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Sample records for kansas energy engineering

  1. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  2. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merriam, Daniel F., E-mail: dmerriam@kgs.ku.edu [University of Kansas (United States); Brady, Lawrence L.; Newell, K. David [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U.S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer.

  3. 78 FR 50409 - Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC, Southwest Power Pool, Inc.; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on August... 206 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 (2013), Kansas...

  4. Risk assessment Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) PCB discharge to Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambariah, Venkatesh; Garrett, J.K.; King, K.H.; Yambert, M.W.; Travis, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-09-29

    The Environmental Protection Department of the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) requested that a risk assessment be performed on the potential health effects of discharges of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the DOE/KCP to the Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City's largest publicly owned treatment works facility (Kansas City POTW). The major objectives of this risk assessment are (1) to determine the potential health impacts of DOE/KCP's current discharges of PCBs to the Kansas City POTW via all reasonable exposure pathways and (2) to determine a health-based, safe'' discharge level for PCBs to the Kansas City POTW. The present risk assessment considers both occupational and public impacts of PCB discharges from the DOE/KCP. Two occupational exposure scenarios assessed are (1) risk to Kansas City POTW sewer line maintenance workers and (2) risk to Kansas City POTW workers during routine operations of the facility. Both types of workers may be dermally exposed to PCBs in sewage. Public risks considered include risk to populations living within 50 km of the Kansas City POTW via inhalation of PCBs from sludge incinerated at the facility. Additionally, risk to the general public associated with PCB releases from the Kansas City POTW to the Missouri River is assessed. These pathways include ingestion of PCBs in drinking water supplied by the Missouri River, dermal adsorption and accidental ingestion of PCBs while swimming in the Missouri River, and ingestion of PCBs through consumption of fish taken from the Missouri River. Risk to breastfed infants from ingestion of PCBs through mothers' milk is also assessed. 108 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Solar energy engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to solar energy engineering, covering topics such as radiation, absorption, its practical applications in space and hot water heating, and solar geometrical and geographical forms.

  6. Energy production systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, Thomas Howard

    2017-01-01

    Energy Production Systems Engineering presents IEEE, Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA), and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards of engineering systems and equipment in utility electric generation stations. Electrical engineers that practice in the energy industry must understand the specific characteristics of electrical and mechanical equipment commonly applied to energy production and conversion processes, including the mechanical and chemical processes involved, in order to design, operate and maintain electrical systems that support and enable these processes. To aid this understanding, Energy Production Systems Engineeringdescribes the equipment and systems found in various types of utility electric generation stations. This information is accompanied by examples and practice problems. It also addresses common issues of electrical safety that arise in electric generation stations.

  7. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas To Be a 100% Renewable Energy City; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, S.; Billman, L.; Wallach, D.

    2010-08-01

    On May 4, 2007, Greensburg, Kansas, was hit by a 1.7-mile wide tornado with 200 mph-plus wind speeds. This tornado destroyed or severely damaged 90% of Greensburg?s structures. We discuss the progress made in rebuilding Greensburg, with a focus on the built environment and on meeting Greensburg?s goal of 100% renewable energy, 100% of the time. We also discuss key disaster recovery efforts that enabled Greensburg to reach this goal. Key strategies included a Sustainable Comprehensive Master Plan, an ordinance resolving that city-owned buildings achieve LEED Platinum and 42% energy savings, a strong focus on rebuilding 'right' with an integrated design process, attracting significant and sustained technical experts and national media attention, and linking renewable and energy efficiency technologies to business development. After three years, more than half the homes that have been rebuilt are rated at an average of 40% energy savings. All significant commercial buildings, including the school, hospital, banks, courthouse, and retail buildings, have been rebuilt to LEED Gold and Platinum standards and exceed 40% savings, with many exceeding 50% savings. Greensburg recently constructed a 12.5-MW community wind farm to provide all the remaining energy needed for its energy-efficient buildings and homes.

  8. Science programs in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Kramer, Ariele R.

    2017-05-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a non-regulatory Earth science agency within the Department of the Interior that provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. The USGS cooperates with Federal, State, tribal, and local agencies in Kansas to deliver long-term data in real-time and interpretive reports describing what those data mean to the public and resource management agencies. USGS science programs in Kansas provide real-time groundwater monitoring at more than 30 locations; streamflow monitoring at more than 232 locations; water-quality and trends in the Little Arkansas and Kansas Rivers; inflows and outflows of sediment to/from reservoirs and in streams; harmful algal bloom research in the Kansas River, Milford Lake, and Cheney Reservoir; water-quantity and water-quality effects of artificial groundwater recharge for the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project near Wichita, Kansas; compilation of Kansas municipal and irrigation water-use data statewide; the occurrence, effects, and movement of environmental pesticides, antibiotics, algal toxins, and taste-and-odor compounds; and funding to the Kansas Water Resources Research Institute to further research and education through Kansas universities.

  9. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Eighteen. Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Kansas governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  10. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas"super-utility"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Cappers, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Local, state and federal policies that jointly promote the generation of electricity from renewable technologies and the pursuit of energy efficiency are expected to help mitigate the detrimental effects of global climate change and foster energy independence. We examine the financial impacts on various stakeholders from alternative compliance strategies with a Combined Efficiency and Renewable Electricity Standard (CERES) using a case study approach for utilities in Kansas. If only supply-side options are considered, our analysis suggests that a Kansas"super-utility" would prefer to build its own renewable energy resources, while ratepayers would favor a procurement strategy that relies on long-term renewable power purchase agreements. Introducing energy efficiency under varying levels as a CERES resource will, under our analysis, reduce ratepayer bills by ~;;$400M to ~;;$1.0B between 2009 and 2028, but commensurately erode shareholder returns by ~;;10 to ~;;100 basis points. If a business model for energy efficiency inclusive of both a lost fixed cost recovery mechanism and a shareholder incentive mechanism is implemented, our results illustrate how shareholder returns can be improved through the pursuit of energy efficiency, by at most ~;;20 basis points if certain conditions apply, while ratepayers continue to save between $10M and ~;;$840M over 20 years.

  11. KANSAS WIND POWERING AMERICAN STATE OUTREACH: KANSAS WIND WORKING GROUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAMMARLUND, RAY

    2010-10-27

    The Kansas Wind Working Group (WWG) is a 33-member group announced by former Governor Kathleen Sebelius on Jan. 7, 2008. Formed through Executive Order 08-01, the WWG will educate stakeholder groups with the current information on wind energy markets, technologies, economics, policies, prospects and issues. Governor Mark Parkinson serves as chair of the Kansas Wind Working Group. The group has been instrumental in focusing on the elements of government and coordinating government and private sector efforts in wind energy development. Those efforts have moved Kansas from 364 MW of wind three years ago to over 1000 MW today. Further, the Wind Working Group was instrumental in fleshing out issues such as a state RES and net metering, fundamental parts of HB 2369 that was passed and is now law in Kansas. This represents the first mandatory RES and net metering in Kansas history.

  12. Solar energy engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayigh, A.A.M. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The scope and advantages of solar energy are dealt with. The nature of the sun, the solar radiation spectrum, the estimation of total, direct, and diffuse radiation, and the heat transfer fundamentals for solar energy application are explained. The fundamentals, fabrication, and uses of various water and air heaters are outlined. Optics and concentrating collectors are dealt with, as well as solar furnaces. The various applications of solar energy are discussed, namely, solar pond, solar distillation, photovoltaic conversion of solar energy, solar refrigeration, solar hydrogen production, space applications, and solar measuring equipment. The cost of solar appliances is discussed. (MHR)

  13. Energy-Aware Software Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eder, Kerstin; Gallagher, John Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of energy in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systems can be wasted by software, regardless of how energy-efficient the underlying hardware is. To avoid such waste, programmers need to understand the energy consumption of programs during the development process rather t......, the chapter discusses how energy analysis and modelling techniques can be incorporated in software engineering tools, including existing compilers, to assist the energy-aware programmer to optimise the energy consumption of code.......A great deal of energy in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systems can be wasted by software, regardless of how energy-efficient the underlying hardware is. To avoid such waste, programmers need to understand the energy consumption of programs during the development process rather...

  14. Kansas Electric Transmission Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital representation of the EletcircTransmission lines for the State of Kansas as maintained by the Kansas Corporation Commission. Data is...

  15. Kansas Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Power Plants database depicts, as point features, the locations of the various types of power plant locations in Kansas. The locations of the power plants...

  16. Kansas Playa Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the distribution, areal extent, and morphometry of playa wetlands throughout western Kansas. Playa wetlands were...

  17. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  18. Kansas DOE/EPSCoR planning and traineeship grants: Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    In 1991, Kansas became the 18th state eligible for EPSCoR support, and it responded quickly to calls for planning proposals from DOE, NSF, and EPA. Planning process was carried out to improve the quality of scientific and engineering R&D in Kansas. All programs attempt to strengthen the intra- and inter-institutional ties to develop a critical mass of researchers in several areas. The following areas of excellence were selected for DOE/EPSCoR traineeships: atomic processes, electric power production, petroleum, high-energy physics, and energy alternative and efficiency.

  19. Free Energy and Internal Combustion Engine Cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, William D

    2012-01-01

    The performance of one type (Carnot) of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) cycle is analyzed within the framework of thermodynamic free energies. ICE performance is different from that of an External Combustion Engine (ECE) which is dictated by Carnot's rule.

  20. Electrochemical energy engineering: a new frontier of chemical engineering innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuang; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2014-01-01

    One of the grand challenges facing humanity today is a safe, clean, and sustainable energy system where combustion no longer dominates. This review proposes that electrochemical energy conversion could set the foundation for such an energy system. It further suggests that a simple switch from an acid to a base membrane coupled with innovative cell designs may lead to a new era of affordable electrochemical devices, including fuel cells, electrolyzers, solar hydrogen generators, and redox flow batteries, for which recent progress is discussed using the authors' work as examples. It also notes that electrochemical energy engineering will likely become a vibrant subdiscipline of chemical engineering and a fertile ground for chemical engineering innovation. To realize this vision, it is necessary to incorporate fundamental electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering principles into the chemical engineering curriculum.

  1. Renewable Energy Park - Preliminary Feasibility & Engineering Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariwite, Roderick [Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe, NV (United States)

    2015-07-31

    This "Renewable Energy Park - Preliminary Feasibility & Engineering Report" seeks to provide an overall assessment and review of renewable energy development opportunities on the Fallon Indian Reservation and Colony Lands.

  2. Council of Energy Engineering Research. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Richard J.

    2003-08-22

    The Engineering Research Program, a component program of the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), was established in 1979 to aid in resolving the numerous engineering issues arising from efforts to meet U.S. energy needs. The major product of the program became part of the body of knowledge and data upon which the applied energy technologies are founded; the product is knowledge relevant to energy exploration, production, conversion and use.

  3. Comparison of 2006 IECC and 2009 IECC Commercial Energy Code Requirements for Kansas City, MO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yunzhi; Gowri, Krishnan

    2011-03-22

    This report summarizes code requirements and energy savings of commercial buildings in climate zone 4 built to the 2009 IECC when compared to the 2006 IECC. In general, the 2009 IECC has higher insulation requirements for exterior walls, roof, and windows and have higher efficiency requirements for HVAC equipment (HVAC equipment efficiency requirements are governed by National Appliance Conversion Act of 1987 (NAECA), and are applicable irrespective of the IECC version adopted). The energy analysis results show that residential and nonresidential commercial buildings meeting the 2009 IECC requirements save between 6.1% and 9.0% site energy, and between 6.4% and 7.7% energy cost when compared to 2006 IECC. Analysis also shows that semiheated buildings have energy and cost savings of 3.9% and 5.6%.

  4. Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD) is an exact digital representation of selected features from the USGS 7.5 minute topographic map series. Features that are...

  5. Kansas LPC CRI Protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Inventory and Monitoring: 2015-2019 Kansas Lesser Prairie-Chicken Cooperative Recovery Initiative. The Kansas Lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) Cooperative Recovery...

  6. Kansas TV facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer shows the location of all Kansas Title V sources (Clean Air Act major sources). Source information came from Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

  7. Kansas Rivers TMDL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set includes all the streams in the Kansas 2006 Water Register that have established TMDLs as of October 17, 2006. The impairments and implementation...

  8. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  9. Wind energy: An engineering survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahas, M.N.; Mohamad, A.S.; Akyurt, M.; El-Kalay, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive survey of literature about wind energy and wind machines, their design and their applications. The paper intends to provide those who plan for energy policy with thorough information about this renewable type of energy and the available machines that convert wind energy into useful mechanical or electrical work. The machines which are available at present range from the simple Savonius rotor to the powerful multi-blade windmills. The advantages and shortcomings of all types are discussed here.

  10. Applying Systems Engineering on Energy Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Safi, J.; Muller, G.; Bonnema, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Systems engineering is a discipline with methods and techniques to address complex problems. We want to study how Systems Engineering methods can help to address today's grand challenges, such as the energy problem. The first step is problem definition which aims at articulating the problem in its c

  11. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. [United States Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas State University (KSU) Electric Vehicle (EV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-01-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter's report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  12. Engineered nanomembranes for smart energy storage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfu; Chen, Yu; Schmidt, Oliver G; Yan, Chenglin

    2016-03-07

    Engineered nanomembranes are of great interest not only for large-scale energy storage devices, but also for on-chip energy storage integrated microdevices (such as microbatteries, microsupercapacitors, on-chip capacitors, etc.) because of their large active surfaces for electrochemical reactions, shortened paths for fast ion diffusion, and easy engineering for microdevice applications. In addition, engineered nanomembranes provide a lab-on-chip electrochemical device platform for probing the correlations of electrode structure, electrical/ionic conductivity, and electrochemical kinetics with device performance. This review focuses on the recent progress in engineered nanomembranes including tubular nanomembranes and planar nanomembranes, with the aim to provide a systematic summary of their fabrication, modification, and energy storage applications in lithium-ion batteries, lithium-oxygen batteries, on-chip electrostatic capacitors and micro-supercapacitors. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between engineered nanomembranes and electrochemical properties of lithium ion storage with engineered single-tube microbatteries is given, and the flexibility and transparency of micro-supercapacitors is also discussed. Remarks on challenges and perspectives related to engineered nanomembranes for the further development of energy storage applications conclude this review.

  13. Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, Jon G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Manwell, James F. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lackner, Matthew A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2012-12-31

    Utility-scale electricity produced from offshore wind farms has the potential to contribute significantly to the energy production of the United States. In order for the U.S. to rapidly develop these abundant resources, knowledgeable scientists and engineers with sound understanding of offshore wind energy systems are critical. This report summarizes the development of an upper-level engineering course in "Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering." This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of both the technical challenges of offshore wind energy and the practical regulatory, permitting, and planning aspects of developing offshore wind farms in the U.S. This course was offered on a pilot basis in 2011 at the University of Massachusetts and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), TU Delft, and GL Garrad Hassan have reviewed its content. As summarized in this report, the course consists of 17 separate topic areas emphasizing appropriate engineering fundamentals as well as development, planning, and regulatory issues. In addition to the course summary, the report gives the details of a public Internet site where references and related course material can be obtained. This course will fill a pressing need for the education and training of the U.S. workforce in this critically important area. Fundamentally, this course will be unique due to two attributes: an emphasis on the engineering and technical aspects of offshore wind energy systems, and a focus on offshore wind energy issues specific to the United States.

  14. Potential for Microbial Degradation of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride in Streambed Sediment at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant, Missouri, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of carbon-14 (14C) radiotracer-based microcosm experiments was conducted to assess the mechanisms and products of degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in streambed sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. The focus of the investigation was the potential for biotic and abiotic cis-DCE and VC degradation in surficial and underlying hyporheic sediment from the Blue River and its tributaries, Indian Creek and Boone Creek. Substantial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE and [1,2-14C] VC to 14C-carbon dioxide (14CO2) was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms prepared under oxic conditions. No significant accumulation of reductive dechlorination products was observed under these oxic incubation conditions. The results indicate that microbial mineralization processes involving direct oxidation or co-metabolic oxidation are the primary mechanisms of cis-DCE and VC biodegradation in oxic stream sediment at the Kansas City Plant. Substantial mineralization of [1,2-14C] VC also was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms incubated in the absence of detectable oxygen (dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 25 micrograms per liter). In general, the accumulation of mineralization products (14CO2 and 14C-methane [14CH4]) predominated with only trace-level detection of the reductive dechlorination product, 14C-ethene. In contrast, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE by reductive dechlorination or mineralization was not significant in the absence of detectable oxygen. The potential for [1,2-14C] VC biodegradation also was significant in sediments from the deeper hyporheic zones under oxic conditions and in the absence of detectable oxygen. In this study, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE was not significant in hyporheic sediment treatments under either oxygen condition. Taken together, the results indicate that microbial mineralization processes in

  15. An evaluation of the use of an advanced oxidation process to remove chlorinated hydrocarbons from groundwater at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, S.B. II; Peyton, G.R.

    1990-10-01

    The Allied-Signal Aerospace Company currently operates a production facility in Kansas City, Missouri, under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Over the years the operation of the DOE Kansas City Plant has resulted in the contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons, including trichloroethene (TCE). One of the plumes of contaminated groundwater, the underground tank farm (UTF) plume, was selected for remediation with an advanced oxidation process (AOP) consisting of simultaneous treatment by ozone (O{sub 3}), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Since the use of AOPs is relatively new for the removal of organics from groundwater, information on design criteria, costs, performance, and operating experience is not well documented in the literature. Therefore, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested to evaluate the treatment process. This report documents the work performed through FY 1989. The results of the initial year of the evaluations, FY 1988, have been published previously, and the evaluation will continue at least through FY 1990. This report first briefly describes the treatment plant and the mechanisms of the treatment process. Next, the methodology and the results from the evaluation are discussed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented. 8 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Balancing Energy Processes in Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balicki Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the issue of balancing energy processes in turbine engines in operation in aeronautic and marine propulsion systems with the aim to analyse and evaluate basic operating parameters. The first part presents the problem of enormous amounts of energy needed for driving fans and compressors of the largest contemporary turbofan engines commonly used in long-distance aviation. The amounts of the transmitted power and the effect of flow parameters and constructional properties of the engines on their performance and real efficiency are evaluated. The second part of the article, devoted to marine applications of turbine engines, presents the energy balance of the kinetic system of torque transmission from main engine turbines to screw propellers in the combined system of COGAG type. The physical model of energy conversion processes executed in this system is presented, along with the physical model of gasodynamic processes taking place in a separate driving turbine of a reversing engine. These models have made the basis for formulating balance equations, which then were used for analysing static and dynamic properties of the analysed type of propulsion, in particular in the aspect of mechanical loss evaluation in its kinematic system.

  17. US hydropower resource assessment for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Kansas.

  18. Solar energy engineering processes and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kalogirou, Soteris A

    2013-01-01

    As perhaps the most promising of all the renewable energy sources available today, solar energy is becoming increasingly important in the drive to achieve energy independence and climate balance. This new book is the masterwork from world-renowned expert Dr. Soteris Kalogirou, who has championed solar energy for decades. The book includes all areas of solar energy engineering, from the fundamentals to the highest level of current research. The author includes pivotal subjects such as solar collectors, solar water heating, solar space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, solar desalina

  19. Energy geostructures innovation in underground engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Laloui, Lyesse

    2013-01-01

    Energy geostructures are a tremendous innovation in the field of foundation engineering and are spreading rapidly throughout the world. They allow the procurement of a renewable and clean source of energy which can be used for heating and cooling buildings. This technology couples the structural role of geostructures with the energy supply, using the principle of shallow geothermal energy. This book provides a sound basis in the challenging area of energy geostructures.The objective of this book is to supply the reader with an exhaustive overview on the most up-to-date and available knowledge

  20. Solar energy engineering processes and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kalogirou, Soteris A

    2009-01-01

    As perhaps the most promising of all the renewable energy sources available today, solar energy is becoming increasingly important in the drive to achieve energy independence and climate balance. This new book is the masterwork from world-renowned expert Dr. Soteris Kalogirou, who has championed solar energy for decades. The book includes all areas of solar energy engineering, from the fundamentals to the highest level of current research. The author includes pivotal subjects such as solar collectors, solar water heating, solar space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, solar desalina

  1. Aerodynamic Electrical Energy: Wind Turbine Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Nielson, Andrew; Marchant, Scott; Baker, Doran; Engh, Michael; Kang, Alvin; Estrada, Gustavo; Graham, Brandon; Johnson, Jason; Nieveen, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Renewable resources such as wind, solar, and water, are important in energy production. This project was to design a wind turbine electricity generation system and gain an understanding of the engineering involved in producing electricity from the wind. Having observed the wind patterns on the campus of Utah State University, it was decided to obtain both a horizontal axis (HAWT) and a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) and mount them on the roof of the USU Dean F. Peterson, Jr. Engineering La...

  2. General engineering ethics and multiple stress of atomic energy engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kunihiko [Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    The factors, by which the modern engineering ethics has been profoundly affected, were classified to three categories, namely mental blow, the destruction of human function and environment damage. The role of atomic energy engineering in the ethic field has been shown in the first place. It is pointed out that it has brought about the mental blow by the elucidation of universal truth and discipline and the functional disorder by the power supply. However, the direct effect of radiation to the human kinds is only a part of the stresses comparing to the accumulation of the social stress which should be taken into account of by the possibility of disaster and the suspicion of the atomic energy politics. An increase in the multiple stresses as well as the restriction of criticism will place obstacles on the promotion of atomic energy. (author)

  3. A Vision for Systems Engineering Applied to Wind Energy (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, F.; Dykes, K.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation was given at the Third Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop on January 14, 2015. Topics covered include the importance of systems engineering, a vision for systems engineering as applied to wind energy, and application of systems engineering approaches to wind energy research and development.

  4. Pesticide evaluation for Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge is an overlay on the Corps of Engineers John Redmond Reservoir in east-central Kansas. The Refuge is managed to provide spring...

  5. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  6. Technical memo, energy engineering; Memotech, genie energetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Zotto, P.; Larre, J.M.; Merlet, A.; Picau, L.

    2003-07-01

    Organized like a database, this book allows to find rapidly all necessary information for the setting up and implementation of energy and air conditioning systems and for their management and maintenance: schemes symbols, standards and regulations, basic recalls of physics, technological solutions with explanation schemes and tables of characteristics. Contents: electrical engineering - general laws; properties of fluids and solids; schemes and graphics; thermal engineering; hydraulics; thermodynamics, refrigeration cycle and refrigerant; psychrometry - air treatment; acoustics; aeraulics; electrotechnics; thermal status and regulation; space heating equipments; refrigeration equipments; ventilation systems; air-conditioning systems; thermoregulation of thermal appliances; technical management of buildings. (J.S.)

  7. Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansure, A J

    2012-12-10

    Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. Too often comparisons of energy systems use efficiency when EROI would be more appropriate. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electricity delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Critical factors in determining the EROI of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) are examined in this work. These include the input energy embodied into the system. Embodied energy includes the energy contained in the materials, as well as, that consumed in each stage of manufacturing from mining the raw materials to assembling the finished system. Also critical are the system boundaries and value of the energy heat is not as valuable as electrical energy. The EROI of an EGS depends upon a number of factors that are currently unknown, for example what will be typical EGS well productivity, as well as, reservoir depth, temperature, and temperature decline rate. Thus the approach developed is to consider these factors as parameters determining EROI as a function of number of wells needed. Since the energy needed to construct a geothermal well is a function of depth, results are provided as a function of well depth. Parametric determination of EGS EROI is calculated using existing information on EGS and US Department of Energy (DOE) targets and is compared to the minimum EROI an energy production system should have to be an asset rather than a liability.

  8. Systems Engineering Model for ART Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Cruz, Carmen Margarita [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, Gary E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, Mollye C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The near-term objective of the EC team is to establish an operating, commercially scalable Recompression Closed Brayton Cycle (RCBC) to be constructed for the NE - STEP demonstration system (demo) with the lowest risk possible. A systems engineering approach is recommended to ensure adequate requirements gathering, documentation, and mode ling that supports technology development relevant to advanced reactors while supporting crosscut interests in potential applications. A holistic systems engineering model was designed for the ART Energy Conversion program by leveraging Concurrent Engineering, Balance Model, Simplified V Model, and Project Management principles. The resulting model supports the identification and validation of lifecycle Brayton systems requirements, and allows designers to detail system-specific components relevant to the current stage in the lifecycle, while maintaining a holistic view of all system elements.

  9. Kansas Water Science Center bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-03-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey Kansas Water Science Center has collected and interpreted hydrologic information in Kansas since 1895. Data collected include streamflow and gage height, reservoir content, water quality and water quantity, suspended sediment, and groundwater levels. Interpretative hydrologic studies are completed on national, regional, statewide, and local levels and cooperatively funded through more than 40 partnerships with these agencies. The U.S. Geological Survey provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. These collected data are in the National Water Information System https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ks/nwis/rt, and all results are documented in reports that also are online at https://ks.water.usgs.gov/. Follow the USGS Kansas Water Science Center on Twitter for the most recent updates and other information: https://twitter.com/USGS_KS.

  10. Master of Engineering Energy Systems Engineering Program: Smart Campus Energy Systems Demonstration DE-SC0005523

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, Martha [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Coulter, John [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2014-09-25

    Program Purpose and Position: The mission of the Master of Engineering in Energy Systems Engineering program is to invigorate the pipeline of new engineering graduates interested in energy oriented careers and thus produce a new generation of technical leaders for the energy and power industries. Over the next decade, nearly 50% of the skilled workers and technical leaders in the gas and electric utility industries will retire -- a much larger void than the current available and qualified professionals could fill [CEWD, 2012 survey]. The Masters of Engineering in Energy System Engineering program provides an opportunity for cross-discipline education for graduates interested in a career in the energy industry. It focuses on electric power and the challenges and opportunities to develop a sustainable, reliable and resilient system that meets human needs in an increasingly sustainable manner through the use of environmentally sound energy resources and delivery. Both graduates and employers benefit from a well-trained professional workforce that is ready to hit the road running and be immediately productive in meeting these challenges, through this innovative and unique program.

  11. A Comparison of E-Book and Print Book Discovery, Preferences, and Usage by Science and Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Julie; Roach, Jennifer; Emde, Judith; McEathron, Scott; Russell, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The availability of science and technology e-books through the University of Kansas Libraries is growing rapidly through approval plans, e-book packages, and electronic demand-driven acquisitions. Based on informal conversations with faculty, questions still lingered as to the acceptance of books in the electronic format by faculty and graduate…

  12. A Comparison of E-Book and Print Book Discovery, Preferences, and Usage by Science and Engineering Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Julie; Roach, Jennifer; Emde, Judith; McEathron, Scott; Russell, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The availability of science and technology e-books through the University of Kansas Libraries is growing rapidly through approval plans, e-book packages, and electronic demand-driven acquisitions. Based on informal conversations with faculty, questions still lingered as to the acceptance of books in the electronic format by faculty and graduate…

  13. Ecoregions of Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a...

  14. Energy, variability and weather finance engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussis, Dimitrios; Parara, Iliana; Gournari, Panagiota; Moustakis, Yiannis; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Iliopoulou, Theano; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Karakatsanis, Georgios

    2017-04-01

    Most types of renewable energies are characterized by intense intermittency, causing significant instabilities to the grid; further requiring additional infrastructure (e.g. pumped-storage) for buffering hydrometeorological uncertainties, as well as complex operational rules for load balancing. In addition, most intermittent renewable units are subsidized, creating significant market inefficiencies. Weather derivatives comprise mature financial tools for integrating successfully the intermittent-load and base-load components into a unified hybrid energy system and establish their operation within a generalized uncertainty management market. With a growing global market share and 46% utilization of this financial tool by the energy industry and 12% by agriculture (that partially concerns biofuel resources), weather derivatives are projected to constitute a critical subsystem of many grids for buffering frequent hydrometeorological risks of low and medium impacts -which are not covered by standard insurance contracts that aim exclusively at extreme events and high financial damages. In this context, we study the attributes of hydrometeorological time series in a remote and small island in Greece, powered by an autonomous hybrid energy system. Upon the results we choose the optimal underlying index and we further compose and engineer a weather derivative with features of a typical option contract -which we consider most flexible and appropriate for the case- to test our assumptions on its beneficiary effects for both the budget of private energy producers and the island's public administration. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  15. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Upper Kansas River Watershed Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period as part of a...

  16. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  17. Wind energy systems control engineering design

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Sanz, Mario

    2012-01-01

    IntroductionBroad Context and MotivationConcurrent Engineering: A Road Map for EnergyQuantitative Robust ControlNovel CAD Toolbox for QFT Controller DesignOutline Part I: Advanced Robust Control Techniques: QFT and Nonlinear SwitchingIntroduction to QFTQuantitative Feedback TheoryWhy Feedback? QFT OverviewInsight into the QFT TechniqueBenefits of QFTMISO Analog QFT Control SystemIntroductionQFT Method (Single-Loop MISO System)Design Procedure OutlineMinimum-Phase System Performance SpecificationsJ LTI Plant ModelsPlant Templates of P?(s), P( j_i )Nominal PlantU-Contour (Stability Bound)Trackin

  18. Kansas Road Centerline Fle (KRCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This version of the Kansas Road Centerline File (0801) represents the first effort to create a statewide roads layer from best available data sources. KGS integrated...

  19. Energy Saving by the Idle Engine Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editor [Korea Energy Management Corporation, Yongin (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    The high energy price facing up to $30 per barrel is the cost increasing factor that brings a deathblow to the domestic transportation industry, so it is serious to practice the energy saving in order to overcome such a situation. Transportation industry once got the great effect from the promotion for a light car, the improvement of auto structure, and the induction to economical driving way. According to the recent survey on drivers, however, the rate of the respondents that replied on the survey as 'in cases of stopping or parking for 1 minute, turn off the engine.' was just 14%, 86% of respondents did not have any consciousness of the problem about the idle operation. The Government has been promoting the legalization of the restriction to prevent an idle operation and enacting 'An Act of Idle Regulation in a Specific Area' and 'A Rule of Idle Restriction in a General Area'. An idle operation, which is one of the biggest factors in excessive consumption of oil as well as an air pollutant, should eradicate by self-participation. However, because an idle operation is conducted by unconsciousness, the development of an automatic controller is required for the restriction of unnecessary energy consumption. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Forests of Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Meneguzzo; B.J. Butler

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on annual inventories conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station (NRS) of the U.S. Forest Service. The estimates presented in this update are based on field data collected in 2009-2013 with comparisons made to data collected from...

  1. Kansas' Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; M.H. Hansen; R.L. Atchison

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  2. Forests of Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Meneguzzo; S.J. Crocker

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on annual inventories conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station (NRS) of the U.S. Forest Service. The estimates presented in this update are based on field data collected in 2010-2014 with comparisons made to data collected from...

  3. Kansas' forest resources, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; P.D. Miles; R.A. Atchison

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  4. Kansas' forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; C.H. Barnett; C.M. Kurtz; R.A. Atchison

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  5. Kansas' forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; M.H. Hansen; C.H. Barnett; R.A. Atchison

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  6. Kansas' forest resources, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; D.E. Haugen; R.A. Atchison

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  7. Sexting in Kansas Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an exploratory study about sexting, the sending of sexually explicit or illicit photos or video between cell phones, in Kansas public schools. An on-line survey asked superintendents to report if they have had an occurrence of sexting in their district. They were also asked if they felt sexting is currently a problem in their…

  8. Wind Energy Status and Future Wind Engineering Challenges: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thresher, R.; Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the current status of wind energy technology, the potential for future wind energy development and the science and engineering challenges that must be overcome for the technology to meet its potential.

  9. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  10. Energy and labor cost of gasoline engine remanufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venta, E.R.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1978-09-01

    This report presents a detailed estimate of the labor and energy, by fuel type, required by the U.S. economy to remanufacture gasoline-fueled automobile and truck engines. Th estimate was obtained by combining data provided by several remanufacturers with the results of input--output analysis. A rough estimate of the labor and energy required to manufacture new engines is also given. These estimates suggest that remanufactured engines require 50% of the energy and 67% of the labor that new engines require.

  11. Engineering Interfaces for Photovoltaic Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Stacey

    2011-03-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and the related quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) show promise as inexpensive, efficient next-generation photovoltaic technologies. A typical cell design consists of a sensitizer chemisorbed to a nanoporous Ti O2 substrate; the sensitizer absorbs a photon and an excited electron is injected into the Ti O2 where it diffuses to the anode. However, many devices suffer from a high rate of electron-hole recombination at the interface between Ti O2 and the hole conductive material, leading to reduced conversion efficiency. In this work we explore whether a passivating layer at the interface can improve efficiency by acting as a barrier against electron recombination. We have studied both organic and inorganic approaches to modifying the interfacial properties in DSSC and QDSSC devices. In studies of CdS-based QDSSCs, a series of organic self-assembled monolayers were formed at the interface, and their effect on CdS uptake and resulting optoelectronic and device properties was investigated. In DSSCs, nanoscale inorganic dielectric films of different thicknesses were applied to the interface using atomic layer deposition prior to dye absorption. The effect on device performance was measured experimentally and compared with predictions from kinetic models. The results of these investigations will be discussed in the context of the ability of interface engineering to improve photovoltaic energy conversion.

  12. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R. M.

    1980-06-01

    The solar heating and cooling system installed at the headquarters of Citizens Mutual Savings Association in Leavenworth, Kansas, is described in detail. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program and became operational in March, 1979. The designer was TEC, Inc. Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri and contractor was Norris Brothers, Inc., Lawrence, Kansas. The solar system is expected to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2200 square feet. Five, 3-ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two, 3000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  13. Energy Efficient Waste Heat Recovery from an Engine Exhaust System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENERGY EFFICIENT WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FROM AN ENGINE EXHAUST SYSTEM 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...release. Distribution is unlimited. ENERGY EFFICIENT WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FROM AN ENGINE EXHAUST SYSTEM Aaron R. VanDenBerg Lieutenant, United...HEAT RECOVERY DEVICES Ships mainly extract heat and energy from exhaust gases by using a waste heat boiler located in the actual exhaust duct. The

  14. Kansas forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Robert L. Atchison; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Mark D. Nelson; Charles H. Perry; William H. IV Reading; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2008-01-01

    The first completed annual inventory of Kansas forests reports 2.1 million acres of forest land, roughly 4 percent of the total land area in the State. Softwood forests account for nearly 5 percent of the total timberland area. Oak/hickory forest types make up 56 percent of the total hardwood forest land area. Elm/ash/cottonwood accounts for more than 30 percent of the...

  15. Kansas' Forests 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Robert L. Atchison; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Grant Domke; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Andrew Lister; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Ronald J. Piva; Christopher W. Woodall

    2013-01-01

    The second completed annual inventory of Kansas' forests reports 2.4 million acres of forest land, roughly 5 percent of the total land area in the State. Softwood forests account for 4.4 percent of the total timberland area. Oak/hickory forest types make up 55 percent of the total hardwood forest land area. Elm/ash/cottonwood accounts for more than 32 percent of...

  16. WIND ENERGY – ECOSUSTAINABILITY ENGINEERING SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Gabriela POPA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Renewables provides increased safety energy supply and limiting imports of energy resources, interms of sustainable economic development. The new requirements for sustainable development have determinedthe world to put the issue of energy production methods and increase the share of energy produced fromrenewable energy. This paper presents the history of wind power, advantages and disadvantages of renewableenergy, particularly wind energy as an alternative source of energy. Windmills can be horizontal axis or verticalaxis Savonius and Darrieus rotor. Latest innovations allow operation of variable speed wind turbines, or turbinespeed control based on wind speed. Wind energy is considered one of the most sustainable choices betweenvariants future wind resources are immense.

  17. Mechanical engineers' handbook, energy and power

    CERN Document Server

    Kutz, Myer

    2015-01-01

    The engineer's ready reference for mechanical power and heat Mechanical Engineer's Handbook provides the mostcomprehensive coverage of the entire discipline, with a focus onexplanation and analysis. Packaged as a modular approach, thesebooks are designed to be used either individually or as a set,providing engineers with a thorough, detailed, ready reference ontopics that may fall outside their scope of expertise. Each bookprovides discussion and examples as opposed to straight data andcalculations, giving readers the immediate background they needwhile pointing them toward more in-depth infor

  18. Maximum Power Output of Quantum Heat Engine with Energy Bath

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shengnan

    2016-01-01

    The difference between quantum isoenergetic process and quantum isothermal process comes from the violation of the law of equipartition of energy in the quantum regime. To reveal an important physical meaning of this fact, here we study a special type of quantum heat engine consisting of three processes: isoenergetic, isothermal and adiabatic processes. Therefore, this engine works between the energy and heat baths. Combining two engines of this kind, it is possible to realize the quantum Carnot engine. Furthermore, considering finite velocity of change of the potential shape, here an infinite square well with moving walls, the power output of the engine is discussed. It is found that the efficiency and power output are both closely dependent on the initial and final states of the quantum isothermal process. The performance of the engine cycle is shown to be optimized by control of the occupation probability of the ground state, which is determined by the temperature and the potential width. The relation betw...

  19. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  20. Renewable energy technology handbook for military engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Renewable energy applications are introduced that are considered promising for military use in the 1980s. These are: solar hot water for buildings, active solar hot water and space heating for buildings, passive solar heating and cooling of buildings, solar industrial process heata, solar ponds, photovoltaic power for homes, photovoltaic power for remote applications, parabolic dish solar systems for remote applications, wind energy for buildings, wind energy for central power plants, wind energy for water pumping, biomass energy systems for buildings, biomass energy systems for central power plants, geothermal energy for process heat, and geothermal energy for central power plants. For each of these is given: a brief history of the technology and information on how the technology works; a detailed technical and economic profile of an operating system; and a summary listing of operating civilian and military systems that are open for public viewing.

  1. Rocket Engine Innovations Advance Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    During launch countdown, at approximately T-7 seconds, the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) roar to life. When the controllers indicate normal operation, the solid rocket boosters ignite and the shuttle blasts off. Initially, the SSMEs throttle down to reduce stress during the period of maximum dynamic pressure, but soon after, they throttle up to propel the orbiter to 17,500 miles per hour. In just under 9 minutes, the three SSMEs burn over 1.6 million pounds of propellant, and temperatures inside the main combustion chamber reach 6,000 F. To cool the engines, liquid hydrogen circulates through miles of tubing at -423 F. From 1981to 2011, the Space Shuttle fleet carried crew and cargo into orbit to perform a myriad of unprecedented tasks. After 30 years and 135 missions, the feat of engineering known as the SSME boasted a 100-percent flight success rate.

  2. Solar energy sciences and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Enteria, Napoleon

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is available all over the world in different intensities. Theoretically, the solar energy available on the surface of the earth is enough to support the energy requirements of the entire planet. However, in reality, progress and development of solar science and technology depends to a large extent on human desires and needs. This is due to the various barriers to overcome and to deal with the economics of practical utilization of solar energy.This book will introduce the rapid development and progress in the field of solar energy applications for science and technology: the advanc

  3. Applied data analysis and modeling for energy engineers and scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, T Agami

    2011-01-01

    ""Applied Data Analysis and Modeling for Energy Engineers and Scientists"" discusses mathematical models, data analysis, and decision analysis in modeling. The approach taken in this volume focuses on the modeling and analysis of thermal systems in an engineering environment, while also covering a number of other critical areas. Other material covered includes the tools that researchers and engineering professionals will need in order to explore different analysis methods, use critical assessment skills and reach sound engineering conclusions. The book also covers process and system design and

  4. The Galatia, Kansas, chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schmus, W. R.; Keil, K.; Lange, D. E.; Conrad, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the Galatia meteorite found August 1971 approximately 7 km ENE of Galatia, Barton County, Kansas (98 deg 53 min W, 38 deg 39.5 min N). The single stone weighed 23.9 kg and is partially weathered. Olivine (Fa 24.9) and pyroxene (Fs 20.9) compositions indicate L-group classification, and textural observations indicate that the stone is of petrologic type 6. While Galatia is similar in many respects to the Otis L6 chondrite found 20 miles to the west, Galatia does not have the brecciated structure of Otis and is therefore not part of the same fall.

