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Sample records for kaohsiung veterans general

  1. Performance of European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation in Veterans General Hospital Kaohsiung cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hsin-Hung; Kang, Pei-Luen; Pan, Jun-Yen; Wu, Tung-Ho; Wu, Chieh-Ten; Lin, Chun-Yao; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Chou, Wan-Ting

    2011-03-01

    The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) model is a widely-used risk prediction algorithm for in-hospital or 30-day mortality in adult cardiac surgery patients. Recent studies indicated that EuroSCORE tends to overpredict mortality. The aim of our study is to evaluate the validity of EuroSCORE in Veterans General Hospital Kaohsiung (VGHKS) cardiac surgery including a number of different surgical and risk subgroups. From January 2006 to December 2009, 1,240 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery in VGHKS were included in this study. The study was followed the guidelines of the Ethics Committee of Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Both additive and logistic score of all patients were calculated depending on the formula in the official EuroSCORE website. The entire cohort, different surgical type and risk stratification subgroups were analyzed. Model discrimination was tested by determining the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Model calibration was tested by the Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test. Clinical performance of model was assessed by comparing the observed and predicted mortality rates. There were significant differences between the VGHKS and European cardiac surgical populations. The additive score and logistic score for the overall group were 7.16% and 12.88%, respectively. Observed mortality was 10.72% overall, 5.68% for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 4.67% for the mitral valve only and 4.25% for the aortic valve only group. The discriminative ability EuroSCORE was very good in all and various surgical subgroups, with area under the ROC curve from 0.75 to 0.87. The addictive and logistic models of EuroSCORE showed excellent accuracy, 0.839 and 0.845, respectively. Good calibration power was recognized by p value higher than 0.05 for the entire cohort and all subgroups of patients except for isolated CABG. The logistic EuroSCORE model overestimated mortality to different

  2. 醫師資訊需求與資訊尋求行為之探討 | An Investigation of Information Needs and Information Seeking Behavior of the Physicians at Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    侯海珠 Hai-Chu Hou

    2002-10-01

    科醫師的資訊利用習慣。

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the information needs and the information seeking behavior of the internists and surgeons. Data are collected from thirty-two physicians in Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital through face-to-face interviews and observation.

    The aims of the research are, first, exploring the physicians’ information needs and the causes of their information needs. Second, exploring their sources of information and their information channels. Third, exploring the difficulties and solutions which they faced when they conducted the information seeking. Fourth, understanding the different results among physicians from different specialties.

    The major findings of this study are listed as follows(1Patient care is the main cause of the information need for the physicians

  3. Air pollution holiday effect in metropolitan Kaohsiung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P.; Chen, P. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Different from Taipei, the metropolitan Kaohsiung which is a coastal and industrial city has the major pollution sources from stationary sources such as coal-fired power plants, petrochemical facilities and steel plants, rather than mobile sources. This study was an attempt to conduct a comprehensive and systematical examination of the holiday effect, defined as the difference in air pollutant concentrations between holiday and non-holiday periods, over the Kaohsiung metropolitan area. We documented evidence of a "holiday effect", where concentrations of NOx, CO, NMHC, SO2 and PM10 were significantly different between holidays and non-holidays, in the Kaohsiung metropolitan area from daily surface measurements of seven air quality monitoring stations of the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration during the Chinese New Year (CNY) and non-Chinese New Year (NCNY) periods of 1994-2010. Concentrations of the five pollutants were lower in the CNY than in the NCNY period, however, that of O3 was higher in the CNY than in the NCNY period and had no holiday effect. The exclusion of the bad air quality day (PSI > 100) and the Lantern Festival Day showed no significant effects on the holiday effects of air pollutants. Ship transportation data of Kaohsiung Harbor Bureau showed a statistically significant difference in the CNY and NCNY period. This difference was consistent with those found in air pollutant concentrations of some industrial and general stations in coastal areas, implying the possible impact of traffic activity on the air quality of coastal areas. Holiday effects of air pollutants over the Taipei metropolitan area by Tan et al. (2009) are also compared.

  4. Evaluation of the effectiveness of postgraduate general medicine training by objective structured clinical examination---pilot study and reflection on the experiences of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jer-Chia; Liu, Keh-Min; Lee, Kun-Tai; Yen, Jo-Chu; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2008-12-01

    Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is an effective assessment method to evaluate medical students' clinical competencies performance. Postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residents have been initiated in a general medicine training program in Taiwan since 2003. However, little is known about the learning effectiveness of trainees from this program. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the clinical core competencies of PGY1 residents using OSCE, and to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of this pilot assessment project. OSCE was conducted for five PGY1 examinees (4 men, 1 woman) with five stations covering core themes, including history taking, physical examination, clinical procedure of airway intubation, clinical reasoning, and communication skills for informing bad news. Itemized checklists and five-point Likert scale global ratings were used for evaluating performance. The results showed that the performance of our PGY1 residents on history taking was significantly better after about 2 months of postgraduate training on general internal medicine. Self-evaluation on performance by examinees revealed significantly lower global ratings on post-course OSCE (4.14 +/- 0.80 vs. 3.68 +/- 0.66; p OSCEs showed consistently favorable responses on the purposes, content, process, and environment of this assessment (4.0 +/- 0.17 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.12, nonsignificant). However, a survey of the examinees completed at pre- and post-course OSCEs showed relatively unfavorable responses to the same aspects, and to tutors and SPs (4.1 +/- 0.09 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.18; p clinical reasoning performance, communication skills (giving bad news) and self-confidence were unsatisfactory. In conclusion, this pilot study has demonstrated that OSCE is a rational and feasible assessment method for evaluating the effectiveness of our PGY general medicine training program. The quantitative data and qualitative information provide a foundation to improve the quality of the program design and evaluation

  5. Kaohsiung Municipal Government: Feasibility study for Kaohsiung hazardous waste management plan. Executive summary. Export trade information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-08-01

    The document is the Executive Summary of a report resulting from a feasibility study conducted for the Republic of China. The objective of the study was to: survey hazardous industrial wastes within Kaohsiung Municipality, analyze the feasibility for planning a hazardous waste treatment and disposal system, develop recommendations for waste minimization and transportation, and identify possible methods of private sector operation.

  6. Kaohsiung Municipal Government: Feasibility study for Kaohsiung Hazardous Waste Management Plan. English report. Export trade information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-08-01

    The report is the result of a feasibility study conducted for the Republic of China. The primary objectives of the study was to: survey hazardous industrial wastes within Kaohsiung Municipality, analyze the feasibility for the planning of a centralized hazardous waste treatment and disposal system, develop recommendations for waste minimization and transportation, and to identify possible methods of private sector operation.

  7. Nightmares: Prevalence among the Finnish General Adult Population and War Veterans during 1972-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Ollila, Hanna M; Revonsuo, Antti; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence of nightmares among the Finnish general adult population during 1972-2007 and the association between nightmare prevalence and symptoms of insomnia, depression, and anxiety in World War II veterans. Eight independent cross-sectional population surveys of the National FINRISK Study conducted in Finland in 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. Epidemiologic. A total of 69,813 people (33,811 men and 36,002 women) age 25-74 years. N/A. The investigation of nightmare prevalence and insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms was based on questionnaires completed by the participants. Among the whole sample, 3.5% of the men and 4.8% of the women reported frequent nightmares (P Sandman N; Valli K; Kronholm E; Ollila HM; Revonsuo A; Laatikainen T; Paunio T. Nightmares: prevalence among the Finnish general adult population and war veterans during 1972-2007. SLEEP 2013;36(7):1041-1050.

  8. Structural design of Kaohsiung Stadium, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideyuki; Tanno, Yoshiro; Nakai, Masayoshi; Ohshima, Takashi; Suguichi, Akihiro; Lee, William H.; Wang, Jensen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an outline description of the structural design of the main stadium for the World Games held in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, in 2009. Three new design concepts, unseen in previous stadiums, were proposed and realized: “an open stadium”, “an urban park”, and “a spiral continuous form”. Based on the open stadium concept, simple cantilever trusses in the roof structure were arranged in a delicate rhythm, and a so-called oscillating hoop of steel tubes was wound around the top and bottom surfaces of a group of cantilever trusses to form a continuous spiral form. Also, at the same time by clearly grouping the structural elements of the roof structure, the dramatic effect of the urban park was highlighted by unifying the landscape and the spectator seating area to form the stadium facade. This paper specifically reports on the overview of the building, concepts of structural design, structural analysis of the roof, roof design, foundation design, and an outline of the construction.

  9. Predictors of persistence of comorbid generalized anxiety disorder among veterans with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Dinesh; Fortney, John C; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Wetherell, Julie L

    2011-11-01

    A limited number of randomized clinical trials show that efficacious pharmacologic treatments exist for comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The aims of this effectiveness study were to describe the impact of a depression care management intervention on the persistence of comorbid GAD symptoms in a sample of primary care patients with MDD and to identify risk factors for persistent GAD. Data were collected from April 2003 to September 2005 for the Telemedicine-Enhanced Antidepressant Management (TEAM) study, a multisite, randomized effectiveness trial targeting US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care patients with depression. Veterans aged 26.59-88.36 years received either the TEAM intervention or usual care in small VA community-based outpatient clinics. The TEAM care management intervention focused on optimizing antidepressant therapy through patient education and activation, symptom monitoring, adherence promotion, and side-effect management. Veterans who screened positive for MDD using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (based on DSM-IV criteria) and who met the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview criteria (maintaining consistency with DSM-IV-TR) for comorbid GAD at baseline were selected for the present study (N = 168). The primary outcome was persistence of GAD at 6 months and 12 months. All predictors available in the TEAM study data that were described in the literature to be associated with influencing GAD outcomes were examined. Persistence of depression was the strongest predictor of persistence of comorbid GAD at both 6 months (OR = 5.75; 95% CI, 2.38-13.86; P < .05) and 12 months (OR = 15.56; 95% CI, 6.10-39.68; P < .05). Although the TEAM intervention significantly reduced depression symptom severity, it was not significantly associated with GAD persistence. Insomnia was a significant protective factor for persistence of GAD at 6 months (OR = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.44-0.99; P < .05). Early

  10. Teaching and learning English in kindergartens in Kaohsiung

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Mei-Ling

    2001-01-01

    Learning English is very popular in Taiwan. This is evident by the increasing number of English cram schools for children and adults in Taiwan. The market for English learning and teaching is so vast that many kindergartens in Taiwan offer English classes, too. The purpose of this study is to investigate the situation of English learning and teaching in Kaohsiung's kindergartens. Since kindergarten children are very young, age is an important concern. There have been innumerable studies on ag...

  11. [The pattern of fresh frozen plasma transfusion in Veterans General Hospital-Taichung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C S; Jour, J H; Lirn, J Y

    1992-09-01

    Conducted a survey at Veterans General Hospital in Taichung, to compile a statistical analysis on the usage of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusions. The investigation was conducted from July 1st to September 30, 1991. According to the distribution of usage of FFP, we investigated 726 transfusions (4,216 units) based on our grouping criteria. We found the following: 532 units were used for clotting support which accounts for 12.6% of total, 815 units (19.3%) for blood pressure support, 148 units (3.5%) for combination of clotting and blood pressure support, 681 units (16.2%) for albumin replacement, 436 units (10.3%) for therapeutic pheresis, 396 units (9.4%) for packed red cell concurrently, 819 units (19.4%) for burn cases, and the remaining (9.2%) for other or unidentified reasons. If it was classified by the departments applying FFP; 76% (3,200 units) were used by surgery, 22.4% (947 units) by internal medicine, and 1.6% (69 units) by other departments. Having classified all the reasons for FFP transfusion, we found that FFP was commonly used as a volume expander, for nutrition support, and reconstituted whole blood. These reasons are out of the range of indications for FFP transfusion. This misuse of FFP transfusion increases the chance of transmission infections therefore, we will thoroughly investigate these treatment modalities in order to ensure our blood source is being used in an appropriate manner. This will allow patients the best possible treatment available.

  12. Dengue Outbreaks in High-Income Area, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, 2003–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Schiøler, Karin L.; Jepsen, Martin R.; Ho, Chi-Kung; Li, Shu-Hua; Konradsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Kaohsiung City, a modern metropolis of 1.5 million persons, has been the focus of dengue virus activity in Taiwan for several decades. The aim of this study was to provide a temporal and spatial description of dengue virus epidemiology in Kaohsiung City by using data for all laboratory-confirmed dengue cases during 2003–2009. We investigated age- and sex-dependent incidence rates and the spatiotemporal patterns of all cases confirmed through passive or active surveillance. Elderly persons wer...

  13. Implementation of an OSCE at Kaohsiung Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Huang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE, a tool to objectively and fairly assess medical students' clinical competences, has become widely used in medical education worldwide. However, most medical schools in Taiwan have just begun to adopt this assessment method. In 2003, Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU established the first standardized patient (SP program in Taiwan and applied SPs with an OSCE. This study reports the process of the implementation of an OSCE at KMU, which includes collecting information, visiting leading clinical skills centers, consulting medical educators from other countries, holding international conferences, establishing an OSCE committee, writing cases, training SPs, administrating the OSCE, and receiving feedback from medical students. Most students were satisfied with the assessment and appreciated the learning experience. Based on the experience in 2003, the OSCE committee decided to incorporate the OSCE into the medical curriculum as a measure to assess medical students' clinical competences. In addition to assessing medical students' clinical competence, the OSCE can also be applied to other professional health education, such as dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy. We are currently sharing our experience with other colleges at KMU.

  14. Health Programs for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Administration » Health Programs for Veterans Veterans Health Administration Health Programs for Veterans Beyond the doctors and nurses who ... Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents Adaptive Sports Program ... Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration National Cemetery ...

  15. 38 CFR 21.155 - Services to a veteran's family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... family. 21.155 Section 21.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.155 Services to a veteran's family. (a) General. VA shall provide services to a veteran's family which are necessary to the implementation of the veteran's...

  16. Suicide among War Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Vsevolod Rozanov; Vladimir Carli

    2012-01-01

    Studies aiming to identify if war veterans are at higher risk of suicide have often produced inconsistent results; this could be due to the complexity of comparisons and different methodological approaches. It should be noted that this contingent has many risk factors, such as stressful exposures, wounds, brain trauma and pain syndrome. Most recent observations confirm that veterans are really more likely to die of suicide as compared to the general population; they are also more likely to ex...

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Giant Sea Perch Iridovirus in Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a megalocytivirus strain, GSIV-K1, isolated from a farmed giant sea perch (Lates calcarifer) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. GSIV-K1 causes mortality in farmed marine fish, including giant sea perch and groupers. The genome sequence is nearly identical to the genome of the orange-spotted grouper iridovirus. PMID:27125488

  18. Veterans Health Administration

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    ... code here VA » Veterans Health Administration Veterans Health Administration Robotic Brace for Veterans of Spinal Cord Injury ... Read more » VA Medical Centers The Veterans Health Administration is home to the United States’ largest integrated ...

  19. Women Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report summarizes the history of women Veterans in the military and as Veterans. It profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2015, and illustrates how...

  20. Receiver Function Analysis of Strong-motion Stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Min; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Kuo, Chun-Hsiang; Huang, Jyun-Yan

    2016-04-01

    The Kaohsiung City and Pingtung County are located in southern Taiwan and bounded on the west side by several active faults. The shallow velocity structure of thick alluvium basin in this area should be delineated to understand the seismic site effect of strong ground motion. Receiver Function (RF) is a conventional technique for studying the structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the seismometer. But, the RF analysis of high-frequency acceleration seismograms is also proved to be feasible for estimating shallow structures recently. This study applied the RF technique on the Strong-motion records of almost one-hundred TSMIP stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area to estimate the shallow shear-wave velocity structures. The averaged RFs of all stations exhibit the obvious variation because of the different geologies and site conditions. After the forward modeling of RFs based on the Genetic Algorithms (GA) searching, the shallow shear-wave velocity structures beneath all the strong-motion stations in the Kaohsiung-Pingtung area were estimated to delineate the iso-depth contour maps of the main formation interfaces and a preliminary shallow 3D velocity model.

  1. Assessment of Service Members Knowledge and Trust of the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    OIF Operation Iraqi Freedom VA Department of Veterans Affairs VA OIG Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General VBA Veterans Benefits...Figure 3. The Decision Trust Model ...............................................................................20 Figure 4. Demographics-Age...reorganization into the three administrations: Veterans Health Administration (VHA), Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) and National Cemetery

  2. Explore Seismic Velocity Change Associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung Earthquake by Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chin-Shang; Wu, Yih-Min; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Huang, Win-Gee; Liu, Chun-Chi

    2016-04-01

    A ML 6.4 earthquake occurred on 4 March 2010 in Kaohsiung, the southern part of Taiwan, this shallow earthquake is the largest one of that area in the past few years. Some damages occurred on buildings and bridges after the earthquake, obvious surface deformation up to few cm was observed and the transportation including road and train traffic was also affected near the source area. Some studies about monitoring the velocity change induced by the big earthquake were carried out recently, most of studies used cross-correlation of the ambient noise-based method and indicated velocity drop was observed immediately after the big earthquake. However, this method is not able to constrain the depth of velocity change, and need to assume a homogeneous seismic velocity change during the earthquake. In this study, we selected 25 broadband seismic stations in the southern Taiwan and time period is from 2009/03 to 2011/03. Then we explored the velocity change associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake by applying ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. ANT is a way of using interferometry to image subsurface seismic velocity variations by using surface wave dispersions extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation of seismic station-pairs, then the 2-D group velocity map with different periods could be extracted. Compare to ambient noise-based cross-correlation analysis, we estimated sensitivity kernel of dispersion curves and converted 2-D group velocity map from "with the period" to "with the depth" to have more constraints on the depth of velocity change. By subtracting shear velocity between "before" and "after" the earthquake, we could explore velocity change associated with the earthquake. Our result shows velocity reduction about 5-10% around the focal depth after the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake and the post-seismic velocity recovery was observed with time period increasing, which may suggest a healing process of damaged rocks.

  3. Dengue outbreak investigations in a high-income urban setting, Kaohsiung City in Taiwan, 2003-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Schiøler, Karin Linda; Jepsen, Martin Rudbeck

    2012-01-01

    Kaohsiung City, a modern metropolis of 1.5 million persons, has been the focus of dengue virus activity in Taiwan for several decades. The aim of this study was to provide a temporal and spatial description of dengue virus epidemiology in Kaohsiung City by using data for all laboratory......-confirmed dengue cases during 2003-2009. We investigated age- and sex-dependent incidence rates and the spatiotemporal patterns of all cases confirmed through passive or active surveillance. Elderly persons were at particularly high risk for dengue virus-related sickness and death. Of all confirmed cases, ˜75...

  4. Veterans Crisis Line

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The caring responders at the Veterans Crisis Line are specially trained and experienced in helping Veterans of all ages and circumstances. Some of the responders are...

  5. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014-2020 VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Claims Representation RESOURCES Careers at VA Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents ...

  6. Molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in Kaohsiung City located at southern Taiwan, 2000-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Yuan Chen

    Full Text Available We present the first comprehensive analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB isolates circulating in southern Taiwan. In this 9-year population-based study, the TB situation in the Kaohsiung region was characterized by genotypic analysis of 421 MTB isolates.All 421 isolates of MTB were analyzed by spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing. Drug-resistance patterns were also analyzed.The percentage of EAI (East African-Indian strains increased across sampling years (2000-2008 in southern Taiwan, whereas the proportion of Beijing lineages remained unchanged. Clustering was more frequent with EAI genotype infections (odds ratio = 3.6, p<0.0001 when compared to Beijing genotypes. Notably, MTB resistance to streptomycin (STR had significantly increased over time, but resistance to other antibiotics, including multidrug resistance, had not. Three major genes (gidB, rpsL and rrs implicated in STR resistance were sequenced and specific mutations identified.This study revealed that EAI strains were highly transmissible and that STR resistance has increased between 2000 and 2008 in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

  7. Air pollution and hospital admissions for asthma in a tropical city: Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang-Shyue Tsai; Meng-Hsuan Cheng; Hui-Fen Chiu; Trong-Neng Wu; Chun-Yuh Yang [I-Shou University, Kaohsiung (Taiwan). Department of Health Care Administration

    2006-07-15

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there is an association between air pollutants levels and hospital admissions for asthma in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for asthma and ambient air pollution data for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 1996 through 2003. The relative risk of hospital admission was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. In the single-pollutant models, on warm days ({>=}25{sup o}C) statistically significant positive associations were found in all pollutants except sulfur dioxide. On cool days ({<=} 25{sup o}C) all pollutants were significantly associated with asthma admissions. For the two pollutant models, CO and O{sub 3} were significant in combination with each of the other four pollutants on warm days. On cool days NO{sub 2} remained statistically significant in all the two-pollutant models. This study provides evidence that higher levels of ambient pollutants increase the risk of hospital admissions for asthma.

  8. Veterans' use of Department of Veterans Affairs care and perceptions of outsourcing inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Rosenbaum, Marcy E; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine veterans' perceptions of problems and benefits of outsourcing inpatient care from Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to private sector hospitals. Primary data were collected from a cross-section of 42 veterans who were VA users and nonusers using focus groups. Focus group discussion examined reasons patients use VA care, differences between VA and civilian care, positive and negative impacts of outsourcing, and special needs of veterans. Analyses revealed five domains related both to use of VA services and perceptions of outsourcing: costs, access, quality of care, contract (i.e., a covenant between veterans and the U.S. government), veteran milieu, and special needs. Participants identified a variety of potential positive and negative impacts. In general, veterans perceived more advantages than disadvantages to outsourcing VA care but still expressed significant concerns related to outsourcing. These issues should be considered in the development of future policy toward outsourcing VA care to the private sector.

  9. Assessment of clinical competence of medical students using the objective structured clinical examination: first 2 years' experience in Taipei Veterans General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chan, Cho-Yu; Wu, Chun-Lien; Chen, Ya-Lin; Yang, Hui-Wen; Huang, Chia-Chang; Chen, Chen-Huan; Huang, William J; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2010-11-01

    Competence-oriented education is currently the mainstream method of teaching clinical medical education. The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is a widely employed and accepted tool to measure the clinical competence of medical students. We describe the first 2 years' experience of OSCE in Taipei Veterans General Hospital. At Taipei Veterans General Hospital, every 7(th)-year medical student has taken the OSCE since 2006. There were 15 stations in the first 2 years' OSCEs. In years 1 and 2, 133 and 132 students were assessed by the OSCE, respectively. The content of the OSCE included internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, communication, and emergency training. All categories and results of examinees' evaluation at each station were recorded inclusively and compared statistically. The average scores of students from the 15 stations ranged from 47.7 ± 16.4 to 93.7 ± 8.5 in 2007. The score for communication skills was the lowest, whereas the score for Micro-Sim was the highest. Communication skills and electrocardiography interpretation were the 2 categories in which most of the students failed. A reliability analysis was conducted of the 2007 OSCE questions. The overall score and reliability (Cronbach's reliability) was 0.641. The difference between the impacts on reliability after deleting a test item ranged from 0.59 to 0.65 for all stations. This meant that every station had a similar impact on reliability after being deleted. The squared multiple correlation, R(2), of the reliability of each item was between 0.12 and 0.49, with chest X-ray interpretation being the lowest. The item-total correlation was between 0.10 and 0.41, with interactive case being the lowest. The OSCE is an effective method for assessing the clinical competence of medical students. The OSCE could be improved further by modifying the examination questions and promoting effective training for standardized patients and examiners. Copyright © 2010

  10. 台北荣民总医院护理管理见闻及借鉴%Learning experiences of nursing management from Taipei Veterans General Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫雅凤

    2014-01-01

    介绍了台北荣民总医院护理管理见闻,包括完善的护理人员进阶制度、护理教师临床实务指导能力考评、院内护理丰富资源共享性、计算机执行医嘱核对实物图片信息的再校对性以及医院开展各种人性化措施。结合大陆护理管理工作实际,可参考和借鉴台北荣民总医院的护理管理经验,尝试建立院内网络护理信息库,实现资源共享;计算机录入校正,显示各类药品实物图片信息,提高医嘱执行查对的高效性和准确性;允许护理人员“要休”“要班”,实施科学、有效、人性化的护理管理,以便进一步为病人提供身心并护的优质服务,同时有益于提升护理人员的快乐工作指数,最终实现多维度共赢。%The author introduced the information of nursing management in Taipei Veterans General Hospital, included the well-established nurse staff promotion system, sharing abundant nursing resources, double check of medication picture information when executing doctor's orders on computer, and lots of humanistic measures applied in this hospital. Combined with the nursing management status of mainland, we can learn some nursing management experiences from Taipei Veterans General Hospital. We could establish nursing information database to share resources, improve the effect and accuracy of doctor's orders checking through computer input revision and displaying medications pictures. We should implement scientiifc, effective and humanistic nursing management, thinking about nurses' demands of on or off duty when allocating nursing staff. It would be help to improve nurses' happiness and patients holistic care, ultimately realize multidimensional win.

  11. Temperature-dependent association between mortality rate and carbon monoxide level in a subtropical city: Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Liao, Chen-Mao

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the combined effect of temperature and air pollutant levels on daily non-accidental deaths and cardiovascular causes of mortality. In this study, associations were assessed by means of time-series analyses over the period 1995-1999 for Kaohsiung, Taiwan's largest industrial city, which has a subtropical climate. Ambient exposures to various air pollutants, including carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), ozone (O(3)), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), and particulate matter (PM(10)), were estimated from the arithmetic means of all daily measurements taken by an air quality monitoring station nearest to the residential district. Generalized additive models with non-parametric spline were used to identify associations between daily mortality and air pollutants as well as the air pollutant-temperature interaction correlation. Our findings indicate that CO is associated with increased risks of non-accidental and cardiovascular mortality. For a 0.2 ppm increase in CO, the increased relative daily risk of non-accidental death is at least 4% on the same day, when the mean temperature is above 24.8 degrees C, while the increased relative risk of mortality due to cardiovascular diseases is 7% two days later at 19.7 degrees C. The study also suggests a statistically significant interaction between CO concentration and daily mean temperature, with non-accidental mortality increasing with a warm outdoor temperature and the effect of CO on cardiovascular mortality being modified by a cold climate. Further reduction of CO pollution is thus deemed crucial for the benefit of public health.

  12. Increased generalization of learned associations is related to re-experiencing symptoms in veterans with symptoms of post-traumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasides, Nicole; Beck, Kevin D; Pang, Kevin C H; Servatius, Richard J; Gilbertson, Mark W; Orr, Scott P; Myers, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    One interpretation of re-experiencing symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is that memories related to emotional information are stored strongly, but with insufficient specificity, so that stimuli which are minimally related to the traumatic event are sufficient to trigger recall. If so, re-experiencing symptoms may reflect a general bias against encoding background information during a learning experience, and this tendency might not be limited to learning about traumatic or even autobiographical events. To test this possibility, we administered a discrimination-and-transfer task to 60 Veterans (11.2% female, mean age 54.0 years) self-assessed for PTSD symptoms in order to examine whether re-experiencing symptoms were associated with increased generalization following associative learning. The discrimination task involved learning to choose the rewarded object from each of six object pairs; each pair differed in color or shape but not both. In the transfer phase, the irrelevant feature in each pair was altered. Regression analysis revealed no relationships between re-experiencing symptoms and initial discrimination learning. However, re-experiencing symptom scores contributed to the prediction of transfer performance. Other PTSD symptom clusters (avoidance/numbing, hyperarousal) did not account for significant additional variance. The results are consistent with an emerging interpretation of re-experiencing symptoms as reflecting a learning bias that favors generalization at the expense of specificity. Future studies will be needed to determine whether this learning bias may pre-date and confer risk for, re-experiencing symptoms in individuals subsequently exposed to trauma, or emerges only in the wake of trauma exposure and PTSD symptom development.

  13. Veterans and Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    health care of veterans, operates all but one of the programs for homeless veterans. The Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ), which is responsible...Robert Rosenheck and Alan Fontana, “A Model of Homelessness Among Male Veterans of the Vietnam War Generation,” The American Journal of Psychiatry...151, no. 3 (March 1994): 421-427 (hereinafter, “A Model of Homelessness Among Male Veterans of the Vietnam War Generation”). 45 See, for example

  14. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  15. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  16. ANALYSIS ON THE DEEP SEATED LANDSLIDE OCCURRED IN SHAOLIN VILLEGE, KAOHSIUNG COUNTY, TAIWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Daizo; Fujita, Masaharu; Miyamoto, Kuniaki; Imaizumi, Fumitoshi; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Kokuryo, Hiroshi; Izumiyama, Hiroaki

    In August 2009, the Typhoon Morakot hit Taiwan and caused an extraordinary amount of rainfall. Due to the heavy rainfall, a large number of floods and sediment-related disasters occurred all over the island. In Shaolin Village, Kaohsiung County, a huge landslide occurred around 6 am August 9, destroyed the village completely and killed more than 500 people. After the landslide, authors visited the landslide site and investigated the landslide scour to collect information on factors affecting landslide occurrence such as exposed bedrock and soil layer conditions. GIS analysis using DEM data were also conducted to determine the sliding domain. According to the site investigation and GIS analysis, rainwater infiltration analysis and slope stability analysis were conducted. Results of the analysis suggested that the landslide domain, about 1,200 m long, 500 m wide and 80 m deep was collapsed by multi phased manner.

  17. The Organizational Climate and Employees’ Job Satisfaction in the Terminal Operation Context of Kaohsiung Port1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaur-luh Tsai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the organizational climate in the terminal operation industry in the port of Kaohsiung. Data was collected from questionnaire survey. Questionnaire designed through the processes included literature review, interviews, pre-test, and pilot test. Exploratory factor analysis, analysis of variable (ANOVA and regression analysis were employed to analyze the respondent data. Subsequently, the primary organizational climate of terminal operation industry, namely, management system, awards and motivation, transformation leadership, and laissez-faire leadership, were yielded, and the employees’ job satisfaction were used as explanation variables in this study. Results interpreted that employees’ job satisfaction strongly related with the types of company and organizational climate. Theoretical and practical implications of the research findings are discussed.

  18. Relationship between Sugar Intake and Obesity among School-Age Children in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Fang-Yu; Chen, Ting-Chun; Chen, Wen-Lee; Doong, Jia-Yau; Shikanai, Saiko; Sarukura, Nobuko; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the prevalence and problem of overweight and obesity in Taiwanese children have increased. There are many reports that the excessive intake of sugar increases the risk of lifestyle-related disease. However, sugar intake in Taiwanese children is not known. In this study, we investigated sugar intake from sugar-sweetened beverages, snacks and desserts among school-age children in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. We also tried to determine the relationship between sugar intake and body mass index (BMI). We contacted all the public elementary schools (10 schools) in a district, Kaohsiung, and obtained permission from 3 schools. The survey subjects were 410 (210 boys, 200 girls) school-age children (7, 10 and 12 y old). A nutrition survey was conducted using 3 non-consecutive days of the 24 h dietary recall method for sugar-sweetened beverages, snacks and desserts. Height and weight were measured. Sugar intakes were not significantly different among the different genders or ages (p>0.05) and average intake of all was 51.6 g/d. Percentages of each sugar in total intake were sucrose 60%, glucose 18%, fructose 16%, and lactose 6%. The intake of glucose and fructose may have come from isomerized sugar. Contributions of sugar-sweetened beverages and snacks (desserts) were 83.5% and 16.5%, respectively. Among the sugar-sweetened beverages the top 3 sources were tea (22%), milk tea (19%) and milk beverages (18%). A relationship between sugar intake and BMI was not observed. In conclusion, sugar intake of the children was higher than the WHO recommendation due to the high intake from beverages; however, sugar was not the cause of the high obesity rate.

  19. An online spatio-temporal prediction model for dengue fever epidemic in Kaohsiung,Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Angulo, Jose; Christakos, George

    2013-04-01

    Dengue Fever (DF) is one of the most serious vector-borne infectious diseases in tropical and subtropical areas. DF epidemics occur in Taiwan annually especially during summer and fall seasons. Kaohsiung city has been one of the major DF hotspots in decades. The emergence and re-emergence of the DF epidemic is complex and can be influenced by various factors including space-time dynamics of human and vector populations and virus serotypes as well as the associated uncertainties. This study integrates a stochastic space-time "Susceptible-Infected-Recovered" model under Bayesian maximum entropy framework (BME-SIR) to perform real-time prediction of disease diffusion across space-time. The proposed model is applied for spatiotemporal prediction of the DF epidemic at Kaohsiung city during 2002 when the historical series of high DF cases was recorded. The online prediction by BME-SIR model updates the parameters of SIR model and infected cases across districts over time. Results show that the proposed model is rigorous to initial guess of unknown model parameters, i.e. transmission and recovery rates, which can depend upon the virus serotypes and various human interventions. This study shows that spatial diffusion can be well characterized by BME-SIR model, especially at the district surrounding the disease outbreak locations. The prediction performance at DF hotspots, i.e. Cianjhen and Sanmin, can be degraded due to the implementation of various disease control strategies during the epidemics. The proposed online disease prediction BME-SIR model can provide the governmental agency with a valuable reference to timely identify, control, and efficiently prevent DF spread across space-time.

  20. NMR-based metabolomics for the environmental assessment of Kaohsiung Harbor sediments exemplified by a marine amphipod (Hyalella azteca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, K H; Dong, C D; Chen, C F; Tsai, M L; Ju, Y R; Chen, T M; Chen, C W

    2017-03-03

    Inflow of wastewater from upstream causes a large flux of pollutants to enter Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan daily. To reveal the ecological risk posed by Kaohsiung Harbor sediments, an ecological metabolomic approach was employed to investigate environmental factors pertinent to the physiological regulation of the marine amphipod Hyalella azteca. The amphipods were exposed to sediments collected from different stream inlets of the Love River (LR), Canon River (CR), Jen-Gen River (JR), and Salt River (SR). Harbor entrance 1 (E1) was selected as a reference site. After 10-day exposure, metabolomic analysis of the Hyalella azteca revealed differences between two groups: {E1, LR, CR} and {JR, SR}. The metabolic pathways identified in the two groups of amphipods were significantly different. The results demonstrated that NMR-based metabolomics can be effectively used to characterize metabolic response related to sediment from polluted areas.

  1. Analysis of Impact of Geographical Environment and Socio-economic Factors on the Spatial Distribution of Kaohsiung Dengue Fever Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Yin; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2013-04-01

    Taiwan is located in subtropical and tropical regions with high temperature and high humidity in the summer. This kind of climatic condition is the hotbed for the propagation and spread of the dengue vector mosquito. Kaohsiung City has been the worst dengue fever epidemic city in Taiwan. During the study period, from January 1998 to December 2011, Taiwan CDC recorded 7071 locally dengue epidemic cases in Kaohsiung City, and the number of imported case is 118. Our research uses Quantile Regression, a spatial infection disease distribution, to analyze the correlation between dengue epidemic and geographic environmental factors and human society factors in Kaohsiung. According to our experiment statistics, agriculture and natural forest have a positive relation to dengue fever(5.5~34.39 and 3.91~15.52). The epidemic will rise when the ratio for agriculture and natural forest increases. Residential ratio has a negative relation for quantile 0.1 to 0.4(-0.005~-0.78), and a positive relation for quantile 0.5 to0.9(0.01~18.0) . The mean income is also a significant factor in social economy field, and it has a negative relation to dengue fever(-0.01~-0.04). Conclusion from our research is that the main factor affecting the degree of dengue fever in predilection area is the residential proportion and the ratio of agriculture and natural forest plays an important role affecting the degree of dengue fever in non predilection area. Moreover, the serious epidemic area located by regression model is the same as the actual condition in Kaohsiung. This model can be used to predict the serious epidemic area of dengue fever and provide some references for the Health Agencies

  2. Employing crisis postcards with case management in Kaohsiung, Taiwan: 6-month outcomes of a randomised controlled trial for suicide attempters

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei-Jen; Ho, Chi-Kung; Shyu, Shi-Sen; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Guei-Ging; Chou, Li-Shiu; Fang, Yun-Ju; Yeh, Pin-Yang; Chung, Tieh-Chi; Chou, Frank Huang-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Background Suicide attempts constitute a serious clinical problem and have important implications for healthcare resources. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of case management using crisis postcards over a 6-month follow-up period. Method A randomised controlled trial was conducted in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Prevention of further suicide attempts was compared between two groups with and without the postcard intervention. The intervention group consisted of 373 partici...

  3. Paralyzed Veterans of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have Served Attend an Event Host an Event Sports Events Volunteer Opportunities We Are #UNSTOPPABLE Get Sports Sports ... Vehicle Donate Clothing or Housegoods Host an Event Sports Events Attend an Event Veterans Day Veterans Day Poster ...

  4. Master Veteran Index (MVI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As of June 28, 2010, the Master Veteran Index (MVI) database based on the enhanced Master Patient Index (MPI) is the authoritative identity service within the VA,...

  5. Rural Veterans by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  6. Minority Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  7. Minority Veteran Report 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  8. 29 CFR 778.600 - Veterans' subsistence allow- ances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION... subsistence allowances provided by Public Law 346 for payment to veterans are not paid as compensation...

  9. Seasonal abundance of vectors at outdoor environments in endemic and nonendemic districts of dengue in Kaohsiung, South Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiu-Hua; Lu, Yi-Ling

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the seasonal variation in abundance of dengue vectors at open spaces, empty houses, parks, and markets in endemic and nonendemic districts of dengue. Ovitraps were placed in these sites from March 2003 to January 2004 in Kaohsiung Area (Kaohsiung City and Kaohsiung County), South Taiwan. The index peaked in May, June, and September in the endemic districts and in May and October in nonendemic districts. The egg production of the vectors increased from April on and peaked in September. Aedes albopictus had a significant higher proportion than A. aegypti throughout the study period and in both districts. Although ovitrap indices at open spaces, empty houses, and parks were significantly higher than those in nearby households, no significant difference was found between markets and households. Moreover, the outdoor ovitrap index was significantly higher than the indoor one. No significant difference was found between the endemic and nonendemic districts in egg production, vector maturation, vector abundance at the outdoor environments, or nearby households. These findings indicate the importance of the environmental conditions surrounding the human dwelling sites in the transmission of dengue. Measures applied to remove dengue vectors should include these sites but also outdoor environments as well.

