lucinda-Silva1 1NIQFAR, Graduate Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Vale do Itajaí, Itajaí, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: The aim of this study was to develop nanoemulsion containing soft extract of stem bark of Rapanea ferruginea to improve the topical delivery and anti-inflammatory activity. The extract of R. ferruginea stem bark was incorporated into the oily phase of the nanoemulsion by the method of phase inversion at low energy. The developed nanoemulsion had an average droplet size of 47.88±8.20 nm and a polydispersibility index of 0.228. Uniformity of size, spherical shape of droplet, and absence of clusters were confirmed by transmission electronic microscopy. The zeta potential was -34.7±1.15 mV. The nanoemulsion showed a moderate degree of skin irritation in the agarose overlay assay in vitro. The content of the extract markers, myrsinoic acids A and B, was 54.10±0.08 and 53.03 µg/g in the formulation, respectively. The formulation demonstrated pseudoplastic and thixotropic rheological behavior. In vitro release of chemical markers was controlled by diffusion mechanism. An extract-loaded nanoemulsion showed a topical anti-inflammatory activity in a croton oil-induced edema ear model, with a decrease in tumor necrosis factor release and myeloperoxidase activity. The nanoemulsion was 160% more efficient than the conventional cream containing 0.13% of the extract. The nanoemulsion showed suitable properties as a carrier for topical use of R. ferruginea extract and the approach for improving the topical anti-inflammatory activity. Keywords: nanotechnology, nanoemulsion, Rapanea ferruginea, anti-inflammatory, phytomedicine

  5. WATER RESISTANCE OF RECYCLED PAPER PANEL

    Alexander Rani Suryandono

    2017-06-01

    Alice Wisler (2015 Facts about Recycling Paper. http://greenliving.lovetoknow.com/Facts_About_Recycling_Paper. Accessed 2 April 2016 Clay Miller (2011 5 Benefits of Recycling Paper. http://www.ways2gogreenblog.com/2011/09/28/5-benefits-of-recycling-paper/. Accessed 10 May 2016 Hari Goyal (2015 Grades of Paper. http://www.paperonweb.com/grade.htm. Accessed 2 April 2016 Hari Goyal (2015 Properties of Paper. http://www.paperonweb.com/paperpro.htm. Accessed 2 April 2016 Kathryn Sukalich (2016 Everything You Need to Know about Paper Recycling. http://earth911.com/business-policy/business/paper-recycling-details-basics/. Accessed 15 July 2016 [U1] Larry West (2015 Why Recycle Paper. http://environment.about.com/od/recycling/a/The-Benefits-Of-Paper-Recycling-Why-Recycle-Paper.htm. Accesed 15 June 2016 Marie-Luise Blue (2008 The Advantages of Recycling Paper. http://education.seattlepi.com/advantages-recycling-paper-3440.html. Accessed 15 June 2016 Nina Spitzer (2009 http://www.sheknows.com/home-and-gardening/articles/810025/the-impact-of-disposable-coffee-cups-on-the-environment. Accessed 15 June 2016 Radio New Zealand (2010 Iwi not Giving Up Fight against Tasman Mill Discharges. http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/regional/64521/iwi-not-giving-up-fight-against-tasman-mill-discharges. Accessed 15 July 2016 Rick LeBlanc (2016 Paper Recycling Facts, Figures and Information Sources. https://www.thebalance.com/paper-recycling-facts-figures-and-information-sources-2877868?_ga=1.192832942.544061388.1477446686. Accesed 2 April 2016 Robinson Meyer (2016 Will More Newspapers Go Nonprofit? http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/newspapers-philadelphia-inquirer-daily-news-nonprofit-lol-taxes/423960/. Accessed 3 August 2016 School of Engineering at Darthmouth (2010 Forest and Paper Industry. http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/~d30345d/courses/engs171/Paper.pdf. Accessed 2 April 2016 T. Subramani, V. Angappan. (2015. Experimental Investigation of Papercrete Concrete

  6. Email Between Patient and Provider: Assessing the Attitudes and Perspectives of 624 Primary Health Care Patients.

    Seth, Puneet; Abu-Abed, Mohamed Ismail; Kapoor, Vikram; Nicholson, Kathryn; Agarwal, Gina

    2016-12-22

    communication. With increasing utility of mobile devices in the general population, the proportion of patients interested in email communication with their health care providers may continue to increase. When following best practices and appropriate guidelines, health care providers can use this resource to enhance patient-provider communication in their clinical work, ultimately leading to improved health outcomes and satisfaction with care among their patients. ©Puneet Seth, Mohamed Ismail Abu-Abed, Vikram Kapoor, Kathryn Nicholson, Gina Agarwal. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 22.12.2016.

  7. Performance of a Mobile Phone App-Based Participatory Syndromic Surveillance System for Acute Febrile Illness and Acute Gastroenteritis in Rural Guatemala.

    Olson, Daniel; Lamb, Molly; Lopez, Maria Renee; Colborn, Kathryn; Paniagua-Avila, Alejandra; Zacarias, Alma; Zambrano-Perilla, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Castro, Sergio Ricardo; Cordon-Rosales, Celia; Asturias, Edwin Jose

    2017-11-09

    surveillance system demonstrated a high reporting rate and good agreement between parental reported data and nurse-reported data during home visits. Several household-level and external factors were associated with decreased syndromic reporting. Poor reporting rate was associated with decreased syndromic and pathogen-specific case ascertainment. ©Daniel Olson, Molly Lamb, Maria Renee Lopez, Kathryn Colborn, Alejandra Paniagua-Avila, Alma Zacarias, Ricardo Zambrano-Perilla, Sergio Ricardo Rodríguez-Castro, Celia Cordon-Rosales, Edwin Jose Asturias. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 09.11.2017.

  8. Does progressive resistance and balance exercise reduce falls in residential aged care? Randomized controlled trial protocol for the SUNBEAM program

    Hewitt J

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Hewitt,1 Kathryn M Refshauge,1 Stephen Goodall,2 Timothy Henwood,3 Lindy Clemson1 1Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 2Centre for Health Economic Research and Evaluation, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW, 3University of Queensland/Blue Care Research and Practice Development Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Introduction: Falls are common among older adults. It is reported that approximately 60% of residents of aged care facilities fall each year. This is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and a significant burden for health care providers and the health system. Among community dwelling older adults, exercise appears to be an effective countermeasure, but data are limited and inconsistent among studies in residents of aged care communities. This trial has been designed to evaluate whether the SUNBEAM program (Strength and Balance Exercise in Aged Care reduces falls in residents of aged care facilities. Research question: Is the program more effective and cost-effective than usual care for the prevention of falls? Design: Single-blinded, two group, cluster randomized trial. Participants and setting: 300 residents, living in 20 aged care facilities. Intervention: Progressive resistance and balance training under the guidance of a physiotherapist for 6 months, then facility-guided maintenance training for 6 months. Control: Usual care. Measurements: Number of falls, number of fallers, quality of life, mobility, balance, fear of falling, cognitive well-being, resource use, and cost-effectiveness. Measurements will be taken at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Analysis: The number of falls will be analyzed using a Poisson mixed model. A logistic mixed model will be used to analyze the number of residents who fall during the study period. Intention-to-treat analysis will be used. Discussion: This study addresses a significant shortcoming in aged care research, and has potential to impact