  5. Potential for energy savings in old and new auto engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, John R.

    1985-11-01

    This paper disucsses the potential for energy savings in the transportation sector through the use of both improved and entirely new automotive engines. Although spark-ignition and diesel internal combustion engines will remain the dominant choices for passenger-car use throughout the rest of this century, improved versions of these engines (lean-burn, low-friction spark-ignition and adiabatic, low-friction diesel engines) could, in the long term, provide a 20-30 percent improvement in fuel economy over what is currently available. The use of new materials, and modifications to both vehicle structure and vehicle transmissions may yield further improvements. Over a longer time frame, the introduction of the high-temperature gas-turbine engine and the use of new synfuels may provide further opportunities for energy conservation.

  6. Electrical engineering complete volume. Energy- and buildings engineering - process engineering - automation engineering; Elektrotechnik Gesamtband. Energie- und Gebaeudetechnik - Betriebstechnik - Automatisierungstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebscher, Heinrich; Dzieia, Michael; Engbarth, Georg (and others)

    2009-07-01

    Contents: Integration of technical systems in buildings using bus technology - the new guideline 6015; integrated automation and communication; roomautomation; integrations of technical solutions shown on building equipment and some examples for components and customer requirements. Main topics are: energy supply and safety; appliances, devices and components; control systems; drive systems; communications systems; facility management; planning and realization; maintenance and retrofitting; attachment with questions. (GL)

  7. Automated Comparison of Building Energy Simulation Engines (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polly, B.; Horowitz, S.; Booten, B.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation describes the BEopt comparative test suite, which is a tool that facilitates the automated comparison of building energy simulation engines. It also demonstrates how the test suite is improving the accuracy of building energy simulation programs. Building energy simulation programs inform energy efficient design for new homes and energy efficient upgrades for existing homes. Stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from simulation programs. Previous research indicates that software tends to over-predict energy usage for poorly-insulated leaky homes. NREL is identifying, investigating, and resolving software inaccuracy issues. Comparative software testing is one method of many that NREL uses to identify potential software issues.

  8. Alternative energies: Engineering, economics, market potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hake, B.

    1981-11-01

    Rentability calculations are disappointing for most alternative energies. Technical improvements that might change this are not in sight, so that the dependence on imported oil and gas will hardly be reduced. Producers of solar collectors, heat pumps, solar cells, and cogeneration units must keep in mind that the market will hardly expand. This was the result of a seminar on 'Alternative energy sources: Technology, economics, marketing potential - a critical review', held on May 5 at Haus der Technik, Essen.

  9. Exhaust gas energy recovery system of pneumatic driving automotive engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Yongqiang; Sun Wenxu; Li Qinghua; Zhong Ming; Hao Wei; Du Wenchang

    2011-01-01

    Almost the same quantity to net output work of energy has been carried out and wasted by exhaust gas in typical automotive engine. Recovering the energy from exhaust gas and converting to mechanical energy will dramatically increase the heat efficiency and decrease the fuel consumption. With the increasing demand of fuel conservation, exhaust gas energy recovery technologies have been a hot topic. At present, many researches have been focused on heating or cooling the cab, mechanical energy using and thermo-electronic converting. Unfortunately, the complicated transmission of mechanical energy using and the depressed efficiency of thermo-electronic converting restrict their widely applying. In this paper, a kind of exhaust gas energy recovery system of pneumatic driving automotive engine, in which highly compressed air acts as energy storing and converting carrier, has been established. Pneumatic driving motor can produce moderate speed and high torque output, which is compatible for engine using. The feasibility has been certificated by GT-Power simulation and laboratory testes. The technologies about increasing recovery efficiency have been discussed in detail. The results demonstrated that the in parallel exhaust gas energy recovery system, which is similar to the compound turbo-charger structure can recovery 8 to 10 percent of rated power output. At last, a comprehensive system,which includes Rankine cycle based power wheel cycle unit etc. , has been introduced.

  10. The Permian system in Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Rocks of Permian age in Kansas were first recognized in 1895, and by the early 21st century the internationally accepted boundary between the Permian and the...

  11. 2010 Kansas bobwhite status report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a brief description of bobwhite population trends in Kansas over the last 30+ years. At the time of this report most of the 2010 surveys...

  12. Reliability engineering in solar energy: workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, G.

    1980-03-01

    A workshop to reveal the scope of reliability-related activities in solar energy conversion projects and in nonsolar segments of industry is described. Two reliability programs, one in heating and cooling and one in photovoltaics, are explicated. This document also presents general suggestions for the establishment of a unified program for reliability, durability, maintainability, and safety (RDM and S) in present and future solar projects.

  13. Control and automation, and energy system engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tai-hoon [Hannam Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Adeli, Hojjat [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Stoica, Adrian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kang, Byeong-Ho (eds.) [Tasmania Univ., Hobart, TAS (Australia)

    2011-07-01

    This book comprises selected papers of the International Conferences, CA and CES3 2011, held as Part of the Future Generation Information Technology Conference, FGIT 2011, in Conjunction with GDC 2011, Jeju Island, Korea, in December 2011. The papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions and focused on the various aspects of control and automation, and circuits, control, communication, electricity, electronics, energy, system, signal and simulation. (orig.)

  14. Reliability engineering in solar energy: workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, G.

    1980-03-01

    A workshop to reveal the scope of reliability-related activities in solar energy conversion projects and in nonsolar segments of industry is described. Two reliability programs, one in heating and cooling and one in photovoltaics, are explicated. This document also presents general suggestions for the establishment of a unified program for reliability, durability, maintainability, and safety (RDM and S) in present and future solar projects.

  15. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  16. Energy engineering: Student-researcher collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leban, Krisztina Monika; Ritchie, Ewen; Beckowska, Patrycja Maria

    2013-01-01

    ; student-researcher and researcher -researcher is analyzed. The problems of work division, synchronization, transportation, storing and dissemination are disused. The importance of a proper work method and collaboration between researchers at different levels is underlined. As a case study, a research......This article reports on cooperation methods between researchers and students at different levels. Levels included in this work are BSc, MSc and PhD student levels. At Aalborg University, Department of Energy Technology education and research are closely linked. The relationship between student-student...

  17. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine detailed design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.; Singer, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    The energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine is a single stage system based on technology advancements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials to achieve high performance, low operating economics and durability commensurate with commercial service requirements. Low loss performance features combined with a low through-flow velocity approach results in a predicted efficiency of 88.8 for a flight propulsion system. Turbine airfoil durability goals are achieved through the use of advanced high-strength and high-temperature capability single crystal materials and effective cooling management. Overall, this design reflects a considerable extension in turbine technology that is applicable to future, energy efficient gas-turbine engines.

  18. Energy management handbook for building operating engineers student workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The handbook provides operating engineers with the basic information needed to implement specific energy conservation opportunities, and additional information is presented relative to the formulation and development of the energy management plan. Chapters are entitled: The Need for Energy Management (International Factors, The US Energy Situation, Energy and the Building Owner); The Fundamentals of Energy Consumption in Buildings (Energy Basics, Heat Basics, Heat Flow and the Building Envelope, Air and Comfort, Factors Affecting Energy Use In Buildings); Principles of Energy Conservation (Building Energy Consumption Characteristics); Planning the Energy Management Program (Obtaining Commitment and Support, Establishing the Energy Use Index, Organizing to Develop the Plan, Developing and Implementing the Plan); Conducting a Survey of Facilities and Operations (The Energy Audit, Preparation of Building and Systems Profile, Measurement and Instrumentation); Guidelines for Energy Conservation (Operator ECO's, Owner ECO'S); Developing the Draft Final Plan (Analyze Survey Findings, Putting the Plan on Paper, Review and Submit); Implementing the Program (Developing the Final Plan, Implementing the Plan, Monitoring and Updating the Program). A glossary is included and specific information on degree days and cooling hours for some selected cities and a computer energy study data for the New York Hilton are included in appendices. (MCW)

  19. 77 FR 74520 - Encore Clean Energy, Inc., Energy & Engine Technology Corp., Equity Media Holdings Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Encore Clean Energy, Inc., Energy & Engine Technology Corp., Equity Media Holdings Corporation, eTotalSource, Inc., Extensions, Inc., Firepond, Inc., and GNC Energy Corporation; Order Withdrawing...

  20. Maximum Power Output of Quantum Heat Engine with Energy Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The difference between quantum isoenergetic process and quantum isothermal process comes from the violation of the law of equipartition of energy in the quantum regime. To reveal an important physical meaning of this fact, here we study a special type of quantum heat engine consisting of three processes: isoenergetic, isothermal and adiabatic processes. Therefore, this engine works between the energy and heat baths. Combining two engines of this kind, it is possible to realize the quantum Carnot engine. Furthermore, considering finite velocity of change of the potential shape, here an infinite square well with moving walls, the power output of the engine is discussed. It is found that the efficiency and power output are both closely dependent on the initial and final states of the quantum isothermal process. The performance of the engine cycle is shown to be optimized by control of the occupation probability of the ground state, which is determined by the temperature and the potential width. The relation between the efficiency and power output is also discussed.

  1. Power turbines for an energy bonus from diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupp, M. (ABB Turbo Systems Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)); Nissen, M. (ABB Industrietechnik AG, Hamburg (Germany))

    1994-01-01

    ABB exhaust-gas turbochargers - more than 150,000 in all - are in service worldwide with diesel engines on board ships and locomotives as well as in stationary power plants. Thanks to the turbochargers, the original outputs of the engines are raised by about 300%. Modern high-power turbochargers are so efficient that some exhaust-gas energy can be drawn off for use in a power turbine. The extra power won in this way can be either transmitted via gearing to the engine crankshaft or converted into electrical energy by a generator. ABB has developed a compact, controlled power turbine-generator installation especially for marine applications. The first unit has been certified by Lloyds Register of Shipping and is providing electricity for the onboard electrical power supply of a large container ship operated by Maersk Line. (orig.)

  2. U.S. Energy Prospects: An Engineering Viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC. Commission on Education.

    With the Arab oil embargo of 1973, the United States became aware of its dependence on foreign fuel to maintain its productive capacity, employment base, political autonomy, strategic security, and living standard. An engineering Task Force on Energy was appointed to provide an informed assessment of the realistic strategies that could be…

  3. Libraries in Kansas: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/kansas.html Libraries in Kansas To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Fort Riley IRWIN ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY 650 Huebner Road FORT RILEY, KS 66442-5037 ...

  4. 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — In 2008, an update of the 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) database was undertaken. The 1990 KLCP database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State...

  5. Kansas Non-State Road System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a single centerline road network representation of 120,000 miles of the Kansas non-state highway system with limited attribution. It includes rural...

  6. Kansas Water Quality Action Targeting System (KATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This system is a revision of the original KATS system developed in 1990 as a tool to aid resource managers target Kansas valuable and vulnerable water resources for...

  7. Fuji Electric's activities and engineering for energy conservation; Sho energy eno torikumi to engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, E.; Kubota, S.; Uemura, T. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-10

    Environmental preservation is the most important subject for living things to survive. Fuji Electric's activities have been based on energy conservation. In proceeding with energy conservation according to the amendment to the Energy Conservation Act and ISO14001, it is recommended to refer to the engineering know-how which Fuji Electric has experienced and accumulated. It is very important that the activity should be given consideration to the three key factors of measuring systems, electrical equipment, and new energy. (author)

  8. The Application of Quantum Energy Saver on Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce diesel fuel consumption, this paper conducts the research in view of a new type of quantum energy saving device, and then produce the sample and applied on automobile engine, Detect fuel use of an automobile by automobile fuel saving technology as-sessment methods from the department of transportation. Compare the changes of fuel use be-fore and after installation of quantum energy saving device on the same car, and give the feed-back of energy saving capability. The result shows, after installed quantum energy saver, both fuel consumption and the smoke of tail gas has decreased. The analysis and application of this paper carry out the conclusion that the quantum energy saver can play an important role in en-ergy saving and emission reduction, and provide a reference for other related research.

  9. Renewable energy technology from underpinning physics to engineering application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infield, D. G.

    2008-03-01

    The UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC) in it's submission to the DTI's 2006 Energy Review reminded us that the ''UK has abundant wind, wave and tidal resources available; its mild climate lends itself to bio-energy production, and solar radiation levels are sufficient to sustain a viable solar industry''. These technologies are at different stages of development but they all draw on basic and applied Science and Engineering. The paper will briefly review the renewable energy technologies and their potential for contributing to a sustainable energy supply. Three research topics will be highlighted that bridge the gap between the physics underpinning the energy conversion, and the engineering aspects of development and deployment; all three are highly relevant to the Government's programme on micro-generation. Two are these are taken from field of thin film photovoltaics (PV), one related to novel device development and the other to a measurement technique for assessing the manufacturing quality of PV modules and their performance. The third topic concerns the development of small building integrated wind turbines and examines the complex flow associated with such applications. The paper will conclude by listing key research challenges that are central to the search for efficient and cost-effective renewable energy generation.

  10. Buffer thermal energy storage for a solar Brayton engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been completed on the application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine. To aid in the study, a computer program was written for complete transient/stead-state Brayton cycle performance. The results indicated that thermal storage can afford a significant decrease in the number of engine shutdowns as compared to operating without thermal storage. However, the number of shutdowns does not continuously decrease as the storage material weight increases. In fact, there appears to be an optimum weight for minimizing the number of shutdowns.

  11. Unit stream power, minimum energy dissipation rate, and river engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted Yang

    2010-01-01

    Unit stream power is the most important and dominant parameter for the determination of transport rate of sand,gravel, and hyper-concentrated sediment with wash load.Minimum energy dissipation rate theory, or its simplified minimum unit stream power and minimum stream power theories,can provide engineers the needed theoretical basis for river morphology and river engineering studies.The Generalized Sediment Transport model for Alluvial River Simulation computer mode series have been developed based on the above theories.The computer model series have been successfully applied in many countries.Examples will be used to illustrate the applications of the computer models to solving a wide range of river morphology and river engineering problems.

  12. Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Alan L; Johnson, Nancy L; Keefe, Andrew C; Alexander, Paul W; Sarosi, Peter Maxwell; Herrera, Guillermo A; Yates, James Ryan

    2013-12-17

    A heat engine includes a first rotatable pulley and a second rotatable pulled spaced from the first rotatable pulley. A shape memory alloy (SMA) element is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at an SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element includes first spring coil and a first fiber core within the first spring coil. A timing cable is disposed about disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at a timing pulley ratio, which is different than the SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element converts a thermal energy gradient between the hot region and the cold region into mechanical energy.

  13. Thermal engineering cuts energy use to speed production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-05-01

    This article gives details of energy saving designs in manufacturing processes implemented by Mannings Thermal and Environmental Engineers of Southport. Descriptions are given of reduced energy consumption and increased production resulting from the thermoforming tool presses used in producing car trim; the introduction of heating units to preheat moulding tools in the production of high performance rubber seals; the simultaneous controlled heating of several metal tools with low voltage ceramic heating elements set in the brickwork housing having a motorised insulated cover forming a sealed heating chamber; and the conversion of a brick lined hearth furnace from electric to gas using hard wearing firebricks, gas burners, and forced cooling system. (UK)

  14. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  15. Renewable energy physics, engineering, environmental impacts, economics & planning

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    This volume is a true shelf reference, providing a thorough overview of the entire renewable energy sphere, while still functioning as a go-to information source for professionals and students when they need answers about a specific technical issue. Crafted over the last 15 years into a problem-solving tool for engineers, researchers, consultants and planners currently working in the field, as well as a detailed map of the renewables universe for those looking to expand into new technological specialties, Renewable Energy by Sorensen offers the most comprehensive coverage of the subject available.

  16. Proceedings of the fifteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Fifteenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 14-15, 1997, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was organized into eight technical sessions, which included 32 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. The topics of the eight sessions are: multiphase flows 1; multiphase flows 2; mostly optics; fluid mechanics; nonlinear fields; welding and cracks; materials; and controls. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. It has the prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation`s future energy options will have to be identified, developed, and built. It is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary for the solution of present and future problems of energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, consistent with respect for the environment. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the energy database for contributions to this Symposium.

  17. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  18. Kansas City Plots Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Kansas City (Missouri) Public Schools is at a crossroads. The district has struggled for decades with poor academic achievement, dwindling enrollment and budget, and short-term superintendents--27 in the past 40 years. Most recently, after a two-year stint during which he helped the district get its financial house in order, closing nearly half of…

  19. Energy Loss in Pulse Detonation Engine due to Fuel Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid viscosity is a significant factor resulting in the energy loss in most fluid dynamical systems. To analyze the energy loss in the pulse detonation engine (PDE due to the viscosity of the fuel, the energy loss in the Burgers model excited by periodic impulses is investigated based on the generalized multisymplectic method in this paper. Firstly, the single detonation energy is simplified as an impulse; thus the complex detonation process is simplified. And then, the symmetry of the Burgers model excited by periodic impulses is studied in the generalized multisymplectic framework and the energy loss expression is obtained. Finally, the energy loss in the Burgers model is investigated numerically. The results in this paper can be used to explain the difference between the theoretical performance and the experimental performance of the PDE partly. In addition, the analytical approach of this paper can be extended to the analysis of the energy loss in other fluid dynamic systems due to the fluid viscosity.

  20. Chemical engineering challenges and investment opportunities in sustainable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The chemical and energy industries are transforming as they adjust to the new era of high-priced petroleum and severe global warming. As a result of the transformation, engineering challenges and investment opportunities abound. Rapid evolution and fast growth are expected in cathode and anode materials as well as polymeric electrolytes for vehicular batteries and in high-performance polymer-ceramic composites for wind turbines, fuel-efficient aircraft, and lighter and safer cars. Unique process-engineering opportunities exist in sand-oil, coal, and possibly also shale liquefaction to produce transportation fuel; and also in genetic engineering of photosynthesizing plants and other organisms for their processing into high-performance biodegradable polymers and high-value-added environmentally friendly chemicals. Also, research on the feasibility of mitigation of global warming through enhancement of CO(2) uptake by the southern oceans by fertilization with trace amounts of iron is progressing. Because chemical engineers are uniquely well trained in mathematical modeling of mass transport, flow, and mixing, and also in cost analysis, they are likely to join the oceanographers and marine biologists in this important endeavor.

  1. Final work plan for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-05-01

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas (Figure 1.1). This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Data obtained in this sampling event will be used to (1) evaluate the current status of previously detected contamination at Webber and (2) determine whether the site requires further action. This work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan, approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document should be consulted for complete details of the technical activities proposed at the former CCC/USDA facility in Webber.

  2. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials. PMID:27283872

  3. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  4. Engineering radical polymer electrodes for electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevers, Douglas R.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Wheeler, Dean R.

    2017-06-01

    In principle a wide range of organic materials can store energy in the form of reversible redox conversions of stable radicals. Such chemistry holds great promise for energy storage applications due to high theoretical capacities, high rate capabilities, intrinsic structural tunability, and the possibility of low-cost ;green; syntheses from renewable sources. There have been steady improvements in the design of organic radical polymers, in which radicals are incorporated into the backbone and/or as pendant groups. This review highlights opportunities for improved redox molecule and polymer design along with the key challenges (e.g., transport phenomena, solubility, and reaction mechanisms) to transitioning known organic radicals into high-performance electrodes. Ultimately, organic-based batteries are still a nascent field with many open questions. Further advances in molecular design, electrode engineering, and device architecture will be required for these systems to reach their full potential and meet the diverse and increasing demands for energy storage.

  5. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  6. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  7. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  8. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  9. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  10. Low-grade energy of the ground for civil engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potienko Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article researches issues related to the relevance of applying renewable energy sources for civil engineering. The aim of the work is the study of modern approaches to designing buildings, using low-grade energy of the ground. The research methodology is based on the complex analysis of international design experience and on identifying the strengths and weaknesses of objects that use low-grade heat. We have identified the prospects of applying it for domestic construction practice. The state policy in the field of the efficient use of energy resources has been analyzed, and the vector of energy-saving programs development for the Samara Region has been defined. The research describes the impact of using geothermal energy on the architectural and planning solutions of buildings, as well as the peculiar features of the latter’s design, which are related primarily to the increase of energy efficiency. As a result, in the article a conclusion is made that the objects under investigation may be considered as one of the vectors of sustainable architecture development.

  11. Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuen-Sen Lin

    2008-12-31

    Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data

  12. Engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Includes papers in the following fields: Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical...

  13. Engineering applications of nanotechnology from energy to drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Hamid, Nor

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the use of nanotechnology in several fields of engineering. Among others, the reader will find valuable information as to how nanotechnology can aid in extending the life of component materials exposed to corrosive atmospheres, in thermal fluid energy conversion processes, anti-reflection coatings on photovoltaic cells to yield enhanced output from solar cells, in connection with friction and wear reduction in automobiles, and buoyancy suppression in free convective heat transfer. Moreover, this unique resource presents the latest research on nanoscale transport phenomena and concludes with a look at likely future trends.

  14. Engineering of surfaces for energy-related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Grant Asano

    Finding solutions to today's energy challenges will be spearheaded by the development of novel materials systems. This dissertation examines the engineering of surfaces for both energy collection and energy storage. Energy collection research, such as the development of more efficient photovoltaic devices, has received much attention in recent literature, however, achieving inexpensive efficiency improvements in other parts of the photovoltaic system has not been well documented. The first part of this dissertation examines the possibility of utilizing a sol-gel approach to fabricate a single-layer abrasion-resistant antireflective coating for cover glass for solar cell arrays. By controlling the porosity of the film to reduce reflection from the substrate, and by controlling the chemistry of the sol-gel formation, we have achieved a film that is both durable and exhibits excellent antireflection properties. The second part of this dissertation examines a novel approach to the protection of lithium metal for use in secondary batteries. Current lithium-ion technologies utilize carbon anodes which have a low energy density compared to lithium metal. However, the interaction between lithium metal and commercially available non-aqueous electrolytes produces an inhomogeneous layer on the surface of the lithium which results in poor cycle life. A novel coating is presented which uses sol-gel precursors to stabilize the surface of lithium metal and results in a film that protects a lithium metal surface for over 100 cycles of stripping and plating.

  15. Thermal energy storage for the Stirling engine powered automobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D. T. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    A thermal energy storage (TES) system developed for use with the Stirling engine as an automotive power system has gravimetric and volumetric storage densities which are competitive with electric battery storage systems, meets all operational requirements for a practical vehicle, and can be packaged in compact sized automobiles with minimum impact on passenger and freight volume. The TES/Stirling system is the only storage approach for direct use of combustion heat from fuel sources not suitable for direct transport and use on the vehicle. The particular concept described is also useful for a dual mode TES/liquid fuel system in which the TES (recharged from an external energy source) is used for short duration trips (approximately 10 miles or less) and liquid fuel carried on board the vehicle used for long duration trips. The dual mode approach offers the potential of 50 percent savings in the consumption of premium liquid fuels for automotive propulsion in the United States.

  16. Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, Alan L; Johnson, Nancy L; Shaw, John Andrew; Churchill, Christopher Burton; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P; Alexander, Paul W; Herrera, Guillermo A; Yates, James Ryan; Brown, Jeffrey W

    2014-09-30

    A heat engine includes a first rotatable pulley and a second rotatable pulley spaced from the first rotatable pulley. A shape memory alloy (SMA) element is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at an SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element includes a first wire, a second wire, and a matrix joining the first wire and the second wire. The first wire and the second wire are in contact with the pulleys, but the matrix is not in contact with the pulleys. A timing cable is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at a timing pulley ratio, which is different than the SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element converts a thermal energy gradient between the hot region and the cold region into mechanical energy.

  17. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  18. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Secondary Contact Recreation Indian Creek 10270102 20 Secondary Contact Recreation James Creek 10270102 87...: Lower Kansas Baldwin Creek 10270104 69 Secondary Contact Recreation Brush Creek 10270104 49...

  19. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biomass Power Generation at the Former Farmland Industries Site in Lawrence, Kansas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomberlin, G.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    Under the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of biomass renewable energy generation at the former Farmland Industries site in Lawrence, Kansas. Feasibility assessment team members conducted a site assessment to gather information integral to this feasibility study. Information such as biomass resources, transmission availability, on-site uses for heat and power, community acceptance, and ground conditions were considered.

  20. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  1. The National Energy Audit (NEAT) Engineering Manual (Version 6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gettings, M.B.

    2001-04-20

    Government-funded weatherization assistance programs resulted from increased oil prices caused by the 1973 oil embargo. These programs were instituted to reduce US consumption of oil and help low-income families afford the increasing cost of heating their homes. In the summer of 1988, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing technical support to the Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). A preliminary study found no suitable means of cost-effectively selecting energy efficiency improvements (measures) for single-family homes that incorporated all the factors seen as beneficial in improving cost-effectiveness and usability. In mid-1989, ORNL was authorized to begin development of a computer-based measure selection technique. In November of 1992 a draft version of the program was made available to all WAP state directors for testing. The first production release, Version 4.3, was made available in october of 1993. The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program has continued funding improvements to the program increasing its user-friendliness and applicability. initial publication of this engineering manual coincides with availability of Version 6.1, November 1997, though algorithms described generally apply to all prior versions. Periodic updates of specific sections in the manual will permit maintaining a relevant document. This Engineering Manual delineates the assumptions used by NEAT in arriving at the measure recommendations based on the user's input of the building characteristics. Details of the actual data entry are available in the NEAT User's Manual (ORNL/Sub/91-SK078/1) and will not be discussed in this manual.

  2. Educating Future Energy Engineers for Sustainability: Case Study in Energy Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şiir Kilkiş

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the case study of an interdisciplinary course in Energy Economy that was developed at the Energy Engineering Graduate Program at Başkent University. The course integrated several unique pedagogical features to satisfy the aim of developing a working knowledge in energy economy with an energy systems perspective. The novel aspects of the course thematically led to a capstone research project where 5 teams of 17 course participants analyzed their prioritized solutions towards improving the energy self-sufficiency of the campus based on the practice of energy economy. The results of the teams’ solutions towards a net-zero energy/exergy campus included electric buses for city-campus transport, poly-generation for the new Arts Center, LED/OLED lighting for campus lighting, dynamo driven/piezoelectric sports center, biofuels from the university-owned dairy products farm, and an energy efficient technology incubation center. This unique course with participatory learning is compared with others before concluding that the case study is a useful international example for energy economy.

  3. Economic and cost engineering aspects of wind energy conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacRae, A.N.

    1990-08-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the economic feasibility of current wind energy conversion systems (WECS) from a cost engineering basis is presented. The initial stage covers a subjective review of the cost implications of various design aspects of current medium sized Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs), based around a 330 kW wind turbine (WT). The second stage is focused on the collection and initial analysis of a comprehensive database of WT technical, cost and performance information from over 100 WT models ranging in size from 8 metre to 55 metre rotor diameter. The formulation of a life cycle cost estimation model for HAWTs, based on semi-empirical relationships between sub-system cost, mass and design parameters is described. The economic feasibility of WECS private generating operation under the tariff structures available in the UK, under the auspices of the Energy Act of 1983, is examined, and broad results are given in terms of feasible tariff scenarios for topographical and regional locations throughout the UK. The prospects for reducing the cost of energy from WECS are explored, and the macro-economic and socio-environmental aspects of WECS are examined. (author).

  4. National education program for energy efficient illumination engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2011-05-01

    About one-third of outdoor lighting escapes unused into the sky, wasting energy and causing sky glow. Because of excessive sky glow around astronomical facilities, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory has a strong motivation to lead light pollution education efforts. While our original motivation of preserving the dark skies near observatories is still important, energy conservation is a critical problem that needs to be addressed nationwide. To address this problem we have created an extensive educational program on understanding and measuring light pollution. A set of four learning experiences introduces school students at all grade levels to basic energy-responsive illumination engineering design principles that can minimize light pollution. We created and utilize the GLOBE at Night citizen science light pollution assessment campaign as a cornerstone activity. We also utilize educational activities on light shielding that are introduced through a teaching kit. These two components provide vocabulary, concepts, and visual illustrations of the causes of light pollution. The third, more advanced component is the school outdoor lighting audit, which has students perform an audit and produce a revised master plan for compliant lighting. These learning experiences provide an integrated learning unit that is highly adaptable for U.S. and international education efforts in this area.

  5. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and ex-pand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Econom-ics. SER-XMU is seeking senior scientists and experienced engineers to serve as Thrust Leaders and Principal Inves-tigators.

  6. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and ex-pand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Econom-ics. SER-XMU is seeking senior scientists and experienced engineers to serve as Thrust Leaders and Principal Inves-

  7. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics. SER-XMU is seeking senior scientists and experienced engineers to serve as Thrust Leaders and Principal Investiga-

  8. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics. SER-XMU is seeking senior scientists and experi-enced engineers to serve as Thrust Leaders and Principal Investigators.

  9. 77 FR 16314 - Kansas Disaster # KS-00062

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Kansas dated 03/12/2012... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  10. Proceedings of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.

    2014-12-01

    The second National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop was held in Broomfield, Colorado, from January 29 to February 1, 2013. The event included a day-and-a-half workshop exploring a wide variety of topics related to system modeling and design of wind turbines and plants. Following the workshop, 2 days of tutorials were held at NREL, showcasing software developed at Sandia National Laboratories, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Laboratories, and NREL. This document provides a brief summary of the various workshop activities and includes a review of the content and evaluation results from attendees.

  11. Energy-related doctoral scientists and engineers in the United States, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    Information is compiled about the number and characteristics of doctoral-level engineers and scientists in primarily energy-related activities. These data are for the year 1977 and are part of the data base for a program of continuing studies on the employment and utilization of all scientists and engineers involved in energy-related activities. Data on mathematics, physics, chemistry, environmental engineering, engineering, life sciences, psychology, and social sciences doctoral degree specialties are included.

  12. Manpower assessment brief: Employment of energy related doctoral scientists and engineers increased between 1981 and 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1985, the nearly 45,000 energy-related doctoral scientists and engineers represented 11% of all employed doctoral scientists and engineers. Engineers comprised 40%, physical scientists, 21%, and earth scientists, almost 10% of those involved in energy-related activities - a significantly different distribution than occurs among all Ph.D. scientists and engineers. Between 1981 and 1985, by far the largest increase in energy-related Ph.D.'s occurred in employment in the life sciences - up over 120%. Employment in the social sciences and pyschology (primarily the latter) grew by 17% and in engineering by 7%.

  13. Low Power Thermodynamic Solar Energy Conversion: Coupling of a Parabolic Trough Concentrator and an Ericsson Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Stouffs

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers thermodynamic conversion of solar energy into electric energy (up to maximum 50 kWe, presenting a very brief review of the possible systems: the ‘Dish/Stirling’ technology, which relies on high temperature Stirling engines and requires high solar energy; low temperature differential thermal engine using direct solar energy without any concentration but with very low power per unit volume or unit mass of the system; and the intermediate solar energy concentration ratio.A theoretical investigation on the coupling of a two-stage parabolic trough concentrator with a reciprocating Joule cycle air engine (i.e. an Ericsson hot air engine in open cycle is presented. It is shown that there is an optimal operating point that maximises the mechanical power produced by the thermal engine. The interest of coupling a simple, low cost parabolic trough and a simple, low technology, mid-DT Ericsson engine is confirmed.

  14. An Integrated Surface Engineering Technology Development for Improving Energy Efficiency of Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Hsu; Liming Chang; Huan Zhan

    2009-05-31

    Frictional losses are inherent in most practical mechanical systems. The ability to control friction offers many opportunities to achieve energy conservation. Over the years, materials, lubricants, and surface modifications have been used to reduce friction in automotive and diesel engines. However, in recent years, progress in friction reduction technology has slowed because many of the inefficiencies have been eliminated. A new avenue for friction reduction is needed. Designing surfaces specifically for friction reduction with concomitant enhanced durability for various engine components has emerged recently as a viable opportunity due to advances in fabrication and surface finishing techniques. Recently, laser ablated dimples on surfaces have shown friction reduction properties and have been demonstrated successfully in conformal contacts such as seals where the speed is high and the load is low. The friction reduction mechanism in this regime appears to depend on the size, patterns, and density of dimples in the contact. This report describes modeling efforts in characterizing surface textures and understanding their mechanisms for enhanced lubrication under high contact pressure conditions. A literature survey is first presented on the development of descriptors for irregular surface features. This is followed by a study of the hydrodynamic effects of individual micro-wedge dimples using the analytical solution of the 1-D Reynolds equation and the determination of individual components of the total friction resistance. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the dimple orientation effects and the approach which may be used to further compare the friction reduction provided by different texture patterns.

  15. Reducing barriers to energy efficiency in the German mechanical engineering sector. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, J.; Boede, U.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the empirical research into barriers to energy efficiency in the German mechanical engineering (ME) sector. It is one of nine such reports in the BARRIERS project. The report contains description and analysis of four case studies of energy management in German companies in the ME sector. The results are analysed using the theoretical framework developed for the BARRIERS project. The report also provides brief recommendations on how these barriers to the rational use of energy (RUE) may be overcome and how energy efficiency within the ME sector may be improved. The results of the study for the ME sector in Germany are summarised in this executive summary under the following headings: - Characterising the mechanical engineering sector; - Case studies of energy management in the German mechanical engineering sector; - Evidence of barriers in the German mechanical engineering sector; - The role of energy service companies in the mechanical engineering sector; - Policy implications. (orig.)

  16. Reducing barriers to energy efficiency in the German mechanical engineering sector. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, J.; Boede, U.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the empirical research into barriers to energy efficiency in the German mechanical engineering (ME) sector. It is one of nine such reports in the BARRIERS project. The report contains description and analysis of four case studies of energy management in German companies in the ME sector. The results are analysed using the theoretical framework developed for the BARRIERS project. The report also provides brief recommendations on how these barriers to the rational use of energy (RUE) may be overcome and how energy efficiency within the ME sector may be improved. The results of the study for the ME sector in Germany are summarised in this executive summary under the following headings: - Characterising the mechanical engineering sector; - Case studies of energy management in the German mechanical engineering sector; - Evidence of barriers in the German mechanical engineering sector; - The role of energy service companies in the mechanical engineering sector; - Policy implications. (orig.)

  17. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Morrill being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Morrill.

  18. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2005-08-31

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at the site of a former grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Centralia being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia.

  19. Energy Efficient Engine (E3) controls and accessories detail design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, R. S.; Lavash, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    An Energy Efficient Engine program has been established by NASA to develop technology for improving the energy efficiency of future commercial transport aircraft engines. As part of this program, a new turbofan engine was designed. This report describes the fuel and control system for this engine. The system design is based on many of the proven concepts and component designs used on the General Electric CF6 family of engines. One significant difference is the incorporation of digital electronic computation in place of the hydromechanical computation currently used.

  20. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-22

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of 2013 irrigation water use in Kansas. The published regional and county-level statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented. Total reported irrigation water use in 2013 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  1. Energy efficient engine: Turbine transition duct model technology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, K.; Thurlin, R.

    1982-01-01

    The Low-Pressure Turbine Transition Duct Model Technology Program was directed toward substantiating the aerodynamic definition of a turbine transition duct for the Energy Efficient Engine. This effort was successful in demonstrating an aerodynamically viable compact duct geometry and the performance benefits associated with a low camber low-pressure turbine inlet guide vane. The transition duct design for the flight propulsion system was tested and the pressure loss goal of 0.7 percent was verified. Also, strut fairing pressure distributions, as well as wall pressure coefficients, were in close agreement with analytical predictions. Duct modifications for the integrated core/low spool were also evaluated. The total pressure loss was 1.59 percent. Although the increase in exit area in this design produced higher wall loadings, reflecting a more aggressive aerodynamic design, pressure profiles showed no evidence of flow separation. Overall, the results acquired have provided pertinent design and diagnostic information for the design of a turbine transition duct for both the flight propulsion system and the integrated core/low spool.

  2. SETI at Planck Energy: When Particle Physicists Become Cosmic Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    What is the meaning of the Fermi Paradox -- are we alone or is starfaring rare? Can general relativity be united with quantum mechanics? The searches for answers to these questions could intersect. It is known that an accelerator capable of energizing particles to the Planck scale requires cosmic proportions. The energy required to run a Planck accelerator is also cosmic, of order 100 M_sun c^2 for a hadron collider, because the natural cross section for Planck physics is so tiny. If aliens are interested in fundamental physics, they could resort to cosmic engineering for their experiments. These colliders are detectable through the vast amount of "pollution" they produce, motivating a YeV SETI program. I investigate what kinds of radiation they would emit in a fireball scenario, and the feasibility of detecting YeV radiation at Earth, particularly YeV neutrinos. Although current limits on YeV neutrinos are weak, Kardashev 3 YeV neutrino sources appear to be at least 30--100 Mpc apart on average, if they are ...

  3. Energy efficient engine shroudless, hollow fan blade technology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Shroudless, Hollow Fan Blade Technology program was structured to support the design, fabrication, and subsequent evaluation of advanced hollow and shroudless blades for the Energy Efficient Engine fan component. Rockwell International was initially selected to produce hollow airfoil specimens employing the superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) fabrication technique. Rockwell demonstrated that a titanium hollow structure could be fabricated utilizing SPF/DB manufacturing methods. However, some problems such as sharp internal cavity radii and unsatisfactory secondary bonding of the edge and root details prevented production of the required quantity of fatigue test specimens. Subsequently, TRW was selected to (1) produce hollow airfoil test specimens utilizing a laminate-core/hot isostatic press/diffusion bond approach, and (2) manufacture full-size hollow prototype fan blades utilizing the technology that evolved from the specimen fabrication effort. TRW established elements of blade design and defined laminate-core/hot isostatic press/diffusion bonding fabrication techniques to produce test specimens. This fabrication technology was utilized to produce full size hollow fan blades in which the HIP'ed parts were cambered/twisted/isothermally forged, finish machined, and delivered to Pratt & Whitney Aircraft and NASA for further evaluation.

  4. 77 FR 71846 - In the Matter of Encore Clean Energy, Inc., Energy & Engine Technology Corp., Equity Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Encore Clean Energy, Inc., Energy & Engine Technology Corp., Equity Media Holdings Corporation, eTotalSource, Inc., Extensions, Inc., Firepond, Inc., and GNC Energy Corporation... that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Encore Clean...

  5. Fall may be imminent for Kansas Cherokee basin coalbed gas output

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Newell K.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas production in the Kansas portion of the Cherokee basin, Southeastern Kansas, for 2008 was 49.1 bcf. The great majority of Cherokee basin gas production is now coal-bed methane (CBM). The major producers are Quest Energy LLC, Dart Cherokee Basin Operating Co. LLC, and Layne Energy Operating LLC. Most CBM in Southeastern Kansas is from Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian high-volatile B and A rank bituminous coals at 800 to 1,200 ft depth. Rates of decline for the CBM wells generally decrease the longer a well produces. A gentler collective decline of 13.8% is calculated by averaging the number of new producing wells in a given year with that of the previous year. By the calculations using the gentler overall 13.8% decline rate, if more than 918 successful CBM wells are drilled in 2009, then gas production will increase from 2008 to 2009.