  10. Introducing Veteran Critical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Glenn A.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2017-01-01

    Research on student veterans is in an infant state. As veterans continue to enroll in institutions of higher education, researchers must explore new ways of "knowing" student veterans. It is not enough to only describe and model this growing demographic, researchers must also have a tool for criticism and question. The next in an…

  11. Prevalence of probable mental disorders and help-seeking behaviors among veteran and non-veteran community college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, John C; Curran, Geoffrey M; Hunt, Justin B; Cheney, Ann M; Lu, Liya; Valenstein, Marcia; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Millions of disadvantaged youth and returning veterans are enrolled in community colleges. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of mental disorders and help-seeking behaviors among community college students. Veterans (n=211) and non-veterans (n=554) were recruited from 11 community colleges and administered screeners for depression (PHQ-9), generalized anxiety (GAD-7), posttraumatic stress disorder (PC-PTSD), non-lethal self-injury, suicide ideation and suicide intent. The survey also asked about the perceived need for, barriers to and utilization of services. Regression analysis was used to compare prevalence between non-veterans and veterans adjusting for non-modifiable factors (age, gender and race/ethnicity). A large proportion of student veterans and non-veterans screened positive and unadjusted bivariate comparisons indicated that student veterans had a significantly higher prevalence of positive depression screens (33.1% versus 19.5%, Pveterans were significantly more likely than non-veterans to screen positive for depression (OR=2.10, P=.01) and suicide ideation (OR=2.31, P=.03). Student veterans had significantly higher odds of perceiving a need for treatment than non-veterans (OR=1.93, P=.02) but were more likely to perceive stigma (beta=0.28, P=.02). Despite greater need among veterans, there were no significant differences between veterans and non-veterans in use of psychotropic medications, although veterans were more likely to receive psychotherapy (OR=2.35, P=.046). Findings highlight the substantial gap between the prevalence of probable mental health disorders and treatment seeking among community college students. Interventions are needed to link community college students to services, especially for student veterans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Systematic review of women veterans' mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnals, Jennifer J; Garovoy, Natara; McCutcheon, Susan J; Robbins, Allison T; Mann-Wrobel, Monica C; Elliott, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    Given recent, rapid growth in the field of women veterans' mental health, the goal of this review was to update the status of women veterans' mental health research and to identify current themes in this literature. The scope of this review included women veterans' unique mental health needs, as well as gender differences in veterans' mental health needs. Database searches were conducted for relevant articles published between January 2008 and July 2011. Searches were supplemented with bibliographic reviews and consultation with subject matter experts. The database search yielded 375 titles; 32 met inclusion/exclusion criteria. The women veterans' mental health literature crosses over several domains, including prevalence, risk factors, health care utilization, treatment preferences, and access barriers. Studies were generally cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed-gender, and examined Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users from all service eras. Results indicate higher rates of specific disorders (e.g., depression) and comorbidities, with differing risk factors and associated medical and functional impairment for female compared with male veterans. Although satisfaction with VA health care is generally high, unique barriers to care and indices of treatment satisfaction exist for women. There is a breadth of descriptive knowledge in many content areas of women veterans' mental health; however, the research base examining interventional and longitudinal designs is less developed. Understudied content areas and targets for future research and development include certain psychiatric disorders (e.g., schizophrenia), the effects of deployment on woman veterans' families, and strategies to address treatment access, attrition, and provision of gender-sensitive care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Experience of problem-based learning in nursing education at Kaohsiung Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Fan-Hao; Chin, Chi-Chun

    2009-05-01

    Nursing education must keep up with the rapidly changing medical landscape to support the competences of nurses in the areas of critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity. Problem-based learning (PBL) provides an appropriate strategy for nursing education innovation. Nursing curricula based on PBL remain in the growing stage in Taiwan. Kaohsiung Medical University introduced PBL into nursing education in 2002. The critical events in the process included: (1) nurturing key tutors; (2) using PBL teaching methods in an elective course--Oncology Nursing, and designing a new elective course--Symposiums Regarding Clinical Cases; (3) holding conferences inside and outside the school to promote PBL teaching methods; (4) linking e-learning and PBL teaching methods; (5) conducting PBL research; (6) establishing a committee of PBL, objective structured clinical examination, and teaching material review for the College of Nursing; and (7) setting up a required course--Nursing Ethics. We now have 12 key tutors in the College of Nursing. We have also completed two studies to evaluate the ability of students and to explore the experience of tutors. From our studies, we know that PBL can increase learner abilities in self-directed learning, critical thinking, and PBL performance. The approach helps students to cope with the changing medical landscape. Furthermore, tutors and teachers develop adequate PBL teaching skills. Based on the experience above, we believe that we are on the right path in terms of continuing tutor development, gradually increasing the number of PBL courses, and undertaking further research to promote PBL methods in Taiwan.

  14. Characteristics of Rural Veterans: 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report uses data from the 2010 American Community Survey to compare the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans and non-Veterans who live in...

  15. Veterans Administration Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  16. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  17. Student Veterans Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlot, John; Green, Sean-Michael; Parker, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Students who have experienced conflict as members of the military come to college expecting to be supported, if not honored for their service. One way that campus administrators can facilitate transitions for student veterans is to assist in founding and maintaining campus-based student organizations for veterans. Military service is a bonding…

  18. Distribution, origin, and potential toxicological significance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Sediment samples were collected from 12 locations of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Total PAH concentrations varied from 472 to 16,201 ng g(-1) dry weight. The highest PAH concentrations were from the industrial zone docks situated in south Kaohsiung Harbor. Diagnostic ratios showed that the possible source of PAHs in the industrial zone dock could be coal combustion while in the other zones it could be petroleum combustion. The toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQcarc) of PAHs varied from 55 to 1964 ng TEQ g(-1) dry weight. Higher total TEQcarc values were found at industrial zone docks (from 1404 to 1964 ng TEQ g(-1) dry weight). As compared with the US Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs), the observed levels of PAHs at industrial zone docks exceeded the effects range low (ERL), and could thus cause acute biological damage. However, the lower levels of PAHs at the other zones would probably not exert adverse biological effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 5 CFR 335.106 - Special selection procedures for certain veterans under merit promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... veterans under merit promotion. 335.106 Section 335.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROMOTION AND INTERNAL PLACEMENT General Provisions § 335.106 Special selection procedures for certain veterans under merit promotion. Preference eligibles or veterans who...

  20. 38 CFR 3.712 - Improved pension elections; surviving spouses of Spanish-American War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... elections; surviving spouses of Spanish-American War veterans. 3.712 Section 3.712 Pensions, Bonuses, and... spouses of Spanish-American War veterans. (a) General. A surviving spouse of a Spanish-American War... and attendance. A surviving spouse of a Spanish-American War veteran who is receiving or entitled...

  1. 38 CFR 3.20 - Surviving spouse's benefit for month of veteran's death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surviving spouse's... General § 3.20 Surviving spouse's benefit for month of veteran's death. (a) Where the veteran died on or... indemnity compensation otherwise payable for the surviving spouse for the month in which the death...

  2. 38 CFR 21.6519 - Eligibility of qualified veterans for employment and counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... veterans for employment and counseling services. 21.6519 Section 21.6519 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... employment and counseling services. (a) General. A qualified veteran for whom vocational rehabilitation and achievenment of a vocational goal are reasonably feasible may be provided the employment and...

  3. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  4. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  5. For Homeless Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher. More Information Compensated Work ... residential treatment services to help Veterans transition from living on the street or in institutions to stable ...

  6. Veterans Choice Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — If you are already enrolled in VA health care, the Choice Program allows you to receive health care within your community. Using this program does NOT impact your...

  7. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aid & Attendance & Housebound Caregivers Community Living Centers (CLC) Community Nursing Homes Domiciliaries (Please contact your local VA Medical Center) Homemaker & Home Health Aid Care Hospice and Palliative Care State Veterans ...

  8. Veterans Health Administration (VHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The purpose of this agreement is for SSA to verify SSNs and other identifying information for the Department of Veterans Affairs, VHA. DVA will use the information...

  9. The Veteran Population Projection 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VetPop2014 is an actuarial projection model developed by the Office of the Actuary (OACT) for Veteran population projection from Fiscal Year FY2014 to FY2043. Using...

  10. Veteran Religious Affiliation by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This dataset provide a count of Veteran by their religious affiliation and state of residence. The dataset set covers all 50 states, District of Columbia and other...

  11. Rural Veterans by State (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This spreadsheet contains data from the 2015 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  12. Rural Veterans by State (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  13. Veterans' Employment and Training Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Careers Women Who Served Programs & Services Transition GPS Frequently Asked Questions Hire a Veteran Find qualified Veterans Policy & Compliance Employer Toolkit Strengthening Military Families Apprenticeships Service Providers Grants & Opportunities Compliance Assistance ...

  14. The Veteran Population Projection 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VetPop2014 is an actuarial projection model developed by the Office of the Actuary (OACT) for Veteran population projection from Fiscal Year FY2014 to FY2043. Using...

  15. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Ping Tan; Lin-Qi Zhu; Jun Zhang; Shi-Min Zhang; Xiao-Yang Lan; Bo Cui; Yu-Cheng Deng; Ying-Hao Li; Guang-Hua Ye; Lu-Ning Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: The awareness, treatment and prevention of chronic diseases are generally poor among the elderly population of China, whereas the prevention and control of chronic diseases in elderly veteran communities have been ongoing for more than 30 years. Therefore, investigating the awareness status of chronic disabling neurological diseases (CDND) and common chronic diseases (CCD) among elderly veterans may provide references for related programs among the elderly in the general populatio...

  16. Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Welcome to the Veterans ...

  17. Veteran Stereotypes: A Closer Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    All Americans, however, should have an interest in veteran reintegration . The success with which we reintegrate our veterans and their families as... successful reintegration through simple coaching and mentoring that assists veterans in navigating reintegration challenges. As explained above, most...already living in the civilian community can have a profound effect on a veteran’s reintegration success . Veterans do not need a hand-out, but a

  18. Psychosocial Equine Program for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruolo, David M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of all combat veterans suffer from serious psychological disorders and reintegration issues. Veterans shy away from typical talk therapy and are seeking alternative treatments. Equine-facilitated mental health therapy has shown promise in treating veterans with depressive and anxiety disorders and reintegration issues. This article reports on an institutional review board-approved pilot program designed to address the mental health needs of veterans. Furthermore, this article discusses future directions for evolving development of equine treatment programming.

  19. Data on Vietnam Era Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration, Washington, DC. Office of the Controller.

    Statistical data are presented on Vietnam era veterans for the following topics: employment status, medical status, compensation and pension, education, housing assistance, expenditures, and demographic information. The estimated number and age of veterans in civil life, categorized by sex and state, and the educational attainment of veterans at…

  20. Rooted in the Community: Assessing the Reintegration Impacts of Agriculture on Rural Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besterman-Dahan, Karen; Chavez, Margeaux; Njoh, Eni

    2017-08-23

    To assess the impact of a Veteran-oriented community agricultural initiative (CAI) on transitioning rural Veterans. Convergent mixed-method program evaluation. A Veteran-oriented farm-to-market CAI in rural Washington State. Veterans who were members of the CAI. Health, well-being, and reintegration were assessed by self-reported data from interview, demographic survey, validated health quality of life measure (Veterans RAND-12 -VR-12), validated reintegration measure (Military to Civilian Questionnaire -M2C-Q), and general satisfaction survey. Veteran participants were primarily Caucasian (88.4%, n=38) and male (74.4%, n=32) and most had a service-connected disability rating (58.2%, n=25). Qualitative and quantitative data revealed that the veterans participating in this CAI experienced health and reintegration benefits. Results on the M2C-Q, VR-12, and the satisfaction survey suggest that participating in this CAI contributed to improved mental, physical, and emotional health and vocational skills, community connectedness, and interpersonal communication. Qualitative interviews supported quantitative findings and revealed that participating in the CAI provided Veterans with a sense of satisfaction, belonging, and helped decrease the stigma surrounding their Veteran status. Veterans who participate in this CAI reported general improvements in physical and mental health, including improvements in sleep, nutrition, exercise, and decreases in anxiety, pain, depression and medication and substance use, all known factors which impact Veteran reintegration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. 75 FR 22164 - Urban Non-Urban Homeless Female Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans' Employment... training, and skills training) to expedite the reintegration of homeless Veterans into the labor...

  2. The Veteran's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    In one important way, student-veterans are like all other students. They need supportive relationships to achieve their academic goals. Serving these students well means learning their stories and helping them succeed. In the process, some of these people may change one's life. In this article, the author shares the touching stories of some of the…

  3. Racial differences in veterans' satisfaction with examination of disability from posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Marc I; Afshartous, David R; Nwosu, Samuel; Scott, Melanie C; Jackson, James C; Marx, Brian P; Murdoch, Maureen; Sinnott, Patricia L; Speroff, Theodore

    2013-04-01

    The examination that determines if a veteran has service-connected posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects veterans' lives for years. This study examined factors potentially associated with veterans' perception of their examination's quality. Veterans (N=384) being evaluated for an initial PTSD service-connection claim were randomly assigned to receive either a semistructured interview or the examiner's usual interview. Immediately after the interview, veterans completed confidential ratings of the examinations' quality and of their examiners' interpersonal qualities and competence. Extensive data characterizing the veterans, the 33 participating examiners, and the examinations themselves were collected. Forty-seven percent of Caucasian veterans and 34% of African-American veterans rated their examination quality as excellent. African Americans were less likely than Caucasians to assign a higher quality rating (odds ratio=.61, 95% confidence interval=.38-.99, p=.047). Compared with Caucasians, African Americans rated their examiners as having significantly worse interpersonal qualities but not lower competence. Ratings were not significantly related to the veterans' age, gender, marital status, eventual diagnosis of PTSD, Global Assessment of Functioning score, the examiner's perception of the prevalence of malingering, or the presence of a third party during the examination. Ratings of disability examinations were generally high, although ratings were less favorable among African-American veterans than among Caucasian veterans.

  4. Monitoring and removal of residual phthalate esters and pharmaceuticals in the drinking water of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gordon C C; Yen, Chia-Heng; Wang, Chih-Lung

    2014-07-30

    This study monitored the occurrence and removal efficiencies of 8 phthalate esters (PAEs) and 13 pharmaceuticals present in the drinking water of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. The simultaneous electrocoagulation and electrofiltration (EC/EF) process was used to remove the contaminants. To this end, a monitoring program was conducted and a novel laboratory-prepared tubular carbon nanofiber/carbon/alumina composite membrane (TCCACM) was incorporated into the EC/EF treatment module (collectively designated as "TCCACM-EC/EF treatment module") to remove the abovementioned compounds from water samples. The monitoring results showed that the concentrations of PAEs were lower in water samples from drinking fountains as compared with tap water samples. No significant differences were found between the concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the two types of water samples. Under optimal operating conditions, the TCCACM-EC/EF treatment module yielded the lowest residual concentrations, ranging from not detected (ND) to 52ng/L for PAEs and pharmaceuticals of concern in the tap water samples. Moreover, the performance of the TCCACM-EC/EF treatment module is comparable with a series of treatment units employed for the drinking fountain water treatment system. The relevant removal mechanisms involved in the TCCACM-EC/EF treatment module were also discussed in this work. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Distinction or Omnivorousness? -- An Analysis of Cultural Participation and Class Reproduction in Kaohsiung from the Perspective of Pierre Bourdieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Focusing upon cultural politics of class relations, this study uses the case of Kaohsiung to explore into four major research questions: How do people participate in cultural activities? What are the possible factors that have influenced cultural taste? What are significant variables related to the quality and quantity of cultural participation? And to what extent there do exist distinction and class reproduction? Data have been collected through a citywide telephone random survey and analyzed from the perspective of Pierre Bourdieu to sort out the causes and consequences of cultural participation. Statistic results show that music, movie and animation are the most popular cultural activities and they are regarded as the very cultural industries that should be fully promoted by the government as well. Cultural capital, according to regression analyses, determines the quality and quantity of cultural participation, whereas cultural participation has further demarcated the difference of class identities, reproduced existing cultural advantage, and facilitated the exchange between cultural capital and social capital. Overall speaking, the composition and volume of cultural capital and economic capital are related to the quality of cultural participation. The volume of cultural capital has positive correlation with the quantity of cultural participation. Distinction, thus, works with cultural omnivorousness side by side, and the outcomes of cultural participation in return have led to certain kinds of class identification and class reproduction.

  6. Determination of source contributions to ambient PM2.5 in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, using a receptor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K S; Lin, C F; Chou, Y M

    2001-04-01

    Ambient particulates of PM2.5 were sampled at three sites in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, during February and March 1999. In addition, resuspended PM2.5 collected from traffic tunnels, paved roads, fly ash of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator, and seawater was obtained. All the samples were analyzed for twenty constituents, including water-soluble ions, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and metallic elements. In conjunction with local source profiles and the source profiles in the model library SPECIATE EPA, the receptor model based on chemical mass balance (CMB) was then applied to determine the source contributions to ambient PM2.5. The mean concentration of ambient PM2.5 was 42.69-53.68 micrograms/m3 for the sampling period. The abundant species in ambient PM2.5 in the mass fraction for three sites were OC (12.7-14.2%), SO4(2-) (12.8-15.1%), NO3- (8.1-10.3%), NH4+ (6.7-7.5%), and EC (5.3-8.5%). Results of CMB modeling show that major pollution sources for ambient PM2.5 are traffic exhaust (18-54%), secondary aerosols (30-41% from SO4(2-) and NO3-), and outdoor burning of agriculture wastes (13-17%).

  7. The Veterans Health Administration’s Treatment of PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury Among Recent Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Boxes1. Eligibility for VHA’s Services 22. Suicide and Mental Illness Among OCO Veterans 12 SummaryMore than 2 million service members have deployed...likely to be prescribed for patients receiving a diagnosis in a mental health clinic than for those diagnosed in a general medical or PSTD clinic.11...common within the OCO veteran population. (For a brief description of other mental health conditions and suicide in that popu- lation, see Box 2.) The

  8. Veterans Benefits: Federal Employment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Heart recipients; • the spouse of a veteran unable to work because of a service-connected disability; • the unmarried widow of certain deceased...veterans; and • certain mothers of veterans who died in service or who are permanently and totally disabled.12...12 To receive the 10-point preference, the mother must be either: (1) married with a husband who is totally disabled; or (2

  9. Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  10. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  11. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Violence Intimate Partner Violence Domestic Abuse Sexual Trauma Culture Change Culture Change I'm One Proud Veteran Women Veterans ... online at www.va.gov/directory ). During normal business hours, you can contact the Veterans Health Administration ( ...

  12. Danish Gulf War Veterans Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Stoltenberg, Christian; Nielsen, Anni B Sternhagen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the assumption that postdeployment incidence of sickness and other absence from work are higher among Gulf War Veterans compared with nonveterans. METHODS: A prospective registry study including a cohort of 721 Danish Gulf War Veterans and a control cohort of 3,629 nonveterans...... and nonveterans in the incidence rate of long-term sickness absence. After an initial short period (3 months) with elevated incidence rate of long-term absence from work among veterans, there was no difference between the cohorts. CONCLUSION: Among Danish Gulf War Veterans, no postdeployment increased risk...

  13. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Spread the Word Videos ...

  14. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Spread the Word Videos ...

  15. The dragon of Kaohsiung. The new soccer stadium in Taiwan's second biggest city will generate more than one million kWh of solar power per annum; Der Drache von Kaohsiung. Das neue Stadion in Taiwans zweitgroesster Stadt soll ueber eine Million Kilowattstunden Solarstrom jaehrlich liefern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Matthew; Wagner, Neelke

    2009-10-15

    The new stadium at Kaohsiung has a spectacular architecture which raised attention world-wide. The public and experts call it the ''flying dragon''. Apart from the sports fans, also the fans of photovoltaic power generation will profit: with an installed capacity of 1 MW, it has the biggest photovoltaic system of any sports facility in the world. (orig.)

  16. Understanding Student Veterans in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    In this research report the author details a phenomenological study documenting identity development in student veterans making the transition from active military service to higher education. This study took place at a doctoral granting proprietary university with a significant veteran population and consisted of in-depth interviews. This…

  17. Military and veteran health behavior research and practice: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haibach, Jeffrey P; Haibach, Michael Ann; Hall, Katherine S; Masheb, Robin M; Little, Melissa A; Shepardson, Robyn L; Dobmeyer, Anne C; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Hunter, Christopher L; Dundon, Margaret; Hausmann, Leslie R M; Trynosky, Stephen K; Goodrich, David E; Kilbourne, Amy M; Knight, Sara J; Talcott, Gerald W; Goldstein, Michael G

    2017-02-01

    There are 2.1 million current military servicemembers and 21 million living veterans in the United States. Although they were healthier upon entering military service compared to the general U.S. population, in the longer term veterans tend to be of equivalent or worse health than civilians. One primary explanation for the veterans' health disparity is poorer health behaviors during or after military service, especially areas of physical activity, nutrition, tobacco, and alcohol. In response, the Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs continue to develop, evaluate, and improve health promotion programs and healthcare services for military and veteran health behavior in an integrated approach. Future research and practice is needed to better understand and promote positive health behavior during key transition periods in the military and veteran life course. Also paramount is implementation and evaluation of existing interventions, programs, and policies across the population using an integrated and person centered approach.

  18. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N=12 also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual’s passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations.

  19. Alcohol and drug misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Katherine J; Jamison, Andrea L; Lehavot, Keren; Cucciare, Michael A; Timko, Christine; Simpson, Tracy L

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on substance misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans, including National Guard/reserve members. We identified 837 articles published between 1980 and 2013. Of 56 included studies, 32 reported rates of alcohol misuse, binge drinking, or other unhealthy alcohol use not meeting diagnostic criteria for abuse or dependence, and 33 reported rates of drug misuse or diagnosed alcohol or drug use disorders. Rates ranged from 4% to 37% for alcohol misuse and from 7% to 25% for binge drinking; among Veterans Health Administration (VA) health-care system outpatients, rates ranged from 3% to 16% for substance use disorder. Studies comparing women veterans and civilians reported no clear differences in binge or heavy drinking. Substance misuse rates were generally lower among women veterans than men veterans. Substance misuse was associated with higher rates of trauma, psychiatric and medical conditions, and increased mortality and suicide rates. Most studies included only VA patients, and many used only VA medical record data; therefore, the reported substance misuse rates likely do not reflect true prevalence. Rates also varied by assessment method, source of data, and the subgroups studied. Further efforts to develop epidemiologically valid prevalence estimates are needed to capture the true health burden of substance misuse in women veterans, particularly those not using VA care.

  20. Cancer in US Air Force veterans not involved with spraying herbicides during the Vietnam War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavuk, M. [SpecPro, Inc. (United States); Michalek, J.; Ketchum, N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, San Antonio, TX (United States); Akhtar, F. [The START Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year prospective study examining the health, mortality and reproductive outcomes in US Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand who sprayed herbicides in Vietnam from 1962 to 1971. Comparison veterans flew or serviced C-130 transport aircraft in Southeast Asia (SEA) during the same time period but did not spray herbicides. They were stationed mostly in Taiwan, the Philippines, Guam, Japan, and Thailand and spent on average less than 30% of their SEA service in Vietnam. Comparison veterans also spent approximately 30% more time in SEA than Ranch Hand veterans. No increases in Ranch Hand cancer mortality and morbidity were found in earlier investigations, but a recent study contrasting cancer rates in Air Force veterans and in the general US (white male) population reported increases in cancer at all SEER sites, prostate cancer and melanoma in Ranch Hand veterans and cancer at all SEER sites and prostate cancer in Comparison veterans. Associations between dioxin exposure category and cancer were found after restriction to Ranch Hand veterans who served in SEA no more than 2 years and to those who spent all of their SEA service in Vietnam. Overall cancer incidence in the general population in countries of SEA is about half of that in the United States, but cancers of the oral cavity/nasopharynx and liver are more prevalent in this region. Here we examine in more detail whether years served in SEA had any effect on the risk of cancer among Comparison veterans.

  1. Characteristics of Telephone Applicants to a Residential Rehabilitation Program for Homeless Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidner, Andrea L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Gathered descriptive data on 163 telephone applicants to residential rehabilitation program for homeless veterans and compared data with general veteran and homeless populations. Found subjects to be young, educated group of homeless men with histories of relatively high, stable functioning and high rates of medical, substance abuse, psychiatric,…

  2. Treating Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with PTSD Who Are at High Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakupcak, Matthew; Varra, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans diagnosed with psychiatric disorders commit suicide at a higher rate than the general population (Kang & Bullman, 2008). Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been identified as a risk factor for suicide in veterans (Bullman & Kang, 1994) and is the most common mental disorder among Iraq and Afghanistan…

  3. VA Is Here for the People Who Support Our Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confidential Homeless Veterans Chat and see resources for homeless Veterans . Network of Support The Veterans Crisis Line can put you in touch with VA ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard ... Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line ...

  4. Race/Ethnicity and End-of-Life Care Among Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Smith, Dawn; Thorpe, Joshua; Del Rosario, Cindy; Ibrahim, Said; Ersek, Mary

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have examined comprehensively racial/ethnic variations in quality of end-of-life care. Examine end-of-life care quality received by Veterans and their families, comparing racial/ethnic minorities to nonminorities. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of chart review and survey data. Nearly all deaths in 145 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers nationally (n=94,697) in addition to Bereaved Family Survey (BFS) data (n=51,859) from October 2009 to September 2014. Outcomes included 15 BFS items and 4 indicators of high-quality end-of-life care, including receipt of a palliative care consult, chaplain visit, bereavement contact, and death in hospice/palliative care unit. Veteran race/ethnicity was measured via chart review and defined as non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, or other. In adjusted models, no differences were observed by race/ethnicity in receipt of a palliative care consult or death in a hospice unit. Although black Veterans were less likely than white Veterans to receive a chaplain visit, Hispanic Veterans were more likely than white Veterans to receive a chaplain visit and to receive a bereavement contact. Less favorable outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities were noted on several BFS items. In comparison with family members of white Veterans, families of minority Veterans were less likely to report excellent overall care, and this difference was largest for black Veterans (48% vs. 62%). Bereaved family members of minority Veterans generally rate the quality of end-of-life care less favorably than those of white Veterans. Family perceptions are critical to the evaluation of equity and quality of end-of-life care.

  5. 38 CFR 45.605 - Inspector General report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspector General report. 45.605 Section 45.605 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... comparable to an Inspector General shall prepare and submit the annual report, or, if there is no...

  6. 2015 Veteran Economic Opportunity Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and data analysis to the VBA and stakeholders. PA&I developed the VBA Enterprise Data Warehouse to enable the generation of recurring and ad hoc...reports in response to VBA decision-making and business needs. PA&I will be a primary source of information on Veteran education, vocational...competitiveness from preliminary analyses pre- sented in this document. 4. Build predictive models through analysis of individual-level stakeholder data on Veteran

  7. Correlates of institutionalized senior veterans' quality of life in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Shinn-Jang

    2010-07-01

    environment domain. Conclusions In general, institutionalized senior veterans' QOL was lower than Taiwanese male norms. Helping senior veterans to effectively improve their subjective mental health and social support, and controlling chronic disease appears to be critical to their QOL.

  8. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Suicide Prevention PSA for Military Families see more videos ... About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line text-messaging service does ...

  9. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 724 - Veterans' Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of paragraph (1) of this subsection, such personal shall be entitled to an appearance before the... effect of, (1) providing any unique or special advantage to veterans awarded general or honorable... not make any claim to recover the value of any benefits provided to such person prior to such earliest...

  10. Vessel traffic patterns in the Port of Kaohsiung and the management implications for preventing the introduction of non-indigenous aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ta-Kang; Tsai, Tzung-Kuen

    2011-03-01

    Data on shipping traffic in one of the busiest seaports in the world, the Port of Kaohsiung, were analyzed to evaluate the implications for ballast water management. Results show that 67% of the arriving vessels were registered to a flag of convenience, which typically have a lower degree of environmental records. The top five donor countries historically suffer from harmful algal bloom problems. The short journey and busy trading between these countries and Taiwan lead to a higher risk of inoculation. In addition, only 1.4% of all vessels visited more than once every year during the 9-year span, indicating that the port authority encounters many new vessels each year. These findings could influence the design and application of ballast water management strategies as well as highlight the challenges in their implementation. We suggest that an analysis of vessel traffic patterns should be coupled with other useful vessel information to make risk assessment successful.

  11. Insomnia and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder among women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jaime; Jouldjian, Stella; Washington, Donna L; Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Women will account for 10% of the Veteran population by 2020, yet there has been little focus on sleep issues among women Veterans. In a descriptive study of 107 women Veterans with insomnia (mean age = 49 years, 44% non-Hispanic white), 55% had probable post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (total score ≥33). Probable PTSD was related to more severe self-reported sleep disruption and greater psychological distress. In a regression model, higher PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C) total score was a significant independent predictor of worse insomnia severity index score while other factors were not. Women Veterans preferred behavioral treatments over pharmacotherapy in general, and efforts to increase the availability of such treatments should be undertaken. Further research is needed to better understand the complex relationship between insomnia and PTSD among women Veterans.

  12. Effect modification of the association between meteorological variables and mortality by urban climatic conditions in the tropical city of Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Goggins

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A deeper understanding of extreme hot weather are needed in cities sensitive to heat effects, an investigation was done in the tropical town of Kaohsiung in Taiwan. Its 11 districts were divided into three climatic classes varying from high urban heat, low levels of green space and lack of proximity to water bodies to low urban heat, adequate green space and proximity to water bodies. Daily data on natural mortality, meteorological variables, and pollutants from May-October 1999-2008 were analysed using generalised additive models for the time-series data. Subgroup analyses were conducted, stratifying decedents according to the level of planning activity required in order to mitigate adverse heat effects in their residential areas, classifying districts as “level 1” for those requiring a high level of mitigation action; “level 2” for those requiring some action; and “level 3” for those that need only preserve existing conditions. Stratified analyses showed that mortality increases per 1 °C rise on average, either on the same day or in the previous 4 days (lags 0-4, were associated with 2.8%, 2.3% and -1.3% for level 1, 2 and 3 districts, respectively. The slope describing the association between temperature and mortality was higher above 29.0 °C resulting in corresponding increases of 4.2%, 5.0% and 0.3% per per 1 °C rise in temperature, respectively. Other meteorological variables were not significantly associated with mortality. It is concluded that hot season mortality in Kaohsiung is only sensitive to heat effects in districts classified as having unfavourably climatic conditions and requiring mitigation efforts in city planning. Urban planning measures designed to improve climatic conditions could reduce excess mortality resulting from extreme hot weather.

  13. Military veteran mortality following a survived suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conigliaro Joseph

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a global public health problem. Recently in the U.S., much attention has been given to preventing suicide and other premature mortality in veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A strong predictor of suicide is a past suicide attempt, and suicide attempters have multiple physical and mental comorbidities that put them at risk for additional causes of death. We examined mortality among U.S. military veterans after hospitalization for attempted suicide. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted with all military veterans receiving inpatient treatment during 1993-1998 at United States Veterans Affairs (VA medical facilities following a suicide attempt. Deaths occurring during 1993-2002, the most recent available year at the time, were identified through VA Beneficiary and Records Locator System data and National Death Index data. Mortality data for the general U.S. adult population were also obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics. Comparisons within the veteran cohort, between genders, and against the U.S. population were conducted with descriptive statistics and standardized mortality ratios. The actuarial method was used estimate the proportion of veterans in the cohort we expect would have survived through 2002 had they experienced the same rate of death that occurred over the study period in the U.S. population having the age and sex characteristics. Results During 1993-1998, 10,163 veterans were treated and discharged at a VA medical center after a suicide attempt (mean age = 44 years; 91% male. There was a high prevalence of diagnosed alcohol disorder or abuse (31.8%, drug dependence or abuse (21.8%, psychoses (21.2%, depression (18.5%, and hypertension (14.2%. A total of 1,836 (18.1% veterans died during follow up (2,941.4/100,000 person years. The cumulative survival probability after 10 years was 78.0% (95% CI = 72.9, 83.1. Hence the 10-year cumulative mortality risk was 22

  14. Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR) receives and stores information on cancer diagnosis and treatment constraints compiled and sent in by the local...

  15. Investigating Veterans' Pre-, Peri-, and Post-Deployment Experiences as Potential Risk Factors for Problem Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Seth W; Potenza, Marc N; Park, Crystal L; McKee, Sherry A; Mazure, Carolyn M; Hoff, Rani A

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Gambling disorder and its comorbid diagnoses are observed at higher rates in military veterans than in the general population. A significant research gap exists regarding the relationships of veterans' life and service experiences to problematic gambling. The present study explored pre-, peri-, and post-deployment factors associated with problem gambling in veterans. Methods Veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn (n = 738; 463 males, and 275 females) completed questionnaires via structured telephone interview. We conducted bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses exploring associations among problem-gambling severity and socio-demographic variables, psychiatric comorbidities, and 10 scales of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory measuring experiences pre-, peri-, and post-deployment. Results Approximately 4.2% of veterans indicated at-risk or probable pathological gambling (ARPG) post-deployment (two or more DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling). Bivariate analyses found more severe gambling in males, higher frequencies of post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependence, traumatic brain injury, panic disorder, and depression in veterans with ARPG, and higher general harassment during deployment, and lower social support and more stressful life events post-deployment in those with ARPG. In multivariable models, both post-deployment factors remained significantly associated with ARPG. Discussion The study suggests that problem gambling among veterans is related to service experiences, and particularly to life experiences post-deployment. Conclusions Adverse service and life experiences and lack of social support may contribute to the risk of problem gambling in military veterans. Investigation of how Veterans Affairs clinical settings may serve veterans following deployment to prevent behavioral addictions is warranted.

  16. Use of outpatient care in VA and Medicare among disability-eligible and age-eligible veteran patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chuan-Fen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than half of veterans who use Veterans Health Administration (VA care are also eligible for Medicare via disability or age, but no prior studies have examined variation in use of outpatient services by Medicare-eligible veterans across health system, type of care or time. Objectives To examine differences in use of VA and Medicare outpatient services by disability-eligible or age-eligible veterans among veterans who used VA primary care services and were also eligible for Medicare. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 4,704 disability- and 10,816 age-eligible veterans who used VA primary care services in fiscal year (FY 2000. We tracked their outpatient utilization from FY2001 to FY2004 using VA administrative and Medicare claims data. We examined utilization differences for primary care, specialty care, and mental health outpatient visits using generalized estimating equations. Results Among Medicare-eligible veterans who used VA primary care, disability-eligible veterans had more VA primary care visits (p p p p p p Conclusions Greater use of primary care and specialty care visits by disability-eligible veterans is most likely related to greater health needs not captured by the patient characteristics we employed and eligibility for VA care at no cost. Outpatient care patterns of disability-eligible veterans may foreshadow care patterns of veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq wars, who are entering the system in growing numbers. This study provides an important baseline for future research assessing utilizations among returning veterans who use both VA and Medicare systems. Establishing effective care coordination protocols between VA and Medicare providers can help ensure efficient use of taxpayer resources and high quality care for disabled veterans.

  17. Using International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to understand challenges in community reintegration of injured veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda J; Allen, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    This pilot study used the framework of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to understand the challenges faced by Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) veterans as they reintegrate into the community. We conducted semistructured interviews with 14 injured veterans, 12 caregivers, and 14 clinicians. We used ICF taxonomy to code data and identify issues. We identified challenges in the following ICF domains: learning and applying knowledge; general tasks and demands; communication; mobility; self-care; domestic life; interpersonal interactions, major life areas; and community, social, and civic life. We found many similarities between the challenges faced by veterans with and without polytraumatic injuries, although veterans with polytraumatic injuries faced challenges of greater magnitude. Identifying community reintegration challenges early and promoting reintegration are important mandates for the Department of Veterans Affairs. The findings of this study are useful in understanding the needs of OEF/OIF veterans.

  18. 38 CFR 3.401 - Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compensation payable by reason of need for aid and attendance or housebound status shall also be awarded for... claim additional disability compensation payable to a veteran by reason of the veteran's spouse's need....) (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 5110 (f), (n)) (c) Divorce of veteran and spouse. See § 3.501(d). (d)...

  19. 77 FR 20849 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... Veterans' Reintegration Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS), Department of...: Section 2021 of Title 38 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) reauthorizes the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) through fiscal year (FY) 2012 and indicates: ``the Secretary of Labor shall...

  20. Gender, race & the veteran wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Brandon; Fontanella, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes earnings outcomes of Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans. We utilize the 2009-2013 American Community Survey and a worker-matching methodology to decompose wage differences between veteran and non-veteran workers. Among fully-employed, 25-40 year-olds, veteran workers make 3% less than non-veteran workers. While male veterans make 9% less than non-veterans, female and black veterans experience a wage premium (2% and 7% respectively). Decomposition of the earnings gap identifies some of its sources. Relatively higher rates of disability and lower rates of educational attainment serve to increase the overall wage penalty against veterans. However, veterans work less in low-paying occupations than non-veterans, serving to reduce the wage penalty. Finally, among male and white subgroups, non-veterans earn more in the top quintile due largely to having higher educational attainment and greater representation in higher-paying occupations, such as management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. D-Day for Veterans' Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Robert R.

    1977-01-01

    Focuses on the unemployment problem among Vietnam veterans and on the various Federal and private employment programs open to these veterans. Discussion also covers labor force statistics, readjustment to civilian life, changes in the American economy, and the role of the Department of Defense and civilian employers in helping veterans to find…

  2. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Ping Tan; Lin-Qi Zhu; Jun Zhang; Shi-Min Zhang; Xiao-Yang Lan; Bo Cui; Yu-Cheng Deng

    2015-01-01

    Background:The awareness,treatment and prevention of chronic diseases are generally poor among the elderly population of China,whereas the prevention and control of chronic diseases in elderly veteran communities have been ongoing for more than 30 years.Therefore,investigating the awareness status of chronic disabling neurological diseases (CDND) and common chronic diseases (CCD) among elderly veterans may provide references for related programs among the elderly in the general population.Methods:A cross-sectional survey was conducted among veterans ≥60 years old in veteran communities in Beijing.The awareness of preventive strategies against dementia,Alzheimer's disease (AD),Parkinson's disease (PD),sleep disorders,cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and CCD such as hypertension,and the approaches used to access this information,including media,word of mouth (verbal communication among the elderly) and health care professionals,were investigated via face-to-face interviews.Results:The awareness rates for CCD and CVD were approximately 100%,but that forAD was the lowest at <10%.The awareness rates for sleep disorders,PD and dementia,were 51.0-89.4%.Media was the most commonly selected mode of communication by which veterans acquired knowledge about CCD and CVD.Media was used by approximately 80% of veterans.Both health care professionals and word of mouth were used by approximately 50% of veterans.With respect to the source of information about CDND excluding AD,the rates of the use of health care professionals,word of mouth and media were 10.6-28.2%,56.5-76.5%,and approximately 50%,respectively.Conclusions:The awareness of CDND among elderly veterans was significantly lower than that of CCD.More information about CDND should be disseminated by health care professionals.Appropriate guidance will promote the rapid and extensive dissemination of information about the prevention of CDND by media and word-of-mouth peer education.