  9. Developmental trajectories of overweight and obesity of US youth through the life course of adolescence to young adulthood

    Chen X

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Xinguang Chen, Kathryn BroganPediatric Prevention Research Center, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USAObjective: To detect subgroups with different risks at different ages to develop overweight and obese during the adolescence–young adulthood period.Design: Accelerated longitudinal design and developmental trajectory analysis were used. The likelihoods to become overweight (body mass index [BMI] .25 kg/m2 and obese (BMI .30 kg/m2 were assessed across the life course from the ages of 12 to 28 years.Subjects: Adolescent participants aged 12–17 years (n = 4119 identified in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 at baseline were followed up to 2008.Results: Seven overweight risk groups (WG were detected for male and female samples respectively, of which five were closely related to each of the following five periods: (a middle-school ages (19.7% and 12.6% for male and female, respectively, (b high-school ages (11.4% and 13.6%, respectively, (c college ages (12.6% and 9.1%, respectively, (d post-college ages (11.8% and 10.0%, respectively, and (e work–family-formation ages (11.0% and 12.9%, respectively; two were nonperiod-specific groups: a permanent low-risk group for both sexes (27.3% for male, 36.4% for female, a growing-risk group for males (6.2%, and a self-limiting risk group for females (5.4%, with the likelihood increasing with age, which peaked at the age of 21 years, and then declined. Likewise, six obesity risk groups (OG were detected, of which four corresponded to the first four high-risk WG groups. The risk groups were relatively independent of race and educational attainment.Conclusions: Findings of this study imply that five risk groups for weight gain like five consecutive "tests" exist from middle-school period to work-and-family formation. Failure to pass any of these tests in the life course could lead to overweight or obese status. Further research needs to study life

  10. Intrinsic association between diet and the gut microbiome: current evidence

    Winglee K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Winglee, Anthony A Fodor Department of Bioinformatics and Genomics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA Abstract: The gut microbiome performs many crucial functions for the human host, but the molecular mechanisms by which host, microbe, and diet interact to mediate health and disease are only starting to be revealed. Here, we review the literature on how changes in the diet affect the microbiome. A number of studies have shown that within a geographic region, different diets (such as vegan vs omnivore are associated with differences in a modest number of taxa, but do not reliably produce radical differences within the gut microbial community. In contrast, studies that look across continents consistently find profoundly different microbial communities between Westernized and traditional populations, although it remains unclear to what extent diet or other differences in lifestyle drive these distinct microbial community structures. Furthermore, studies that place subjects on controlled short-term experimental diets have found the resulting alterations to the gut microbial community to generally be small in scope, with changes that do not overcome initial individual differences in microbial community structure. These results emphasize that the human gut microbial community is relatively stable over time. In contrast, short-term changes in diet can cause large changes in metabolite profiles, including metabolites processed by the gut microbial community. These results suggest that commensal gut microbes have a great deal of genetic plasticity and can activate different metabolic pathways independent of changes to microbial community composition. Thus, future studies of how the diet impacts host health via the microbiome may wish to focus on functional assays such as transcriptomics and metabolomics, in addition to 16S rRNA and whole-genome metagenome shotgun analyses of DNA. Taken together, the literature is most

  11. Enlisting New Teachers in Clinical Environments (ENTICE; novel ways to engage clinicians

    Peyser B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Peyser,1 Kathryn A Daily,2 Nicholas M Hudak,3 Kenyon Railey,3 Hayden B Bosworth1,41Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3Department of Community and Family Medicine, Physician Assistant Program, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAPurpose: To explore the barriers and incentives that affect primary care providers who precept students in outpatient clinics in the US.Method: In 2013, leadership of our large primary care group sent a 20-question survey via e-mail to all of the 180 providers within the network. The survey assessed provider demographics, precepting history, learner preferences, and other issues that might affect future decisions about teaching.Results: The response rate was 50% (90 providers. The top reasons for precepting in the past were enjoyment for teaching and personal interaction with learners. The most commonly cited reason for not precepting previously was a perceived lack of time followed by increased productivity demands. When questioned about the future, 65% (59 respondents indicated that they were likely to precept within the next 6 months. A desired reduction in productivity expectations was the most commonly cited motivator, followed by anticipated monetary compensation and adjusted appointment times. A top barrier to future precepting was a belief that teaching decreases productivity and requires large amounts of time.Conclusion: This survey represents an opportunity to study a change in focus for a cohort of busy clinicians who were mostly new to teaching but not new to clinical practice. The survey provides further insight into clinician educators' perceptions regarding the education of a variety of different learners. The results align with data from previous studies in that time

  12. Hubble space telescope servicing mission joint ESA/BAE UK technical press briefing Wednesday 10 March 1993

    1993-02-01

    On Wednesday 10 March 1993 astronauts from ESA and NASA will be at British Aerospace Space Systems Limited, Filton, Bristol, UK, training on the replacement set of solar arrays which they are scheduled to fit to the Hubble Space Telescope at year end. You are invited to attend a technical briefing on that day, which will be given by senior representatives of the European Space Agency and British Aerospace. The briefing will include details of the design modifications and status of the solar arrays, together with a brief overview of the scientific results already achieved by the teams of astronomers using the telescope. There will be an opportunity for interviews with the mission specialists in the crew of NASA's Space Shuttle flight STS-61, who will be carrying out the servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope in a series of "Extra-Vehicular Activities - EVA' (space-walks). Five astronauts are expected : Story Musgrave, Colonel Tom Akers, Jeffrey A. Hoffman, Kathryn C. Thornton from NASA and Claude Nicollier from ESA. There will also be a chance to view the solar arrays in the British Aerospace clean room area where the astronauts are working on their familiarisation programme. The briefing will take place on Wednesday 10 March 1993 at British Aerospace Space Systems, Filton, Bristol, UK (on the northern outskirts of the city of Bristol). The event will begin at 10h30 a.m. and end with a buffet lunch running from approximately 01h30 p.m. to 02h30 p.m. In order to assists with arrangements for travel to and from bristol, British Aerospace proposes to run a free coach from and to London Victoria Coach Station - if there proves to be sufficient press interest. This coach would depart from London at approximately 07h50 a.m. and arrive back at around 05h30 p.m. Further details will be available on request when numbers are known. In order to gain access to the site and the briefing it is essential that all attendees are expected and their names are provided in