  6. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  7. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  8. FWP executive summaries: basic energy sciences materials sciences and engineering program (SNL/NM).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, George A.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. A general programmatic overview is also presented.

  9. Biomass as a Sustainable Energy Source: An Illustration of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Marguerite A.; May, Nicole; Assaf-Anid, Nada M.; Castaldi, Marco J.

    2006-01-01

    The ever-increasing global demand for energy has sparked renewed interest within the engineering community in the study of sustainable alternative energy sources. This paper discusses a power generation system which uses biomass as "fuel" to illustrate the concepts taught to students taking a graduate level chemical engineering process…

  10. Biomass as a Sustainable Energy Source: An Illustration of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Marguerite A.; May, Nicole; Assaf-Anid, Nada M.; Castaldi, Marco J.

    2006-01-01

    The ever-increasing global demand for energy has sparked renewed interest within the engineering community in the study of sustainable alternative energy sources. This paper discusses a power generation system which uses biomass as "fuel" to illustrate the concepts taught to students taking a graduate level chemical engineering process…

  11. Engineering for Sustainable Energy Education within Suburban, Urban and Developing Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikai, Moijue; Baker, Erin

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial that the younger generation be included in the conversation of sustainable development, given the urgent need of a global transition to cleaner energy solutions. Sustainable energy engineering (SEE) taught as early as secondary school can not only increase the number of students that will potentially study engineering to solve global…

  12. An experimental study of energy balance in low heat rejection diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taymaz, I. [University of Sakarya, Adapazari (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2006-03-01

    In a conventional internal combustion engine, approximately one-third of total fuel input energy is converted to useful work. Since the working gas in a practical engine cycle is not exhausted at ambient temperature, a major part of the energy is lost with the exhaust gases. In addition, another major part of energy input is rejected in the form of heat via the cooling system. If the energy normally rejected to the coolant could be recovered instead on the crankshaft as useful work, then a substantial improvement in fuel economy would result. In this study, the effect of insulated heat transfer surfaces on diesel engine energy balance system was investigated. The research engine was a four-stroke, direct injected, six cylinder, turbocharged and inter-cooled diesel engine. This engine was tested at different speeds and load conditions without coating. Then, combustion chamber surfaces, cylinder head, valves and piston crown faces were coated with ceramic materials. Ceramic layers were made of CaZrO{sub 3} and MgZrO{sub 3} and plasma coated onto base of the NiCrAl bond coat. The ceramic-coated research engine was tested at the same operation conditions as the standard (without coating) engine. The results indicate a reduction in fuel consumption and heat losses to engine cooling system of the ceramic-coated engine. (author)

  13. Irrigation trends in Kansas, 1991–2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fact sheet examines trends in total reported irrigation water use and acres irrigated as well as irrigation water use by crop type and system type in Kansas for...

  14. "Consumer Satisfaction" Response from Kansas State Alumni

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew P. Barkley

    1993-01-01

    The determinants of the degree of alumni satisfaction with their investment in college education were identified using survey data from recent graduates of the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University...

  15. Major Kansas Perennial Streams : 1961 and 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map of major perennial streams in Kansas for the years 1961 and 2009. The map shows a decrease in streams regarded as perennial in 1961, compared to stream regarded...

  16. Using engine exhaust gas as energy source for an absorption refrigeration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzela, Andre Aleixo [PETROBRAS, Exploration and Production, Av. Rui Barbosa, 1940 - 3 andar, 27915-012 - Macae - RJ (Brazil); Hanriot, Sergio Morais; Cabezas-Gomez, Luben; Sodre, Jose Ricardo [Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Av. Dom Jose Gaspar, 500, 30535-610 - Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    This work presents an experimental study of an ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system using the exhaust of an internal combustion engine as energy source. The exhaust gas energy availability and the impact of the absorption refrigeration system on engine performance, exhaust emissions, and power economy are evaluated. A production automotive engine was tested in a bench test dynamometer, with the absorption refrigeration system adapted to the exhaust pipe. The engine was tested for 25%, 50%, 75% and wide-open throttle valve. The refrigerator reached a steady state temperature between 4 and 13 C about 3 h after system start up, depending on engine throttle valve opening. The calculated exhaust gas energy availability suggests the cooling capacity can be highly improved for a dedicated system. Exhaust hydrocarbon emissions were higher when the refrigeration system was installed in the engine exhaust, but carbon monoxide emissions were reduced, while carbon dioxide concentration remained practically unaltered. (author)

  17. Decimal Engine for Energy-Efficient Multicore Processors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    propose a hybrid BFP/DFP engine to perform BFP division and DFP addition, multiplication and division. The main purpose of this engine is to offload the binary floating-point units for this type of operations and reduce the latency for decimal operations, and power and temperature for the whole die....

  18. 75 FR 103 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... been given in the Federal Register (74 FR 17953-17954, 4/20/2009) and the application has been... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Order No. 1655 Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas...

  19. Proc. of the sixteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences, May 13-15, 1998, Argonne, IL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-05-13

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Sixteenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 13--15, 1998, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was structured into eight technical sessions, which included 30 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. A list of participants is appended to this volume. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term, mission-oriented research in the Department. The Office has prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation's future energy options will be identified, developed, and built. BES is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary to solve present and future problems regarding energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, while maintaining respect for the environment. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, prolonging the useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing. The program emphasis is on reducing costs through improved industrial production and performance and expanding the nation's store of fundamental knowledge for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in energy technologies. To achieve these goals, the Engineering Research Program supports approximately 130 research projects covering a broad spectrum of topics that cut across traditional engineering disciplines. The program

  20. Energy-related doctoral scientists and engineers in the United States, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-11-01

    The pursuit of a vigorous research and development program to provide renewable and other resources to meet U. S. energy needs in the next century is an important objective of President Carter's National Energy Plan. A highly educated and motivated pool of engineers and scientists must be available for energy research and development if this objective is to be achieved. This report provides, for the first time, information about the number and characteristics of doctoral-level engineers and scientists in primarily energy-related activities. These data for the year 1975 will become part of the data base for a program of continuing studies on the employment and utilization of all scientists and engineers involved in energy-related activities. Information is provided for employment in the following fields: mathematics; physics/astronomy; chemistry; Earth, Environment, and Marine Sciences; Engineering; Life Sciences; Psychology; Social Sciences; Arts and Humanities; and Education and Business.

  1. Engineering Electricity Markets for a Decarbonized Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenle, Rasmus Ploug; Pallesen, Trine

    Decarbonization of the Danish electricity sector has recently been sought achieved through the introduction of a novel retail electricity market, named EcoGrid, designed to create price responsive consumers. By following the market design process undertaken by engineers at the Technical University...... of Denmark, the analysis addresses the question: how do engineers make markets? The answer to this question as presented here is: engineers design control systems. By tracing the origins of EcoGrid, this paper documents the governing of electricity consumers through a ‘synthetic market’, i.e. a market...... artifact devised to attain specified objectives within a specific task environment. It is shown that EcoGrid has been designed by modelling a retail electricity market on three different concepts from control systems engineering. These findings are used as a springboard to discuss the implications...

  2. Kansas Protects and Restores Wetlands, Streams and Riparian Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetland Program Development Grant (WPDG) in 2007 when the Kansas State Conservation Commission began identifying team members interested in developing a framework for a comprehensive Kansas Wetland and Aquatic Resources Conservation Plan.

  3. MODIS 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  4. Landsat TM and ETM+ Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2000-2001 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and...

  5. ASTER 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  6. Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM)...

  7. Kansas Educational Achievement Report Card 2015. Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Mark; Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This report includes a high-level overview of student outcome data and how Kansas measures up to the other 49 states. It is meant to complement the other reporting that the Kansas Association of School Boards has released and will be releasing related to improving student outcomes for all Kansas public schools. The following are key findings…

  8. An approach for IC engine coolant energy recovery based on low-temperature organic Rankine cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付建勤; 刘敬平; 徐政欣; 邓帮林; 刘琦

    2015-01-01

    To promote the fuel utilization efficiency of IC engine, an approach was proposed for IC engine coolant energy recovery based on low-temperature organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The ORC system uses IC engine coolant as heat source, and it is coupled to the IC engine cooling system. After various kinds of organic working media were compared, R124 was selected as the ORC working medium. According to IC engine operating conditions and coolant energy characteristics, the major parameters of ORC system were preliminary designed. Then, the effects of various parameters on cycle performance and recovery potential of coolant energy were analyzed via cycle process calculation. The results indicate that cycle efficiency is mainly influenced by the working pressure of ORC, while the maximum working pressure is limited by IC engine coolant temperature. At the same working pressure, cycle efficiency is hardly affected by both the mass flow rate and temperature of working medium. When the bottom cycle working pressure arrives at the maximum allowable value of 1.6 MPa, the fuel utilization efficiency of IC engine could be improved by 12.1%. All these demonstrate that this low-temperature ORC is a useful energy-saving technology for IC engine.

  9. Clean Air Act Standards and Guidelines for Energy, Engines, and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the energy, engines, and combustion industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  10. Low birth weight in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, V James; Lai, Sue Min; Suminski, R; Crawford, G

    2015-05-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with infant morbidity and mortality. This is the first study of LBW in Kansas using vital statistics to determine maternal and health care system factors associated with LBW. Low birth weight. Determine if prenatal care, maternal socio-demographic or medical factors, or insurance status were associated with LBW. Birth certificate data were merged with Medicaid eligibility data and subjected to logistic regression analysis. Of the 37,081 single vaginal births, LBW rates were 5.5% overall, 10.8% for African Americans, and 5% for White Americans. Lacking private insurance was associated with 34% more LBW infants (AOR 1.34; 95% CI 1.13-1.58), increased comorbidity, and late or less prenatal care. Low birth weight was associated with maternal medical comorbidity and with previous adverse birth outcomes. Insurance status, prenatal care, and maternal health during pregnancy are associated with LBW. Private insurance was consistently associated with more prenatal care and better outcomes. This study has important implications regarding health care reform.

  11. Energy, Entropy and Exergy Concepts and Their Roles in Thermal Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Ibrahim; Cengel, Yunus A.

    2001-09-01

    Energy, entropy and exergy concepts come from thermodynamics and are applicable to all fields of science and engineering. Therefore, this article intends to provide background for better understanding of these concepts and their differences among various classes of life support systems with a diverse coverage. It also covers the basic principles, general definitions and practical applications and implications. Some illustrative examples are presented to highlight the importance of the aspects of energy, entropy and exergy and their roles in thermal engineering.

  12. Novel thick-foam ferroelectret with engineered voids for energy harvesting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z.; Shi, J.; Beeby, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    This work reports a novel thick-foam ferroelectret which is designed and engineered for energy harvesting applications. We fabricated this ferroelectret foam by mixing a chemical blowing agent with a polymer solution, then used heat treatment to activate the agent and create voids in the polymer foam. The dimensions of the foam, the density and size of voids can be well controlled in the fabrication process. Therefore, this ferroelectret can be engineered into optimized structure for energy harvesting applications.

  13. The kinematic Stirling engine as an energy conversion subsystem for paraboloidal dish solar thermal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of a suitably designed and economically manufactured Stirling engine as the energy conversion subsystem of a paraboloidal dish-Stirling solar thermal power module was estimated. Results obtained by elementary cycle analyses were shown to match quite well the performance characteristics of an advanced kinematic Stirling engine, the United Stirling P-40, as established by current prototypes of the engine and by a more sophisticated analytic model of its advanced derivative. In addition to performance, brief consideration was given to other Stirling engine criteria such as durability, reliability, and serviceability. Production costs were not considered here.

  14. Possibility to Increase Biofuels Energy Efficiency used for Compression Ignition Engines Fueling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin D. Iclodean

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the possibilities of optimizing the use of biofuels in terms of energy efficiency in compression ignition (CI engines fueling. Based on the experimental results was determinate the law of variation of the rate of heat released by the combustion process for diesel fuel and different blends of biodiesel. Using this law, were changed parameters of the engine management system (fuel injection law and was obtain increased engine performance (in terms of energy efficiency for use of different biofuel blends.

  15. Urbanization Impacts on Flooding in the Kansas River Basin and Evaluation of Wetlands as a Mitigation Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates the impacts of future land use changes on flooding in the Kansas River Basin. It also studies the impacts of wetlands on flood reduction. The study presents Hydrologic Engineering Centers-Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) based runoff modeling and River A...

  16. Scaling up nanoscale water-driven energy conversion into evaporation-driven engines and generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Goodnight, Davis; Gao, Zhenghan; Cavusoglu, Ahmet H.; Sabharwal, Nina; Delay, Michael; Driks, Adam; Sahin, Ozgur

    2015-06-01

    Evaporation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the natural environment and a dominant form of energy transfer in the Earth's climate. Engineered systems rarely, if ever, use evaporation as a source of energy, despite myriad examples of such adaptations in the biological world. Here, we report evaporation-driven engines that can power common tasks like locomotion and electricity generation. These engines start and run autonomously when placed at air-water interfaces. They generate rotary and piston-like linear motion using specially designed, biologically based artificial muscles responsive to moisture fluctuations. Using these engines, we demonstrate an electricity generator that rests on water while harvesting its evaporation to power a light source, and a miniature car (weighing 0.1 kg) that moves forward as the water in the car evaporates. Evaporation-driven engines may find applications in powering robotic systems, sensors, devices and machinery that function in the natural environment.

  17. Colloquy and workshops: regional implications of the engineering manpower requirements of the National Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segool, H. D. [ed.

    1979-05-01

    The crucial interrelationships of engineering manpower, technological innovation, productivity and capital re-formaton were keynoted. Near-term, a study has indicated a much larger New England energy demand-reduction/economic/market potential, with a probably larger engineering manpower requirement, for energy-conservation measures characterized by technological innovation and cost-effective capital services than for alternative energy-supply measures. Federal, regional, and state energy program responsibilities described a wide-ranging panorama of activities among many possible energy options which conveyed much endeavor without identifiable engineering manpower demand coefficients. Similarly, engineering manpower assessment data was described as uneven and unfocused to the energy program at the national level, disaggregated data as non-existent at the regional/state levels, although some qualitative inferences were drawn. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 16 individual presentations for the DOE Energy Data Base (EDB); 14 of these were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and 2 for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  18. Application of Green computing in Framing Energy Efficient Software Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritra Mitra, Riya Basu, Avik Guha, Shalabh Agarwal, Asoke Nath

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Green computing and energy saving is now a veryimportant issue in Computer science andinformation technology. Dueto tremendousgrowth in information technology now the bigchallenge is how to minimize the power usage andhow to reduce the carbon foot print. Greencomputing is now a prime research area where thepeople are trying to minimize the carbon footprintand minimum usage of energy. To minimize theusage of energy there are two independentapproaches one is designing suitable hardware andthe second one is to redesign the softwaremethodology. In the present paper the authorshave tried to explore the software methodologiesand designs that can be used today to save energy.The authors have also tried to extend mobileplatform battery time as well as the various toolsthat support the development of energy-efficientsoftware.

  19. Energy supplies and future engines for land, sea, and air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David Gordon

    2012-06-01

    The years 2012 and beyond seem likely to record major changes in energy use and power generation. The Japanese tsunami has resulted in large countries either scaling back or abolishing the future use of nuclear energy. The discovery of what seems like vast amounts of economically deliverable natural gas has many forecasting a rapid switch from coal- to gas-fired generating plants. On the other hand, environmentalists have strong objections to the production of natural gas and of petroleum by hydraulic fracturing from shale, or by extraction of heavy oil. They believe that global warming from the use of fossil fuels is now established beyond question. There has been rapid progress in the development of alternative energy supplies, particularly from on-shore and off-shore wind. Progress toward a viable future energy mix has been slowed by a U.S. energy policy that seems to many to be driven by politics. The author will review the history of power and energy to put all of the above in context and will look at possible future developments. He will propose what he believes to be an idealized energy policy that could result in an optimum system that would be arrived at democratically.

  20. Chlordane exposure to interior least terns nesting along the Kansas River, Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The federally endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) has been known to nest on sandbars along the Kansas River, KS since 1996. Documented concentrations...

  1. High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C.P.

    1993-07-01

    Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

  2. Thirteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Fluid/thermal processes, systems analysis and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are: (1) to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, for prolonging useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and for developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing with emphasis on reducing costs with improved industrial production and performance quality; and (2) to expand the store of fundamental concepts for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in the energy technologies. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) fluid mechanics 1--fundamental properties; (2) fluid mechanics 2--two phase flow; (3) thermal processes; (4) fluid mechanics 3; (5) process analysis and control; (6) fluid mechanics 4--turbulence; (7) fluid mechanics 5--chaos; (8) materials issues; and (9) plasma processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Quarry Creek - Excavation, Analysis and Prospect of a Kansas City Hopewell Site, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    1980 Culture Drift: A Case Study of the Kansas City Hopewell. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Department of Antropology , University of Kansas...provides information on the horizontal and vertical extent of cultural deposits and the nature of them. The application and results of a proton...middens, below which six trash-filled pits were revealed. Cultural material at the site includes an abundance of ceramic and lithic artifacts and well

  4. Survey of Fossil Vertebrates from East-Central Kansas, Kansas River Bank Stabilization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    pages 15-19) Figure 1. Upper molar of adult mastodon, Mammut americanus (KUVP 5898), from Kansas River at Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas. Figure 2...fact, one of the earliest specimens to be added to that collection was a mandible of an American mastodon, Mammut americanum. It was found by then...Pleistocene assemblage including forms indicative of spruce forest such as the American mastodon, Mammut americanum, the woodland musk ox, 5.mbos cavifrons

  5. Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education (H2E3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Peter A.; Cashman, Eileen; Lipman, Timothy; Engel, Richard A.

    2011-09-15

    Schatz Energy Research Center's Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education curriculum development project delivered hydrogen energy and fuel cell learning experiences to over 1,000 undergraduate engineering students at five California universities, provided follow-on internships for students at a fuel cell company; and developed commercializable hydrogen teaching tools including a fuel cell test station and a fuel cell/electrolyzer experiment kit. Monitoring and evaluation tracked student learning and faculty and student opinions of the curriculum, showing that use of the curriculum did advance student comprehension of hydrogen fundamentals. The project web site (hydrogencurriculum.org) provides more information.

  6. Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy in the Engineering Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stachowicz, M.S.; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2011-01-01

    project. The design workshop topic for the fall 2010 was the use of fuzzy logic to control comfort in solar home. The workshop is described. The project work is evaluated during the process as well as the final results using principle based on Problem Based and Project Organized Learning (PBL......This paper describes a Design Workshop course offered at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (ECE) at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD). The workshop course is one mechanism by which students completing the ECE program at UMD can satisfy the requirement for a senior design...

  7. Energy systems a new approach to engineering thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gicquel, Renaud

    2011-01-01

    Forewords, About the Author, General introduction, Structure of the book, Objectives, A working tool on many levels, Mind Maps, List of Symbols, Conversion FactorsI First Steps in Engineering Thermodynamics1 A New Educational Paradigm1.1 Introduction1.2 General remarks on the evolution of training specifi cations1.3 Specifi cs of applied thermodynamics teaching1.4 A new educational paradigm1.5 Diapason modules1.6 A three-step progressive approach1.7 Main pedagogic innovations brought by Thermoptim1.8 Digital resources of the Thermoptim-UNIT portal1.9 Comparison with other tools with teaching p

  8. Teaching Sustainable Energy and Power Electronics to Engineering Students in a Laboratory Environment Using Industry-Standard Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, David S.; Miller, Ruth Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Power electronics and renewable energy are two important topics for today's power engineering students. In many cases, the two topics are inextricably intertwined. As the renewable energy sector grows, the need for engineers qualified to design such systems grows as well. In order to train such engineers, new courses are needed that highlight the…

  9. Energy Efficiency as a Factor of Engineering Product Competitiveness and its Formation on Product Economic Life Cycle Stages

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan V. Evstratov

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of energy efficiency of enterprises and engineering products. The author research how energy efficiency effect on engineering product competitiveness and how rate of enterprise and engineering product formation on stages of the economic product life cycle.

  10. Energy Efficiency as a Factor of Engineering Product Competitiveness and its Formation on Product Economic Life Cycle Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V. Evstratov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of energy efficiency of enterprises and engineering products. The author research how energy efficiency effect on engineering product competitiveness and how rate of enterprise and engineering product formation on stages of the economic product life cycle.

  11. On a Novel Energy Engineering Model from China’s Rural Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Long Xie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive investigation of the ecological agriculture of quaternity, an innovative mode of energy engineering emerging in North China’s rural areas. A delineation and analysis of the composition, functions and principles for designing and working concerning this energy model is conducted. The input, output and input-output ratio with reference to energy in this system and its three subsystems is estimated, compared and discussed, based on the data from a trial sample. The study finds that this quaternity energy mode fulfills an organic integration of the planting industry and the breeding industry and also integration of production and life, affording self-sufficient materials for biogas fermentation and generating abundant organic fertilizers, thus to achieve benign circulation of energy and material flows and ultimately accomplish a high unification of energy, ecology, economic and social utilities. On the empirical evidence, the study exhibits that this model of energy engineering operates well and is energy-concentrated, with rationality in the agro-production structure and considerable comprehensive efficiency. Nevertheless, its energy productivity is merely at a middling level and the area and variety of crops is minor. The study concludes with pointing out proposals of improving and popularizing this energy engineering pattern.

  12. 76 FR 61775 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00059

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  13. 76 FR 47637 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00055

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00055 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  14. 1977 Kansas Field Crop Insect Control Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Leroy; Gates, Dell E.

    This publication is prepared to aid producers in selecting methods of insect population management that have proved effective under Kansas conditions. Topics covered include insect control on alfalfa, soil insects attacking corn, insects attacking above-ground parts of corn, and sorghum, wheat, and soybean insect control. The insecticides…

  15. JAZZ E CRIME ORGANIZADO EM KANSAS CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Kôei Itikawa Tanaka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay aims at analyzing the problematic relationship between jazz and gangsterism in Robert Altman’s Kansas City (1996. Through an analysis of the film’s final sequence, we will bring up a historical background about the theme and investigate how the connection between musical production and organized crime is established through the formal construction of the movie.

  16. 77 FR 32708 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00064

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This...: 02/25/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  17. Air Force Civil Engineer Center Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    generated a database of trained Air Force personnel. Air Force Energy Office officials stated that they did not reach out to DOE-FEMP to track Air Force...completed, and terminated Air Force energy -savings performance-contract projects. The database should include, but not be limited to, appropriate...Force Civil Engineer Center Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts Needs Improvement M A Y 4 , 2 0 1 6 Report No. DODIG-2016-087 Mission

  18. Streamflow alteration at selected sites in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Eng, Ken

    2017-06-26

    An understanding of streamflow alteration in response to various disturbances is necessary for the effective management of stream habitat for a variety of species in Kansas. Streamflow alteration can have negative ecological effects. Using a modeling approach, streamflow alteration was assessed for 129 selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the State for which requisite streamflow and basin-characteristic information was available. The assessment involved a comparison of the observed condition from 1980 to 2015 with the predicted expected (least-disturbed) condition for 29 streamflow metrics. The metrics represent various characteristics of streamflow including average flow (annual, monthly) and low and high flow (frequency, duration, magnitude).Streamflow alteration in Kansas was indicated locally, regionally, and statewide. Given the absence of a pronounced trend in annual precipitation in Kansas, a precipitation-related explanation for streamflow alteration was not supported. Thus, the likely explanation for streamflow alteration was human activity. Locally, a flashier flow regime (typified by shorter lag times and more frequent and higher peak discharges) was indicated for three streamgages with urbanized basins that had higher percentages of impervious surfaces than other basins in the State. The combination of localized reservoir effects and regional groundwater pumping from the High Plains aquifer likely was responsible, in part, for diminished conditions indicated for multiple streamflow metrics in western and central Kansas. Statewide, the implementation of agricultural land-management practices to reduce runoff may have been responsible, in part, for a diminished duration and magnitude of high flows. In central and eastern Kansas, implemented agricultural land-management practices may have been partly responsible for an inflated magnitude of low flows at several sites.

  19. CONSIDERATIONS ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES AND THEIR RELATED PERSPECTIVES OFAGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Foppa-Pedretti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some considerations and advances a number of proposals about the potential of Agricultural Engineering to contribute to the field of renewable energy, with an emphasis on biomass. Several areas for action are identified. First, general education and teaching of students who will go on to become technicians and professionals in the sector of renewable energies, even though the characteristics of the sectors are still fuzzy. Diffusion of the energy culture, a too often neglected aspect that is however indispensable to sustain the overdue penetration of renewable energies in Italy, is an additional area for action. Another critical area, energy planning, is currently viewed mainly as involving the assessment on more or less wide areas of energy consumption and for the scope of replacing fossil resources with renewables to meet some energy requirements. A more complex, overarching issue is energy efficiency, especially of buildings, which should be a mainstay of the planning process but is in fact not so clearly addressed in development plans for renewables. At this same level, all interactions among production sectors should be assessed, to enhance the role of agriculture, one of the new potential energy-producing sectors and one of the possible prospective suppliers of renewable energy for different final users, from households to the service sector and industry. Agricultural Engineering has the skills needed to implement all these different actions. A role for it in advanced research, i.e. biotechnologies, can and should also be envisaged. Its work in the renewable energy sector should closely involve microbiological, genetic, chemical, agronomic, and animal research to define the goals to be pursued and to implement intuitions. In this way, Agricultural Engineering would increasingly be characterized as Biosystems Engineering.

  20. Energy recovery from solid waste. [production engineering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, C.; Huang, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    A recent group study on the problem of solid waste disposal provided a decision making model for a community to use in determining the future for its solid waste. The model is a combination of the following factors: technology, legal, social, political, economic and environmental. An assessment of local or community needs determines what form of energy recovery is desirable. A market for low pressure steam or hot water would direct a community to recover energy from solid waste by incineration to generate steam. A fuel gas could be produced by a process known as pyrolysis if there is a local market for a low heating value gaseous fuel. Solid waste can also be used directly as a fuel supplemental to coal in a steam generator. An evaluation of these various processes is made.

  1. Energy recovery from solid waste. [production engineering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, C.; Huang, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    A recent group study on the problem of solid waste disposal provided a decision making model for a community to use in determining the future for its solid waste. The model is a combination of the following factors: technology, legal, social, political, economic and environmental. An assessment of local or community needs determines what form of energy recovery is desirable. A market for low pressure steam or hot water would direct a community to recover energy from solid waste by incineration to generate steam. A fuel gas could be produced by a process known as pyrolysis if there is a local market for a low heating value gaseous fuel. Solid waste can also be used directly as a fuel supplemental to coal in a steam generator. An evaluation of these various processes is made.

  2. Energy efficiency and economic feasibility of CCHP driven by Stirling engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, X.Q.; Wang, R.Z.; Huang, X.H. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China). Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics

    2004-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of energy efficiency evaluation and economic feasibility analysis of a small scale trigeneration system for combined cooling, heating and power generation (CCHP) with an available Stirling engine. Trigeneration systems have a large potential of energy saving and economical efficiency. The decisive values for energetic efficiency evaluation of such systems are the primary energy rate and comparative primary energy saving ({delta}q), while the economic feasibility analysis of such systems relates the avoided cost, the total annual saving and payback period. The investigation calculates and compares the energy saving and economic efficiency of trigeneration system with Stirling engine against contemporary conventional independent cooling, heating and power, showing that a CCHP system saves fuel resources and has the assurance of economic benefits. (author)

  3. Integration of Wind Energy Systems into Power Engineering Education Program at UW-Madison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataramanan, Giri [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Lesieutre, Bernard [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Jahns, Thomas [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Desai, Ankur R [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This project has developed an integrated curriculum focused on the power engineering aspects of wind energy systems that builds upon a well-established graduate educational program at UW- Madison. Five new courses have been developed and delivered to students. Some of the courses have been offered on multiple occasions. The courses include: Control of electric drives for Wind Power applications, Utility Applications of Power Electronics (Wind Power), Practicum in Small Wind Turbines, Utility Integration of Wind Power, and Wind and Weather for Scientists and Engineers. Utility Applications of Power Electronics (Wind Power) has been provided for distance education as well as on-campus education. Several industrial internships for students have been organized. Numerous campus seminars that provide discussion on emerging issues related to wind power development have been delivered in conjunction with other campus events. Annual student conferences have been initiated, that extend beyond wind power to include sustainable energy topics to draw a large group of stakeholders. Energy policy electives for engineering students have been identified for students to participate through a certificate program. Wind turbines build by students have been installed at a UW-Madison facility, as a test-bed. A Master of Engineering program in Sustainable Systems Engineering has been initiated that incorporates specializations that include in wind energy curricula. The project has enabled UW-Madison to establish leadership at graduate level higher education in the field of wind power integration with the electric grid.

  4. Electrical engineering - energy- and facility engineering. Special learning fields 5-13; Elektrotechnik - Energie- und Gebaeudetechnik. Lernfelder 5-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzieia, Michael; Huebscher, Heinrich; Jagla, Dieter; Krehbiel, Michael; Plichta, Stephan; Reh, Torsten; Wenzl, Ludwig; Wickert, Harald

    2009-07-01

    Contents: Integration of technical systems in buildings using bus technology - the new guideline 6015; integrated automation and communication; roomautomation; integrations of technical solutions shown on building equipment and some examples for components and customer requirements. Main topics are: energy supply and safety; appliances, devices and components; control systems; drive systems; communications systems; facility management; planning and realization; maintenance and retrofitting; attachment with questions. (GL)

  5. Energy Returned On Investment of Engineered Geothermal Systems Annual Report FY2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansure, A.J.

    2011-12-31

    Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electricity delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Critical factors in determining the EROI of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) are examined in this work. These include the input energy embodied into the system. The embodied energy includes the energy contained in the materials, as well as, that consumed in each stage of manufacturing from mining the raw materials to assembling the finished plant. Also critical are the system boundaries and value of the energy - heat is not as valuable as electrical energy.

  6. Energy, Entropy and Exergy Concepts and Their Roles in Thermal Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus A. Cengel

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Energy, entropy and exergy concepts come from thermodynamics and are applicable to all fields of science and engineering. Therefore, this article intends to provide background for better understanding of these concepts and their differences among various classes of life support systems with a diverse coverage. It also covers the basic principles, general definitions and practical applications and implications. Some illustrative examples are presented to highlight the importance of the aspects of energy, entropy and exergy and their roles in thermal engineering.

  7. Reservoir Engineering Studies of Geopressured Geothermal Energy Resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kun Sang [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea)

    1998-04-30

    Transient pressure analysis techniques were used to evaluate the performance of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal reservoir which has been monitored and tested under U.S. Department of Energy geopressured -geothermal research program. Analysis of transient pressure data furnished a reservoir description such as the formation parameters, pore volume and shape of the reservoir, and average reservoir pressure. Results of pressure tests suggest that the Gladys McCall reservoir probably has a long narrow shape with the well located off-center. During both production and shut-in periods, pressure buildup tests indicated some degree of external pressure support. Aquifer recharging was believed to be the main source. An aquifer influx model was derived from a conceptual model of water leakage through a partially sealing fault into the reservoir under steady-state conditions. Moreover, a match of the pressure history required that the conductivity of the fault be a function of the pressure difference between the supporting aquifer and the reservoir. Results of analyses provided a quantitative evaluation of the reservoir and a better understanding of the reservoir energy drive mechanism. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  8. The Role of Science in Managed Aquifer Recharge--the Equus Beds aquifer near Wichita, Kansas Andrew Ziegler, Director Brian Kelly, Office Chief Michael Jacobs, Manager of Water Planning and Production Debra Ary, Engineer, Water Systems Planning (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A. C.; Jacobs, M.; Ary, D.; Kelly, B.

    2013-12-01

    Data collection and interpretation using statistical, geochemical, and numerical simulation tools are essential parts of a long-term cooperative study between the city of Wichita, U.S. Geological Survey, and others to describe water quantity and quality conditions in a 165 square-mile part of the Equus Beds aquifer and Arkansas and Little Arkansas Rivers. The Equus Beds aquifer, eastern part of the High Plains Aquifer in south-central Kansas, is a vital water resource for agriculture and city of Wichita. Withdrawals for public supply began in the 1940s and agricultural irrigation began in the 1950-60s. These withdrawals led to water-level declines of up to 40 feet (historic low in 1993), a storage loss of 250,000 acre feet compared to predevelopment, and may enhance movement of chloride contamination from a past oilfield disposal area near Burrton and from natural chloride along the Arkansas River. Monitoring data and modeling show chloride near Burrton moved about 3 miles in 45 years, is about 1 mile away from the nearest public supply wells, and will continue to move for decades to centuries making the water unusable for irrigation or water supply without treatment. These concerns led to development of Wichita's 1993 integrated local water-supply plan that increased use of Cheney Reservoir and implemented aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) within the aquifer using high flows from the Little Arkansas River. ASR benefits include replacing depleted storage and slowing chloride movement. Decreased withdrawals, increased precipitation, and artificial recharge increased water levels and added 100,000 acre feet of storage through 2010, but drought since 2011 has increased withdrawals. A calibrated model will be used to simulate transport of chloride under several withdrawal scenarios using MODFLOW coupled with SEAWAT. Since 1995, water-quality data collection for more than 400 organic and inorganic compounds in surface water, treated source water for artificial recharge

  9. Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

    2011-12-01

    This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and

  10. Effect of ethanol-gasoline blends on small engine generator energy efficiency and exhaust emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Yinn; Chang, Yuan-Yi; Hsieh, You-Ru

    2010-02-01

    This study was focused on fuel energy efficiency and pollution analysis of different ratios of ethanol-gasoline blended fuels (E0, E3, E6, and E9) under different loadings. In this research, the experimental system consisted of a small engine generator, a particulate matter measurement system, and an exhaust gas analyzer system. Different fuels, unleaded gasoline, and ethanol-gasoline blends (E0, E3, E6, and E9) were used to study their effects on the exhaust gas emission and were expressed as thermal efficiency of the small engine generator energy efficiency. The results suggested that particle number concentration increased as the engine loading increased; however, it decreased as the ethanol content in the blend increased. While using E6 as fuel, the carbon monoxide (CO) concentration was less than other fuels (E0, E3, and E9) for each engine loading. The average of CO concentration reduction by using E3, E6, and E9 is 42, 86, and 83%, respectively. Using an ethanol-gasoline blend led to a significant reduction in exhaust emissions by approximately 78.7, 97.5, and 89.46% of the mean average values of hydrocarbons (HCs) with E3, E6, and E9 fuels, respectively, for all engine loadings. Using an ethanol-gasoline blend led to a significant reduction in exhaust emissions by approximately 35, 86, and 77% of the mean average values of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with E3, E6, and E9 fuels, respectively, at each engine loading. The E6 fuel gave the best results of the exhaust emissions, and the E9 fuel gave the best results of the particle emissions and engine performance. The thermal efficiency of the small engine generator increased as the ethanol content in the blend increased and as the engine loading increased.

  11. Teaching physics using project-based engineering curriculum with a theme of alternative energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasior, Bryan

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) provide a new set of science standards that, if adopted, shift the focus from content knowledge-based to skill-based education. Students will be expected to use science to investigate the natural world and solve problems using the engineering design process. The world also is facing an impending crisis related to climate, energy supply and use, and alternative energy development. Education has an opportunity to help provide the much needed paradigm shift from our current methods of providing the energy needs of society. The purpose of this research was to measure the effectiveness of a unit that accomplishes the following objectives: uses project-based learning to teach the engineering process and standards of the NGSS, addresses required content expectations of energy and electricity from the HSCE's, and provides students with scientific evidence behind issues (both environmental and social/economic) relating to the energy crisis and current dependence of fossil fuels as our primary energy source. The results of the research indicate that a physics unit can be designed to accomplish these objectives. The unit that was designed, implemented and reported here also shows that it was highly effective at improving students' science content knowledge, implementing the engineering design standards of the NGSS, while raising awareness, knowledge and motivations relating to climate and the energy crisis.

  12. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.; Eslick, Patrick J.

    2015-10-27

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2013. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are also shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented.

  13. An Augmented Virtuality Based Solar Energy Power Calculator in Electrical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Ehimika Ohireime Onime

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly important to include information about power generation from renewable energy sources in the training of electrical engineers. Solar energy is arguably the most common renewable energy source in use today. Providing practical hands-on training on solar energy power generation today requires the use of photovoltaic panel devices which are used for transforming solar energy into electrical energy. In many developing countries, practical hands-on training on solar power generation is limited due to the cost of photovoltaic panel devices and so the training consists of theoretical and tutorial classes sometimes supported by remote and virtual laboratories. This paper presents an augmented virtuality tool where real-time information from a mobile device’s sensors is used directly within a virtual or computer generated environment. The tool provides a practical context for hands-on tutorial exercises on solar energy power generation.

  14. The Effect of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Energy Bypass on Specific Thrust for a Supersonic Turbojet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of a thermodynamic cycle analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy bypass system that explores a wide range of MHD enthalpy extraction parameters. Through the analysis described here, it is shown that applying a magnetic field to a flow path in the Mach 2.0 to 3.5 range can increase the specific thrust of the turbojet engine up to as much as 420 N/(kg/s) provided that the magnitude of the magnetic field is in the range of 1 to 5 Tesla. The MHD energy bypass can also increase the operating Mach number range for a supersonic turbojet engine into the hypersonic flight regime. In this case, the Mach number range is shown to be extended to Mach 7.0.

  15. Integrated energy and emission management for heavy-duty diesel engines with waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Rascanu, G.; Feru, E.

    2015-01-01

    Rankine-cycleWasteHeatRecovery (WHR)systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine andWHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel en

  16. Integrated energy and emission management for heavy-duty diesel engines with waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Cloudt, R.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue consumpt

  17. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume III. Engineering drawings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1979-01-01

    Engineering drawings are presented for the Solar Total Energy System at Fort Hood, Texas. Drawings are given for the solar collector subsystem, power conversion subsystem, instrumentation and control subsystem, thermal storage subsystem, site preparation, thermal storage area piping and equipment layout, heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystem, STES building and facility, and electrical distribution. (WHK)

  18. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  19. Greentech in mechanical engineering and plant engineering of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Potentials in the future fields energy efficiency, renewable energy, electro mobility; Greentech im Maschinen- und Anlagenbau Baden-Wuerttembergs. Potenziale in den Zukunftsfeldern Energieeffizienz, Erneuerbare Energien, Elektromobilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dispan, Juergen

    2011-07-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the chances of some key topics for green-tech mechanical engineering and plant engineering in Baden-Wuerttemberg (Federal Republic of Germany). From the broad green-tech spectrum, in the connection with 'energy' future fields are selected for a more detailed analysis: energy efficiency, renewable energy and electric mobility. Framework conditions such as the EU regulation and EU funding will find special consideration. Operational case studies are described based on publicly available information. Fields of activity for a sustainable industrial policy in Baden-Wuerttemberg are described in terms of key mechanical engineering and plant engineering.

  20. Product design for energy reduction in concurrent engineering: An Inverted Pyramid Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadi, Nasr M.