  3. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies.

  4. Veteran Competencies for Undergraduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jacqueline A; Moore, Randy L; Selleck, Cynthia S

    2015-01-01

    Military Veterans comprise approximately 10% of the US population. Most Veterans do not receive their health care through Veterans Affairs facilities, are seen across the health care system, and their prior military service and associated health issues often go unrecognized. In this study, a modified Delphi design was used to develop a set of 10 Veteran Care Competencies and associated knowledge, skills, and attitudes for Undergraduate Nursing Education: Military and Veteran Culture, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Amputation and Assistive Devices, Environmental/Chemical Exposures, Substance Use Disorder, Military Sexual Trauma, Traumatic Brain Injury, Suicide, Homelessness, and Serious Illness Especially at the End of Life.

  5. Psychological and behavioral problems in children of war veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Krešić Ćorić

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD caused by war trauma experiences affects veterans'; ability to meet their parental obligations, which can lead to the appearance of psychological and behavioral problems in their children. We explored, based on the parents'; assessment, whether the children of veterans with PTSD exhibit more psychological and behavioral problems and whether there are differences in relation to the age and sex of the child. Methods: The study group consisted of 91 children from 50 veterans receiving treatment for the war-related PTSD at the Psychiatric Department of the University Clinical Hospital Mostar. The control group consisted of 98 children of 50 war veterans without PTSD who were selected from veteran associations by the snowball method. The following instruments were used in the study: General Demographic Questionnaire, Harvard Trauma Questionnaire-Bosnia and Herzegovina version and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for children. Results: Children of veterans with PTSD have more pronounced psychological and behavioral problems (U = 2372.5; P < 0.001 compared to the children of veterans without PTSD. Male children of veterans with PTSD have more frequent behavioral problems (χ² = 7.174; P = 0.025 compared to the female children, and overall, they more frequently exhibit borderline or abnormal psychological difficulties (χ² = 6.682; P = 0.029. Children exhibiting abnormal levels of hyperactivity are significantly younger than children who exhibit normal or borderline levels of hyperactivity (Kruskal-Wallis = 3.982; P = 0.046. Conclusions: The children of war veterans with PTSD have more psychological and behavioral problems in comparison with the children of veterans without PTSD.

  6. Rapid HIV testing experience at Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System's Homeless Stand Downs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshyar, Dina; Surís, Alina M; Czarnogorski, Maggie; Lepage, James P; Bedimo, Roger; North, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    In the USA, 21% of the estimated 1.1 million people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are unaware they are HIV-infected. In 2011, Veterans Health Administration (VHA)'s Office of Public Health in conjunction with VHA's Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program funded grants to support rapid HIV testing at homeless outreach events because homeless populations are more likely to obtain emergent rather than preventive care and have a higher HIV seroprevalence as compared to the general population. Because of a Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System (VANTHCS)'s laboratory testing requirement, VANTHCS partnered with community agencies to offer rapid HIV testing for the first time at VANTHCS' 2011 Homeless Stand Downs in Dallas, Fort Worth, and Texoma, Texas. Homeless Stand Downs are outreach events that connect Veterans with services. Veterans who declined testing were asked their reasons for declining. Comparisons by Homeless Stand Down site used Pearson χ², substituting Fisher's Exact tests for expected cell sizes Stand Downs, 261 Veterans reported reasons for declining HIV testing, and 133 Veterans were tested, where 92% of the tested Veterans obtained their test results at the events - all tested negative. Veterans' reported reasons for declining HIV testing included previous negative result (n=168), no time to test (n=49), no risk factors (n=36), testing is not a priority (n=11), uninterested in knowing serostatus (n=6), and HIV-infected (n=3). Only "no time to test" differed significantly by Homeless Stand Down site. Nonresponse rate was 54%. Offering rapid HIV testing at Homeless Stand Downs is a promising testing venue since 15% of Veterans attending VANTHCS' Homeless Stand Downs were tested for HIV, and majority obtained their HIV test results at point-of-care while further research is needed to determine how to improve these rates.

  7. The Veteran Student in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Anthony M.; Jackson, Robert; Lindsay, Douglas R.; McCabe, Damian G.; Sanders, Joseph E., III

    2010-01-01

    The President of the United States promises to return servicemen and servicewomen back home from the war in the Middle East by 2011. This raises important questions about how the people in higher education will view and serve those who have worn the military uniform. As they watch the veterans who are making the transition from the battlefield to…

  8. Understanding Health-Care Needs of Sexual and Gender Minority Veterans: How Targeted Research and Policy Can Improve Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Kauth, Michael R; Sandfort, Theo; Matza, Alexis R; Sullivan, J Cherry; Shipherd, Jillian C

    2014-03-01

    Given the size of the patient population of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), it is likely the largest single provider of health care for sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals in the United States, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons. However, current VHA demographic data-collection strategies limit the understanding of how many SGM veterans there are, thereby making a population-based understanding of the health needs of SGM veterans receiving care in VHA difficult. In this article, we summarize the emergent research findings about SGM veterans and the first initiatives that have been implemented by VHA to promote quality care. Though the research on SGM veterans is in its infancy, it suggests that SGM veterans share some of the health risks noted in veterans generally and also risks associated with SGM status. Some promising resiliency factors have also been identified. These findings have implications for both VHA and non-VHA systems in the treatment of SGM veterans. However, more research on the unique needs of SGM veterans is needed to fully understand their health risks and resiliencies in addition to health-care utilization patterns.

  9. 38 CFR 3.454 - Veterans disability pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veterans disability pension. 3.454 Section 3.454 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.454 Veterans...

  10. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from ... Administration Commitments PSA see more videos from Veterans Health Administration The Veterans Crisis Line: Gun Safety see more videos from Veterans ...

  11. Effect of center-based counseling for veterans and veterans' families on long-term mental health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Meaghan; Varker, Tracey; Perry, Desmond; Phelps, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS), established by the Australian government, plays a pivotal role in providing mental health services to veterans and their families. This research explored the impact of center-based psychological counseling on depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol use severity. A stratified sample of VVCS clients were invited to participate in this study. Data were collected on intake to the program, at the fifth counseling session, and 12 months after the commencement of counseling. Repeated-measures general linear model analyses were conducted to examine the impact of center-based counseling on depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol severity over time. VVCS center-based counseling resulted in a significant reduction in depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol use severity after five sessions, and these improvements were maintained over the next 12 months. Despite these improvements, however, participants continued to report moderate-to-severe levels of mental health problems. VVCS center-based counseling successfully reduced depression, anxiety, stress, and alcohol use symptom severity of veterans and their families. However, the clinical profiles of this population are often complex and challenges remain in terms of addressing the mental health needs of this group.

  12. Salt Lake Community College Veterans Services: A Model of Serving Veterans in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Aaron; Foster, Michael; Head, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the birth and growth of a veterans' program in Salt Lake City, Utah, and discusses next steps in spurring additional innovations and advancements to improve service for student veterans in community colleges.

  13. Pain in veterans of the Gulf War of 1991: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunstan Frank

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Veterans of the Persian Gulf War of 1991 have reported a range of adverse health symptoms. This systematic review aims to identify all studies that have compared the prevalence of symptoms of pain in veterans of the Gulf War to that in a non-Gulf military comparison group, and to determine whether Gulf War veterans are at increased risk of reporting pain. Methods Studies published between January 1990 and May 2004 were identified by searching a large number of electronic databases. Reference lists and websites were also searched and key researchers were contacted. Studies were included if they reported the prevalence of any symptom or condition that included the word "pain" in Gulf War veterans and in a comparison group of non-Gulf veterans. 2401 abstracts were independently reviewed by two authors. Results Twenty studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Five main sites of pain were identified (muscle, joint, chest/heart, back and abdominal pain and separate meta-analyses were performed to summarise the results related to each site. A greater proportion of Gulf veterans reported symptoms at each site of pain when compared to a non-Gulf military group. Gulf deployment was most strongly associated with abdominal pain, with Gulf veterans being more than three times more likely to report such pain than a comparison group (OR 3.23; 95%CI 2.31–4.51. Statistical heterogeneity between study estimates was significant, probably due to variation in measured periods of prevalence and symptom measurement methods. Conclusion A higher proportion of veterans of the Persian Gulf War of 1991 reported symptoms of pain than military comparison groups. This is consistent with previously demonstrated increased reporting of more general symptoms (fatigue, multiple chemical sensitivity, post traumatic stress disorder in these veterans compared with non-Gulf military groups. However, the primary studies were heterogeneous and varied greatly in

  14. Effects of Local Circulations, Turbulent Internal Boundary Layers, and Elevated Industrial Plumes on Coastal Ozone Pollution in the Downwind Kaohsiung Urban-Industrial Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Lin Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Linyuan (LY is a coastal station located down wind of the industrial city of Kaohsiung in southern Taiwan. This station is often affected by severe ozone pollution during sea breeze events. Intensive tethered ozone soundings were per formed at this station during a 4-day ozone episode in November, 2005. Back air trajectories were also calculated to track the origins of air masses arriving at the station during the experiment. The investigation revealed complicated ozone pro files in the lower at mo sphere (be low 1300 m both day and night. At night, industrial plumes forming no-ozone air layers were frequently distributed at 400 - 800 m. Mixing layers rapidly decreased from 800 - 1100 m down to 200 - 350 m in the late morning hours when sea breezes and thermal internal boundary layers (TIBLs developed. Recirculation of polluted in land air masses over the sea, the development of TIBLs, and the late development of sea-breeze events all are likely responsible for severe ozone pollution at the LY station. Elevated industrial plumes or ozone aloft above TIBLs revealed only aminor contribution to ozone pollution via a downward mixing process. Elevated ozone levels (140 - 170 ppb were of ten trapped within transitional layers of sea-breeze circulations at 600 - 800 m and were accompanied by ambient northerly flows parallel to the coast line, suggesting that an ozone pollution core likely formed over the west coast of Taiwan on ozone-episodic days when sea-breeze circulations developed.

  15. 75 FR 14633 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Veterans' Employment and Training Service Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans' Employment... placement services (including job readiness and literacy and skills training) to expedite the...

  16. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in crisis, find a facility near you. Spread the Word Download logos, Web ads, and materials and ... from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ...

  17. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — These quick facts use data from the 2011 Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch to compare Veteran employment in the Federal Government by agency,...

  18. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Watch additional videos about getting help. Be ... Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see ...

  19. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... videos about getting help. Be There: Help Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ... more videos from Veterans Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard ...

  20. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Watch additional videos about getting help. Be ... Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see ...

  1. An Exploration of Transition Experiences Shaping Student Veteran Life Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Brian Tuan

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer transformative opportunities for veterans transitioning from military service. Veteran-specific cultural supports in educational environments offer participation in occupations and development of skills needed to complete educational goals. However, veterans experience complex life circumstances atypical from…

  2. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Watch additional videos about getting help. Be There: ... a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more ...

  3. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... videos about getting help. Be There: Help Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ... more videos from Veterans Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard ...

  4. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — These quick facts use data from the 2011 Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch to compare Veteran employment in the Federal Government by agency,...

  5. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more videos from Veterans Health Administration Lost: The Power of One Connection see more videos from Veterans Health Administration The Power of 1 PSA see more videos from Veterans ...

  6. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in crisis, find a facility near you. Spread the Word Download logos, Web ads, and materials and ... from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from Veterans Health Administration ...

  7. More Research on Veteran Employment Would Show What’s Good for Business and for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    to programs and processes. Research that adds structure and data to the business case for veteran employment efforts can demonstrate the value of...empirical data to confirm this assertion. Building the business case for hiring veterans is critical to sustaining veteran employment efforts over... data collection effort, stakeholders must determine ways to effectively share quantitative and qualita- tive data . Improved data sharing would

  8. 75 FR 78807 - Agency Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or Beneficiary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration... Veterans Affairs of Veteran or Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control... should be reduced or terminated when he or she is incarcerated in a penal institution in excess of...

  9. Posttraumatic stress disorder in reserve veterans: important reintegration considerations for the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lynn A; Burns, Candace

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental health concern for returning U.S. military personnel who have a higher prevalence rate of PTSD than the general population. Among the military population, reserve service members are at increased risk of developing PTSD compared with full-time active duty service members mainly due to difficulty reintegrating into civilian life. Understanding the social risk factors along with the protective effects social support has on PTSD in veterans will provide occupational health professionals the opportunity to support reserve veterans with adjustment into post-deployment life. This literature review examines PTSD in reserve veterans, with a focus on occupational factors, social factors, guideline recommendations, available resources, as well as provides suggestions for occupational health nurses caring for reserve veterans returning to the workplace.

  10. Workplace social support in job satisfaction among veterans with posttraumatic stress symptoms: A preliminary correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J I; Strom, Thad Q; Ferrier-Auerbach, Amanda G; Kaler, Matthew E; Hansen, Lucas P; Erbes, Christopher R

    2017-01-01

    For Veterans managing PTSD symptoms, returning to vocational functioning is often challenging; identifying modifiable variables that can contribute to positive vocational adjustment is critical to improved vocational rehabilitation services. Workplace social support has proven to be important in vocational adjustment in both general population and vocational rehabilitation samples, but this area of inquiry has received little attention among Veterans with PTSD symptoms. In this small correlational study, employed Veterans (N = 63) presenting for outpatient PTSD treatment at a VA Health Care System completed surveys assessing demographic variables, PTSD symptoms, workplace social support, and job satisfaction. Workplace social support contributed to the prediction of job satisfaction. It is of note that workplace social support predicted a larger proportion of the variance in employment satisfaction than PTSD symptoms. Further research on workplace social support as a vocational rehabilitation resource for Veterans with PTSD is indicated.

  11. Development and Evaluation of Veteran Supportive Supervisor Training (VSST): Improving Reintegration of the Oregon National Guard and Reserves in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    include area code) 162 INTRODUCTION: The funded research project, Study for Employment Retention of Veterans (SERVe), addresses reintegration and...training was not a barrier to successful job completion, due to the military’s reliance on on-the-job training  Civilian life o Veterans generally do not...proposed research project addresses veteran reintegration and retention in the civilian workforce, health, and work outcomes among National Guard (NG

  12. Use of outpatient mental health services by homeless veterans after hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa M; Barnett, Scott; Hickling, Edward; Frahm, Kathryn; Campbell, Robert R; Olney, Ronald; Schinka, John A; Casey, Roger

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the impact of hurricanes on people who are homeless at the time a disaster occurs. Although researchers have extensively studied the psychosocial consequences of disaster produced homelessness on the general population, efforts focused on understanding how homeless people fare have been limited to a few media reports and the gray literature. In the event of a hurricane, homeless veterans may be at increased risk for negative outcomes because of their cumulative vulnerabilities. Health care statistics consistently document that homeless veterans experience higher rates of medical, emotional, substance abuse, legal, and financial problems compared with the general population. This study used the 2004 to 2006 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Outpatient Medical Dataset to examine the effects of hurricanes on use of outpatient mental health services by homeless veterans. Homeless veterans residing in hurricane-affected counties were significantly more likely to participate in group psychotherapy (32.4% vs. 13.4%, p < .002), but less likely to participate in individual 30-40-min sessions with medical evaluations (3.5% vs. 17.3%, p < .001). The study findings have implications for homeless programs and the provision of VHA mental health services to homeless veterans postdisaster. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Sociodemographic Correlates of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors Among College Student Service Members/Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J; Bryan, AnnaBelle O

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to quantify the lifetime, past-year, and past-month incidence rates of suicidal ideation, planning, and attempts; frequency of suicide attempts; and suicide attempt methods among college student service members/veterans. Four hundred twenty-two college student service members/veterans completing an online survey from January to October 2013. An anonymous online survey was conducted. Lifetime incidence rates were 33.4% (ideation), 13.7% (plan), and 6.9% (attempt). Past-year incidence rates were 14.7% (ideation), 3.6% (plan), and 0.7% (attempt). Past-month incidence rates were 7.6% (ideation), 1.9% (plan), and 0.5% (attempt). Rates among student service member/veterans were similar to general college student population rates. Native American student service members/veterans report significantly increased rates of ideation, plans, and attempts. Observed rates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among student service members/veterans are comparable to general college study rates, but Native American student service members/veterans demonstrate increased risk.

  14. Comparison Study of Memory Status in War-PTSD Veterans With Depression and Non- Veterans Depressed Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvari SS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive problems in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD include poor concentration and impaired memory. Prevalence of PTSD in all aspects of life is 8% in USA. Regarding the importance of memory in functional levels, this study was performed to review memory status in these patients. Methods: Fifty male war veterans with PTSD and major depression and 50 male non-veterans with depression participated in this study performed at psychiatric outpatient ward in Baqiyatallah hospital during 2008-2009. The patients met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Depression severity, sex, age, educational level, and marital status were matched in both groups. A psychologist completed demographic and Mississippi questionnaires, PTSD checklist (PCL, beck depression Inventory and wechsler memory scale. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 11.0. A P-value smaller than 0.05 was considered significant.Results: The mean age of the veterans and non-veterans was 43.9±4.7 and 42±9.4 years, respectively. Memory status did not differ between the two groups (P>0.05. There was no statistically significant correlation between duration and severity of PTSD with memory impairment (P>0.05. A negative correlation was found between personal and general information with re-experiencing in the veterans (P<0.05. Impaired memory was correlated with age greater than 45, educational level lower than high school diploma, severity of depression and longer participation in war. Conclusion: Although both PTSD and major depression affected memory, but memory status did not differ between patients with PTSD and depression and patients with chronic depression.

  15. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life anxiety: Similarities and differences between Veteran and community participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Terri L; Cully, Jeffrey A; Amspoker, Amber B; Wilson, Nancy L; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Wagener, Paula D; Calleo, Jessica S; Teng, Ellen J; Rhoades, Howard M; Masozera, Nicholas; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for anxiety; however, a growing body of research suggests that CBT effect sizes are smaller in Veteran samples. The aim of this study was to perform secondary data analyses of a randomized controlled trial of CBT for late-life generalized anxiety disorder compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in a Veteran (n = 101) and community-based (n = 122) sample. Veterans had lower income and less education than community participants, greater severity on baseline measures of anxiety and depression, poorer physical health, and higher rates of psychiatric comorbidity. Treatment effects were statistically significant in the community sample (all ps 0.05). Further analyses in Veterans revealed that poorer perceived social support significantly predicted poorer outcomes (all ps anxiety, and suggest that additional work is needed to improve the efficacy of CBT for Veterans, with particular attention to social support. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The underdiagnosis of cannabis use disorders and other Axis-I disorders among military veterans within VHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Bucossi, Meggan M; Trafton, Jodie A

    2012-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that rates of cannabis use disorders are significantly lower among military veterans within the Veterans Affairs Health Care System (VA) than the general U.S. population. However, prevalence rates obtained from the VA rely on clinician diagnosis, which have been shown to be underrepresentative of actual disorder rates. The present study utilized structured clinical interviews to assess a sample of 84 military veterans with a cannabis use disorder and compared Axis-I disorder diagnosis rates to those obtained through a retrospective electronic medical record chart review. Findings indicated that cannabis use disorders, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders, were significantly underdiagnosed within this military veteran population. In contrast, rates of other substance use disorders as well as mood disorders were overdiagnosed within this VA population. Findings are discussed in relation to the improvement of screening and repeated structured assessment of military veterans within the VA.

  17. Improving risk assessment of violence among military veterans: an evidence-based approach for clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Fuller, Sara; Johnson, Sally C; Brooks, Stephanie; Kinneer, Patricia; Calhoun, Patrick S; Beckham, Jean C

    2010-08-01

    Increased media attention to post-deployment violence highlights the need to develop effective models to guide risk assessment among military Veterans. Ideally, a method would help identify which Veterans are most at risk for violence so that it can be determined what could be done to prevent violent behavior. This article suggests how empirical approaches to risk assessment used successfully in civilian populations can be applied to Veterans. A review was conducted of the scientific literature on Veteran populations regarding factors related to interpersonal violence generally and to domestic violence specifically. A checklist was then generated of empirically-supported risk factors for clinicians to consider in practice. To conceptualize how these known risk factors relate to a Veteran's violence potential, risk assessment scholarship was utilized to develop an evidence-based method to guide mental health professionals. The goals of this approach are to integrate science into practice, overcome logistical barriers, and permit more effective assessment, monitoring, and management of violence risk for clinicians working with Veterans, both in Department of Veteran Affairs settings and in the broader community. Research is needed to test the predictive validity of risk assessment models. Ultimately, the use of a systematic, empirical framework could lead to improved clinical decision-making in the area of risk assessment and potentially help prevent violence among Veterans.

  18. Psychotropic Medication Prescribing in Iraq/Afghanistan Veterans and Vietnam Era Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvoda, Dolores; Stefanovics, Elina A; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2017-09-26

    A new generation of veterans from Iraq/Afghanistan wars is seeking psychotropic pharmacotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from the Veterans Health Administration, but little is known about differences in prescribing practices between this group and Vietnam era veterans with the same diagnosis. The Veterans Health Administration administrative data for fiscal year 2012 were used to compare prescribing for 155,631 Iraq/Afghanistan veterans and for 327,634 Vietnam era veterans diagnosed with PTSD. The proportion of veterans who were prescribed psychotropic medications (altogether and within five of seven medication classes) were not substantially different between veteran groups. Iraq/Afghanistan veterans were more frequently prescribed prazosin (p < 0.0001, relative risk = 1.51). However, the number of prescriptions for anxiolytics/sedatives/hypnotics as well as prazosin and opiates filled by this younger group was lower by a small magnitude (Cohen's d < 0.2). Iraq/Afghanistan veterans have good access to psychopharmacological treatment for PTSD but fill somewhat fewer prescriptions than Vietnam era veterans.

  19. Caring for veterans in the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Maggie Leonard; Coplan, Bettie

    2015-11-01

    Veterans have several significant healthcare needs that can be addressed in the primary care setting. Within the private sector, clinicians can use military and nonmilitary resources to provide care to this unique population. Recommendations for several veteran healthcare needs also are addressed.

  20. 75 FR 69327 - Veterans Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ....) [FR Doc. 2010-28609 Filed 11-9-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... her warriors. In an unbroken line of valor stretching across more than two centuries, our veterans..., as Veterans Day. I encourage all Americans to recognize the valor and sacrifice of our...

  1. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 24/7) Department of Veterans Affairs Military & Veterans Crisis Line 800-273-8255, press 1 National Headquarters 1335 East-West Highway, Ste. 6-100 Silver Spring, MD 20910 800-870-9244 TBI & Psychological Health Information DCoE Outreach Center (24/7) 866- ...

  2. Faculty Attitudes and Behaviors towards Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carlene A.; Elliott, Marta

    2016-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Education (2013), approximately 11% of undergraduate students reported having a disability in the 2007-2008 academic year. Of these students, veterans reported having disabilities more than their non-veteran counterparts (5% vs. 3%). This study investigates faculty members' attitudes and behaviors toward student…

  3. Veterans as Adult Learners in Composition Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre Cleary, Michelle; Wozniak, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Considering veterans in the context of research on adult and nontraditional students in college writing classes, this article proposes Malcolm Knowles's six principles for adult learning as an asset-based heuristic for investigating how writing programs and writing teachers might build upon existing resources to support veteran students.

  4. 75 FR 14633 - Veterans Workforce Investment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...' Employment and Training Service Veterans Workforce Investment Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and...' Workforce Investment Program (VWIP) for Program Year (PY) 2010, as authorized under section 168 of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998. This Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) notice contains...

  5. 38 CFR 21.276 - Incarcerated veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31...)) (b) Definition. The term incarcerated veteran means any veteran incarcerated in a Federal, State, or... pursuing a rehabilitation program under Chapter 31 while residing in a halfway house or participating in...

  6. Veterans with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Miller, Wayne K., II; Vance, Mary Lee

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, veterans with disabilities have been a catalyst in the development of services for students with disabilities in higher education. Current converging factors, including anticipated large numbers of veterans with disabilities enrolling in postsecondary education, Office for Civil Rights directives, and the passage of the…

  7. Defining "Rural" for Veterans' Health Care Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Alan N.; Lee, Richard E.; Shambaugh-Miller, Michael D.; Bair, Byron D.; Mueller, Keith J.; Lilly, Ryan S.; Kaboli, Peter J.; Hawthorne, Kara

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) devised an algorithm to classify veterans as Urban, Rural, or Highly Rural residents. To understand the policy implications of the VHA scheme, we compared its categories to 3 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and 4 Rural-Urban Commuting Area (RUCA) geographical categories. Method: Using…

  8. Symptom Patterns Among Gulf War Registry Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, William K.; Kipen, Howard M.; Diefenbach, Michael; Boyd, Kendal; Kang, Han; Leventhal, Howard; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We identify symptom patterns among veterans who believe they suffer from Gulf War–related illnesses and characterize groups of individuals with similar patterns. Methods. A mail survey was completed by 1161 veterans drawn from the Gulf War Health Registry. Results. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 symptom factors. A K-means cluster analysis revealed 2 groups: (1) veterans reporting good health and few moderate/severe symptoms, and (2) veterans reporting fair/poor health and endorsing an average of 37 symptoms, 75% as moderate/severe. Those in Cluster 2 were more likely to report having 1 or more of 24 medical conditions. Conclusions. These findings are consistent with previous investigations of symptom patterns in Gulf War veterans. This multisymptom illness may be more fully characterized by the extent, breadth, and severity of symptoms reported. PMID:12660208

  9. Insomnia treatment acceptability and preferences of male Iraq and Afghanistan combat veterans and their healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Dana R; Babcock-Parziale, Judith L; Haynes, Patricia L; Herb, Christine A

    2012-01-01

    Sleep difficulty is a prevalent problem among returning Veterans. Although there is strong evidence for the efficacy and durability of cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBT-I) in the general population, the interventions require motivation, attention, and adherence from patients to achieve successful outcomes. Given the unique characteristics of Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) Veterans who have experienced blast-related injuries and other trauma, CBT-I for these patients may require modification, including alternative delivery methods, to ensure effective implementation and positive outcomes. We interviewed 18 OIF/OEF Veterans who screened positive for mild traumatic brain injury and 19 healthcare providers to determine the acceptability of insomnia treatments and preferences for the interventions and treatment delivery. Veterans and providers had distinct preferences for insomnia treatment and its delivery. The treatments the Veterans found most acceptable were also the ones they preferred: relaxation treatment and pharmacotherapy. The providers identified relaxation therapy as the most acceptable treatment. Veterans preferred the individual treatment format as well as electronic methods of treatment delivery. Despite some differences between patients and providers, a compromise through modification of empirically supported behavioral treatments is feasible, and implications for preference-based insomnia intervention development and testing are discussed.

  10. Lack of access to mental health services contributing to the high suicide rates among veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Ronald D

    2017-01-01

    The United States has become a country that is constantly at war. This situation has created a crisis amongst our veterans. The current uneven access to appropriate mental health services that returning U.S. veterans encounter echoes the disparities in access to quality mental health services for the general population. The information presented here shows that the shortcomings of our health care system in addressing the mental health needs for our returning veterans may lead to the high suicide rates. Addressing the problem of inadequate access to quality mental health services is critical in any efforts to reforming the U.S. health care system. Our findings suggest that mental health disparities are often a leading factor to the high suicide rates among veterans who experience depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. To improve the health and well-being of our veterans who have served this nation, requires a collaboration between public and non-profit mental health providers at the State and local levels. It is imperative that we increase the availability of crisis intervention and mental health services for all veterans that have served this nation.

  11. Faith-Based Organizations and Veteran Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werber, Laura; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rudnick, Mollie; Harrell, Margaret C.; Naranjo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faith-based organizations (FBOs) are an important community-based resource for veterans as they readjust to civilian life. Through interviews with both national-level and smaller, local FBOs, the authors sought to understand better the current and potential roles for FBOs in veteran reintegration. Interviewees suggested that veterans may look to FBOs for support because they offer privacy and confidentiality, two features that may be especially critical when a potential stigma is involved. Some FBOs have also developed a reputation as safe places for veterans, providing supportive, judgment-free environments. FBOs not only help veterans with spiritual matters but address diverse areas of veteran health and wellness, including vocation, education, financial and legal stability, shelter, access to goods and services, mental health, access to health care, physical health, family, and social networks. In some cases, the support is offered to veterans directly; in other instances, the support is indirect, via training individuals to help veterans or educating the public about them. In the process of providing support, FBOs interact with varied organizations, including government entities, private nonprofits, and one another, for training, outreach, referrals, information exchange, obtaining donations, and collaboration. Yet challenges exist, including insufficient connections with chaplains working in different settings and others in the web of support, resource and capacity constraints, lack of awareness of experience with veterans, issues related to religious philosophy or orientation, and characteristics of veterans themselves. To move forward, the authors offer recommendations for policymakers, organizations that interact with FBOs, and FBOs themselves to help FBOs engage fully in the web of reintegration support. PMID:28083391

  12. 38 CFR 21.272 - Veteran-student services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by the Chapter 30 rate; (2) Motivation of the veteran; and (3) Compatibility of the work assignment...), 3485) (f) Veteran reduces rate of training. In the event the veteran reduces his or her training to... training. If the veteran terminates all training before completing an agreement, VA: (1) Will permit him...

  13. 76 FR 33788 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ...' Employment and Training Service Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans' Employment... Veterans Reintegration Program through fiscal year (FY) 2011 and indicates: ``The Secretary of Labor shall... training) to expedite the reintegration of homeless veterans into the labor force.'' HVRP grants...

  14. 38 CFR 21.328 - Two veteran cases-dependents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Two veteran cases-dependents. 21.328 Section 21.328 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Authorization of Subsistence Allowance and Training and Rehabilitation Services § 21.328 Two...

  15. Supporting Student Veteran Transition to College and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Veterans enrolled in college face unique challenges compared with those of traditional students. Their experiences and perspectives, coupled with battling stereotypes and entering an unstructured college setting, contribute toward what can be a difficult transition. Student veteran organizations, veteran resource centers, veteran-specific…

  16. 78 FR 28292 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. VA is inviting...

  17. 76 FR 65321 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. VA is inviting...

  18. 75 FR 16577 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. The VA is inviting public comments...

  19. 78 FR 59861 - VA Acquisition Regulation: Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and Veteran-Owned Small Business Status...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... (definition service-disabled Veteran)''. Upon rendering a decision, new VAAR 819.307(g) provides that the... AFFAIRS 48 CFR Part 819 RIN 2900-AM92 VA Acquisition Regulation: Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and... Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses (SDVOSB) and Veteran-Owned Small Businesses (VOSB)...

  20. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Stecker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracy Stecker1,2, John Fortney3,4, Francis Hamilton1,2, Cathy D Sherbourne5, Icek Ajzen61Psychiatric Research Center, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA; 2VA Health Services Research and Development, White River Junction Veterans Administration, White River Junction, VT, USA; 3VA Health Services Research and Development (HR S&D, Center for Mental Health and Outcomes Research, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, North Little Rock, AR, USA; 4Division of Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 5RAND, Santa Monica, CA, USA; 6Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USAObjectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq.Methods: Participants were one hundred and fifty Operation Iraqi Freedom National Guard soldiers who screened positive for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder or alcohol abuse disorder on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing beliefs about mental health treatment and treatment-seeking behavior.Results: Beliefs related to symptom reduction and work were significantly related to mental health treatment-seeking behavior. Conclusions: Interventions developed to engage veterans into care must be directed toward cognitive factors that motivate treatment seeking in addition to traditionally targeted structural barriers.Keywords: treatment

  1. Variation in Veteran Identity as a Factor in Veteran-Targeted Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Samantha M; DeForge, Bruce R; Lucksted, Alicia

    2017-03-01

    The sociocultural identities that people self-assign or accept influence their interpersonal interactions and decision making. Identity-based interventions attempt to influence individuals by associating healthy behaviors with in-group membership. Outreach and educational efforts aimed at veterans may rely on "typical" veteran identity stereotypes. However, as discussed in this Open Forum, there is evidence that veteran identity is not monolithic but rather fluctuates on the basis of personal characteristics and individual military service experiences. Overall, the impact of veteran identity on veterans' health behaviors and use of health care is not known and has been understudied. A major limiting factor is the lack of a standardized measure of veteran identity that can assess variations in salience, prominence, and emotional valence.

  2. Factors associated with presenting >12 hours after symptom onset of acute myocardial infarction among Veteran men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Kelly

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 2/3 of Veterans admitting to Veterans Health Administration (VHA facilities present >12 hours after symptom onset of acute myocardial infarction (AMI (“late presenters”. Veterans admitted to VHA facilities with AMI may delay hospital presentation for different reasons compared to their general population counter parts. Despite the large descriptive literature on factors associated with delayed presentation in the general population, the literature describing these factors among the Veteran AMI population is limited. The purpose of this analysis is to identify predictors of late presentation in the Veteran population presenting with AMI to VHA facilities. Identifying predictors will help inform and target interventions for Veterans at a high risk of late presentation. Methods In our cross-sectional study, we analyzed a cohort of 335 male Veterans from nine VHA facilities with physician diagnosed AMI between April 2005 and December 2006. We compared demographics, presentation characteristics, medical history, perceptions of health, and access to health care between early and late presenting Veterans. We used standard descriptive statistics for bivariate comparisons and multivariate logistic regression to identify independent predictors of late presentation. Results Our cohort was an average of 64 ± 10 years old and was 88% white. Sixty-eight percent of our cohort were late presenters. Bivariate comparisons found that fewer late presenters had attended at least some college or vocational school (late 53% vs. early 66%, p = 0.02. Multivariate analysis showed that presentation with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI was associated with early presentation (OR = 0.4 95%CI [0.2, 0.9] and ≥2 angina episodes in the prior 24 hours (versus 0-1 episode was associated with late presentation (OR = 7.5 95%CI [3.6,15.6]. Conclusions A significant majority of Veterans presenting to VHA

  3. Our favorite tips for interviewing veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James; Boehnlein, James

    2007-06-01

    Like many mental health patients, veterans often come to psychiatrists with their defenses raised by past experience with caregivers whom they perceive as lacking in understanding. Although health care professionals' own veteran and combat status sometimes can afford instant credibility, not all providers have wartime experience to use in developing rapport with their patients. To connect rapidly and effectively with their sometimes suspicious patients, they must find other ways to speed rapport. This article discusses the issues of establishing rapport, keeping an open mind, and dealing with questions about the clinician's own opinions that arise in interviewing veterans.

  4. Long-term disabilities associated with combat casualties: measuring disability and reintegration in combat veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Reiber, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Many physical and mental health problems associated with combat casualties affect the reintegration of service members into home and community life. Quantifying and measuring reintegration is important to answer questions about clinical, research, economic, and policy issues that directly affect combat veterans. Although the construct of participation presented in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems and in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a theoretical framework with which to understand and measure community reintegration in general, a measure was needed that specifically addressed the reintegration of combat veterans. To address this need, the Community Reintegration for Service Members global outcomes measure was developed. It consists of three scales, which measure extent of participation, perceived limitations, and satisfaction. The measure was validated in a general sample of veterans and in a sample of severely wounded service members. The computer-adapted test version shows good precision, reliability, construct validity, and predictive validity.

  5. 48 CFR 801.602-70 - General review requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General review requirements. 801.602-70 Section 801.602-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.602-70...

  6. Diet quality is associated with mental health, social support, and neighborhood factors among Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerster, Katherine D; Wilson, Sarah; Nelson, Karin M; Reiber, Gayle E; Masheb, Robin M

    2016-12-01

    United States Veterans have a higher prevalence of overweight and related chronic conditions compared to the general population. Although diet is a primary and modifiable contributor to these conditions, little is known about factors influencing diet quality among Veterans. The goal of this study is to examine individual, social environment, and physical environment correlates of general diet quality among Veterans. Study participants (N=653) received care at an urban VA Medical Center in Seattle, WA and completed a mailed survey in 2012 and 2013. Diet quality was assessed with Starting the Conversation, an instrument that measures consumption of unhealthy snacks, fast food, desserts, sugar-sweetened beverages, and fats; fruits and vegetables; and healthy proteins. Variables significantly (pavailability of low-fat foods in neighborhood stores where the Veteran shops (Diff=-0.37; CI=-0.6, -0.2; pphysical environment. Findings from this study suggest that interventions aimed at mental health, social support, and neighborhood access to healthy foods are needed to improve Veteran diet quality.

  7. VA (Veterans Administration) can Reduce Excess Disability Payments by Improving Pay Data Exchange with the Military Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Recoup the additional $385,000 on the 64 separation payment cases GAO identified where the recoupment balance was understated. -- Follow Agency appeal...D-R157 613 Vfi (VETERANS ADMINISTRATION) CAN REDUCE EXCESS / DI SRILITY PAYMENTS BY IMP..(UL) GENERAL ACCOUNTING U U LASI E OFFIC WASHINGTON DC...Affairs < VA Can Reduce Excess Disability Payments By Improving Pay Data * Exchange With The Military Services Federal law requires that the Veterans

  8. Psychosocial function and health in veteran families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mai Tødsø; Karmsteen, Kirstine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    During the last 25 years Denmark has regularly contributed to international missions through the deployment of Danish soldiers. From 1992 till 2014 32,000 Danish women and men have been deployed. With this mapping of publications we aim to contribute with an overview of publications within...... the research field of psychosocial functioning and health among relatives living with a veteran, including potential gaps within this research field. We have found 103 publications. Most of them are American, 7 are from Europe and none from Scandinavia. Most publications focus on the partner’s relationship...... to the veteran or the mental health of the partner while relatively few publications deal with the veteran family as a whole or its members social relations outside the primary family. Furthermore, there are relatively few publications focusing on relatives to veterans deployed other places than Iraq...

  9. 78 FR 67285 - Veterans Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... should be forgotten, and no veteran should be overlooked. Let us always remember our wounded, our missing, our fallen, and their families. And as we continue our responsible drawdown from the war...

  10. Sexual Trauma: Women Veterans Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Health Awareness Campaigns: Sexual Trauma Sexual Trauma Women Veterans Health ... abuse drugs or alcohol or engage in risky sexual behavior. In some cases, anger and stress stemming from ...

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Gulf War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Gulf War Veterans Gulf War ... and be at least 10 percent disabling. About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome CFS is an unexplained, severe and ...