  13. Insulin glargine 300 U/mL for basal insulin therapy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Lau IT

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ip Tim Lau,1 Ka Fai Lee,2 Wing Yee So,3 Kathryn Tan,4 Vincent Tok Fai Yeung5 1Department of Medicine, Tseung Kwan O Hospital, 2Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Kwong Wah Hospital, 3Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 4Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, 5Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Our Lady of Maryknoll Hospital, Hong Kong, China Objective: To review published clinical studies on the efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 units/mL (Gla-300, a new long-acting insulin analog, for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DMMaterials and methods: Data sources comprised primary research articles on Gla-300, including pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical studies.Results: In pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies, Gla-300 showed a flatter time–action profile and longer duration of action than Gla-100. Noninferiority of Gla-300 versus Gla-100 for lowering of glycated hemoglobin was demonstrated in Phase III clinical studies covering a range of T1DM and T2DM patient populations. Over 6–12 months of follow-up, Gla-300 consistently showed comparable glycemic efficacy with less hypoglycemia vs Gla-100, even during the first 8 weeks of treatment. Although titrated insulin doses were 11%–17% higher with Gla-300 vs Gla-100, changes in body weight were similar or favored Gla-300.Conclusion: Clinical studies provide evidence that the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of Gla-300 may translate into clinical benefits in both T1DM and T2DM. Gla-300 may provide a new option for people initiating basal insulin, those requiring higher basal insulin doses, those with T1DM, and those who may be at increased risk for hypoglycemia, such as people with chronic kidney disease, the elderly, and those with cardiovascular comorbidities. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, long-acting insulin, insulin glargine

  14. Cultural adaptation: translatability assessment and linguistic validation of the patient-reported outcome instrument for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea

    Delgado-Herrera L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Leticia Delgado-Herrera,1 Kathryn Lasch,2 Ana Popielnicki,3 Akito Nishida,4 Rob Arbuckle,5 Benjamin Banderas,6 Susan Zentner,1 Ingrid Gagainis,1 Bernhardt Zeiher1 1Astellas Pharma Global Development, Northbrook, IL, 2Pharmerit International, Newton, MA, USA; 3TransPerfect, Linguistic Validation Group, Boston, MA, USA; 4Development Project Management, Astellas Pharma Inc, Tokyo, Japan; 5Patient-Centered Outcomes Adelphi Values, Bollington, UK; 6Patient-Centered Outcomes Adelphi Values, Boston, MA, USA Background and objective: Following a 2009 US Food and Drug Administration guidance, a new patient-reported outcome (PRO instrument was developed to support end points in multinational clinical trials assessing irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D symptom severity. Our objective was to assess the translatability of the IBS-D PRO instrument into ten languages, and subsequently perform a cultural adaptation/linguistic validation of the questionnaire into Japanese and US Spanish. Materials and methods: Translatability assessments of the US English version of the IBS-D PRO were performed by experienced PRO translators who were native speakers of each target language and currently residing in target-language countries. Languages were Chinese (People’s Republic of China, Dutch (the Netherlands, French (Belgium, German (Germany, Japanese (Japan, Polish (Poland, Portuguese (Brazil, Russian (Russia, Spanish (Mexico, and Spanish (US. The project team assessed the instrument to identify potential linguistic and/or cultural adaptation issues. After the issues identified were resolved, the instrument was translated into Spanish (US and Japanese through a process of two forward translations, one reconciled translation, and one backward translation. The project team reviewed the translated versions before the instruments were evaluated by cognitive debriefing interviews with samples of five Spanish (US and five Japanese IBS-D patients. Results

  15. List of Posters

    , Calibration, and Jets/Missing Transverse Energy Measurements By Sergey Petrushanko. The CMS Silicon Tracker By Oliver Pooth. Drift Chamber for CMD-3 detector By Alexandr Popov, et al.. Vacuum Phototriods for the CMS ECAL Endcap crystal calorimeter By Vladimir Postoev. CMS Silicon Tracker: Track Reconstruction and Alignment By Frank-Peter Schilling. eRHIC - A precision electron-proton/ion collider facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory By Bernd Surrow. Development of tracking detectors with industrially produced GEM foils By Bernd Surrow, et al.. A Linear Collider Facility with High Intensity e+e- beams (A high intensity e+e- Linear Collider Facility at low energy) By Andre Schoening. Construction of the BESIII detector for tau-charm physics By Yifang Wang. The HERMES Recoil Detector By Sergey Yashchenko. Simulation of MICE in G4 MICE MICE Experiment: The new DO Layer O silicon detector The DO trigger upgrade for RUNIIb The Do Collaboration. Operational experiences with the silicon detector at CDF By Jeannine Wagner. Mathematical aspects of QFT & string theory: Electron in superstrong Coulomb field By D. Gitman. Stability of a non-commutative Jackiw-Teitelboim gravity By Fresneda Rodrigo, et al.. 4d gravity localized on thick branes: the complete mass spectrum By Alfredo Herrera-Aguilar. On Emergence of Quantum Mechanics By L. V. Prokhorov.

  16. Mathematics education and students with learning disabilities: introduction to the special series.

    Rivera, D P

    1997-01-01

    influences on the field of mathematics education. Reform efforts have shaped the field significantly since the 1950s, contributing to the curriculum offered in mathematics textbooks and the pedagogical practices taught in higher education courses. Mathematics educators continue to search for a better understanding of how children learn mathematics; this process is shaped by the prevailing theoretical orientations and research methodologies. This special series in mathematics special education provides readers with information about the characteristics of students with mathematics learning disabilities, assessment procedures, mathematics programming, teacher preparation, and future directions for the field. The series originated as a result of discussions with Dr. Lee Wiederholt and Dr. Judith K. Voress, who saw a need for the compilation of recent research and best practices in mathematics special education. I thank them for their support of and thoughtful insights about the development of this series. I also appreciate the support of Dr. George Hynd and his editorial assistant, Kathryn Black, in finalizing the details for publication. Finally, I am most appreciative of the authors' contributions to this series; their work continues to significantly influence the development of the field of mathematics special education and programming for students with mathematics learning disabilities.

  17. Developing mHealth Messages to Promote Postmenstrual Regulation Contraceptive Use in Bangladesh: Participatory Interview Study.

    Eckersberger, Elisabeth; Pearson, Erin; Andersen, Kathryn; Hossain, Altaf; Footman, Katharine; Biswas, Kamal Kanti; Nuremowla, Sadid; Reiss, Kate

    2017-12-14

    planning methods over the phone after their menstrual regulation. Women most commonly wanted information about the contraceptive method they were currently using and wanted this information to be tailored to their particular needs. Women preferred voice messages to text and liked the interactive voice message format. When asked to repeat and identify the main points of the messages, women demonstrated good understanding of the content. Women did not seem too concerned with privacy or with others reading the messages and welcomed including their husbands in speaking to a counselor. This study found that menstrual regulation clients are very interested in receiving information on their phones to support family planning use and wanted more information about the method of contraception they were using. Participatory voicemail was the preferred modality. ©Elisabeth Eckersberger, Erin Pearson, Kathryn Andersen, Altaf Hossain, Katharine Footman, Kamal Kanti Biswas, Sadid Nuremowla, Kate Reiss. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 14.12.2017.