    Energy factors in product design in concurrent engineering (CE) are becoming an emerging dimension for several reasons; (a) the rising interest in "green design and manufacturing", (b) the national energy security concerns and the dramatic increase in energy prices, (c) the global competition in the marketplace and global climate change commitments including carbon tax and emission trading systems, and (d) the widespread recognition of the need for sustainable development. This research presents a methodology for the intervention of energy factors in concurrent engineering product development process to significantly reduce the manufacturing energy requirement. The work presented here is the first attempt at integrating the design for energy in concurrent engineering framework. It adds an important tool to the DFX toolbox for evaluation of the impact of design decisions on the product manufacturing energy requirement early during the design phase. The research hypothesis states that "Product Manufacturing Energy Requirement is a Function of Design Parameters". The hypothesis was tested by conducting experimental work in machining and heat treating that took place at the manufacturing lab of the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Department (IMSE) at West Virginia University (WVU) and at a major U.S steel manufacturing plant, respectively. The objective of the machining experiment was to study the effect of changing specific product design parameters (Material type and diameter) and process design parameters (metal removal rate) on a gear head lathe input power requirement through performing defined sets of machining experiments. The objective of the heat treating experiment was to study the effect of varying product charging temperature on the fuel consumption of a walking beams reheat furnace. The experimental work in both directions have revealed important insights into energy utilization in machining and heat-treating processes and its variance based

  1. Energy engineering analysis, Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Burlington, Iowa. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonik, D.M.

    1982-06-22

    This Energy Engineering Analysis consists of the main report, three appendices, and a summary of annual energy consumption on a per-building basis. The main report identifies the purpose of the study, describes the existing and anticipated energy use trends, and defines and summarizes specific energy conservation projects recommended to achieve the goals stated in the Army Facilities Energy Plan. Appendices I, II and III, and the Annual Energy Consumption Summary include building information, weather data, cost data, and detailed computer-generated and manual calculations for each individual project. The analysis will enable ammunition plant personnel to identify energy conservation measures and meet Army energy reduction goals. The report includes: Energy consumption by fuel type Energy consumption trends ECAM projects Other potential projects Quick-fix management form Description of analyzed buildings In addition, the Analysis is a detailed data base consisting of: An analysis of building energy use Energy Conservation Measures applied to each analyzed building to be improved A set of marked-up prints from the survey indicating the conditions when surveyed.

  2. Energy flows, material cycles and global development. A process engineering approach to the Earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, Georg [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Institut; Turek, Thomas [TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemische Verfahrenstechnik

    2011-07-01

    The book deals with the global flows of energy and materials, and changes caused by human activities. Based on these facts, the limitations of anthropogenic energy and material flows and the resulting consequences for the development of human societies are discussed. Different scenarios for lifestyle patterns are correlated with the world's future development of energy supply and climate. The book provides a process engineering approach to the Earth system and global development. It requires basic understanding of mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology, and provides an insight into the complex matter for readers ranging from undergraduate students to experts. (orig.)

  3. Energy and Exergy Analysis of a Diesel Engine Fuelled with Diesel and Simarouba Biodiesel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Nabnit; Mohanty, Mahendra Kumar; Mishra, Sruti Ranjan; Mohanty, Ramesh Chandra

    2016-08-01

    This article intends to determine the available work and various losses of a diesel engine fuelled with diesel and SB20 (20 % Simarouba biodiesel by volume blended with 80 % diesel by volume). The energy and exergy analysis were carried out by using first law and second law of thermodynamics respectively. The experiments were carried out on a 3.5 kW compression ignition engine. The analysis was conducted on per mole of fuel basis. The energy analysis indicates that about 37.23 and 37.79 % of input energy is converted into the capacity to do work for diesel and SB20 respectively. The exergetic efficiency was 34.8 and 35 % for diesel and Simarouba respectively. Comparative study indicates that the energetic and exergetic performance of SB20 resembles with that of diesel fuel.

  4. Environmental engineering: energy value of replacing waste disposal with resource recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour; Stenstrom; Tchobanoglous; Miller; Wright; Vossoughi

    1999-07-30

    Although in the past, environmental engineering has been primarily concerned with waste disposal, the focus of the field is now shifting toward viewing wastes as potential resources. Because reclamation usually consumes less energy than producing new materials, increasing reclamation not only reduces pollution but saves energy. Technological innovations contributing to this shift are summarized here, and are variously classified as emerging technologies or research topics, as either new departures or incremental improvements, and as opportunistic innovations, or examples of a unifying strategy. Both liquid and solid waste examples are given, such as a recent discovery of effects in disinfecting microfiltered reclaimed wastewater with ultraviolet light. In addition to its value in reducing pollution and conserving energy, this reorientation of environmental engineering could contribute to a more general shift toward greater cooperation among organizations dealing with the environment.

  5. Army symposium: Electrical energy engineering today; Wehrtechnisches Symposium: Moderne elektrische Energietechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, H. (ed.) [Bundesakademie fuer Wehrverwaltung und Wehrtechnik, Mannheim (Germany). Fachgebiet Elektrotechnik und Elektroenergiewesen

    2000-05-01

    This symposium was held in Mannheim on May 20/21, 2000. All aspects of energy engineering were discussed, including electrochemical energy sources like accumulator batteries and fuel cells. The proceedings volume contains 26 papers which reflect the state of the art and current trends in electrical energy engineering in the German army. [German] Das Wehrtechnische Symposium 'Moderne elektrische Energietechnik' wurde von der Lehrabteilung Wehrtechnik der Bundesakademie fuer Wehrverwaltung und Wehrtechnik in Mannheim in der Zeit vom 20.05.-21.05.2000 durchgefuehrt. Das Programm enthaelt die aktuellen Themen der elektrischen Energietechnik. Die elektroschemischen Energiequellen (Batterien und Brennstoffzellen) wurden in das Programm integriert. Dadurch konnte das gesamte Spektrum der Energietechnik vielschichtig dargestellt und in der Diskussion unter z.T. sehr verschiedenen Gesichtspunkten beleuchtet werden. Die im vorliegenden Tagungsband abgedruckten 26 Skripte wurden weder gekuerzt noch ergaenzt. Sie zeigen insgesamt den aktuellen Stand und die erfolgversprechenden Entwicklungstendenzen der elektrischen Energietechnik in der Bundeswehr auf. (orig.)

  6. Energy Management of a Hybrid-Power Gas Engine-Driven Heat Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingkun Meng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid-power gas engine-driven heat pump (HPGHP combines hybrid power technology with a gas engine heat pump. The engine in the power system is capable of operating constantly with high thermal efficiency and low emissions during different operating modes. In this paper, the mathematical models of various components is established, including the engine thermal efficiency map and the motor efficiency map. The comprehensive charging/discharging efficiency model and energy management optimization strategy model which is proposed to maximize the efficiency of instantaneous HPGHP system are established. Then, different charging/discharging torque limits are obtained. Finally, a novel gas engine economical zone control strategy which combined with the SOC of battery in real time is put forward. The main operating parameters of HPGHP system under energy management are simulated by Matlab/Simulink and validated by experimental data, such as engine and motor operating torque, fuel consumption rate and comprehensive efficiency, etc. The results show that during 3600 s’ run-time, the SOC value of battery packs varies between 0.58 and 0.705, the fuel consumption rate reaches minimum values of approximately 291.3 g/(kW h when the compressor speed is nearly 1550 rpm in mode D, the engine thermal efficiency and comprehensive efficiency reach maximum values of approximately 0.2727 and 0.2648 when the compressor speed is 1575 rpm and 1475 rpm, respectively, in mode D. In general, the motor efficiency can be maintained above 0.85 in either mode.

  7. 5. Kassel symposium on energy systems engineering: On-site energy generation using renewable energy sources. Proceedings 2000; 5. Kasseler Symposium: Energie-Systemtechnik. Erneuerbare Energien- und rationelle Energieverwendung. Dezentrale Energieversorgung mit hohem regenerativen Anteil. Tagungsband 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R. (comp.)

    2000-07-01

    The focal topic of the 5th Kassel Symposium on Energy Systems Engineering was ''Decentralised energy supply with a high share of renewable energies''. The contributions covered a wide range of issues including the potential of renewable energies, supply and operating concepts, components, systems engineering and future perspectives. [German] Das 5. Kasseler Symposium Energie-Systemtechnik legt seinen Schwerpunkt auf das Thema: 'Dezentrale Energieversorgung mit hohem regenerativem Anteil'. Es spannt hierzu einen Bogen von den Potenzialen der Erneuerbaren Energien ueber Versorgungs- und Betriebsfuehrungskonzepte sowie Komponenten und Systemtechnik bis hin zu zukuenftigen Perspektiven. (orig.)

  8. A 4-cylinder Stirling engine computer program with dynamic energy equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, C. J.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1983-05-01

    A computer program for simulating the steady state and transient performance of a four cylinder Stirling engine is presented. The thermodynamic model includes both continuity and energy equations and linear momentum terms (flow resistance). Each working space between the pistons is broken into seven control volumes. Drive dynamics and vehicle load effects are included. The model contains 70 state variables. Also included in the model are piston rod seal leakage effects. The computer program includes a model of a hydrogen supply system, from which hydrogen may be added to the system to accelerate the engine. Flow charts are provided.

  9. Renewable energy from Cyanobacteria: energy production optimization by metabolic pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Naira; Van der Kooy, Frank; Van de Rhee, Miranda D; Voshol, Gerben P; Verpoorte, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The need to develop and improve sustainable energy resources is of eminent importance due to the finite nature of our fossil fuels. This review paper deals with a third generation renewable energy resource which does not compete with our food resources, cyanobacteria. We discuss the current state of the art in developing different types of bioenergy (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, etc.) from cyanobacteria. The major important biochemical pathways in cyanobacteria are highlighted, and the possibility to influence these pathways to improve the production of specific types of energy forms the major part of this review.

  10. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  11. History and Future of Professional Development Schools in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Debbie; Myers, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a history of the Professional Development School (PDS) movement in Kansas, as well as the major influences and challenges ahead as partnerships continue to grow and adapt. Mercer and Myers highlight the Kansas State Department of Education's (KSDE's) engagement in dialogue about the professional learning continuum of licensed…

  12. State of Kansas: K-12 Enrollment Projection Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This document contains headcount enrollment projections for the State of Kansas for the 2015-16 school year through the 2019-20 school year. These projections are based on resident live births in Kansas and the headcount enrollment data for previous school years. Based on the available data related to resident live births by county and previous…

  13. Kansas's forests, 2005: statistics, methods, and quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Miles; W. Keith Moser; Charles J. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of Kansas's forests was completed in 2005 after 8,868 plots were selected and 468 forested plots were visited and measured. This report includes detailed information on forest inventory methods and data quality estimates. Important resource statistics are included in the tables. A detailed analysis of Kansas inventory is presented...

  14. Lead and cadmium exposure study, Galena, Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, R.J.; Stallings, F.L.; Feese, D.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 167 residents from Galena, Kansas, and 283 residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, participated in the study. Residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, area served as the comparison population. Biological, environmental, and questionnaire information collected from residents of the Galena, Kansas, was compared with similar information collected from residents of the comparison area.

  15. Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines for Tomorrow's Energy-Efficient Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    A new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiative is accelerating the introduction of affordable, scalable, and sustainable biofuels and high-efficiency, low-emission vehicle engines. The simultaneous fuels and vehicles research and development (R&D) is designed to deliver maximum energy savings, emissions reduction, and on-road vehicle performance. The initiative's integrated approach combines the previously independent areas of biofuels and combustion R&D, bringing together two DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy research offices, nine national laboratories, and numerous industry and academic partners to more rapidly identify commercially viable solutions. This multi-year project will provide industry with the scientific underpinnings required to move new biofuels and advanced engine systems to market faster while identifying and addressing barriers to their commercialization. This project's ambitious, first-of-its-kind approach simultaneously tackles fuel and engine innovation to co-optimize performance of both elements and provide dramatic and rapid cuts in fuel use and emissions.

  16. Analytical, FEA, and Experimental Comparisons of Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Using Engine Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Khalatkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric elements can be used as sensors and actuators in flexible structures. In this paper, using the most basic concepts of piezoelectric micropower generators, all useful mathematical equations for getting analytical output are discussed and derived for different piezo positions on cantilever beam and then 3D finite element modeling and simulation of generalized piezoelectric laminated beam problem with proper specifications and properties are done in ANSYS12.0. Experimental analysis is also done on the very practical problem to harvest energy (to get electric energy by applying some deflection (mechanical energy on piezo-bonded aluminum beam, that is, to harvest energy (at microlevel at least by using vibrations of 4-stroke car diesel engine with mounting of piezo cantilever beam. Here piezoelectric beam is used to measure the charge generated from the engine vibrations. The vibration amplitudes are measured with a Laser Vibrometer with considerations of maximum number of power cycles is to be covered for analysis. The vibration response data of displacement of the cantilever at free end measured from Vibrometer are considered for harmonic and analytical analyses as mean displacement amplitude of 3.98 mm at free end. The study further carried out for effect of different piezo positions and various engine speeds also. Then comparison is also done among obtained results from these three analyses to get validation of all derived mathematical equations.

  17. Fuel from Bacteria, CO2, Water, and Solar Energy: Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Harvard is engineering a self-contained, scalable Electrofuels production system that can directly generate liquid fuels from bacteria, carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and sunlight. Harvard is genetically engineering bacteria called Shewanella, so the bacteria can sit directly on electrical conductors and absorb electrical current. This current, which is powered by solar panels, gives the bacteria the energy they need to process CO2 into liquid fuels. The Harvard team pumps this CO2 into the system, in addition to water and other nutrients needed to grow the bacteria. Harvard is also engineering the bacteria to produce fuel molecules that have properties similar to gasoline or diesel fuel—making them easier to incorporate into the existing fuel infrastructure. These molecules are designed to spontaneously separate from the water-based culture that the bacteria live in and to be used directly as fuel without further chemical processing once they’re pumped out of the tank.

  18. 76 FR 40624 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas AGENCY... Plan (SIP) submittal from the State of Kansas addressing the requirements of Clean Air Act (CAA or Act... Division, 901 North 5th Street, Kansas City, Kansas 66101. EPA requests that, if at all possible, you...

  19. Development by design: mitigating wind development's impacts on wildlife in Kansas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Obermeyer

    Full Text Available Wind energy, if improperly sited, can impact wildlife through direct mortality and habitat loss and fragmentation, in contrast to its environmental benefits in the areas of greenhouse gas, air quality, and water quality. Fortunately, risks to wildlife from wind energy may be alleviated through proper siting and mitigation offsets. Here we identify areas in Kansas where wind development is incompatible with conservation, areas where wind development may proceed but with compensatory mitigation for impacts, and areas where development could proceed without the need for compensatory mitigation. We demonstrate that approximately 10.3 million ha in Kansas (48 percent of the state has the potential to provide 478 GW of installed capacity while still meeting conservation goals. Of this total, approximately 2.7 million ha would require no compensatory mitigation and could produce up to 125 GW of installed capacity. This is 1,648 percent higher than the level of wind development needed in Kansas by 2030 if the United States is to get 20 percent of its electricity from wind. Projects that avoid and offset impacts consistent with this analysis could be awarded "Green Certification." Certification may help to expand and sustain the wind industry by facilitating the completion of individual projects sited to avoid sensitive areas and protecting the industry's reputation as an ecologically friendly source of electricity.

  20. EASTFILE: An Energy Aware, Scalable, and TCAM based Fast IP Lookup Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Mahini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Routers are one of the important entities in computer networks especially in the Internet. Forwarding IPpackets is a valuable and vital function in the Internet routers. Routers extract destination IP addressfrom packets and lookup those addresses in their own routing table. This task is called IP lookup.Ternary Content-Addressable Memories (TCAMs are becoming very popular for designing highthroughputaddress Lookup engines on routers: they are fast, cost effective and simple to manage.Despite their premise on high-throughput, large TCAM arrays are prohibitive due to their excessivepower consumption and lack of scalable design schemes. Therefore high power consumption in TCAMsis the mainspring of their failure in scalable IP lookup engines. This paper presents a novel andintelligent energy aware TCAM-Based IP lookup engine (EASTFILE which is scalable for large IPlookup tables and also IPv6 lookup. Energy aware means that power consumption in this scheme isbounded. Actually this method decreases power consumption nearly 74% rather than the referencedarchitecture in the worst case. Also this method decreases 46% number of match lines in the first step oflookup operation rather than the other multi level enabling techniques or simple partitioning technique.This fact provides using TCAMs in large IP lookup tables and IPv6 addresses. In addition, the mainoperations of an IP lookup engine such as lookup, insert, withdrawal and update are very efficient in theproposed approach.

  1. Process Systems Engineering R&D for Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-09-11

    This presentation will examine process systems engineering R&D needs for application to advanced fossil energy (FE) systems and highlight ongoing research activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the auspices of a recently launched Collaboratory for Process & Dynamic Systems Research. The three current technology focus areas include: 1) High-fidelity systems with NETL's award-winning Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) technology for integrating process simulation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and virtual engineering concepts, 2) Dynamic systems with R&D on plant-wide IGCC dynamic simulation, control, and real-time training applications, and 3) Systems optimization including large-scale process optimization, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and cost estimation. Continued R&D aimed at these and other key process systems engineering models, methods, and tools will accelerate the development of advanced gasification-based FE systems and produce increasingly valuable outcomes for DOE and the Nation.

  2. Energy system feasibility study of an Otto cycle/Stirling cycle hybrid automotive engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, Barry; McGovern, Jim [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin (Ireland)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of utilising a Stirling cycle engine as an exhaust gas waste heat recovery device for an Otto cycle internal combustion engine (ICE) in the context of an automotive power plant. The hybrid arrangement would produce increased brake power output for a given fuel consumption rate when compared to an ICE alone. The study was dealt with from an energy system perspective with design practicalities such as power train integration, location of auxiliaries, manufacture costs and other general plant design considerations neglected. The study necessitated work in two distinct areas: experimental assessment of the performance characteristics of an existing automotive Otto cycle ICE and mathematical modelling of the Stirling cycle engine based on the output parameters of the ICE. It was subsequently found to be feasible in principle to generate approximately further 30% useful power in addition to that created by the ICE by using a Stirling cycle engine to capture waste heat expelled from the ICE exhaust gases over the complete range of engine operating speeds. (author)

  3. Energy, Entropy and Exergy Concepts and Their Roles in Thermal Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Cengel, Yunus A.; Ibrahim Dincer

    2001-01-01

    Abstract: Energy, entropy and exergy concepts come from thermodynamics and are applicable to all fields of science and engineering. Therefore, this article intends to provide background for better understanding of these concepts and their differences among various classes of life support systems with a diverse coverage. It also covers the basic principles, general definitions and practical applications and implications. Some illustrative examples are presented to highlight the importance of t...

  4. Reducing aeration energy consumption in a large-scale membrane bioreactor: Process simulation and engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianyu; Liang, Peng; Yan, Xiaoxu; Zuo, Kuichang; Xiao, Kang; Xia, Junlin; Qiu, Yong; Wu, Qing; Wu, Shijia; Huang, Xia; Qi, Meng; Wen, Xianghua

    2016-04-15

    Reducing the energy consumption of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is highly important for their wider application in wastewater treatment engineering. Of particular significance is reducing aeration in aerobic tanks to reduce the overall energy consumption. This study proposed an in situ ammonia-N-based feedback control strategy for aeration in aerobic tanks; this was tested via model simulation and through a large-scale (50,000 m(3)/d) engineering application. A full-scale MBR model was developed based on the activated sludge model (ASM) and was calibrated to the actual MBR. The aeration control strategy took the form of a two-step cascaded proportion-integration (PI) feedback algorithm. Algorithmic parameters were optimized via model simulation. The strategy achieved real-time adjustment of aeration amounts based on feedback from effluent quality (i.e., ammonia-N). The effectiveness of the strategy was evaluated through both the model platform and the full-scale engineering application. In the former, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 15-20%. In the engineering application, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 20%, and overall specific energy consumption correspondingly reduced by 4% to 0.45 kWh/m(3)-effluent, using the present practice of regulating the angle of guide vanes of fixed-frequency blowers. Potential energy savings are expected to be higher for MBRs with variable-frequency blowers. This study indicated that the ammonia-N-based aeration control strategy holds promise for application in full-scale MBRs.

  5. Energy analysis of the engineering-economic optimization of convective heat-transfer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, N. M.

    1991-07-01

    The influence of the specific costs of the heat transfer surface, 1 kW of installed power of the blower and motor, 1 kW·h of electrical energy consumption by it, operating time of the surface, and other factors on the optimum specific power expenditure to force heat-transfer fluids through the ducts of heattransfer surfaces is investigated. The minimum engineering-economically justified operating time of the surface is determined.

  6. Statistics and Analysis on Papers Published on Journal 'Advanced Technology of Electrical Engineering and Energy'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Jie; LIN Liangzhen; QI Zhiping; MA Yuhuan; SHEN Guoliao; JING Bohong

    2009-01-01

    The paper presented the statistics and analysis on papers published on the journal 'Advanced Technology of Electrical Engineering and Energy' from 1996 to 2008: the paper acceptance rate, the paper category, the first author's affiliations, the top 7 first authors, the top 10 coauthors and also the joumal evaluation indexes of the journal. It offers details of the journal to anyone interested, especially to our editorial board and our broad readers.

  7. Energy, Entropy and Exergy Concepts and Their Roles in Thermal Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Cengel, Yunus A.; Ibrahim Dincer

    2001-01-01

    Abstract: Energy, entropy and exergy concepts come from thermodynamics and are applicable to all fields of science and engineering. Therefore, this article intends to provide background for better understanding of these concepts and their differences among various classes of life support systems with a diverse coverage. It also covers the basic principles, general definitions and practical applications and implications. Some illustrative examples are presented to highlight the importance of t...

  8. Determination of Gibbs energies of formation in aqueous solution using chemical engineering tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toure, Oumar; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Standard Gibbs energies of formation are of primary importance in the field of biothermodynamics. In the absence of any directly measured values, thermodynamic calculations are required to determine the missing data. For several biochemical species, this study shows that the knowledge of the standard Gibbs energy of formation of the pure compounds (in the gaseous, solid or liquid states) enables to determine the corresponding standard Gibbs energies of formation in aqueous solutions. To do so, using chemical engineering tools (thermodynamic tables and a model enabling to predict activity coefficients, solvation Gibbs energies and pKa data), it becomes possible to determine the partial chemical potential of neutral and charged components in real metabolic conditions, even in concentrated mixtures.

  9. Embracing a clean-energy future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebelius, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The former governor of Kansas describes how her state is greening. The Blue Green Alliance has estimated that in a renewable-energy economy, Kansas stands to gain more than 11,000 jobs and almost $2 billion in new economic investments.

  10. Wastewater off-gas to electricity: A look at energy recovery using the internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, S.C. [Eckenfelder Inc., Greenville, SC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Historically, publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) have not been regulated for air pollutant emissions. Federal, state, and local regulatory agencies have placed increased scrutiny on POTW volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions. In fact, the USEPA is developing Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for publicly owned facilities that receive and treat sewage and wastewater from residential, commercial, and industrial generators. Once promulgated, this standard will require POTWs to limit and control HAP emissions. One option available for the control of HAP emissions from wastewater facilities is the use of the internal combustion (IC) engine-generator systems to convert wastewater off-gas to energy. Single or multiple IC engines can be arranged to utilize wastewater off-gas in place of natural gas and diesel fuel to produce electricity. The electricity generated can then be used to power the treatment facility or sold to the local utility. These systems utilize an otherwise wasted energy resource while significantly reducing HAP and VOC emissions from the wastewater treatment process. This paper will discuss the principles of using the internal combustion engine for energy recovery and examine the technical and economic benefits involved with their use at POTW facilities.

  11. Engine control strategy for a series hybrid electric vehicle incorporating load-leveling and computer controlled energy management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochgraf, C.G.; Ryan, M.J.; Wiegman, H.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper identifies important engine, alternator and battery characteristics needed for determining an appropriate engine control strategy for a series hybrid electric vehicle. Examination of these characteristics indicates that a load-leveling strategy applied to the small engine will provide better fuel economy than a power-tracking scheme. An automatic energy management strategy is devised whereby a computer controller determines the engine-alternator turn-on and turn-off conditions and controls the engine-alternator autonomously. Battery state of charge is determined from battery voltage and current measurements. Experimental results of the system`s performance in a test vehicle during city driving are presented.

  12. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Diesel Engine Integrated with a PCM Based Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Velraj

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the energy and exergy analysis of a diesel engine integrated with a PCM based energy storage system, and provides more realistic and meaningful assessment than the conventional energy analysis. Using actual system data, the assessments of energy and exergy saved, and energy and exergy efficiencies are done. The exergy saved in the overall system is quantified and illustrated using an exergy flow diagram. Also, energy and exergy flow diagrams are compared. It is observed through the analysis that 6.13% of the total energy of the fuel is saved using the TES system. From the exergy analysis, it is identified that only 0.47% of the chemical availability of the fuel is saved. The energy efficiency of the integrated system is found to be varying between 3.19% and 34.15%. In contrast, the exergy efficiency, which incorporates the second law of thermodynamics for the integrated system, ranges from 0.25% to 27.41%.

  13. Energy-related scientists and engineers: a statistical profile of recent entrants into the work force, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Sharon E.

    1979-12-01

    This report examines the educational and employment characteristics of scientists and engineers who graduated during the years 1972, 1974, 1975, and 1976, with special attention to those whose work involves energy. The characteristics of energy-related graduates are also compared to those of more experienced scientists and engineers involved in energy activities. Information is based on the results of the 1976 and 1978 National Surveys of Recent Science and Engineering Graduates, and the 1976 National Survey of Natural and Social Scientists and Engineers, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy. Tabulations are included for the first time on employment involving specific energy sources and activities. Other characteristics discussed include educational level, salary, primary work activity, type of employer, and the proportion of graduates who found employment in their major field.

  14. Estadio de Kansas City (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy, C. F.

    1978-05-01

    Full Text Available The Crosby Kemper stadium, located in the center of an industrial district of Kansas City, was designed for various uses which include activities ranging from music and sports competitions to equestrian sports. It has a capacity for approximately 16 to 18,000 people and parking for 4,000 cars. The outstanding feature of its architectonic conception is the solution adopted for building the roof, by means of enormous metal tubular beams, of triangular section and a height of 8.25 meters with pipe diameters reaching 120 cm.

    El estadio Crosby Kemper, situado en el centro de un distrito industrial de Kansas, fue concebido para un funcionamiento diverso que comprende actividades que van desde la música y competiciones deportivas hasta pruebas hípicas. Tiene capacidad para unas 16.000 ó 18.000 personas, y plazas de aparcamiento para 4.000 coches. En su concepción arquitectónica sobresale la solución adoptada para la realización de la cubierta, mediante enormes vigas tubulares metálicas, de sección triangular y altura de 8,25 m, con diámetros de tubo que alcanzan los 120 cm.

  15. Development of an Organic Rankine Cycle system for exhaust energy recovery in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollone, Roberto; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Gualtieri, Angelo; Di Battista, Davide; Mauriello, Marco; Fatigati, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Road transportation is currently one of the most influencing sectors for global energy consumptions and CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, more than one third of the fuel energy supplied to internal combustion engines is still rejected to the environment as thermal waste at the exhaust. Therefore, a greater fuel economy might be achieved recovering the energy from exhaust gases and converting it into useful power on board. In the current research activity, an ORC-based energy recovery system was developed and coupled with a diesel engine. The innovative feature of the recovery power unit relies upon the usage of sliding vane rotary machines as pump and expander. After a preliminary exhaust gas mapping, which allowed to assess the magnitude of the thermal power to be recovered, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out to design the ORC system and the sliding vane machines using R236fa as working fluid. An experimental campaign was eventually performed at different operating regimes according to the ESC procedure and investigated the recovery potential of the power unit at design and off-design conditions. Mechanical power recovered ranged from 0.7 kW up to 1.9 kW, with an overall cycle efficiency from 3.8% up to 4.8% respectively. These results candidate sliding vane machines as efficient and reliable devices for waste heat recovery applications.

  16. Building energy analysis of Electrical Engineering Building from DesignBuilder tool: calibration and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, J.; Osma, G.; Caicedo, C.; Torres, A.; Sánchez, S.; Ordóñez, G.

    2016-07-01

    This research shows the energy analysis of the Electrical Engineering Building, located on campus of the Industrial University of Santander in Bucaramanga - Colombia. This building is a green pilot for analysing energy saving strategies such as solar pipes, green roof, daylighting, and automation, among others. Energy analysis was performed by means of DesignBuilder software from virtual model of the building. Several variables were analysed such as air temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, daylighting, and energy consumption. According to two criteria, thermal load and energy consumption, critical areas were defined. The calibration and validation process of the virtual model was done obtaining error below 5% in comparison with measured values. The simulations show that the average indoor temperature in the critical areas of the building was 27°C, whilst relative humidity reached values near to 70% per year. The most critical discomfort conditions were found in the area of the greatest concentration of people, which has an average annual temperature of 30°C. Solar pipes can increase 33% daylight levels into the areas located on the upper floors of the building. In the case of the green roofs, the simulated results show that these reduces of nearly 31% of the internal heat gains through the roof, as well as a decrease in energy consumption related to air conditioning of 5% for some areas on the fourth and fifth floor. The estimated energy consumption of the building was 69 283 kWh per year.

  17. Norwegian Residential Energy Demand: Coordinated use of a System Engineering and a Macroeconomic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor A Johnsen

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available In Norway, the system engineering model MARKAL and the macroeconomic model MSG-EE are both used in studies of national CO2 controlling strategies. MARKAL is a linear programming model that calculates a composite set of technologies necessary to meet demand and environmental constraints at minimised total energy expenditure. MSG-EE is an applied general equilibrium model including the link between economic activity, energy demand and emissions to air. MSG-EE has a theory consistent description of the link between income, prices and energy demand, but the representation of technological improvements is simple. MARKAL has a sophisticated description of future energy technology options, but includes no feedback to the general economy. A project for studying the potential for a coordinated use of these two models was initiated and funded by the Norwegian Research Council (NFR. This paper gives a brief presentation of the two models. Results from independent model calculations show that MARKAL gives a signficant lower residential energy demand than MSG-EE does. This is explained by major differences in modelling approach. A first attempt of coordinating the residential energy demand in the models is reported. This attempt shows that implementing results from MARKAL, in MSG-EE for the residential sector alone gives little impact on the general economy. A further development of an iteration procedure between the models should include all energy using sectors.

  18. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-02-02

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work to be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Powhattan, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the property; (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination; and (3) provide recommendations for future action, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. It should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Powhattan.

  19. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS--NEAR TERM--CLASS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    1999-06-01

    This annual report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  20. Separate process wastewaters, part A: Contaminated flow collection and treatment system for the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to assist the agency in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 as it applies to modification of ongoing groundwater treatment at DOE`s Kansas City Plant (KCP), located about 19 km (12 miles) south of the central business district of Kansas City, Missouri. The KCP is currently owned by DOE and is operated by the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal Inc. The plant manufactures nonnuclear components for nuclear weapons. The purpose of and need for the DOE action is to treat identified toxic organic contaminated groundwater at the KCP to ensure that human health and the environment are protected and to comply with groundwater treatment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3008(h) Administrative Order on Consent and the discharge requirements of the Kansas City, Missouri, ordinances for the city sewer system. Four source streams of toxic organic contaminated groundwater have been identified that require treatment prior to discharge to the city sewer system. The toxic organic contaminants of concern consist of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in the groundwater and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) predominantly associated with some soils near the Main Manufacturing Building. The no-action alternative is to continue with the current combination of treatment and nontreatment and to continue operation of the KCP groundwater treatment system in its current configuration at Building 97 (B97). The DOE proposed action is to collect and treat all identified toxic organic contaminated groundwater prior to discharge to the city sewer system. The proposed action includes constructing an Organics Collection System and Organics Treatment Building, moving and expanding the existing groundwater treatment system, and operating the new groundwater treatment facility.

  1. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  2. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work that will be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Ramona, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential source areas on the property, (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination, and (3) provide recommendations for future actions, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. Under the Intergovernmental Agreement, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. The Master Work Plan was approved by the KDHE. It contains materials common to investigations at locations in Kansas and should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Ramona.

  3. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Nicole M. Aulerich; Irwin,Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  4. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  5. Integrated Energy and Emission Management for Diesel Engines with Waste Heat Recovery Using Dynamic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Frank

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rankine-cycle Waste Heat Recovery (WHR systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine and WHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel engine with WHR system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing online the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue consumption. Contrary to other control studies, the proposed control strategy optimizes overall engine-aftertreatment-WHR system performance and deals with emission constraints. From simulations, the potential of this IPC strategy is demonstrated over a World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC using a high-fidelity simulation model. These results are compared with a state-of-the-art baseline engine control strategy. By applying the IPC strategy, an additional 2.6% CO2 reduction is achieved compare to the baseline strategy, while meeting the tailpipe NOx emission limit. In addition, the proposed low-level WHR controller is shown to deal with the cold start challenges.

  6. Microalgal bioengineering for sustainable energy development: Recent transgenesis and metabolic engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Singh, Puneet Kumar; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-03-01

    Exploring the efficiency of algae to produce remarkable products can be directly benefitted by studying its mechanism at systems level. Recent advents in biotechnology like flux balance analysis (FBA), genomics and in silico proteomics minimize the wet lab exertion. It is understood that FBA predicts the metabolic products, metabolic pathways and alternative pathway to maximize the desired product, and these are key components for microalgae bio-engineering. This review encompasses recent transgenesis techniques and metabolic engineering strategies applied to different microalgae for improving different traits. Further it also throws light on RNAi and riboswitch engineering based methods which may be advantageous for high throughput microalgal research. A valid and optimally designed microalga can be developed where every engineering strategies meet each other successfully and will definitely fulfill the market needs. It is also to be noted that Omics (viz. genetic and metabolic manipulation with bioinformatics) should be integrated to develop a strain which could prove to be a futuristic solution for sustainable development for energy.

  7. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  8. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2005-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  9. Energy Consumption and Saving Analysis for Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing awareness of environmental protection and sustainable manufacturing, the environmental impact of laser additive manufacturing (LAM technology has been attracting more and more attention. Aiming to quantitatively analyze the energy consumption and extract possible ways to save energy during the LAM process, this investigation studies the effects of input variables including laser power, scanning speed, and powder feed rate on the overall energy consumption during the laser deposition processes. Considering microhardness as a standard quality, the energy consumption of unit deposition volume (ECUDV, in J/mm3 is proposed as a measure for the average applied energy of the fabricated metal part. The potential energy-saving benefits of the ultrasonic vibration–assisted laser engineering net shaping (LENS process are also examined in this paper. The experimental results suggest that the theoretical and actual values of the energy consumption present different trends along with the same input variables. It is possible to reduce the energy consumption and, at the same time, maintain a good part quality and the optimal combination of the parameters referring to Inconel 718 as a material is laser power of 300 W, scanning speed of 8.47 mm/s and powder feed rate of 4 rpm. When the geometry shaping and microhardness are selected as evaluating criterions, American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI 4140 powder will cause the largest energy consumption per unit volume. The ultrasonic vibration–assisted LENS process cannot only improve the clad quality, but can also decrease the energy consumption to a considerable extent.

  10. Unnotched Charpy Impact Energy Transition Behavior of Austempered Engineering Grade Ductile Iron Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisakurek, Sukru Ergin; Ozel, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    Unnotched Charpy impact energy transition behavior of five different engineering grade ductile iron castings, as specified by EN 1563 Standards, were examined in as-cast, as well as in austempered states. ADIs were produced with the maximum impact energy values permissible for the grades. Austempering treatment detrimented the sub-zero impact properties of the ferritic castings, but considerably enhanced those of the pearlitic-ferritic irons. The impact energy transition behavior of the austempered states of all the grades examined were noted to be determined by the progressive transformation of the unavoidable carbon-unsaturated and untransformed regions of the austenite remaining in the matrix of the austempered ductile iron to martensite with decreasing temperature.

  11. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials.

  12. Detection of High Energy Cosmic Rays at the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    de Jong, Sijbrand

    2016-01-01

    Detection of (ultra-) high-energy cosmic rays with the use of radio frequency emission from extensive air showers has been proven as complimentary to existing ground array detection techniques. Great progress has been made in the understanding of the emission processes and in their Monte Carlo modelling. These have led to experimental results, notably also at the Auger Engineering Radio Array, on energy, angular and mass composition resolution of the primary cosmic rays. Recent results are reported. The measured resolutions turn out to be competitive with existing techniques and they have independent uncertainties. Implications for cross-calibration with existing techniques and for future large-scale applications of radio detection of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are discussed.

  13. HBL variability at high energies: clues on jet structure and driving engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costamante, Luigi

    High-energy-peaked BLLac objects (HBL) are characterized by the highest energy electrons in the whole blazar class. They show strong variability on many different timescales, in particular in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands, which are close to the peaks of their spectral energy distribution (SED). This variability carries information on two different aspects: on how the central engine drives the jet (long time series analysis) and on the details of the acceleration and emission processes in each single dissipative event. In the latter case, the study of flares (down to few minutes in gamma-rays) with time-resolved spectroscopy and correlations in different bands is now providing new clues on the structure of the jet, exposing the limits of the one-zone interpretation for the SED peaks. I will discuss the recent progresses allowed by multi-wavelength campaigns with new-generation instruments.

  14. A four power-piston low-temperature differential Stirling engine using simulated solar energy as a heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongtragool, Bancha; Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Laboratory (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, the performances of a four power-piston, gamma-configuration, low-temperature differential Stirling engine are presented. The engine is tested with air at atmospheric pressure by using a solar simulator with four different solar intensities as a heat source. Variations in engine torque, shaft power and brake thermal efficiency with engine speed and engine performance at various heat inputs are presented. The Beale number obtained from the testing of the engine is also investigated. The results indicate that at the maximum actual energy input of 1378 W and a heater temperature of 439 K, the engine approximately produces a maximum torque of 2.91 N m, a maximum shaft power of 6.1 W, and a maximum brake thermal efficiency of 0.44% at 20 rpm. (author)

  15. Dissipated energy and entropy production for an unconventional heat engine: the stepwise `circular cycle'

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Liberto, Francesco; Pastore, Raffaele; Peruggi, Fulvio

    2011-05-01

    When some entropy is transferred, by means of a reversible engine, from a hot heat source to a colder one, the maximum efficiency occurs, i.e. the maximum available work is obtained. Similarly, a reversible heat pumps transfer entropy from a cold heat source to a hotter one with the minimum expense of energy. In contrast, if we are faced with non-reversible devices, there is some lost work for heat engines, and some extra work for heat pumps. These quantities are both related to entropy production. The lost work, i.e. ? , is also called 'degraded energy' or 'energy unavailable to do work'. The extra work, i.e. ? , is the excess of work performed on the system in the irreversible process with respect to the reversible one (or the excess of heat given to the hotter source in the irreversible process). Both quantities are analysed in detail and are evaluated for a complex process, i.e. the stepwise circular cycle, which is similar to the stepwise Carnot cycle. The stepwise circular cycle is a cycle performed by means of N small weights, dw, which are first added and then removed from the piston of the vessel containing the gas or vice versa. The work performed by the gas can be found as the increase of the potential energy of the dw's. Each single dw is identified and its increase, i.e. its increase in potential energy, evaluated. In such a way it is found how the energy output of the cycle is distributed among the dw's. The size of the dw's affects entropy production and therefore the lost and extra work. The distribution of increases depends on the chosen removal process.

  16. TEST CELLS SE-5 - SE-8 - SE-10 IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB AND 117 HIGH ENERGY FUELS LABORAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    TEST CELLS SE-5 - SE-8 - SE-10 IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB AND 117 HIGH ENERGY FUELS LABORATORY HEFL - TRANSDUCER INSTRUMENTATION CONSOLE SE-10 - TEMPERATURE INSTRUMENTATION CONSOLE SE-10 - MODULE FUEL CELL EXPERIMENT SE-8 -

  17. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-11-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

  18. Energy estimation of cosmic rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A. W.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30-80 MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy deposit per area is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two-dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge-excess emission components. The spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8 MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. This radiation energy—corrected for geometrical effects—is used as a cosmic-ray energy estimator. Performing an absolute energy calibration against the surface-detector information, we observe that this radio-energy estimator scales quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy as expected for coherent emission. We find an energy resolution of the radio reconstruction of 22% for the data set and 17% for a high-quality subset containing only events with at least five radio stations with signal.