  12. Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us: ncptsd@va.gov Also see: VA Mental Health Connect with us return to top CONNECT Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social Media Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required Button ...

  13. Suicide assessment and action for women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-04-01

    Many deployed women Veterans, as described in a previous article, have experienced similar combat exposure as their male counterparts in wars since 1990. Upon reintegration, many Veterans visit civilian health facilities with behavioral health issues, sometimes voicing and/or attempting suicide. Effective nursing assessment and actions are needed to specifically care for this unique population. Any suicide variables (e.g., ideation, attempts, completed) are concerning; therefore, all women Veterans from the Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars should be assessed. The first priority is always patient safety. Timely and frequent screening for a variety of risk factors, documented for both men and women Veterans, and women specifically, are important. Symptomology may not become evident for 3 to 15 months into reintegration. Applicable dialogue can recognize changing thoughts, judgment, and behavior patterns. Health promotion efforts, interventions, and resourceful referrals are provided.

  14. Emerged HA and NA mutants of the pandemic influenza H1N1 viruses with increasing epidemiological significance in Taipei and Kaohsiung, Taiwan, 2009-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Liang Kao

    Full Text Available The 2009 influenza pandemic provided an opportunity to observe dynamic changes of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA of pH1N1 strains that spread in two metropolitan areas--Taipei and Kaohsiung. We observed cumulative increases of amino acid substitutions of both HA and NA that were higher in the post-peak than in the pre-peak period of the epidemic. About 14.94% and 3.44% of 174 isolates had one and two amino acids changes, respective, in the four antigenic sites. One unique adaptive mutation of HA2 (E374K was first detected three weeks before the epidemic peak. This mutation evolved through the epidemic, and finally emerged as the major circulated strain, with significantly higher frequency in the post-peak period than in the pre-peak (64.65% vs 9.28%, p<0.0001. E374K persisted until ten months post-nationwide vaccination without further antigenic changes (e.g. prior to the highest selective pressure. In public health measures, the epidemic peaked at seven weeks after oseltamivir treatment was initiated. The emerging E374K mutants spread before the first peak of school class suspension, extended their survival in high-density population areas before vaccination, dominated in the second wave of class suspension, and were fixed as herd immunity developed. The tempo-spatial spreading of E374K mutants was more concentrated during the post-peak (p = 0.000004 in seven districts with higher spatial clusters (p<0.001. This is the first study examining viral changes during the naïve phase of a pandemic of influenza through integrated virological/serological/clinical surveillance, tempo-spatial analysis, and intervention policies. The vaccination increased the percentage of E374K mutants (22.86% vs 72.34%, p<0.001 and significantly elevated the frequency of mutations in Sa antigenic site (2.36% vs 23.40%, p<0.001. Future pre-vaccination public health efforts should monitor amino acids of HA and NA of pandemic influenza viruses isolated at

  15. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    employees receiving preventative occupational immunizations such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. 49 Department of Veterans Affairs, FY2011...such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 20 Formulation of VHA’s...1,977,000 1,225,000 Emergency appropriations- Gulf Coast Hurricanes (P.L. 109-148) — — — — 198,265 — — 198,265 Emergency appropriations- Avian Flu

  16. Long-Term Care Services for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-14

    VHA is statutorily required to conduct medical research into the special health care needs of veterans, to train health care professionals, to serve...also required the VA to provide non-institutional care, such as home-based care and adult day health care, to all enrolled veterans. In his signing...The Veterans’ Health Care Eligibility Reform Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-262) required the establishment of a national enrollment system to manage the

  17. Emergency preparedness of veterans and nonveterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Joseph F Iii

    This study examined statistical differences in levels of disaster preparedness between former members of the US Armed Forces (veterans) and civilians (nonveterans). It was hypothesized that veterans would exhibit a higher degree of disaster preparedness as compared to their nonveteran counterparts as a consequence of their training and life experience. Furthermore, if this were proven to be valid, the finding would identify this cohort as an ideal target audience for emergency and disaster preparedness education efforts. A four-page survey consisting principally of closed-ended questions about emergency preparedness was written to measure these differences. Most of the questions required respondents to rank their answers according to a five-step Likert Scale. The survey could be completed either in hard copy or online from September 2014 to January 2015. Ultimately, 113 surveys were returned for evaluation. Of those respondents, 62 were veterans and 51 were nonveterans. The responses were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance tests for statistical significance using the 95 percent confidence standard for each tested value. The results support that veterans are more prepared for domestic emergencies than nonveterans. In addition, veterans were more willing to provide leadership and direction to others in an effort to assist emergency managers in responding to domestic disasters. It is for these reasons that emergency managers should consider targeting veterans for disaster preparedness training to help ensure effective and efficient responses to emergencies.

  18. Barriers to Psychosocial Services among Homeless Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Poza, Ines; Hines, Vivian; Washington, Donna L

    2012-01-01

    Veterans comprise a disproportionate fraction of the nation's homeless population, with women veterans up to four times more likely to be homeless than non-veteran women. This paper provides a grounded description of barriers to psychosocial services among homeless women veterans. Three focus groups were held in Los Angeles, CA, with a total of 29 homeless women veterans. These women described three primary, proximal (current) barriers: lack of information about services, limited access to services, and lack of coordination across services. Compared to non-veteran homeless women, women veterans potentially face additional challenges of trauma exposure during military service, post-military readjustment issues, and few services specific to women veterans. Understanding their service needs and experiences is critical to the development of relevant and appropriate services that move homeless women veterans away from vulnerability, into safety.

  19. PTSD Treatment Programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs In a Crisis? If you are in crisis dial 911 or ... Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving ...

  20. The Health and Social Isolation of American Veterans Denied Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Dennis Adrian; Passannante, Marian; Helmer, Drew; Holland, Bart K; Halperin, William E

    2017-02-01

    Authors comparatively analyzed health and social isolation between U.S. military veterans denied Veterans Affairs (VA) disability compensation and veterans awarded VA disability compensation. The 2001 National Survey of Veterans was used to create a sample of 4,522 veterans denied or awarded VA disability compensation. Using the Andersen health services utilization model as a conceptual framework, multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess relationships between VA disability compensation award status, three separate domains of health, and correlates of social isolation. Results indicate that denied applicants were more likely than those awarded to have poor overall health (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23, 1.70), and limitations in activities of daily living (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21). Denied applicants' physical functioning (40.3) and mental functioning (41.2) composite summary scores were not clinically different from those of awarded applicants (39.0 and 40.1, respectively), indicating that both were comparably impaired. Veterans denied VA disability compensation had poor health and functional impairments. They also experienced poverty and isolation, suggesting that they may be in need of additional supportive services. Connecting veterans to community resources could be a vital service to provide to all veterans applying for disability compensation. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  1. An Analysis of Selected Characteristics of Napa College Veteran and Non-Veteran Male Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, George; And Others

    In April 1973, it was proposed that Napa College implement a special remedial program designed to serve the needs of soon-to-be-discharged military personnel and veterans. This study was conducted to determine the need for such a program. The overriding hypothesis was that there was no significant difference between male veterans and non-veterans…

  2. 78 FR 37278 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Veteran (VOV) measurement program for their lines of business: Compensation Service, Pension Service... services and ] will provide VA/VBA leadership with actionable and timely Veteran feedback on how VBA is... sample size, as approved and reviewed by VBA Leadership and statistician. Affected Public:...

  3. 76 FR 4152 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ...: Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Voice of the Veteran (VOV) Pilot Surveys. a. Compensation and... a decision on a compensation or pension benefit claim within 30 days prior to the fielding period. The sample will be stratified as follows: (1) Type of benefit (i.e., Compensation, Pension), (2...

  4. Gender disparities in Veterans Health Administration care: importance of accounting for veteran status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Susan M; Yano, Elizabeth M; Nguyen, Vu Q; Yu, Wei; Ananth, Lakshmi; Chiu, Victor Y; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2008-05-01

    In an effort to assess and reduce gender-related quality gaps, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has promoted gender-based research. Historically, such appraisals have often relied on secondary databases, with little attention to methodological implications of the fact that VHA provides care to some nonveteran patients. To determine whether conclusions about gender differences in utilization and cost of VHA care change after accounting for veteran status. Cross-sectional. All users of VHA in 2002 (N = 4,429,414). Veteran status, outpatient/inpatient utilization and cost, from centralized 2002 administrative files. Nonveterans accounted for 50.7% of women (the majority employees) but only 3.0% of men. Among all users, outpatient and inpatient utilization and cost were far lower in women than in men, but in the veteran subgroup these differences decreased substantially or, in the case of use and cost of outpatient care, reversed. Utilization and cost were very low among women employees; women spouses of fully disabled veterans had utilization and costs similar to those of women veterans. By gender, nonveterans represent a higher proportion of women than of men in VHA, and some large nonveteran groups have low utilization and costs; therefore, conclusions about gender disparities change substantially when veteran status is taken into account. Researchers seeking to characterize gender disparities in VHA care should address this methodological issue, to minimize risk of underestimating health care needs of women veterans and other women eligible for primary care services.

  5. Rehabilitation of Danish veterans with spinal cord injuries during international missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Nicolaj Jersild; Noe, Bodil Bjørnshave; Hoffmann, Dorte Dahl;

    2015-01-01

    , five in the military. Satisfaction with their current work was related to whether their work skills corresponded to the work tasks at hand. Four found that their QoL was very good, one that it was satisfactory, another that it was unsatisfactory. CONCLUSION: Danish veterans with SCI were generally...

  6. Distance to Veterans Administration Medical Centers as a Barrier to Specialty Care for Homeless Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Lori M; Pettey, Warren B P; Redd, Andrew M; Suo, Ying; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2017-01-01

    Homeless women Veterans have a high prevalence of chronic mental and physical conditions that necessitate frequent healthcare visits, but travel burdens to specialty services may be overwhelming to navigate for this population, especially for those in rural settings. Access to specialty care is a key priority in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and understanding the geographic distribution and rural designation of this population in relation to medical centers (VAMC) can assist in care coordination. We identified 41,747 women Veterans age 18-44y with administrative evidence of homelessness in the VHA anytime during 2002-2015. We found 7% live in rural settings and 29% live >40miles from a VAMC. The mean travel distance for homeless women Veterans with a rural designation to a VAMC specialty center was 107 miles. Developing interventions to overcome this travel burden and engage vulnerable Veterans in necessary care can improve overall health outcomes for this high-risk population.

  7. Central nervous system and musculoskeletal medication profile of a veteran cohort with blast-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dustin D; Bair, Matthew J; Bass, Elizabeth; Campbell, Robert R; Siddharthan, Kris

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the utilization of central nervous system (CNS) and musculoskeletal (MS) medications in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) veterans with blast-related injuries (BRIs). We followed prescription drug use among a cohort of 133 OIF/OEF veterans with BRIs by using the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry, the Tampa Polytrauma Registry, and electronic medical records. We extracted 12 months of national medication records from the Veterans Health Administration Decision Support System and analyzed them with descriptive statistics. Over the 12-month period (fiscal year 2007), CNS medications comprised 27.9% (4,225/15,143) of total prescriptions dispensed to 90.2% (120/133) of our cohort. Approximately one-half (48.9%) of the 133 patients were treated with opioid analgesics. Nearly 60% received antidepressants. More than one-half (51.1%) of patients were treated with anticonvulsants. Benzodiazepines and antipsychotics were dispensed to 17.3% and 15.8%, respectively. For MS medicines, 804 were prescribed for 48.1% (64/133) of veterans. Nearly one-fourth (24.8%) were treated with skeletal muscle relaxants. The CNS and MS medications, in general, were continuously prescribed over the 12-month study period. This study provides insight into the complex medical management involved in the care of veterans with BRIs.

  8. From Whom Do Student Veterans Seek Help?: Understanding the Roles of Professional, Informal, and Religious Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Joseph M; Deiss, Jessie; McDermott, Ryon C

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this brief report was to ascertain student veterans' patterns of help-seeking from professional, informal, and religious sources. In total, 350 veterans from an academic institution on the Gulf Coast completed assessments of help-seeking intentions from a range of potential sources in their communities. Analyses revealed that veterans had a neutral probability to seek help from professional sources (e.g., physicians and psychologists) but were likely to pursue informal sources (e.g., partner/spouse, friend) in a psychological/emotional crisis. However, when compared with their nonclinical counterparts, veterans with a probable need for treatment for PTSD and/or depression generally reported less probability to seek help from informal and religious sources. In addition, sex, ethnicity, and religious background each contributed a significant influence in shaping preferences for seeking help for psychological or emotional concerns. Given unmet mental health needs of student veterans, findings highlight the importance attending to help-seeking preferences in this growing population.

  9. Comparison of Veteran experiences of low-cost, home-based diet and exercise interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bree Holtz, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant health problem among Veterans who receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, as it is for so many other Americans. Veterans from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF experience a myriad of chronic conditions, which can make it difficult to maintain a physically active lifestyle. This pilot study tested the feasibility and user satisfaction with three low-cost, home-based diet and exercise programs, as well as point-of-decision prompts among these Veterans. The three programs target mechanisms that have been shown to improve healthy behavior change, including (1 online mediated social support, (2 objective monitoring of physical activity, and (3 structured high-intensity workouts. This was a randomized crossover trial; each participant used two of the three programs, and all used the point-of-decision prompts. Our qualitative results identified five overall themes related to social support, objective monitoring, structured activity, awareness and understanding, and the point-of-decision prompts. In general, participants were satisfied with and lost weight with each of the interventions. This study demonstrated that these low-cost interventions could be successful with the OIF/OEF Veteran population. A larger and longer study is planned to further investigate the effectiveness of these interventions.

  10. THE IMPACT OF POSTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER ON PARTNER OF IRANIAN VETERANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zarrabi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD suffer from distressing and disabling symptoms. Many studies have shown that PTSD symptoms can negatively influence quality of life of their partners. This study was designed to assess general health, marital satisfaction and self-esteem levels of partners of Iranian veterans with PTSD. We performed a case-control study. Cases were comprised of 40 partners of veterans with PTSD. Controls were comprised of 40 married women referred to general health center in Rasht city. Three self report psychometric inventories including General Health Questionnaire (GHQ28, Evaluating and Nurturing Relationship Issues, Communication and Happiness questionnaire (ENRICH and Cooper-Smith inventory-adult form were applied assessing general health, marital satisfaction and self-esteem levels in our subjects. Mean score of GHQ28 questionnaire was 39.77 ± 20.96 in case group and 17.12 ± 9.08 in control group (P = 0.0001, t = 6.269. Average scores of ENRICH questionnaire in case and control groups were 133.7 ± 28.05 and 165.90 ± 31.10 respectively (P = 0.0001, t = 4.861. Mean score of Cooper-Smith test was 29.62 ± 7.89 in cases while it was 39.92 ± 6.36 between controls (P = 0.0001, t = 4.551. We concluded that partners of veterans with PTSD significantly showed lower levels of general health, marital satisfaction and self-esteem than other women. In general, our results demonstrated that partners of veterans with PTSD had lower levels of quality of life comparing other women.

  11. Coming Home to School: Challenges and Strategies for Effective Teaching with Military Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel A. Sportsman, PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is an analysis of the unique needs of returning service members at the college or university level that impact the teaching decisions made by instructors. The article also discusses the challenges that service members are individually addressing while acclimating themselves to their new environment of learning. With the reduction in forces occurring after the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, many higher level learning institutions are struggling to adequately meet the needs of returning veterans. In turn, veterans often find that the style of instruction and the general college-level universe are difficult to negotiate. The combination of these factors can often result in veteran students performing below expectation or leaving school without finishing. The article proposes a variety of ways to understand and address these challenges including the use of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL strategies and characteristics.

  12. The Invisible Wound: Moral Injury and Its Impact on the Health of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Grace W

    2016-05-01

    Many veterans are now returning from Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) deployments with physical and mental health problems. However, there are few studies that examine the impact of moral injury on both physical and mental well-being. This study examines the impact of moral injury on self-reported general physical health, general mental health, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, and depression symptoms. Cross-sectional data were collected at as part of a pilot study at the New Jersey Veteran Affairs. 100 OEF/OIF veterans recruited at the New Jersey Veteran Affairs completed the paper questionnaire. We found that moral injury and combat experiences positively predicted post-traumatic stress disorder scores. Seeing the aftermath of battle and moral injury were negatively associated with mental well-being and positively associated with depression. Physical health status was negatively associated with depression. Spirituality and moral injury were negatively associated with physical health, whereas age was positively associated with physical health. Moral injury plays an important role in both physical and mental health outcomes for OEF/OIF veterans, but it is often not addressed in health care. These results underline the need for an approach to veterans' health care that includes discussion of existential and moral issues since they may impact health outcomes for many service members.

  13. Veterans on Campus: A Handbook for Programs, Services, Staffing and Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Lee John, Ed.

    A handbook to provide information that will aid in establishing bondage between veterans and those professional people providing service for returning servicemen and women is presented. Topics discussed include: Vietnam veteran; organizing to serve the veteran; a veterans Outreach Program; veterans with special needs--minority veterans, academic…

  14. Tribal Veterans Representative (TVR) training program: the effect of community outreach workers on American Indian and Alaska Native Veterans access to and utilization of the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Buck Richardson, W J; Floyd, James; Shore, Jay

    2014-10-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives serve at the highest rate of any US race or ethnic group, yet are the most underserved population of Veterans and do not take advantage of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits and services. Barriers to seeking care include stigma, especially for mental health issues; distance to care; and lack of awareness of benefits and services they are entitled to receive. In response to this underutilization of the VA, an innovative program--the Tribal Veterans Representative (TVR) program--was developed within the VA to work with American Indians and Alaska Natives in rural and remote areas. The TVR goes through extensive training every year; is a volunteer, a Veteran and tribal community member who seeks out unenrolled Native Veterans, provides them with information on VA health care services and benefits, and assists them with enrollment paperwork. Being from the community they serve, these outreach workers are able to develop relationships and build rapport and trust with fellow Veterans. In place for over a decade in Montana, this program has enrolled a countless number of Veterans, benefiting not only the individual, but their family and the community as well. Also resulting from this program, are the implementation of Telemental Health Clinics treating Veterans with PTSD, a transportation program helping Veterans get to and from distant VA facilities, a Veteran Resource Center, and a Veteran Tribal Clinic. This program has successfully trained over 800 TVRs, expanded to other parts of the country and into remote areas of Alaska.

  15. Review of American Indian veteran telemental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Jay; Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Brooks, Elizabeth; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Richardson, W J Buck; Floyd, James; Lowe, Jeff; Nagamoto, Herbert; Phares, Robert; Manson, Spero

    2012-03-01

    Rural American Indian veterans have unique healthcare needs and face numerous barriers to accessing healthcare services. Over the past decade, the Department of Veterans Affairs in conjunction with the University of Colorado Denver has turned to the promising field of telemental health to develop a series of videoconferencing-based clinics to reach this vulnerable population and improve mental healthcare services. The ongoing development, implementation, and expansion of these clinics have been assessed as part of a program improvement. The outcomes of these assessments have been documented in a series of published articles, controlled studies, program and case reports, and model descriptions. This article summarizes a decade of experience with the American Indian Telemental Health Clinics, the clinic model, and the literature arising from these clinics and presents lessons learned while establishing, maintaining, and evaluating these clinics. The ability to tailor the clinics to individual sites and cultures and to provide various services has been critical to the operation of the clinics. Culturally specific care through culturally knowledgeable providers, onsite tribal outreach workers, and collaboration with community services has proven essential in operating the clinics, as well as building rapport, trust, and engagement with the target patient population. It is hoped that the lessons learned and practices presented here can not only assist others working to improve the care for rural Native veterans but also serve as a model in the use of telemental health services for improving care and access to rural veteran and non-veteran populations.

  16. 78 FR 26698 - Report: Strategies for Serving Our Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... depression-screening for female Veterans and to identify innovative approaches and best practices to reduce... identify root-causes of identified problems and track women Veterans across ``the life-cycle of...

  17. Service Utilization of Veterans Dually Eligible for VA...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Service Utilization of Veterans Dually Eligible for VA and Medicare Fee-For-Service, 1999-2004 According to findings in Service Utilization of Veterans Dually...

  18. For-Profit Institutions and Student Veteran Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Fox Garrity, Bonnie K.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores the lack of data about student veterans and reasons this lack of data raises particular concerns about for-profit institutions, which enroll a large percentage of student veterans.

  19. Exploring Veteran Success through State-Level Administrative Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Tod; Gogia, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes the benefits and challenges of state-level longitudinal data collection on student veterans and offers recommendations for optimizing collection and reporting for the advocacy of student veteran success.

  20. The Post-Military Earnings of Female Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    if an occupation change is also involved. 5 To estimate veteran-nonveteran wage differentials among women, earnings functions are specified using the...unadjusted veteran wage differentials is small, but as indicated in column 2, veterans have substantially larger earnings endowments than do nonveterans. The...When veteran wage differentials are examined by schooling group, as shown in line 3, women with high school diplomas (or less) and those with some

  1. Are "g" and the General Factor of Personality (GFP) Correlated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwing, Paul; Booth, Tom; Nyborg, Helmuth; Rushton, J. Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether the General Factor of Personality (GFP) is related to the "g" factor of cognitive ability using data from the Vietnam Experience Study which randomly sampled 4462 Vietnam War veterans from a total sample of about five million Vietnam era army veterans. Exclusionary criteria included passing a fitness test, achieving a…

  2. 38 CFR 18.443 - General treatment of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... students. 18.443 Section 18.443 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Postsecondary Education § 18.443 General treatment of students. (a) No qualified handicapped student shall, on... recipient that considers participation by students in education programs or activities not operated...

  3. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Veterans Crisis Line Skip to Main Content SuicidePreventionLifeline.org Get Help Materials Get Involved Crisis Centers About Be There ... see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from ...

  4. 38 CFR 21.400 - Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Committee on Rehabilitation. 21.400 Section 21.400 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation § 21.400...

  5. Military Veterans' Midlife Career Transition and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Heather C.; Brott, Pamelia E.

    2014-01-01

    Many military veterans face the challenging transition to civilian employment. Military veteran members of a national program, Troops to Teachers, were surveyed regarding life satisfaction and related internal/external career transition variables. Participants included military veterans who were currently or had previously transitioned to K-12…

  6. 38 CFR 12.1 - Designee cases; competent veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may not be an employee of the Department of Veterans Affairs unless such employee be the wife (or husband), child, grandchild, mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, brother, or sister of the veteran... the Department of Veterans Affairs in Personal Funds of Patients which were derived from...

  7. Veteran-Students in Transition at a Midwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Vincent; Gentry, Debra

    2014-01-01

    One of the fastest-growing subpopulations of nontraditional college students is military veterans who enroll in institutions of higher education following their returns from deployment. Although much research has been conducted on veteran-students, much of that work has focused on issues such as veterans' finances or academic achievement, rather…

  8. Coming Home: Student Veterans' Articulation of College Re-Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Wade G.; Havice, Pamela A.; Cawthon, Tony W.; Fleming, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study described student veterans' navigation of college re-enrollment. Fifteen participants interviewed at one institution were less likely to seek academic support and more inclined to pursue social support in the form of associating with fellow veterans with whom they felt more comfortable. They downplayed or hid their veteran status from…

  9. Understanding Transition Experiences of Combat Veterans Attending Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of research concerning student veterans has been conducted at the university level, with minimum analysis performed at the level where the vast majority of returning veterans attend school: the community college. While some research has discussed what services colleges and universities should offer returning veterans, little research…

  10. Use of Psychotherapy by Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Jeffrey A.; Jameson, John P.; Phillips, Laura L.; Kunik, Mark E.; Fortney, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether differences exist between rural and urban veterans in terms of initiation of psychotherapy, delay in time from diagnosis to treatment, and dose of psychotherapy sessions. Methods: Using a longitudinal cohort of veterans obtained from national Veterans Affairs databases (October 2003 through September 2004), we extracted…

  11. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about getting help. Be There: Help Save a Life see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from Veterans Health Administration I'm Good. But are you ready to listen? see more ...

  12. Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with Reintegration Problems: Differences by Veterans Affairs Healthcare User Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Orazem, Robert J; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Gravely, Amy; Frazier, Patricia; Carlson, Kathleen F; Schnurr, Paula P; Oleson, Heather

    2015-07-01

    We studied 1,292 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who participated in a clinical trial of expressive writing to estimate the prevalence of perceived reintegration difficulty and compare Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare users to nonusers in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics. About half of participants perceived reintegration difficulty. VA users and nonusers differed in age and military background. Levels of mental and physical problems were higher in VA users. In multivariate analysis, military service variables and probable traumatic brain injury independently predicted VA use. Findings demonstrate the importance of research comparing VA users to nonusers to understand veteran healthcare needs.

  13. Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Andra Teten; Sherman, Michelle D; Bowling, Ursula; Townsend, Bradford J

    2016-03-01

    The current study has three aims: (1) to describe the frequency, gender differences, and agreement in couples' reports of male-to-female and female-to-male intimate partner violence (IPV) reported by male veterans and their female partners who were seeking couples therapy; (2) to describe the pattern of violence reported by these couples (e.g., one-sided, mutual) and determine if frequency of violence varied based on patterns; and (3) to examine whether frequency of violence or pattern of violence were associated with veteran diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One hundred heterosexual couples (male Iraq/Afghanistan veteran, female civilian) seeking couples therapy at a Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic completed self-report measures of violence in their relationship. Almost all couples reported verbal aggression. Men reported perpetrating more frequent sexual coercion, and women reported perpetrating more frequent physical aggression. Correspondence in partners' reports of violence varied based on type of violence from high correspondence on verbal aggression to low correspondence on sexual coercion. Three patterns of violence were identified: verbally aggressive (n = 45), one-sided physically aggressive (n = 27), and mutually physically aggressive (n = 26). Mutually physically aggressive couples generally reported the most frequent violence. Frequency and pattern of violence were not associated with veteran diagnosis of PTSD. Findings underscore the need for clinicians to assess both partners for violence perpetration and the need for effective prevention strategies and treatments for IPV among veterans.

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of Online Expressive Writing to Address Readjustment Difficulties Among U.S. Afghanistan and Iraq War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Frazier, Patricia A; Pennebaker, James W; Orazem, Robert J; Schnurr, Paula P; Murdoch, Maureen; Carlson, Kathleen F; Gravely, Amy; Litz, Brett T

    2015-10-01

    We examined the efficacy of a brief, accessible, nonstigmatizing online intervention-writing expressively about transitioning to civilian life. U.S. Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans with self-reported reintegration difficulty (N = 1,292, 39.3% female, M = 36.87, SD = 9.78 years) were randomly assigned to expressive writing (n = 508), factual control writing (n = 507), or no writing (n = 277). Using intention to treat, generalized linear mixed models demonstrated that 6-months postintervention, veterans who wrote expressively experienced greater reductions in physical complaints, anger, and distress compared with veterans who wrote factually (ds = 0.13 to 0.20; ps reintegration difficulty compared with veterans who did not write at all (ds = 0.22 to 0.35; ps ≤ .001). Veterans who wrote expressively also experienced greater improvement in social support compared to those who did not write (d = 0.17). Relative to both control conditions, expressive writing did not lead to improved life satisfaction. Secondary analyses also found beneficial effects of expressive writing on clinically significant distress, PTSD screening, and employment status. Online expressive writing holds promise for improving health and functioning among veterans experiencing reintegration difficulty, albeit with small effect sizes.

  15. The Post-9/11 GI Bill: Insights from Veterans Using Department of Veterans Affairs Educational Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Geri L.; Boland, Elizabeth A.; Dudgeon, Brian; Johnson, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Because the Post-9/11 GI Bill was implemented in August of 2009, increasing numbers of veterans returning from the Global War on Terror (GWT) have drawn on Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) educational benefits. Based on the findings of a mixed-methods study, quantitative and qualitative survey responses from veterans enrolled at a major…

  16. Department of Veterans Affairs, Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses Task Force to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    Rates of adverse reproductive outcomes are similar among GW- exposed and non-exposed pregnancies . 14. Do Gulf War Veterans report more pulmonary...lymphoma, prostate cancer and respiratory cancer. Other diseases, such as osteoporosis , have been presumptively service connected for some former

  17. Construction of the Chinese Veteran Clinical Research (CVCR) Platform for the assessment of non-communicable diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Jiping; Li Nan; Gao Jing; Guo Yuhe; Hu Wei; Yang Jinsheng; Yu Baocheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on the excellent medical care and management system for Chinese veterans,as well as the detailed medical documentation available,we aim to construct a Chinese Veteran Clinical Research (CVCR) platform on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and carry out studies of the primary disabling NCDs.Methods The Geriatric Neurology Department of Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital and veterans' hospitals serve as the leading and participating units in the platform construction.The fundamental constituents of the platform are veteran communities.Stratified typical cluster sampling is adopted to recruit veteran communities.A cross-sectional study of mental,neurological,and substance use (MNS) disorders are performed in two stages using screening scale such as the Mini-Mental State Examination and Montreal cognitive assessment,followed by systematic neuropsychological assessments to make clinical diagnoses,evaluated disease awareness and care situation.Results A total of 9 676 among 277 veteran communities from 18 cities are recruited into this platform,yielding a response rate of 83.86%.8 812 subjects complete the MNS subproject screening and total response rate is 91.70%.The average participant age is (82.01±4.61) years,69.47% of veterans are 80 years or older.Most participants are male (94.01%),83.36% of subjects have at least a junior high school degree.The overall health status of veterans is good and stable.The most common NCD are cardiovascular disorders (86.44%),urinary and genital diseases (73.14%),eye and ear problems (66.25%),endocrine (56.56%) and neuro-psychiatric disturbances (50.78%).Conclusion We first construct a veterans' comprehensive clinical research platform for the study of NCDs that is primarily composed of highly educated Chinese males of advanced age and utilize this platform to complete a cross-sectional national investigation of MNS disorders among veterans.The good and stable health condition of the

  18. Infertility Care Among OEF/OIF/OND Women Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee; Zephyrin, Laurie; Katon, Jodie; Weitlauf, Julie; Bastian, Lori; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of young women Veterans seek reproductive health care through the VA, yet little is known regarding the provision of infertility care for this population. The VA provides a range of infertility services for Veterans including artificial insemination, but does not provide in vitro fertilization. This study will be the first to characterize infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans using VA care. Methods We analyzed data from the OEF/OIF/OND roster file from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC)—Contingency Tracking System Deployment file of military discharges from October 1, 2001–December 30, 2010, which includes 68,442 women Veterans between the ages of 18 and 45 who utilized VA health care after separating from military service. We examined the receipt of infertility diagnoses and care using ICD-9 and CPT codes. Results Less than 2% (n = 1323) of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received an infertility diagnosis during the study period. Compared with women VA users without infertility diagnosis, those with infertility diagnosis were younger, obese, black, or Hispanic, have a service-connected disability rating, a positive screen for military sexual trauma, and a mental health diagnosis. Overall, 22% of women with an infertility diagnosis received an infertility assessment or treatment. Thirty-nine percent of women Veterans receiving infertility assessment or treatment received this care from non-VA providers. Conclusions Overall, a small proportion of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received infertility diagnoses from the VA during the study period, and an even smaller proportion received infertility treatment. Nearly 40% of those who received infertility treatments received these treatments from non-VA providers, indicating that the VA may need to examine the training and resources needed to provide this care within the VA. Understanding women’s use of VA infertility services is an important component of understanding VA

  19. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Methods: Participants were one hundred and fifty Operation Iraqi Freedom National Guard soldiers who screened positive for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder or alcohol abuse disorder on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing beliefs about mental health treatment and treatment-seeking behavior. Results: Beliefs related to symptom reduction and work were significantly related to mental health treatment-seeking behavior. Conclusions: Interventions developed to engage veterans into care must be directed toward cognitive factors that motivate treatment seeking in addition to traditionally targeted structural barriers. PMID:20390058

  20. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-03-24

    Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Participants were one hundred and fifty Operation Iraqi Freedom National Guard soldiers who screened positive for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder or alcohol abuse disorder on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing beliefs about mental health treatment and treatment-seeking behavior. Beliefs related to symptom reduction and work were significantly related to mental health treatment-seeking behavior. Interventions developed to engage veterans into care must be directed toward cognitive factors that motivate treatment seeking in addition to traditionally targeted structural barriers.

  1. Mindfulness as a Weight Loss Treatment for Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vicente Stanton

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial evidence for their effectiveness in treating disordered eating and obesity, mindfulness-based treatments have not been broadly implemented among Veterans. A number of reviews have reported mindfulness to be beneficial in promoting healthy eating behaviors and weight loss among non-Veteran samples. We discuss this approach in the context of the Veterans Affairs system, the largest integrated healthcare provider in the United States and in the context of Veterans, among whom obesity is at epidemic proportions. In this article, we discuss what is known about treating obesity using a mindfulness approach, mindfulness interventions for Veterans, a new pilot mindfulness-based weight loss program designed for Veterans, and future directions for this type of obesity treatment in Veterans. We conclude that this population may be uniquely poised to benefit from mindfulness-based treatments.

  2. Department of Veterans Affairs compensation and medical care benefits accorded to veterans with major limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Charles; Flohr, Brad; Guagliardo, Tony A; Martin, Chris H; McFarland, Lynne V; Pruden, Jonathan D; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Veterans injured in theaters of combat operations are eligible for benefits, including medical care and compensation. This article describes veterans with service-connected disability for major lower- and/or upper-limb loss resulting from combat-field-associated injuries sustained in the Vietnam war, Operation Desert Shield/Operation Desert Storm, and Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF). Using the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Compensation and Pension Mini-Master file, we identified 2,690 veterans who in August 2007 received compensation for loss of one or more limbs. More than 97% sustained their injuries in Vietnam; most were young men who served in the U.S. Army or Marine Corps. All but 5% had at least 50% combined service-connected disability and nearly half had a 100% rating. In addition to limb loss, one of the most prevalent compensable conditions was posttraumatic stress disorder, present in 46% of OIF/OEF and 20% of Vietnam veterans. Of these veterans, 82% visited VA outpatient clinics in 2007, although only 4% were hospitalized. A special obligation exists to those who have sustained serious injuries related to combat; this responsibility extends for the life of the servicemember and beyond to his or her spouse and dependents.

  3. 77 FR 67533 - Veterans Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ...'s veterans. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby... in peace, their service has been selfless and their accomplishments have been extraordinary. Even... thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-27630 Filed 11-9-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3...

  4. MINDFULNESS BEHANDLING AF DANSKE VETERANER - ET PILOTSTUDIE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjorback, Lone

    2015-01-01

    I foråret 2014 mødtes en gruppe på 12 danske veteraner en gang om ugen i 9 uger for at deltage i programmet Mindfulness Baseret Stress Reduktion (MBSR). Deltagerne havde meldt sig frivilligt, og gruppen var blandet mht. alder, køn, antal udsendelser og diagnoser. Det, de havde til fælles, var...

  5. 38 CFR 3.501 - Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Disappearance of veteran. See § 3.656. (d) Divorce or annulment (38 U.S.C. 5112(b)(2)): (1) Divorce or annulment prior to October 1, 1982: last day of the calendar year in which divorce or annulment occurred. (2) Divorce or annulment on or after October 1, 1982: last day of the month in which divorce or...

  6. Mental Health Concerns: Veterans & Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NAMI to 741741 Find Help Living with a Mental Health Condition Family Members and Caregivers Teens and Young Adults Veterans & Active Duty Diverse Communities LGBTQ NAMI Programs Discussion Groups NAMI HelpLine Get Involved stigma free Learn how you can help replace stigma ...

  7. 5 CFR 315.707 - Disabled veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....707 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CAREER AND CAREER-CONDITIONAL EMPLOYMENT Conversion to Career or Career-Conditional Employment From Other Types of... disabled veteran who meets the conditions below to career or career-conditional employment from a time...

  8. Adapted Sport Programs for Veterans with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    The Paralympic games began as a way for World War II veterans to take part in elite-level competition. Thanks to various disability-sport organizations, men and women who have served in the military are still using sport as a form of rehabilitation and a way to transition into their new life.

  9. Why helping war veterans, at all?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beara Vladan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available "The society for the protection of mental health of the war veterans and victims of the 1991 - 1999 wars" was founded in 1999, as a non-governmental non-partite and non-profit association of citizens whose basic aim is the preservation of mental health of refugees and displaced persons, war veterans (persons who have undergone the experience of war, usually against their will, members of their families and all persons who have been traumatized by the wars in the area of the former SFRY in the period between 1991 and 1999. The current projects involve: 1. The Trauma Center in Novi Sad, which provides psychological and legal assistance to war veterans and all citizens who were endangered by war operations; 2. Counseling services for trauma in Leskovac, Vranje and Bujanovac, whose primary aims are remobilization and treatment of the traumatized participants and casualties of the wars, as well as the decrease of social, political and interethnic tensions; 3. Education of war veterans for the leaders of self-help peer groups and 4. Educational experience seminars for REBT psychotherapeutic work with psychological trauma with the aim to educate experts for more efficient work with traumatized clients.

  10. Veteran’s Health Care Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-30

    consists of a Rehabilitation Physician, Rehabilitation Nurses, Physical Therapists , Occupational Therapists , Speech and Language Pathologists, Recreation...51 Chiropractic Care Available to All Veterans Act (H.R. 1470) . . . . . . 51...colonial settlements of America, the nation has provided benefits in varying degrees to those who have worn the uniform and suffered physical

  11. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  12. Beijing Tour Helps Veterans Realize Their Dreams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN GUOZHEN

    2011-01-01

    @@ It was November 10, 2010.The MU (Harmony) train rolled off the railway station from Changchun of Jilin Province in Northeast China and was fast moving down southward.In the train, 11 veterans were so excited that they were singing, chatting and laughing like a pack of children.

  13. Alcohol and drug abuse among U.S. veterans: comparing associations with intimate partner substance abuse and veteran psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark W; Reardon, Annemarie F; Wolf, Erika J; Prince, Lauren B; Hein, Christina L

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the relative influences of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), other psychopathology, and intimate partner alcohol and drug use on substance-related problems in U.S. veterans (242 couples, N = 484). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that partner alcohol and drug use severity explained more variance in veteran alcohol use and drug use (20% and 13%, respectively) than did veteran PTSD, adult antisocial behavior, or depression symptoms combined (6% for veteran alcohol use; 7% for veteran drug use). Findings shed new light on the influence of relationship factors on veteran alcohol and drug use and underscore the importance of couples-oriented approaches to treating veterans with comorbid PTSD and substance abuse.