  18. Very Nice Indeed: Cyprian Latewood's Masochistic Sublime, and the Religious Pluralism of Against the Day

    Michael Jarvis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available My paper deals with mythological/religious imagery and syncretic soteriologies in Thomas Pynchon’s 2006 novel 'Against the Day', focusing in particular on the character of Cyprian Latewood, bisexual spy, Orpheus stand-in, and masochist par excellence. Cyprian’s path throughout the novel is specifically an Orphic descent/return myth, but it also deals with issues of mystical transcendence, metempsychosis, Dionysian 'ekstasis', and Buddhist 'nirvana'. These are represented at the macro level in themes such as retreat from the world, neo-monasticism, anarchic activism, or hope for transcendent knowledge, and also within specific images and scenes, such as those involving flight, self-negation, disembodied voices, and the final voyage of the Chums of Chance, a Manichaean allegory of escape. Cyprian’s final home at a Bogomil-Orphic monastery near Thrace serves to tie together disparate religio-political strands within the novel, including a syncretic teleology (Gnostic/Buddhist/Manichaean and countercultural activism. It is simultaneously a retreat from the world – a political move with relevance to the history of the Bogomils as both persecuted sect and social agitators – and also a move towards transcendence through gnostic ritual. There are a few important results of this reading, touching on religious, mythological, and Pynchon studies, and sexual and political discourse. Firstly, it challenges the ease with which Western, and specifically Christian, ideologies appropriate counter-discourses in acts of cultural hegemony, exemplified in one instance by Kathryn Hume’s early reading of the novel’s ethos as explicitly Roman Catholic, even in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary (“The Religious and Political Vision of 'Against the Day'”, 2007. Secondly, though other critics have gestured at the presence of Orphism and Buddhism in 'Against the Day', they have failed to convincingly tie these concerns to a larger

  19. Medical resource utilization in dermatomyositis/polymyositis patients treated with repository corticotropin injection, intravenous immunoglobulin, and/or rituximab

    Knight T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tyler Knight,1 T Christopher Bond,1 Breanna Popelar,2 Li Wang,3 John W Niewoehner,4 Kathryn Anastassopoulos,1 Michael Philbin4 1Covance Market Access Services Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, 2Xcenda, LLC, Palm Harbor, FL, 3STATinMED Research, Ann Arbor, MI, 4Mallinckrodt, LLC, Hazelwood, MO, USA Background: Dermatomyositis and polymyositis (DM/PM are rare, incurable inflammatory diseases that cause progressive muscle weakness and can be associated with increased medical resource use (MRU. When corticosteroid treatment is unsuccessful, patients may receive intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, rituximab, or repository corticotropin injection (RCI. This study compared real-world, non-medication MRU between patients treated with RCI and those treated with IVIg and/or rituximab for DM/PM.Methods: Claims of DM/PM patients were analyzed from the combination of three commercial health insurance databases in the United States from July 2009 to June 2014. Patients treated with RCI were propensity score matched to those treated with IVIg, rituximab, and both (IVIg+rituximab based on demographics, prior clinical characteristics, and prior MRU. Per-patient per-month (PPPM MRU and costs were compared using Poisson regression and generalized linear modeling, respectively.Results: One-hundred thirty-two RCI, 1,150 IVIg, and 562 rituximab patients had an average age of 52.6, 46.6, and 51.7 years, respectively, and roughly two-thirds were female. After matching, there were no significant differences in demographics or prior clinical characteristics. RCI patients had fewer PPPM hospitalizations (0.09 vs 0.17; P=0.049, shorter length of stay (LOS; 3.24 days vs 4.55 days; P=0.004, PPPM hospital outpatient department (HOPD visits (0.60 vs 1.39; P<0.001, and PPPM physician office visits (2.01 vs 2.33; P=0.035 than IVIg. RCI had fewer PPPM HOPD visits (0.56 vs 0.92; P<0.001 than rituximab. Patients treated with RCI had shorter LOS (2.18 days vs 5.15; P<0.001 and less PPPM HOPD

  20. Epic Allies, a Gamified Mobile Phone App to Improve Engagement in Care, Antiretroviral Uptake, and Adherence Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men and Young Transgender Women Who Have Sex With Men: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn E; Platt, Alyssa; Soni, Karina; Egger, Joseph R; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; McNulty, Tobias; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2018-04-05

    primary outcome measure is viral suppression. Secondary outcome measures include engagement in care, ART uptake, ART adherence, and psychosocial barriers to engagement in care and ART adherence, including psychological distress, stigma, and social support. Baseline enrollment began in September 2015 and was completed in September 2016 (n=146), and assessment of intervention outcomes continued through August 2017. Results for primary and secondary outcome measures are expected to be reported in ClinicalTrials.gov by April 30, 2018. If successful, Epic Allies will represent a novel adherence intervention for a group disproportionately impacted by HIV in the United States. Adherent patients would require less frequent clinic visits and experience fewer HIV-related secondary infections, thereby reducing health care costs and HIV transmission. Epic Allies could easily be expanded and adopted for use among larger populations of YMSM and YTWSM, other HIV-positive populations, and for those diagnosed with other chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02782130; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02782130 (Archived by Webcite at http://www.webcitation.org/6yGODyerk). ©Sara LeGrand, Kathryn E Muessig, Alyssa Platt, Karina Soni, Joseph R Egger, Nkechinyere Nwoko, Tobias McNulty, Lisa B Hightow-Weidman. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 05.04.2018.

  1. Benefits and risks of weight-loss treatment for older, obese women

    Rossen LM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lauren M Rossen,1,2 Vanessa A Milsom,1,3 Kathryn R Middleton,1,4 Michael J Daniels,5,6 Michael G Perri1,71Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 2National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 4Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USA; 5Department of Statistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 6Division of Statistics and Scientific Computation, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 7College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USABackground: A key issue in the treatment of obesity in older adults is whether the health benefits of weight loss outweigh the potential risks with respect to musculoskeletal injury.Objective: To compare change in weight, improvements in metabolic risk factors, and reported musculoskeletal adverse events in middle-aged (50–59 years and older (65–74 years, obese women.Materials and methods: Participants completed an initial 6-month lifestyle intervention for weight loss, comprised of weekly group sessions, followed by 12 months of extended care with biweekly contacts. Weight and fasting blood samples were assessed at baseline, month 6, and month 18; data regarding adverse events were collected throughout the duration of the study.Results: Both middle-aged (n = 162 and older (n = 56 women achieved significant weight reductions from baseline to month 6 (10.1 ± 0.68 kg and 9.3 ± 0.76 kg, respectively and maintained a large proportion of their losses at month 18 (7.6 ± 0.87 kg and 7.6 ± 1.3 kg, respectively; there were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to weight change. Older women further

  2. How do eHealth Programs for Adolescents With Depression Work? A Realist Review of Persuasive System Design Components in Internet-Based Psychological Therapies.