  19. Energy and environmental issues on building services engineering in the life-style of twenty-first century; 21 seiki no kankyo energy to life style no arikata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, N.

    2001-01-05

    The author discussed building services technologies that characterize twenty-first century in view of the energy, environment and life-style. Natural energy systems shall take a principal roll in this century from the energy and environmental point of view. Among building engineering issues, IT technologies such as BEMS and BOFD connected to the internet and backed by simulation technologies will become most important together with establishment of commissioning process. Home office will become the new life-style of the century and home environmental conditioning systems shall be further developed. As important social system issues, international relations and language matters, the education system of environmental system engineering and the licensing of professional engineers were discussed. Maintaining philosophy to seek for truth hidden behind the shadow was concluded as most important for environmental engineers. (author)

  20. Lorentz factor - Beaming corrected energy/luminosity correlations and GRB central engine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2017-03-01

    We work on a GRB sample whose initial Lorentz factors (Γ0) are constrained by the afterglow onset method and the jet opening angles (θj) are determined by the jet break time. We confirm the Γ0-Eγ,iso correlation by Liang et al. (2010), and the Γ0-Lγ,iso correlation by Lü et al. (2012). Furthermore, we find correlations between Γ0 and the beaming corrected γ-ray energy (Eγ) and mean γ-ray luminosity (Lγ). By also including the kinetic energy of the afterglow, we find rough correlations (with larger scatter) between Γ0 and the total (γ-ray plus kinetic) energy and the total mean luminosity, both for isotropic values and beaming corrected values: these correlations allow us to test the data with GRB central engine models. Limiting our sample to the GRBs that likely have a black hole central engine, we compare the data with theoretical predictions of two types of jet launching mechanisms from BHs, i.e. the non-magnetized ν ν bar -annihilation mechanism, and the strongly magnetized Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We find that the data are more consistent with the latter mechanism, and discuss the implications of our findings for GRB jet composition.

  1. Systems Engineering Applied to the Development of a Wave Energy Farm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Bull, Diana L; Costello, Ronan Patrick; Aurelien Babarit; Kim Nielsen; Claudio Bittencourt Ferreira; Ben Kennedy; Malins, Robert Joseph; Kathryn Dykes; Jochem Weber

    2017-04-01

    A motivation for undertaking this stakeholder requirements analysis and Systems Engineering exercise is to document the requirements for successful wave energy farms to facilitate better design and better design assessments. A difficulty in wave energy technology development is the absence to date of a verifiable minimum viable product against which the merits of new products might be measured. A consequence of this absence is that technology development progress, technology value, and technology funding have largely been measured, associated with, and driven by technology readiness, measured in technology readiness levels (TRLs). Originating primarily from the space and defense industries, TRLs focus on procedural implementation of technology developments of large and complex engineering projects, where cost is neither mission critical nor a key design driver. The key deficiency with the TRL approach in the context of wave energy conversion is that WEC technology development has been too focused on commercial readiness and not enough on the stakeholder requirements and particularly economic viability required for market entry.

  2. A continuous latitudinal energy balance model to explore non-uniform climate engineering strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, F.; McInnes, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Current concentrations of atmospheric CO2 exceed measured historical levels in modern times, largely attributed to anthropogenic forcing since the industrial revolution. The required decline in emissions rates has never been achieved leading to recent interest in climate engineering for future risk-mitigation strategies. Climate engineering aims to offset human-driven climate change. It involves techniques developed both to reduce the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere (Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) methods) and to counteract the radiative forcing that it generates (Solar Radiation Management (SRM) methods). In order to investigate effects of SRM technologies for climate engineering, an analytical model describing the main dynamics of the Earth's climate has been developed. The model is a time-dependent Energy Balance Model (EBM) with latitudinal resolution and allows for the evaluation of non-uniform climate engineering strategies. A significant disadvantage of climate engineering techniques involving the management of solar radiation is regional disparities in cooling. This model offers an analytical approach to design multi-objective strategies that counteract climate change on a regional basis: for example, to cool the Artic and restrict undesired impacts at mid-latitudes, or to control the equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Using the Green's function approach the resulting partial differential equation allows for the computation of the surface temperature as a function of time and latitude when a 1% per year increase in the CO2 concentration is considered. After the validation of the model through comparisons with high fidelity numerical models, it will be used to explore strategies for the injection of the aerosol precursors in the stratosphere. In particular, the model involves detailed description of the optical properties of the particles, the wash-out dynamics and the estimation of the radiative cooling they can generate.

  3. Climate and weather atlas of Kansas : An introduction

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Because Kansas lies in the center of the continental United States, it is subject to varying weather patterns as air masses move across the state. Much of the severe...

  4. The ecology of a boggy marsh in Stafford County, Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The fluctuating water level of lakes and ponds is one of the most critical factors in the establishment of aquatic vegetation in Kansas. This study utilizes an...

  5. Eleventh symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Solid mechanics and processing: Analysis, measurement and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Eleventh Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 3--5, 1993, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the eight technical sessions held at this meeting. This symposium was organized into eight technical sessions: Surfaces and interfaces; thermophysical properties and processes; inelastic behavior; nondestructive characterization; multiphase flow and thermal processes; optical and other measurement systems; stochastic processes; and large systems and control. Individual projects were processed separately for the databases.

  6. Conversion of thermal energy into electricity via a water pump operating in Stirling engine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavin, V.S. [Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS (Russian Federation); Bakos, G.C. [Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Laboratory of Energy Economics, 67 100 Xanthi (Greece); Finnikov, K.A. [Siberian Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the principle of heat energy conversion via Stirling pump into electricity is considered. New scheme of Stirling pump is proposed, that differs from known ones in application of offset heater and cooler and valves controlling the motion of liquid. The mathematical model is implemented to examine the liquid flow and gas heat exchange in cylinders and regenerator. The numerical simulation of engine's working cycle is conducted for the purpose of determining the characteristic parameters of its design. A possibility of achieving high thermal efficiency at acceptable power level is shown. (author)

  7. Convex Optimization for the Energy Management of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Considering Engine Start and Gearshift Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Nüesch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method to solve the energy management problem for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs with engine start and gearshift costs. The method is based on a combination of deterministic dynamic programming (DP and convex optimization. As demonstrated in a case study, the method yields globally optimal results while returning the solution in much less time than the conventional DP method. In addition, the proposed method handles state constraints, which allows for the application to scenarios where the battery state of charge (SOC reaches its boundaries.

  8. Using the Beopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maguire, Jeff [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Horowitz, Scott [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures to follow when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important because a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes building models that isolate the impacts of specific components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models. These discrepancies are caused by differences in the algorithms used by the engines or coding errors.

  9. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  10. Using the Beopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maguire, Jeff [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Horowitz, Scott [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures to follow when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important because a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes building models that isolate the impacts of specific components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models. These discrepancies are caused by differences in the algorithms used by the engines or coding errors.

  11. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  12. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2014 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  13. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This Monitoring Report describes groundwater monitoring for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory. Monitoring was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  14. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  15. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2015 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  16. Assessing the engineering performance of affordable net-zero energy housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallpe, Jordan P.

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate affordable technologies that are capable of providing attractive, cost-effective energy savings to the housing industry. The research did so by investigating the 2011 Solar Decathlon competition, with additional insight from the Purdue INhome. Insight from the Purdue INhome verified the importance of using a three step design process to design a net-zero energy building. In addition, energy consumption values of the INhome were used to compare and contrast different systems used in other houses. Evaluation of unbiased competition contests gave a better understanding of how a house can realistically reach net-zero. Upon comparison, off-the-shelf engineering systems such as super-efficient HVAC units, heat pump hot water heaters, and properly designed photovoltaic arrays can affordably enable a house to become net-zero. These important and applicable technologies realized from the Solar Decathlon will reduce the 22 percent of all energy consumed through the residential sector in the United States. In conclusion, affordable net-zero energy buildings can be built today with commitment from design professionals, manufacturers, and home owners.

  17. Physician Practices Regarding SIDS in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill-Scott, Fannette; Dong, Frank; Redmond, Michelle; Ablah, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months. The purpose of this study was to assess prenatal and postnatal physicians' knowledge about SIDS in a county with high rates of SIDS deaths. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of pediatricians, family practitioners, and obstetricians in Sedgwick County, Kansas. Most physicians reported correctly that there were effective measures to reduce SIDS. Most respondents agreed it was important to discuss SIDS with parents. Pediatricians were more likely than family practitioners and obstetricians to recognize that pacifier use is important for infants in their first year to reduce SIDS and 2 to 4 months is the age range for peak incidence of SIDS. Pediatricians, family practitioners, and obstetricians are knowledgeable about SIDS and SIDS risk reduction. However, they are not allocating adequate time for discussing SIDS and SIDS reduction efforts with patients.

  18. Radar research at the University of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Shannon D.; Allen, Christopher; Arnold, Emily; Hale, Richard; Hui, Rongqing; Keshmiri, Shahriar; Leuschen, Carlton; Li, Jilu; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Salandrino, Alessandro; Stiles, James

    2017-05-01

    Radar research has been synonymous with the University of Kansas (KU) for over half a century. As part of this special session organized to highlight significant radar programs in academia, this paper surveys recent and ongoing work at KU. This work encompasses a wide breadth of sensing applications including the remote sensing of ice sheets, autonomous navigation methods for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), novel laser radar capabilities, detection of highenergy cosmic rays using bistatic radar, different forms of waveform diversity such as MIMO radar and pulse agility, and various radar-embedded communication methods. The results of these efforts impact our understanding of the changing nature of the environment, address the proliferation of unmanned systems in the US airspace, realize new sensing modalities enabled by the joint consideration of electromagnetics and signal processing, and greater facilitate radar operation in an increasingly congested and contested spectrum.

  19. Prevalence of epilepsy in rural Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Liu, Yi; Paschal, Angelia M; Hawley, Suzanne; Thurman, David; Hauser, W Allen

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of active epilepsy in two southeastern rural Kansas counties. Medical records were abstracted from the emergency rooms, out- and inpatient services and clinics of 9 hospitals, from 10 doctors' offices, and 1 nursing home in and surrounding the two counties. Letters were mailed from hospitals and doctors' offices to invite their potentially eligible patients to participate in an interview. Medical record information and the interview, when available, were used for the final determination of active epilepsy, seizure type, etiology, syndrome, age, and gender in consensus conferences. Prevalence of epilepsy was calculated, and capture-recapture methodology, which estimates prevalence based on what is known about the population, was employed to assess active epilepsy in the two counties. This study identified 404 individuals with active prevalent epilepsy who visited at least one of the 20 facilities during the observation period. The overall prevalence of active epilepsy was 7.2 per 1000. The seizure type for 71.3% of prevalent cases was unknown; among the 76 cases with known and classifiable seizure type, 55.3% had focal with secondary generalized seizures. Among the 222 cases with classifiable etiology, 53.1% were idiopathic/cryptogenic. About 75% (n=301) were captured at only one center, 72% (n=75) of the remaining 103 patients were captured at two centers, and 28 patients were identified at three or more centers. The capture-recapture assessment yielded an estimation of 982 prevalent patients. The overall estimated prevalence of epilepsy in the two Kansas counties using capture-recapture was 17 per 1000. The crude prevalence of epilepsy, using medical record survey methods, was similar to, but on the high end, of other total population prevalence studies in the United States. The capture-recapture assessment suggested that epilepsy prevalence might be considerably higher than the crude prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  20. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer; Restrepo-Osorio, Diana

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Release provides derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2015. Gallons per capita per day is calculated using self-reported information in the “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” and “Part C: Population, Service Connections, and Water Rates” sections of the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources' (DWR) annual municipal water use report (see appendixes at http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds964 for an example of a municipal water use report form.) Percent unaccounted for water is calculated using self-reported information in “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” of the DWR’s municipal water-use report. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2011–2014) are also shown with the 2015 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. Derivative statistics of 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 5-year averages for gallons per capita per day (gpcd) are also provided by the Kansas Water Authority's 14 regional planning areas, and the DWR regions used for analysis of per capita water use in Kansas. An overall Kansas average (yearly and 5-year average) is also calculated. Kansas state average per capita municipal water use in 2015 was 105 gpcd.

  1. [Energy value evaluation of dike-pond agro-ecological engineering modes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongfang; Peng, Shaolin; Lan, Shengfang; Chen, Feipeng

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, energy value analysis and new energy index for sustainable development (EISD) were used to evaluate three different dike-pond agro-ecological engineering modes in Sanshui city of Pearl River Delta in system and subsystem levels. The result showed that mode III was the best in its sustainable development ability. The EISD of mode III was 58.3% and 29.7% higher than that of modes I and II. With a higher economic benefit and higher environmental loading, the planting subsystem had the lowest sustainability. Although the economic benefit of stock raising subsystem was not high, its indirect benefit was higher. With a higher economic benefit and a lower environmental loading, fishing subsystem had the highest sustainability.

  2. Building Professional Competencies Indices in the Solar Energy Industry for the Engineering Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Guo Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop professional competency indices and their subindices as needed by the solar energy industry, to establish a basis for development of the engineering education curriculum. The methodologies adopted by the study are literature analysis, expert advisories, and focus groups. The study focuses on the establishment of competency indices by experts at stock market-listed companies and then confirms these competencies with focus groups. The study found that the competencies required by the solar industry consist of knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the areas of materials development and applications, photovoltaic technology, cell manufacturing technology, biotechnology, chemical technology, power generation and electricity, process development and improvement, data collection and analysis, industry regulation, green energy beliefs, and working attitudes and values. The results of this study can be used as the basis for the cultivation, selection, and employment of industry professionals.

  3. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

    2010-12-07

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  4. Heartland Engineers: A Century of Superior Service 1907-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    KANSAS CITY DISTRICT ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS DISTINGUISHED CIVILIANS LOUIS G. FEIL SUPERVISORY CIVIL ENGINEER / CHIEF, ENGINEERING DIVISION 1939 to 1966...MARK TWAIN IND PARK: PA/INPR 133. MARSHALL SATELLITE POW CAMP: PA/INPR 134. MARTIN AARON 135. MATTIACE PETROLEUM, NY SUPERFUND SITE, HAZARDOUS WASTE

  5. Progression of Technology Education for Atomic Energy Engineering in Tsuyama National College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Manabu; Kobayashi, Toshiro; Okada, Tadashi; Sato, Makoto; Sasai, Yuji; Konishi, Daijiro; Harada, Kanji; Taniguchi, Hironari; Toya, Hideaki; Inada, Tomomi; Sori, Hitoshi; Yagi, Hideyuki

    This paper describes the achievements of a program in which technology education is provided to cultivate practical core engineers for low-level radiation. It was made possible by means of (1) an introductory education program starting at an early age and a continuous agenda throughout college days and (2) regional collaboration. First, with regard to the early-age introductory education program and the continuous education agenda, the subjects of study related to atomic energy or nuclear engineering were reorganized as “Subjects related to Atomic Power Education” for all grades in all departments. These subjects were included in the syllabus and the student guide book, emphasizing a continuous and consistent policy throughout seven-year college study, including the five-year system and additional two-year advanced course. Second, to promote practical education, the contents of lectures, experiments, and internships were enriched and realigned in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Okayama University and The Cyugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. In addition to the expansion and rearrangement of atomic power education, research on atomic power conducted for graduation thesis projects were undertaken to enhance the educational and research activities. In consequence, it has been estimated that there is now a total of fourteen subject areas in atomic energy technology, more than eight-hundred registered students in the department, and thirteen members of the teaching staff related to atomic energy technology. Furthermore, the “Tsuyama model” is still being developed. This program was funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  6. Thermal energy storage for the Stirling engine powered automobile. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D T [ed.

    1979-03-01

    A detailed design of a thermal energy storage (TES) system for use with the Stirling engine as an automotive power system has been developed. The gravimetric and volumetric storage densities are competitive with electric battery storage systems. The TES/Stirling engine system meets all operational requirements for a practical vehicle and can be packaged in compact-sized automobiles with minimum impact on passenger and freight volume. The TES/Stirling system is the only storage approach for direct use of combustion heat from fuel sources not suitable for direct transport and use on the vehicle. The particular concept developed in this study is also useful for a dual-mode TES/liquid fuel system in which the TES (recharged from an external energy source) is used for short-duration trips (approx. 10 miles or less) and liquid fuel carried onboard the vehicle used for long-duration trips (as in current automobiles). The dual-mode approach permits an automobile with the convenience and flexibility of current automobiles while offering the potential of 50% savings in the consumption of premium liquid fuels for automotive propulsion in the United States. Relative to the TES-only vehicle, the dual mode approach also reduces the TES cost significantly because of the much smaller TES capacity required.

  7. Integrated Community Energy Systems: engineering analysis and design bibliography. [368 citations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.; Sapienza, G.R.

    1979-05-01

    This bibliography cites 368 documents that may be helpful in the planning, analysis, and design of Integrated Community Energy Systems. It has been prepared for use primarily by engineers and others involved in the development and implementation of ICES concepts. These documents include products of a number of Government research, development, demonstration, and commercialization programs; selected studies and references from the literature of various technical societies and institutions; and other selected material. The key programs which have produced cited reports are the Department of Energy Community Systems Program (DOE/CSP), the Department of Housing and Urban Development Modular Integrated Utility Systems Program (HUD/MIUS), and the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Integrated Utility Systems Program (HEW/IUS). The cited documents address experience gained both in the U.S. and in other countries. Several general engineering references and bibliographies pertaining to technologies or analytical methods that may be helpful in the analysis and design of ICES are also included. The body of relevant literature is rapidly growing and future updates are therefore planned. Each citation includes identifying information, a source, descriptive information, and an abstract. The citations are indexed both by subjects and authors, and the subject index is extensively cross-referenced to simplify its use.

  8. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-15

    what future CCC/USDA actions may be necessary, with the ultimate goal of achieving classification of the Sylvan Grove site at no further action status. The proposed activities are to be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA concerning environmental site characterization and remediation at former grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. That document should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove.

  9. Reducing Vehicle Weight and Improving U.S. Energy Efficiency Using Integrated Computational Materials Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, William J.

    2012-09-01

    Transportation accounts for approximately 28% of U.S. energy consumption with the majority of transportation energy derived from petroleum sources. Many technologies such as vehicle electrification, advanced combustion, and advanced fuels can reduce transportation energy consumption by improving the efficiency of cars and trucks. Lightweight materials are another important technology that can improve passenger vehicle fuel efficiency by 6-8% for each 10% reduction in weight while also making electric and alternative vehicles more competitive. Despite the opportunities for improved efficiency, widespread deployment of lightweight materials for automotive structures is hampered by technology gaps most often associated with performance, manufacturability, and cost. In this report, the impact of reduced vehicle weight on energy efficiency is discussed with a particular emphasis on quantitative relationships determined by several researchers. The most promising lightweight materials systems are described along with a brief review of the most significant technical barriers to their implementation. For each material system, the development of accurate material models is critical to support simulation-intensive processing and structural design for vehicles; improved models also contribute to an integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) approach for addressing technical barriers and accelerating deployment. The value of computational techniques is described by considering recent ICME and computational materials science success stories with an emphasis on applying problem-specific methods.

  10. Energy Estimation of Cosmic Rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anastasi, Gioacchino Alex; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernán Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Blazek, Jiri; Bleve, Carla; Blümer, Hans; Boháčová, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bretz, Thomas; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceição, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Díaz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Anjos, Rita dos; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filipčič, Andrej; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martín Miguel; Fujii, Toshihiro; García, Beatriz; Garcia-Gamez, Diego; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; Głas, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Vitale, Primo F Gómez; González, Nicolás; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matías Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hörandel, Jörg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kääpä, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Keilhauer, Bianca; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Kuempel, Daniel; Mezek, Gasper Kukec; Kunka, Norbert; Awad, Alaa Metwaly Kuotb; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; López, Rebeca; Casado, Aida López; Louedec, Karim; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mariş, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martínez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masías; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano; Micheletti, Maria Isabel; Middendorf, Lukas; Minaya, Ignacio A; Miramonti, Lino; Mitrica, Bogdan; Molina-Bueno, Laura; Mollerach, Silvia; Montanet, François; Morello, Carlo; Mostafá, Miguel; Moura, Celio A; Muller, Marcio Aparecido; Müller, Gero; Müller, Sarah; Navas, Sergio; Necesal, Petr; Nellen, Lukas; Nelles, Anna; Neuser, Jens; Nguyen, Phong H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, Mihai; Niechciol, Marcus; Niemietz, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Nitz, Dave; Nosek, Dalibor; Novotny, Vladimir; Nožka, Lyberis; Núñez, Luis; Ochilo, Livingstone; Oikonomou, Foteini; Olinto, Angela; Pacheco, Noelia; Selmi-Dei, Daniel Pakk; Palatka, Miroslav; Pallotta, Juan; Papenbreer, Philipp; Parente, Gonzalo; Parra, Alejandra; Paul, Thomas; Pech, Miroslav; Pękala, Jan; Pelayo, Rodrigo; Pepe, Iuri; Perrone, Lorenzo; Petermann, Emily; Peters, Christine; Petrera, Sergio; Petrov, Yevgeniy; Phuntsok, Jamyang; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pierog, Tanguy; Pieroni, Pablo; Pimenta, Mário; Pirronello, Valerio; Platino, Manuel; Plum, Matthias; Porcelli, Alessio; Porowski, Czeslaw; Prado, Raul Ribeiro; Privitera, Paolo; Prouza, Michael; Quel, Eduardo J; Querchfeld, Sven; Quinn, Sean; Rautenberg, Julian; Ravel, Olivier; Ravignani, Diego; Reinert, Darius; Revenu, Benoît; Ridky, Jan; Risse, Markus; Ristori, Pablo; Rizi, Vincenzo; de Carvalho, Washington Rodrigues; Rojo, Jorge Rubén Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, Maria Dolores; Rogozin, Dmytro; Rosado, Jaime; Roth, Markus; Roulet, Esteban; Rovero, Adrian; Saffi, Steven J; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Salazar, Humberto; Saleh, Ahmed; Greus, Francisco Salesa; Salina, Gaetano; Gomez, Jose Sanabria; Sánchez, Federico; Sanchez-Lucas, Patricia; Santos, Edivaldo Moura; Santos, Eva; Sarazin, Fred; Sarkar, Biswaijt; Sarmento, Raul; Sarmiento-Cano, Christian; Sato, Ricardo; Scarso, Carlos; Schauer, Markus; Scherini, Viviana; Schieler, Harald; Schmidt, David; Scholten, Olaf; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Schovánek, Petr; Schröder, Frank G; Schulz, Alexander; Schulz, Johannes; Schumacher, Johannes; Sciutto, Sergio; Segreto, Alberto; Settimo, Mariangela; Shadkam, Amir; Shellard, Ronald C; Sigl, Guenter; Sima, Octavian; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Šmída, Radomir; Snow, Gregory; Sommers, Paul; Sonntag, Sebastian; Sorokin, J; Squartini, Ruben; Srivastava, Yogendra N; Stanca, Denis; Stanič, Samo; Stapleton, James; Stasielak, Jaroslaw; Stephan, Maurice; Stutz, Anne; Suarez, Federico; Durán, Mauricio Suarez; Suomijärvi, Tiina; Supanitsky, A Daniel; Sutherland, Michael; Swain, John; Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Taborda, Oscar Alejandro; Tapia, Alex; Tepe, Andreas; Theodoro, Vanessa Menezes; Tibolla, Omar; Timmermans, Charles; Peixoto, Carlos J Todero; Toma, Gabriel; Tomankova, Lenka; Tomé, Bernardo; Tonachini, Aurelio; Elipe, Guillermo Torralba; Machado, Diego Torres; Travnicek, Petr; Trini, Marta; Ulrich, Ralf; Unger, Michael; Urban, Martin; Galicia, Jose F Valdés; Valiño, Ines; Valore, Laura; van Aar, Guus; van Bodegom, Patrick; Berg, Ad M van den; van Velzen, Sjoert; van Vliet, Arjen; Varela, Enrique; Cárdenas, Bernardo Vargas; Varner, Gary; Vasquez, Rafael; Vázquez, Jose R; Vázquez, Ricardo; Veberič, Darko; Verzi, Valerio; Vicha, Jakub; Videla, Mariela; Villaseñor, Luis; Vlcek, Brian; Vorobiov, Serguei; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wainberg, Oscar; Walz, David; Watson, Alan; Weber, Marc; Weidenhaupt, Klaus; Weindl, Andreas; Welling, Christoph; Werner, Felix; Widom, Allan; Wiencke, Lawrence; Wilczyński, Henryk; Winchen, Tobias; Wittkowski, David; Wundheiler, Brian; Wykes, Sarka; Yang, Lili; Yapici, Tolga; Yushkov, Alexey; Zas, Enrique; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zavrtanik, Marko; Zepeda, Arnulfo; Zimmermann, Benedikt; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30 to 80 MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy density is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge excess emission components. The spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8 MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving per...

  11. Molecularly Engineered Azobenzene Derivatives for High Energy Density Solid-State Solar Thermal Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eugene N; Zhitomirsky, David; Han, Grace G D; Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-15

    Solar thermal fuels (STFs) harvest and store solar energy in a closed cycle system through conformational change of molecules and can release the energy in the form of heat on demand. With the aim of developing tunable and optimized STFs for solid-state applications, we designed three azobenzene derivatives functionalized with bulky aromatic groups (phenyl, biphenyl, and tert-butyl phenyl groups). In contrast to pristine azobenzene, which crystallizes and makes nonuniform films, the bulky azobenzene derivatives formed uniform amorphous films that can be charged and discharged with light and heat for many cycles. Thermal stability of the films, a critical metric for thermally triggerable STFs, was greatly increased by the bulky functionalization (up to 180 °C), and we were able to achieve record high energy density of 135 J/g for solid-state STFs, over a 30% improvement compared to previous solid-state reports. Furthermore, the chargeability in the solid state was improved, up to 80% charged from 40% charged in previous solid-state reports. Our results point toward molecular engineering as an effective method to increase energy storage in STFs, improve chargeability, and improve the thermal stability of the thin film.

  12. Performance characteristics of a diesel engine using low- and medium-energy gases as a fuel supplement (fumigation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monford, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    The use of low- and medium-energy gases derived from solid waste is investigated. Gases that simulate those gases that could be derived from refuse were injected into the air inlet of a 298-kilowatt (400 horsepower) diesel engine as a fuel supplement. This process is called fumigation. Three different gases with thermal-energy contents of 6.11 MJ/cu m (164 Btu/cu ft), 18.1 MJ/cu m (485 Btu/cu ft), and 18.8 MJ/cu m (505 Btu/cu ft, respectively, were used at rates ranging as high as 20 percent of the normal fuel oil energy at four different engine load points. The test results indicated approximately 100 percent gas energy utilization with no observable deleterious effect on the engine.

  13. Application of the advanced engineering environment for optimization energy consumption in designed vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monica, Z.; Sękala, A.; Gwiazda, A.; Banaś, W.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays a key issue is to reduce the energy consumption of road vehicles. In particular solution one could find different strategies of energy optimization. The most popular but not sophisticated is so called eco-driving. In this strategy emphasized is particular behavior of drivers. In more sophisticated solution behavior of drivers is supported by control system measuring driving parameters and suggesting proper operation of the driver. The other strategy is concerned with application of different engineering solutions that aid optimization the process of energy consumption. Such systems take into consideration different parameters measured in real time and next take proper action according to procedures loaded to the control computer of a vehicle. The third strategy bases on optimization of the designed vehicle taking into account especially main sub-systems of a technical mean. In this approach the optimal level of energy consumption by a vehicle is obtained by synergetic results of individual optimization of particular constructional sub-systems of a vehicle. It is possible to distinguish three main sub-systems: the structural one the drive one and the control one. In the case of the structural sub-system optimization of the energy consumption level is related with the optimization or the weight parameter and optimization the aerodynamic parameter. The result is optimized body of a vehicle. Regarding the drive sub-system the optimization of the energy consumption level is related with the fuel or power consumption using the previously elaborated physical models. Finally the optimization of the control sub-system consists in determining optimal control parameters.

  14. Energy Engineering Analysis. Cutler Army Community Hospital and Associated Facilities, Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Volume 1 - executive summary. Final Submittal report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-10-01

    In February 1980, the Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District, initiated Contract No. DACA65-80-C-0003 with Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Architects-Engineers-Planners, Inc. of Jacksonville, Florida. This contract called for the performance of Energy Engineering Analysis Programs (EEAP) at three U.S. Army installations: Fort Devens, Massachusetts; Letterkenny Army Depot, Pennsylvania; and Seneca Army Depot, New York. The objective of these programs was the identification, evaluation and development of programming documents for energy conservation projects which meet the criteria of the Army`s Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) and other funding mechanisms. The basic contract was modified by the Corps of Engineers several times to include additional increments of energy-related studies at each of the three installations. Work performed thus far for Fort Devens has included the following increments: A - ECIP`s for buildings and processes; B - ECIP`s for utilities and energy distribution systems and EMCS; C - Solar and renewable energy systems; D - Wood-Fired Steam Generation Plant; E - Coal conversion; and G - Projects identified in Increments A B that did not meet ECIP criteria In order to fulfill expanded requirements of the Army Facilities Energy Plan, the Corps of Engineers extended the contract with RSH to include a detailed energy audit of the Cutler Army Community Hospital and Associated Facilities at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. The Associated Facilities are the Vail Dental Clinic and the Oral Health Center. The energy audit consists of a field survey, analysis of energy conservation opportunities, and development of 1391`s and other programming documents for qualifying projects.

  15. Final master work plan : environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, J. C.; Environmental Research

    2003-01-23

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under which Argonne National Laboratory provides technical assistance for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation for the CCC/USDA. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites in Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. Argonne applies its QuickSite(reg sign) Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) approach to these former facilities. The QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology is Argonne's proprietary implementation of the ESC process (ASTM 1998). Argonne has used this approach at several former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, including Agenda, Agra, Everest, and Frankfort. The Argonne ESC approach revolves around a multidisciplinary, team-oriented approach to problem solving. The basic features and steps of the QuickSite methodology are as follows: (1) A team of scientists with diverse expertise and strong field experience is required to make the process work. The Argonne team is composed of geologists, geochemists, geophysicists, hydrogeologists, chemists, biologists, engineers, computer scientists, health and safety personnel, and regulatory staff, as well as technical support staff. Most of the staff scientists are at the Ph.D. level; each has on average, more than 15 years of experience. The technical team works together throughout the process. In other words, the team that plans the program also implements the program in the field and writes the reports. More experienced scientists do not remain in the office while individuals with lesser degrees or experience carry out the field work. (2) The technical team reviews, evaluates, and interprets existing data for the site and the contaminants there to determine which data sets are technically valid and can be used in initially designing the field program. A basic

  16. Final master work plan : environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, J. C.; Environmental Research

    2003-01-23

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under which Argonne National Laboratory provides technical assistance for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation for the CCC/USDA. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites in Kansas where former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were located. Argonne applies its QuickSite(reg sign) Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) approach to these former facilities. The QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology is Argonne's proprietary implementation of the ESC process (ASTM 1998). Argonne has used this approach at several former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, including Agenda, Agra, Everest, and Frankfort. The Argonne ESC approach revolves around a multidisciplinary, team-oriented approach to problem solving. The basic features and steps of the QuickSite methodology are as follows: (1) A team of scientists with diverse expertise and strong field experience is required to make the process work. The Argonne team is composed of geologists, geochemists, geophysicists, hydrogeologists, chemists, biologists, engineers, computer scientists, health and safety personnel, and regulatory staff, as well as technical support staff. Most of the staff scientists are at the Ph.D. level; each has on average, more than 15 years of experience. The technical team works together throughout the process. In other words, the team that plans the program also implements the program in the field and writes the reports. More experienced scientists do not remain in the office while individuals with lesser degrees or experience carry out the field work. (2) The technical team reviews, evaluates, and interprets existing data for the site and the contaminants there to determine which data sets are technically valid and can be used in initially designing the field program. A basic

  17. Background report for the formerly utilized Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission sites program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    The Department of Energy is conducting a program to determine radiological conditions at sites formerly used by the Army Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission in the early years of nuclear energy development. Also included in the program are sites used in the Los Alamos plutonium development program and the Trinity atomic bomb test site. Materials, equipment, buildings, and land became contaminated, primarily with naturally occurring radioactive nuclides. They were later decontaminated in accordance with the standards and survey methods in use at that time. Since then, however, radiological criteria, and proposed guidelines for release of such sites for unrestricted use have become more stringent as research on the effects of low-level radiation has progressed. In addition, records documenting some of these decontamination efforts cannot be found, and the final radiological conditions of the sites could not be adequately determined from the records. As a result, the Formerly Utilized Sites Program was initiated in 1974 to identify these formerly used sites and to reevaluate their radiological status. This report covers efforts through June 1980 to determine the radiological status of sites for which the existing conditions could not be clearly defined. Principal contractor facilities and associated properties have already been identified and activities are continuing to identify additional sites. Any new sites located will probably be subcontractor facilities and areas used for disposal of contractor waste or equipment; however, only limited information regarding this equipment and material has been collected to date. As additional information becomes available, supplemental reports will be published.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Kansas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Kansas.

  19. Landsat TM and ETM+ 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  20. Correlations between Energy and Displacement Demands for Performance-Based Seismic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaioli, Fabrizio; Bruno, Silvia; Decanini, Luis; Saragoni, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    The development of a scientific framework for performance-based seismic engineering requires, among other steps, the evaluation of ground motion intensity measures at a site and the characterization of their relationship with suitable engineering demand parameters (EDPs) which describe the performance of a structure. In order to be able to predict the damage resulting from earthquake ground motions in a structural system, it is first necessary to properly identify ground motion parameters that are well correlated with structural response and, in turn, with damage. Since structural damage during an earthquake ground motion may be due to excessive deformation or to cumulative cyclic damage, reliable methods for estimating displacement demands on structures are needed. Even though the seismic performance is directly related to the global and local deformations of the structure, energy-based methodologies appear more helpful in concept, as they permit a rational assessment of the energy absorption and dissipation mechanisms that can be effectively accomplished to balance the energy imparted to the structure. Moreover, energy-based parameters are directly related to cycles of response of the structure and, therefore, they can implicitly capture the effect of ground motion duration, which is ignored by conventional spectral parameters. Therefore, the identification of reliable relationships between energy and displacement demands represents a fundamental issue in both the development of more reliable seismic code provisions and the evaluation of seismic vulnerability aimed at the upgrading of existing hazardous facilities. As these two aspects could become consistently integrated within a performance-based seismic design methodology, understanding how input and dissipated energy are correlated with displacement demands emerges as a decisive prerequisite. The aim of the present study is the establishment of functional relationships between input and dissipated energy

  1. The central engine of GRB 130831A and the energy breakdown of a relativistic explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.; Racusin, J. L.; Kann, D. A.; Zhang, B.; Pozanenko, A.; Volnova, A. A.; Trotter, A.; Frank, N.; Cucchiara, A.; Troja, E.; Sbarufatti, B.; Butler, N. R.; Schulze, S.; Cano, Z.; Page, M. J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Lien, A.; Fox, O.; Littlejohns, O.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; de Diego, J. A.; Gonzalez, J.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Watson, A. M.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Kutyrev, A.; Zane, S.; Hoette, V.; Russell, R. R.; Rumyantsev, V.; Klunko, E.; Burkhonov, O.; Breeveld, A. A.; Reichart, D. E.; Haislip, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, yet the nature and physical properties of their energy sources are far from understood. Very important clues, however, can be inferred by studying the afterglows of these events. We present optical and X-ray observations of GRB 130831A obtained by Swift, Chandra, Skynet, Reionization And Transients Infra-Red camera, Maidanak, International Scientific Optical-Observation Network, Nordic Optical Telescope, Liverpool Telescope and Gran Telescopio Canarias. This burst shows a steep drop in the X-ray light curve at ≃105 s after the trigger, with a power-law decay index of α ˜ 6. Such a rare behaviour cannot be explained by the standard forward shock (FS) model and indicates that the emission, up to the fast decay at 105 s, must be of `internal origin', produced by a dissipation process within an ultrarelativistic outflow. We propose that the source of such an outflow, which must produce the X-ray flux for ≃1 d in the cosmological rest frame, is a newly born magnetar or black hole. After the drop, the faint X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical emission, on the other hand, shows no break across the X-ray steep decrease, and the late-time decays of both the X-ray and optical are consistent. Using both the X-ray and optical data, we show that the emission after ≃105 s can be explained well by the FS model. We model our data to derive the kinetic energy of the ejecta and thus measure the efficiency of the central engine of a GRB with emission of internal origin visible for a long time. Furthermore, we break down the energy budget of this GRB into the prompt emission, the late internal dissipation, the kinetic energy of the relativistic ejecta, and compare it with the energy of the associated supernova, SN 2013 fu.

  2. MoS2 edges and heterophase interfaces: energy, structure and phase engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Songsong; Han, Jian; Sun, Jianwei; Srolovitz, David J.

    2017-06-01

    The transition metal dichalcogenides exhibit polymorphism; i.e. both 2H and 1T‧ crystal structures, each with unique electronic properties. These two phases can coexist within the same monolayer microstructure, producing 2H/1T‧ interfaces. Here we report a systematic investigation of the energetics of the experimentally most important MoS2 heterophase interfaces and edges. The stable interface and edge structures change with chemical potential (these edges/interfaces are usually non-stoichiometric). Stable edges tend to be those of highest atomic density and the stable interfaces correspond to those with local atomic structure very similar to the 2H crystal. The interfacial energies are lower than those of the edges, and the 1T‧ edges have lower energy than the 2H edges. Because the 1T‧ edges have much lower energy than the 2H edges, a sufficiently narrow 1T‧ ribbon will be more stable than the corresponding 2H ribbon (this critical width is much larger in MoTe2 than in MoS2). Similarly, a large 2H flake have an equilibrium strip of 1T‧ along its edge (again this effect is much larger in MoTe2 than in MoS2). Application of tensile strains can increase the width of the stable 1T‧ strip or the critical thickness below which a ribbon favors the 1T‧ structure. These effects provide a means to phase engineer transition metal dichalcogenide microstructures.

  3. Band Gap Engineering in a 2D Material for Solar-to-Chemical Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Guo, Zhenkun; Mcwilliams, Peter E; Darges, John E; Druffel, Daniel L; Moran, Andrew M; Warren, Scott C

    2016-01-13

    The electronic structure of 2D semiconductors depends on their thickness, providing new opportunities to engineer semiconductors for energy conversion, electronics, and catalysis. Here we show how a 3D semiconductor, black phosphorus, becomes active for solar-to-chemical energy conversion when it is thinned to a 2D material. The increase in its band gap, from 0.3 eV (3D) to 2.1 eV (2D monolayer), is accompanied by a 40-fold enhancement in the formation of chemical products. Despite this enhancement, smaller flakes also have shorter excited state lifetimes. We deduce a mechanism in which recombination occurs at flake edges, while the "van der Waals" surface of black phosphorus bonds to chemical intermediates and facilitates electron transfer. The unique properties of black phosphorus highlight its potential as a customizable material for solar energy conversion and catalysis, while also allowing us to identify design rules for 2D photocatalysts that will enable further improvements in these materials.

  4. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Frank G.