  14. Nightmares as predictors of suicide: an extension study including war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2017-03-15

    Nightmares are intensive dreams with negative emotional tone. Frequent nightmares can pose a serious clinical problem and in 2001, Tanskanen et al. found that nightmares increase the risk of suicide. However, the dataset used by these authors included war veterans in whom nightmare frequency - and possibly also suicide risk - is elevated. Therefore, re-examination of the association between nightmares and suicide in these data is warranted. We investigated the relationship between nightmares and suicide both in the general population and war veterans in Finnish National FINRISK Study from the years 1972 to 2012, a dataset overlapping with the one used in the study by Tanskanen et al. Our data comprise 71,068 participants of whom 3139 are war veterans. Participants were followed from their survey participation until the end of 2014 or death. Suicides (N = 398) were identified from the National Causes of Death Register. Frequent nightmares increase the risk of suicide: The result of Tanskanen et al. holds even when war experiences are controlled for. Actually nightmares are not significantly associated with suicides among war veterans. These results support the role of nightmares as an independent risk factor for suicide instead of just being proxy for history of traumatic experiences.

  15. Nightmares as predictors of suicide: an extension study including war veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    Nightmares are intensive dreams with negative emotional tone. Frequent nightmares can pose a serious clinical problem and in 2001, Tanskanen et al. found that nightmares increase the risk of suicide. However, the dataset used by these authors included war veterans in whom nightmare frequency - and possibly also suicide risk - is elevated. Therefore, re-examination of the association between nightmares and suicide in these data is warranted. We investigated the relationship between nightmares and suicide both in the general population and war veterans in Finnish National FINRISK Study from the years 1972 to 2012, a dataset overlapping with the one used in the study by Tanskanen et al. Our data comprise 71,068 participants of whom 3139 are war veterans. Participants were followed from their survey participation until the end of 2014 or death. Suicides (N = 398) were identified from the National Causes of Death Register. Frequent nightmares increase the risk of suicide: The result of Tanskanen et al. holds even when war experiences are controlled for. Actually nightmares are not significantly associated with suicides among war veterans. These results support the role of nightmares as an independent risk factor for suicide instead of just being proxy for history of traumatic experiences. PMID:28294195

  16. 75 FR 29366 - ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) National Technical Assistance Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration... the Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) to include the Homeless Female Veterans and... to expedite the reintegration of homeless Veterans into the labor force. In order to assist the...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1310 - Who is a World War II veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is a World War II veteran. 404.1310... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1310 Who is a World War II veteran. You are a World War II veteran if you were in the...

  18. 38 CFR 13.57 - Payment to the wife or husband of incompetent veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment to the wife or husband of incompetent veteran. 13.57 Section 13.57 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION, FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES § 13.57 Payment to the wife...

  19. Military-Veteran Students' Perceptions of College Transition and Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphile, Murielle F.

    2013-01-01

    Military veterans preparing for new careers in the civilian world are pursuing higher educational degrees to fulfill career goals. The real-life experiences of veterans in the military are beneficial tools that can effectively enhance student veterans' academic performance and success. As veterans' enrollment continues to rise, veteran's academic…

  20. From Brownfield to Wetland-Vegetation Restoration Plan for Kaohsiung Jhong-Dou Wetland Park%自棕地到湿地——高雄中都湿地公园植群复育计划

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖荣一; (日)堀込宪二; 郭城孟; 郭中端

    2011-01-01

    高雄市政府为贯彻“高雄市都会型湿地生态廊道串连计划”,定于2010年完成开辟高雄市内9处与市区紧邻的湿地公园,作为动植物生态可自由迁移于都会区内的“带状湿地生态廊道”.中都湿地公园即是此计划完成的最后一处湿地工程.高雄的生态系丰富多样,其中包含森林生态系的热带季雨林、海洋生态系的海岸林以及河口生态系的红树林.中都显地公园内规划各类植群的生长环境,期望复育成功后可诱发其所属生态系.本湿地公园完工后建议高雄市政府拟订公园内动物及植群监测计划,记录中都湿地的生态变迁,说明高雄在全球地理位置上所占的重要生态地位,并制定植群维护管理计划,使中都湿地公园可持续兼具生态及景观休憩机能.%The Kaohsiung City Government plans to set up nine urban wetland parks by 2010 as part of its implementation of "The Kaohsiung Urban Wetlands Eco-corridor Connection Project", which aims to build a belt of wetland ecological corridors allowing animal and plant life to migrate freely within the urban areas. The Jhong-Dou Wetland Park is the final wetland construction for the current project. The eco-system of Kaohsiung is very rich and diverse, which includes the tropical rainforest eco-system, the coastal forest of marine eco-system, and the mangrove forest of estuary eco-system. Different type of environments were planned out for different plants to grow in Jhong-dou Wetland Park, hoping the rehabilitation of each plant would induce and bring out its own ecosystem. Monitoring and recording both animals and plants in the park were highly recommended for the future by the City Government. By recording the changes of the eco-system in the wetland park, it would be easy to understand the importance of Kauhsoung from the perspective of global ecology. In order to sustain the ecological system and the landscape recreation purpose of Jhong-dou Wetland

  1. VHA chaplaincy contact with veterans at increased risk of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Marek S; McCarten, Janet M; Pollitt, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    To examine the extent to which chaplains interact with military veterans at increased risk of suicide and select characteristics related to those at-risk veterans who present for chaplaincy services. The nationwide network of chaplains affiliated with the Veterans Health Administration (n = 990) was e-mailed a letter inviting those who have contact with at-risk veterans to complete a survey. This letter included an Internet link, connecting respondents to an online survey collection service. One hundred eighteen chaplains (11.91%) responded to the survey. More than half of the respondents reported that veterans at increased risk of suicide constitute either 1 chaplain, and present at a moderate-to-high level of risk. The present study finds that some at-risk veterans look to chaplains for supportive services. The findings also allow for opportunities for future research.

  2. Veterans Medical Care: FY2010 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    medical services such as: medical, surgical, and mental health care, including care for substance abuse; prescription drugs, including over-the- counter...travel payments to eligible veterans were paid when specialized modes of transportation, such as ambulance or wheelchair van, were medically required...reimbursement who are traveling by special modes of transportation such as ambulance, air ambulance, wheelchair van, or to receive a compensation and pension

  3. Cancer incidence in Australian Vietnam veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.; Horsley, K. [Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs (Australia); Hoek, R. van der [Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel participated in the Vietnam Conflict from 1962 to 1973, involving nearly 60,000 personnel, of whom over 500 died during service and 3131 were severely physically wounded. Service in the Vietnam conflict presented distinct health challenges. Besides the hazards of combat conditions for extended periods, herbicides and other toxic chemicals were used extensively. The United States military sprayed more than 76,000,000L of herbicide over Vietnam in their Air Force Ranch Hand and Operation Trail Dust programs. The most heavily used herbicide was Agent Orange, contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Since the Vietnam conflict, ex-Service organisations (ESOs) have maintained that Vietnam service adversely affected the health of veterans. Initial studies showed no excess risk attributable to their service. However, more recent studies have shown that Vietnam veterans have excess incidence and mortality rates from several conditions such as cancers and heart disease. This paper describes the first cancer incidence study for all ADF Vietnam veterans.

  4. Veterans’s Medical Care: FY2014 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ), and the National Cemetery Administration (NCA). This report focuses on funding for the VHA. The VHA is primarily...administrations and the Board of Veterans Appeals (BVA).9 The Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) is responsible for, among other things, providing...Congress begins with the formulations of the budget based on the Enrollee Health Care Projection Model (EHCPM).31 The model estimates the amount of

  5. Accuracy of Veterans Affairs Databases for Diagnoses of Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiologic studies usually use database diagnoses or patient self-report to identify disease cohorts, but no previous research has examined the extent to which self-report of chronic disease agrees with database diagnoses in a Veterans Affairs (VA) health care setting. Methods All veterans who had a medical care visit from October 1, 1996, through May 31, 1998, at any of the Veterans Integrated Service Network 13 facilities were surveyed about physician diagnosis of chronic ob...

  6. First-generation student veterans: implications of poverty for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Kristin G; Rinaldi, Anthony P; Woods, Tamara S; Liu, William Ming

    2013-02-01

    Student veterans are arriving at university and college campuses and many counselors may not be prepared. Multiple and intersecting identities complicate the student's integration and matriculation into higher education. We review literature on first-generation college students and issues pertinent to student veterans. Using the revised Social Class Worldview Model, this article offers a case example to illustrate how counselors may best work with student veterans. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Veterans’ Disability Compensation: Trends and Policy Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    veterans to claim benefits, the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and difficult labor market conditions during the past several years. Spending...Than the Full Retirement Age for Social Security All veterans 17 Phased in for veterans age 65 or younger in 2015 8 Option 5: Supplement Payments to...available to service members who do not qualify for a DoD-approved medi - cal separation. The difference between the two programs is in the time frame

  8. Yoga for veterans with chronic low back pain: Design and methods of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groessl, Erik J; Schmalzl, Laura; Maiya, Meghan; Liu, Lin; Goodman, Debora; Chang, Douglas G; Wetherell, Julie L; Bormann, Jill E; Atkinson, J Hamp; Baxi, Sunita

    2016-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) afflicts millions of people worldwide, with particularly high prevalence in military veterans. Many treatment options exist for CLBP, but most have limited effectiveness and some have significant side effects. In general populations with CLBP, yoga has been shown to improve health outcomes with few side effects. However, yoga has not been adequately studied in military veteran populations. In the current paper we will describe the design and methods of a randomized clinical trial aimed at examining whether yoga can effectively reduce disability and pain in US military veterans with CLBP. A total of 144 US military veterans with CLBP will be randomized to either yoga or a delayed treatment comparison group. The yoga intervention will consist of 2× weekly yoga classes for 12weeks, complemented by regular home practice guided by a manual. The delayed treatment group will receive the same intervention after six months. The primary outcome is the change in back pain-related disability measured with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire at baseline and 12-weeks. Secondary outcomes include pain intensity, pain interference, depression, anxiety, fatigue/energy, quality of life, self-efficacy, sleep quality, and medication usage. Additional process and/or mediational factors will be measured to examine dose response and effect mechanisms. Assessments will be conducted at baseline, 6-weeks, 12-weeks, and 6-months. All randomized participants will be included in intention-to-treat analyses. Study results will provide much needed evidence on the feasibility and effectiveness of yoga as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of CLBP in US military veterans.

  9. Foot care education and self management behaviors in diverse veterans with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Olson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan M Olson1, Molly T Hogan2, Leonard M Pogach3, Mangala Rajan3, Gregory J Raugi4, Gayle E Reiber51University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Healthcare System, Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, East Orange, NJ, USA; 4Division of Dermatology, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Research and Development, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to examine differences in self-reported diabetes foot care education, self management behaviors, and barriers to good foot care among veterans with diabetes by race and ethnicity. Data was collected using the Veterans Health Administration Footcare Survey, a validated tool that assessed demographic, general health, diabetes and foot self-care information, barriers to foot self-care, receipt of professional foot care, and satisfaction with current care. We mailed surveys to a random sample of patients with diabetes from eight VA medical centers. Study participants were 81% White; 13% African American; 4% Asian, and 2% American Indian and Pacific Islanders. The majority of respondents felt that they did not know enough about foot self-care. There were large gaps between self-reported knowledge and actual foot care practices, even among those who reported “knowing enough” on a given topic. There were significant differences in self-reported foot care behaviors and education by race and ethnicity. These findings document the need for culturally-specific self-management education to address unique cultural preferences and barriers to care.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetic foot, patient self-management, ethnic groups, education

  10. 75 FR 37776 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... responsibility is to coordinate the model program; monitoring the rates of veteran student enrollment... document the applicant's current activities to support veteran student enrollment, persistence, and... Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student...

  11. 76 FR 24571 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry); Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry); Comment Request AGENCY... information needed to maintain Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance accounts. DATES: Written comments and... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life...

  12. 77 FR 3842 - Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans' Group Life Insurance); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... members, especially service members with disabilities are informed about their life insurance...

  13. 77 FR 20886 - Agency Information Collection (Conversion From Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Conversion From Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans' Group Life Insurance); Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of... Evaluation of the Conversion Privilege from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) to Veterans'...

  14. 78 FR 36829 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life...

  15. America's Women Veterans: Military Service History and VA Benefit Utilization Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This comprehensive report chronicles the history of women in the military and as Veterans, profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2009, illustrates how...

  16. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA) is a health care benefit program designed for the dependents of certain Veterans....

  17. 76 FR 72243 - Proposed Information Collection (Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... facilities for returning Operation Enduring Freedom/ Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans and their families... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Operation Enduring Freedom/ Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans.... Title: Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans Health Needs Assessment, VA Form 10...

  18. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch: Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 to 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This chart summarizes Veteran employment in the federal government using data from the Office of Personnel Management's (OPM) report, Employment of Veterans in the...

  19. Barriers and facilitators to Veterans Administration collaboration with community providers: the Lodge Project for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretzmeyer, Margaret; Moeckli, Jane; Liu, William Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. Veterans Administration has made concentrated efforts to end homelessness among veterans. As part of these efforts, the Iowa City, Iowa, VA Health Care System in collaboration with local community providers deployed a supportive housing program aimed at homeless veterans. Called the Lodge program, it is intended to serve a Mid-Western mid-size city and its surrounding rural communities. This article presents qualitative findings from a mixed-method, two-year formative evaluation of the Lodge's implementation. Primary barriers to the effectiveness of the Lodge program were regulations hindering cooperation between service programs, followed by problems regarding information sharing and client substance abuse. Facilitators included personal communication and cooperation between individuals within and among service groups. The feasibility of implementing a Lodge program in a more rural community than Iowa City was also discussed.

  20. Delegations of authority/claims for cost of medical care and services--Department of Veterans Affairs. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-22

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has amended VA regulations to increase the settlement and waiver authority delegated to officials within the Office of the General Counsel and District Counsels. This change follows increased authority delegated by the Department of Justice to heads of departments and agencies of the United States.

  1. 38 CFR 21.8012 - Vocational training program for certain children of Vietnam veterans-spina bifida and covered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program for certain children of Vietnam veterans-spina bifida and covered birth defects. 21.8012 Section...-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects General § 21.8012 Vocational training program for certain children of Vietnam veterans—spina bifida and covered birth defects. VA will provide an evaluation to...

  2. Realizing Federal Policy Outcomes of the Post-9/11 GI Bill: Veterans' and Active Duty/Reservist Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporte, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (Public Law 78-346), generally referred to as the GI Bill, provided any veteran, who had served for at least 90 days from the time period of September 1940 to July 1947, paid full-time education. The original Act also called for the creation of a central agency dedicated to the administration of all…

  3. Posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and suicide in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo; Braquehais, María Dolores; Casas, Miquel

    2012-02-01

    Suicidal behavior is a critical problem in war veterans. Combat veterans are not only more likely to have suicidal ideation, often associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, but they are more likely to act on a suicidal plan. Especially since veterans may be less likely to seek help from a mental health professional, non-mental-health physicians are in a key position to screen for PTSD, depression, and suicidal ideation in these patients. The authors discuss the association of PTSD, depression, and suicide in veterans, keys to assessment of suicide risk, and interventions.

  4. Peer Support, Self-efficacy, and Combat-related Trauma Symptoms among Returning OIF/OEF Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann MacEachron

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of PTSD and other combat-related trauma symptoms among more than 2 million veterans returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF in Afghanistan suggests that many will experience psychological challenges in adjusting to civilian life. However, the literature is sparse about this new group of veterans. This study examined the relationships between peer support, self-efficacy, and PTSD symptoms among 216 OIF/OEF veterans who had attended 1 of 17 Vets4Vets peer support weekend retreats. Vets4Vets is a national grassroots program whose mission is to improve the psychological well-being of returning OIF/OEF veterans. Analysis of posttest changes indicate the generalizability of previous research findings, based on other groups of trauma-affected groups, to OIF/OEF veterans. As predicted, increased perceived peer support and self-efficacy reduced PTSD symptoms. From a theoretical perspective, we found that both models of self-efficacy, situation-specific (Bandura, 1997; Benight & Bandura, 2004 and general self-efficacy (Schwarzer & Fuchs, 1996, mediated or explained the relationship between peer support and PTSD symptoms. Implications for social work are discussed.

  5. Critical concerns in Iraq/Afghanistan war veteran-forensic interface: veterans treatment court as diversion in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Daniel E; McGuire, James; Garrick, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Shoba; Dow, Daniel; Woehl, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The veteran-forensic interface is an emerging area of relevance to forensic clinicians assessing or treating returning Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans facing criminal sanctions. Veterans' Treatment Court (VTC) represents a recent diversion mechanism for low-level offenses that is based on a collaborative justice model. Thirty-nine percent of veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan and receiving VA services reside in rural areas. Rural veterans facing criminal justice charges may be at a disadvantage due to limited access to forensic psychiatrists with relevant expertise in providing veterans services for diversion. Therefore, widening the pool of forensic clinicians who have such expertise, as well as knowledge of the signature wounds of the wars as related to aggression and reckless behavior is necessary. This article presents an overview of VTCs and discusses the role of forensic clinicians as stakeholders in this process.

  6. Perspectives of family and veterans on family programs to support reintegration of returning veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ellen P; Sherman, Michelle D; McSweeney, Jean C; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Owen, Richard R; Dixon, Lisa B

    2015-08-01

    Combat deployment and reintegration are challenging for service members and their families. Although family involvement in mental health care is increasing in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, little is known about family members' preferences for services. This study elicited the perspectives of returning Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and their families regarding family involvement in veterans' mental health care. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 veterans receiving care for posttraumatic stress disorder at the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System or Oklahoma City VA Medical Center and 36 veteran-designated family members. Interviews addressed perceived needs related to veterans' readjustment to civilian life, interest in family involvement in joint veteran/family programs, and desired family program content. Interview data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Both groups strongly supported inclusion of family members in programs to facilitate veterans' postdeployment readjustment and reintegration into civilian life. Both desired program content focused on information, practical skills, support, and gaining perspective on the other's experience. Although family and veteran perspectives were similar, family members placed greater emphasis on parenting-related issues and the kinds of support they and their children needed during and after deployment. To our knowledge, this is the first published report on preferences regarding VA postdeployment reintegration support that incorporates the perspectives of returning male and female veterans and those of their families. Findings will help VA and community providers working with returning veterans tailor services to the needs and preferences of this important-to-engage population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Costs Associated With Surgical Site Infections in Veterans Affairs Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Marin L; Cullen, Joseph J; Perencevich, Eli N; Vaughan Sarrazin, Mary S

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are potentially preventable complications that are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. To determine the excess costs associated with total, deep, and superficial SSIs among all operations and for high-volume surgical specialties. Surgical patients from 129 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals were included. The Veterans Health Administration Decision Support System and VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases were used to assess costs associated with SSIs among VA patients who underwent surgery in fiscal year 2010. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate incremental costs associated with SSIs, controlling for patient risk factors, surgical risk factors, and hospital-level variation in costs. Costs of the index hospitalization and subsequent 30-day readmissions were included. Additional analysis determined potential cost savings of quality improvement programs to reduce SSI rates at hospitals with the highest risk-adjusted SSI rates. Among 54,233 VA patients who underwent surgery, 1756 (3.2%) experienced an SSI. Overall, 0.8% of the cohort had a deep SSI, and 2.4% had a superficial SSI. The mean unadjusted costs were $31,580 and $52,620 for patients without and with an SSI, respectively. In the risk-adjusted analyses, the relative costs were 1.43 times greater for patients with an SSI than for patients without an SSI (95% CI, 1.34-1.52; difference, $11,876). Deep SSIs were associated with 1.93 times greater costs (95% CI, 1.71-2.18; difference, $25,721), and superficial SSIs were associated with 1.25 times greater costs (95% CI, 1.17-1.35; difference, $7003). Among the highest-volume specialties, the greatest mean cost attributable to SSIs was $23,755 among patients undergoing neurosurgery, followed by patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, general surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, and urologic surgery. If hospitals in the highest 10th percentile (ie, the worst hospitals) reduced their SSI rates to the

  8. 75 FR 68007 - Office of the Assistant Secretary; The Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... Office of the Assistant Secretary; The Advisory Committee on Veterans' Employment, Training and Employer.... McWilliam, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Operations and Management, Veterans' Employment and...

  9. Burnout among psychiatrists in the Veterans Health Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector A. Garcia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that mental health workers are at high risk for burnout, and that burnout can increase staff turnover and reduce quality of care. The Veterans Administration (VA employs over 3000 psychiatrists across the United States, but little is known about burnout in this population. This study was conducted to examine predictors of burnout and intent to leave the VA among a national sample of VA psychiatrists. Participants (N = 125 responded to an anonymous online survey. Regression analyses were used to examine relationships between workplace variables, patient characteristics, and burnout as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey – which includes sub-scales for cynicism, exhaustion, and professional efficacy – as well as intent to leave the VA. Based on established cut-off scores, 90% of the sample reported high cynicism, 86% reported high exhaustion, and 74% reported high professional efficacy. High cynicism predicted the intent to leave the VA (p = .004. Not feeling part of a coherent team predicted greater cynicism (p = .01, and patient characteristics such as suspected malingering showed a positive trend with cynicism (p = .05. Workplace characteristics such as unfair treatment by supervisors (p = .03 and insufficient resources (p = .001 predicted greater exhaustion. The current findings suggest that burnout is prevalent in the VA psychiatry workforce. Specific administrative measures to reduce burnout may have potential to improve the emotional health of that workforce and ensure high quality of care for the veteran population it serves. The size of both the VA psychiatry workforce and patient population underscores the importance of greater understanding of burnout as it occurs in the VA.

  10. 48 CFR 817.502 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General. 817.502 Section 817.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Interagency Acquisitions Under the Economy Act 817.502 General. (a) After December 31, 2008, any contract...

  11. The civilian labor market experiences of Vietnam-era veterans: the influence of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoca, Elizabeth; Rosenheck, Robert

    2000-12-01

    . Among those who were employed, veterans with PTSD earned, on average, $2.38 less per hour ($3.61 in 1999 U.S. dollars). Anxiety disorders and major depression had nearly as large an effect on employment rates, as did PTSD. Major depression was also found to have lowered hourly wages by an average of $6.77 per hour ($10.17 in 1999 US dollars). However, psychiatric health did not affect typical hours worked per week. DISCUSSION: This study contributes new information to several literatures. Previous research on the extent to which PTSD interferes with readjustment to civilian life has focused on quality-of-life outcomes such as overall well-being, physical health, and homelessness. Previous research on mental health and earnings has focused on annual earnings. This study makes hourly wage comparisons, a closer measure of productivity differences since they represent differences in pay for the same input of time. Finally, this study demonstrates that the effects of psychiatric health are as important as the influence of non-health characteristics that are thought to signal earnings potential in the civilian labor market (education and experience). These findings, however, may not apply generally. The importance of PTSD may be specific to veterans of the Vietnam War and may not pertain to persons suffering non-combat-related PTSD. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE PROVISION AND USE AND HEALTH POLICY FORMULATION: The magnitude of our estimates implies potentially large benefits from developing effective treatments for PTSD and from insuring access to these treatments. IMPLICATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: Future research should examine the relationship between work and PTSD in the general population and should explore the indirect effects of mental health, such as its effects on the post-service educational attainment and occupational choices of veterans.

  12. Fibromyalgia syndrome care of Iraq- and Afghanistan-deployed Veterans in Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, April F; Helmer, Drew A; Muthukutty, Anusha; McAndrew, Lisa M; Carter, Marjorie E; Judd, Joshua; Garvin, Jennifer H; Samore, Matthew H; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) care among Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND) Veterans. Current recommendations include interdisciplinary, team-based combined care approaches and limited opioid use. In this study of OIF/OEF/OND Veterans who accessed Veterans Health Administration services between 2002 and 2012, we hypothesized that combined care (defined as at least 4 primary care visits/yr with visits to mental health and/or rheumatology) versus Hispanic, and never/currently married. Combined primary, mental health, and rheumatology care was associated with at least 2 opioid prescriptions (RR [95% CI] for males 2.2 [1.1-4.4] and females 2.8 [0.4-18.6]). Also, combined care was associated with at least 2 nonopioid pain-related prescriptions, a practice supported by evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. In tandem, these results provide mixed evidence of benefit of combined care for FMS. Future studies of healthcare encounter characteristics, care coordination, and benefits for Veterans with FMS are needed.

  13. An Analysis of Homeless Veterans Participating in the Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Katrina Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an analysis on ex post facto data of the federal grant supported Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) administered at Goodwill Industries of Lower South Carolina. Pre-existing data on variables such as performance goals, training activities, support services, and demographics from program years…

  14. 75 FR 61247 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... the notice. This notice solicits comments for information needed from penal institutions regarding... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control Number: 2900-0116. Type of...

  15. 78 FR 46420 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... the notice. This notice solicits comments for information needed from penal institutions regarding... in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control Number: 2900-0116. Type of Review: Extension of...

  16. Disability Among Veterans: Analysis of the National Survey of Veterans (1997-2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Lynn H; Weinstein, Ali A; Frankenfeld, Cara L; Huynh, Minh

    2016-03-01

    This manuscript assesses whether the Veterans Administration Rating System (VADR) correlates with self-reported activities of daily living (ADL) used in the National Survey of Veterans and likelihood of employment. Veterans' disability benefits are determined based on a single-index standardized rating scheme, measured at time of discharge. The primary aim of this study was to assess how this single-index rating of disability for veterans compares to multidimensional measures of disability (ADL and instrumental activities of daily living [IADL]). The relationship between disability ratings and labor market outcomes such as job search behavior and the likelihood of being employed was assessed. Successful labor market reintegration requires both physical/mental well-being, we examined the extent that VADR can capture the relationship between job market behavior and measures of mental/physical health. Kernel regression estimates were obtained of the likelihood of working/looking for work. Mean numbers of IADL and ADL difficulties and medical conditions were positively associated with VADR (p-trend trend 4 ADL/IADL deficits and mental health diagnosis increased the likelihood of not working. The probability of not working correlated with VADR when VADR was greater than 40%.

  17. An Analysis of Homeless Veterans Participating in the Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Katrina Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an analysis on ex post facto data of the federal grant supported Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) administered at Goodwill Industries of Lower South Carolina. Pre-existing data on variables such as performance goals, training activities, support services, and demographics from program years…

  18. Comparison of health related quality of life between two groups of veteran and non-veteran spinal cord injured patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamati, Payman; Rostami, Reza; Saadat, Soheil; Taheri, Taher; Tajabadi, Maryam; Ranjbari, Ghazale; Naji, Zohrehsadat; Jafarpour, Saba; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have a lower health related quality of life (HRQOL) compared to both healthy controls and the normal population. The aim of this study was to compare HRQOL between two groups of veteran and non-veteran SCI patients. Methods: All male paraplegic non-veterans who had sustained complete SCI before 1988 and were residents of Tehran province (Iran), and a similar group of SCI veterans who consecutively participated in a health screening program were enrolled in this study. Patients fewer than 35 and older than 65 years of age were not included in this study. The participants were interviewed based on the Persian version of SF-36 questionnaire by two psychologists. Eight sub-scales and two physical and mental component summaries of the instrument were assessed. We used chi-square, odds ratio, Mann-Whitney U, independent t-test and linear regression for analysis. Results: Overall, 25 veterans and 22 non-veterans were enrolled in the study. The mean age, time since injury and the presence of comorbid illnesses were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). A greater number of veterans were married (p= 0.003) and employed (p= 0.047). On average, veterans had more years of formal education than non-veterans (p= 0.001). The mean (SD) bodily pain sub-scale was 72.73(31.253) for non-veterans and 49.7 (28.287) for veterans (p=0.011). Absence of comorbid illnesses was associated with a better physical component summary (p< 0.001). Employment was associated with a better mental component summary (p= 0.022). Conclusion: We did not find any differences in HRQOL between the two groups except for the bodily pain sub-scale. Further studies with larger sample sizes are recommended. PMID:26157716

  19. Rehabilitation of Danish veterans with spinal cord injuries during international missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Nicolaj Jersild; Noe, Bodil Bjørnshave; Hoffmann, Dorte Dahl

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the past decades, Danish soldiers have participated more frequently in combat which has resulted in an increased number of severe injuries. The aim of this study was to describe the initial treatment and rehabilitation as well as the level of function, employment, social relations......, participation in leisure time activities, health, quality of life (QoL) and late complications at a follow-up in six veterans who sustained a spinal cord injury (SCI) during international military missions. METHODS: Medical records were retrieved regarding the initial treatment and rehabilitation......, five in the military. Satisfaction with their current work was related to whether their work skills corresponded to the work tasks at hand. Four found that their QoL was very good, one that it was satisfactory, another that it was unsatisfactory. CONCLUSION: Danish veterans with SCI were generally...

  20. Post-Service Earnings of Veterans: Evidence from the Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    Security Administration Records," American Economic Review (June): 80: 313-336. (1989). "Why Do World War II Veterans Earn More Than Nonveterans...Relations Research Association, pp. 422-431. DeTray, Dennis (1982). "Veteran Status as a Screening Device," American Economic Review (March) 72: 133-142

  1. Writing War: Veterans in the College Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, D. Alexis; Thompson, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As writing classrooms may be the primary locations where students' military experiences are shared, writing instructors bear special ethical responsibility when teaching veterans. A discussion of research conducted with the support of a Conference on College Composition and Communications (CCCC) Research Initiative Grant, investigating the demographics of Post-9/11 military veterans who are entering college writing courses.

  2. Natural Medicine: Wilderness Experience Outcomes for Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Zachary Clayborne; Joye, Shauna Wilson; Garcia, Joseph Amos

    2015-01-01

    Wilderness Experience Programs (WEPs) have been shown to enhance psychological well-being for numerous populations. However, among veteran populations, these studies have historically evaluated programs that are short-term experiences, usually less than 1 week. The current research sought to evaluate a WEP for post-9/11 combat veterans engaging in…

  3. Veterans Affairs: Presumptive Service Connection and Disability Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    requirements that a veteran must show diagnosis by a medical examination conducted by a medical officer of the then Veterans Bureau or duly qualified...to include a “medically unexplained chronic multisymptom illness (such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia , and irritable bowel syndrome) that

  4. 77 FR 73312 - Technical Revisions-State Veterans Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... structure. Under VHA's new organizational structure, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has delegated... must be updated because of recent changes to the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) organizational structure, which reassigned certain administrative duties of the Chief Consultant of the Office of...

  5. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... serious mental illness or some other kind of disability. The commenter argues this has been replaced with..., including halfway houses)'' to ``veterans suffering from serious mental illness, including veterans who are... who are homeless and suffering from serious mental illness or a substance use disorder. Many of the...

  6. Pittsburgh Student Veterans' Experience with Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to understand how student veteran's experienced using social media in the context of higher education. It also explored how they used it for peer bonding and how student veterans perceived the benefits of using social media. This was a qualitative research study that used a phenomenological approach to data collection and…

  7. Challenges on the Front Lines: Serving Today's Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander; Parks, Rodney; Edwards, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, veterans have enrolled at higher education institutions in vastly increasingly numbers to utilize their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits. In response to this influx, universities have established a variety of resources and support systems designed to serve the needs of student veterans. There has also been heightened attention toward…

  8. Promoting College and Career Success: Portfolio Assessment for Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Active service members and veterans are pursuing postsecondary degrees in record numbers today, due in large part to the GI Bill education benefits that can cover much or all of the cost. An important tool for helping service members and veterans succeed in postsecondary education is prior learning assessment (PLA). PLA is a process that includes…

  9. "It's Not One Size Fits All": Diversity "among" Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Veterans are a growing subpopulation of students on college campuses. While writing proliferates about best practices and veteran-friendly suggestions (e.g., Carr, 2010; Cook & Kim, 2009; Lokken, Pfeffer, McAuley & Strong, 2009; McBain, Kim, Cook & Snead, 2013), only a small body of empirical research about contemporary student…

  10. Do Military Veteran and Civilian Students Function Differently in College?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James G.; Vilhauer, Ruvanee P.; Chafos, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to assess military veterans' functioning in college by comparing their experience with that of civilian students. Participants: The study, conducted from April 2012 to February 2013, included 445 civilian and 61 student service member/veteran (SSM/V) undergraduates, drawn from a community college and two 4-year…

  11. Examining the Development of Self-Authorship among Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Sharon L. M.

    2014-01-01

    The literature has shown that student veterans arrive in college with unique characteristics and also face unique challenges (Black et al., 2007; Bonar & Domenici, 2011; Church, 2009; DiRamio & Jarvis, 2011). There is also some evidence that student veterans develop complex ways of making meaning at younger ages than students in the…

  12. Exploring the Challenges of Academic Advising for Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Rodney; Walker, Erin; Smith, Carol

    2015-01-01

    As troops return to the United States from conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, many student veterans are expected to utilize their education benefits and enroll in higher education. A key element in their success in college will be the quality of academic advising they receive. Student veterans are much more likely than traditional students to drop…

  13. Pittsburgh Student Veterans' Experience with Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to understand how student veteran's experienced using social media in the context of higher education. It also explored how they used it for peer bonding and how student veterans perceived the benefits of using social media. This was a qualitative research study that used a phenomenological approach to data collection and…

  14. Transformations: Working with Veterans in the Composition Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardy, Galen

    2009-01-01

    Veterans make up a fair number of potential students. It is important to understand them, even if teachers do not agree with the politics of the War on Terror, Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). In working with the veterans at Black Hawk College and other two-year and four-year institutions, the author has learned…

  15. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations about reaching out for help. Bittersweet More Videos ... Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard Signs of Crisis Identifying ...

  16. An Examination of Family Adjustment among Operation Desert Storm Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Casey T.; Schumm, Jeremiah A.; Panuzio, Jillian; Proctor, Susan P.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined interrelationships among combat exposure, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and family adjustment in a sample of male and female Operation Desert Storm veterans (N = 1,512). In structural equation models for both male and female veterans, higher combat exposure was associated with higher PTSD symptoms, which in…

  17. Natural Medicine: Wilderness Experience Outcomes for Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Zachary Clayborne; Joye, Shauna Wilson; Garcia, Joseph Amos

    2015-01-01

    Wilderness Experience Programs (WEPs) have been shown to enhance psychological well-being for numerous populations. However, among veteran populations, these studies have historically evaluated programs that are short-term experiences, usually less than 1 week. The current research sought to evaluate a WEP for post-9/11 combat veterans engaging in…

  18. Did Massachusetts Health Reform Affect Veterans Affairs Primary Care Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin S; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Hebert, Paul L; Batten, Adam; Nelson, Karin M; Fihn, Stephan D; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2016-09-20

    Massachusetts Health Reform (MHR), implemented in 2006, introduced new health insurance options that may have prompted some veterans already enrolled in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System (VA) to reduce their reliance on VA health services. This study examined whether MHR was associated with changes in VA primary care (PC) use. Using VA administrative data, we identified 147,836 veterans residing in Massachusetts and neighboring New England (NE) states from October 2004 to September 2008. We applied difference-in-difference methods to compare pre-post changes in PC use among Massachusetts and other NE veterans. Among veterans not enrolled in Medicare, VA PC use was not significantly different following MHR for Massachusetts veterans relative to other NE veterans. Among VA-Medicare dual enrollees, MHR was associated with an increase of 24.5 PC visits per 1,000 veterans per quarter (p = .048). Despite new non-VA health options through MHR, VA enrollees continued to rely on VA PC. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. 77 FR 18307 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... published the report in the Federal Register (76 FR 65321) and posted it on a social media Web site created... over 450 comments from over 500 registered users through the social media Web site. VA sincerely thanks... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs....

  20. Bridging the Gap: Technology and Veteran Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, David; Hammond, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two unique yet confluent perspectives regarding the use of technology to support student veterans in college, and is meant to ignite discussion of the blending of high impact practices with technology to promote their academic success. The authors highlight the historical trends of student veterans in the academy and discuss…

  1. Employing Our Veterans. Part 2. Service Member Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    one common website that will consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service...consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service providers should be used to enhance the

  2. 77 FR 38397 - Agency Information Collection (Report of General Information) Activities Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Report of General Information) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY... Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, will submit the collection of information... describes the nature of the information collection and its expected cost and burden; it includes the...

  3. Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty Competencies and Teaching Strategies to Enhance the Care of the Veteran Population: Perspectives of Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Judy

    2016-01-01

    It is critical that faculty competencies, teaching strategies, and the essential knowledge relating to the care of our veterans be delineated and taught to health care professionals in order for our Veterans to receive optimal care. The purpose of this qualitative study was to ascertain from nursing faculty members who have worked extensively with veterans, the necessary faculty competencies, essential knowledge, and teaching strategies needed to prepare baccalaureate level nurses to provide individualized, quality, and holistic care to veterans. Six Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy faculty members participated in two 2-hour focus group sessions. There were a total of 12 multidimensional major concepts identified: 5 faculty competencies, 4 essential knowledge areas, and 3 teaching strategies specifically related to veteran care. The information generated can be used for faculty, staff, and or nurse development. Having a comprehensive understanding of veteran health care needs enable effective patient-centered care delivery to veterans, which is the gold standard in health care our veterans deserve.

  4. Serum concentrations of TCDD and other dioxin-like compounds in US Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuk, Marian; Patterson, Donald G; Turner, Wayman E

    2014-05-01

    We measured serum concentrations of seven dibenzo-p-dioxin congeners (PCDDs), ten dibenzofurans (PCDFs), four non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (noPCBs) and six mono-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (moPCBs) in 1950 veterans of the Vietnam War. The veterans were participants in the Air Force Health Study (AFHS) who attended the final medical examination in 2002. Blood samples were collected from 777 Ranch Hands involved in the aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam and a comparison group of 1173 veterans ("Comparisons") who served in Southeast Asia during the same time period. Results for moPCBs were based on a random subsample of 800 veterans. The median 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) concentrations in 2002 were 5.0 pg g(-1) lipid in Ranch Hands and 2.2 pg g(-1) lipid in Comparisons. No substantial differences were found in measured concentrations of other PCDDs, PCDFs, and noPCBs. Similarly, no substantial differences were found for moPCBs in the subsample. The median total dioxin toxic equivalent (TEQ) in Ranch Hands was 18.7 pg g(-1) lipid for PCDDs, 3.4 pg g(-1) lipid for PCDFs, and 3.2 pg g(-1) lipid for noPCBs. Median TEQs in Comparisons were 14.4 pg g(-1) lipid for PCDDs, 3.5 pg g(-1) lipid for PCDFs, and 3.3 pg g(-1) lipid for noPCBs. These TEQs, with the exception of PCDD TEQ in Ranch Hands (primarily due to elevated TCDD), were similar to or lower than those reported for similar age and gender groups in the 2001-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). These findings support the assumption that the Ranch Hand veterans were not more highly exposed to dioxin-like compounds other than TCDD than were Comparison veterans or the general US population.