    Wozney, Lori; Huguet, Anna; Bennett, Kathryn; Radomski, Ashley D; Hartling, Lisa; Dyson, Michele; McGrath, Patrick J; Newton, Amanda S

    2017-08-09

    . Of those, 71% (42/59) were of moderate to high quality. The PSD features surface credibility (competent "look and feel"), dialogue support (online program + in-person support), liking and similarity (esthetics and content appeal to adolescent users), the reduction and tunneling of therapeutic content (reducing online content into simple tasks, guiding users), and use of self-monitoring were present in therapies that resulted in improved therapy engagement, satisfaction, and adherence, as well as symptom and functional impairments. When incorporated into Internet-based CBT for adolescent depression, PSD features may improve adolescent adherence, satisfaction, and depression-related outcomes. Testing of these features using hypothesis-driven dismantling approaches is recommended to advance our understanding of how these features contribute to therapy effectiveness. ©Lori Wozney, Anna Huguet, Kathryn Bennett, Ashley D Radomski, Lisa Hartling, Michele Dyson, Patrick J McGrath, Amanda S Newton. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 09.08.2017.

  3. Commercially Available Smartphone Apps to Support Postoperative Pain Self-Management: Scoping Review.

    Lalloo, Chitra; Shah, Ushma; Birnie, Kathryn A; Davies-Chalmers, Cleo; Rivera, Jordan; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell, Fiona

    2017-10-23

    included apps were designed exclusively for the Android platform. Education was the most common self-management feature offered (8/10, 80%), with none of the apps offering features related to goal setting or social support. Overall, no single app was comprehensive in terms of pain self-management content. Five (50%) apps reported the involvement of a health care provider in their development. However, not a single app involved end users in their development, and none of the apps underwent scientific evaluation. Additionally, none of the apps were designed for use in pediatric patients. Currently available postoperative pain apps for patients lack evidence-based content, goal setting, and social support functions. There is a need to develop and test comprehensive theory-based apps to support patients with pain self-management care following surgery. ©Chitra Lalloo, Ushma Shah, Kathryn A Birnie, Cleo Davies-Chalmers, Jordan Rivera, Jennifer Stinson, Fiona Campbell. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 23.10.2017.

  4. IntelliCare: An Eclectic, Skills-Based App Suite for the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety.

    Mohr, David C; Tomasino, Kathryn Noth; Lattie, Emily G; Palac, Hannah L; Kwasny, Mary J; Weingardt, Kenneth; Karr, Chris J; Kaiser, Susan M; Rossom, Rebecca C; Bardsley, Leland R; Caccamo, Lauren; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Schueller, Stephen M

    2017-01-05

    briefly to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety. The IntelliCare system is elemental, allowing individual apps to be used or not used based on their effectiveness and utility, and it is eclectic, viewing treatment strategies as elements that can be applied as needed rather than adhering to a singular, overarching, theoretical model. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02176226; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02176226 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation/6mQZuBGk1). ©David C Mohr, Kathryn Noth Tomasino, Emily G. Lattie, Hannah L Palac, Mary J Kwasny, Kenneth Weingardt, Chris J Karr, Susan M Kaiser, Rebecca C Rossom, Leland R Bardsley, Lauren Caccamo, Colleen Stiles-Shields, Stephen M Schueller. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 05.01.2017.

  5. Book Reviews

    Redactie KITLV

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available -Barbara Watson Andaya, Susan Blackburn, Love, sex and power; Women in Southeast Asia. Clayton VIC: Monash Asia Institute, 2001, iv + 144 pp. [Monash papers on Southeast Asia 55.] -Kathryn Gay Anderson, Juliette Koning ,Women and households in Indonesia; Cultural notions and social practices. Richmond, Surrey: Curzon, 2000, xiii + 354 pp. [Nordic Institute of Asian studies, studies in Asian topics 27.], Marleen Nolten, Janet Rodenburg (eds -Greg Bankoff, Takeshi Kawanaka, Power in a Philippine city. Chiba: Institute of developing economies, 2002, 118 pp. [IDE Occasional papers series 38.] -René van den Berg, John Lynch ,The Oceanic languages. Richmond, Surrey: Curzon, 2002, xvii + 924 pp., Malcolm Ross, Terry Crowley (eds -H.J.M. Claessen, Douglas Oliver, Polynesia in early historic times. Honolulu: Bess Press, 2002, 305 pp. -Harold Crouch, Andrew Rosser, The politics of economic liberalisation in Indonesia; State, market and power. Richmond, Surrey: Curzon, 2002, xv + 232 pp. -Hans Hägerdal, Arend de Roever, De jacht op sandelhout; De VOC en de tweedeling van Timor in de zeventiende eeuw. Zutphen: Walburg Pers, 2002, 383 pp. -Fiona Harris, Lorraine V. Aragon ,Structuralism's transformations; Order and revision in Indonesian and Malaysian societies; Paper written in honor of Clark E. Cunningham. Tempe AZ: Arizona State University Press, 1999, lxii + 402 pp., Susan D. Russell (eds -David Henley, Christiaan Heersink, Dependence on green gold: A socio-economic history of the Indonesian coconut island Selayar. Leiden: KITlV Press, 1999, xviii + 371 pp. [Verhandelingen 184.] -David Hicks, James T. Siegel ,Southeast Asia over three generations; Essays presented to Benedict R.O'G. Anderson 2003, 398 pp. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Southeast Asia program. [Studies on Southeast Asia 36.], Audrey R. Kahin (eds -Janny de Jong, L. de Jong, The collapse of a colonial society; The Dutch in Indonesia during the second world war. With an introduction by

  6. INTERGROWTH-21st Gestational Dating and Fetal and Newborn Growth Standards in Peri-Urban Nairobi, Kenya: Quasi-Experimental Implementation Study Protocol.

    Millar, Kathryn; Patel, Suha; Munson, Meghan; Vesel, Linda; Subbiah, Shalini; Jones, Rachel M; Little, Sarah; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Villar, Jose; Wegner, Mary Nell; Pearson, Nick; Muigai, Faith; Ongeti, Catherine; Langer, Ana

    2018-06-22

    through conferences, seminars, publications, and knowledge management platforms. From October 2016 to February 2017, over 90% of all full-time Jacaranda clinicians (26/28) received at least one of the three aspects of the INTERGROWTH-21 st training: gestational dating ultrasound, fetal growth monitoring ultrasound, and neonatal anthropometry standards. Following the training, implementation and evaluation of the standards in Jacaranda Health's clinical workflow will take place from March 2017 through March 5, 2018. Data analysis will be finalized, and results will be shared by August 2018. The findings of this study will have major implications on the national and global scale up of the INTERGROWTH-21 st standards and on the process of scaling up global standards in general, particularly in limited-resource settings. RR1-10.2196/10293. ©Kathryn Millar, Suha Patel, Meghan Munson, Linda Vesel, Shalini Subbiah, Rachel M. Jones, Sarah Little, Aris T. Papageorghiou, Jose Villar, Mary Nell Wegner, Nick Pearson, Faith Muigai, Catherine Ongeti, Ana Langer. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 22.06.2018.