    2016-07-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an enhancement of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Covering about 17km2, AERA is the world-largest antenna array for cosmic-ray observation. It consists of more than 150 antenna stations detecting the radio signal emitted by air showers, i.e., cascades of secondary particles caused by primary cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. At the beginning, technical goals had been in focus: first of all, the successful demonstration that a large-scale antenna array consisting of autonomous stations is feasible. Moreover, techniques for calibration of the antennas and time calibration of the array have been developed, as well as special software for the data analysis. Meanwhile physics goals come into focus. At the Pierre Auger Observatory air showers are simultaneously detected by several detector systems, in particular water-Cherenkov detectors at the surface, underground muon detectors, and fluorescence telescopes, which enables cross-calibration of different detection techniques. For the direction and energy of air showers, the precision achieved by AERA is already competitive; for the type of primary particle, several methods are tested and optimized. By combining AERA with the particle detectors we aim for a better understanding of cosmic rays in the energy range from approximately 0.3 to 10 EeV, i.e., significantly higher energies than preceding radio arrays.

  5. October 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-26

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b), March 2008 (Argonne 2008c), and July 2008 (Argonne 2008d) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the

  6. The aerodynamic design and performance of the General Electric/NASA EEE fan. [Energy Efficient Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Hager, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and test results of the fan and quarter-stage component for the GE/NASA Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) are presented. The fan is a high bypass ratio, single-stage design having 32 part-span shrouded rotor blades, coupled with a unique quarter-stage arrangement that provides additional core-stream pressure ratio and particle separation. The fan produces a bypass pressure ratio of 1.65 at the exit of the low aspect ratio vane/frame and a core-stream pressure ratio of 1.67 at the entrance to the core frame struts. The full-scale fan vehicle was instrumented, assembled and tested as a component in November 1981. Performance mapping was conducted over a range of speeds and bypass ratios using individually-controlled bypass and core-stream discharge valves. The fan bypass and core-stream test data showed excellent results, with the fan exceeding all performance goals at the important engine operating conditions.

  7. Introduction of team self-regulation for teamwork promotion. A case study in energy engineering topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús González-Fernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The learning and development of teamwork skill is onlypossible if its achievement is a self-building process of the student. In turn,the teachers must become guides in the process of a learning which is notlimited only to the topic of their own course, but which must be imbedded witha good dose of this skill. Promotionof teamwork is not spontaneous but very often requires the use ofself-regulation within teams. The aim of the paper is to elucidateif positive or negative self-regulation of teams are useful to promoteteamwork. The paper presents some experiences onthe use of self-regulation of teams within ofactive teaching strategies that involve teamwork as a criticalskill in engineering education. The paper presents first the fundamentals ofthe learning strategy adopted, intended to develop teamwork abilities in thestudents. It then describes the context and challenges faced up in the casestudies, as well as the essentials of the learning activities proposed.Finally, the paper discusses the student’s achievement and perception. Althoughsome influence of unbalanced teams there exists, it can be stated that positiveself-regulation of teams is more easily accepted by teams than the negative ones,because of the influence on interpersonal relationships amongst students. Thetopics involved in this experience are energy related topics such as electricalinstallations, heat transfer, engineering thermodynamics or theory of circuits.

  8. Chemical Energy and Exergy. An Introduction to Chemical Thermodynamics for Engineers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Norio [NS electrochemical Laboratory, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2004-03-01

    This book is a beginners introduction to chemical thermodynamics for engineers. In the textbook efforts have been made to visualize as clearly as possible the main concepts of thermodynamic quantities such as enthalpy and entropy, thus making them more perceivable. Furthermore, intricate formulae in thermodynamics have been discussed as functionally unified sets of formulae to understand their meaning rather than to mathematically derive them in detail. In this textbook, the affinity of irreversible processes, defined by the second law of thermodynamics, has been treated as the main subject, rather than the equilibrium of chemical reactions. The concept of affinity is applicable in general not only to the processes of chemical reactions but also to all kinds of irreversible processes. This textbook also includes electrochemical thermodynamics in which, instead of the classical phenomenological approach, molecular science provides an advanced understanding of the reactions of charged particles such as ions and electrons at the electrodes. Recently, engineering thermodynamics has introduced a new thermodynamic potential called exergy, which essentially is related to the concept of the affinity of irreversible processes. This textbook discusses the relation between exergy and affinity and explains the exergy balance diagram and exergy vector diagram applicable to exergy analyses in chemical manufacturing processes. This textbook is written in the hope that the readers understand in a broad way the fundamental concepts of energy and exergy from chemical thermodynamics in practical applications. Finishing this book, the readers may easily step forward further into an advanced text of their specified line.

  9. Emissions and Total Energy Consumption of a Multicylinder Piston Engine Running on Gasoline and a Hydrogen-gasoline Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A multicylinder reciprocating engine was used to extend the efficient lean operating range of gasoline by adding hydrogen. Both bottled hydrogen and hydrogen produced by a research methanol steam reformer were used. These results were compared with results for all gasoline. A high-compression-ratio, displacement production engine was used. Apparent flame speed was used to describe the differences in emissions and performance. Therefore, engine emissions and performance, including apparent flame speed and energy lost to the cooling system and the exhaust gas, were measured over a range of equivalence ratios for each fuel. All emission levels decreased at the leaner conditions. Adding hydrogen significantly increased flame speed over all equivalence ratios.

  10. Applications of β-NMR and Low Energy μSR for Interface Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Zaher

    2016-09-01

    One of the big hopes in material science today is the capability of producing materials and devices which satisfy a list of requirements/functions on demand. Interface engineering is proposed as a route to achieve this aim by growing thin film layered structures of different materials. Generally, the properties of the interfaces in these structures are different from those of the constituent materials. Of particular interest are interfaces between transition metal oxides (TMOs). This important class of materials exhibits a variety of physical properties and ground states including magnetic, superconducting, insulating and conducting. Therefore, heterostructures involving such materials provide a rich and interesting prospect for producing interfaces with physical properties not present, nor predictable, from the constituent materials, and may lead to new technological applications. Here we present applications of low energy beams of spin polarized 8Li and muons to study such interfaces, providing a unique depth resolved measurement of their magnetic properties on the nanometer scale.

  11. Service design projects sponsored by the Kansas State University Student Chapter of the IEEE EMBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Connor; Gruber, Lucinda; Young, Ethan; Humphrey, Jason; Warren, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Service projects offer volunteer student organizations a means to generate interest and focus activity outside of the context of the classroom. This paper addresses efforts by the Kansas State University (KSU) Student Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) to initiate and guide service projects in two primary areas: (1) research to aid persons with disabilities (RAPD) and (2) hands-on efforts to interest young women in the quantitative fields of science and engineering. Three RAPD projects are presented: a computer mouse design that helps to alleviate productivity problems associated with Parkinson's tremors, a battery removal tool for arthritic individuals with limited dexterity, and a wireless door control and communication system to assist mobility-limited individuals. Service projects to garner science and engineering interest in young women are co-sponsored by the KSU Women in Engineering and Science Program (WESP). The most recent activity, entitled 'Vital Signs Shirts,' is presented in this paper, along with a summary of pending interactive laboratories designed to interest participants in engineering as applied to the human body. These service projects encourage IEEE EMBS student chapter members to explore their biomedical engineering interests and make a positive impact in the community.

  12. Optimizing Fracture Treatments in a Mississippian "Chat" Reservoir, South-Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. David Newell; Saibal Bhattacharya; Alan Byrnes; W. Lynn Watney; Willard Guy

    2005-10-01

    This project is a collaboration of Woolsey Petroleum Corporation (a small independent operator) and the Kansas Geological Survey. The project will investigate geologic and engineering factors critical for designing hydraulic fracture treatments in Mississippian ''chat'' reservoirs. Mississippian reservoirs, including the chat, account for 159 million m3 (1 billion barrels) of the cumulative oil produced in Kansas. Mississippian reservoirs presently represent {approx}40% of the state's 5.6*106m3 (35 million barrels) annual production. Although geographically widespread, the ''chat'' is a heterogeneous reservoir composed of chert, cherty dolomite, and argillaceous limestone. Fractured chert with micro-moldic porosity is the best reservoir in this 18- to 30-m-thick (60- to 100-ft) unit. The chat will be cored in an infill well in the Medicine Lodge North field (417,638 m3 [2,626,858 bbls] oil; 217,811,000 m3 [7,692,010 mcf] gas cumulative production; discovered 1954). The core and modern wireline logs will provide geological and petrophysical data for designing a fracture treatment. Optimum hydraulic fracturing design is poorly defined in the chat, with poor correlation of treatment size to production increase. To establish new geologic and petrophysical guidelines for these treatments, data from core petrophysics, wireline logs, and oil-field maps will be input to a fracture-treatment simulation program. Parameters will be established for optimal size of the treatment and geologic characteristics of the predicted fracturing. The fracturing will be performed and subsequent wellsite tests will ascertain the results for comparison to predictions. A reservoir simulation program will then predict the rate and volumetric increase in production. Comparison of the predicted increase in production with that of reality, and the hypothetical fracturing behavior of the reservoir with that of its actual behavior, will serve as tests of

  13. Hydrologic Conditions in Kansas, water year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Madison R.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. In 2015, the network included about 200 real-time streamgages (hereafter referred to as “gages”), 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 30 groundwater-level monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve the understanding of Kansas’s water resources.Real-time data are verified by the USGS throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow, lake levels, and groundwater levels. These data are used in protecting life and property; and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes. Yearly hydrologic conditions are characterized by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends.

  14. Electric power engineering. Fundamentals, energy supply, drives and power electronics; Elektrische Energietechnik. Grundlagen, Energieversorgung, Antriebe und Leistungselektronik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttas, Christian [Technische Univ. Kaiserslautern (Germany). FB Elektro- und Informationstechnik; Marenbach, Richard; Nelles, Dieter

    2013-08-01

    The electric power engineering is one of the major branches of the electrical engineering. It is a separate field of study in higher education and is presented by three to five chairs. The book under consideration covers the entire subject area made in one piece and is suitable as a companion for the study and as a refresher for practitioners. The high social relevance of energy technology in the public results to emotionally charged discussions. Some key points of this book are: nuclear power plants, CO{sub 2} emissions and energy policy. The book explains the relevant connections to these topics in general terms without ideological determinations.

  15. Kasseler symposium on energy-related system engineering: renewable energy sources and rational energy use. Proceedings '98; Kasseler Symposium Energie-Systemtechnik: Erneuerbare Energien und Rationelle Energieverwendung. Tagungsband '98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R. [comp.

    1999-07-01

    The ISET ended the 10th anniversary year since its foundation in 1998 with already the third Kassel symposium on energy-related system engineering: renewable energy sources and rational energy use. Covering several special subjects talks were given about the topics modelling and simulation in the fields of wind energy, photovoltaic systems, hybrid systems or sewage water treatment. The keen interest of the participants shows the importance that modelling of conditions or processes has gained in the meantime in the field of system engineering of renewable energy sources. The core of each simulation is the integration of differential equations, which describe the system. Properties of the system can be easily varied and affects on the overall system can be easily investigated. Critical conditions can be discovered and be taken into consideration at the hardware engineering. Mistakes in terms of component design can be avoided and engineering cost can be reduced considerably. The present conference book gives an ideal overview of the topics discussed during the symposium. (orig.) [German] Sein Jubilaeumsjahr zum zehnjaehrigen Bestehen beschloss das ISET 1998 mit dem nun bereits 3. Kasseler Symposium Energie-Systemtechnik - Erneuerbare Energien und Rationelle Energieverwendung. Fachgebietsuebergreifend wurde zu den Themen Modellbildung und Simulation in Bereichen wie Windenergie, Photovoltaik, Hybridsysteme oder Abwasserbehandlung referiert. Das rege Interesse der Teilnehmer unterstreicht die Bedeutung, die die Modellierung von Zustaenden oder Prozessen in der Systementwicklung bei den erneuerbaren Energien inzwischen gewonnen hat. Der Kern einer jeden Simulation ist die Integration der systembeschreibenden Differentialgleichungen. Eigenschaften des Systems koennen in einfacher Weise variiert und die Auswirkungen auf das Gesamtsystem untersucht werden. Kritische Zustaende koennen entdeckt und in der Entwicklung der Hardware entsprechend beruecksichtigt werden. Fehler

  16. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University(SER-XMU)was founded in 2007,to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy,Chemical Energy,Bio-energy,Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics.

  17. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and ex-pand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Econom-ics.

  18. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007,to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy,Chemical Energy,Bio-energy,Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics.

  19. Schaben field, Kansas: Improving performance in a Mississippian shallow-shelf carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Gerlach, P.; Byrnes, A.; Guy, W.; Carr, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Schaben field (Kansas), located along the northeastern shelf of the Hugoton embayment, produces from Mississippian carbonates in erosional highs immediately beneath a regional unconformity. Production comes from depths of around 4400 ft (1342 m) in partially dolomitized shelf deposits. A detailed reservoir characterization/simulation study, recently performed as part of a Department of Energy Reservoir Class Oil Field Demonstration Project, has led to important revision in explanations for observed patterns of production. Cores recovered from three new data wells identify three main facies: Spicule-rich wackestone-packstone, echinoderm wackestone/packstone/grainstone, and dolomitic mudstone-wackestone. Reservoir quality is highest in spicule-rich wackestone/packstones but is subject to a very high degree of vertical heterogeneity due to facies interbedding, silification, and variable natural fracturing. The oil reservoir is underlain by an active aquifer, which helps maintain reservoir pressure but supports significant water production. Reservoir simulation, using public-domain, PC-based software, suggests that infill drilling is an efficient approach to enhanced recovery. Recent drilling directed by simulation results has shown considerable success in improving field production rates. Results from the Schaben field demonstration project are likely to have wide application for independent oil and exploration companies in western Kansas.Schaben field (Kansas), located along the northeastern shelf of the Hugoton embayment, produces from Mississippian carbonates in erosional highs immediately beneath a regional unconformity. Production comes from depths of around 4400 ft (1342 m) in partially dolomitized shelf deposits. A detailed reservoir characterization/simulation study, recently performed as part of a Department of Energy Reservoir Class Oil Field Demonstration Project, has led to important revision in explanations for observed patterns of production. Cores

  20. Getting to no: how Kansas advocates derailed the Anthem steamroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A battle royale has taken shape in Kansas about the future of its Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. This past February, Kansas Insurance Commissioner Kathleen Sebelius rocked the corporate health care establishment by refusing to allow Anthem Insurance Company to buy the state's independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. Then in June, a state judge overturned her decision. Now the case is headed to appeals court, where Sebelius will seek to have her decision reinstated. At the heart of the legal wrangling is the unprecedented manner in which advocates have asserted consumer interests, raising issues that will persist long after the courts hand down a final ruling. States of Health looks at how consumer advocates have responded to the proposed Blues transaction, a process that has strengthened the health consumer voice in Kansas--and offers important lessons for advocates in other states as well.

  1. Metabolic engineering of biomass for high energy density: oilseed-like triacylglycerol yields from plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhercke, Thomas; El Tahchy, Anna; Liu, Qing; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Shrestha, Pushkar; Divi, Uday K; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Mansour, Maged P; Nichols, Peter D; James, Christopher N; Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D; Beaudoin, Frederic; Ruiz-López, Noemi; Larkin, Philip J; de Feyter, Robert C; Singh, Surinder P; Petrie, James R

    2014-02-01

    High biomass crops have recently attracted significant attention as an alternative platform for the renewable production of high energy storage lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG). While TAG typically accumulates in seeds as storage compounds fuelling subsequent germination, levels in vegetative tissues are generally low. Here, we report the accumulation of more than 15% TAG (17.7% total lipids) by dry weight in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) leaves by the co-expression of three genes involved in different aspects of TAG production without severely impacting plant development. These yields far exceed the levels found in wild-type leaf tissue as well as previously reported engineered TAG yields in vegetative tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana and N. tabacum. When translated to a high biomass crop, the current levels would translate to an oil yield per hectare that exceeds those of most cultivated oilseed crops. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and mass spectrometry imaging confirmed the accumulation of TAG within leaf mesophyll cells. In addition, we explored the applicability of several existing oil-processing methods using fresh leaf tissue. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of a vegetative plant oil production platform and provide for a step change in the bioenergy landscape, opening new prospects for sustainable food, high energy forage, biofuel and biomaterial applications.

  2. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS - NEAR TERM - CLASS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    2000-04-30

    This annual report describes progress during the final year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of the project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated, including PfEFFER spreadsheet log analysis software. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. A summary of demonstration phase at the Schaben and Ness City North sites demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies and technologies. At the Schaben Field, a total of 22 additional locations were evaluated based on the reservoir characterization and simulation studies and resulted in a significant incremental production increase. At Ness City North Field, a horizontal infill well (Mull Ummel No.4H) was planned and drilled based on the results of reservoir characterization and simulation studies to optimize the location and length. The well produced excellent and predicted oil rates for the first two months. Unexpected presence of vertical shale intervals in the lateral resulted in loss of the hole. While the horizontal well was not economically successful, the technology was demonstrated to have potential to recover significant additional reserves in Kansas and the Midcontinent. Several low-cost approaches were developed to evaluate candidate reservoirs for potential horizontal well applications at the field scale, lease level, and well level, and enable the small

  3. Metabolic engineering of sugarcane to accumulate energy-dense triacylglycerols in vegetative biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zale, Janice; Jung, Je Hyeong; Kim, Jae Yoon; Pathak, Bhuvan; Karan, Ratna; Liu, Hui; Chen, Xiuhua; Wu, Hao; Candreva, Jason; Zhai, Zhiyang; Shanklin, John; Altpeter, Fredy

    2016-02-01

    Elevating the lipid content in vegetative tissues has emerged as a new strategy for increasing energy density and biofuel yield of crops. Storage lipids in contrast to structural and signaling lipids are mainly composed of glycerol esters of fatty acids, also known as triacylglycerol (TAG). TAGs are one of the most energy-rich and abundant forms of reduced carbon available in nature. Therefore, altering the carbon-partitioning balance in favour of TAG in vegetative tissues of sugarcane, one of the highest yielding biomass crops, is expected to drastically increase energy yields. Here we report metabolic engineering to elevate TAG accumulation in vegetative tissues of sugarcane. Constitutive co-expression of WRINKLED1 (WRI1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase1-2 (DGAT1-2) and oleosin1 (OLE1) and simultaneous cosuppression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and a subunit of the peroxisomal ABC transporter1 (PXA1) in transgenic sugarcane elevated TAG accumulation in leaves or stems by 95- or 43-fold to 1.9% or 0.9% of dry weight (DW), respectively, while expression or suppression of one to three of the target genes increased TAG levels by 1.5- to 9.5-fold. Accumulation of TAG in vegetative progeny plants was consistent with the results from primary transgenics and contributed to a total fatty acid content of up to 4.7% or 1.7% of DW in mature leaves or stems, respectively. Lipid droplets were visible within mesophyll cells of transgenic leaves by confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results provide the basis for optimizations of TAG accumulation in sugarcane and other high yielding biomass grasses and will open new prospects for biofuel applications. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Annual Report of Groundwater Monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Periodic sampling is performed at Centralia, Kansas, on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) by Argonne National Laboratory. The sampling is currently (2009-2012) conducted in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater sitewide (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a), as well as the response to the interim measure (IM) pilot test that is in progress (Argonne 2007b). This report provides a summary of the findings for groundwater inspection in Centralia.

  5. Potential of sustainable energy with regard to engineering structures. WINN Energy from Water; Potentie duurzame energie bij kunstwerken. WINN Energie uit water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, R.J. [Deltares, Delft (Netherlands); Slootjes, N. [HKV Lijn in Water, Lelystad (Netherlands); Van den Noortgaete, T. [Royal Haskoning, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    This exploratory study focuses on the options of generating electrical energy from flowing water of constructions. Machines that could be suitable for other locations are also indicated. Remarks on deployment of hydropower in future constructions are also included [Dutch] Deze verkennende studie richt zich op de mogelijkheden bij bestaande kunstwerken elektrische energie uit stromend water op te wekken. Mogelijke machines voor andere locaties worden ook aangegeven. Opmerkingen over toepassing van waterkracht bij toekomstige werken zijn ook opgenomen.

  6. October 2008 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-03-10

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2005), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for the most recent monitoring event, in October 2008. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. During the two-year period, the originally approved scope of the monitoring was expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007, after a visual reconnaissance along Terrapin Creek [Argonne 2007a]). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March and September 2006, March and October 2007, and April 2008 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007b, 2008a,c). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon

  7. Sitewide monitoring at Agra, Kansas, June 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-01-14

    In 1985, carbon tetrachloride was discovered in the groundwater at Agra, Kansas, during routine sampling of public water supply wells. Two of Agra's four public water supply wells contained low but detectable levels of carbon tetrachloride; the concentrations in wells PWS-3 and PWS-4 exceeded the maximum contaminant level. These wells were removed from service in 1986, although they remain available for uses other than drinking water. Other public wells, outside the area of contamination, supply drinking water for the city of Agra. In 1987-2005, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted investigations to delineate the contaminant plume and to identify source areas for the contamination - which results from the past use of grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride. Source areas were identified on the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility property and on the Producers Agricultural Marketing Association, Inc., property located to the south (Argonne 2006). The contaminant plume extends to the southeast, toward well PWS-3, from the identified source areas. Both the CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag Marketing are currently implementing KDHE-approved interim measures (IMs). To address the contamination identified on its former property, the CCC/USDA is implementing a source control IM consisting of large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). Pro-Ag Marketing plans to use groundwater extraction to address the downgradient plume. The CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag completed installation of the two interim measures in May 2009 and August 2009, respectively. The performance and assessments of the effectiveness of the IMs are being reported separately by the responsible entities. As part of the IM process, the KDHE (2008) requested the development of a joint sitewide groundwater monitoring plan to allow periodic assessment of the

  8. Energy Optimization and Fuel Economy Investigation of a Series Hybrid Electric Vehicle Integrated with Diesel/RCCI Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Solouk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Among different types of low temperature combustion (LTC regimes, eactively controlled compression ignition (RCCI has received a lot of attention as a promising advanced combustion engine technology with high indicated thermal efficiency and low nitrogen oxides ( NO x and particulate matter (PM emissions. In this study, an RCCI engine for the purpose of fuel economy investigation is incorporated in series hybrid electric vehicle (SHEV architecture, which allows the engine to run completely in the narrow RCCI mode for common driving cycles. Three different types of energy management control (EMC strategies are designed and implemented to achieve the best fuel economy. The EMC strategies encompass rule-based control (RBC, offline, and online optimal controllers, including dynamic programing (DP and model predictive control (MPC, respectively. The simulation results show a 13.1% to 14.2% fuel economy saving by using an RCCI engine over a modern spark ignition (SI engine in SHEV for different driving cycles. This fuel economy saving is reduced to 3% in comparison with a modern compression ignition (CI engine, while NO x emissions are significantly lower. Simulation results show that the RCCI engine offers more fuel economy improvement in more aggressive driving cycles (e.g., US06, compared to less aggressive driving cycles (e.g., UDDS. In addition, the MPC results show that sub-optimal fuel economy is achieved by predicting the vehicle speed profile for a time horizon of 70 s.

  9. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bioenergy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Econom-

  10. Bio-based targeted chemical engineering education : Role and impact of bio-based energy and resourcedevelopment projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardoa, N.M.; Venselaar, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Avans University of Applied Sciences is redrafting its courses and curricula in view of sustainability. For chemical engineering in particular that implies a focus on 'green' and bio-based processes, products and energy. Avans is situated in the Southwest region of the Netherlands and specifically i

  11. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Reservoir Engineering 1976-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, B. Mack [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pruess, Karsten [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippmann, Marcelo J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Majer, Ernest L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rose, Peter E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Adams, Michael [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Roberston-Tait, Ann [GeothermEx Inc., San Pablo, CA (United States); Moller, Nancy [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Weare, John [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Clutter, Ted [ArtComPhoto (United States); Brown, Donald W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This report, the third in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in reservoir engineering and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  12. Microbial Community Responses to Glycine Addition in Kansas Prairie Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottos, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; White, R. A., III; Brislawn, C.; Fansler, S.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding our abilities to unravel aspects of microbial community structure and function in complex systems like soil; however, characterizing the highly diverse communities is problematic, due primarily to challenges in data analysis. To tackle this problem, we aimed to constrain the microbial diversity in a soil by enriching for particular functional groups within a community through addition of "trigger substrates". Such trigger substrates, characterized by low molecular weight, readily soluble and diffusible in soil solution, representative of soil organic matter derivatives, would also be rapidly degradable. A relatively small energy investment to maintain the cell in a state of metabolic alertness for such substrates would be a better evolutionary strategy and presumably select for a cohort of microorganisms with the energetics and cellular machinery for utilization and growth. We chose glycine, a free amino acid (AA) known to have short turnover times (in the range of hours) in soil. As such, AAs are a good source of nitrogen and easily degradable, and can serve as building blocks for microbial proteins and other biomass components. We hypothesized that the addition of glycine as a trigger substrate will decrease microbial diversity and evenness, as taxa capable of metabolizing it are enriched in relation to those that are not. We tested this hypothesis by incubating three Kansas native prairie soils with glycine for 24 hours at 21 degree Celsius, and measured community level responses by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics. Preliminary evaluation of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed minor changes in bacterial community composition in response to glycine addition. We will also present data on functional gene abundance and expression. The results of these analyses will be useful in designing sequencing strategies aimed at dissecting and deciphering complex microbial communities.

  13. Implementation of deep soil mixing at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Korte, N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Strong-Gunderson, J.; Siegrist, R.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Baker, J. [AlliedSignal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP), AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted field-scale tests of in situ soil mixing and treatment technologies within the Northeast Area (NEA) of the KCP at the Former Ponds site. This demonstration, testing, and evaluation effort was conducted as part of the implementation of a deep soil mixing (DSM) innovative remedial technology demonstration project designed to test DSM in the low-permeability clay soils at the KCP. The clay soils and groundwater beneath this area are contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE). The demonstration project was originally designed to evaluate TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency using soil mixing coupled with vapor stripping. Treatability study results, however, indicated that mixed region vapor stripping (MRVS) coupled with calcium oxide (dry lime powder) injection would improve TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency in saturated soils. The scope of the KCP DSM demonstration evolved to implement DSM with the following in situ treatment methodologies for contaminant source reduction in soil and groundwater: DSM/MRVS coupled with calcium oxide injection; DSM/bioaugmentation; and DSM/chemical oxidation using potassium permanganate. Laboratory treatability studies were started in 1995 following collection of undisturbed soil cores from the KCP. These studies were conducted at ORNL, and the results provided information on optimum reagent concentrations and mixing ratios for the three in situ treatment agents to be implemented in the field demonstration.

  14. FY12 annual Report: PHEV Engine Control and Energy Management Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, Paul H [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    The objectives are: (1) Investigate novel engine control strategies targeted at rapid engine/catalyst warming for the purpose of mitigating tailpipe emissions from plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) exposed to multiple engine cold start events; (2) Optimize integration of engine control strategies with hybrid supervisory control strategies in order to reduce cold start emissions and fuel consumption of PHEVs; and (3) Ensure that development of new vehicle technologies complies with existing emission standards.

  15. Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced Biomass Feedstock Logistics Supply Chains in Kansas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Nguyen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels in order to access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver quality-controlled biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”. Preprocessing depots densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The logistics of biomass commodity supply chains could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of corn stover logistics within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. The first scenario sited four preprocessing depots evenly across the state of Kansas but within the vicinity of counties having high biomass supply density. The second scenario located five depots based on the shortest depot-to-biorefinery rail distance and biomass availability. The logistics supply chain consists of corn stover harvest, collection and storage, feedstock transport from field to biomass preprocessing depot, preprocessing depot operations, and commodity transport from the biomass preprocessing depot to the biorefinery. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the feedstock logistics gate-to-gate sequence. Within the logistics supply chain GHG emissions are most sensitive to the

  16. 6. Kassel symposium on energy system engineering. On-site energy generation using renewable energy sources. Proceedings 2001; 6. Kasseler Symposium: Energie-Systemtechnik. Erneuerbare Energien und rationelle Energieverwendung. Innovative Energiewandler. Tagungsband 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caselitz, P. (comp.)

    2001-07-01

    The sixth Kassel symposium on energy system engineering. On-site energy generation using renewable energy sources focuses on the subject of innovative energy converter. The status and the development of generally known technologies is not only supposed to be reported on but also some conversion methods, which are currently not too well known. The changed frame conditions in the field of energy economy cause some systems, which have already been developed, to appear in a new light. The first talk of this symposium does not really discuss a method of energy conversion compared to the other talks. It rather describes a scenario that focuses on silicium as future energy carrier. Further contributions report on new, innovative concepts for electrical partial systems of wind and water power plants with variable revolution. Modern design methods for water turbines are presented with the example of hydraulic turbo-engines. Three contributions present the current status of technology and perspectives in the field of photovoltaics, thermal photovoltaics as well as new developments in the field of solarthermal systems. Talks about micro gas turbines and fuel cells discuss the use of these systems in dual purpose power plants and in the field of energy supply for houses. Information about modern steam engines and the use of Stirling engines in the field of biomass utilization complete the subject range of this symposium. (orig.) [German] Das 6. Kasseler Symposium zur Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien und rationellen Energieverwendung widmet sich dem Thema Innovative Energiewandler. Dabei soll nicht nur ueber den Stand und die Entwicklung weithin bekannter Technologien berichtet werden. Vorgestellt werden auch einige Konversionsverfahren, deren Bekanntheitsgrad heute noch gering ist. Auch lassen die veraenderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Energiewirtschaft einige im Prinzip entwickelte Systeme moeglicherweise in einem neuen Licht erscheinen. Der erste Beitrag des Symposiums setzt

  17. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  18. Performance characteristics of a combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  19. Engineering Cost Management under Building Energy Efficiency%建筑节能下的工程造价管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾宏

    2015-01-01

    From building energy efficiency and the present situation of project cost management as well as the existing problems, the article analyzes building energy efficiency's influence on engineering cost, and puts forward some reform measures in project cost management to adapt to the energy conservation requirements.%本文从建筑节能和工程造价管理的现状以及存在的问题入手,分析了建筑节能对工程造价的影响,并提出了适应节能要求的工程造价管理改革措施。

  20. Defect chemistry and defect engineering of TiO2-based semiconductors for solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, Janusz; Alim, Mohammad Abdul; Bak, Tadeusz; Idris, Mohammad Asri; Ionescu, Mihail; Prince, Kathryn; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Sigmund, Wolfgang

    2015-12-07

    This tutorial review considers defect chemistry of TiO2 and its solid solutions as well as defect-related properties associated with solar-to-chemical energy conversion, such as Fermi level, bandgap, charge transport and surface active sites. Defect disorder is discussed in terms of defect reactions and the related charge compensation. Defect equilibria are used in derivation of defect diagrams showing the effect of oxygen activity and temperature on the concentration of both ionic and electronic defects. These defect diagrams may be used for imposition of desired semiconducting properties that are needed to maximize the performance of TiO2-based photoelectrodes for the generation of solar hydrogen fuel using photo electrochemical cells (PECs) and photocatalysts for water purification. The performance of the TiO2-based semiconductors is considered in terms of the key performance-related properties (KPPs) that are defect related. It is shown that defect engineering may be applied for optimization of the KPPs in order to achieve optimum performance.

  1. Impact of engineered zinc oxide nanoparticles on the energy budgets of Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Erik B.; Hanna, Shannon K.; Lenihan, Hunter S.; Miller, Robert J.; Nisbet, Roger M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper characterizes the sublethal impact of engineered ZnO nanoparticles on the individual performance of the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis within the context of Dynamic Energy Budget theory, thereby allowing an integrated evaluation of the impact of multiple stressors on various endpoints. Data include measurements of the impact of ZnO nanoparticles on body burden, feeding, respiration, shell length, biomass, and mortality of mussels kept in laboratory tanks for over 100 days. ZnO nanoparticles in the environment impair the mussels' feeding rate (EC50 for the maximum feeding rate is 1.5 mg ZnO nanoparticles L- 1). Zn accumulated in tissue increases respiration (EC50 for the respiration rate is 0.9 mg environmental ZnO nanoparticles L- 1 with the body burden having reached its ultimate level), indicating that maintenance processes are more affected by ZnO nanoparticles than feeding. The feeding regime constrained growth and biomass production to the extent that the impact of ZnO nanoparticles on these processes was undetectable, yet the remaining measurements allowed the estimation of the toxicity parameters. The toxicity representation, combined with the DEB model, allowed the calculation of the effect of the nanoparticles on the expected lifetime production of reproductive matter. EC50 for the expected lifetime production of reproductive matter is less than 0.25 mg ZnO nanoparticles L- 1, indicating that that the ecological impact of ZnO nanoparticle exposure is stronger than its impact on individual physiological rates.

  2. Final work plan : targeted groundwater sampling and monitoring well installation for potential site reclassification at Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-07-11

    This ''Work Plan'' outlines the scope of work for a targeted groundwater sampling investigation and monitoring well installation at Barnes, Kansas. This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Data resulting from the proposed work will be used to determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and determine additional monitoring requirements at Barnes. The overall goal is to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The proposed work will be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Farm Service Agency of the USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a ''Master Work Plan'' (Argonne 2002) to provide general guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The ''Master Work Plan'', approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Barnes.

  3. Effects of dark energy on the efficiency of charged AdS black holes as heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Meng, Xin-He

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study the heat engine where a charged AdS black hole surrounded by dark energy is the working substance and the mechanical work is done via the PdV term in the first law of black hole thermodynamics in the extended phase space. We first investigate the effects of a kind of dark energy (quintessence field in this paper) on the efficiency of the RN-AdS black holes as the heat engine defined as a rectangular closed path in the P- V plane. We get the exact efficiency formula and find that the quintessence field can improve the heat engine efficiency, which will increase as the field density ρ _q grows. At some fixed parameters, we find that a larger volume difference between the smaller black holes(V_1) and the bigger black holes(V_2 ) will lead to a lower efficiency, while the bigger pressure difference P_1-P_4 will make the efficiency higher, but it is always smaller than 1 and will never be beyond the Carnot efficiency, which is the maximum value of the efficiency constrained by thermodynamics laws; this is consistent to the heat engine in traditional thermodynamics. After making some special choices for the thermodynamical quantities, we find that the increase of the electric charge Q and the normalization factor a can also promote the heat engine efficiency, which would infinitely approach the Carnot limit when Q or a goes to infinity.

  4. Serologic incidence of some diseases in Kansas wild turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, J K; Applegate, R D; Osborne, S J

    1998-01-01

    Wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo, n = 1164) were tested for Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae, and Salmonella pullorum from 1990 to 1997. Although 3.3% of the turkeys were suspect for one or more diseases, only 0.9% were serologically positive for M. gallisepticum. These 11 positives were all from one country in south-central Kansas.

  5. Teaching Kansas History: The State of the State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isern, Thomas D.

    1990-01-01

    Provides a history of debate concerning issue of teaching Kansas state history in public schools as mandated by law. Studies show the failure to comply was a result of nonavailability of textbooks and lack of teacher preparation. Contends that State Department of Education did not support the law because state history is not taught in many Kansas…

  6. Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, Joan I.

    The development of 10 preschool children who attended the Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center was compared with the development of 10 preschool children who did not attend a child care center to ascertain the value of the center's program. Both groups were tested with the Denver Developmental Screening Test at the beginning and…

  7. The Best Little Teacher Education Program in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Many undergraduate teacher education programs still treat technology as an elective, instead of an integral and inseparable part of the curriculum. So when "T.H.E. Journal" set out to find the best program for training tomorrow's teachers, it found one at a K-12 school district in Kansas. The Blue Valley School District in Overland Park,…

  8. Why Kansas Is Developing Standards for Its Adult Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharakis, Jeff; Glass, Dianne S.

    2010-01-01

    In Kansas, local and state adult education leaders realized that leadership standards cannot be ignored if adult education is to be perceived as a professional discipline within the state's larger educational community. The perfect opportunity to study and develop leadership standards for adult education directors and coordinators presented itself…

  9. Kansas Citizens Plan Comprehensive Mental Retardation Services. Summary and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Social Welfare, Topeka. Div. of Institutional Management.

    Summarized are the recommendations and findings of 1 1/2-year project to prepare a plan to combat mental retardation in Kansas. The study is said to have been based on the principle that needs rather than diagnostic labels should determine services provided. Outlined are mental retardation planning activities at the federal level and preplanning…

  10. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, S.

    2010-05-01

    This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report.

  11. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in thirteen sections: (1) Orientation and Careers, (2) Leadership and Future Farmers of America, (3) Supervised Occupational Experience Program, (4) Plant…

  12. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  13. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Human Relations, (2) Business Operations, (3) Greenhouse, (4) Retail Flowershop Operation, (5) Landscape Nursery, (6) Lawn Maintenance, (7)…

  14. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-04-01

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  15. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Egan

    2010-04-14

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  16. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams, 2014 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; King, Lindsey R.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-08-29

    Dissolved oxygen concentrations in streams are affected by physical, chemical, and biological factors in the water column and streambed, and are an important factor for the survival of aquatic organisms. Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) rates in Kansas streams are not well understood. During 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, measured SOD at eight stream sites in eastern Kansas to quantify SOD rates and variability with respect to season, land use, and bottom-sediment characteristics. Sediment oxygen demand rates (SODT) ranged from 0.01 to 3.15 grams per square meter per day at the ambient temperature of the measurements. The summer mean SOD rate was 3.0-times larger than the late fall mean rate, likely because of increased biological activity at warm water temperatures. Given the substantial amount of variability in SOD rates possible within sites, heterogeneity of substrate type is an important consideration when designing SOD studies and interpreting the results. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams was correlated with land use and streambed-sediment characteristics, though the strength of relations varied seasonally. The small number of study sites precluded a more detailed analysis. The effect of basin land use and streambed sediment characteristics on SOD is currently (2016) not well understood, and there may be many contributing factors including basin influences on water quality that affect biogeochemical cycles and the biological communities supported by the stream.

  17. Collection Development Policy for the University of Kansas Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Ted, Ed.; And Others

    This policy reflects developmental patterns governing the evolution of collections in the University of Kansas Libraries. Policy statements, written by bibliographers, are provided for 54 subject areas: African studies; anthropology; applied English; architecture and urban design; art; astronomy and physics; biological sciences; business…

  18. Piezoelectric motor development at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pressly, R.B.; Mentesana, C.P.

    1994-11-01

    The Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal Inc. has been investigating the fabrication and use of piezoelectric motors in mechanisms for United States Department of Energy (DOE) weapons applications for about four years. These motors exhibit advantages over solenoids and other electromagnetic actuators. Prototype processes have been developed for complete fabrication of motors from stock materials, including abrasive machining of piezoelectric ceramics and more traditional machining of other motor components, electrode plating and sputtering, electric poling, cleaning, bonding and assembly. Drive circuits have been fabricated and motor controls are being developed. Laboratory facilities have been established for electrical/mechanical testing and evaluation of piezo materials and completed motors. Recent project efforts have focused on the potential of piezoelectric devices for commercial and industrial use. A broad range of various motor types and application areas has been identified, primarily in Japan. The Japanese have been developing piezo motors for many years and have more recently begun commercialization. Piezoelectric motor and actuator technology is emerging in the United States and quickly gaining in commercial interest. The Kansas City Division is continuing development of piezoelectric motors and actuators for defense applications while supporting and participating in the commercialization of piezoelectric devices with private industry through various technology transfer and cooperative development initiatives.