  5. Comparing life experiences in active addiction and recovery between veterans and non-veterans: A national study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre; Timko, Christine; Hill, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The costs of addiction are well documented but the potential benefits of recovery are less well known. Similarly, substance use issues among both active duty military personnel and veterans are well known but their recovery experiences remain under-investigated. Further, little is known about whether and how addiction and recovery experiences differ between veterans and non veterans. This knowledge can help refine treatment and recovery support services. Capitalizing on a national study of persons in recovery (N = 3,208) we compare addiction and recovery experiences among veterans (N = 481) and non veterans. Vets’ addiction phase was 4 years longer than non vets and they experienced significantly more financial and legal problems. Dramatic improvements in functioning were observed across the board in recovery with subgroup differences leveling off. We discuss possible strategies to address the specific areas where vets are most impaired in addiction and note study limitations including the cross-sectional design. PMID:24783976

  6. 20 CFR 1001.110 - Role of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Role of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans... SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES FOR VETERANS Federal Responsibilities § 1001.110 Role of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET). (a) As...

  7. 78 FR 55777 - Proposed Information Collection (VA, National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events, Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA, National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events, Event... Events, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of National Veterans Sports... Service Application, VA Form 0927f. k. National Veterans Summer sports Clinic Event Application, VA...

  8. 78 FR 58611 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0212.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance... collection. Abstract: Veterans complete VA Form 29-8636 to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI)...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  10. VA Puget Sound Telemental Health Service to rural veterans: a growing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Sara V Smucker; Juretic, Meghan A; Hoerster, Katherine D; Van de Plasch, Richard; Felker, Bradford L

    2012-05-01

    The VA Puget Sound Health Care System Telemental Health program connects veterans with psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers via live clinical video teleconferencing. Providers deliver care to veterans in rural Veteran Affairs medical centers, community-based outpatient clinics and residences, and thus, increase access to specialty mental health care for rural and medically underserved veteran communities.

  11. 38 CFR 3.453 - Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay. 3.453 Section 3.453 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation...

  12. 76 FR 27384 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... better understand Veterans and their families' awareness of VA's suicide prevention and mental health... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys.... Veterans Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513. b. Veterans Family Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513a. c....

  13. 76 FR 64184 - Advisory Committee on Women Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ...; overviews of the Veterans Health Administration, the Veterans Benefits Administration, and the Women Veterans Health Strategic Health Care Group; and briefings on mental health, women Veterans' legislative... of the Secretary. Vivian Drake, Committee Management Officer. BILLING CODE 8320-01-P...

  14. Recruitment and retention of young adult veteran drinkers using Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R; Naranjo, Diana; Marshall, Grant N

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the feasibility of using Facebook as a platform to recruit and retain young adult veteran drinkers into an online-alcohol use intervention study. Facebook's wide accessibility and popularity among the age group that comprises the majority of veterans from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan make it a compelling resource through which research can extend its reach to this otherwise hard-to-reach group. We developed a series of Facebook advertisement campaigns to reach veteran drinkers not specifically searching for alcohol treatment. In doing so, we recruited 793 valid veteran participants in approximately two weeks for an advertising cost of $4.53 per obtained participant. The study sample consisted primarily of male veterans, between 19 and 34 years of age, who were drinking at moderate to heavy levels. Although about half of the sample reported mental health comorbidity, few had received any mental health or substance use treatment in the past year. Facebook appears to be a valuable mechanism through which to recruit young veterans with unmet behavioral health needs, although more specific efforts may be needed to engage certain types of veterans after initial study enrollment.

  15. Transfer component skill deficit rates among Veterans who use wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Koontz, PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to quantify the deficit rates for transfer component skills in a Veteran cohort and explore the relationship between deficit rates and subject characteristics. Seventy-four men and 18 women performed up to four transfers independently from their wheelchair to a mat table while a therapist evaluated their transfer techniques using the Transfer Assessment Instrument. The highest deficit rates concerned the improper use of handgrips (63%. Other common problems included not setting the wheelchair up at the proper angle (50% and not removing the armrest (58%. Veterans over 60 yr old and Veterans with moderate shoulder pain were more likely to set up their wheelchairs inappropriately than younger Veterans (p = 0.003 and Veterans with mild shoulder pain (p = 0.004. Women were less likely to remove their armrests than men (p = 0.03. Subjects with disabilities other than spinal cord injury were less inclined to set themselves up for a safe and easy transfer than the subjects with spinal cord injury (p Veterans and will inform the development of future transfer training programs both within and outside of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

  16. Recruitment and retention of young adult veteran drinkers using Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Naranjo, Diana; Marshall, Grant N.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the feasibility of using Facebook as a platform to recruit and retain young adult veteran drinkers into an online-alcohol use intervention study. Facebook’s wide accessibility and popularity among the age group that comprises the majority of veterans from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan make it a compelling resource through which research can extend its reach to this otherwise hard-to-reach group. We developed a series of Facebook advertisement campaigns to reach veteran drinkers not specifically searching for alcohol treatment. In doing so, we recruited 793 valid veteran participants in approximately two weeks for an advertising cost of $4.53 per obtained participant. The study sample consisted primarily of male veterans, between 19 and 34 years of age, who were drinking at moderate to heavy levels. Although about half of the sample reported mental health comorbidity, few had received any mental health or substance use treatment in the past year. Facebook appears to be a valuable mechanism through which to recruit young veterans with unmet behavioral health needs, although more specific efforts may be needed to engage certain types of veterans after initial study enrollment. PMID:28249027

  17. Homelessness and money mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Sullivan, Connor P; Wolfe, James; Wagner, Henry Ryan; Beckham, Jean C

    2013-12-01

    We examined the empirical link between money mismanagement and subsequent homelessness among veterans. We used a random sample of Iraq and Afghanistan War era veterans from the National Post-Deployment Adjustment Survey in 2009-2011. Veterans were randomly selected from a roster of all US military service members in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom who were separated from active duty or in the Reserves/National Guard. Veterans (n = 1090) from 50 states and all military branches completed 2 waves of data collection 1 year apart (79% retention rate). Thirty percent reported money mismanagement (e.g., bouncing or forging a check, going over one's credit limit, falling victim to a money scam in the past year). Multivariate analysis revealed money mismanagement (odds ratio [OR] = 4.09, 95% CI = 1.87, 8.94) was associated with homelessness in the next year, as were arrest history (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.33, 5.29), mental health diagnosis (OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.26, 5.33), and income (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.13, 0.71). Money mismanagement, reported by a substantial number of veterans, was related to a higher rate of subsequent homelessness. The findings have implications for policymakers and clinicians, suggesting that financial education programs offered by the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs may be targeted to effectively address veteran homelessness.

  18. Impacts of mustard gas exposure on veterans mental health: A study on the role of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Gholam-Reza; Ameli, Javad; Roeintan, Rahim; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Saburi, Amin

    2013-01-01

    The mustard gas (MG) exposure can impair physical health and therefore increase the probability of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychological disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate long-term effects of MG exposure on veterans' mental health. This was a cross-sectional study. In order to assess prevalence of mental health and PTSD of 100 MG victims 25 years after the exposure to MG in Iran-Iraq conflict, the general health questionnaire (GHQ-28) and Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively was administered. The mean (±standard deviation (SD)) age of participants was 40.63 (±5.86) years. The mean GHQ-28 (47.34) of the study group was higher compared to standardized cutoff point (23) of the Iranian community. Also, it was found that 38 participants (38%) suffer from PTSD. The results of this study showed that academic education in the PTSD group was less than that in the non-PTSD group (P=0.03). In addition, in multivariate analysis it was found that only education level of the veterans and their wives were effective on the mental health score (adjusted P=0.036 and 0.041, respectively). The mean score of depression and psychosocial activity subscale in patients at higher education level was lower than patients at lower education level (Pchemical injured veterans and it is important that providing more mental health centers for this community.

  19. Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Lung Disease in Veterans of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Mary Jo; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Leung, Kar-Wei; Faverio, Paola; Fleming, Nicholas; Mortensen, Eric; Amuan, Megan E; Wang, Chen-Pin; Eapen, Blessen; Restrepo, Marcos; Morris, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Research from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have focused on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mental health conditions; however, it is becoming clear that other health concerns, such as respiratory illnesses, warrant further scientific inquiry. Early reports from theater and postdeployment health assessments suggested an association with deployment-related exposures (e.g., sand, burn pits, chemical, etc.) and new-onset respiratory symptoms. We used data from Veterans Affairs medical encounters between fiscal years 2003 and 2011 to identify trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and interstitial lung disease in veterans. We used data from Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense sources to identify sociodemographic (age, sex, race), military (e.g., service branch, multiple deployments) and clinical characteristics (TBI, smoking) of individuals with and without chronic lung diseases. Generalized estimating equations found significant increases over time for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Trends for interstitial lung disease were significant only in adjusted analyses. Age, smoking, and TBI were also significantly associated with chronic lung diseases; however, multiple deployments were not associated. Research is needed to identify which characteristics of deployment-related exposures are linked with chronic lung disease.

  20. Examination of Veterans Affairs disability compensation as a disincentive for employment in a population-based sample of Veterans under age 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Concerns that disability benefits may create disincentives for employment may be especially relevant for young American military veterans, particularly veterans of the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who are facing a current economic recession and turning in large numbers to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability compensation. This study describes the rate of employment and VA disability compensation among a nationally representative sample of veterans under the age of 65 and examines the association between levels of VA disability compensation and employment, adjusting for sociodemographics and health status. Data on a total of 4,787 veterans from the 2010 National Survey of Veterans were analyzed using multinomial logistic regressions to compare employed veterans with two groups that were not employed. Two-thirds of veterans under the age of 65 were employed, although only 36 % of veterans with a VA service-connected disability rating of 50 % or higher were employed. Veterans who received no VA disability compensation or who were service-connected 50 % or more were more likely to be unemployed and not looking for employment than veterans who were not service-connected or were service-connected less than 50 %, suggesting high but not all levels of VA disability compensation create disincentives for employment. Results were similar when analyses were limited to veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Education and vocational rehabilitation interventions, as well as economic work incentives, may be needed to maximize employment among veterans with disabilities.

  1. Internalizing and Externalizing Problems in Children of War Veterans in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Eglantina Kraja

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescent children of veterans of the war in Kosovo (1998-1999. The results of this study are quite interesting from the perspective of the dilemma for the state of the children of veterans even 15 years after the war ended. Parents’ emotional problems affect the functioning of the family in general and children in particular. Children can react to symptoms of parents by developing different symptoms as trouble sleeping, appetite loss, emotional instability or even problems in development, according to research done on children's reactions to the problems of parents explained by interactions between environment, brain and behaviour driven by trauma. The results of this study have shown that the internalizing problems have not shown gender differences, meantime externalizing problems were found higher in male participants. An interesting finding of this study was the highest scores of emotional problems in children born before and during the war, compare to those born after the war ended. We also found that anxiety problems in children [R2= .83, p < .001] were a significant predictor of internalizing problems. The assessment of the scale of positive qualities [R2= .19, p < .001] was also found to be a significant predictor for externalizing problems.Only 0.8% of the variance of internalizing problems was explained by the income. Considering that the subject of this study were adolescent children of war veterans of the 1999 conflict in Kosovo, we must take into account that the post-traumatic stress disorder is a very frequent problem among war veterans and that its impact on their personal and family life cannot be overlooked.

  2. Open access phone triage for veterans with suspected malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Charles Jeff; Fisichella, Piero Marco; Moseley, Jennifer M; Shoni, Melina; Lebenthal, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Phone triaging patients with suspected malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) within the Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA) system offers a model for rapid, expert guided evaluation for patients with rare and treatable diseases within a national integrated healthcare system. To assess feasibility of national open access telephone triage using evidence-based treatment recommendations for patients with MPM, measure timelines of the triage and referral process and record the impact on "intent to treat" for patients using our service. A retrospective study. The main outcome measures were: (1) ability to perform long distance phone triage, (2) to assess the speed of access to a mesothelioma surgical specialist for patients throughout the entire VHA, and (3) to determine if access to a specialist would alter the plan of care. Sixty veterans were screened by our phone triage program, 38 traveled an average of 997 miles to VA Boston Healthcare system. On average, 14 d elapsed from initial phone contact until the patient was physically evaluated in our general thoracic clinic in Boston. The treatment plan was altered for 71% of patients evaluated at VA Boston Healthcare system based on 2012 International Mesothelioma Interest Group guidelines. Our initial experience demonstrates that in-network centralized care for Veterans with MPM is feasible within the VHA. National open access phone triage improves access to expert surgical advice and can be delivered in a timely manner for Veterans using our service. Guideline-based treatment recommendations ("intent to treat") changed the therapeutic course for the majority of patients who used our service. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 20 CFR 404.1320 - Who is a post-World War II veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is a post-World War II veteran. 404.1320... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1320 Who is a post-World War II veteran. You are a post-World War II veteran if...

  4. VA Health Care: Improved Monitoring Needed for Effective Oversight of Care for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Health Care Letter 1 Background 6 VHA Lacks Complete and Accurate Data on VAMC Compliance with Environment of Care Requirements for Women Veterans...of Care Requirements 40 Appendix IV Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Gynecologist Availability 44 Appendix V Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinics...Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Requirements Related to the Outpatient Environment of Care for Women Veterans, December 2015-March 2016 40 Table

  5. Veterans Health Care: Veterans Health Administration Processes for Responding to Reported Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    evaluation, a clinician is given an opportunity to improve his or her clinical competence over a period of time as determined by the VAMC director. At... competence by a peer. GAO-12-827R Veterans Health Administration Response to Reported Adverse Events 8 concerns about clinical competence remain...the discretion of the VAMC director, this evaluation can include progressive training or proctoring aimed at helping the clinician improve clinical

  6. Military and Veterans’ Benefits: Analysis of VA Compensation Levels for Survivors of Veterans and Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    pensions , and life insurance. Lastly, GAO interviewed officials from VA and groups representing veterans, servicemembers, and their survivors. GAO is...in our analysis other sources of income survivors may receive, such as Social Security, private pensions , or life insurance. For additional context...with survivors receiving a percentage of the employee’s calculated retirement annuity .31 FERS offers similar survivor benefits, but the maximum is 50

  7. Sleep disturbances in veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul; Masoudi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Post-traumatic stress disorder is related to a wide range of medical problems, with a majority of neurological, psychological, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes, as well as sleep disorders. Although the majority of studies reveal the association between PTSD and sleep disturbances, there are few studies on the assessment of sleep disruption among veterans with PTSD. In this review, we attempt to study the sleep disorders including insomnia, nightmare, sleep-related breathing disorders, sleep-related movement disorders and parasomnias among veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD. It is an important area for further research among veterans with PTSD. PMID:27093088

  8. Caring for veterans returning home from Middle Eastern wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wands, Lisa Marie

    2011-04-01

    After serving at war, veterans work to resume a normal life at home. For some, the difficulties of reintegration are compounded by significant physical injury or psychological trauma, such as traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. It is equally important to attend to the all-encompassing experience of reintegration for any veteran. The transition is deeply embedded in the context of relationships and, as such, nurses can provide support. Nurses can find guidance on how to better connect with veterans returning home from war in Swanson's work on caring.

  9. A Health Assessment Survey of Veteran Students: Utilizing a Community College-Veterans Affairs Medical Center Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-10-01

    To assess health status among student veterans at a community college utilizing a partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college. Student veterans at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio, in January to April 2013. A health assessment survey was sent to 978 veteran students. Descriptive analyses to assess prevalence of clinical diagnoses and health behaviors were performed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for independent predictors of functional limitations. 204 students participated in the survey (21% response rate). Self-reported depression and unhealthy behaviors were high. Physical and emotional limitations (45% and 35%, respectively), and pain interfering with work (42%) were reported. Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independent association of self-reported depression with functional limitation (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.8, p student veterans at a community college. A partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college can be utilized to help understand the health needs of veteran students. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. The Veterans Choice Act: A Qualitative Examination of Rapid Policy Implementation in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Mengeling, Michelle; Sadler, Anne; Baldor, Rebecca; Bastian, Lori

    2017-07-01

    Congress enacted the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 [Veterans Choice Act (VCA)] to improve access to timely, high-quality health care for Veterans. Although Congress mandated that VCA must begin within 90 days of passage of the legislation, no guidelines were provided in the legislation to ensure that Veterans had access to an adequate number of community providers across different specialties of care or distinct geographic areas, including rural areas of the country. To examine VCA policy implementation across a sampling of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Medical Centers. We conducted a qualitative study of 43 VHA staff and providers by conducting in-person interviews at 5 VA medical centers in the West, South, and Midwest United States. Interview questions focused on perceptions and experiences with VCA and challenges related to implementation for VHA staff and providers. We identified 3 major themes to guide description of choice implementation: (1) VCA implemented too rapidly with inadequate preparation; (2) community provider networks insufficiently developed; and (3) communication and scheduling problems with subcontractors may lead to further delays in care. Our evaluation suggests that VCA was implemented far too rapidly, with little consideration given to the adequacy of community provider networks available to provide care to Veterans. Given the challenges we have highlighted in VCA implementation, it is imperative that the VHA continue to develop care coordination systems that will allow the Veterans to receive seamless care in the community.

  11. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter E; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  12. Perceived Stigma, Discrimination, and Disclosure of Sexual Orientation Among a Sample of Lesbian Veterans Receiving Care in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Sullivan, J Cherry; Bertrand, Christina; Kinney, Rebecca L; Sherman, Michelle D; Gustason, Carolyn

    2015-06-01

    Many lesbian women experience stigma and discrimination from their healthcare providers as a result of their sexual orientation. Additionally, others avoid disclosure of their sexual orientation to their providers for fear of mistreatment. With the increasing number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans seeking care from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), it is important to understand lesbian veterans' experiences with stigma, discrimination, and disclosure of sexual orientation. This article examines lesbian veterans' experiences with perceived stigma and discrimination in VHA healthcare, their perspectives on disclosure of sexual orientation to VHA providers, and their recommendations for improvements in VHA healthcare to create a welcoming environment for lesbian veterans. This is a mixed methods study of twenty lesbian veterans at four VHA facilities. The women veterans participated in a one-hour interview and then completed an anonymous survey. Ten percent of lesbian veterans had experienced mistreatment from VHA staff or providers, but nearly 50% feared that their Veterans Affairs (VA) providers would mistreat them if they knew about their sexual orientation. A majority of lesbian veterans (70%) believed that VHA providers should never ask about sexual orientation or should only ask if the veteran wanted to discuss it. A majority (80%) believed the VHA had taken steps to create a welcoming environment for LBGT veterans. Though many lesbian veterans have fears of stigma and discrimination in the context of VHA care, few have experienced this. Most lesbian veterans believed the VHA was trying to create a welcoming environment for its LGBT veterans. Future research should focus on expanding this study to include a larger and more diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender veterans receiving care at VA facilities across the country.

  13. Recruitment and retention of young adult veteran drinkers using Facebook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eric R Pedersen; Diana Naranjo; Grant N Marshall

    2017-01-01

    ... research can extend its reach to this otherwise hard-to-reach group. We developed a series of Facebook advertisement campaigns to reach veteran drinkers not specifically searching for alcohol treatment...

  14. Delegation of Chinese Advisers And Veterans Visits Vietnam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Vietnam Union of Friendship Organizations (VUFO),Jing Dunquan, vice president of the CPAFFC, led the delegation of Chinese advisers and veterans who had participated in China’s aid mission to help

  15. 75 FR 45035 - National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... and vibrant economy in South Korea, forging a bond between our people that stands strong today. As we... at Panmunjom, let us raise our flags high to honor the service and valor of our veterans, to reflect...

  16. 48 CFR 419.201 - General policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 419.201 General policy. It is the policy of USDA to provide maximum practicable contracting and subcontracting opportunities to small business (SB), small disadvantaged business (SDB), HUBZone small business, women-owned business (WOB), veteran-owned small business (VOSB),......

  17. 48 CFR 833.102 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Protests 833.102 General. Solicitations must instruct interested...: (a) For contracts to be awarded by the Office of Construction and Facilities Management: Director, Office of Construction and Facilities Management, Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue, NW...

  18. Helping Veterans Transition into Academic Life through the Creation of a University Veteran Support Group: So We Can Better Serve Those Who Served Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Wesley M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a significant rise in the number of veterans who are being treated for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and the number of veterans who are completing suicide. In the next couple of years, there will be an increase in the number of veterans who will be attending institutions of higher education; therefore, it is essential that…

  19. Male combat veterans' narratives of PTSD, masculinity, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddick, Nick; Smith, Brett; Phoenix, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    This article uniquely examines the ways a group of male combat veterans talk about masculinity and how, following post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), they performed masculinities in the context of a surfing group, and what effects this had upon their health and wellbeing. Participant observations and life history interviews were conducted with a group of combat veterans who belonged to a surfing charity for veterans experiencing PTSD. Data were rigorously explored via narrative analysis. Our findings revealed the ways in which veterans enacted masculinities in accordance with the values that were cultivated during military service. These masculine performances in the surfing group had important effects both on and for the veterans' wellbeing. Significantly, the study highlights how masculine performances can be seen alternately as a danger and as a resource for health and wellbeing in relation to PTSD. The article advances knowledge on combat veterans and mental health with critical implications for the promotion of male veterans' mental health. These include the original suggestion that health-promoting masculine performances might be recognised and supported in PTSD treatment settings. Rather than automatically viewing masculinity as problematic, this article moves the field forward by highlighting how hegemonic masculinities can be reconstructed in positive ways which might improve veterans' health and wellbeing. A video abstract of this article can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaYzaOP1kAY. © 2015 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A sailor's pain: Veterans' musculoskeletal disorders, chronic pain, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James M; Chiasson, Roland; Loisel, Patrick; Besemann, Lt Col Markus; Pranger, Tina

    2009-11-01

    A few years after leaving the navy, a 50-year-old Veteran* presents to a new family physician with chronic knee and back pain. He is seeking a new physician for opioid and benzodiazepine refills, referrals for ongoing acupuncture and massage therapy, and completion of Veteran Affairs Canada (VAC) disability claim forms for his back. He was medically released at the rank of Petty Officer owing to knee impairment secondary to a fracture sustained aboard ship. He twice strained his back on deployments, but did not develop chronic low back pain until after leaving the Canadian Forces (CF). On release from the CF he completed comprehensive medical, psychosocial, and vocational rehabilitation in the VAC Rehabilitation Program for disability related to his knee impairment. Lately, chronic low back pain prevents him from continuing civilian employment and enjoying life.The physician takes the Veteran's history, performs appropriate physical examination and diagnostic investigations, and obtains previous medical records. The physician diagnoses chronic mechanic allow back pain and knee osteoarthritis, and is concerned about the Veteran's mental health. When the family physician tries to explore the mental health differential diagnosis, the Veteran initially becomes upset,but he responds to motivational interviewing. The physician books follow-up appointments to develop a therapeutic relationship with the Veteran and completes the VAC forms. With consent, the physician also sends a referral letter to the VAC district office, outlining the Veteran's health issues. The client is found to be eligible to re-enter the VAC Rehabilitation Program to manage disability related to his back pain. The Veteran is ultimately able to withdraw from chronic opiate and benzodiazepine medications and optimize his participation in life.

  1. Veteran, Primary Care Provider, and Specialist Satisfaction With Electronic Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Access to specialty care is challenging for veterans in rural locations. To address this challenge, in December 2009, the Veterans Affairs (VA) Pittsburgh Healthcare System (VAPHS) implemented an electronic consultation (e-consult) program to provide primary care providers (PCPs) and patients with enhanced specialty care access. Objective The aim of this quality improvement (QI) project evaluation was to: (1) assess satisfaction with the e-consult process, and (2) identify perceive...

  2. In-Home Exposure Therapy for Veterans with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    and complete the therapy “homework” assigned by the therapists (such as doing feared activities around the house or the neighborhood). We have now...these Veterans because it will help Veterans attend each session and complete the therapy “homework” assigned by the therapists (such as doing feared ...have our study advertised on the TV screens around the VA hospital and community-based outpatient clinics, and that has generated many self-referrals

  3. A Story for All Americans: Vietnam, Victims, and Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Grzyb, Frank L.; Kerry, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Story for All Americans: Vietnam, Victims, and Veterans (formerly titled, Touched by the Dragon) details wartime accounts of average servicemen and women-some heroic, some frightening, some amusing, some nearly unbelievable. The work is a historical compendium of fascinating and compelling stories woven together in a theme format. What makes this book truly unique, however, is its absence of literary pretentiousness. Relating oral accounts, the veterans speak in a no-nonsense, matter-of-fact ...

  4. The Post-Military Earnings of Female Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen L. Mehay; Hirsch, Barry T.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The civilian labor market performance of women veterans is examined, using both traditional data sets and a special survey of reservists that facilitates control for selection by the military and enlistees. Evidence from all data sets indicates that female veterans possess a higher level of measured earnings endowments than do nonveterans. Moreover, evidence from the reservist survey supports the hypothesis that unobserved ability and...

  5. Vascular and Skeletal Muscle Function in Gulf War Veterans Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Page 1 of 14 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0216 TITLE: Vascular and Skeletal Muscle Function in Gulf War Veterans Illness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...30 Jun 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vascular and Skeletal Muscle Function in Gulf War Veterans Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...cholinesterases and acetylcholine, which could affect activity at the neuromuscular junction of skeletal muscle, muscarinic receptors affecting vascular smooth

  6. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Kosovo Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoza Shahini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD at veterans 8 years after war, to find out relation of PTSD with other demographic and health related variables and discover the impact of depression and trauma on PTSD on 687 veterans from six municipalities in Kosovo. Method: Participants were 687 war veterans selected from six regions of Kosovo during 2008. The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ-40, was administered to measure PTSD and Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25 for depression and anxiety. Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. Results: Results indicated that 11.2 % of veterans even 8 years after the war ended were suffering from PTSD. Six percent of veterans with PTSD did not seek medical help. They reported to have had emotional problems and physical problems, but they did not seek medical help. The findings suggest that self-medication may be one way of veterans dealing with PTSD symptoms. Veterans with PTSD symptoms were more concerned with “family issues” than those without PTSD symptoms. Conclusions: The study found that 8 years after the war the veterans of the war in Kosovo suffer PTSD symptoms and that a good number of them do not seek help for this problem. The establishment of adequate services by the state would transform these veterans’ dealing with PTSD not into a moral challenge but into a fundamental right to equal and high-quality services.

  7. Autobiographical memories in testimonies of WWII Veterans with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia Olea Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is a continuation of investigations of personal narratives of healthy older adults and those with aphasia. It focuses on autobiographical memories in testimonies of elderly WWII veterans with dementia, with particular emphasis on emotional events that occurred at the time of their memory peak. This study describes how declines in memory affect changes in language in narratives of memorable experiences at the time in old age when life review is typically experienced. Ten WWII veterans with dementia were selected from a larger study of healthy elderly veterans. Participants were between the ages of 86-91 years old, with the majority obtaining higher education. Based on the Arizona Battery for Communication Disorders of Dementia, participants demonstrated dementia of mild-to-moderate severity. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit memorable war experiences. Modifications to the interview were made, such as the use of photos to set the topic and occasional closed-ended questions to facilitate responses. Information was recorded and analyzed in terms of the amount and specificity of linguistic information, overall coherence of narratives, and the evaluations of memorable war experiences. The participants were not able to produce complete narratives; they instead relayed short episodes of their war experiences. Difficulties with semantic and episodic memory were reflected in the reduced length of their stories. Anomia was inherent in these episodes, as evidenced by the absence of specific names, dates and places. Lack of specificity was exhibited in reduced details and the use of nonspecific referents, such as “thing,” “stuff,” “there.” Participants produced coherent short story episodes. Coherence in episodic structure was maintained by the ability to relate events in a temporal sequence. Repetition was a strategy that served essential functions of emphasizing a point and/or clarifying breakdowns in communication

  8. Older Military Veteran Care: Many Still Believe They Are Forgotten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Cathy; Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Lacy, Darlene

    2017-06-01

    Almost 44% of our nation's 23 million men and women veterans are 65 years of age or older. Most are proud of their service, yet many believe their services for our country were forgotten, especially those in combat between 1950 and 1975. Further information to ultimately assist their holistic well-being will be important for nursing practice as countless older veterans are beginning to obtain more care within civilian facilities. Using the Korean War (1950-1953) as a backdrop to illustrate the interconnectiveness of older veteran physical, emotional, and spiritual concerns that can occur from a military deployment, the major purposes of this article are to provide a brief historical snapshot of that war and discuss prior-era military environmental situations that now are producing the lingering effects from their combat exposure. Relevant literature about the Korean War and Veterans was compiled. Some of these health risks for both the Korean men and women veterans are cold exposure, neurologic, and posttraumatic stress disorder concerns, as well as the need for hepatitis C and suicide assessments. To ultimately improve their bio-psycho-socio-spiritual well-being, prompt identification of the older military veteran, their lingering combat effects, and reminiscing will be important.

  9. New women veterans in the VHA: a longitudinal profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sarah A; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Schmitt, Susan K; Hayes, Patricia M; Herrera, Laura; Frayne, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The number of women veterans using Veterans Health Administration (VHA) services has increased rapidly, but the characteristics of women joining VHA are not well understood. We sought to describe sociodemographic characteristics, utilization, and retention of new and returning women VHA patients over a 7-year period. We identified women veterans who used VHA outpatient services from VHA Enrollment and Utilization files for fiscal years 2003 through 2009. "New" patients in a given year had no outpatient use within the prior 3 years. Patients were "retained" if they continued to use VHA in subsequent years. Of the 287,447 women veteran VHA outpatients in 2009, 40,000 (14%) were new to VHA in that year and over half had joined VHA since 2003. Nearly two thirds of these new patients were younger than 45, and 43% carried a service-connected disability status. Most new patients (88%) received primary care services in 2008, and 40% used mental health services. Repeated use of mental health services (at least three visits per year) nearly doubled among new patients (from 11% in 2003 to 20% in 2008). Among those using VHA primary care in 2006, 68% of new patients versus 91% of returning patients were retained in either of the subsequent 2 years. The influx of new women veterans seeking VHA services in recent years, combined with their high rate of retention within VHA, contribute to the marked increase in numbers of women veterans using VHA. Many require fairly intensive VHA services. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Fen; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Sales, Anne EB

    2005-01-01

    Background The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides a health care safety net to veterans. This study examined changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999 when VHA implemented major organizational changes to improve access of ambulatory care and to provide care to more veterans. Methods The study used two cross-sectional samples of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS), a national representative survey, in 1996 and 1999. The 1996 MEPS survey included 1,944 veterans and the 1999 MEPS survey included 1,974 veterans. There were 534 veterans and 740 veterans who used VHA services in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Results The proportion of veterans using the VHA system increased from 12.4% in 1996 to 14.6% in 1999. In both years, veterans were more likely to use VHA care if they were older, male, less educated, uninsured, unemployed, and in fair or poor health status. Only two variables, marital status and income, were different between the two years. Married veterans were more likely to use VHA care in 1999, but not in 1996. Veterans with higher incomes had greater odds of using VHA care in 1996, but there was no significant association between income and VHA use in 1999. Conclusion Characteristics of VHA users did not fundamentally change despite the reorganization of VHA health care delivery system and changes in eligibility and enrollment policy. The VHA system maintains its safety net mission while attracting more veterans. PMID:15836789

  11. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18-44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty.

  12. Linking Returning Veterans in Rural Community Colleges to Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    behaviors Self-injury4 8.6 8.3 8.6 0.97 0.49-1.92 .920 2.28 0.82-6.31 .113 Suicide ideation5 10.8 19.2 10.6 2.01 1.17-3.46 .011 2.34 1.10-5.02 .028...PHQ-9), generalized anxiety (GAD-7), posttraumatic stress disorder (PC-PTSD), non-lethal self-injury, suicide ideation and acute suicide ideation. The...Lust, K. (2011). Post-traumatic stress disorder and health risk behaviors among Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans attending college. American

  13. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olenick M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maria Olenick,1 Monica Flowers,1 Valerie J Diaz1,21Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Science, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville, United States Navy Nurse Corps, Jacksonville, FL, USAAbstract: United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies

  14. Suicide in Scottish military veterans: a 30-year retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, B P; Mackay, D F; Smith, D J; Pell, J P

    2017-07-01

    Although reassuring data on suicide risk in UK veterans of the 1982 Falklands conflict and 1991 Gulf conflict have been published, there have been few studies on long-term overall suicide risk in UK veterans. To examine the risk of suicide in a broad population-based cohort of veterans in Scotland, irrespect ive of length of service or exposure to conflict, in comparison with people having no record of military service. A retrospective 30-year cohort study of 56205 veterans born 1945-85 and 172741 matched non-veterans, using Cox proportional hazard models to compare the risk of suicide and fatal self-harm overall, by sex, birth cohort, length of service and year of recruitment. There were 267 (0.48%) suicides in the veterans compared with 918 (0.53%) in non-veterans. The difference was not statistically significant overall [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86-1.13]. The incidence was lower in younger veterans and higher in veterans aged over 40. Early service leavers were at non-significantly increased risk (adjusted HR 1.13; 95% CI 0.91-1.40) but only in the older age groups. Women veterans had a significantly higher risk of suicide than non-veteran women (adjusted HR 2.44; 95% CI 1.32-4.51, P < 0.01) and comparable risk to veteran men. Methods of suicide did not differ significantly between veterans and non-veterans, for either sex. The Scottish Veterans Health Study adds to the emerging body of evidence that there is no overall difference in long-term risk of suicide between veterans and non-veterans in the UK. However, female veterans merit further study.

  15. The quality of care delivered to Parkinson's disease patients in the U.S. Pacific Northwest Veterans Health System

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common chronic neurological disorder of the elderly. Despite the fact that a comprehensive review of general health care in the United States showed that the quality of care delivered to patients usually falls below professional standards, there is limited data on the quality of care for patients with PD. Methods Using the administrative database, the Pacific Northwest Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Data Warehouse, a popula...

  16. Adaptation of Lean Six Sigma Methodologies for the Evaluation of Veterans Choice Program at 3 Urban Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sherry L; Stevenson, Lauren D; Ladebue, Amy C; McCreight, Marina S; Lawrence, Emily C; Oestreich, Taryn; Lambert-Kerzner, Anne C

    2017-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is adapting to meet the changing needs of our Veterans. VHA leaders are promoting quality improvement strategies including Lean Six Sigma (LSS). This study used LSS tools to evaluate the Veterans Choice Program (VCP), a program that aims to improve access to health care services for eligible Veterans by expanding health care options to non-VHA providers. LSS was utilized to assess the current process and efficiency patterns of the VCP at 3 VHA Medical Centers. LSS techniques were used to assess data obtained through semistructured interviews with Veterans, staff, and providers to describe and evaluate the VCP process by identifying wastes and defects. The LSS methodology facilitated the process of targeting priorities for improvement and constructing suggestions to close identified gaps and inefficiencies. Identified key process wastes included inefficient exchange of clinical information between stakeholders in and outside of the VHA; poor dissemination of VCP programmatic information; shortages of VCP-participating providers; duplication of appointments; declines in care coordination; and lack of program adaptability to local processes. Recommendations for improvement were formulated using LSS. This evaluation illustrates how LSS can be utilized to assess a nationally mandated health care program. By focusing on stakeholder, staff, and Veteran perspectives, process defects in the VCP were identified and improvement recommendations were made. However, the current LSS language used is not intuitive in health care and similar applications of LSS may consider using new language and goals adapted specifically for health care.

  17. Developing a brief depression screen and identifying associations with comorbid physical and psychological illness in Australian Gulf War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Dean P; Sim, Malcolm R; Clarke, David M; Forbes, Andrew B; Ikin, Jillian F; Kelsall, Helen L

    2015-12-01

    Major depression occurs frequently in veterans, and is associated with comorbid psychological and physical disorders and poorer quality of life. Depression can be difficult to detect in primary care, while lengthy assessment instruments can deter use. Our study aimed to develop a brief depression screen that could be used by veterans and caregivers, and then to compare the association between the brief screen and comorbidities and quality of life with that of a longer instrument. Our dataset comprised 1204 male Royal Australian Navy veterans of the 1990/91 Gulf War. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), health-related quality of life by the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12), major depression and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses such as posttraumatic disorder (PTSD) using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) criteria. Comorbid physical illnesses including musculoskeletal disorders, chronic fatigue and diabetes were examined. A brief depression screen of three key self-reported symptoms was identified. Veterans with major depression present according to the screen were over four times more likely to have multisymptom illness or PTSD, and almost twice as likely to have musculoskeletal disorders. Having depression according to the brief screen and having at least one other physical or psychological condition was associated with poorer quality of life. Similar results were obtained for a longer screen based on all GHQ-12 items. A 3 item depression screen performed as well as a 12 item one in identifying major depression, comorbid physical and psychological illness and poorer quality of life in veterans. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  19. Changes in Suicide Mortality for Veterans and Nonveterans by Gender and History of VHA Service Use, 2000–2010

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffmire, Claire A; Kemp, Janet E; Bossarte, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    ... less is known regarding differences by history of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) service use. This study directly compared veteran and nonveteran suicide risk while for the first time differentiating veterans by VHA service...

  20. 76 FR 11935 - Death of Army Corporal Frank W. Buckles, the Last Surviving American Veteran of World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Surviving American Veteran of World War I By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As... veteran of World War I, and in remembrance of the generation of American veterans of World War I, I hereby...

  1. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  2. Ensuring Appropriate Care for LGBT Veterans in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Virginia Ashby; Uchendu, Uchenna S

    2014-09-01

    Within health care systems, negative perceptions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons have often translated into denial of services, denial of visitation rights to same-sex partners, reluctance on the part of LGBT patients to share personal information, and failure of workers to assess and recognize the unique health care needs of these patients. Other bureaucratic forms of exclusion have included documents, forms, and policies that fail to acknowledge a patient's valued relationships because of, for example, a narrow definition of "spouse," "parent," or "family." Bureaucratic exclusion has taken a particularly prominent form in the U.S. military. Until its repeal and termination in 2011, the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy had for eighteen years barred openly gay men and lesbians from serving in the military. Among the effects of DADT is a dearth of information about the number and needs of LGBT service members who transition to the Veterans Health Administration for health care at the end of their military service. The long-standing social stigma against LGBT persons, the silence mandated by DADT, and the often unrecognized bias built into the fabric of bureaucratic systems make the task of creating a welcoming culture in the VHA urgent and challenging. The VHA has accepted a commitment to that task. Its Strategic Plan for fiscal years 2013 through 2018 stipulates that "[v]eterans will receive timely, high quality, personalized, safe, effective and equitable health care irrespective of geography, gender, race, age, culture or sexual orientation." To achieve this goal, the VHA undertook a number of coordinated initiatives to create an environment and culture that is informed, welcoming, positive, and empowering for the LGBT veterans and families whom the agency serves.