  7. Social Media Interventions to Promote HIV Testing, Linkage, Adherence, and Retention: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Cao, Bolin; Gupta, Somya; Wang, Jiangtao; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Muessig, Kathryn E; Tang, Weiming; Pan, Stephen; Pendse, Razia; Tucker, Joseph D

    2017-11-24

    studies providing HIV self-testing, 16% of participants requested HIV testing kits from social media platforms. Existing social media platforms such as Facebook (n=15) and the gay dating app Grindr (n=10) were used most frequently. Data from four studies show that HIV testing uptake increased after social media interventions (n=1283, RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.28-1.76). In the studies where social media interventions were participatory, HIV testing uptake was higher in the intervention arm than the comparison arm (n=1023, RR 1.64, 95% CI 1.19-2.26). Social media interventions are effective in promoting HIV testing among MSM in many settings. Social media interventions to improve HIV services beyond HIV testing in low- and middle-income countries and among other key populations need to be considered. International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO): CRD42016048073; http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.php?ID=CRD42016048073 (Archived by WebCite at http://www. webcitation.org/6usLCJK3v). ©Bolin Cao, Somya Gupta, Jiangtao Wang, Lisa B Hightow-Weidman, Kathryn E Muessig, Weiming Tang, Stephen Pan, Razia Pendse, Joseph D. Tucker. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 24.11.2017.

  8. Timely Digital Patient-Clinician Communication in Specialist Clinical Services for Young People: A Mixed-Methods Study (The LYNC Study).

    Griffiths, Frances; Bryce, Carol; Cave, Jonathan; Dritsaki, Melina; Fraser, Joseph; Hamilton, Kathryn; Huxley, Caroline; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Kim, Sung Wook; Kimani, Peter K; Madan, Jason; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Sujan, Mark; Sturt, Jackie

    2017-04-10

    improve trust. The clinical teams studied had not themselves formally evaluated the impact of their intervention. Staff time is the main cost driver, but offsetting savings are likely elsewhere in the health service. Risks include increased dependence on clinicians, inadvertent disclosure of confidential information, and communication failures, which are mostly mitigated by young people and clinicians using common-sense approaches. As NHS policy prompts more widespread use of digital communication to improve the health care experience, our findings suggest that benefit is most likely, and harms are mitigated, when digital communication is used with patients who already have a relationship of trust with the clinical team, and where there is identifiable need for patients to have flexible access, such as when transitioning between services, treatments, or lived context. Clinical teams need a proactive approach to ethics, governance, and patient safety. ©Frances Griffiths, Carol Bryce, Jonathan Cave, Melina Dritsaki, Joseph Fraser, Kathryn Hamilton, Caroline Huxley, Agnieszka Ignatowicz, Sung Wook Kim, Peter K Kimani, Jason Madan, Anne-Marie Slowther, Mark Sujan, Jackie Sturt. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 10.04.2017.

  9. Gathering Opinions on Depression Information Needs and Preferences: Samples and Opinions in Clinic Versus Web-Based Surveys.

    Bernstein, Matthew T; Walker, John R; Sexton, Kathryn A; Katz, Alan; Beatie, Brooke E

    2017-04-24

    important. Those who had received or thought they would have benefited in the past from medication treatment saw fewer topics as important. Participants in both groups expressed an interest in receiving information through discussion with a counselor or a physician, through written brochures, or through a recommended website. The recruitment strategies were helpful in obtaining opinions from members of the public with different concerns and perspectives, and the results from the two methods were complementary. Persons coping with emotional distress and individuals not specifically seeking help for depression would be interested in information to answer a wide range of important questions about depression treatment. The Clinic sample yielded more cultural diversity that is a closer match to the population. The Web sample was less costly to recruit and included persons who were most interested in receiving information. ©Matthew T Bernstein, John R Walker, Kathryn A Sexton, Alan Katz, Brooke E Beatie, Mobilizing Minds Research Group. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 24.04.2017.

  10. Selected abstracts from the Breastfeeding and Feminism International Conference 2016

    Lisa H. Amir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents A1. Infant feeding and poverty: a public health perspective in a global context Lisa H. Amir A2. Mothers’ experiences with galactagogues for lactation: an exploratory cross sectional study Alessandra Bazzano, Shelley Thibeau, Katherine P. Theall A3. The motherhood journey and breastfeeding: from self-efficacy to resilience and social stigma Anna Blair, Karin Cadwell A4. Breastfeeding as an evolutionary adaptive behavior Emily A. Bronson A5. Conflict-of-interest in public health policy: as real as that logo on your website Elizabeth C. Brooks A6. Co-opting sisterhood and motherhood: behind the scenes of Similac’s aggressive social media campaigns Jodine Chase A7. The exclusion of women from the definition of exclusive breastfeeding Ellen Chetwynd, Rebecca Costello, Kathryn Wouk A8. Healthy maternity policies in the workplace: a state health department’s experience with the “Bring Your Infant to Work” program Lindsey Dermid-Gray A9. Implications for a paradigm shift: factors related to breastfeeding among African American women Stephanie Devane-Johnson, Cheryl Woods Giscombe, Miriam Labbok A10. Social experiences of breastfeeding: building bridges between research and policy: an ESRC-funded seminar series in the UK Sally Dowling A11. Manager’s perspectives of lactation breaks Melanie Fraser A12. The challenging second night: a dialogue from two perspectives Jane Grassley, Deborah McCarter-Spaulding, Becky Spencer A13. The role of lactation consultants in two council breastfeeding services in Melbourne, Australia – some preliminary impressions Jennifer Hocking, Pranee Liamputtong A14. Integrating social marketing and community engagement concepts in community breastfeeding programs Sheree H. Keitt, Harumi Reis-Reilly A15. What happens before and after the maternity stay? Creating a community-wide Ten Steps approach Miriam Labbok A16. #RVABREASTFEEDS: cultivating a breastfeeding-friendly community Leslie Lytle A17

  11. Deep brain stimulation targeting the fornix for mild Alzheimer dementia: design of the ADvance randomized controlled trial