  19. Energy Return on Investment (EROI) for Forty Global Oilfields Using a Detailed Engineering-Based Model of Oil Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Adam R; Sun, Yuchi; Bharadwaj, Sharad; Livingston, David; Tan, Eugene; Gordon, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the energy return on investment (EROI) for oil production generally rely on aggregated statistics for large regions or countries. In order to better understand the drivers of the energy productivity of oil production, we use a novel approach that applies a detailed field-level engineering model of oil and gas production to estimate energy requirements of drilling, producing, processing, and transporting crude oil. We examine 40 global oilfields, utilizing detailed data for each field from hundreds of technical and scientific data sources. Resulting net energy return (NER) ratios for studied oil fields range from ≈2 to ≈100 MJ crude oil produced per MJ of total fuels consumed. External energy return (EER) ratios, which compare energy produced to energy consumed from external sources, exceed 1000:1 for fields that are largely self-sufficient. The lowest energy returns are found to come from thermally-enhanced oil recovery technologies. Results are generally insensitive to reasonable ranges of assumptions explored in sensitivity analysis. Fields with very large associated gas production are sensitive to assumptions about surface fluids processing due to the shifts in energy consumed under different gas treatment configurations. This model does not currently include energy invested in building oilfield capital equipment (e.g., drilling rigs), nor does it include other indirect energy uses such as labor or services.

  20. Energy Return on Investment (EROI for Forty Global Oilfields Using a Detailed Engineering-Based Model of Oil Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Brandt

    Full Text Available Studies of the energy return on investment (EROI for oil production generally rely on aggregated statistics for large regions or countries. In order to better understand the drivers of the energy productivity of oil production, we use a novel approach that applies a detailed field-level engineering model of oil and gas production to estimate energy requirements of drilling, producing, processing, and transporting crude oil. We examine 40 global oilfields, utilizing detailed data for each field from hundreds of technical and scientific data sources. Resulting net energy return (NER ratios for studied oil fields range from ≈2 to ≈100 MJ crude oil produced per MJ of total fuels consumed. External energy return (EER ratios, which compare energy produced to energy consumed from external sources, exceed 1000:1 for fields that are largely self-sufficient. The lowest energy returns are found to come from thermally-enhanced oil recovery technologies. Results are generally insensitive to reasonable ranges of assumptions explored in sensitivity analysis. Fields with very large associated gas production are sensitive to assumptions about surface fluids processing due to the shifts in energy consumed under different gas treatment configurations. This model does not currently include energy invested in building oilfield capital equipment (e.g., drilling rigs, nor does it include other indirect energy uses such as labor or services.

  1. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy, Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics. SER-XMU is seeking senior scientists

  2. Open Positions for Senior Scientists and Engineers in School of Energy Research at Xiamen University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The School of Energy Research at Xiamen University (SER-XMU) was founded in 2007, to consolidate and expand research in the areas of Physical Energy, Chemical Energy,Bio-energy, Energy Efficiency and Energy Economics. SER-XMU is seeking senior scientists and experienced

  3. The Evolution of Groundwater Management Paradigms in Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local ground-water management districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/Aquifer Storage and Recovery project of the City of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further halt the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking." Further necessary measures include determining to what extent water-rights holders might be subjected to reasonable dictates without having the security of their rights altered.

  4. Spatial variability of harmful algal blooms in Milford Lake, Kansas, July and August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Stiles, Tom C.; Boyer, Marvin G.; King, Lindsey R.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2017-01-09

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) tend to be spatially variable vertically in the water column and horizontally across the lake surface because of in-lake and weather-driven processes and can vary by orders of magnitude in concentration across relatively short distances (meters or less). Extreme spatial variability in cyanobacteria and associated compounds poses unique challenges to collecting representative samples for scientific study and public-health protection. The objective of this study was to assess the spatial variability of cyanobacteria and microcystin in Milford Lake, Kansas, using data collected on July 27 and August 31, 2015. Spatially dense near-surface data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, nearshore data were collected by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, and open-water data were collected by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. CyanoHABs are known to be spatially variable, but that variability is rarely quantified. A better understanding of the spatial variability of cyanobacteria and microcystin will inform sampling and management strategies for Milford Lake and for other lakes with CyanoHAB issues throughout the Nation.The CyanoHABs in Milford Lake during July and August 2015 displayed the extreme spatial variability characteristic of cyanobacterial blooms. The phytoplankton community was almost exclusively cyanobacteria (greater than 90 percent) during July and August. Cyanobacteria (measured directly by cell counts and indirectly by regression-estimated chlorophyll) and microcystin (measured directly by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and indirectly by regression estimates) concentrations varied by orders of magnitude throughout the lake. During July and August 2015, cyanobacteria and microcystin concentrations decreased in the downlake (towards the outlet) direction.Nearshore and open-water surface grabs were collected and analyzed for microcystin as part of this study. Samples were collected in the

  5. Geometry and Simulation Results for a Gas Turbine Representative of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Russell W.; Beach, Tim; Turner, Mark; Hendricks, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the geometry and simulation results of a gas-turbine engine based on the original EEE engine developed in the 1980s. While the EEE engine was never in production, the technology developed during the program underpins many of the current generation of gas turbine engines. This geometry is being explored as a potential multi-stage turbomachinery test case that may be used to develop technology for virtual full-engine simulation. Simulation results were used to test the validity of each component geometry representation. Results are compared to a zero-dimensional engine model developed from experimental data. The geometry is captured in a series of Initial Graphical Exchange Specification (IGES) files and is available on a supplemental DVD to this report.

  6. Geometry and Simulation Results for a Gas Turbine Representative of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Russell W.; Beach, Tim; Turner, Mark; Siddappaji, Kiran; Hendricks, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the geometry and simulation results of a gas-turbine engine based on the original EEE engine developed in the 1980s. While the EEE engine was never in production, the technology developed during the program underpins many of the current generation of gas turbine engines. This geometry is being explored as a potential multi-stage turbomachinery test case that may be used to develop technology for virtual full-engine simulation. Simulation results were used to test the validity of each component geometry representation. Results are compared to a zero-dimensional engine model developed from experimental data. The geometry is captured in a series of Initial Graphical Exchange Specification (IGES) files and is available on a supplemental DVD to this report.

  7. Miniature Internal Combustion Engine-Generator for High Energy Density Portable Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    very effective at maintaining a constant voltage and stroke as the HCCI combustion pressure varies during engine warmup. The current is modulated by the...Comparison of Measured and Predicted Two- Stroke Engine Power Output for Jet-A and Propane 5 The exhaust emissions of the 300 W MICE generator with HCCI ...1 Two-Stroke Engine Double- Helix Spring Linear Alternator Magnet Pole Permanent Magnet Alternator Coil Spring Casing Coil Standoff Double-Helix

  8. Sub-Balanced Energy Consumption through Engineered Gaussian Deployment Strategies in Corona-Based Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiq-Ur-Rahman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are getting more widespread use and can be used in a wide range of applications, such as environmental monitoring, smart homes, military surveillance, forests, habitat monitoring, farmlands and precision agriculture. Due to the limited battery power, energy efficiency is the most challenging problem in wireless sensor network. For various applications, it is necessary to deploy sensor node in efficient way to monitor the event precisely, achieve balance energy depletion and extend the network lifetime. In many-to-one traffic pattern, nodes closer to the sink have heavier traffic loads and deplete their energy quickly; this leads to energy holes around the sink. Due to the creation of energy holes, data can no longer be delivered to the sink, although most of sensor nodes have enough residual energy. To overcome the problem of energy hole and achieving sub-balanced energy consumption in corona-based wireless sensor network, engineered Gaussian deployment strategies are proposed. Simulation result shows that the proposed technique maximizes the network lifetime, data delivery, energy consumption and also reducing the chances of energy-hole formation in a network.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from the Atmosphere Through Engineered Chemical Sinkage: Enabling Energy and Environmental Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Ziock, H.; Rueff, G.; Smith, W. S.; Colman, J.; Elliott, S.; Lackner, K.; Johnston, N. A.

    2002-05-01

    We present the case for carbon dioxide (CO2) extraction from air using engineered chemical sinks as a means of sustaining fossil energy use by avoiding climate change. Existing carbon sequestration strategies such as CO2 injection into geologic formations or the deep ocean and mineral carbonation, require a pure stream of concentrated CO2 to be viable. Furthermore, current emphasis on reducing the global CO2 emissions is on large centralized power plants. However, more than half of all emissions are from the transportation sector and small, distributed sources such as home heating, etc. Most solutions for dealing with these sources explicitly or implicitly entail completely overhauling the existing infrastructure. To solve these problems, Los Alamos National Laboratory has conceived a novel approach for directly extracting CO2 from the atmosphere. Direct extraction converts the dilute CO2 (370 parts per million) in the atmosphere into a pure CO2 stream ready for permanent sequestration. It provides the following advantages: (1) Preserves our existing energy use and fuel distribution systems, which represent a large investment, (2) Indirectly captures CO2 from the myriad of small, distributed, and mobile sources that otherwise are not accessible to sequestration, (3) Allows atmospheric CO2 levels to be restored to their pre-industrial age value, (4) Provides free transport of CO2 to suitable sequestration sites by using natural atmospheric circulation, and (5) Is relatively compact and therefore inexpensive when compared to renewable concepts. Our concept harnesses atmospheric circulation to transport CO2 to sites where the CO2 is extracted by binding it to an adsorbent. The bound CO2 is then recovered as pure gas by heating together with the solid adsorbent that is recycled. As a proof of concept, we show that an aqueous Ca(OH)2 solution efficiently converts CO2 to a CaCO3 solid that can be heated to obtain pure CO2 and recover the CaO. Even with recycling costs

  10. Energy evaluation on bounded nonlinear control laws for civil engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattulli, Vincenzo

    1994-09-01

    In the last decades researchers in the field of structural engineering have challenged the idea of facing natural hazard mitigation problems by adding to structures particular systems which are designed to protect buildings, bridges and other facilities from the damaging effects of destructive environmental actions. Among most protective systems and devices, active structural control, although having already reached the stage of full-implemented systems, still need theoretical investigation to achieve a complete exploitation of its capacity in reducing structural vibrations. In most of the operating systems (e.g. Soong and Reinhorn, 1993), linear control laws based on some quadratic performance function criteria are used since the design process for these linear strategies are fully developed and investigated. Moreover, the performances of structural systems controlled by linear techniques bring about some question concerning the complete and wise utilization of the capacity of control devices. Indeed, some of these inefficiencies are evident such as the inability to produce a significant peak response reduction in the first cycles of recorded or simulated time histories. (e.g. Reinhorn et al., 1993). Realizing that the expected maximum value for the required control force is a fundamental parameter in all processes to design the complete control system, in this paper it is shown that appropriate nonlinear control laws can significantly enhance the reduction of the system response under the same constraints imposed on the control force. Energy evaluation on the performance of different kinds of nonlinearities are reported such that a common base is built to perform comparative studies. These techniques have been successfully experimented on a structural model with ground excitations supplied by shaking table (e.g. Gattulli et al., 1994).

  11. Progress Scored by CAS in Fuel Cell Engine and Hydrogen Energy Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Huamin

    2004-01-01

    @@ The fuel cell is an energy conversion device, in which the energy stored in fuel and oxidant is transformed into electricity and heat energy via electrochemical reactions. It has the advantage of high energy transform efficiency, low noise and environmental friendliness. It can also achieve energy supply diversity.

  12. Review of some energy and environmental aspects of the gas turbine engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najjar, Y.S.H.; Akyurt, M.; Al-Rabghi, O.M.; Alp, T. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). College of Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology has been developed continuously in diverse areas such as cycle analysis, including novel cycles and second-law analyses; design, development and economic maintenance; combustion and environment; in addition to modeling, simulation and performance of engine components. A brief review of these areas is presented to highlight future trends. (author)

  13. Hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the Kansas River, northeast Kansas, November 2001-August 2002, and simulation of ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Christensen, Victoria G.

    2005-01-01

    Large concentrations of ammonia and densities of bacteria have been detected in reaches of the Kansas River in northeast Kansas during low streamflow conditions, prompting the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to list these reaches as water-quality limited with respect to ammonia and fecal coliform bacteria. Sources for ammonia and bacteria in the watershed consist of wastewater-treatment facilities (WWTFs) and agricultural and urban runoff. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with KDHE, conducted an investigation of the Kansas River to characterize hydrologic and water-quality conditions and to simulate ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low streamflow. This report characterizes the water-quality conditions, documents the calibration of a two-dimensional water-quality model, and presents results of hypothetical simulations of existing and future WWTFs discharging to the Kansas River during low streamflow.

  14. The Assistance of Molecular Vibrations on Coherent Energy Transfer in Photosynthesis from the View of Quantum Heat Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhedong

    2015-01-01

    Recently the quantum nature in the energy transport in solar cell and light-harvesting complexes have attracted much attention, as being triggered by the experimental observations. We model the light-harvesting complex (i.e., PEB50 dimer) as a quantum heat engine (QHE) and study the effect of the undamped intra-molecule vibrational modes on the coherent energy transfer process and quantum transport. We find that the exciton-vibration interaction has non-trivial contribution to the promotion of quantum yield as well as transport properties of the quantum heat engine at steady state, by enhancing the quantum coherence quantified by entanglement entropy. The perfect quantum yield over 90% has been obtained, with theexciton-vibration coupling. We attribute these improvements to the renormalization of the electronic couplings effectively induced by exciton-vibration interaction and the subsequent delocalization of excitons. Finally we demonstrate that the thermal relaxation and dephasing can help the excitation en...

  15. Investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    The results of the 2006 investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas, clearly demonstrate the following: {sm_bullet} Sources of carbon tetrachloride contamination were found on the Navarre Co-op property. These sources are the locations of the highest concentrations of carbon tetrachloride found in soil and groundwater at Navarre. The ongoing groundwater contamination at Navarre originates from these sources. {sm_bullet} The sources on the Co-op property are in locations where the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) never conducted grain storage operations. {sm_bullet} No definitive sources of carbon tetrachloride were identified on the portion of the current Co-op property formerly used by the CCC/USDA. {sm_bullet} The source areas on the Co-op property are consistent with the locations of the most intense Co-op operations, both historically and at present. The Co-op historically stored carbon tetrachloride for retail sale and used it as a grain fumigant in these locations. {sm_bullet} The distribution patterns of other contaminants (tetrachloroethene and nitrate) originating from sources on the Co-op property mimic the carbon tetrachloride plume. These other contaminants are not associated with CCC/USDA operations. {sm_bullet} The distribution of carbon tetrachloride at the Co-op source areas, particularly the absence of contamination in soils at depths less than 20 ft below ground level, is consistent with vertical migration into the subsurface through a conduit (well Co-op 2), with subsequent lateral migration through the subsurface. {sm_bullet} The groundwater flow direction, which is toward the west-northwest, is not consistent with migration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater from the former CCC/USDA property to the source areas on the Co-op property. {sm_bullet} The absence of soil and groundwater contamination along surface drainage pathways on the former CCC/USDA property is not consistent with

  16. Energy systems: an analysis for engineers and policy makers. [14 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.E. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Changing society to a less-intensive energy level is a challenge for experts in many disciplines. A semester-long interdisciplinary seminar was conducted to bring together views on the energy problem. Part I, Energy Dilemmas in the United States, contains 6 papers: Energy, Labor, and Capital Considerations in Productivity Enhancements, James E. Bailey; Energy, Growth, and Altruism, Bruce M. Hannon; A Comment on the Politics of Energy in 1977, Howard Bucknell; Nuclear Power and the History of the Future, Mark Reader; The Energy/Ecology Dilemma, John W. Klock; and The Human Side of the Fuel Crisis, John P. Decker. Part II, Energy Delivery Systems, Present and Future, contains 5 papers: Arizona's Energy Alternative, Bruce Boussard; Energy Financing Projection, David G. Clove; Prospects for Geothermal Energy in Arizona, Michael F. Sheridan; The Status of Solar Energy, Charles E. Backus; Urban Wastes as an Energy Source, James L. Kuester. Part III, Energy Research Poblems and Approaches, contains 3 papers: Potential Research Problems in Energy Systems Analysis, H. William Welch; Energy Economics - A Research Analysis, David A. Huettner; Energy and Input-Output Analysis, Charles D. Hoyt and Gayle Lynn Berry. Part IV entitled Energy Dialogue, contains questions and answers transcribed from the seminar, assembled by Gayle Lynn Berry.

  17. Energy-state formulation of lumped volume dynamic equations with application to a simplified free piston Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, C. J.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Lumped volume dynamic equations are derived using an energy-state formulation. This technique requires that kinetic and potential energy state functions be written for the physical system being investigated. To account for losses in the system, a Rayleigh dissipation function is also formed. Using these functions, a Lagrangian is formed and using Lagrange's equation, the equations of motion for the system are derived. The results of the application of this technique to a lumped volume are used to derive a model for the free-piston Stirling engine. The model was simplified and programmed on an analog computer. Results are given comparing the model response with experimental data.

  18. Energy saving for OpenFlow switch on the NetFPGA platform based on queue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Tran Hoang; Luc, Vu Cong; Quan, Nguyen Trung; Thanh, Nguyen Huu; Nam, Pham Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Data centers play an important role in our daily activities. The increasing demand on data centers in both scale and size has led to huge energy consumption that rises the cost of data centers. Besides, environmental impacts also increase considerably due to a large amount of carbon emissions. In this paper, we present a design aimed at green networking by reducing the power consumption for routers and switches. Firstly, we design the Balance Switch on the NetFPGA platform to save consumed energy based on Queue Engineering. Secondly, we design the test-bed system to precisely measure the consumed energy of our switches. Experimental results show that energy saving of our switches is about 30% - 35% of power consumption according to variation of input traffic compared with normal Openflow Switch. Finally, we describe performance evaluations.

  19. Effect of Compaction Energy on Engineering Properties of Fly Ash –Granite Dust Stabilized Expansive Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Kumar Sabat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of compaction energy on engineering properties of an expansive soil stabilized with optimum percentage of fly ash-granite dust have been discussed in this paper. Expansive soil stabilized with optimum percentage of fly ash-granite dust was compacted with five compaction energy levels. Maximum dry density and optimum moisture content corresponding to each energy level were determined. Based on these maximum dry density and optimum moisture content, samples were prepared for unconfined compressive strength, soaked California bearing ratio, hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure tests. From the test results it is found that increase in compaction energy increased the maximum dry density, unconfined compressive strength, soaked California bearing ratio and swelling pressure, and decreased the optimum moisture content and hydraulic conductivity.

  20. Multi-step excitation energy transfer engineered in genetic fusions of natural and synthetic light-harvesting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joshua A; Kodali, Goutham; Jiang, Jianbing; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Bryant, Donald A; Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2017-02-01

    Synthetic proteins designed and constructed from first principles with minimal reference to the sequence of any natural protein have proven robust and extraordinarily adaptable for engineering a range of functions. Here for the first time we describe the expression and genetic fusion of a natural photosynthetic light-harvesting subunit with a synthetic protein designed for light energy capture and multi-step transfer. We demonstrate excitation energy transfer from the bilin of the CpcA subunit (phycocyanin α subunit) of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic light-harvesting phycobilisome to synthetic four-helix-bundle proteins accommodating sites that specifically bind a variety of selected photoactive tetrapyrroles positioned to enhance energy transfer by relay. The examination of combinations of different bilin, chlorin and bacteriochlorin cofactors has led to identification of the preconditions for directing energy from the bilin light-harvesting antenna into synthetic protein-cofactor constructs that can be customized for light-activated chemistry in the cell.

  1. The influence of beam energy, mode and focal length on the control of laser ignition in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, J. D.; Dodd, R.; Williams, C. J.; Triantos, G.; Dearden, G.; Shenton, A. T.; Watkins, K. G.; Carroll, S. D.; Scarisbrick, A. D.; Keen, S.

    2007-08-01

    This work involves a study on laser ignition (LI) in an internal combustion (IC) engine and investigates the effects on control of engine combustion performance and stability of varying specific laser parameters (beam energy, beam quality, minimum beam waist size, focal point volume and focal length). A Q-switched Nd : YAG laser operating at the fundamental wavelength 1064 nm was successfully used to ignite homogeneous stoichiometric gasoline and air mixtures in one cylinder of a 1.6 litre IC test engine, where the remaining three cylinders used conventional electrical spark ignition (SI). A direct comparison between LI and conventional SI is presented in terms of changes in coefficient of variability in indicated mean effective pressure (COVIMEP) and the variance in the peak cylinder pressure position (VarPPP). The laser was individually operated in three different modes by changing the diameter of the cavity aperture, where the results show that for specific parameters, LI performed better than SI in terms of combustion performance and stability. Minimum ignition energies for misfire free combustion ranging from 4 to 28 mJ were obtained for various optical and laser configurations and were compared with the equivalent minimum optical breakdown energies in air.

  2. Analysis of an Internal Combustion Engine Using Porous Foams for Thermal Energy Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ali Ehyaei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous and complete combustion in internal combustion engines is advantageous. The use of a porous foam in the exhaust gas in an engine cylinder for heat recovery is examined here with the aim of reducing engine emissions. The internal combustion engine with a porous core regenerator is modeled using SOPHT software, which solved the differential equations for the thermal circuit in the engine. The engine thermal efficiency is observed to increase from 43% to 53% when the porous core regenerator is applied. Further, raising the compression ratio causes the peak pressure and thermal efficiency to increase, e.g., increasing the compression ratio from 13 to 15 causes the thermal efficiency and output work to increase from 53% to 55% and from 4.86 to 4.93 kJ, respectively. The regenerator can also be used as a catalytic converter for fine particles and some other emissions. The regenerator oxidizes unburned hydrocarbons. Meanwhile, heat recovered from the exhaust gases can reduce fuel consumption, further reducing pollutant emissions from the internal combustion engine.

  3. Energy efficient engine flight propulsion system preliminary analysis and design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    A flight propulsion system preliminary design was established that meets the program goals of at least a 12 percent reduction in thrust specific fuel consumption, at least a five percent reduction in direct operating cost, and one-half the performance deterioration rate of the most efficient current commercial engines. The engine provides a high probability of meeting the 1978 noise rule goal. Smoke and gaseous emissions defined by the EPA proposed standards for engines newly certified after 1 January 1981 are met with the exception of NOx, despite incorporation of all known NOx reduction technology.

  4. Enhanced fatty acid production in engineered chemolithoautotrophic bacteria using reduced sulfur compounds as energy sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beller, Harry R.; Zhou, Peng; Jewell, Talia N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, such as H2S, while fixing CO2 are an untapped source of renewable bioproducts from sulfide-laden waste, such as municipal wastewater. In this study, we report engineering of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus...... strength of the two native promoters as assessed by fatty acid production in engineered strains was very similar to that assessed by expression of the cognate genes in the wild-type strain. This proof-of-principle study suggests that engineering sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacteria...

  5. Energy service contracts in regional engineering center for small and medium businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil'manshin, I. R.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of the energy service contracts development in Russia is given in the article. The role of the Complex learning centres in the field of energy efficiency in the promotion of energy service contracts is described. The reasons of constraining the development of energy service contracts are described.

  6. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbine Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to test and substantiate erosion-resistant (ER) nanocoatings for application on compressor airfoils for gas turbine engines in both industrial gas turbines and commercial aviation.

  7. Solar energy conversion systems engineering and economic analysis radiative energy input/thermal electric output computation. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, G.

    1982-09-01

    The direct energy flux analytical model, an analysis of the results, and a brief description of a non-steady state model of a thermal solar energy conversion system implemented on a code, SIRR2, as well as the coupling of CIRR2 which computes global solar flux on a collector and SIRR2 are presented. It is shown how the CIRR2 and, mainly, the SIRR2 codes may be used for a proper design of a solar collector system. (LEW)

  8. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, water year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louen, Justin M.

    2017-04-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. Real-time data are collected at 216 streamgage sites and are verified throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow made by USGS personnel. Annual assessments of hydrologic conditions are made by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the calendar year in which the period ends. Long-term monitoring of hydrologic conditions in Kansas provides critical information for water-supply management, flood forecasting, reservoir operations, irrigation scheduling, bridge and culvert design, ecological monitoring, and many other uses.

  9. Quality of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/ .

  10. CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON WHEAT PRODUCTION IN KANSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C. Howard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of climate change on wheat production in Kansas using annual time series data from 1949 to 2014. For the study, an error correction model is developed in which the price of wheat, the price of oats (substitute good, average annual temperature and average annual precipitation are used as explanatory variables with total output of wheat being the dependent variable. Time series properties of the data series are diagnosed using unit root and cointegration tests. The estimated results suggest that Kansas farmers are supply responsive to both wheat as well as its substitute (oat prices in the short run as well as in the long run. Climate variables; temperature has a positive effect on wheat output in the short run but an insignificant effect in the long run. Precipitation has a positive effect in the short run but a negative effect in the long run.

  11. College-industry alliances improving science education in Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Moore, J.; Palubicki, S. [Kansas Newman College, Wichita, KS (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Kansas Newman College`s investigate laboratory approach and its partnership with local industries has been motivating precollege students into science since 1990. The Vulcan Chemical Company in Wichita supported our Investigative Summer Science Program for high school juniors where we make science fun and exciting through exploration and testing of ideas, broaden their scientific interests, foster independent scholarship, and with active involvement of community scientists, make them aware of career opportunities and challenges in sciences. Upon completion, 80% to 94% of the participants became interested in pursuing science in college. Our second approach has been to encourage pre-college faculty to have their students present science projects at the annual meeting of Kansas Junior Academy of Science. The Metropolitan Life Foundation has been underwriting all the expenses for promoting participation and hosting of the annual meeting since 1987. The number of science projects/papers has increased from 11 in 1987 to 43 in 1993.

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littleton, Harry; Griffin, John

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU's/year and 6.46 trillion BTU's/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  13. Bendix Kansas City Division technological spinoff through 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, H.T.

    1979-02-01

    The results of work of Bendix Kansas City Division are made available in the form of technical reports that are processed through the DOE Technical Information Center in Oak Ridge. The present report lists the documents released by the Division, along with author and subject indexes. Drawing sets released are also listed. Locations of report collections in the U.S., other countries, and international agencies are provided. (RWR)

  14. High throughput screening operations at the University of Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anuradha

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Screening Laboratory at University of Kansas plays a critical role in advancing academic interest in the identification of chemical probes as tools to better understand the biological and biochemical basis of new therapeutic targets. The HTS laboratory has an open service policy and collaborates with internal and external academia as well as for-profit organizations to execute projects requiring HTS-compatible assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization.

  15. Assessing urban forest effects and values: Douglas County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Allison R. Bodine; Robert E. Hoehn; Alexis Ellis; Kim Bomberger; Daniel E. Crane; Theodore A. Endreny; Thomas Taggert; Emily. Stephan

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of trees in Douglas County, Kansas, reveals that this area has about 14,164,000 trees with tree and shrub canopy that covers 25.2 percent of the county. The most common tree species are American elm, northern hackberry, eastern redcedar, Osage-orange, and honeylocust. Trees in Douglas County currently store about 1.7 million tons of carbon (6.4 million tons...

  16. Monitoring the Increase in Seismicity in South-Central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, K.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Watney, W. L.

    2016-12-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in seismicity in the Midcontinent over the last five years, which appears to be linked to the injection of large volumes of wastewater from oilfield operations. Injection of fluids into deeper formations causes an increase in pore pressure, which can facilitate slip on existing faults oriented optimally to subsurface stress fields. Very little is known about the stresses within the shallow basement in Southern Kansas which has seen an increase in seismicity. The historical average of 21 M>3 earthquakes a year has increased to 188 M>3 reported earthquakes observed in 2011, in the US midcontinent. Earthquake focal mechanisms were analyzed for western Sumner County, south-central Kansas, from May of 2015 to July of 2016. The Kansas Geological Society (KGS) seismometer array in the Wellington Oil Field and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) portable array in southern Kansas were used to locate the earthquakes. These arrays generated a catalog of events from Mw .4 to Mw 3.5. Analyses of focal mechanisms for nearly 200 earthquakes larger than approximately Mw 2.0 were included in the inversion. Earthquakes of this magnitude were recorded on nearly all stations. The larger magnitude events tend to cluster in Northeast-Southwest and Northwest-Southeast lineations. These local, larger earthquakes provide a better understanding of the stresses that are causing the increased seismicity. The stress tensor was calculated for the region to the west of the city of Wellington, KS, in Sumner County. The primary horizontal stress direction is nearly east. This observation is in agreement with well data that estimates the maximum horizontal stress at approximately 75 degrees.

  17. Revising the Dust Bowl: High Above the Kansas Grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Kenneth M; Rupley, Eric S A

    2012-07-01

    This article reconstructs land cover patterns in Depressionera Kansas from historical aerial photos and compares the locations of crop fields to areas of submarginal land identified in modern digital soil survey maps. The analysis argues that New Deal land retirement programs overestimated the degree of bad land use because they lacked the basic science to make comprehensive assessments. The findings demonstrate that the misuse of land unfit for cultivation was relatively rare across the central plains but especially in the Dust Bowl region.

  18. Archaeological Survey and Testing at Perry Lake, Jefferson County, Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    underneath it was a representation of the nation’s capitol dome built entirely of Kansas apples with tall jars of grain and seed for the pillars . Visitors...one spark plug, a %piece of iron wire, one metal fastener, a copper coin (penny) and one piece of brick. Although the whiteware dates between 1860 and...pre-1900 date of manufacture, while the electroplated spoon handle has a small floral pattern and probablN dates to the early twentieth century. The

  19. Energy Surveys of Army Hospitals, Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    condutted under this con.tract, The conclusions of AIR& study are briefly suiarited in SIction 7.2.1.2. Lastly, Section 7.2,1.3 presents recomendations...Asr Cord~tt~ow 4ng Engineers 3. 9HP: Wiler Her$Ctowet - tQufialtnt to 33440~ ItuJWp of 34.5 Lbs of steam. I4. BTU: British Thermal Unit - A’iaurt of...total heat contitnt o• a given mass Of a substance 3 82. k: Thermal conductivity (Stu/•-r.t*.1: 83. m: Mass flo Rite 84. wb: wet fulb (also W8) £ 8

  20. Biomedical learning experiences for middle school girls sponsored by the Kansas State University Student Chapter of the IEEE EMBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Lucinda; Griffith, Connor; Young, Ethan; Sullivan, Adriann; Schuler, Jeff; Arnold-Christian, Susan; Warren, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Learning experiences for middle school girls are an effective means to steer young women toward secondary engineering curricula that they might not have otherwise considered. Sponsorship of such experiences by a collegiate student group is worthwhile, as it gives the group common purpose and places college students in a position to mentor these young women. This paper addresses learning experiences in different areas of bio-medical engineering offered to middle school girls in November 2008 via a day-long workshop entitled "Engineering The Body." The Kansas State University (KSU) Student Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) worked with the KSU Women in Engineering and Science Program (WESP) to design and sponsor these experiences, which addressed the areas of joint mechanics, electrocardiograms, membrane transport, computer mouse design, and audio filters for cochlear implants. Fifty five middle-school girls participated in this event, affirming the notion that biomedical engineering appeals to young women and that early education and recruitment efforts have the potential to expand the biomedical engineering talent pool.

  1. Modeling of piezoelectric energy extraction in a thermoacoustic engine with multi-pole time-domain impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeffrey; Scalo, Carlo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out the first high-fidelity Navier-Stokes simulation of a complete thermoacoustic engine with piezoelectric energy extraction. The standing-wave thermoacoustic piezoelectric (TAP) engine model comprises a 51 cm long cylindrical resonator, containing a thermoacoustic stack on one end and capped by a PZT-5A piezoelectric diaphragm on the other end, tuned to the frequency of the thermoacoustically-amplified mode (388 Hz). A multi-pole broadband time-domain impedance model has been adopted to accurately simulate the measured electromechanical properties of the piezoelectric diaphragm. Simulations are first carried out from quasi-quiescent conditions to a limit cycle, with varying temperature gradients and stack configurations. Stack geometry and boundary layers are fully resolved. Acoustic energy extraction is then activated, achieving a new limit cycle at lower pressure amplitudes. The scaling of the modeled electrical power output and attainable thermal-to-electric energy conversion efficiencies are discussed. Limitations of extending a quasi-one-dimensional linear approximation based on Rott's theory to a (low amplitude) limit cycle are discussed, as well as nonlinear effects such as thermoacoustic energy transport and viscous dissipation.

  2. Cigarette Consumption and Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Among Adults in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, John S; Lai, Sue Min

    2015-06-11

    Recent tobacco prevention and cessation activities have focused on nonsmoking ordinances and behavioral changes, and in Kansas, the overall prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults has decreased. The objective of this study was to determine whether overall cigarette consumption (mean annual number of cigarettes smoked) in Kansas also decreased. Data on cigarette smoking prevalence for 91,465 adult Kansans were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey for 1999 through 2010. Data on annual cigarette consumption were obtained from the 2002 and 2006 Kansas Adult Tobacco Survey and analyzed by totals, by sex, and by smoking some days or smoking every day. Linear regression was used to evaluate rate changes over time. Among men, but not women, cigarette smoking prevalence decreased significantly over time. The prevalence of smoking every day decreased significantly among both men and women, whereas the prevalence of smoking on some days increased significantly for women but not men. For current smokers, the mean annual number of cigarettes consumed remained the same. The decline in overall smoking prevalence coupled with the lack of change in mean annual cigarette consumption may have resulted in a more intense exposure to cigarettes for the smoking population. The significant increase in some day use among women indicates a need for additional prevention and education activities; the impact on future lung cancer incidence rates needs further investigation.

  3. Evolution of the Hydro-Kansas Research Program to Test Two Integrative Scaling Hypotheses in the Whitewater Basin, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V. K.

    2005-12-01

    The Hydro-Kansas (H-K) research program represents an illustrative example of the Water, Earth, Biota (WEB) report to develop an integrated hydrologic science involving new theories and observations (http://cires.colorado.edu/hydrology). The main objective of the H-K research program is to test two integrative scaling hypotheses in the 1100 sq. km. Whitewater Basin, KS: Fundamental statistical scale invariant relationships exist for floods and riparian vegetation evapotranspiration (ET) with respect to complete Horton-Strahler order streams. The biophysical origins of scaling can be tested from biophysical processes that couple water, energy, terrain and vegetation on time scales of individual rainfall-runoff events. The long-term goal is to extend these hypotheses to seasonal, annual and inter-annual time scales. The H-K research program requires developing new analytical theories and numerical models, and taking new integrated core observations in the Whitewater basin. Several academic institutions and federal agencies are cooperating and supporting the H-K program, which has been developing in several phases since 2001. The first phase (2001-present) has developed a digital watershed environment for numerical modeling and for data archiving. The first set of results to test the physical basis of statistical scaling flood hypothesis on two Agriculture Research Service (ARS) basins will be presented in a companion talk in this session. We developed and tested a new steam gauging methodology on the Whitewater basin during the second phase of the project (2003-2004). Initial results are very promising and are comparable to or better than the well-established, USGS stream-gauging methodology. The third phase (2005-06) consists of a pilot project to install 12 stream flow gauges at the end of complete Horton-Strahler streams. In addition, 14 rainfall-gauging sites are being installed and will be used in tandem with NEXRAD at Wichita for estimating space-time variable

  4. Estimating decades-long trends in petroleum field energy return on investment (EROI) with an engineering-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vinay S; Brandt, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    This paper estimates changes in the energy return on investment (EROI) for five large petroleum fields over time using the Oil Production Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE). The modeled fields include Cantarell (Mexico), Forties (U.K.), Midway-Sunset (U.S.), Prudhoe Bay (U.S.), and Wilmington (U.S.). Data on field properties and production/processing parameters were obtained from a combination of government and technical literature sources. Key areas of uncertainty include details of the oil and gas surface processing schemes. We aim to explore how long-term trends in depletion at major petroleum fields change the effective energetic productivity of petroleum extraction. Four EROI ratios are estimated for each field as follows: The net energy ratio (NER) and external energy ratio (EER) are calculated, each using two measures of energy outputs, (1) oil-only and (2) all energy outputs. In all cases, engineering estimates of inputs are used rather than expenditure-based estimates (including off-site indirect energy use and embodied energy). All fields display significant declines in NER over the modeling period driven by a combination of (1) reduced petroleum production and (2) increased energy expenditures on recovery methods such as the injection of water, steam, or gas. The fields studied had NER reductions ranging from 46% to 88% over the modeling periods (accounting for all energy outputs). The reasons for declines in EROI differ by field. Midway-Sunset experienced a 5-fold increase in steam injected per barrel of oil produced. In contrast, Prudhoe Bay has experienced nearly a 30-fold increase in amount of gas processed and reinjected per unit of oil produced. In contrast, EER estimates are subject to greater variability and uncertainty due to the relatively small magnitude of external energy investments in most cases.

  5. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE APPLICABILITY OF SOFTWARE PRODUCT LINE ENGINEERING FOR ENERGY AND COST-EFFICIENT GREENHOUSE PRODUCTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærsk-Møller, Hans Martin

    Software product line engineering (SPLE) has shown promising results with respect to software reuse and has a wide range of benefits. Thus, we want to investigate the applicability of SPLE to develop tools for improving the energy and cost-efficiency of greenhouse production in Denmark...... control concept, called DynaLight, which reduces the energy consumption and cost by optimizing the use of the supplementary light in greenhouses. As the DynaLight concept can be used to analyze, plan and control production, a tool suite has to be developed. The need for developing multiple tools...... context especially with respect to small teams, it reports on the experience and describes the application in a detailed and tangible way. It describes the development process, the results of the tools with respect to cost and energy-efficiency, how component-based architecture is utilized as software...

  6. Assistance of molecular vibrations on coherent energy transfer in photosynthesis from the view of a quantum heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhedong; Wang, Jin

    2015-04-02

    Recently, the quantum nature in the energy transport in solar cells and light-harvesting complexes has attracted much attention as being triggered by the experimental observations. We model the light-harvesting complex (i.e., PEB50 dimer) as a quantum heat engine (QHE) and study the effect of the undamped intramolecule vibrational modes on the coherent energy-transfer process and quantum transport. We find that the exciton-vibration interaction has nontrivial contribution to the promotion of quantum yield as well as transport properties of the QHE at steady state by enhancing the quantum coherence quantified by entanglement entropy. The perfect quantum yield over 90% has been obtained, with the exciton-vibration coupling. We attribute these improvements to the renormalization of the electronic couplings effectively induced by exciton-vibration interaction and the subsequent delocalization of excitons. Finally, we demonstrate that the thermal relaxation and dephasing can help the excitation energy transfer in the PEB50 dimer.

  7. The Chemical Engineering behind How Carbonated Beverages Go Flat: A Hands-On Experiment for Freshmen Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Keith L.

    2007-01-01

    A hands-on project was developed to educate new chemical engineering students about the types of problems chemical engineers solve and to improve student enthusiasm for studying chemical engineering. In this project, students studied the phenomenon of carbonated beverages going flat. The project was implemented in 2003 and 2004 at Kansas State…

  8. The Chemical Engineering behind How Carbonated Beverages Go Flat: A Hands-On Experiment for Freshmen Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Keith L.

    2007-01-01

    A hands-on project was developed to educate new chemical engineering students about the types of problems chemical engineers solve and to improve student enthusiasm for studying chemical engineering. In this project, students studied the phenomenon of carbonated beverages going flat. The project was implemented in 2003 and 2004 at Kansas State…

  9. Energy and exergy analyses of homogeneous charge compressin ignition (HCCI engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatehi Ghahfarokhi Rasool

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, a single-cylinder, four-stroke cycle, TD43 engine has been used to evaluate the first and second laws of thermodynamics terms. To this aim, the first law analysis is done by using a thermo-kinetic model. The results show a good agreement with the experimental data. Also for the second law analysis, a developed in house computational code is applied. Behaviors of the results have a good accordance with the literature. The result show that an increase in the inlet charge temperature causes the maximum pressure, indicated work availability and entropy generation per cycle be reduced and the in-cylinder temperature, heat loss availability and total availability be increased. Also the results show that an increase in the engine speed causes the total availability be increased and the heat loss availability be decreased. When the engine speed increases, reduction in the duration of cycle evolution causes the reduction of heat transfer.