  3. Does a Fitness Factor Contribute to the Association between Intelligence and Health Outcomes? Evidence from Medical Abnormality Counts among 3654 US Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Rosalind; Gottfredson, Linda S.; Miller, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    We suggest that an over-arching "fitness factor" (an index of general genetic quality that predicts survival and reproductive success) partially explains the observed associations between health outcomes and intelligence. As a proof of concept, we tested this idea in a sample of 3654 US Vietnam veterans aged 31-49 who completed five cognitive…

  4. Marital Relationship and Its Associated Factors in Veterans Exposed to High Dose Chemical Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the associates of marital relationship in mustard exposed veterans.Materials and Methods: Two hundred ninety two married Iranian mustard exposed veterans, who had been exposed to single high dose mustard gas in Iraq-Iran war, were assessed for marital adjustment with Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS. Census sampling was done. The patients' quality of life (SF-36, spirometric measures and war related data were also extracted.Results: A total of 189 subjects (65% completed our study. The mean (±SD of the RDAS Total score, RDAS Dyadic Consensus , RDAS Affectional Expression, RDAS Dyadic Satisfaction , and RDAS Dyadic Cohesion were 50.61 (8.16, 16.67 (2.77, 7.62 (1.84, 14.76 (3.39, and 11.54 (3.79, respectively. RDAS Dyadic satisfaction was correlated with SF-36 and all its sub-scores (p<0.05. RDAS total score showed significant correlation with SF-36 total score and most of its sub-scores (p<0.05. RDAS affective expression was significantly correlated with role limitation, social function, general mental health, vitality, General health perceptions, physical composite score (PCS and mental composite score (MCS (p<0.05. RDAS dyadic consensus was not correlated with any SF-36 sub-scores.Conclusion: Veterans health team including physicians, psychologists and/or psychiatrists should know that poorer marital satisfaction is linked with lower quality of life scores, late after mustard exposure, although marital relationship is independent of spirometric findings, age, duration from exposure and comorbidity score.

  5. Management of Bacteriuria in Veterans Affairs Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Emily S; Burk, Muriel; Zhang, Rongping; Jones, Makoto M; Neuhauser, Melinda M; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Cunningham, Francesca E

    2017-09-15

    Bacteriuria contributes to antibiotic overuse through treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and long durations of therapy for symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs), yet large-scale evaluations of bacteriuria management among inpatients are lacking. Inpatients with bacteriuria were classified as asymptomatic or symptomatic based on established criteria applied to data collected by manual chart review. We examined frequency of treatment of ASB, factors associated with treatment of ASB, durations of therapy, and frequency of complications including Clostridium difficile infection, readmission, and all-cause mortality within 28 days of discharge. Among 2225 episodes of bacteriuria, 64% were classified as ASB. After excluding patients with non-UTI indications for antibiotics, 72% of patients with ASB received antibiotics. When evaluating only patients not meeting SIRS criteria, 68% of patients with ASB received antibiotics. The mean (±SD) days of antibiotic therapy for ASB, cystitis, CA-UTI and pyelonephritis were 10.0 (4.5), 11.4 (4.7), 12.0 (6.1), and 13.6 (5.3), respectively. In sum, 14% of patients with ASB were treated for greater than 14 days, and fluoroquinolones were the most commonly used empiric antibiotic for ASB [245/691 (35%)]. Complications were rare but more common among patients with ASB treated with antibiotics. The majority of bacteriuria among inpatient veterans is due to ASB with high rates of treatment of ASB and prolonged durations of therapy for ASB and symptomatic UTIs.

  6. Venture capitalism at the Veterans Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, G H

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the implementation of a venture capitalism program in a 519-bed Veterans Administration tertiary care medical center. Venture capitalism at the VA West Side Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois is realized through a pool of capital within the budget, for the trial implementation of various ideas and programs that demonstrate a potential to reduce costs or increase revenues. Through this adaptation of venture capitalism, the principles of entrepreneurship can be applied. Employees submit a proposal to management that describes what they wish to accomplish. The proposal includes the time schedule required for implementation and how much capital will be needed to make the proposal operational. If the proposal is successful and becomes self-sufficient, the original venture capital is returned to the pool and used for other ventures. If the proposal does not meet expectations, support is withdrawn and the remaining capital is returned to the venture capital pool. In conclusion, several successful ventures are described to demonstrate the practicality of using the concepts of entrepreneurship and venture capitalism within the budget constraints of the federal government.

  7. Arthritis, comorbidities, and care utilization in veterans of operations enduring and Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jessica C; Amuan, Megan E; Morris, Ruth M; Johnson, Anthony E; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2017-03-01

    Veteran populations are known to have frequencies of arthritis higher than civilian populations. The aim of this study is to define the prevalence of arthritis among a cohort of veterans from ongoing U.S. military operations. A retrospective cohort study using Veterans Administration data sources for service connected disability, comorbidities, clinic utilization, and pharmacy utilization was conducted including veterans who deployed in service to operations in Afghanistan or Iraq, comparing veterans with a diagnosis of arthritis, arthritis plus back pain, and veterans with no pain diagnoses. The frequency of arthritis was 11.8%. Veterans with arthritis and arthritis plus back pain had greater frequencies of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity compare to veterans with no pain diagnosis. Veterans with arthritis plus back pain had the highest pain clinic utilization and prescription use of opioids and anti-inflammatories. Veterans with no pain diagnosis had higher frequencies of diagnosis and clinic utilization for mental health disorders. Arthritis is prevalent among the latest generation of combat veterans and is associated with diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular comorbidities. The need for arthritis care and associated comorbidities is expected to increase as the Veterans Administration and the civilian health care sector assumes care of these veterans. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:682-687, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Role of Combat Exposure and Insomnia in Student Veterans' Adaptation to College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, James J; Riggs, Shelley A; Taylor, Daniel J

    2017-08-04

    Since 2002, the number of college student veterans has nearly doubled, although 30-40% of veterans fail to complete their degree. Few research efforts to understand the challenges veterans face transitioning to college in recent years have looked beyond the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder. Insomnia is the most frequently reported symptom of combat veterans and can have serious implications for college students. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of insomnia in student veteran adaptation to college relative to civilian students. College students (N = 588), including 154 veterans, participated in a large online study examining the psychological, relational, and academic functioning of college students. Approximately 61% of the veteran subsample reported combat exposure. Students were administered a Background Information Questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, and the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis of covariance and regression to test for direct and indirect effects. Student veterans reported better academic and personal-emotional adaptation than civilian students, while civilians reported better social adjustment than veterans. However, follow-up analyses revealed that these effects might be explained by group differences in gender, income, and marital status. Although combat veterans without insomnia had better academic adjustment than noncombat veterans and civilian students, insomnia seemed to have a greater negative effect on combat veterans' academic adjustment relative to civilian students. Furthermore, insomnia mediated the relationship between combat exposure and veterans' personal-emotional adjustment to college.

  9. Randomized controlled trial of acceptance and commitment therapy for distress and impairment in OEF/OIF/OND veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ariel J; Schnurr, Paula P; Jain, Sonia; He, Feng; Walser, Robyn D; Bolton, Elisa; Benedek, David M; Norman, Sonya B; Sylvers, Patrick; Flashman, Laura; Strauss, Jennifer; Raman, Rema; Chard, Kathleen M

    2017-08-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a widely utilized psychotherapeutic approach, but randomized, controlled studies are lacking in veterans. This study evaluated the efficacy of ACT for emotional distress among veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. One hundred sixty veterans (80% male, Mage = 34 years) with anxiety or depressive disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) were randomized to ACT or present-centered therapy (PCT) and assessed before, during, and after treatment and during 3- to 12-month follow-up. The primary outcome was general distress as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 Global Severity Index. Additional outcomes included symptomatology, disability, quality of life, acceptability, and satisfaction. There was improvement following treatment in the whole sample across a variety of measures, including general distress (d = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI: 0.52, 0.96]) and functioning (d = 0.71, 95% CI [0.50, 0.93]) and moderate to high levels of satisfaction with treatment. Response to the 2 interventions did not differ on the primary outcome or most secondary outcomes, although ACT led to greater improvement in insomnia than did PCT (ds = 0.63 and 0.08, respectively). Treatment dropout did not differ by condition but was high (41.9%). ACT's efficacy in this group was modest and generally did not differ from that for PCT. Additional work is needed to understand the reasons that ACT did not perform as well as predicted in this veteran sample. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Coping, family social support, and psychological symptoms among student veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Daniel H; Riggs, Shelley A; Ruggero, Camilo

    2015-04-01

    With rising numbers of student veterans on today's college campuses, multicultural competence in college counseling centers increasingly includes an understanding of military culture and its relation to the psychological health and functioning of student veterans. Research on interpersonal and intrapersonal factors associated with college student veterans' mental health is scarce. The current study examines the contributions of coping style and family social support on symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress in a student veteran sample. We also tested the moderating role of family social support in the relationship between coping style and psychological symptoms. Data from 136 student veterans were analyzed by using path analysis. Results revealed that avoidant coping and family social support significantly predicted depressive and anxiety symptoms. Avoidant coping also significantly predicted posttraumatic stress symptoms. In addition, findings indicated that family social support moderated the relationship between problem-focused coping and depression, as well as between avoidant coping and symptoms of anxiety and depression but not posttraumatic stress. Implications of results for college and university counselors are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Sex differences between Veterans participating in interdisciplinary chronic pain rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Murphy, PhD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The improved management of pain among the growing number of female Veterans receiving care through the Veterans Health Administration has been established as a priority, but studies suggest that females may respond differently to pain treatment. This study explored differences between female and male Veterans engaged in a Chronic Pain Rehabilitation Program and determined how female and male Veterans change following participation. Veterans (N = 324 in a 3 wk inpatient program completed self-report measures at admission, discharge, and 3 mo follow-up. Participants were 21% female (n = 67 and 79% male (n = 257. Compared with males, females were younger and less likely to be white or married/partnered. Females reported shorter pain duration and were more likely to have primary head or limb pain. At admission, fewer females were prescribed opioids than males and at lower doses. After opioid cessation in the program, however, there were no significant differences in use between the sexes at follow-up. Improvements in a range of domains were sustained at follow-up for both sexes, but females did not maintain gains in pain intensity or sleep while males reported more pain-related fear at discharge and follow-up. This study adds to the literature on sex-specific variations in chronic pain and implications for treatment.

  12. 77 FR 69549 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans.... This notice solicits comments on the Veteran experience in taking the Compensation and Pension... on the collection of information through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at...

  13. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 45 - State Directors of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., App. D Appendix D to Part 45—State Directors of Veterans Affairs Alabama Director, Department of..., Trenton, NJ 08608. New Mexico Director, Veterans Service Commission, P.O. Box 2324, Santa Fe, NM 87503...

  14. 76 FR 24570 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-Change of Address Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address Statement... Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of... information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address Statement, VA Form...

  15. 76 FR 70470 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Evaluation of the Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... of strategies to prevent veterans from becoming homeless'' (Senate Report No. 110-418). The Senate... which VHPD services and activities meet the needs of veterans experiencing a housing crisis and...

  16. Increasing physical activity for veterans in the Mental Health Intensive Case Management Program: A community-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, S Akeya; Libet, Julian; Pope, Charlene; Lauerer, Joy A; Johnson, Emily; Edlund, Barbara J

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), experience increased mortality-20 years greater disparity for men and 15 years greater disparity for women-compared to the general population (Thornicroft G. Physical health disparities and mental illness: The scandal of premature mortality. Br J Psychiatr. 2011;199:441-442). Numerous factors contribute to premature mortality in persons with SMI, including suicide and accidental death (Richardson RC, Faulkner G, McDevitt J, Skrinar GS, Hutchinson D, Piette JD. Integrating physical activity into mental health services for persons with serious mental illness. Psychiatr Serv. 2005;56(3):324-331; Thornicroft G. Physical health disparities and mental illness: The scandal of premature mortality. Br J Psychiatr. 2011;199:441-442), but research has shown that adverse health behaviors-including smoking, low rate of physical activity, poor diet, and high alcohol consumption-also significantly contribute to premature deaths (Jones J. Life expectancy in mental illness. Psychiatry Services. 2010. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07/13/life-expectancy-in-mental-illness). This quality improvement (QI) project sought to improve health and wellness for veterans in the Mental Health Intensive Case Management Program (MHICM), which is a community-based intensive program for veterans with SMI at risk for decompensation and frequent hospitalizations. At the time of this QI project, the program had 69 veterans who were assessed and treated weekly in their homes. The project introduced a pedometer steps intervention adapted from the VA MOVE! Program-a physical activity and weight management program-with the addition of personalized assistance from trained mental health professionals in the veteran's home environment. Because a large percentage of the veterans in the MHICM program had high blood pressure and increased weight, these outcomes were the focus of this project. Through mental health case management involvement and

  17. Sexual Self-Esteem and Psychosocial Functioning in Military Veterans After Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Syme, Maggie L.; Delaney, Eileen; Moye, Jennifer; Gosian, Jeffrey; Wachen, Jennifer Schuster

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the sexual well-being of male Veteran cancer survivors, or the relationship of sexual concerns to psychosocial adaptation postcancer. This study examined the association between sexual self-esteem and psychosocial concerns in male Veteran cancer survivors. Forty-one male survivors were recruited from a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital to participate in a pilot study addressing cancer survivorship care for Veterans. Sixty- to 90-minute interviews were conducted, assessing s...

  18. Accessing Skills: Assisting Military Veteran Students in the Traditional Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Through Post-911 GI Bill benefits, military veterans are flooding college admissions offices and writing classes at rates not seen since the World War II era. According to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, over 1 million veterans attended colleges and universities between 2009 and 2013; and 53.6 percent of veteran students using benefits applied them toward completing undergraduate work at a college or vocational/technical school (“Annual Benefits Report,” 2011). Clearly, many...

  19. Do medical house officers value the health of veterans differently from the health of non-veterans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckhaupt Sara

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little information is available regarding medical residents' perceptions of patients' health-related quality of life. Patients cared for by residents have been shown to receive differing patterns of care at Veterans Affairs facilities than at community or university settings. We therefore examined: 1 how resident physicians value the health of patients; 2 whether values differ if the patient is described as a veteran; and 3 whether residency-associated variables impact values. Methods All medicine residents in a teaching hospital were asked to watch a digital video of an actor depicting a 72-year-old patient with mild-moderate congestive heart failure. Residents were randomized to 2 groups: in one group, the patient was described as a veteran of the Korean War, and in the other, he was referred to only as a male. The respondents assessed the patient's health state using 4 measures: rating scale (RS, time tradeoff (TTO, standard gamble (SG, and willingness to pay (WTP. We also ascertained residents' demographics, risk attitudes, residency program type, post-graduate year level, current rotation, experience in a Veterans Affairs hospital, and how many days it had been since they were last on call. We performed univariate and multivariable analyses using the RS, TTO, SG and WTP as dependent variables. Results Eighty-one residents (89.0% of eligible participated, with 36 (44.4% viewing the video of the veteran and 45 (55.6% viewing the video of the non-veteran. Their mean (SD age was 28.7 (3.1 years; 51.3% were female; and 67.5% were white. There were no differences in residents' characteristics or in RS, TTO, SG and WTP scores between the veteran and non-veteran groups. The mean RS score was 0.60 (0.14; the mean TTO score was 0.80 (0.20; the mean SG score was 0.91 (0.10; and the median (25th, 75th percentile WTP was $10,000 ($7600, $20,000 per year. In multivariable analyses, being a resident in the categorical program was

  20. Physical activity in postdeployment Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine R. Buis, PhD

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Veteran activity levels may decrease between Active Duty and postdeployment. We examined attitudes and changes in self-reported activities between the two in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA services. We conducted an online cross-sectional survey (June-August 2008 of postdeployment OIF/OEF veterans registered with the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Descriptive statistics summarized demographic data and attitudes, while regression analyses compared physical activities during Active Duty with physical activities postdeployment. Participants (n = 319, 15.6% response rate reported that they believe staying physically fit is important, they worry about gaining weight, and they believe exercise will keep them healthy (77%, 72%, and 90% agree or strongly agree, respectively. Running (30.0%, Exercise with Gym Equipment (21.5%, Occupational Activities (14.9%, and Walking (13.0% were the most frequently reported Active Duty physical activities. The most frequently reported postdeployment physical activities included Walking (21.1%, Running (18.5%, and Exercise with Gym Equipment (17.9%. Health problems (39% and chronic pain (52% were common barriers to physical activity. Postdeployment OIF/OEF veterans using the VA believe physical activity is beneficial, yet many report health problems and/or chronic pain that makes exercise difficult. Physical activity promotes health, and strategies are needed to facilitate physical activity in this population.

  1. Understanding the student veterans' college experience: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Timothy; Badger, Karen; McCuddy, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Students with active duty military experience are a unique and growing population on college campuses in the United States. This study explores student veterans' perceptions of their transition to and experience in higher education. This mixed methods study used a sample of 10 active military and reserve component student veterans to explore their perceptions of their personal strengths, challenges, factors impacting participation in university resource programs, and suggestions for ideal resources to support their academic success. Content analysis yielded primary themes such as the strength of self-discipline, the challenge of social interactions, and the desire for programs that connect student-veterans and assist with social integration. Implications for education, retention, and transition from active duty are discussed.

  2. An examination of family adjustment among Operation Desert Storm veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Casey T; Schumm, Jeremiah A; Panuzio, Jillian; Proctor, Susan P

    2008-08-01

    This study examined interrelationships among combat exposure, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and family adjustment in a sample of male and female Operation Desert Storm veterans (N = 1,512). In structural equation models for both male and female veterans, higher combat exposure was associated with higher PTSD symptoms, which in turn were associated with poorer family adjustment, although these indirect effects did not reach statistical significance. The model for female veterans evidenced a significant direct negative association between combat exposure and family adjustment when it statistically accounted for PTSD symptoms. When the relative impacts of separate PTSD symptom groupings were examined, those reflecting withdrawal/numbing symptoms and arousal/lack of control symptoms significantly and indirectly accounted for the negative effects of combat exposure on family adjustment. Study findings indicate a number of possible pathways through which war-zone deployments negatively impact military families and suggest several avenues for future research. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Veterans' Perspectives on Interventions to Improve Retention in HIV Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie G Minick

    Full Text Available Poor retention in HIV medical care is associated with increased mortality among patients with HIV/AIDS. Developing new interventions to improve retention in HIV primary care is needed. The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA is the largest single provider of HIV care in the US. We sought to understand what veterans would want in an intervention to improve retention in VA HIV care. We conducted 18 one-on-one interviews and 15 outpatient focus groups with 46 patients living with HIV infection from the Michael E. DeBakey VAMC (MEDVAMC. Analysis identified three focus areas for improving retention in care: developing an HIV friendly clinic environment, providing mental health and substance use treatment concurrent with HIV care and encouraging peer support from other Veterans with HIV.

  4. Update on TBI and Cognitive Impairment in Military Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in military life. Interest in military TBI has increased recently due to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Certain types of TBI are relatively unique to the military, the most prominent being blast-related TBI. Blast-related mild TBI has been of particular concern in veterans from the most recent conflicts although controversy remains concerning its separation from post-traumatic stress disorder. TBI is also a risk factor for the later development of neurodegenerative diseases in which cognitive impairment is prominent putting veterans at risk for disorders including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Recent evidence associating TBI with chronic cognitive impairment is reviewed in the context of its relevance to military veterans.

  5. Comfort Theory: Unraveling the Complexities of Veterans' Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudiab, Lina Daou; Kolcaba, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    The health care needs of veterans, especially those who have served in combat zones and their families are complicated, challenging, and interrelated. Physical limitations impact mental health, and mental health problems affect every aspect of adjustment to civilian life. Comfort theory offers a simple and holistic pattern for identifying needs, creating interventions to meet those needs, and evaluating the effects of those interventions. The aim of this article is to demonstrate how comfort theory has been applied throughout 1 Veterans Administration System to fulfill the goal of providing quality veteran-centric care. The application of comfort theory to daily patient and family care, discharge planning, and follow-up in various settings, as well as ways to enhance institutional integrity and branding are discussed.

  6. 77 FR 76170 - Presumption of Exposure to Herbicides for Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Not Supported

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., 7, 8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD). Numerous adverse health effects in veterans who served in... Brown Water Navy Veterans had qualitatively more pathways of exposure to Agent Orange-associated TCDD... to Agent Orange-associated TCDD and, therefore, that exposure of Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans...

  7. 78 FR 77204 - Proposed Information Collection (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys... ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys)'' in any... National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW (VA...

  8. 76 FR 40451 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-Change of Address Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-- Change of Address Statement.... 2900-0503.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address... continued ownership of property issued under Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance when an address change for...

  9. 78 FR 58264 - Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life Insurance Information Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 9 RIN 2900-AO42 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life... Insurance (SGLI), Family SGLI, SGLI Traumatic Injury Protection, and Veterans' Group Life Insurance (all...-AO42 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life Insurance Information...

  10. 75 FR 68038 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control... complete VA Form 29-8636 to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) or to provide information...

  11. 76 FR 40455 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review... INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry, VA Form 29-0543. OMB Control Number: 2900-0501... insured under Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) completes VA Form 29-0543 to report any...

  12. 75 FR 68040 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written...: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control Number: 2900-0212. Type of...

  13. 75 FR 52065 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written...: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control Number: 2900-0212. Type of...

  14. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0811 TITLE: Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Members and Veterans with SCI PRINCIPAL...criteria to include all veterans as well as civilians. 8 Products DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PAPER Long-term community reintegration ...2014 Presentation on rehabilitation outcomes and community reintegration experiences of servicemembers and veterans with extremity amputation or

  15. Unruly Bodies: The Rhetorical Domestication of Twenty-First-Century Veterans of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achter, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Veterans of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq with visually identifiable injuries possess "unruly" bodies that render the story of war in efficient, emotional terms. The injured veteran's explicit connection of war with injury motivates state and mainstream news discourse that domesticates veterans' bodies, managing representations of injured veterans…

  16. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  17. 78 FR 50145 - Advisory Committee on Women Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Freedom House, patient aligned care teams, and the Women's Health Center of Excellence. On August 21, the... Veterans with respect to health care, rehabilitation, compensation, outreach, and other programs and... Veteran Program, the Women Veterans Health Committee, the Women's Health Collaborative Workgroup,...

  18. 75 FR 26683 - Hospital and Outpatient Care for Veterans Released From Incarceration to Transitional Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ...-26685] [FR Doc No: 2010-11177] DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN41 Hospital and... its regulations to authorize VA to provide hospital and outpatient care to a veteran in a program that... 2900-AN41 Hospital and Outpatient Care for Veterans Released from Incarceration to Transitional...

  19. The Disappeared Ones: Female Student Veterans at a Four-Year College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzman, Amy Claire; Somers, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the military draft in 1973, women have entered military service in greater numbers: Women currently account for 16 percent of active-duty service personnel; by 2035, they will account for 15 percent of the total veteran population (National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics 2011). The profile of female veterans differs…

  20. Online Training for Working with Student Veterans: A Social Work Elective Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Wright, Micah C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one school of social work's innovative online elective course to prepare Masters of Social Work (MSW) students for practice with the military, veterans and their families. Developed as part of a university-wide Veterans Initiative, this online course keeps the focus on the student veteran and uses the best practices of…

  1. Considering Student Veterans on the Twenty-First-Century College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchi, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The new GI Bill offers the best educational benefits for veterans in the history of the nation. While many campus officials believe a surge of student veterans is under way, 2012 is the first year of college eligibility for veterans who enlisted specifically for the Post 9-11 GI Bill benefits signed into law in the summer of 2008. Further, the…

  2. 78 FR 36309 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... diagnosing and treating Gulf War Veterans, and a drug treatment trial which is underway. On June 18, the... AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting The Department of... Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on June 17 and 18, 2013, in room...

  3. A Longitudinal Analysis of Rural and Urban Veterans' Health-Related Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Amy E.; Lee, Richard; MacKenzie, Todd A.; West, Alan N.; Wright, Steven; Booth, Brenda M.; Hawthorne, Kara; Weeks, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Cross-sectional studies have identified rural-urban disparities in veterans' health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) scores. Purpose: To determine whether longitudinal analyses confirmed that these disparities in veterans' HRQOL scores persisted. Methods: We obtained data from the SF-12 portion of the veterans health administration's…

  4. 75 FR 8789 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural... Carnegie Hotel, 1216 West State of Franklin Road, Johnson City, Tennessee. The sessions will begin at 8...

  5. 77 FR 58913 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee will hold a meeting on October 25-26, 2012, at the Waterfront Place Hotel,...

  6. 76 FR 60965 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural... Hotel, 363 Maine Mall Road, Portland, ME. The sessions will begin at 8 a.m. each day and adjourn at 4...

  7. The Comorbidity of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Suicidality in Vietnam Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Teresa L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assessed 232 Vietnam veterans for suicidal thinking and behaviors and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Findings support notion that suicidal thoughts are prevalent in this group, with veterans in psychotherapy reporting greater likelihood of such symptoms than veterans in community or those seeking assistance through…

  8. Military Veterans Bring Many Positives--and Some Needs--into Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Janis Newby; Gordon, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Public schools have hired over 17,000 veterans who have participated in Troops to Teachers (TTT), a federal program designed to assist those leaving careers in the military to transition into teacher careers. Despite some educators' bias against former service members, the advantages of hiring veterans as teachers are manifold. Veterans typically…

  9. 20 CFR 404.1360 - Veterans Administration pension or compensation payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterans Administration pension or... Veterans Administration pension or compensation payable. (a) Before we determine and certify payment. If we are informed by the Veterans Administration that a pension or compensation is payable to you before we...

  10. 48 CFR 852.203-71 - Display of Department of Veterans Affairs hotline poster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Veterans Affairs hotline poster. 852.203-71 Section 852.203-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 852.203-71 Display of Department of Veterans Affairs hotline poster. As prescribed in 803.7001, insert the following clause: Display of Department of Veterans Affairs Hotline Poster...

  11. 38 CFR 21.402 - Responsibilities of the Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities of the Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation. 21.402 Section 21.402 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans..., United States Code. (b) Submission of an annual report. The committee shall: (1) Submit to the...

  12. 76 FR 15055 - Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... updates on the roles of the advisory committee, ethics, ] Center for Minority Veterans, Office of Policy... Administration. In the morning on April 6, the Committee will have a panel discussion with Center for Women... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs...

  13. 76 FR 78569 - Medical Benefits for Newborn Children of Certain Woman Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO05 Medical Benefits for Newborn Children of Certain Woman Veterans... to provide certain health care services to a newborn child of a woman veteran who is receiving... woman veteran who is receiving maternity care furnished by for not more than seven days after the...

  14. Veterans Health Administration: Management Attention Is Needed to Address Systemic, Long standing Human Capital Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    required by the Choice Act: the Independent Assessment of the Health Care Delivery Systems and Management Processes of the Department of Veterans...VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Management Attention Is Needed to Address Systemic, Long-standing Human Capital...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-17-30, a report to congressional requesters December 2016 VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

  15. Department of Veterans Affairs' Implementation of Information Security Education Assistance Program. GAO-10-170R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilshusen, Gregory C.; Melvin, Valerie C.

    2009-01-01

    The Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006 authorizes the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to establish an educational assistance program for information security. The Information Security Education Assistance Program is envisioned as a means for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to attract and retain individuals…

  16. Case-control study: posttraumatic stress disorder and habits of war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalihić, Amra; Skobić, Helena; Pejanović-Skobić, Natasa

    2008-03-01

    To correlate habits (abuse of tobacco, alcohol, psychoactive substances and drugs) of war veterans and the frequency of symptoms in persons with PTSD and those without it. We have carried out a prospective research (case-control study) over the period between September of 2005 and June 2006. The sample consisted of two groups of examinees: 60 males, war veterans with PTSD and 60 males, war veterans without PTSD. The group of war veterans without PTSD was formed using matching criteria (same age, level of education). Both groups included married males. Research was performed using a questionnaire designed for this study. A higher number of war veterans without PTSD were employed compared to war veterans with PTSD (chi2=45.753; df=4; pwar veterans with PTSD used psychoactive substances during the war period compared to war veterans without PTSD (18.3% vs. 3.3%). We have observed that 85% of examinees with PTSD have used anxiolitic drugs in the period of research, compared to only 5% of those without PTSD (chi2=77.576; df=1; Pwar veterans without PTSD had employment in comparison to the group of war veterans with PTSD. A higher number of war veterans with PTSD had some form of sleeping disorder, used psychoactive substances and anxiolitic drugs during the war period, and had alcohol abuse in comparison to the group of war veterans without PTSD.

  17. Using a Cognitive Information Processing Approach to Group Career Counseling with Visually Impaired Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lauren K.

    2014-01-01

    Unemployment continues to be a growing concern among both civilian and veteran populations. As 14% of the veteran population currently identify as disabled because of service, this population's need for specialized vocational rehabilitation is increasing. Specifically in Veterans Affairs (VA) Blind Rehabilitation Centers (BRC) where holistic…

  18. Personality and neuroimaging measures differentiate PTSD from mTBI in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Nicholas D; Lim, Kelvin O; Sponheim, Scott R

    2015-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common among recent veterans and often is associated with chronic post-concussive symptoms (PCS). Elevated PCS may also be a consequence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which shares symptoms with PCS. Identification of personality, biological, and psychopathology factors that contribute to the relationship between mTBI and PCS could help isolate the sources of chronic post concussive syndrome in veterans. Clinician rated diagnoses (PTSD, Major Depression, Alcohol Dependence), personality characteristics (Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire [MPQ] subscales), white matter brain imaging measures (Mean Diffusivity, Generalized Fractional Anisotropy), and diagnoses of mTBI were collected from 125 American military veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan. Linear and logistic regression models were tested to determine contributions to PCS and whether there were similar contributors to PTSD and mTBI. PCS score was associated with personality characteristics of high Stress Reaction and Traditionalism and low Control as well as mTBI. A diagnosis of PTSD was associated with low Social Closeness, PCS, Alcohol Dependence, and abnormal white matter mean diffusivity. Diagnosis of mTBI was associated with fewer white matter mean diffusivity abnormalities, PCS, and number of deployments. As commonly observed clinically, both PTSD and mTBI were associated with higher rates of PCS, though the contribution of PTSD appears to be secondary to personality traits, particularly Stress Reaction. Furthermore, the observation of factors that are uniquely associated with Blast mTBI (number of deployments) or with PTSD (Lifetime Alcohol Dependence and low Social Closeness), as well as a factor (region of abnormal MD) that had opposite effects on the likelihood of each diagnosis, indicates that the complex relationships between personality, psychopathology, and nature of mTBI need to be considered when interpreting chronic post-concussive symptoms.

  19. Disabled Veteran Leave and Other Miscellaneous Changes. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-05

    The Office of Personnel Management is issuing final regulations to implement the Wounded Warriors Federal Leave Act of 2015, which establishes a separate new leave category, to be known as "disabled veteran leave," available during a 12-month period beginning on the first day of employment to be used by an employee who is a veteran with a service-connected disability rated at 30 percent or more for purposes of undergoing medical treatment for such disability. We are also rescinding two obsolete leave-related regulations.

  20. Variations in Health Communication Needs Among Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Aaron I.; Lincoln, Andrew E.; Curbow, Barbara; Kang, Han K.

    2004-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study of US military combat veterans, we assessed the helpfulness of different media for providing health risk communication messages. We have provided preliminary results from a postal survey of 5000 veterans sampled because of their deployment to Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, or Bosnia–Kosovo. Respondents endorsed the primary care provider as the most helpful source of health information. Access to the Internet and use of this medium for seeking health information differed by race, age, and cohort. PMID:15569954

  1. Mindfulness meditation for veterans---implications for occupational health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Norma G

    2008-08-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MfM) is a mind-body therapy identified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Initially taught in a formal classroom setting, MfM is a sustainable intervention with minimal costs that can be used over time. For veterans, after mastery, this technique shows promise in improving health outcomes and quality of life. This article describes MfM, discusses the conceptual framework and evidence-based research for MfM, and identifies the implications of MfM use by health care providers who are caring for war veterans.

  2. The Association Between Primary Source of Healthcare Coverage and Colorectal Cancer Screening Among US Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Folasade P; Yano, Elizabeth M; Provenzale, Dawn; Neil Steers, W; Washington, Donna L

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a deadly but largely preventable disease. Screening improves outcomes, but screening rates vary across healthcare coverage models. In the Veterans Health Administration (VA), screening rates are high; however, it is unknown how CRC screening rates compare for Veterans with other types of healthcare coverage. To determine whether Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage (VA, military, TRICARE) have higher rates of CRC screening than Veterans with alternate sources of healthcare coverage. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of Veterans 50-75 years from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. We examined CRC screening rates and screening modalities. We performed multivariable logistic regression to identify the role of coverage type, demographics, and clinical factors on screening status. The cohort included 22,138 Veterans. Of these, 76.7% reported up-to-date screening. Colonoscopy was the most common screening modality (83.7%). Screening rates were highest among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage (82.3%), as was stool-based screening (10.8%). The adjusted odds of up-to-date screening among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage were 83% higher than among Veterans with private coverage (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.52-2.22). Additional predictors of screening included older age, black race, high income, access to medical care, frequent medical visits, and employed or married status. CRC screening rates were highest among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage. High CRC screening rates among US Veterans may be related to system-level characteristics of VA and military care. Insight to these system-level characteristics may inform mechanisms to improve CRC screening in non-VA settings.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-Trauma Specific (AAQ-TS): A study with Portuguese Colonial War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Gouveia, José; Carvalho, Teresa; Cunha, Marina; Duarte, Joana; Walser, Robyn D

    2015-10-01

    The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-Trauma Specific (AAQ-TS) is a self-report measure designed to assess-trauma-related psychological (in)flexibility, as conceptualized in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. However, there are no studies to date regarding its psychometric properties. This study explores such properties in the Portuguese version of the AAQ-TS, in Portuguese Colonial War Veterans. A Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was conducted in a sample from the general population of war Veterans (N=371). Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) as well as reliability and convergent validity studies were performed in a different sample from the same population (N=312). For the discriminant validity a clinical sample with a war-related PTSD (N=42) and a non-clinical sample without PTSD (N=44) were used. The CFA suggested a re-specified 15-item model with good global adjustment and factorial validity. The AAQ-TS showed internal consistency, a good temporal reliability, convergent validity with psychopathological symptoms (related to PTSD, anxiety, depression and stress) and peritraumatic dissociation (altered awareness and depersonalization/derealization). The questionnaire also discriminates between war Veterans with and without a PTSD diagnosis. The major limitation relates to the samples' characteristics and sampling methods, which can limit the generalization of results. The Portuguese version of the AAQ-TS is a reliable and valid measure to assess experiential avoidance related to trauma in Portuguese Colonial War Veterans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 38 CFR 74.4 - Who does CVE consider to control a veteran-owned small business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the applicant or participant. (h) Non-veterans who transfer majority stock ownership or control of the... control a veteran-owned small business? 74.4 Section 74.4 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... does CVE consider to control a veteran-owned small business? (a) Control means both the day-to-day...

  5. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health... day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult...

  6. Community Reintegration Problems Among Veterans and Active Duty Service Members With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, Suzanne; Barnett, Scott D; Lamberty, Greg; Kretzmer, Tracy; Powell-Cope, Gail; Patel, Nitin; Nakase-Richardson, Risa

    To examine community reintegration problems among Veterans and military service members with mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at 1 year postinjury and to identify unique predictors that may contribute to these difficulties. VA Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Participants were 154 inpatients enrolled in the VA TBI Model Systems Program with available injury severity data (mild = 28.6%; moderate/severe = 71.4%) and 1-year postinjury outcome data. Prospective, longitudinal cohort. Community reintegration outcomes included independent driving, employability, and general community participation. Additional measures assessed depression, posttraumatic stress, and cognitive and motor functioning. In the mild TBI (mTBI) group, posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms were associated with lower levels of various community reintegration outcomes. In the moderate/severe TBI group, cognition and motor skills were significantly associated with lower levels of community participation, independent driving, and employability. Community reintegration is problematic for Veterans and active duty service members with a history of TBI. Unique comorbidities across injury severity groups inhibit full reintegration into the community. These findings highlight the ongoing rehabilitation needs of persons with TBI, specifically evidence-based mental healthcare, in comprehensive rehabilitation programs consistent with a chronic disease management model.

  7. Nicotine dependence and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities in a sample of American Indian male veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Daniel L; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Canive, Jose; Thuras, Paul; Westermeyer, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest rates of nicotine dependence in the U.S. However, studies analyzing associations between nicotine dependence and psychiatric and substance use disorders in these groups have been limited. This study analyzes the co-occurrence of current and lifetime DSM-III-R nicotine dependence with psychiatric and substance use disorders in a community sample of 480 American Indian male veterans. Lifetime nicotine dependence (23.3%) was associated with all lifetime disorders studied, including alcohol use and drug use disorders, affective and anxiety disorders, PTSD, pathological gambling and antisocial personality disorder. Current nicotine dependence was present in 19% of the sample and significantly associated with current affective and gambling disorder. Substantial co-morbidity exists between nicotine dependence and other substance abuse and psychiatric disorders among this sample of American Indian male veterans, particularly for lifetime diagnoses. Screening for all psychiatric disorders among American Indian/Alaska Native smokers may be warranted. Although these results are similar to those observed among the general U.S. population, unique risk factors exist among American Indians/Alaska Natives which may require further attention. Specific public health and clinical interventions to reduce the rate of nicotine dependence among American Indians/Alaska Natives are recommended.

  8. An innovative approach to treating combat veterans with PTSD at risk for suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, Herbert

    2014-10-01

    Suicide rates among military personnel had a significant drop in 2013, but there is no evidence of a drop among veterans. The problem of suicide among combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains a source of concern. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs are now calling for innovative treatment approaches to the problem. A short-term psychodynamic therapy presented here may be able to fill that need by dissipating the guilt from veterans' combat-related actions that leads to suicidal behavior. The treatment showed promise of success with veterans of the war in Vietnam. Preliminary work with combat veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan indicates that it may be equally successful in treating them. Basic aspects of the psychodynamic approach could be incorporated into current therapies and should improve their ability to treat veterans with PTSD at risk for suicide.