    Holroyd KB

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn B Holroyd,1 Lisa Fosdick,2 Gwenn S Smith,1 Jeannie-Marie Leoutsakos,1 Cynthia A Munro,1 Esther S Oh,1 Kristen E Drake,2 Paul B Rosenberg,1 William S Anderson,1 Stephen Salloway,3–5 J Cara Pendergrass,6 Anna D Burke,7 David A Wolk,8 David F Tang-Wai,9–11 Francisco A Ponce,12 Wael F Asaad,13,14 Marwan N Sabbagh,15 Michael S Okun,16 Gordon Baltuch,17 Kelly D Foote,18 Steven D Targum,2,6 Andres M Lozano,10,11 Constantine G Lyketsos1 1Johns Hopkins University Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center, Baltimore, MD, 2Functional Neuromodulation Ltd, Minneapolis, MN, 3Department of Neurology, Butler Hospital, 4Department of Neurology, Rhode Island Hospital, 5Department of Neurology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, 6Clintara LLC, Boston, MA, 7Banner Alzheimer's Institute, Phoenix, AZ, 8Penn Memory Center, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 9Department of Neurology, 10Department of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, 11Division of Neurology, University Health Network Memory Clinic, Toronto, ON, Canada; 12Division of Neurological Surgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 13Department of Neurosurgery, Rhode Island Hospital, 14Department of Neurosurgery, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, 15Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Sun City, AZ, 16Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Department of Neurology, University of Florida – Gainsville, Gainsville, FL, 17Center for Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 18Department of Neurosurgery, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, University of Florida, Gainsville, FL, USA Background: There are currently few available treatments and no cure for Alzheimer disease (AD, a growing public health burden. Animal models and an open-label human trial have indicated that deep brain

  12. Managing our Nuclear Waste: Choosing Safety and Sustainable Development. Proceedings of the European Forum 2005

    Fischer, Claude; SCHNEITER, Jean-Louis; Lamoureux, Francois; ); Haug, Peter; Flueler, Thomas; Bouzon, Jean-Luc; Carlsson, Torsten; DEMET, Michel; Marsily, Ghislain de; Gadbois, Serge; Gatignol, Claude; Hooft, Evelyn; Jordan Cizelj, Romana; Rollinger, Francois; Bataille, Christian; Shaver, Kathryn; Linkohr, Rolf; Castellan, Angelo; Collard, Daniel; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Dose, Francois; Dupraz, Bernard; Gonnot, Francois-Michel; Leclere, Robert; Pradel, Philippe; Webster, Simon; ); Herzog, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    , professor of geology, member of CNE, Academy of Sciences and Academy of Technologies, Serge Gadbois, sociologist, member of Mutadis and COWAM, Claude Gatignol, Manche representative at the French Parliament, member of OPECST, Evelyn Hooft, ONDRAF, Belgium; Romana Jordan Cizelj, Member of the European Parliament, Slovenia, Francois Rollinger, CFDT - CSSIN. 4 - Audition: Christian Bataille, Nord representative at the French Parliament, member of OPECST, Kathryn Shaver, Head of NWMO, Canada. 5 - 2. round table 'Research laboratories and disposal sites: opportunities for dynamics based on sustainable development' (Chairman: Rolf Linkohr, nuclear physicist, Head of C.E.R.E.S. (DE)). The idea is to increase awareness of the fact that our system of production is tending towards eco-production. The nuclear industry has been a pioneer in this respect, by developing new technologies. In fact, the management and storage of waste is a very high-tech industry which can create a range of businesses with added value e.g. storage, safety etc. Moreover, the producers of waste 'have other expertise' which can be called upon by 'departements' that have agreed to the siting of such disposal sites, using the expertise in a way that takes account of the 'departement's' specific advantages (biomass from farming and forestry, control of energy requirements for small businesses etc.). This presupposes that all local and industrial stakeholders will shoulder their responsibilities and make a commitment, along with the local people, to create new training and businesses in the area concerned. A number of questions will be looked at in detail: - the social and environmental responsibility of waste producers: the technologies and expertise that should be used to further sustainable development (nuclear safety and security, bio-fuels, control of energy demands etc.) - partnerships in contracts of agreed objectives; the involvement of all players; the issue of public/private sector partnerships to fund

  13. Obituary: Ronald A. Parise, 1951-2008

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    though Comet Halley was not observed by Astro-1, well over a hundred papers on multiple astronomical sources resulted from Astro-1 and Astro-2. Ron participated in a number of observational astronomy projects using data from ground-based observatories, Copernicus, IUE, and the Astro observatory. His interests were primarily in circumstellar matter within binary star systems and globular- cluster evolution. He bridged the gaps between science, engineering, and spaceflight operations. After the completion of the two Astro missions, Ron supported NASA studies in advanced communications for spaceflight missions and was involved in projects in the Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch developing standard Internet Protocols [IP] in space-data transmission applications. Throughout his career, Ron supported education both by appearances at schools and through his amateur radio interests. Indeed, he had a large following of ham radio operators as he, along with Frank Bauer, brought about the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment [SAREX] payload that enabled many schools to talk to Shuttle crew members in space. Ron's love for amateur radio and for inspiring students came to focus through the Amateur Radio on the International Space STation [ARISS] program. His volunteer help was key in the development of those systems now on board the ISS. As Frank Bauer, a ham colleague, put it in his tribute to Ron Parise, WA4SIR SK: may your exploration spirit live on in us all! Ron leaves behind his wife, Cecilia; son, Nicholas; daughter, Katharine; his parents Henry and Kathryn Parise; and sister, Rita Parise.

  14. Chandra Finds Oxygen and Neon Ring in Ashes of Exploded Star

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed an expanding ring-like structure of oxygen and neon that was hurled into space by the explosion of a massive star. The image of E0102-72 provides unprecedented details about the creation and dispersal of heavy elements necessary to form planets like Earth. The results were reported by Professor Claude Canizares of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Ga. Drs. Kathryn Flanagan, David Davis, and John Houck of MIT collaborated with Canizares in this investigation. E0102-72 is the remnant of a supernova explosion located in our neighbor galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, nearly 200,000 light years away. It was created by the explosion of a star that was more than ten times as massive as our Sun. We are seeing the aftermath of the explosion a thousand or more years after the outburst. Shock waves are heating gas to temperatures of nearly 10 million degrees, so it glows with X-rays that are detected by Chandra's instruments. By using the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETG), astronomers were able to pinpoint the distribution of each chemical element individually and measure the velocities of different parts of the expanding ring. They also show the shock wave in a kind of "freeze-frame," revealing the progressive heating of the stellar matter as it plows into the surrounding gas. This is the first time such detailed X-ray information has ever been obtained for a supernova remnant, and should provide critical clues to the nature of supernovas. The grating spectrometer, which was built by an MIT team led by Canizares, spreads the X-rays according to their wavelength, giving distinct images of the object at specific wavelengths characteristic of each chemical element. Small wavelength shifts caused by the Doppler effect are used to measure the expansion velocities of each element independently. "We've been