  10. Trends in peak flows of selected streams in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, T.J.; Perry, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of a systematic change in flood potential led to an investigation of trends in the magnitude of annual peak flows in Kansas. Efficient design of highway bridges and other flood-plain structures depends on accurate understanding of flood characteristics. The Kendall's tau test was used to identify trends at 40 stream-gaging stations during the 40-year period 1958-97. Records from 13 (32 percent) of the stations showed significant trends at the 95-percent confidence level. Only three of the records (8 percent) analyzed had increasing trends, whereas 10 records (25 percent) had decreasing trends, all of which were for stations located in the western one-half of the State. An analysis of flow volume using mean annual discharge at 29 stations in Kansas resulted in 6 stations (21 percent) with significant trends in flow volumes. All six trends were decreasing and occurred in the western one-half of the State. The Kendall's tau test also was used to identify peak-flow trends over the entire period of record for 54 stream-gaging stations in Kansas. Of the 23 records (43 percent) showing significant trends, 16 (30 percent) were decreasing, and 7 (13 percent) were increasing. The trend test then was applied to 30-year periods moving in 5-year increments to identify time periods within each station record when trends were occurring. Systematic changes in precipitation patterns and long-term declines in ground-water levels in some stream basins may be contributing to peak-flow trends. To help explain the cause of the streamflow trends, the Kendall's tau test was applied to total annual precipitation and ground-water levels in Kansas. In western Kansas, the lack of precipitation and presence of decreasing trends in ground-water levels indicated that declining water tables are contributing to decreasing trends in peak streamflow. Declining water tables are caused by ground-water withdrawals and other factors such as construction of ponds and terraces. Peak

  11. Comparable Research of Energy and Ecology Parameters of 1st, 2nd and 3rd Generation Biofuels for Compression Ignition Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Justas Zaglinskis

    2015-01-01

    .... Main attention focused on energy and environmental characteristics of diesel engine performance using 1st, 2nd and 3rd generation alcohol, fatty acid methyl and butyl esters blends with conventional diesel fuel (EN 590...

  12. The impact of problem-based learning on engineering students' beliefs about physics and conceptual understanding of energy and momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of problem-based learning (PBL) on freshmen engineering students' beliefs about physics and physics learning (referred to as epistemological beliefs) and conceptual understanding of physics. The multiple-choice test of energy and momentum concepts and the Colorado learning attitudes about science survey were used to collect the data. The sample consisted of 142 students enrolled in the PBL and traditional lecture classes in the engineering faculty of a state university in Turkey. The analyses showed that the PBL group obtained significantly higher conceptual learning gains than the traditional group and the change (improvement) in the PBL group students' beliefs from the pre- to post test were significantly larger than that of the traditional group. The results revealed that beliefs were correlated with conceptual understanding. Suggestions are presented regarding the implementation of the PBL approach.

  13. Performance, Emission, Energy, and Exergy Analysis of a C.I. Engine Using Mahua Biodiesel Blends with Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Nabnit; Mohanty, Mahendra Kumar; Mishra, Sruti Ranjan; Mohanty, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on a four-stroke single cylinder diesel engine fuelled with the blends of Mahua oil methyl ester (MOME) and diesel. The performance emission, energy, and exergy analysis has been carried out in B20 (mixture of 80% diesel by volume with 20% MOME). From energy analysis, it was observed that the fuel energy input as well as energy carried away by exhaust gases was 6.25% and 11.86% more in case of diesel than that of B20. The unaccounted losses were 10.21% more in case of diesel than B20. The energy efficiency was 28%, while the total losses were 72% for diesel. In case of B20, the efficiency was 65.74 % higher than that of diesel. The exergy analysis shows that the input availability of diesel fuel is 1.46% more than that of B20. For availability in brake power as well as exhaust gases of diesel were 5.66 and 32% more than that of B20. Destructed availability of B20 was 0.97% more than diesel. Thus, as per as performance, emission, energy, and exergy part were concerned; B20 is found to be very close with that of diesel. PMID:27350999

  14. Improved engineering-economic model of residential energy use. [1970-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Cope, J.; Cohn, S.; Lin, W.; Hoskins, R.

    1977-04-01

    An improved version of the ORNL residential energy use model was developed to simulate energy use in the residential sector from 1970 through 2000. The model provides considerable detail on annual energy uses by fuel, end use, and housing type; and also estimates annual equipment installations and ownership, equipment energy requirements, structural thermal integrities, fuel expenditures, equipment costs, and costs for improving thermal integrities on new and existing housing units. Thus, the model provides considerable detail on residential energy uses and associated costs. These details are useful for evaluating alternative energy conservation policies, programs, and technologies for their energy and economic effects during the next quarter century. The present version of the model deals with four fuels, eight end uses, and three housing types. Each of these 96 fuel use components is calculated each year as a function of stocks of occupied housing units and new construction, equipment ownership by fuel and end use, thermal integrity of housing units, average unit energy requirements for each equipment type, and usage factors that reflect household behavior. Simulations of energy use from 1960 to 1975 show that the model accurately predicts historical data on aggregate energy use, energy use by fuel, energy use by end use, and equipment ownership market-shares. A reference projection developed with the model shows residential energy use growing from 17.5 GGJ (10/sup 18/ joules) in 1975 to 18.5 GGJ in 1980 and 26.6 GGJ in 2000, with an average annual growth rate of 1.7 percent. Electricity increases its share of the energy budget from 44 percent in 1975 to 67 percent in 2000. Shares provided by gas, oil, and other fuels all decline during this period.

  15. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays from a Magnetized Strange Star Central Engine for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have been tried to be related to the most varied and powerful sources known in the universe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are natural candidates. Here, we argue that cosmic rays can be accelerated by large amplitude electromagnetic waves (LAEMWs) when the MHD approximation of the field in the wind generated by the GRB's magnetized central engine breaks down. The central engine considered here is a strange star born with differential rotation from the accretion induced conversion of a neutron star into a strange star in a low-mass X-ray binary system. The LAEMWs generated this way accelerate light ions to the highest energies $E = q\\eta\\Delta\\Phi_{max}$ with an efficiency $\\eta \\sim 10^{-1}$ that accounts for all plausible energy losses. Alternatively, we also consider the possibility that, once formed, the LAEMWs are unstable to creation of a relativistically strong electromagnetic turbulence due to an overturn instability. Under this assumption, a lower limit to the efficien...

  16. Control Limits for Building Energy End Use Based on Engineering Judgment, Frequency Analysis, and Quantile Regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henze, G. P.; Pless, S.; Petersen, A.; Long, N.; Scambos, A. T.

    2014-02-01

    Approaches are needed to continuously characterize the energy performance of commercial buildings to allow for (1) timely response to excess energy use by building operators; and (2) building occupants to develop energy awareness and to actively engage in reducing energy use. Energy information systems, often involving graphical dashboards, are gaining popularity in presenting energy performance metrics to occupants and operators in a (near) real-time fashion. Such an energy information system, called Building Agent, has been developed at NREL and incorporates a dashboard for public display. Each building is, by virtue of its purpose, location, and construction, unique. Thus, assessing building energy performance is possible only in a relative sense, as comparison of absolute energy use out of context is not meaningful. In some cases, performance can be judged relative to average performance of comparable buildings. However, in cases of high-performance building designs, such as NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) discussed in this report, relative performance is meaningful only when compared to historical performance of the facility or to a theoretical maximum performance of the facility as estimated through detailed building energy modeling.

  17. Role of a biodiesel blend in sustaining the energy and environment as a CI engine fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Saravanan, G.Nagarajan, G.Lakshmi Narayana rao, S.Sampath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, biodiesel derived from high free fatty acid (FFA crude rice bran oil, (CRBO a non-edible vegetable oil was tested as a fuel in a compression ignition engine in blended form to test its suitability and also its ability to create a sustainable environment. A 4.4 kW direct injection stationary diesel engine was used for experimentation. Biodiesel (crude rice bran oil methyl ester blend was prepared by mixing 20 % crude rice bran oil methyl ester (CRBME with 80 % diesel on volume basis. An enhanced thermal oxidation was observed for the CRBME blend which oxidizes most of the UBHC into CO and CO2. As a result of this, UBHC emission and smoke density were reduced by 28 % and 35 % respectively with a marginal increase in CO and NOx emission than diesel. It was also observed that by blending CRBME with diesel, the brake thermal efficiency of the engine decreased only marginally which ensures the suitability of CRBME blend as a CI engine fuel. Experimental results show almost similar performance in CRBME blend when compared to diesel which strengthens its ability to have a sustainable environment. This research work can be extended to improve the thermal oxidation process which may result in further reduction in CO, UBHC and particulate emission than that of the emissions reported in this paper.

  18. Engineering interfacial energy profile by changing the substrate terminating plane in perovskite heterointerfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, S.; Solmaz, A.; Burton, J.D.; Huijben, M.; Rijnders, A.J.H.M.; Tsymbal, E.Y.; Banerjee, T.

    2016-01-01

    Atomically engineered oxide heterointerfaces show a range of novel phenomena not present in their bulk form, thus providing an additional knob to tune the functional properties across such interfaces. Here we show that for an oxide Schottky interface between metallic SrRuO 3 and semiconducting Nb

  19. Engineering interfacial energy profile by changing the substrate terminating plane in perovskite heterointerfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, S.; Solmaz, A.; Burton, J.D.; Huijben, Mark; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Tsymbal, E.Y.; Banerjee, T.

    2016-01-01

    Atomically engineered oxide heterointerfaces show a range of novel phenomena not present in their bulk form, thus providing an additional knob to tune the functional properties across such interfaces. Here we show that for an oxide Schottky interface between metallic SrRuO 3 and semiconducting Nb do

  20. Metabolic engineering of free-energy (ATP) conserving reactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kok, S.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineering – the improvement of cellular activities by manipulation of enzymatic, transport and regulatory functions of the cell – has enabled the industrial production of a wide variety of biological molecules from renewable resources. Microbial production of fuels and chemicals thereby

  1. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  2. Federal-State Cooperative Program in Kansas, seminar proceedings, July 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years, water-resource management in Kansas has undergone reorientation with the creation of the Kansas Water Authority and the Kansas Water office. New thrusts toward long-term goals based on the Kansas State Water plan demand strong communication and coordination between all water-related agencies within the State. The seminar discussed in this report was an initial step by the Kansas Water Office to assure the continued presence of a technical-coordination process and to provide an opportunity for the U.S. Geological Survey to summarize their technical-informational activities in Kansas for the benefit of State and Federal water agencies with the State. The seminar was held on July 8 and 9, 1985, in Lawrence, Kansas. The agenda included a summary of the data-collection activities and short synopses of projects completed within the past year and those currently underway. The data program discussions described the information obtained at the surface water, groundwater, water quality, and sediment sites in Kansas. Interpretive projects summarized included studies in groundwater modeling, areal hydrologic analysis, regional analysis of floods , low-flow, high-flow, and flow-volume characteristics, water quality of groundwater and lakes, and traveltime and transit-loss analysis. (USGS)

  3. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  4. Kansas School District Leaders' Handbook for Maximizing Nontraditional Donations and Grant Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarek, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to research, develop, and validate a handbook of effective strategies that Kansas school district leaders can use to increase their ability to maximize their school districts' nontraditional funding. Kansas School District Leaders' Handbook for Maximizing Nontraditional Donations and Grant Funding was developed using…

  5. Geospatial economics of the woody biomass supply in Kansas -- A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olga Khaliukova; Darci Paull; Sarah L. Lewis-Gonzales; Nicolas Andre; Larry E. Biles; Timothy M. Young; James H. Perdue

    2017-01-01

    This research assessed the geospatial supply of cellulosic feedstocks for potential mill sites in Kansas (KS), with procurement zones extending to Arkansas (AR), Iowa(IA), Missouri(MO), Oklahoma (OK), and Nebraska (NE). A web-based modeling system, the Kansas Biomass Supply Assessment Tool, was developed to identify least-cost sourcing areas for logging residues and...

  6. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 11th Annual Progress Report, 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Information about the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project for 1974 is presented in this annual progress report. The Project provides: (1) migrant education programs; (2) health education; (3) nursing services; (4) medical and dental services; (5) hospital services; and (6) supplemental food programs. Since August 1974, the western Kansas VISTA…

  7. Archaeological Investigation in the Perry Lake Project Area, Northeastern Kansas National Register Evaluation of 17 Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    University of Kansas ( lithic analysis ), Ms. Michelle Dunlap, Museum of Anthropology, University of Kansas (ceramic analysis; historic assemblages). I...address relevant research goals of the Perry Lake Project. In the past, lithic analysis primarily consisted of classification schemes. From these...the methods of lithic analysis employed here will follow procedures established for the recent Clinton Lake Archaeological Project by Ritterbush

  8. Assessing the Engineering Performance of Affordable Net-Zero Energy Housing

    OpenAIRE

    Wallpe, Jordan P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate affordable technologies that are capable of providing attractive, cost-effective energy savings to the housing industry. The research did so by investigating the 2011 Solar Decathlon competition, with additional insight from the Purdue INhome. Insight from the Purdue INhome verified the importance of using a three step design process to design a net-zero energy building. In addition, energy consumption values of the INhome were used to compare and ...

  9. Energy Consumption and Saving Analysis for Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Powders

    OpenAIRE

    Zhichao Liu; Fuda Ning; Weilong Cong; Qiuhong Jiang; Tao Li; Hongchao Zhang; Yingge Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing awareness of environmental protection and sustainable manufacturing, the environmental impact of laser additive manufacturing (LAM) technology has been attracting more and more attention. Aiming to quantitatively analyze the energy consumption and extract possible ways to save energy during the LAM process, this investigation studies the effects of input variables including laser power, scanning speed, and powder feed rate on the overall energy consumption during the laser...

  10. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-27

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride

  11. Photovoltaic energy conversion in vocational training. Training program for electrical engineering; Photovoltaik in der beruflichen Ausbildung. Lernprogramm. Berufsfeld Elektrotechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    ISET is an application-orientated research institute for designing electric systems for renewable energy use, rational energy use, andwater treatment. ISET focuses on environmentally acceptable an sustainable use of energy and water and the saving of natural resources. This training program was developed by ISET in cooperation with the department of vocational training of Gesamthochschule Kassel University and is based on two diploma dissertations. It is available on CD-ROM and presents the fundamentals of photovoltaic energy conversion for vocational training in the field of electrical engineering. [German] Das ISET ist ein anwendungsorientiertes Forschungsinstitut zur Gestaltung der elektrischen Systemtechnik fuer die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien, der rationellen Energieverwendung und der Wasserbehandlung. Wir setzen uns fuer einen umweltvertraeglichen und nachhaltigen Umgang mit Energie und Wasser zur Erhaltung der natuerlichen Lebensgrundlagen ein. Bei der Entwicklung des Lernprogrammes hat das ISET die technisch-wissenschaftliche Betreuung uebernommen. Das Lernprogramm wurde im Rahmen von zwei Diplomarbeiten an der Universitaet Gesamthochschule Kassel, Fachbereich Berufs- und Fachdidaktik, entwickelt und wird in Form einer CD-ROM angeboten. Die curriculare und didaktische Entwicklung eines Lerngebietes zur Photovoltaik fuer die Berufsausbildung im Berufsfeld Elektrotechnik waren Schwerpunkt der Arbeiten. (orig./AKF)

  12. Energy-Level Engineering at ZnO/Oligophenylene Interfaces with Phosphonate-Based Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpel, Melanie; Nardi, Marco V; Ligorio, Giovanni; Wegner, Berthold; Pätzel, Michael; Kobin, Björn; Hecht, Stefan; Koch, Norbert

    2015-06-10

    We used aromatic phosphonates with substituted phenyl rings with different molecular dipole moments to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface in order to engineer the energy-level alignment at hybrid inorganic/organic semiconductor interfaces, with an oligophenylene as organic component. The work function of ZnO was tuned over a wide range of more than 1.7 eV by different SAMs. The difference in the morphology and polarity of the SAM-modified ZnO surfaces led to different oligophenylene orientation, which resulted in an orientation-dependent ionization energy that varied by 0.7 eV. The interplay of SAM-induced work function modification and oligophenylene orientation changes allowed tuning of the offsets between the molecular frontier energy levels and the semiconductor band edges over a wide range. Our results demonstrate the versatile use of appropriate SAMs to tune the energy levels of ZnO-based hybrid semiconductor heterojunctions, which is important to optimize its function, e.g., targeting either interfacial energy- or charge-transfer.

  13. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second

  14. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second subj

  15. Pemanfaatan Perbedaan Temperatur pada Main Engine Cooling System sebagai Energi Alternatif untuk Pembangkit Listrik di Kapal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Julianto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dari 100 persen bahan bakar yang masuk ke dalam mesin kapal, hanya sekitar 40 persem yang dikonversi menjadi daya. Sedangkan 30 persen panas dilepas menuju sistem pendingin (cooling system dan sisanya menjadi gas buang (exhaust. Energi panas yang terbuang tersebut bisa dimanfaatkan menjadi energi listrik. Perbedaan temperatur antara air panas yang keluar dari mesin kapal dan air laut yang digunakan sebagai pendingin dapat dikonversi menjadi energi listrik dengan menggunakan thermoelectric. Besarnya daya listrik yang dihasilkan tergantung pada besarnya perbedaan temperatur dan jumlah thermoelectric yang dipasang. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk menemukan metode yang tepat guna memanfaatkan energi panas yang terbuang pada sistem pendingin mesin. Metode yang digunakan adalah dengan melakukan kajian pustaka serta analisa ekperimen menggunakan prototype. Hasil penelitian berdasarkan keluaran  jacket water mesin Wartsila 6L20 sebesar 91 oC yang harus didinginkan dengan air laut bertemperatur 30oC didapatkan daya sebesar 32,4 Watt dari 12 thermoelectric yang dipasang. Dengan penyerapan energi sebesar 0,4 persen. Dengan begitu, masih banyak potensi energi yang masih bisa diserap untuk diubah menjadi energi listrik. Sehingga, dari penelitian tersebut dapat disimpulkan bahwa panas yang terbuang dari mesin yang dianggap tidak berguna dapat diubah menjadi energi listrik yang ramah lingkungan.

  16. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a. variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions, This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solution with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. And the literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  17. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions. This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solutions with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. The literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  18. Engineering of the fluorescent-energy-conversion arm of phi29 DNA packaging motor for single-molecule studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Jin; Zhang, Hui; Chang, Chun-Li; Savran, Cagri; Guo, Peixuan

    2009-11-01

    The bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor contains a protein core with a central channel comprising twelve copies of re-engineered gp10 protein geared by six copies of packaging RNA (pRNA) and a DNA packaging protein gp16 with unknown copies. Incorporation of this nanomotor into a nanodevice would be beneficial for many applications. To this end, extension and modification of the motor components are necessary for the linkage of this motor to other nanomachines. Here the re-engineering of the motor DNA packaging protein gp16 by extending its length and doubling its size using a fusion protein technique is reported. The modified motor integrated with the eGFP-gp16 maintains the ability to convert the chemical energy from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to mechanical motion and package DNA. The resulting DNA-filled capsid is subsequently converted into an infectious virion. The extended part of the gp16 arm is a fluorescent protein eGFP, which serves as a marker for tracking the motor in single-molecule studies. The activity of the re-engineered motor with eGFP-gp16 is also observed directly with a bright-field microscope via its ability to transport a 2-microm-sized cargo bound to the DNA.

  19. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission

  20. Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qui, Songgang [Temple University; Galbraith, Ross [Infinia

    2013-01-23

    This final report summarizes the final results of the Phase II Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation project being performed by Infinia Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-FC36-08GO18157 during the project period of September 1, 2009 - August 30, 2012. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the practicality of integrating thermal energy storage (TES) modules, using a suitable thermal salt phase-change material (PCM) as its medium, with a dish/Stirling engine; enabling the system to operate during cloud transients and to provide dispatchable power for 4 to 6 hours after sunset. A laboratory prototype designed to provide 3 kW-h of net electrical output was constructed and tested at Infinia's Ogden Headquarters. In the course of the testing, it was determined that the system's heat pipe network - used to transfer incoming heat from the solar receiver to both the Stirling generator heater head and to the phase change salt - did not perform to expectations. The heat pipes had limited capacity to deliver sufficient heat energy to the generator and salt mass while in a charging mode, which was highly dependent on the orientation of the device (vertical versus horizontal). In addition, the TES system was only able to extract about 30 to 40% of the expected amount of energy from the phase change salt once it was fully molten. However, the use of heat pipes to transfer heat energy to and from a thermal energy storage medium is a key technical innovation, and the project team feels that the limitations of the current device could be greatly improved with further development. A detailed study of manufacturing costs using the prototype TES module as a basis indicates that meeting DOE LCOE goals with this hardware requires significant efforts. Improvement can be made by implementing aggressive cost-down initiatives in design and materials

  1. Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation for Carbon Capture and Storage, Within the Arbuckle Aquifer, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S.; Campbell, B.; Vega, M.; Barker, R. L.; Holubnyak, E.; Watney, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    A class VI permit site under U.S. Department of Energy has been proposed for carbon sequestration in south-central Kansas. In an effort to maintain environmental stability three wells have been drilled to basement rock, two being near the injection site, KGS 1-32 and KGS 1-28, and one being to the western annex, Cutter KGS #1. The western annex site, Cutter, is being utilized as a cross-comparison for mineralogical, geochemical, and structural component to the eastern sites in Wellington. A link will be determined of the continuity of three zones of interest: the Mississippian pay zone (3670'-3700'), a potential baffle zone in the upper Arbuckle (4400'-4550'), and the proposed CO2 injection zone (4900'-5050'). 11 depths within Cutter have been swabbed, and samples taken to investigate the chemistry of the subsurface formation water. The different depths will allow for a quantitative determination of how the brine composition varies with depth, and also provides a baseline for future monitoring. Initial chemical analysis by ICP-OES and HR-ICP-MS show a hyper saline brine (50,000-190,000TDS), dominated by Cl, Na, and Ca ions. pH ranges from 6.4 to 7.5, and total alkalinity from 124 and 378 mg/L of HCO¬3-. One complex, yet intriguing, species is Iron. It could potentially allow for further precipitation of the CO2¬ from the formation of Fe carbonates, such as siderite. Cores and thin sections were taken from a variety of depths ranging from 3681.9' to 5176.9' (Wellington) and 5564.3' to 7540.2' (Cutter). Dominant mineralogy consists of dolomite with varying forms of silicic intrusions, usually in the form of chert nodules with sulfide minerals and argillaceous materials in between. Extensive vugs and microfractures allow for varying porosity within each interval. Pay zone rocks typically display fine-grained cherty dolomite with subhedral to euhedral dolomite rhombs as well as oil stains oriented in parallel blotches. Characteristics such as high porosity and small

  2. Effects of Regulation on Induced Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Dougherty, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The appearance of seismicity concurrent with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes there. Much of the seismicity can be related to high-rate injection wells within 5 km of the earthquakes. There is significant complexity to the situation, though. Some of the seismicity, including the 2014 M4.8 Milan earthquake, the largest earthquake to occur in the area, lies at least 10km from high-rate injection wells. Additionally, the presence of high-rate wells does not guarantee that there will be nearby seismicity. Many of the highest-rate injection wells are located to the southwest of our study area, where there is minimal seismicity. We have also seen changes in earthquake rates shortly following the March 2015 enactment of new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in five areas in southern Kansas. Overall, the earthquake rate has decreased significantly since these rules went into place. In more detail, however, earthquake rates within the five areas decreased, but the rate outside the five zones increased. It is likely that fluid-pressure diffusion is responsible for the migration of seismicity outside the areas of reduced injection because there is little injection in the areas unaffected by the new injection rules. This increase is also a reminder that seismicity can persist long after the reduction or cessation of injection. In addition to the effect of the new injection rules, it is possible that the reduction in injection may be partially caused by economic factors that have resulted in a decrease in the production of oil and gas. We have yet to disentangle the effects of the new injection rules and the low prices of oil and gas on the induced seismicity in southern Kansas.

  3. Final Monitoring Plan for Site Closure at Inman, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Inman, Kansas, is a rural town located in southwest McPherson County, in sections 8, 9, 16, and 17, Township 21 South, Range 4 West (Figure 1.1). There are 1,377 people in 513 households, as of the census of 2010. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the southern edge of the city of Inman, Kansas, from 1954 to 1965. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In 1997, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contamination level [MCL] of 5.0 μg/L) were detected in three private wells near the former grain storage facility at Inman, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. No public water supply wells were identified within 1 mi of the town by the KDHE in 1998. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with grain storage operations. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA agreed to conduct a multi-phase investigation at Inman. The investigation was performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA.

  4. Energy and Exergy Analyses of a Diesel Engine Fuelled with Biodiesel-Diesel Blends Containing 5% Bioethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Sayin Kul

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, energy and exergy analysis were performed for a single cylinder, water-cooled diesel engine using biodiesel, diesel and bioethanol blends. Each experiment was performed at twelve different engine speeds between 1000 and 3000 rev/min at intervals of 200 rev/min for four different fuel blends. The fuel blends, prepared by mixing biodiesel and diesel in different proportions fuel with 5% bioethanol, are identified as D92B3E5 (92% diesel, 3% biodiesel and 5% bioethanol, D85B10E5 (85% diesel, 10% biodiesel and 5% bioethanol, D80B15E5(80% diesel, 15% biodiesel and 5% bioethanol and D75B20E5 (75% diesel, 20% biodiesel and 5% bioethanol. The effect of blends on energy and exergy analysis was investigated for the different engine speeds and all the results were compared with effect of D100 reference fuel. The maximum thermal efficiencies obtained were 31.42% at 1500 rev/min for D100 and 31.42%, 28.68%, 28.1%, 28% and 27.18% at 1400 rev/min, respectively, for D92B3E5, D85B10E5, D80B15E5, D75B20E5. Maximum exergetic efficiencies were also obtained as 29.38%, 26.8%, 26.33%, 26.15% and 25.38%, respectively, for the abovementioned fuels. As a result of our analyses, it was determined that D100 fuel has a slightly higher thermal and exergetic efficiency than other fuel blends and all the results are quite close to each other.

  5. Genetic Engineering of Energy Crops: A Strategy for Biofuel Production in China Free Access

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guosheng Xie; Liangcai Peng

    2011-01-01

    Biomass utilization is increasingly considered as a practical way for sustainable energy supply and long-term environment care around the world.In concerns with food security in China,starch or sugar-based bioethanol and edible-oil-derived biodiesel are harshly restricted for large scale production.However,conversion of lignocellulosic residues from food crops is a potential alternative.Because of its recalcitrance,current biomass process is unacceptably expensive,but genetic breeding of energy crops is a promising solution.To meet the need,energy crops are defined with a high yield for both food and biofuel purposes.In this review,main grasses(rice,wheat,maize,sorghum and miscanthus)are evaluated for high biomass production,the principles are discussed on modification of plant cell walls that lead to efficient biomass degradation and conversion,and the related biotechnologies are proposed in terms of energy crop selection.

  6. Toward a mathematical model of solar radiation for engineering analysis of solar energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C. L.; Reid, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    The currently most-used insolation model and what improvements might be made in it to better suit it for use in designing energy systems is discussed. An approach to constructing an upgraded model is sketched.

  7. The system approach to energy savings in engineering networks of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Goshka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration that there is not definite differentiation between definitions "economy of energy" and "energy saving", often the effect of energy effective technologies can be received only by reduction of air exchange, that is breach of sanitary and hygienic regulations. In the article the attempt to distinguish these definitions with using system approach is done. In building branch absence of the system approach to building and city leads to serious system errors. For example, warming of building wallings using natural ventilation don't give real energy saving, but it leads to the air exchange decrease, therefore the given action raises risk of various diseases. In the article various system errors which can lead to acceptance of the erroneous decisions, influencing the sensitive initial data through air exchange reduction, are considered. A consequence of it are diseases of noninfectious character. To decrease quantity of system errors it is offered to use the system approach to these problems.

  8. Electrode surface engineering by atomic layer deposition: A promising pathway toward better energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2016-04-29

    Research on electrochemical energy storage devices including Li ion batteries (LIBs), Na ion batteries (NIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs) has accelerated in recent years, in part because developments in nanomaterials are making it possible to achieve high capacities and energy and power densities. These developments can extend battery life in portable devices, and open new markets such as electric vehicles and large-scale grid energy storage. It is well known that surface reactions largely determine the performance and stability of electrochemical energy storage devices. Despite showing impressive capacities and high energy and power densities, many of the new nanostructured electrode materials suffer from limited lifetime due to severe electrode interaction with electrolytes or due to large volume changes. Hence control of the surface of the electrode material is essential for both increasing capacity and improving cyclic stability of the energy storage devices.Atomic layer deposition (ALD) which has become a pervasive synthesis method in the microelectronics industry, has recently emerged as a promising process for electrochemical energy storage. ALD boasts excellent conformality, atomic scale thickness control, and uniformity over large areas. Since ALD is based on self-limiting surface reactions, complex shapes and nanostructures can be coated with excellent uniformity, and most processes can be done below 200. °C. In this article, we review recent studies on the use of ALD coatings to improve the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices, with particular emphasis on the studies that have provided mechanistic insight into the role of ALD in improving device performance. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The effect of injection timing on energy and exergy analysis of a diesel engine with biodiesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Farhadi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Nowadays, due to higher environmental pollution and decreasing fossil fuels many countries make decisions to use renewable fuels and restrict using of fossil fuels. Renewable fuels generally produce from biological sources. Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel derived from the transesterification of vegetable oils, animal fats, or waste frying oils. Considering the differences between diesel and biodiesel fuels, engine condition should be modified based on the fuel or fuel blends to achieve optimum performance. One of the simplest and yet the most widely used models is the thermodynamic model. After verification of the data obtained by model with experimental data it is possible to generalize the extracted data to an unlimited number of functional conditions or unlimited number of fuel types which saves time and reduces costs for experimental engine tests. Using the second law of thermodynamics, it is possible to calculate and analyze the exergy of the engine.4 Materials and Methods In this work, the zero-dimensional model was used to account for internal energy variations, pressure work, heat transfer losses to the solid walls and heat release. The applied assumptions include: The cylinder mixture temperature, pressure and composition were assumed uniform throughout the cylinder. Furthermore, the one-zone thermodynamic model assumes instantaneous mixing between the burned and unburned gases. The cylinder gases were assumed to behave as an ideal gas mixture, Gas properties, include enthalpy, internal energy modeled using polynomial equations associated with temperature. In this research, the equations 1 to 20 were used in Fortran programming language. The results of incylinder pressure obtained by the model were validated by the results of experimental test of OM314 engine. Then the effects of injection timing on Energy and Exergy of the engine were analyzed for B20 fuel. Results and Discussion Comparing the results of the model

  10. Annual Report of Monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the public water supply wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. This document reports the findings concerning the groundwater in Morrill.

  11. Wastewater Disposal, Hydraulic Fracturing, and Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Terra, F. M.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    The concurrent appearance of seismicity with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes. These earthquakes occur in a portion of the Mississippian Lime Play, an oil and gas field stretching from central Oklahoma to northwestern Kansas. As has been seen in other areas of high-rate wastewater injection, the seismicity appears to be driven by the disposal of produced water by injection into deep sedimentary formations. We focus on an 1800 km^2 region in Harper and Sumner counties where a temporary, 14-station seismic network deployed by the USGS monitors ongoing seismicity. Regional and national networks supplement the temporary network. Earthquake locations and magnitudes are reported on a daily basis and M≥1.5 earthquakes are included in the USGS Comprehensive Catalog (ComCat) with a magnitude of completeness of ~M2.0. The clusters of earthquakes are principally in the crystalline basement, some forming lineations extending up to 10 km. Focal mechanisms indicate normal faulting, consistent with the local tectonic stress field. While some of the clusters of seismicity are located close to high-rate injection wells, others are at least 10km from large injection wells. Additionally, high-rate wells do not always appear to be associated with seismicity. In response to the increased seismicity, on March 29, 2015 the Kansas Corporation Commission placed new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in 5 areas in southern Kansas. Since this regulation has been in place, earthquake activity has decreased by 40-50%. In the 87 days between January 1, 2015 and March 29, when the order was enacted, there were on average three M≥2 earthquakes and 0.3 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the study area. The earthquake rate in the 87 days following the change in regulations dropped to 1.8 M≥2 and 0.2 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the same region over the same amount of time. The two

  12. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-wang

    2015-01-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs. PMID:26220470

  13. Nano-engineering and simulating electrostatic capacitors for electrical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspert, Lauren Christine

    Electrical energy storage solutions with significantly higher gravimetric and volumetric energy densities and rapid response rates are needed to balance the highly dynamic, time-variant supply and demand for power. Nanoengineering can provide useful structures for electrical energy storage because it offers the potential to increase efficiency, reduce size/weight, and improve performance. While several nanostructured devices have shown improvements in energy and/or power densities, this dissertation focuses on the nanoengineering of electrostatic capacitors (ESC) and application of these high-power electrostatic capacitors in electrical energy storage systems. A porous nano-template with significant area enhancement per planar unit area coated with ultra-thin metal-insulator-metal (MIM) layers has shown significant improvements in areal capacitance. However, sharp asperities inherent to the initial nano-template localized electric fields and caused premature (low field) breakdown, limiting the possible energy density (E = ½ CV 2/m). A nanoengineering strategy was identified for rounding the template asperities, and this showed a significant increase in the electrical breakdown strength of the device, providing rapid charging and discharging and an energy density of 1.5 W-h/kg---which compares favorably with the best state-of-the-art devices that provide 0.7 W-h/kg. The combination of the high-power ESC with a complementary high-energy-density electrochemical capacitor (ECC) was modeled to evaluate methods resulting in the combined power-energy storage capabilities. While significant improvements in the ESC's energy density were reported, the nanodevices display nonlinear leakage resistance, which directly relates to charge retention. The ECC has distinctly different nonlinearities, but can retain a greater density of charge for significantly longer, albeit with slower inherent charging and discharging rates than the ESC. The experimentally derived dynamic model

  14. ESES, a master's program in solar energy engineering at Dalarna University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, C.; Broman, L.; Lindberg, E. [Solar Energy Research Center SERC, Dalarna Univ., Borlaenge (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    The first group of students was admitted to the European Solar Engineering School, a master's level two-semester program at Dalarna University in Sweden, in August 1999. Now that the fifth group is all but through their year, some conclusions from our experiences are possible to draw. The paper gives the background of ESES, some information about how the program is arranged, and also some of the ESES staff experiences. Further information on ESES is found on www.eses.org. (orig.)

  15. Surgical complications specific to monopolar electrosurgical energy: engineering changes that have made electrosurgery safer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Roger C

    2013-01-01

    Monopolar electrosurgical energy is the most commonly used energy source during laparotomic and laparoscopic surgery. The clinical application of monopolar energy is not without risk. Monopolar electrosurgical energy was introduced into surgical practice at the turn of the 20th century. Alternate site burns during laparotomic application were the most common complication for the first half century (i.e., ground point burns and dispersive electrode burns [1920-1970]). The aims of this article were to discuss historic design flaws associated with the most common alternate site burns, ground point burns, and dispersive electrode burns and the technological advancements introduced to mitigate these risks to the patient and to discuss current design flaws associated with stray energy burns during laparoscopy because of insulation failure and capacitive coupling and the technological advancements introduced to eliminate these risks to the patient. Today, insulation failure and capacitive coupling are the most common reasons for electrosurgical injury during laparocopic procedures. There is a need for advanced technology such as active electrode monitoring to address these invisible risks to the surgeon and their patients. In addition, the laparoscopic surgeon should be encouraged to study the basic biophysics involved in electrosurgery.

  16. Perspective of energy efficient engineering in other domains; Perspektiven fuer energieeffiziente Querschnittstechniken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, U.; Mauch, W.; Niedermeier, R.; Duschl, A.; Lilleike, J.; Megele, W.; Saller, A.; Arndt, U.; Mayr, R.; Carter, J.; Hellriegel, E. [Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft (FfE), Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Section 8 of the IKARUS project comprised investigations of energy-intensive technologies by the Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft e.V. (FfE) at Munich. This comprises technologies for energy use and energy conversion in the end use sector whose equipment, plants and systems are serially produced and are used in many sectors of industry. Pumps, for example, are used in industry, trade, households and public applications, e.g. for heating, materials transport etc. (orig.) [German] Im Teilvorhaben 8 des IKARUS-Projekts sind energieintensive Querschnittstechniken durch die der Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft e.V. (FfE) in Muenchen untersucht worden. Unter Querschnittstechniken sind Techniken zur Energieanwendung und -umwandlung im Endenergiebereich zu verstehen, deren Anlagen, Geraete und Systeme serienmaessig hergestellt und branchenuebergreifend eingesetzt werden. Pumpen sind eine klassische Querschnittstechnik. Sie werden in Industrie, Kleinverbraucher, privaten Haushalten und oeffentlichen Einrichtungen in verschiedensten Anlagen wie z.B. Heizungsanlagen, Foerderanlagen etc. eingesetzt. (orig.)

  17. Advances in graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysts for solar energy conversion: fundamentals and materials engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiuqiang; Kretschmer, Katja; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-08-01

    Graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysis has been regarded as a promising technology for solar energy storage and conversion. In this review, we summarized recent developments of graphene-based photocatalysts, including preparation of graphene-based photocatalysts, typical key advances in the understanding of graphene functions for photocatalytic activity enhancement and methodologies to regulate the electron transfer efficiency in graphene-based composite photocatalysts, by which we hope to offer enriched information to harvest the utmost fascinating properties of graphene as a platform to construct efficient graphene-based composite photocatalysts for solar-to-energy conversion.

  18. Potential of sustainable energy with regard to engineering structures. WINN Energy from Water; Energieverbruik nationaal en regionaal waterbeheer. WINN Energie uit Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahm, R.; Bruggers, M. [Deltares, Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    An overview is offered of the annual energy use of pumping stations, weirs and sluices in the Netherlands. This involves both the energy use of wet objects (pumping stations, weirs and sluices) in the main water system and the regional water systems. The reports has an annex containing the report 'Inventarisatie energieverbruik waterwerken' (Inventory of energy use by water works) published by Grontmij Netherlands [Dutch] Een overzicht wordt gegeven van het jaarlijkse energieverbruik door gemalen, stuwen en sluizen in Nederland. Het gaat daarbij zowel om het energieverbruik van de natte objecten (gemalen, stuwen en sluizen) in het hoofdwatersysteem als om de regionale watersystemen. Het rapport bevat als bijlage het rapport 'Inventarisatie energieverbruik waterwerken' door Grontmij Nederland.

  19. An energy-aware engineered control plane for wavelength-routed networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricciardi, Sergio; Wang, Jiayuan; Palmieri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significant degree of technological maturity reached by large-scale optical transmission infrastructures, new critical issues are emerging as side effects associated to their energy consumption, environmental impact and related costs, now accounting for an important part of the networks...

  20. Exposing Engineering Students to Renewable Energy through Hands-On Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonggao; Li, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Renewable energy is the most rapidly growing discipline in today's business world and is commonly viewed as the main arena for research and development in various fields. This article summarizes the work and efforts of an educational project conducted at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU). A major goal of the project was to design renewable…