  9. Telerehabilitation for Veterans with Combat Related TBI/PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    signed by a proxy. Veterans and/or care givers must also possess basic computer literacy such as being able to access a web page and making entrees in...with Combat Related TBI/PTSD RTO-MP-HFM-205 15 - 7 or intervention ( diabetes , CHF, dementia etc), our cohort exhibits a very diverse population in

  10. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ping Tan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The awareness of CDND among elderly veterans was significantly lower than that of CCD. More information about CDND should be disseminated by health care professionals. Appropriate guidance will promote the rapid and extensive dissemination of information about the prevention of CDND by media and word-of-mouth peer education.

  11. How Military Service Affects Student Veteran Success at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Patrick C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly more service members are separating from the military as the United States draws down the force and moves towards a post-war era. Tens of thousands of these veterans will leverage their GI Bill tuition and housing benefits in an attempt to access Southern California community colleges and bolster their transition into mainstream…

  12. Millennial Combat Veterans: How Identity Shapes Experience in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Shane Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to build upon the growing foundational base of knowledge on the academic and social transitions of student combat veterans and contribute to a greater theoretical understanding of this population and how their perception of identity may influence their experience as college students. The researcher conducted a…

  13. Empty Promise: Black American Veterans and the New GI Bill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottley, Alford H.

    2014-01-01

    The 2008 GI Bill offers college funds for veterans. Yet Black male vets are not taking advantage of these benefits. This chapter examines personal and societal problems that hinder access to higher education for Black vets, and suggests some ways adult educators can advocate for these young men.

  14. Personalized Medicine in Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    the altered regulation of select small nucleo - lar RNA and miRNA that we ob- served in PBMCs of veteran mTBI cases might have implica- tions in the...Sullivan JM. Mi- croRNA132 modulates short-term synaptic plasticity but not basal release probability in hippocampal neurons. PLoS One 2010; 5: e15182

  15. Abuse of war zone detainees: veterans' perceptions of acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, William C; Gariti, Katherine O; Sadeghi, Leila; Joisa, Sowmya D

    2007-02-01

    We assessed detainee abuse acceptance and variables associated with it. Outpatients from a veterans' hospital were administered questionnaires with three increasingly severe scenarios of a U.S. soldier abusing a detainee. Three questionnaire versions differed in the final line of each version's scenarios, describing abuse either as: soldier initiated, superior ordered, or wrong by a "whistleblower" soldier. Three hundred fifty-one veterans participated, 80% with service during the Vietnam War. Zero tolerance for abuse--"completely unacceptable" regardless of who the detainee was--increased with abuse severity (16% for exposure, 31% for humiliation, and 48% for rape of detainee) and with soldier initiation. The strongest, most consistently significant odds were of depressed veterans, veterans with comorbid depression/post-traumatic stress disorder, and men being approximately 2, 3, and 4 to 20 times more tolerant of abuse than those without depression/post-traumatic stress disorder and women, respectively. There may be potential value to using similar scenario-based questionnaires to study active duty military perceptions of detainee abuse. Results may inform prevention policies.

  16. Supporting Military Veteran Students: Early Lessons from Kohlberg Prize Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Klempin, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Postsecondary education participation is critical for military-connected individuals as they transition back to civilian life. The Kisco Foundation's Kohlberg Prize, a competitive grant awarded in 2015 and 2016, is aimed at making community colleges more welcoming and better able to meet the needs of veteran students. This review details the early…

  17. Veteran Transfer Students and Concealed Weapons on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesetski, Christine; Ofstein, Jennifer; Outlaw, Stacy; Brooks, Racheal

    2014-01-01

    This case details the challenges faced by various members of a 4-year university regarding Kathryn, a non-traditional transfer student and military veteran who recently returned from a traumatic deployment in Afghanistan. Precisely, this study identifies ambiguities pertaining to (a) threat assessment, (b) university weapons policies, (c) transfer…

  18. A Proactive Approach to Serving Military and Veteran Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Tracey L.; Schma, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    With the introduction of the Post 9/11 GI Bill in August 2009, Veterans Affairs anticipated a 25% increase in the number of service members who would enroll in higher education (Student Affairs Leadership Council, 2009). Between fall 2005 and spring 2010 semesters, Western Michigan University (WMU; Kalamazoo, MI) experienced a 43% boom, from just…

  19. How Military Service Affects Student Veteran Success at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Patrick C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly more service members are separating from the military as the United States draws down the force and moves towards a post-war era. Tens of thousands of these veterans will leverage their GI Bill tuition and housing benefits in an attempt to access Southern California community colleges and bolster their transition into mainstream…

  20. Academic Advisors of Military and Student Veterans: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, there is an influx of active-duty military and student veterans enrolling in postsecondary and graduate-level education. The role of an academic advisor increases significantly with this influx of enrollment. The purpose of this study was to determine how a graduate-level academic advisor perceives…

  1. Psychosocial and Moral Development of PTSD-Diagnosed Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John G.; Baker, Stanley B.

    2007-01-01

    Two related studies were conducted in order to investigate whether psychosocial and moral development appeared to have been disrupted and arrested in veterans diagnosed as having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study 1 was devoted to developing a measure of late adolescence, early adulthood, and adulthood stages of psychosocial…

  2. Improving Performance through Knowledge Translation in the Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Joseph; Perlin, Jonathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VA) provides a case study for linking performance measurement, information technology, and aligned research efforts to facilitate quality improvement in a large, complex health system. Dialogue between clinical researchers and VA leaders occurs through structured activities (e.g., the Quality Enhancement…

  3. Trauma and Substance Use Disorders in Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David L.; Wilkinson, Jamie; Paradis, Bryce; Kelley, Stephanie; Naseem, Ahsan; Grant, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Disparities in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of multiple mental health conditions have been described between rural and urban populations. However, there is limited information regarding differences in exposure to trauma and trauma-related mental health conditions in these populations. Given the number of veterans who are…

  4. 77 FR 45477 - National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... the defining moments of the Cold War. Today, on the 59th anniversary of the Military Armistice Agreement signed at Panmunjom, we honor all who served in the Korean War, and we pay lasting tribute to the... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8844 of July 27, 2012 National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2012 By...

  5. The formation of corona reception of judo veteran competitive activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulin Serhij

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the substantiation of the algorithm of corona reception of judo veteran competitive activity formation, each of its steps. Purposeful formation of judoka technical actions individual arsenal using the proposed algorithm (7 stages is implemented on the basis of the identification, a subsequent in-depth development and improvement of the best techniques.

  6. Veteran Transfer Students and Concealed Weapons on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesetski, Christine; Ofstein, Jennifer; Outlaw, Stacy; Brooks, Racheal

    2014-01-01

    This case details the challenges faced by various members of a 4-year university regarding Kathryn, a non-traditional transfer student and military veteran who recently returned from a traumatic deployment in Afghanistan. Precisely, this study identifies ambiguities pertaining to (a) threat assessment, (b) university weapons policies, (c) transfer…

  7. Combat veterans and the death penalty: a forensic neuropsychiatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortzel, Hal S; Arciniegas, David B

    2010-01-01

    With our nation's present conflicts, a new generation of veterans are returning home, many of whom have substantial psychopathology and are encountering significant barriers in accessing care. Headlines from around the nation reflect that some of these wounded warriors go on to commit offenses that are potentially punishable by death. Existing circumstances speak to the urgency with which the subject of combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both facing capital crimes ought to be addressed. This publicity has led to a recent call for a legislatively or judicially enacted, narrow, categorical exclusion for combat veterans who were affected by either PTSD or TBI at the time of their capital offenses. In the present article, we illustrate the reality that combat veterans who commit capital offenses may face execution, summarize legal arguments offered in favor of a categorical exclusion, and provide a neuropsychiatric perspective on PTSD, TBI, and aggression, to help inform further dialogue on this weighty subject.

  8. Trauma and Substance Use Disorders in Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David L.; Wilkinson, Jamie; Paradis, Bryce; Kelley, Stephanie; Naseem, Ahsan; Grant, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Disparities in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of multiple mental health conditions have been described between rural and urban populations. However, there is limited information regarding differences in exposure to trauma and trauma-related mental health conditions in these populations. Given the number of veterans who are…

  9. 78 FR 46245 - National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... prosperous peace. In six decades, the Republic of Korea has become one of the world's largest economies and... ago, and the men and women who preserve it today. So as we mark this milestone, let us offer a special salute to our Korean War veterans. Let us renew the sacred trust we share with all who have served. And...

  10. Optimizing strategies to improve interprofessional practice for veterans, part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya SB

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Shelley B Bhattacharya,1–3 Michelle I Rossi,1,2 Jennifer M Mentz11Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC, Veteran's Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, 2University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Albert Schweitzer Fellowship Program, Pittsburgh, PA, USAIntroduction: Interprofessional patient care is a well-recognized path that health care systems are striving toward. The Veteran's Affairs (VA system initiated interprofessional practice (IPP models with their Geriatric Evaluation and Management (GEM programs. GEM programs incorporate a range of specialties, including but not limited to, medicine, nursing, social work, physical therapy and pharmacy, to collaboratively evaluate veterans. Despite being a valuable resource, they are now faced with significant cut-backs, including closures. The primary goal of this project was to assess how the GEM model could be optimized at the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania VA to allow for the sustainability of this important IPP assessment. Part 1 of the study evaluated the IPP process using program, patient, and family surveys. Part 2 examined how well the geriatrician matched patients to specialists in the GEM model. This paper describes Part 1 of our study.Methods: Three strategies were used: 1 a national GEM program survey; 2 a veteran/family satisfaction survey; and 3 an absentee assessment.Results: Twenty-six of 92 programs responded to the GEM IPP survey. Six strategies were shared to optimize IPP models throughout the country. Of the 34 satisfaction surveys, 80% stated the GEM clinic was beneficial, 79% stated their concerns were addressed, and 100% would recommend GEM to their friends. Of the 24 absentee assessments, the top three reasons for missing the appointments were transportation, medical illnesses, and not knowing/remembering about the appointment. Absentee rate diminished from 41% to 19% after instituting a reminder phone call policy.Discussion: Maintaining the

  11. Changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejewski Matthew L

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA provides a health care safety net to veterans. This study examined changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999 when VHA implemented major organizational changes to improve access of ambulatory care and to provide care to more veterans. Methods The study used two cross-sectional samples of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS, a national representative survey, in 1996 and 1999. The 1996 MEPS survey included 1,944 veterans and the 1999 MEPS survey included 1,974 veterans. There were 534 veterans and 740 veterans who used VHA services in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Results The proportion of veterans using the VHA system increased from 12.4% in 1996 to 14.6% in 1999. In both years, veterans were more likely to use VHA care if they were older, male, less educated, uninsured, unemployed, and in fair or poor health status. Only two variables, marital status and income, were different between the two years. Married veterans were more likely to use VHA care in 1999, but not in 1996. Veterans with higher incomes had greater odds of using VHA care in 1996, but there was no significant association between income and VHA use in 1999. Conclusion Characteristics of VHA users did not fundamentally change despite the reorganization of VHA health care delivery system and changes in eligibility and enrollment policy. The VHA system maintains its safety net mission while attracting more veterans.

  12. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients’ military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty. PMID:26664252

  13. Health-related quality of life among veterans in addictions treatment: identifying behavioral targets for future intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppezzo, Marily A.; Michalek, Anne K.; Delucchi, Kevin; Baiocchi, Michael T. M.; Barnett, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background US veterans report lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL) relative to the general population. Identifying behavioral factors related to HRQoL that are malleable to change may inform interventions to improve well-being in this vulnerable group. Purpose The current study sought to characterize HRQoL in a largely male sample of veterans in addictions treatment, both in relation to US norms and in association with five recommended health behavior practices: regularly exercising, managing stress, having good sleep hygiene, consuming fruits and vegetables, and being tobacco free. Methods We assessed HRQoL with 250 veterans in addictions treatment (96 % male, mean age 53, range 24–77) using scales from four validated measures. Data reduction methods identified two principal components reflecting physical and mental HRQoL. Model testing of HRQoL associations with health behaviors adjusted for relevant demographic and treatment-related covariates. Results Compared to US norms, the sample had lower HRQoL scores. Better psychological HRQoL was associated with higher subjective social standing, absence of pain or trauma, lower alcohol severity, and monotonically with the sum of health behaviors (all p management, and sleep hygiene. Regular exercise also related to better physical HRQoL. The models explained >40 % of the variance in HRQoL. Conclusions Exercise, sleep hygiene, and stress management are strongly associated with HRQoL among veterans in addictions treatment. Future research is needed to test the effect of interventions for improving well-being in this high-risk group. PMID:26886926

  14. Changes in Suicide Mortality for Veterans and Nonveterans by Gender and History of VHA Service Use, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmire, Claire A; Kemp, Janet E; Bossarte, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Veterans are believed to be at high risk of suicide. However, research comparing suicide rates between veterans and nonveterans is limited, and even less is known regarding differences by history of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) service use. This study directly compared veteran and nonveteran suicide risk while for the first time differentiating veterans by VHA service use. The cross-sectional study analyzed data from 173,969 adult suicide decedents from 23 states (2000-2010) included in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs suicide data archive. Annual standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for veterans compared with nonveterans and for veterans who used VHA services compared with veterans who did not, overall and separately for males and females. After the analysis controlled for age and gender differences, the number of observed veteran suicides was approximately 20% higher than expected in 2000 (SMR=1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.28), and this increased to 60% higher by 2010 (SMR=1.63, CI=1.58-1.68). The elevated risk for female veterans (2010 SMR=5.89) was higher than that observed for male veterans (2010 SMR=1.54). Trends for non-VHA-utilizing veterans mirrored those of the veteran population as a whole, and the SMR for VHA-utilizing veterans declined. Since 2003, the number of suicides among VHA-utilizing veterans was less than expected when compared directly with the suicide rate among non-VHA-utilizing veterans. Veterans are members of the community and, as such, are an important part of observed increases in U.S. suicide rates. Not all veterans are at equal or increasing risk of suicide, however. VHA-utilizing veterans appear to have declining absolute and relative suicide rates.

  15. Reproductive health and pregnancy outcomes among French gulf war veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bégassat Marion

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1993, many studies on the health of Persian Gulf War veterans (PGWVs have been undertaken. Some authors have concluded that an association exists between Gulf War service and reported infertility or miscarriage, but that effects on PGWV's children were limited. The present study's objective was to describe the reproductive outcome and health of offspring of French Gulf War veterans. Methods The French Study on the Persian Gulf War (PGW and its Health Consequences is an exhaustive cross-sectional study on all French PGWVs conducted from 2002 to 2004. Data were collected by postal self-administered questionnaire. A case-control study nested in this cohort was conducted to evaluate the link between PGW-related exposures and fathering a child with a birth defect. Results In the present study, 9% of the 5,666 Gulf veterans who participated reported fertility disorders, and 12% of male veterans reported at least one miscarriage among their partners after the PGW. Overall, 4.2% of fathers reported at least one child with a birth defect conceived after the mission. No PGW-related exposure was associated with any birth defect in children fathered after the PGW mission. Concerning the reported health of children born after the PGW, 1.0% of children presented a pre-term delivery and 2.7% a birth defect. The main birth defects reported were musculoskeletal malformations (0.5% and urinary system malformations (0.3%. Birth defect incidence in PGWV children conceived after the mission was similar to birth defect incidence described by the Paris Registry of Congenital Malformations, except for Down syndrome (PGWV children incidence was lower than Registry incidence. Conclusion This study did not highlight a high frequency of fertility disorders or miscarriage among French PGW veterans. We found no evidence for a link between paternal exposure during the Gulf War and increased risk of birth defects among French PGWV children.

  16. Comparing strategies for United States veterans' mortality ascertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asch Steven M

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to determine optimal strategies for complete mortality ascertainment comparing death certificates and United States (US Veterans Administration (VA records. Methods We constructed a cohort of California veterans who died in fiscal year (FY 2000 and used VA services the year before death. We determined decedent status using California death certificates linked to VA utilization data and the VA Beneficiary Identification and Records Locator System (BIRLS death file. We compared the characteristics of decedents who would not have been identified by either single source (e.g., VA BIRLS alone or California death certificates alone with the rest of the cohort. Results A total of 8,813 veteran decedents were identified from both VA decedent files and death certificates. Of all decedents, 5,698 / 8,813 (65% veterans were identified in both source files, but 2,426 / 8,813 (28% decedents were not identified in VA BIRLS, and 689 / 8,813 (8% were not identified in death certificates. Compared to the rest of the cohort, decedents whose mortality status was ascertained through either single source differed by race / ethnicity, marital status, and California residence. Clinically, veterans identified from either single source had less comorbidity and were less likely to have been users of VA inpatient or long term care, but equally or more likely to have been users of VA outpatient services. Conclusion As single sources, VA decedent files and death certificates each provided an incomplete record, and death ascertainment was improved by using both source files. Potential bias may vary depending on analytic interest.

  17. Effect of Lean Processes on Surgical Wait Times and Efficiency in a Tertiary Care Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsangkar, Nakul P; Eppstein, Andrew C; Lawson, Rick A; Taylor, Amber N

    2017-01-01

    There are an increasing number of veterans in the United States, and the current delay and wait times prevent Veterans Affairs institutions from fully meeting the needs of current and former service members. Concrete strategies to improve throughput at these facilities have been sparse. To identify whether lean processes can be used to improve wait times for surgical procedures in Veterans Affairs hospitals. Databases in the Veterans Integrated Service Network 11 Data Warehouse, Veterans Health Administration Support Service Center, and Veterans Information Systems and Technology Architecture/Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol were queried to assess changes in wait times for elective general surgical procedures and clinical volume before, during, and after implementation of lean processes over 3 fiscal years (FYs) at a tertiary care Veterans Affairs medical center. All patients evaluated by the general surgery department through outpatient clinics, clinical video teleconferencing, and e-consultations from October 2011 through September 2014 were included. Patients evaluated through the emergency department or as inpatient consults were excluded. The surgery service and systems redesign service held a value stream analysis in FY 2013, culminating in multiple rapid process improvement workshops. Multidisciplinary teams identified systemic inefficiencies and strategies to improve interdepartmental and patient communication to reduce canceled consultations and cases, diagnostic rework, and no-shows. High-priority triage with enhanced operating room flexibility was instituted to reduce scheduling wait times. General surgery department pilot projects were then implemented mid-FY 2013. Planned outcome measures included wait time, clinic and telehealth volume, number of no-shows, and operative volume. Paired t tests were used to identify differences in outcome measures after the institution of reforms. Following rapid process improvement workshop project rollouts, mean

  18. Are Student Veterans a Traditional, Nontraditional, or Special Population? A Study of Veterans on the Auburn University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattillo, Stephen Prescott

    2011-01-01

    This non-experimental study used, with the Educational Testing Service's permission, an updated 1946 Student Opinion Questionnaire (originally designed to compare WWII veterans and nonveterans) to collect data regarding student backgrounds, attitudes and motives, worries and concerns, use of time, and perceptions of respect concerning nonveterans,…

  19. Physical Health Conditions Among a Population-Based Cohort of Vietnam-Era Women Veterans: Agreement Between Self-Report and Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Schumacher, Karen; Frayne, Susan M; Cypel, Yasmin; Barbaresso, Michelle M; Nord, Kristina M; Perzhinsky, Juliette; Lai, Zongshan; Prenovost, Katherine; Spiro, Avron; Gleason, Theresa C; Kimerling, Rachel; Huang, Grant D; Serpi, Tracey B; Magruder, Kathryn M

    2017-08-07

    Little is known about medical morbidity among women Vietnam-era veterans, or the long-term physical health problems associated with their service. This study assessed agreement comparing data on physical health conditions from self-report and medical records from a population-based cohort of women Vietnam-era Veterans from the Health of Vietnam Era Women's Study (HealthViEWS). Women Vietnam-era veterans (n = 4219) self-completed a survey and interview on common medical conditions. A subsample (n = 900) were contacted to provide permission to obtain medical records from as many as three of their providers. Medical record reviews were conducted using a standardized checklist. Agreement and kappa (agreement beyond chance) were calculated for physical health condition groups. Of the 900, 449 had medical records returned, and of those, 412 had complete surveys/interviews. The most commonly reported conditions based on self-report or medical record review included hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or arthritis. Kappa scores between self-reported conditions and medical record documentation were 0.75-0.91 for hypertension, diabetes, most cancers, and neurological conditions, but lower (k = 0.29-0.55) for cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal conditions. Generally, agreement did not significantly vary by different sociodemographic groups. There was relatively high agreement for physical health conditions when self-report was compared with medical record review. As more women are increasingly represented in the military and more veterans in general seek care outside the Veterans Health Administration, accurate measurement of physical health conditions among population-based samples is crucial.

  20. Exploring Rural Disparities in Medical Diagnoses Among Veterans With Transgender-related Diagnoses Utilizing Veterans Health Administration Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Leigh A; Blosnich, John; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael R; Brown, George R; Gordon, Adam J

    2017-09-01

    Research shows transgender individuals experience pronounced health disparities compared with their nontransgender peers. Yet, there remains insufficient research about health differences within transgender populations. This study seeks to fill this gap by exploring how current urban/rural status is associated with lifetime diagnosis of mood disorder, alcohol dependence disorder, illicit drug abuse disorder, tobacco use, posttraumatic stress disorder, human immunodeficiency virus, and suicidal ideation or attempt among veterans with transgender-related diagnoses. This study used a retrospective review of The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data for transgender patients who received VA care from 1997 through 2014. Transgender patients were defined as individuals that had a lifetime diagnosis of any of 4 International Classification of Diseases-9 diagnosis codes associated with transgender status. Independent multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore associations of rural status with medical conditions. Veterans with transgender-related diagnoses residing in small/isolated rural towns had increased odds of tobacco use disorder (adjusted odds ratio=1.39; 95% confidence intervals, 1.09-1.78) and posttraumatic stress disorder (adjusted odds ratio=1.33; 95% confidence intervals, 1.03-1.71) compared with their urban transgender peers. Urban/rural status was not significantly associated with other medical conditions of interest. This study contributes the first empirical investigations of how place of residence is associated with medical diagnoses among veterans with transgender-related diagnoses. The importance of place as a determinant of health is increasingly clear, but for veterans with transgender-related diagnoses this line of research is currently limited. The addition of self-reported sex identity data within VA electronic health records is one way to advance this line of research.

  1. Mixed methods study examining work reintegration experiences from perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Rattray, Nicholas A; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reintegration for Veterans is often challenging. One difficult aspect of reintegration—transitioning into the civilian workplace—has not been fully explored in the literature. To address this gap and examine work reintegration, this mixed methods study examined the perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders receiving Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare. Forty Veterans rated factors that affect work success; participants also provided narratives on their most and least successful work experiences. We used t-tests and qualitative analysis to compare participants who did and did not serve in combat. Several themes relevant to work reintegration emerged in the narratives, particularly for Veterans who served in combat. An array of work difficulties were reported in the months following military discharge. In addition, Veterans who served in combat reported significantly more work barriers than Veterans who did not serve in combat, particularly health-related barriers. In conclusion, Veterans with mental health disorders who served in combat experienced more work reintegration difficulty than their counterparts who did not serve in combat. The role of being a Veteran affected how combat Veterans formed their self-concept, which also shaped their work success and community reintegration, especially during the early transition period.

  2. The use of VA Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance among working-aged veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmoth, Janet M; London, Andrew S; Heflin, Colleen M

    2015-07-01

    Although there is substantial disability among veterans, relatively little is known about working-aged veterans' uptake of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance (DI). This study identifies levels of veteran participation in VA disability and/or DI benefit programs, examines transitions into and out of VA and DI programs among veterans, and estimates the size and composition of the veteran population receiving VA and/or DI benefits over time. Data from the 1992, 1993, 1996, 2001, 2004, and 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) are used to describe VA and DI program participation among veterans under the age of 65. The majority of working-aged veterans do not receive VA or DI benefits and joint participation is low, but use of these programs has increased over time. A higher percentage of veterans receive VA compensation, which ranges from 4.9% in 1992 to 13.2% in 2008, than DI compensation, which ranges from 2.9% in 1992 to 6.7% in 2008. The rate of joint participation ranges from less than 1% in 1992 to 3.6% in 2008. Veterans experience few transitions between VA and DI programs during the 36-48 months they are observed. The number of veterans receiving benefits from VA and/or DI nearly doubled between 1992 and 2008. There have been substantial shifts in the composition of veterans using these programs, as cohorts who served prior to 1964 are replaced by those who served after 1964. The findings suggest potential gaps in veterans' access to disability programs that might be addressed through improved coordination of VA and DI benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of post-traumatic-stress-disorder on intra-operative analgesia in a veteran population during cataract procedures carried out using retrobulbar or topical anesthesia: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Yuna; Wayman, Laura L; Chomsky, Amy S

    2017-06-07

    A growing proportion of veterans treated at the Veterans Health Administration (VA) have a history of post-traumatic-stress-disorder (PTSD), and there exists a higher rate of PTSD amongst veterans than the general population. The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between PTSD and intra-operative analgesia, intra-operative time, and anesthesia type for cataract surgery in a veteran population. Secondary objectives are to determine if patient age, and first or second eye surgery affect intra-operative pain control or are correlated with type of anesthesia modality. A retrospective study of 330 cataract surgeries performed by resident physicians between January and September 2012 at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville and Murfreesboro Campuses was completed. Three hundred and thirty veteran patients were selected if their cataract surgery was performed between January and September 2012. Combined cases were excluded. The primary outcome evaluated was intra-operative analgesia. Secondary outcomes included history of post-traumatic-stress-disorder, anesthesia type, first or second eye, pain control, intra-operative heart rate and blood pressure, age, and case complexity. Data was analyzed using an unpaired two-sample Welch's t-test assuming unequal variance and Z test of comparison of proportions. Patients with post-traumatic-stress-disorder reported higher pain scores, had longer operative times, and were more likely to have received a retrobulbar block. Operative time was not associated with an increased pain score, irrespective of anesthesia type, when controlled for PTSD. Complex cases had longer operative times, more sedation, and higher pain scores. P < 0.05 was used consistently. Post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety are more prevalent in the veteran population. Our data suggests that a history of post-traumatic-stress-disorder was correlated with higher pain scores, longer operative times

  4. Report to Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs and Joint Standing Committee on Veteran and Legal Affairs: Student Veterans (PL 2015, Chapter 465)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhauser, Derek P.

    2017-01-01

    Because The Maine Community College System (MCCS) is aware of that fact that student veterans and those veterans seeking to enroll in college have specific needs, each of the colleges in the MCCS system is working to develop and strengthen target responses to meet those needs. The Maine Community College System is therefore providing this report…

  5. Military and VA General Dentistry Training: A National Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Bachand, William; Buchanan, C. Richard; Lefever, Karen H.; Lin, Sylvia; Engelhardt, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Compared the program characteristics of the postgraduate general dentistry (PGD) training programs sponsored by the military and the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Gathered information on program infrastructure and emphasis, resident preparation prior to entering the program, and patients served and types of services provided. Programs…

  6. Prevalence of diagnosed ocular disease in veterans with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Osamah; Ashraf, Hasan; Malouf, Marc; Slade, Eric P; Medoff, Deborah R; Li, Lan; Kreyenbuhl, Julie

    To compare the prevalence of diagnosed ocular disease and eye disease treatment between Veteran's Administration (VA) patients with and without serious mental illness (SMI). Retrospective comparison of diagnosed ocular disease and treatment prevalence among patients with and without diagnosed SMI in fiscal year 2011 in the VA Capitol Health Care System (VISN 5). We identified 6462 VA patients with SMI and 137,933 without SMI. The prevalence of diagnosed ocular disease was 22.7% in SMI patients and 35.4% in non-SMI patients (Pdisease, particularly cataract, glaucoma and dry eye. While SMI patients utilize eye care services at a higher rate than the general VA population, the majority of subjects with SMI do not get recommended annual eye examinations. More consistent annual ocular screening among VA patients with SMI may be indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Implications of Psychiatric Comorbidity Among Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    through the military health care network. Mental health care from non-TRICARE providers were not included in our data. Furthermore, out of fear of...Yonkers KA, Otto MW, et al; Influence of psychiatric comor- bidity on recovery and recurrence in generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia , and panic

  8. Nightmare reduction in a Vietnam veteran using imagery rehearsal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Kate L; Means, Melanie K; Edinger, Jack D

    2010-10-15

    Following exposure to traumatic events, approximately 19% of combat veterans develop posttraumatic stress disorder. One of the main symptoms of this mental illness is reexperiencing the trauma, which is commonly expressed in the form of chronic trauma-related nightmares. In these patients, nightmares can fragment sleep, decrease sleep quality, and even cause fear about going to sleep. One promising psychological treatment for chronic nightmares is imagery rehearsal therapy. Imagery rehearsal therapy presumes that nightmares are a learned behavior and that activating the visual imagery system may facilitate emotional processing of the trauma. This treatment involves deliberately rewriting a nightmare and mentally rehearsing images from the newly rescripted scenario while awake. Imagery rehearsal therapy has been found to reduce nightmares and associated distress. We present a case study demonstrating the use of imagery rehearsal therapy in a Vietnam-era veteran with posttraumatic stress disorder and chronic nightmares. Nightmares were considerably reduced and the quality of sleep greatly improved after treatment.

  9. The Veterans Health Administration: an American success story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Adam

    2007-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides health care for U.S. military veterans. By the early 1990s, the VHA had a reputation for delivering limited, poor-quality care, which led to health care reforms. By 2000, the VHA had substantially improved in terms of numerous indicators of process quality, and some evidence shows that its overall performance now exceeds that of the rest of U.S. health care. Recently, however, the VHA has started to become a victim of its own success, with increased demands on the system raising concerns from some that access is becoming overly restricted and from others that its annual budget appropriations are becoming excessive. Nonetheless, the apparent turnaround in the VHA's performance offers encouragement that health care that is both financed and provided by the public sector can be an effective organizational form.

  10. Implementation and early utilization of a Suicide Hotline for veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Kerry L; Kemp, Janet; McKeon, Richard; Katz, Ira R

    2012-03-01

    Suicide crisis lines have a respected history as a strategy for reducing deaths from suicide and suicidal behaviors. Until recently, however, evidence of the effectiveness of these crisis lines has been sparse. Studies published during the past decade suggest that crisis lines offer an alternative to populations who may not be willing to engage in treatment through traditional mental health settings. Given this promising evidence, in 2007, the Department of Veterans Affairs in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration implemented a National Suicide Hotline that is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by Veterans Affairs clinical staff. We report here on the implementation of this suicide hotline and our early observations of its utilization in a largely male population.

  11. Breast Cancer in Transgender Veterans: A Ten-Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, George R

    2015-03-01

    All known cases of breast cancer in patients with a diagnosis consistent with transgender identification were identified in the Veterans Health Administration (1996-2013). Ten cases were confirmed: seven birth sex females and three birth sex males. Of the three birth sex males, two identified as gender dysphoric male-to-female and one identified as transgender with transvestic fetishism. The birth sex males all presented with late-stage disease that proved fatal, whereas most of the birth sex female transgender veterans presented with earlier stage disease that could be treated. These cases support the importance of screening for breast cancer using standard guidelines in birth sex males and females. Family history of breast cancer should be obtained from transgender people as part of routine care. This report expands the known cases of breast cancer in transgender persons from 5 to 12 (female-to-male) and from 10 to 13 (male-to-female).

  12. Lesions esportives en competició en atletes veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Alvero-Cruz, José

    2008-01-01

    Introducció i objectius: Hi ha pocs estudis que revelin la incidència de lesions esportives en atletes veterans. L'objectiu principal és descriure el nombre i el tipus de lesions durant el Campionat d'Espanya d'Atletisme 2005 per a atletes veterans. Mètodes: S'ha fet un estudi estadístic descriptiu per causa de lesió. D'un total de 996 atletes participants, es va fer un total de 40 visites mèdiques (4,01%) i 26 assistències de fisioteràpia (2,61%). Resultats: De 40 assistències mèdiques, un 8...

  13. Prospective prediction of functional difficulties among recently separated Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald E. Larson, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reports of functional problems are common among Veterans who served post-9/11 (more than 25% report functional difficulties in at least one domain. However, little prospective work has examined the risk and protective factors for functional difficulties among Veterans. In a sample of recently separated Marines, we used stepwise logistic and multiple regressions to identify predictors of functional impairment, including work-related problems, financial problems, unlawful behavior, activity limitations due to mental health symptoms, and perceived difficulty reintegrating into civilian life. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms assessed both before and after military separation significantly predicted functional difficulties across all domains except unlawful behavior. Certain outcomes, such as unlawful behavior and activity limitations due to mental health symptoms, were predicted by other or additional predictors. Although several forms of functioning were examined, the list was not exhaustive. The results highlight a number of areas where targeted interventions may facilitate the reintegration of military servicemembers into civilian life.

  14. Drivers of Continuing Education Learning Preferences for Veterans Affairs Women's Health Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowski, Jessica L; Hamilton, Alison B; Washington, Donna L; Gomez, Arthur G; Veet, Laure; Cordasco, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    Documented gaps in health professionals' training in women's health are a special concern for continuing education (CE). In the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system, women veterans are a numerical minority, preferably assigned to designated women's health primary care providers (DWHPs). DWHPs need to maintain their knowledge and skills in women's health topics, in addition to general internal medicine topics. We explored drivers of VA DWHPs' learning preferences for women's health topics-ie, factors which influence greater and lesser learning interest. We conducted semistructured telephone interviews with DWHPs across six VA health care systems. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded in ATLAS.ti. We synthesized results by grouping relevant coded sections of text to form emergent themes. Among the 31 DWHPs interviewed, reported drivers of learning interests among women's health topics were (1) high frequency of clinical incidence of particular issues; (2) perceived appropriateness of particular issues for management in primary care settings; and (3) perceived appropriateness of particular issues for partial management in primary care. Lower interest in particular women's health topics was associated with (1) perceived existing competency or recent training in an issue and (2) perceived need for specialty care management of an issue. Understanding drivers of DWHPs' CE learning priorities lays a foundation for developing CE programming that will be of interest to women's health primary care providers. Attention to drivers of learning interests may have applicability beyond women's health, suggesting a general approach for CE programming that prioritizes high-volume topics within the practice scope of target providers.

  15. Preparing staff to care for veterans in a way they need and deserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Allen, Patricia E; Armstrong, Myrna L

    2015-03-01

    More than 2.5 million military veterans have been deployed for service in Iraq and/or Afghanistan, whereas another 20 million veterans currently reside in the United States. For various reasons, increasing numbers of military and associated personnel from various wars could go to civilian population-based care facilities for their rest-of-life health care. Therefore, educational activities are important to prepare nursing staff for the culturally sensitive care that veterans, their dependents, and civilian contractor personnel need. This article (a) provides rationale for veterans' admissions, (b) summarizes some common health situations that veterans are likely to encounter, (c) stresses major educational goals, and (d) emphasizes the use of the universal assessment question: Have you ever served in the military? Several educational implications and challenges are discussed, including war zone physiology, reintegration, military culture and pride, ethical challenges, educational speakers, simulation, veteran individuality, and compassion fatigue. Available resources to accompany this content are provided.

  16. Applying behavior change theory to technology promoting veteran mental health care seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealin, Julia M; Kuhn, Eric; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Despite the availability of effective mental health interventions, the vast majority of veterans with a mental disorder underutilize psychological services. Contemporary research has revealed that several factors such as low education, stigma, stoicism, lack of knowledge, and negative beliefs about mental health services are associated with veterans' underutilization of services. In this article, the authors provide an overview of factors that affect symptomatic veterans' decisions about whether to seek mental health services. Second, they describe the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980), a useful model for understanding mental health care seeking that can inform the development of technology-based interventions designed to increase veterans' willingness to seek psychological services. Third, the authors describe the development of Considering Professional Help, a personalized web-based tool developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which has been designed to promote mental health care seeking in veterans with mental health problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Military Veterans’ Experiences in For-Profit Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    committees; gov commissions an review and over RAND Corporat research organi objective analys solutions that ad facing the public around the worl do not... order RAND documents or to obtain additional information, contact Distribution Services: Telephone: (310) 451-7002; Email: order @rand.org 1...military veterans. The HELP Committee noted that in the first year after the new , Post 9/11 GI Bill took effect in August 2009, 36.5 percent of the

  18. Predicting violence in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Aleksandar A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Frequent expression of negative affects, hostility and violent behavior in individuals suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD were recognized long ago, and have been retrospectively well documented in war veterans with PTSD who were shown to have an elevated risk for violent behavior when compared to both veterans without PTSD and other psychiatric patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of clinical prediction of violence in combat veterans suffering from PTSD. Methods. The subjects of this study, 104 male combat veterans with PTSD were assessed with the Historical, Clinical and Risk Management 20 (HCR-20, a 20-item clinicianrated instrument for assessing the risks for violence, and their acts of violence during one-year follow-up period were registered based on bimonthly check-up interviews. Results. Our findings showed that the HCR-20, as an actuarial measure, had good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.82, excellent interrater reliability (Interaclass Correlation ICC = 0.85, as well as excellent predictive validity for acts of any violence, non-physical violence or physical violence in the follow-up period (AUC = 0.82-0.86. The HCR-20 also had good interrater reliability (Cohen's kappa = 0.74, and acceptable predictive accuracy for each outcome criterion (AUC = 0.73-0.79. Conclusion. The results of this research confirm that the HCR-20 may also be applied in prediction of violent behavior in the population of patients suffering from PTSD with reliability and validity comparable with the results of previous studies where this instrument was administered to other populations of psychiatric patients.

  19. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Methods: Partic...

  20. Nightmare Reduction in a Vietnam Veteran Using Imagery Rehearsal Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Berlin, Kate L.; Means, Melanie K.; Edinger, Jack D.

    2010-01-01

    Following exposure to traumatic events, approximately 19% of combat veterans develop posttraumatic stress disorder. One of the main symptoms of this mental illness is reexperiencing the trauma, which is commonly expressed in the form of chronic trauma-related nightmares. In these patients, nightmares can fragment sleep, decrease sleep quality, and even cause fear about going to sleep. One promising psychological treatment for chronic nightmares is imagery rehearsal therapy. Imagery rehearsal ...