  15. Book Reviews

    Dieuwke Wendelaar Bonga

    1998-10-01

    Hahl, Gouverneursjahre in Neuguinea. Edited by Wilfried Wagner. Hamburg: Abera Verlag Meyer, 1997, xxxi + 230 pp. - Elly Touwen-Bouwsma, Dieuwke Wendelaar Bonga, Eight prison camps; A Dutch family in Japanese Java. Athens, Ohio: University Center for International Studies, 1996, xii + 219 pp. - Freek Colombijn, Anthony J. Whitten, The ecology of Sumatra. Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada University Press, 1987 [First edition 1984], xxiii + 583 pp., photographs, figures, tables, index., Sengli J. Damanik, Jazanul Anwar (eds. - David Henley, Anthony J. Whitten, The ecology of Sulawesi. Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada University Press, 1987, xxi + 777 pp., Muslimin Mustafa, Gregory S. Henderson (eds. - Peter Boomgaard, Tony Whitten, The ecology of Java and Bali. [Singapore]: Periplus Editions, 1996, xxiii + 969 pp. [The Ecology of Indonesia Series 2.], Roehayat Emon Soeriaatmadja, Surya A. Afiff (eds. - Han Knapen, Kathy MacKinnon, The ecology of Kalimantan. [Singapore]: Periplus Editions, 1996, xxiv + 802 pp., tables, figures, boxes, index. [The Ecology of Indonesia Series 3.], Gusti Hatta, Hakimah Halim (eds. - Bernice de Jong Boers, Manon Ossewiejer, Kathryn A. Monk, The ecology of Nusa Tenggara and Maluku. [Singapore]: Periplus Editions, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997, xvii + 966 pages, tables, figures, boxes, annexes, appendixes, index. [The Ecology of Indonesia Series 5.], Yance de Fretes, Gayatri Reksodiharjo-Lilley (eds. - Freek Colombijn, Tomas Tomascik, The ecology of the Indonesian seas [2 volumes]. Hong Kong: Periplus, 1997, xiv + vi + 1388 pp., photographs, figures, tables, indexes. [The Ecology of Indonesia Series 7-8.], Anmarie Janice Mah, Anugerah Nontji (eds.

  16. Especially for High School Teachers

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-05-01

    JCE Classroom Activity: #27. How Does Your Garden Grow? Investigating the "Magic Salt Crystal Garden", edited by Nancy S. Gettys and Erica K. Jacobsen, p 624A. Some Articles of Interest photos by Jerrold J. Jacobsen and Nancy S. Gettys This month's issue covers a wide variety of topics, from historical notes to the latest software from JCE. Gas burners are such familiar items in the laboratory that little thought is given to their development. An interesting article by Kathryn Williams (pp 558-559) explains how these humble devices came into being, beginning with Robert Bunsen's invention in 1857, through their adaptation in the United States in the 1930s to burn natural gas. Bunsen, in collaboration with Gustav Kirchhoff, used his invention in constructing an emission spectrometer that could be used in chemical analysis. A drawing of the instrument appears in the Williams article. The spectrometer is described in more detail in an article titled "A Brief History of Atomic Emission Spectrochemical Analysis, 1666-1950". Author Richard Jarrell traces the history of this important and lasting method of analysis from Isaac Newton's discovery of the visible spectrum to the development of the powerful analytical instruments that were in use in the 1950s. For readers who have a deeper interest in atomic emission spectroscopy, Jarrell's article is the first of five that are based on a symposium conducted in 1999 (pp 573-607). Visualizing the structure of ionic crystals is the topic of articles by Keenan Dungey (pp 618-619), Bruce Mattson (pp 622-623), and J. Kamenícek and M. Melichárek (pp 623-624). The ionic crystal theme is also carried out in JCE Classroom Activity #27 (pp 624A-B) and a demonstration on the preparation of sodium iodide, written by Zelek Herman (pp 619-621). Together, the five articles provide an interesting combination of ideas for investigating and describing both the macroscopic and the submicroscopic views of ionic crystals. Is It the "Write" Time

  17. Obituary: Kenneth Ingvard Greisen, 1918-2007

    Greisen, Eric W.

    2007-12-01

    for his courses so that his students could take popular courses in other departments, and heavily supported the careers of those faculty members who distinguished themselves as teachers. Ken served on many national committees, was university Ombudsman 1975-1977, was Chairman of the Astronomy Department 1976-1979, and was Dean of the Faculty 1978-1983. He was granted an Emeritus professorship in 1984 and retired in 1986. The affection his colleagues felt for Ken was perhaps best illustrated when a Japanese Post-Doc and life-long friend named his first child Kenichi. Comments received at his death emphasized his ``great competence'' as a scientist; his kindness, generosity, and concern for his students; and his ``thoughtful human values'' and ``great integrity'' as a ``man of character.'' Ken loved music, attending many concerts, playing flute and recorder, and singing in church and senior choirs. He greatly enjoyed hiking, boating, golf, and other outdoor activities, including, in his retirement years, the bicycle and month-long vacations in Kauai and Florida. Ken viewed retirement as a reason to leave university life behind, but not to cease providing service to those about him who needed help. In retirement, Ken volunteered in a variety of activities to assist those less fortunate than himself. In his later years, he engaged in a nearly daily ``hobby'' of writing checks to numerous charities. Ken was preceded in death by his parents, younger brother Sigurd Greisen, older sister Agnita Dupree, first wife of 34 years Elizabeth Chase Greisen, second wife of 20 years Helen Wiltberger Greisen, and stepson Bruce Wiltberger. He is survived by his long-time companion Tommie Bryant of Ithaca; daughter Kathryn Greisen of Columbus, Ohio; son Eric Greisen of Socorro, New Mexico; step children Heather Wiltberger of Marshall, Virginia, Paul Wiltberger of Arlington, Washington, and Lois Wiltberger of Arlington, Massachusetts; and several step-grandchildren.

  18. Frof Guest Editors

    Mark J. W. LEE

    2007-07-01

    Special thanks must go to the members of the international review panels here:Ø Anne Bartlett-Bragg, University of Technology, Sydney, AustraliaØ Dr Tony Bates, Tony Bates Associates, CanadaØ Kathryn Cleary, University of Notre Dame, AustraliaØ Dr Barney Dalgarno, Charles Sturt University, AustraliaØ Stephen Downes, National Research Council, CanadaØ Geoff Fellows, Charles Sturt University, AustraliaØ Jim Flood, United KingdomØ Dr Stylianos Hatzipanagos, King's College, London, United KingdomØ Dr Manolya Kavakli, Macquarie University, AustraliaØ Dr Matthew Kearney, University of Technology, Sydney, AustraliaØ Associate Professor Piet Kommers, University of Twente, The NetherlandsØ Professor Dr Selahatin Kuru, Işık University, TurkeyØ Associate Professor Catherine McLoughlin, Australian Catholic UniversityØ Dr Charlynn Miller, University of Ballarat, AustraliaØ Dr Belinda Tynan, University of New England, Australia REFERENCESO’Reilly, T. (2005. What is Web 2.0: design patterns and business models for the next generation of software. Retrieved 15 December 2006, from http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html. Siemens, G. (2004. Connectivism: A learning theory for a digital age. Retrieved 9 December 2006, from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.html. Curry, A. (2004. iPodder – A brief history. Retrieved 23 April 2005, from http://www.ipodder.org/history.

  19. News and Announcements

    1999-05-01

    Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.) A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970 The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator Discovery of Lawrencium How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms The Discovery of Element 106-Finally The Naming of Element 106 The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements What Good Is a Heavy Element? To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall